WorldWideScience

Sample records for sami people

  1. Perspectives on Sami Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte; Eira, Ellen J. Sara; Sriraman, Bharath

    2011-01-01

    The Sami are an indigenous people of the Arctic, and through a resolution of the United Nations, Norway is bound to take care of the Sami culture and language. Since 1987 the Sami have had their own curriculum, but they have no mathematics syllabus. In this paper we summarize the legal acts that take care of the Sami culture within the Norwegian…

  2. One Valley, Three Hands: The Bilateral Negotiations of the Deatnu Agreement and Its Impact on Sami People's Rights

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    Áike Niillas Peder Selfors

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The salmon stocks of the Deatnu River, in the core area of Sápmi, the traditional lands of the Sami people, have been designated as critically endangered. In November 2011, Norway and Finland agreed to renegotiate the agreement that regulates salmon fishing in the Deatnu River. This article explores the safeguards under international human rights law that are available to the Sami people in the Deatnu Valley in connection with this renegotiation process. Since the Sami people are recognized as an indigenous people in both countries, the negotiations touch upon several core issues of indigenous peoples’ rights, amongst these: the principle of self-determination, the principle of non-discrimination, and indigenous issues related to international border regulations. The article shows that the ongoing negotiations’ structure and preparations, to all appearances, have violated the rights of the Sami people. Consequently, risking a dissemination of further violations of Sami people's rights—both, in regards to the negotiation process, and in what may be the new Deatnu Agreement.

  3. Survival of Sami cancer patients

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    Leena Soininen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30 and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20, indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  4. What is known about the health and living conditions of the indigenous people of northern Scandinavia, the Sami?

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    Per Sjölander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sami are the indigenous ethnic population of northern Scandinavia. Their health condition is poorly known, although the knowledge has improved over the last decade.The aim was to review the current information on mortality, diseases, and risk factor exposure in the Swedish Sami population.Health-related research on Sami cohorts published in scientific journals and anthologies was used to compare the health condition among the Sami and the majority non-Sami population. When relevant, data from the Sami populations in Swedish were compared with corresponding data from Norwegian and Finnish Sami populations.Life expectancy and mortality patterns of the Sami are similar to those of the majority population. Small differences in incidences of cancer and cardiovascular diseases have been reported. The traditional Sami lifestyle seems to contain elements that reduce the risk to develop cancer and cardiovascular diseases, e.g. physical activity, diet rich in antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids, and a strong cultural identity. Reindeer herding is an important cultural activity among the Sami and is associated with high risks for accidents. Pain in the lower back, neck, shoulders, elbows, and hands are frequent among both men and women in reindeer-herding families. For men, these symptoms are related to high exposure to terrain vehicles, particularly snowmobile, whereas for women psychosocial risk factors seem to more important, e.g. poor social support, high effort, low reward, and high economical responsibilities.Although the health condition of the Sami population appears to be rather similar to that of the general Swedish population, a number of specific health problems have been identified, especially among the reindeer-herding Sami. Most of these problems have their origin in marginalization and poor knowledge of the reindeer husbandry and the Sami culture in the majority population. It is suggested that the most sustainable measure to

  5. Song, Poetry and Images in Writing: Sami Literature

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    Harald Gaski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is an overview of Sami literature, past and present, with a specific emphasis on the connection between tradition and innovation, in which literature is regarded in a broader sense than only limited to the written word. Thus the relationship between the traditional epic yoik songs and contemporary poetry is being dealt with, as is the multimedia approach that several Sami artists have chosen for their creative expression. It is almost more the rule than an exemption that Sami artists express themselves through the use of more than only one medium. Through the introduction to Sami literature, the reader also gets acquainted with the history and the culture of the Sami, who are the indigenous people of the northern regions of Scandinavia, Finland and the Kola peninsula in Russia.

  6. Struggles of being and becoming: a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of Sami elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blix, Bodil Hansen; Hamran, Torunn; Normann, Hans Ketil

    2013-08-01

    The Sami are an indigenous people living in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. Historically, national states have made strong efforts to assimilate the Sami people into the majority populations, and the Sami have experienced stigmatization and discrimination. However, after World War II, there has been a revitalization process among the Sami that was pioneered by the Sami Movement and gradually adopted in broader spheres of Norwegian society. The lifespans of the current cohort of elderly Sami unfold throughout a historical period in which contrasting public narratives about the Sami have dominated. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between elderly Sami's individual life stories and contrasting public narratives about the Sami. Nineteen elderly Sami individuals in Norway were interviewed. This article is a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of four elderly Sami. The article illuminates how individual life stories are framed and shaped by public narratives and how identifying is an ongoing process also in late life. A dialogical relationship between individual life stories and public narratives implies that individual stories have the capacity to shape and revise dominant public narratives. To do so, the number of stories that are allowed to act must be increased. A commitment in dialogic narrative research on minority elderly is to make available individual stories from the margins of the public narratives to reduce narrative silences and to prevent the reproduction of established "truths". Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Historical Skolt Sami music and two types of melodic structures in leu ́dd tradition

    OpenAIRE

    Jouste, M. (Marko)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Sami are an indigenous people living in Scandinavia, northern Fennoscandia, and the Kola Peninsula. The land of the Sami is located on the territories of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. Due to the fact that the Skolt Sami have always lived in a multicultural environment, their musical tradition is inherently multi-layered and the Skolt Sami have adopted a significant amount of shared traditions from the northeast of Russia into their own musical culture. However, the Skol...

  8. "We are like lemmings": making sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among the indigenous Sami in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoor, Jon Petter A; Kaiser, Niclas; Jacobsson, Lars; Renberg, Ellinor Salander; Silviken, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is a widespread problem among indigenous people residing in the circumpolar Arctic. Though the situation among the indigenous Sami in northern Scandinavia is better than among some other indigenous people, suicide is still regarded as a major public health issue. To adapt prevention strategies that are culturally attuned one must understand how suicide is understood within context. That is, the cultural meaning(s) of suicide. To explore and make sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among Sami in Sweden. Open-ended focus group discussions (FGDs) on the topic "suicide among Sami" were carried out in 5 Sami communities in Sweden, with in total 22 strategically selected Sami participants. FGDs were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed through employing content analysis. From the FGDs 4 themes emerged including "The Sami are fighting for their culture and the herders are in the middle of the fight," "Suicide as a consequence of Sami losing (or having lost) their identity," "A wildfire in the Sami world" and "Difficult to get help as a Sami." Findings indicate that Sami in Sweden make sense of suicide in relation to power and identity within a threatened Sami cultural context. Suicide is then understood as an act that takes place and makes sense to others when a Sami no longer has the power to maintain a Sami identity, resulting in being disconnected from the Sami world and placed in an existential void where suicide is a solution. The findings are useful in development of culturally attuned suicide prevention among Sami in Sweden.

  9. Mammographic screening in Sami speaking municipalities and a control group. Are early outcome measures influenced by ethnicity?

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    Jan Norum

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Female citizens of Sami (the indigenous people of Norway municipalities in northern Norway have a low risk of breast cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the attendance rate and outcome of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP in the Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group. Study design. A retrospective registry-based study. Methods. The 8 municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (Sami were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities (non-Sami. Population data were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data regarding invitations and outcome in the NBCSP during the period 2001–2010 was derived from the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN. The NBCSP targets women aged 50–69 years. Rates and percentages were compared using chi-square test with a p-value<0.05 as statistical significant. Results. The attendance rate in the NBCSP was 78% in the Sami and 75% in the non-Sami population (p< 0.01. The recall rates were 2.4 and 3.3% in the Sami and non-Sami population, respectively (p<0.01. The rate of invasive screen detected cancer was not significantly lower in the Sami group (p=0.14. The percentage of all breast cancers detected in the NBCSP among the Sami (67% was lower compared with the non-Sami population (86%, p=0.06. Conclusion. Despite a lower risk of breast cancer, the Sami attended the NBCSP more frequently than the control group. The recall and cancer detection rate was lower among the Sami compared with the non-Sami group.

  10. Sense of coherence of reindeer herders and other Samis in comparison to other Swedish citizens

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    Agneta Abrahamsson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Samis are indigenous people in north Europe. In the territory called Sápmi (Lapland, reindeer herding is the traditional base for the Sami economy. The relation between living conditions and positive health of the Swedish Samis has been sparsely studied. As health is closely linked to sense of coherence (SOC, an understanding of the background factors to SOC may contribute knowledge that might be useful in promoting living conditions and health. Methods. The study examines relations between the level of SOC and background factors from surveys in a Sami population (n=613 in comparison to a non-Sami population (n=525 in Sweden, and in comparison between 2 subsamples of Samis, that is, herders and non-herders. Results. There are more similarities than differences between the Sami and non-Sami populations. However, dividing the Sami population, reindeer herders had significantly lower SOC, and in specific the subcomponent manageability, that is, less ability to use available resources to meet different demands in life, compared to non-herders. Conclusions. In addition to age and health, predictors of SOC are related to the life form of reindeer husbandry and the belonging to the herding community.

  11. Legal Protection of Sami Traditional Livelihoods from the Adverse Impacts of Mining: A Comparison of the Level of Protection Enjoyed by Sami in Their Four Home States

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    Timo Koivurova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of the growing global need for minerals, extractive industries are continuously expanding. In the North, together with several environmental problems such as climate change, this poses a real threat to the traditional livelihoods of Sami people. The article examines how the rights of Sami indigenous people are protected against adverse impacts of mining activities. The relevant national legislation is analyzed in all the four countries where Sami are present. It is specifically examined how the main mining act in each country protects the right of Sami people to their traditional livelihoods. Finally, the article sheds light on the actual effectiveness of the legal regulation. This is done by analyzing the results of interviews conducted with relevant actors and stakeholders in the mining industry.

  12. Socioeconomic characteristics and health outcomes in Sami speaking municipalities and a control group in northern Norway

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    Jan Norum

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The Sami people constitute an ethnic minority in northern Norway. The objectives of this study were to compare municipalities with a majority of Sami in the population and a control group with regard to socioeconomic factors and health outcome. Methods. Original data from Statistics Norway and Directorate of health on socioeconomic factors (education, unemployment, disability, poverty and health outcomes [total mortality, cancer specific mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD specific mortality] were imported from the “Health Atlas” at the Northern Norway Regional Health Authority (NNRHA trust. The 8 municipalities in the administration area of the Sami language law (Sami-majority group – 18,868 inhabitants was compared with a control group consisting of 11 municipalities where the Sami constitute a small minority in the population (18,931 inhabitants. Most data were from 2005 and 2008. Results. There was no significant difference in socioeconomic factors. Overall, cancer- and CVD-specific mortality rates were similar in both groups. The life expectancy was significantly longer among women in the Sami-majority area (81.3 vs. 79.5 years, p=0.035 and males (74.5 vs. 72.0 years, p=0.037. Conclusion. Socioeconomic factors and cause-specific mortality rate were similar in the Sami-majority group and the control group. Residents of both sexes in Sami-majority areas enjoyed longer life expectancy.

  13. “We are like lemmings”: making sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among the indigenous Sami in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoor, Jon Petter A; Kaiser, Niclas; Jacobsson, Lars; Renberg, Ellinor Salander; Silviken, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Suicide is a widespread problem among indigenous people residing in the circumpolar Arctic. Though the situation among the indigenous Sami in northern Scandinavia is better than among some other indigenous people, suicide is still regarded as a major public health issue. To adapt prevention strategies that are culturally attuned one must understand how suicide is understood within context. That is, the cultural meaning(s) of suicide. Objective To explore and make sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among Sami in Sweden. Design Open-ended focus group discussions (FGDs) on the topic “suicide among Sami” were carried out in 5 Sami communities in Sweden, with in total 22 strategically selected Sami participants. FGDs were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed through employing content analysis. Results From the FGDs 4 themes emerged including “The Sami are fighting for their culture and the herders are in the middle of the fight,” “Suicide as a consequence of Sami losing (or having lost) their identity,” “A wildfire in the Sami world” and “Difficult to get help as a Sami.” Conclusions Findings indicate that Sami in Sweden make sense of suicide in relation to power and identity within a threatened Sami cultural context. Suicide is then understood as an act that takes place and makes sense to others when a Sami no longer has the power to maintain a Sami identity, resulting in being disconnected from the Sami world and placed in an existential void where suicide is a solution. The findings are useful in development of culturally attuned suicide prevention among Sami in Sweden. PMID:26333721

  14. “We are like lemmings”: making sense of the cultural meaning(s of suicide among the indigenous Sami in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Petter A Stoor

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suicide is a widespread problem among indigenous people residing in the circumpolar Arctic. Though the situation among the indigenous Sami in northern Scandinavia is better than among some other indigenous people, suicide is still regarded as a major public health issue. To adapt prevention strategies that are culturally attuned one must understand how suicide is understood within context. That is, the cultural meaning(s of suicide. Objective: To explore and make sense of the cultural meaning(s of suicide among Sami in Sweden. Design: Open-ended focus group discussions (FGDs on the topic “suicide among Sami” were carried out in 5 Sami communities in Sweden, with in total 22 strategically selected Sami participants. FGDs were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed through employing content analysis. Results: From the FGDs 4 themes emerged including “The Sami are fighting for their culture and the herders are in the middle of the fight,” “Suicide as a consequence of Sami losing (or having lost their identity,” “A wildfire in the Sami world” and “Difficult to get help as a Sami.” Conclusions: Findings indicate that Sami in Sweden make sense of suicide in relation to power and identity within a threatened Sami cultural context. Suicide is then understood as an act that takes place and makes sense to others when a Sami no longer has the power to maintain a Sami identity, resulting in being disconnected from the Sami world and placed in an existential void where suicide is a solution. The findings are useful in development of culturally attuned suicide prevention among Sami in Sweden.

  15. Health consumption in Sami speaking municipalities and a control group with regard to medical imaging

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    Jan Størmer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Northern Norway Regional Health Authority trust aims to offer a high quality specialist health care to all inhabitants. The objective of this study was to document the consumption of medical imaging [conventional radiography (CR, computerised tomography (CT, magnetic resonance (MR, ultrasound (US]. Methods: The eight municipalities in northern Norway included in the administration area of the Sami language law (Sami group – 132,490 persons/year in the period 2003–2009, mean/year 19,363 inhabitants were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities (non-Sami group – 135,539 persons/year, mean/year 18,927 inhabitants. Population data was accessed from Statistics Norway. Data on imaging exams were derived from a regional database including production data from all public and private institutions within the region. All four main modality groups (CR, CT, MR, US were analysed. Variations for imaging frequency on each modality were compared between the Sami and non-Sami municipalities. Results: A total of 278,832 exams were performed during study period. The age adjusted exam rate (all modalities was significantly higher (p < 0.001 in non-Sami (females and males group. There was no difference with regard to conventional radiography (CR (p = 0.855. Whereas MR (p < 0.001 imaging was more common in the Sami group, CT (p < 0.001 and US (p = 0.003 exams were more frequently used in the control group. Conclusion: People living in Sami speaking communities experienced significantly less CT and US exams, but had more MR exams than the control group. A relatively high physical activity, obesity and a lower risk of cancer may be explanations.

  16. Discrimination amongst Arctic Indigenous Sami and Non-Sami Populations in Norway : The SAMINOR 2 Questionnaire Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Minton, James Minton; Friborg, Oddgeir; Sørlie, Tore

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent research demonstrates that for many indigenous Sami people, experiencing ethnic discrimination is a regular occurrence. The present study was designed to provide estimates of the prevalence of self-reported discrimination in order to identify specific settings where discrimination happened, to identify perpetrators and to examine individuals’ responses to the discrimination. Methods: In 2012, all inhabitants aged between 18 and 69 living in selected municipalities with both...

  17. Ethnic identity negotiation among Sami youth living in a majority Sami community in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystad, Kristine; Spein, Anna Rita; Balto, Asta Mitkija; Ingstad, Benedicte

    2017-01-01

    This study was part of the international research project "Circumpolar Indigenous Pathways to Adulthood" (CIPA). To explore ethnic identity negotiation, an unexplored theme, among indigenous North Sami youth living in a majority Sami community context in Arctic Norway. A qualitative design was followed using open-ended, in-depth interviews conducted in 2010 with 22 Sami adolescents aged 13-19 years, all reporting Sami self-identification. Grounded theory, narrative analysis, theories of ethnic identity and ecological perspectives on resilience were applied in order to identify the themes. All 22 youth reported being open about either their Sami background (86%) and/or ethnic pride (55%). Ethnic pride was reported more often among females (68%) than males (27%). However, a minority of youth (14%) with multi-ethnic parentage, poor Sami language skills, not having been born or raised in the community and with a lack of reindeer husbandry affiliation experienced exclusion by community members as not being affirmed as Sami, and therefore reported stressors like anger, resignation, rejection of their Sami origins and poor well-being. Sami language was most often considered as important for communication (73%), but was also associated with the perception of what it meant to be a Sami (32%) and "traditions" (23%). Ethnic pride seemed to be strong among youth in this majority Sami context. Denial of recognition by one's own ethnic group did not negatively influence ethnic pride or openness about ones' ethnic background, but was related to youth experience of intra-ethnic discrimination and poorer well-being. As Sami language was found to be a strong ethnic identity marker, effective language programmes for Norwegian-speaking Sami and newcomers should be provided. Language skills and competence would serve as an inclusive factor and improve students' well-being and health. Raising awareness about the diversity of Sami identity negotiations among adolescents in teacher

  18. From Nature to iNature. Articulating a Sami Christian Identity Online

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    Torjer Olsen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the activities of both indigenous people and religion online, and introduces the pair of concepts indigeneity-online/online-indigeneity as a means of analysing this activity. This concept is new, and leans heavily on the pair of concepts religion-online/online-religion that is used in religious studies. The second part of the article consists of an analysis of the website www.osko.no, a site for the Christian education of Sami children and youth. I treat this as an expression of, or a medium for, the contemporary formation of Sami identity, and argue that it can be seen as an indigenous website. The Church of Norway, as an institution with a strong history of colonization  and  Norwegianization, has  developed  into an  institution  that  seeks  to integrate, implement and strengthen the Sami voices and traditions to such extent thatSami  Christians  use  it  as platform  for  the  communication  of  a Sami  kind of Christianity. www.osko.no is an example of a certain articulation of Sami identity. What seems  to  be  the  preferred  or idealized  Saminess  is  related  to nature and  a particular past, and is distant to modernity, urban culture and Norwegian culture.

  19. 'The Finn line' - a historical curiosity or a juridicial rality? The Sami reindeer herders' land rights in southern Sami areas evaluated from land consolidation practice (In Norwegian with Summary in English

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    Øyvind Ravna

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes towards the land rights of Sami reindeer herders have changed considerably during the last 100 years. So, too, has consideration of how such rights should be treated by Land Consolidation Courts. This paper reviews changes in attitudes to the Sami land rights with respect to how these are considered in Land Con¬solidation Courts in southern Sami areas in Norway. The review also considers changing attitudes regarding the competence of Land Consolidation Courts to deal with such matters. There were several cases in the 20th Century in which Land Consolidation Courts treated Sami land rights in a restricted and unfortunate manner. Legal practice, however, was not always like that, evidenced by the so-called 'Finn line' (Norwegian: 'finnelinja' -'Finn' is an archaic name for Sami. This boundary was established during a land consolidation case in 1873 and was confirmed in 1883. At that time, Sami land rights were evidently accepted as appurtenant right in privately owned mountain pasture and the Sami were treated in the same way as others who enjoyed rights of usufruct on it. The regulation of 1883 included rules governing compensation for grazing damage on farming land. In particular, responsibility for grazing damage was divided between owners and the reindeer herders, providing these looked after their animals properly, 'The Finn line' subsequently achieved wider importance. The case of 1873¬1883 has been referred to several times as a valuable and valid precedent for a way in which to organize grazing conflicts in other Sami areas. It was used in 1964 as evidence of the special rights of Sami reindeer people in the Brekken common land case. The Sami won this case in 1968 and, in its judgement, the Norwegian Supreme Court of Justice emphasised the importance of the line (Rt. 1968, p. 394. Although, owing to changes in land use practices, the 'Finn line' no longer has any practical significance, its juridical significance remains

  20. Sami tourism in destination development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lise Smed

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous tourism has become an important component of the tourism industry. Previous indigenous tourism research has indicated three conflict areas that can have an impact on destination development - internal conflicts over indigenous identity, the use of indigenous culture in destination...... marketing, and land-use conflicts. To varying degrees these areas of conflict have been found to impact local and regional destination development in northern Europe. This paper draws on case studies to understand how conflicts in Sami tourism in local and regional destination development are addressed...... challenging to address through collaboration due to the history of colonisation by nation states. Such prevailing conflicts place certain requirements on the facilitator of collaboration processes in tourism destination development....

  1. Ethnic identity negotiation among Sami youth living in a majority Sami community in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystad, Kristine; Spein, Anna Rita; Balto, Asta Mitkija; Ingstad, Benedicte

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: This study was part of the international research project “Circumpolar Indigenous Pathways to Adulthood” (CIPA). Objectives: To explore ethnic identity negotiation, an unexplored theme, among indigenous North Sami youth living in a majority Sami community context in Arctic Norway. Methods: A qualitative design was followed using open-ended, in-depth interviews conducted in 2010 with 22 Sami adolescents aged 13–19 years, all reporting Sami self-identification. Grounded theory, narrative analysis, theories of ethnic identity and ecological perspectives on resilience were applied in order to identify the themes. Findings: All 22 youth reported being open about either their Sami background (86%) and/or ethnic pride (55%). Ethnic pride was reported more often among females (68%) than males (27%). However, a minority of youth (14%) with multi-ethnic parentage, poor Sami language skills, not having been born or raised in the community and with a lack of reindeer husbandry affiliation experienced exclusion by community members as not being affirmed as Sami, and therefore reported stressors like anger, resignation, rejection of their Sami origins and poor well-being. Sami language was most often considered as important for communication (73%), but was also associated with the perception of what it meant to be a Sami (32%) and “traditions” (23%). Conclusion: Ethnic pride seemed to be strong among youth in this majority Sami context. Denial of recognition by one’s own ethnic group did not negatively influence ethnic pride or openness about ones’ ethnic background, but was related to youth experience of intra-ethnic discrimination and poorer well-being. As Sami language was found to be a strong ethnic identity marker, effective language programmes for Norwegian-speaking Sami and newcomers should be provided. Language skills and competence would serve as an inclusive factor and improve students’ well-being and health. Raising awareness

  2. Emotional, physical and sexual violence among Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: The SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Astrid M A; Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Javo, Cecilie; Schei, Berit

    2015-08-01

    To assess the prevalence and investigate ethnic differences of emotional, physical and sexual violence among a population of both Sami and non-Sami in Norway. Our study was based on the SAMINOR 2 study, a population-based survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Central and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,296 participants: 2197 (19.4%) Sami respondents and 9099 (80.6 %) non-Sami respondents. Almost half of the Sami female respondents and one-third of the non-Sami female respondents reported any violence (any lifetime experience of violence). Sami women were more likely to report emotional, physical and sexual violence than non-Sami women. More than one-third of the Sami men compared with less than a quarter of non-Sami men reported having experienced any violence in their life. Sami men were more likely to report emotional and physical violence than non-Sami men. However, ethnicity was not significantly different regarding sexual violence experienced among men. Violence was typically reported to have occurred in childhood. Sami participants were more likely to report having experienced violence in the past 12 months. For all types of violence, the perpetrator was typically known to the victim. Regardless of gender, Sami respondents were more likely to report interpersonal violence. The prevalence of any violence was substantial in both ethnic groups and for both genders; it was highest among Sami women. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  3. Internalization symptoms, perceived discrimination, and ethnic identity in indigenous Sami and non-Sami youth in Arctic Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Margrethe; Turi, Anne Lene; Skre, Ingynn; Kvernmo, Siv

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare symptoms of anxiety and depression among indigenous Sami and non-Sami youth in the Arctic part of Norway, and to examine the influence of perceived discrimination and ethnic identity on these symptoms. The relationship between ethnic self-labeling and native language competence on internalization symptoms was explored for Sami adolescents. The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study was conducted among 10th graders in junior high schools in North Norway in 2003-2005. The sample consisted of 4449 adolescents, of whom 450 (10%) were indigenous Sami and 3999 (90%) were non-Sami. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were assessed using a short version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-10. Participants also completed The Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) and a measure of perceived discrimination. No differences were found among ethnic groups in internalization symptoms. Sami youth reported more discrimination than the non-Sami. Both MEIM and perceived discrimination were positively associated with internalization symptoms. Moreover, Sami youth who had not learned their native language at home were more vulnerable to experiencing internalization symptoms compared to Sami youth who had learned their native language at home. Culture-specific protective factors were discussed as potential explanations for the similarities between Sami and non-Sami youth. The present study documented a relationship between internalization symptoms and ethnic identity, perceived discrimination, and language loss. These findings could be understood as consequences of the recent colonial history and oppression of the indigenous Sami.

  4. Facing the limit of resilience: perceptions of climate change among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Furberg

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic area is a part of the globe where the increase in global temperature has had the earliest noticeable effect and indigenous peoples, including the Swedish reindeer herding Sami, are amongst the first to be affected by these changes.To explore the experiences and perceptions of climate change among Swedish reindeer herding Sami.In-depth interviews with 14 Swedish reindeer herding Sami were performed, with purposive sampling. The interviews focused on the herders experiences of climate change, observed consequences and thoughts about this. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. One core theme emerged from the interviews: facing the limit of resilience. Swedish reindeer-herding Sami perceive climate change as yet another stressor in their daily struggle. They have experienced severe and more rapidly shifting, unstable weather with associated changes in vegetation and alterations in the freeze–thaw cycle, all of which affect reindeer herding. The forecasts about climate change from authorities and scientists have contributed to stress and anxiety. Other societal developments have lead to decreased flexibility that obstructs adaptation. Some adaptive strategies are discordant with the traditional life of reindeer herding, and there is a fear among the Sami of being the last generation practising traditional reindeer herding.The study illustrates the vulnerable situation of the reindeer herders and that climate change impact may have serious consequences for the trade and their overall way of life. Decision makers on all levels, both in Sweden and internationally, need improved insights into these complex issues to be able to make adequate decisions about adaptive climate change strategies.

  5. Connecting and correcting : a case study of Sami healers in Porsanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Barbara Helen

    2007-01-01

    Connecting and Correcting is a case study of Sami healers in Porsanger, Finnmark, Norway, and focuses on two Coastal Sami healers, their worldview and healing practices. The cultural and historic context of Sami healing practices is explored, most notably Sami folk beliefs, the Laestadian branch of

  6. SAMIS- STANDARD ASSEMBLY-LINE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY SIMULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Standard Assembly-Line Manufacturing Industry Simulation (SAMIS) program was originally developed to model a hypothetical U. S. industry which manufactures silicon solar modules for use in electricity generation. The SAMIS program has now been generalized to the extent that it should be useful for simulating many different production-line manufacturing industries and companies. The most important capability of SAMIS is its ability to "simulate" an industry based on a model developed by the user with the aid of the SAMIS program. The results of the simulation are a set of financial reports which detail the requirements, including quantities and cost, of the companies and processes which comprise the industry. SAMIS provides a fair, consistent, and reliable means of comparing manufacturing processes being developed by numerous independent efforts. It can also be used to assess the industry-wide impact of changes in financial parameters, such as cost of resources and services, inflation rates, interest rates, tax policies, and required return on equity. Because of the large amount of data needed to describe an industry, a major portion of SAMIS is dedicated to data entry and maintenance. This activity in SAMIS is referred to as model management. Model management requires a significant amount of interaction through a system of "prompts" which make it possible for persons not familiar with computers, or the SAMIS program, to provide all of the data necessary to perform a simulation. SAMIS is written in TURBO PASCAL (version 2.0 required for compilation) and requires 10 meg of hard disk space, an 8087 coprocessor, and an IBM color graphics monitor. Executables and source code are provided. SAMIS was originally developed in 1978; the IBM PC version was developed in 1985. Release 6.1 was made available in 1986, and includes the PC-IPEG program.

  7. "You never know who are Sami or speak Sami" Clinicians' experiences with language-appropriate care to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Northern Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsvold, Inger; Møllersen, Snefrid; Stordahl, Vigdis

    2016-01-01

    The Indigenous population in Norway, the Sami, have a statutory right to speak and be spoken to in the Sami language when receiving health services. There is, however, limited knowledge about how clinicians deal with this in clinical practice. This study explores how clinicians deal with language-appropriate care with Sami-speaking patients in specialist mental health services. This study aims to explore how clinicians identify and respond to Sami patients' language data, as well as how they experience provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Sami language administrative districts. Data were collected using qualitative method, through individual interviews with 20 therapists working in outpatient mental health clinics serving Sami populations in northern Norway. A thematic analysis inspired by systematic text reduction was employed. Two themes were identified: (a) identification of Sami patients' language data and (b) experiences with provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients. Findings indicate that clinicians are not aware of patients' language needs prior to admission and that they deal with identification of language data and offer of language-appropriate care ad hoc when patients arrive. Sami-speaking participants reported always offering language choice and found more profound understanding of patients' experiences when Sami language was used. Whatever language Sami-speaking patients may choose, they are found to switch between languages during therapy. Most non-Sami-speaking participants reported offering Sami-speaking services, but the patients chose to speak Norwegian. However, a few of the participants maintained language awareness and could identify language needs despite a patient's refusal to speak Sami in therapy. Finally, some non-Sami-speaking participants were satisfied if they understood what the patients were saying. They left it to patients to address language problems, only to discover patients

  8. Design and Applications of the SAMI-pH Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. S.; Degrandpre, M. D.; Cullison, S. E.; Harris, K. E.; Beck, J.; Spalding, R.; Dickson, A. G.

    2010-12-01

    Spectrophotometric methods are routinely used to make high-precision pH measurements in oceanographic studies. The SAMI-pH sensor incorporates this technique into an autonomous, in situ sensor capable of extended deployments with minimal instrument drift. The SAMI-pH operates by mixing seawater with an indicator dye (metacresol purple) and measuring pH by absorbance. Laboratory studies have found that the SAMI-pH has an accuracy of 0.0017 ± 0.0007 pH units. Additionally, two SAMIs deployed for 22 days in coastal waters had a mean difference of +0.0042, and there was no drift evident during the deployment. The SAMI-pH has recently been re-designed with funding from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program. The new SAMI-pH design replaces the tungsten lamp with LEDs, decreasing power consumption. The SAMI-pH can now make more than 2,300 measurements in a single deployment, i.e. run for 290 days sampling every 3 hours. The design is also much more compact, allowing for easier deployment. Additionally, the SAMI-pH can now be deployed with a certified reference material (CRM), allowing for in situ data verification. The CRM, produced by Dr. Andrew Dickson (Scripps), is a tris seawater buffer that has a pH that is accurately known over the range of seawater temperatures. The new SAMI-pH has been tested extensively in the lab, with consistent high accuracy and precision. Field based studies have also yielded very good results. The SAMI-pH was deployed for three months at the MBARI M0 mooring. Data collected were used with salinity derived alkalinity to calculate in situ pCO2, which initially had a mean difference of 2.0 ± 0.4 μatm, as compared to an infrared CO2 sensor mounted on the buoy. During this time aragonite saturation states varied from 1.8-3.7, and calcite saturation states varied from 2.9-5.8. Data collected by a SAMI-pH and SAMI-CO2 on the NH-10 mooring off the Oregon Coast gave similar results. The SAMI-pH was deployed on a drifter for 1 month in the

  9. Traditional ecological knowledge among Sami reindeer herders in northern Sweden about vascular plants grazed by reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Inga

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional knowledge about how reindeer utilize forage resources was expected to be crucial to reindeer herders. Seventeen Sami reindeer herders in four reindeer herding communities in Sweden (“samebyar” in Swedish were interviewed about plants species considered to be important reindeer food plants in scientific literature. Among 40 plant species, which the informants were asked to identify and indicate whether and when they were grazed by reindeer, they identified a total of 21 plant taxa and five plant groups. They especially recognised species that were used as human food by the Sami themselves, but certain specific forage plants were also identified. Detailed knowledge of vascular plants at the species level was surprisingly general, which may indicate that knowledge of pasture resources in a detailed species level is not of vital importance. This fact is in sharp contradiction to the detailed knowledge that Sami people express for example about reindeer (as an animal or snow (as physical element. The plausible explanation is that observations of individual plant species are unnecessarily detailed information in large-scale reindeer pastoralism, because the animals graze freely under loose herding and border surveillance.

  10. Transit safety & security statistics & analysis 2002 annual report (formerly SAMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The Transit Safety & Security Statistics & Analysis 2002 Annual Report (formerly SAMIS) is a compilation and analysis of mass transit accident, casualty, and crime statistics reported under the Federal Transit Administrations (FTAs) National Tr...

  11. Transit safety & security statistics & analysis 2003 annual report (formerly SAMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    The Transit Safety & Security Statistics & Analysis 2003 Annual Report (formerly SAMIS) is a compilation and analysis of mass transit accident, casualty, and crime statistics reported under the Federal Transit Administrations (FTAs) National Tr...

  12. The international biological program/human adaptability studies among the Skolt Sami in Finland (1966–1970

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Forsius

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The population is increasingly lighter pigmented moving in a northward direction in Europe until reaching the Arctic Circle, where the Samis (Lapps are clearly more pigmented. Methods: In 1966–1970, we investigated a total of 689 subjects in the villages of Sevettijärvi and Nellim, including persons with mixed Sami and Finnish heritage; of these, 487 (242 males, 245 females had both parents classified as Skolt Sami. For estimation of the colour of the iris and hair, international scales were used. For translucency of the iris, pigmentation of the fundus was estimated in 3 different shades. The length and type of eyelashes were classified into 3 categories. To our knowledge, a simultaneous study of the pigmentation of eyebrows, eyelashes and eye fundus at different ages has not previously been published. Results: The age differences of iris colour were highly significant. Iris colour in children varied markedly, and they generally had lighter colours than later in life. Age and sex effects on the translucency of irises were found. Male irises were more translucent. Fundus pigmentation was scanty in the youngest age groups, with full pigmentation being reached at 20 years. Among young individuals hair colour darkens with increasing age. Eyebrow colour was slightly lighter for both sexes in the youngest age groups that in older cohorts. Women had longer eyelashes than males. Conclusions: The main factor of the lighter skin is a higher ability to synthesize vitamin D, providing superior protection against rickets. The Skolt Samis are more pigmented than other Nordic people. In earlier times they had problems with rickets but our studies did not show any essential symptoms of rickets today. Visual acuity among Skolt Samis was good. They had lower prevalence of myopia compared to Finns. The stronger pigmentation of Skolt Samis is probably due to their origin from darker Eastern populations. Since our investigations were made, the Skolt

  13. Ethnodemographic processes among the Sami of modern Norway

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    Kseniia S. Babenysheva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of statistics and comparative analysis the article shows ethnodemographic processes among the Sami of Norway in 2000–2013, including the dynamic of population, natural increase, factors and reasons which caused them in this period. The short analysis of references has been made. Stable economic situation is improving the conditions of Sami. At the modern stage, special conditions for keeping the Sami’s ethnic identity are arranged, the basis of which is the language development.

  14. Prevalence of self-reported myocardial infarction in Sami and non-Sami populations: the SAMINOR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent-Martin Eliassen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Measure the prevalence of self-reported myocardial infarction (SMI in Sami and non-Sami populations in rural areas of Norway, and explore whether possible ethnic differences could be explained by established cardiovascular risk factors. Design: Cross-sectional population-based study. Methods: A health survey was conducted in 2003–2004 in areas with Sami and non-Sami populations (SAMINOR. The response rate was 60.9%. Information concerning lifestyle was collected by 2 self-administrated questionnaires, and clinical examinations provided anthropometric measurements, and data on blood pressure and lipid levels. Results: The total number for the subsequent analysis was 15,206 men and women aged 36–79 years (born 1925–1968. Sex-specific analyses revealed no ethnic difference in SMI. In terms of the most important risk factors such as smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels, no or only trivial ethnic differences were found in both women and men. Conclusion: In this study, we found no difference in SMI between Sami and non-Sami in rural areas in Norway. The similar risk profile is the most plausible explanation; similar living conditions and close interaction between the ethnic groups may explain this.

  15. Prevalence of self-reported myocardial infarction in Sami and non-Sami populations: the SAMINOR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliassen, Bent-Martin; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Braaten, Tonje; Melhus, Marita; Broderstad, Ann R

    2015-01-01

    Measure the prevalence of self-reported myocardial infarction (SMI) in Sami and non-Sami populations in rural areas of Norway, and explore whether possible ethnic differences could be explained by established cardiovascular risk factors. Cross-sectional population-based study. A health survey was conducted in 2003-2004 in areas with Sami and non-Sami populations (SAMINOR). The response rate was 60.9%. Information concerning lifestyle was collected by 2 self-administrated questionnaires, and clinical examinations provided anthropometric measurements, and data on blood pressure and lipid levels. The total number for the subsequent analysis was 15,206 men and women aged 36-79 years (born 1925-1968). Sex-specific analyses revealed no ethnic difference in SMI. In terms of the most important risk factors such as smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels, no or only trivial ethnic differences were found in both women and men. In this study, we found no difference in SMI between Sami and non-Sami in rural areas in Norway. The similar risk profile is the most plausible explanation; similar living conditions and close interaction between the ethnic groups may explain this.

  16. Ethical guidelines for Sami research: the issue that disappeared from the Norwegian Sami Parliament's agenda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stordahl, Vigdis; Tørres, Grete; Møllersen, Snefrid; Eira-Åhren, Inger-Marit

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades many indigenous communities, policy makers and researchers worldwide have criticized the academic community for not being aware of the specific challenges these communities have faced and still are facing with regard to research. One result of the decades of discourse in indigenous communities is the development in many Western countries of indigenously sensitive ethical research guidelines. In 1997 the Sami Parliament (SP) in Norway reached a unanimous decision that ethical guidelines for Sami research had to be drawn up. Such guidelines are however still to be created. The objectives of this article are to enquire into what happened to the Norwegian SP's decision of 1997 and to reflect on why the issue seems to have disappeared from the SP's agenda. Finally, we consider whether research ethics is to be a subject for the research community only. A review of parliamentary white papers on research and SP documents relating to research ethics. The response to the SP's decision in 1997 took place in two different channels, both of them national, namely the research ethics channel and the political channel. Thus, there were actually two parallel processes taking place. In spite of nearly two decades of reports, the concept of the participation of indigenous communities in research is still not an integral part of Norwegian ethical guidelines. The issue of indigenously sensitive research ethics seems to have disappeared from the SP's agenda and the research ethics review system with regard to Sami research is with minor adjustments the same as when the SP asked for a revision.

  17. Ethnic discrimination and health: the relationship between experienced ethnic discrimination and multiple health domains in Norway's rural Sami population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketil Lenert Hansen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Self-reported ethnic discrimination has been associated with a range of health outcomes. This study builds on previous efforts to investigate the prevalence of self-reported ethnic discrimination in the indigenous (Sami population, and how such discrimination may be associated with key health indicators. Study design: The study relies on data from the 2003/2004 (n=4,389 population-based study of adults (aged 36–79 years in 24 rural municipalities of Central and North Norway (the SAMINOR study. Self-reported ethnic discrimination was measured using the question: “Have you ever experienced discrimination due to your ethnic background?” Health indicators included questions regarding cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic muscle pain, metabolic syndrome and obesity. Logistic regression was applied to examine the relationship between self-reported ethnic discrimination and health outcomes. Results: The study finds that for Sami people living in minority areas, self-reported ethnic discrimination is associated with all the negative health indicators included in the study. Conclusion: We conclude that ethnic discrimination affects a wide range of health outcomes. Our findings highlight the importance of ensuring freedom from discrimination for the Sami people of Norway.

  18. Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group's access to somatic specialist health care (SHC: a retrospective study on general practitioners’ referrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Norum

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Sami people constitute the indigenous people in northern Norway. The objective of this study was to clarify whether they have a similar supply of somatic specialist health care (SHC as others. Methods: The referrals from general practitioners (GPs in the primary health care (PHC in the administration area of the Sami language law (8 municipalities were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities. Population data was accessed from Statistics Norway and the time period 2007–2010 was analysed. The main outcome was the number of referrals per 1,000 inhabitants according to age group, gender and place of living. Results: 504,292 referrals in northern Norway were indentified and the Sami and control group constituted 23,093 and 22,541 referrals, respectively. The major findings were a similar referral ratio (RR (1.14 and 1.17 (p = 0.624 and women more commonly referred (female/male ratio 1.45 and 1.41 in both groups. GPs in both groups were loyal to their local hospital trust. Conclusion: Inhabitants in Sami-speaking municipalities in northern Norway have a similar supply of SHC services as controls. Inter-municipal variation was significant in both groups.

  19. SAMI3_ICON: Model of the Ionosphere/Plasmasphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huba, J. D.; Maute, A.; Crowley, G.

    2017-10-01

    The NRL ionosphere/plasmasphere model SAMI3 has been modified to support the NASA ICON mission. Specifically, SAMI3_ICON has been modified to import the thermospheric composition, temperature, and winds from TIEGCM-ICON and the high-latitude potential from AMIE data. The codes will be run on a daily basis during the ICON mission to provide ionosphere and thermosphere properties to the science community. SAMI3_ICON will provide ionospheric and plasmaspheric parameters such as the electron and ion densities, temperatures, and velocities, as well as the total electron content (TEC), peak ionospheric electron density (NmF2) and height of the F layer at NmF2 (hmF2).

  20. ‘‘We are like lemmings’’: making sense of the cultural meaning(s) of suicide among the indigenous Sami in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Stoor, Jon Petter A.; Niclas Kaiser; Lars Jacobsson; Ellinor Salander Renberg; Anne Silviken

    2015-01-01

    Background. Suicide is a widespread problem among indigenous people residing in the circumpolar Arctic. Though the situation among the indigenous Sami in northern Scandinavia is better than among some other indigenous people, suicide is still regarded as a major public health issue. To adapt prevention strategies that are culturally attuned one must understand how suicide is understood within context. That is, the cultural meaning(s) of suicide. Objective. To explore and make s...

  1. Prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway – the SAMINOR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketil Lenert Hansen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main purpose of this work was to identify the prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among Sami and non-Sami adults. Study design: A cross-sectional population-based study (the SAMINOR study. Data were collected by self-administrated questionnaires. Method: SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions conducted in 24 municipalities in Northern Norway during 2003 and 2004. The present study included 15,546 individuals aged between 36 and 79, whose ethnicity was categorized as Sami (33.4%, Kven (7.3% and Norwegian majority population (57.2%. Results: Sami respondents had a higher prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk than the Norwegian majority population. The reporting was highest among Sami females (27.1%. Consumption of milk and dairy products (yoghurt and cheese was high among all the ethnic groups. However, significantly more Sami than non-Sami never (or rarely consume milk or cheese, and individuals who reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk had an significant lower intake of dairy products than those not reporting stomach symptoms after consuming dairy products. Sami reported general abdominal pain more often than the majority population. The adjusted models show a significant effect of Sami ethnicity in both men and women on self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk. In females, the odds ratio (OR=1.77 (p=0.001 and in males OR=1.64 (p=0.001. Conclusion: Our study shows that the Sami population reported more stomach symptoms after consuming milk, suggesting a higher prevalence of milk intolerance among the Sami population than the Norwegian majority population.

  2. Ethnic difference in the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in regions with Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway – the SAMINOR1 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naseribafrouei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in rural populations of Norway, as well as to explore potential ethnic disparities with respect to dysglycaemia in Sami and non-Sami populations. Design: Cross-sectional population-based study. Methods: The SAMINOR1 study was performed in 2003–2004. The study took place in regions with both Sami and non-Sami populations and had a response rate of 60.9%. Information in the SAMINOR1 study was collected using two self-administered questionnaires, clinical examination and laboratory tests. The present analysis included 15,208 men and women aged 36–79 years from the SAMINOR1 study. Results: Age-standardised prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus among Sami men was 3.4 and 5.5%, respectively. Corresponding values for non-Sami men were 3.3 and 4.6%. Age-standardised prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus for Sami women was 2.7 and 4.8%, respectively, while corresponding values for non-Sami women were 2.3 and 4.5%. Relative risk ratios for dysglycaemia among Sami participants compared with non-Sami participants were significantly different in different geographical regions, with the southern region having the highest prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus among Sami participants. Conclusion: We observed a heterogeneity in the prevalence of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus in different geographical regions both within and between different ethnic groups.

  3. Changes in Film Representations of Sami Culture and Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kari Skardhamar

    2008-02-01

    represents a totally different perspective by focusing on power relations, religious attitudes and ethical values. The language of the film is Sami. Finally, Gaup's most recent film, Kautokeinoopprøret (Kautokeino riot (2007, a narrative based on historical events, will be briefly discussed.

  4. “You never know who are Sami or speak Sami” Clinicians’ experiences with language-appropriate care to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Northern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Dagsvold

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Indigenous population in Norway, the Sami, have a statutory right to speak and be spoken to in the Sami language when receiving health services. There is, however, limited knowledge about how clinicians deal with this in clinical practice. This study explores how clinicians deal with language-appropriate care with Sami-speaking patients in specialist mental health services. Objectives: This study aims to explore how clinicians identify and respond to Sami patients’ language data, as well as how they experience provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Sami language administrative districts. Method: Data were collected using qualitative method, through individual interviews with 20 therapists working in outpatient mental health clinics serving Sami populations in northern Norway. A thematic analysis inspired by systematic text reduction was employed. Findings: Two themes were identified: (a identification of Sami patients’ language data and (b experiences with provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients. Conclusion: Findings indicate that clinicians are not aware of patients’ language needs prior to admission and that they deal with identification of language data and offer of language-appropriate care ad hoc when patients arrive. Sami-speaking participants reported always offering language choice and found more profound understanding of patients’ experiences when Sami language was used. Whatever language Sami-speaking patients may choose, they are found to switch between languages during therapy. Most non-Sami-speaking participants reported offering Sami-speaking services, but the patients chose to speak Norwegian. However, a few of the participants maintained language awareness and could identify language needs despite a patient's refusal to speak Sami in therapy. Finally, some non-Sami-speaking participants were satisfied if they understood what the patients were saying

  5. “You never know who are Sami or speak Sami” Clinicians’ experiences with language-appropriate care to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsvold, Inger; Møllersen, Snefrid; Stordahl, Vigdis

    2016-01-01

    Background The Indigenous population in Norway, the Sami, have a statutory right to speak and be spoken to in the Sami language when receiving health services. There is, however, limited knowledge about how clinicians deal with this in clinical practice. This study explores how clinicians deal with language-appropriate care with Sami-speaking patients in specialist mental health services. Objectives This study aims to explore how clinicians identify and respond to Sami patients’ language data, as well as how they experience provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Sami language administrative districts. Method Data were collected using qualitative method, through individual interviews with 20 therapists working in outpatient mental health clinics serving Sami populations in northern Norway. A thematic analysis inspired by systematic text reduction was employed. Findings Two themes were identified: (a) identification of Sami patients’ language data and (b) experiences with provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients. Conclusion Findings indicate that clinicians are not aware of patients’ language needs prior to admission and that they deal with identification of language data and offer of language-appropriate care ad hoc when patients arrive. Sami-speaking participants reported always offering language choice and found more profound understanding of patients’ experiences when Sami language was used. Whatever language Sami-speaking patients may choose, they are found to switch between languages during therapy. Most non-Sami-speaking participants reported offering Sami-speaking services, but the patients chose to speak Norwegian. However, a few of the participants maintained language awareness and could identify language needs despite a patient's refusal to speak Sami in therapy. Finally, some non-Sami-speaking participants were satisfied if they understood what the patients were saying. They left it to patients

  6. Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study

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    Astrid M. A. Eriksen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. Objective: The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. Design: The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5% and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%. Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. Results: Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model, and higher pain intensity. Conclusion: Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.

  7. Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Astrid M A; Schei, Berit; Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Sørlie, Tore; Fleten, Nils; Javo, Cecilie

    2016-01-01

    Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity. Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.

  8. Analysis of the economic adaptation of Sami reindeer management - A co-operation project between Nordic Sami Institute (NSI and Umeå University (UU, Centre for Sami Research (CESAM (In Norwegian with Summary in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Åge Riseth

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of low economic return in Sami reindeer management in most regions, there has been an increasing human population in the reindeer industry during the latest decades. This deviates from the expectations given by modern purpose rationality. There are indications that the reindeer managing Sami practices in Weberian sense a substantial rationality. Analysis at hand indicate close connections between landscape, management type, and type of rationality in reindeer management. The project is based on two major hypotheses: 1 The life form hypothesis: reindeer management has an particular value for the performers being the condition for an active choice of remaining within the industry, 2 The capital hypothesis: lacking re¬cognition of the resources of the reindeer managing Sami is/ has been limiting their establishment in capital requiring undertakings. The project will analyse the economy of reindeer management based on investigations in several types of reindeer management as well in Norway as in Sweden, in North Sami and South Sami areas. In chosen regions both quantitative and qualitative studies will be undertaken, focusing household level, to map the economy of the reindeer managing Sami. For the quantitative analyses creation and extent of value streams in the households of reindeer management and near surroundings are focused. In the qualitative analyses the point of departure is decision situations and strategic choices with reindeer managing Sami. Based on the regional analyses comparative analyses are conducted to find representativity of the regional studies. The project was started 1st July 2004 and is financed for 2!/!> years from The Research Council of Norway (Program for Sami Research, Interreg (Interreg IIIA Såpmi & Åarjelsaemie dajve, The Sami Parliament of Sweden and self-financing from NSI and UU. The project has near after start 2 full time researchers and project leader in a 20% position. Another researcher will join

  9. The health of young Swedish Sami with special reference to mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Omma

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the health of young Sami in Sweden and the relationship between health and experience of negative societal treatment due to ethnicity, as well as socio-demographic background factors. Study design. Cross-sectional population-based questionnaire study. Methods. A total of 876 persons aged 18–28 and involved in Sami associated activities were addressed, and 516 (59% responded to a questionnaire investigating physical health, mental health, and stress. Data were analyzed with regard to gender, family situation, occupation, education, enculturation factors and experience of being badly treated because of ethnicity. Results. A majority of the young Sami reported feeling healthy, but close to half of the group reported often having worries, often forgetting things and often experiencing lack of time for doing needed things. Women and those living alone reported a more negative health. Furthermore, half of the group had perceived bad treatment because of Sami ethnicity, and this was negatively associated with some aspects of mental health. Conclusion. The young Sami had a rather good and possibly slightly better health than other young Swedes, except regarding worries and stress. A high degree of bad treatment due to Sami ethnicity and its negative association with health, may partly explain the high degree of some health problems.

  10. Genes related to the metabolism of nutrients in the Kola Sami population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Andrew; Borinskaya, Svetlana; Vershubsky, Galina; Vasilyev, Eugeny; Popov, Vasily; Sokolova, Maria; Sanina, Ekaterina; Kaljina, Nina; Rebrikov, Dmitry; Lisitsyn, Dmitry; Yankovsky, Nikolay

    2008-02-01

    The environmental and life-style conditions of the Kola Sami could have influenced the population-specific frequencies of the AGXTProIILeu allele, and certain alleles of APOE and LCT genes, involved respectively, in the metabolism of animal proteins, lipids and milk sugar. Study Design. DNA samples were collected from the Sami population of Lovozero settlement (Murmansk Region) in 2005. The analysis of the traditional diet of the Kola Sami was made using the data of ethnographic studies conducted in the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. Frequencies of the AGXT ProllLeu, APOE*e4 alleles and LCT gene CC w9 genotype were defined by molecular-genetic analysis. The specificity of the Kola Sami gene pool is in the lower frequency of APOE*e4 allele compared with the Sami of Finland (0.205 and 0.310, respectively) and when compared with other groups (except the Skolt) in the higher frequency of hypolactasia conditioned by the CC(-13910) genotype of the LCT gene (0.484). The high prevalence of the AGXT allele T bearers among Kola Sami (0.273) does not contradict the hypothesis of the adaptive role this allele plays in populations with a traditionally high intake of meat.

  11. Cross-informant correlations on social competence and behavioral problems in Sami and Norwegian preadolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javo, Cecilie; Rønning, John A; Handegård, Bjørn Helge; Rudmin, Floyd W

    2009-03-01

    In a community-based birth cohort from Arctic Norway, correlations between parents and teachers on child competence and behavioral problems were determined for Sami and Norwegian 11-12 year-olds, using as instruments the child behavior checklist (CBCL), teacher report form (TRF), and the impact supplement of the extended strength and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ). Parent-teacher correlations on child behavioral problems were generally high in the Norwegian group, but low in the Sami group. Cross-cultural differences in cross-informant correlations were highest regarding externalizing and attention problems. Parent-teacher correlations on total impact of child difficulties also differed between the ethnic groups. Once again, a lower correlation was found for the Sami children. The discrepancy between parents' and teachers' perception of problems that needed attention was highest for the Sami, and lowest for the Norwegians. The Sami parents reported fewer perceived difficulties and less impact of problems than did the Norwegian parents. In contrast, no ethnic differences emerged for teachers' ratings. The paper discusses how cultural norms might influence the reports of child problems. It demonstrates the importance of combining parent and teacher reports of child behavior problems in minority and indigenous children, who often live under different cultural norms in home and school contexts.

  12. A population-based study on health and living conditions in areas with mixed Sami and Norwegian settlements – the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magritt Brustad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the method, data collection procedure and participation in The Population-based Study on Health and Living Conditions in Areas with both Sami and Norwegian Settlements – the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study. Study design: Cross-sectional and semi-longitudinal. Methods: In 2012, all inhabitants aged 18–69 and living in selected municipalities with both Sami and Norwegian settlements in Mid and Northern Norway were posted an invitation to participate in a questionnaire survey covering several topics related to health and living conditions. The geographical area was similar to the area where the SAMINOR 1 study was conducted in 2003/2004 with the exception of one additional municipality. Participants could alternatively use a web-based questionnaire with identical question and answer categories as the posted paper version. Results: In total, 11,600 (27% participated (16% used the web-based questionnaire, with a higher participation rate among those over 50 (37% for women and 32% for men. Some geographical variation in participation rates was found. In addition, for those invited who also participated in the SAMINOR 1 study, we found that the participation rates increased with the level of education and income, while there was little difference in participation rates across ethnic groups. Conclusion: The knowledge generated from future theme-specific research utilizing the SAMINOR 2 database has the potential to benefit the general population in this geographical area of Norway, and the Sami people in particular, by providing knowledge-based insight into the health and living conditions of the multi-ethnic population in these parts of Norway.

  13. A population-based study on health and living conditions in areas with mixed Sami and Norwegian settlements - the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustad, Magritt; Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild; Hansen, Solrunn; Melhus, Marita

    2014-01-01

    To describe the method, data collection procedure and participation in The Population-based Study on Health and Living Conditions in Areas with both Sami and Norwegian Settlements - the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study. Cross-sectional and semi-longitudinal. In 2012, all inhabitants aged 18-69 and living in selected municipalities with both Sami and Norwegian settlements in Mid and Northern Norway were posted an invitation to participate in a questionnaire survey covering several topics related to health and living conditions. The geographical area was similar to the area where the SAMINOR 1 study was conducted in 2003/2004 with the exception of one additional municipality. Participants could alternatively use a web-based questionnaire with identical question and answer categories as the posted paper version. In total, 11,600 (27%) participated (16% used the web-based questionnaire), with a higher participation rate among those over 50 (37% for women and 32% for men). Some geographical variation in participation rates was found. In addition, for those invited who also participated in the SAMINOR 1 study, we found that the participation rates increased with the level of education and income, while there was little difference in participation rates across ethnic groups. The knowledge generated from future theme-specific research utilizing the SAMINOR 2 database has the potential to benefit the general population in this geographical area of Norway, and the Sami people in particular, by providing knowledge-based insight into the health and living conditions of the multi-ethnic population in these parts of Norway.

  14. What can we talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom? Sami patients' experiences of language choice and cultural norms in mental health treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsvold, Inger; Møllersen, Snefrid; Stordahl, Vigdis

    2015-01-01

    The Sami in Norway have a legal right to receive health services adapted to Sami language and culture. This calls for a study of the significance of language choice and cultural norms in Sami patients' encounters with mental health services. To explore the significance of language and cultural norms in communication about mental health topics experienced by Sami patients receiving mental health treatment to enhance our understanding of linguistic and cultural adaptation of health services. Data were collected through individual interviews with 4 Sami patients receiving mental health treatment in Northern Norway. A systematic text reduction and a thematic analysis were employed. Two themes were identified:(I) Language choice is influenced by language competence, with whom one talks and what one talks about.Bilingualism was a resource and natural part of the participants' lives, but there were limited possibilities to speak Sami in encounters with health services. A professional working relationship was placed on an equal footing with the possibility to speak Sami. Sami patients' language choice in different communication situations is influenced by a complexity of social and cultural factors. Sami patients have varying opinions about and preferences for what they can talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom. Bilingualism and knowledge about both Sami and Norwegian culture provide latitude and enhanced possibilities for both patients and the health services. The challenge for the health services is to allow for and safeguard such individual variations within the cultural framework of the patients.

  15. Prevalence and associations for use of a traditional medicine provider in the SAMINOR 1 Survey: a population-based study on Health and Living Conditions in Regions with Sami and Norwegian Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Agnete Egilsdatter; Stub, Trine; Melhus, Marita; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild

    2017-12-12

    In Northern Norway, traditional medicine (TM) is shaped by both Christianity and traditional Sami nature worship. The healing rituals may include prayer and the use of tools such as moss, water, stones, wool and soil. Examples of TM modalities offered is cupping, blood-stemming, laying on of hands, healing prayers, and rituals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the use of TM in areas with predominantly Sami and Norwegian populations, and the influence of ethnicity, geography, gender, age, education, household income, religiosity and self-reported health on such use. The study is based on data collected in the first SAMINOR Survey (SAMINOR 1) conducted in 2003/2004, including three self-administered questionnaires, clinical measures, and blood analyses. Data was collected in 24 municipalities in Norway known to have a substantial population of Sami. All residents aged 30 and 36-78/79 years in the predefined regions were invited regardless of ethnic background (N = 27,987). Of these, 16,865 (60.3%) accepted to participate and gave their consent to medical research. Of the 16,544 people responding to the question about TM use, 2276 (13.8%) reported to have used TM once or more during their lifetime. The most outstanding characteristic of the TM users was the affiliation to the Laestadian church, where 34.3% (n = 273) reported such use, followed by an inner Finnmark residence (31.1%, n = 481) and a Sami ethnicity (25.7%, n = 1014). Women were slightly more likely to use TM compared to men (15.9% and 11.5% accordingly, p < 0.001), and the TM users were slightly younger than the non-TM users (mean age 52.3 versus 54.3 years, p < 0.001). The TM users also had lower income (p < 0.001) than the non-TM users. We found no significant differences between the TM users and the non-TM users concerning years of education, and whether the participants were living with a spouse/partner or not. Further studies are necessary

  16. Stroke and acute myocardial infarction in the Swedish Sami population: incidence and mortality in relation to income and level of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölander, Per; Hassler, Sven; Janlert, Urban

    2008-01-01

    Gender differences in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among the Sami have been reported previously. The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of and mortality from stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the Swedish Sami population between 1985 and 2002, and to analyse the potential impact of income and level of education on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A Sami cohort of 15,914 persons (4,465 reindeer herding and 11,449 non-herding Sami) were followed up from 1985 to 2002 with regard to incidence and mortality rates of AMI, stroke, and SAH. Incidence and mortality ratios were calculated using a demographically matched non-Sami control population (DMC) as the standard (71,550 persons). There was no elevated risk of developing AMI among the Sami compared with the DMC. However, the mortality ratio of AMI was significantly higher for Sami women. Higher incidence rates of stroke and SAH for both Sami men and women was observed, but no differences in mortality rates. Apart from the reindeer-herding men who demonstrated lower levels of income and education, the income and education levels among Sami were similar to the DMC. High mortality rates from AMI rather than stroke explain the excess mortality for CVD previously shown among Sami women. The results suggest that the differences in incidence of stroke between herding and non-herding Sami men, and between Sami women and non-Sami women, are caused by behavioural and psychosocial risk factors rather than by traditional socioeconomic ones.

  17. The influence of cultural background in intercultural dementia care: exemplified by Sami patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Ingird

    2013-06-01

    To gain knowledge about how the original culture may influence communication and interaction with institutionalised patients with dementia and of what particular cultural aspects may come to the fore, exemplified by Sami patients. Qualitative narrative interviews with 15 interviewees, family members of Sami patients with dementia and nursing staff experienced with dementia care were conducted. Hermeneutic, thematic analysis was used. Although the way dementia influence mental functions, language, etc. is universal, behaviours, reactions and responses may be coloured by the patient's background culture. Knowledge of language, cultural codes and the patient's former life are primary keys to understanding. Rhythm of life, spirituality, singing and tangible aspects of traditional culture like clothes and food constitute important aspects of culture-appropriate care. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. FIRST SCIENCE WITH SAMI: A SERENDIPITOUSLY DISCOVERED GALACTIC WIND IN ESO 185-G031

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Lisa M. R.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Croom, Scott M.; Bryant, Julia J.; Richards, Samuel; Allen, James T. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Green, Andrew W.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Bauer, Amanda E.; Birchall, Michael N.; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Ellis, Simon C.; Farrell, Tony; Goodwin, Michael; Heald, Ron; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Horton, Anthony; Lee, Steve [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jones, D. Heath [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); and others

    2012-12-20

    We present the first scientific results from the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object IFS (SAMI) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. This unique instrument deploys 13 fused fiber bundles (hexabundles) across a one-degree field of view allowing simultaneous spatially resolved spectroscopy of 13 galaxies. During the first SAMI commissioning run, targeting a single galaxy field, one object (ESO 185-G031) was found to have extended minor axis emission with ionization and kinematic properties consistent with a large-scale galactic wind. The importance of this result is twofold: (1) fiber bundle spectrographs are able to identify low surface brightness emission arising from extranuclear activity and (2) such activity may be more common than presently assumed because conventional multi-object spectrographs use single-aperture fibers and spectra from these are nearly always dominated by nuclear emission. These early results demonstrate the extraordinary potential of multi-object hexabundle spectroscopy in future galaxy surveys.

  19. A traditional Sami diet score as a determinant of mortality in a general northern Swedish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Maria Nilsson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the relationship between “traditional Sami” dietary pattern and mortality in a general northern Swedish population. Study design . Population-based cohort study. Methods. We examined 77,319 subjects from the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP cohort. A traditional Sami diet score was constructed by adding 1 point for intake above the median level of red meat, fatty fish, total fat, berries and boiled coffee, and 1 point for intake below the median of vegetables, bread and fibre. Hazard ratios (HR for mortality were calculated by Cox regression. Results. Increasing traditional Sami diet scores were associated with slightly elevated all-cause mortality in men [Multivariate HR per 1-point increase in score 1.04 (95% CI 1.01–1.07, p=0.018], but not for women [Multivariate HR 1.03 (95% CI 0.99–1.07, p=0.130]. This increased risk was approximately equally attributable to cardiovascular disease and cancer, though somewhat more apparent for cardiovascular disease mortality in men free from diabetes, hypertension and obesity at baseline [Multivariate HR 1.10 (95% CI 1.01–1.20, p=0.023]. Conclusions. A weak increased all-cause mortality was observed in men with higher traditional Sami diet scores. However, due to the complexity in defining a “traditional Sami” diet, and the limitations of our questionnaire for this purpose, the study should be considered exploratory, a first attempt to relate a “traditional Sami” dietary pattern to health endpoints. Further investigation of cohorts with more detailed information on dietary and lifestyle items relevant for traditional Sami culture is warranted.

  20. Temporomandibular disorders, headaches, and cervical pain among females in a Sami population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Christina; Wänman, Anders

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and co-morbidity of long-standing, intense, and frequent symptoms of pain and dysfunction in the jaw-face, head, and cervical region among adult females drawn from the Sami population in northern Sweden. A total of 487 females, taken from the register of the Swedish Sami Parliament or registered as reindeer owners or reindeer herders in the Swedish Board of Agriculture and living in the Arctic region of northern Sweden, participated in a questionnaire study. The prevalence of pain and/or dysfunction in the jaw-face region was 32%, of headaches 61%, and of pain in the cervical region 56%. When the criterion of frequent symptoms (once a week or more often) was used, prevalence dropped to 17%, 19%, and 30%, respectively, and when that of intense symptoms, defined as 5 or more on an 11-point numerical rating scale, was added, prevalence dropped further to 8%, 11%, and 20%, respectively. The majority reported long-standing symptoms (67-98% depending on symptom). A high statistically significant relationship was found between frequent symptoms of pain and/or dysfunction in the jaw-face, frequent headaches, and frequent cervical pain (pcervical pain were frequently reported among a sample of Sami females living in the Swedish Arctic region. The prevalence of symptoms was strongly dependent on criteria of frequency and intensity.

  1. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Spatially Resolving the Main Sequence of Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medling, Anne M.; Cortese, Luca; Croom, Scott M.; Green, Andrew W.; Groves, Brent; Hampton, Elise; Ho, I.-Ting; Davies, Luke J. M.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Schaefer, Adam L.; Taylor, Edward; Zafar, Tayyaba; Bekki, Kenji; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bloom, Jessica V.; Brough, Sarah; Bryant, Julia J.; Catinella, Barbara; Cecil, Gerald; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Driver, Simon P.; Federrath, Christoph; Foster, Caroline; Goldstein, Gregory; Goodwin, Michael; Hopkins, Andrew; Lawrence, J. S.; Leslie, Sarah K.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Owers, Matt S.; McDermid, Richard; Richards, Samuel N.; Sharp, Robert; Scott, Nicholas; Sweet, Sarah M.; Taranu, Dan S.; Tescari, Edoardo; Tonini, Chiara; van de Sande, Jesse; Walcher, C. Jakob; Wright, Angus

    2018-01-01

    We present the ˜800 star formation rate maps for the SAMI Galaxy Survey based on Hα emission maps, corrected for dust attenuation via the Balmer decrement, that are included in the SAMI Public Data Release 1. We mask out spaxels contaminated by non-stellar emission using the [O III]/Hβ, [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [O I]/Hα line ratios. Using these maps, we examine the global and resolved star-forming main sequences of SAMI galaxies as a function of morphology, environmental density, and stellar mass. Galaxies further below the star-forming main sequence are more likely to have flatter star formation profiles. Early-type galaxies split into two populations with similar stellar masses and central stellar mass surface densities. The main sequence population has centrally-concentrated star formation similar to late-type galaxies, while galaxies >3σ below the main sequence show significantly reduced star formation most strikingly in the nuclear regions. The split populations support a two-step quenching mechanism, wherein halo mass first cuts off the gas supply and remaining gas continues to form stars until the local stellar mass surface density can stabilize the reduced remaining fuel against further star formation. Across all morphologies, galaxies in denser environments show a decreased specific star formation rate from the outside in, supporting an environmental cause for quenching, such as ram-pressure stripping or galaxy interactions.

  2. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus in Sami and Norwegian populations. The SAMINOR-a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild; Melhus, Marita

    2016-04-22

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is recognised as a reliable long-term predictor of adverse health outcomes. Elevated prevalence rates of MetS and chronic lifestyle diseases have been documented in different indigenous groups. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of MetS and diabetes mellitus in relation to ethnicity in Northern Norway. In addition, we discussed different cut-off values for waist circumference (WC) and what impact this has on the prevalence of MetS. SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions in areas home to Sami and non-Sami populations. The survey was carried out in 2003-2004. All eligible residents in specific age groups were invited. In total, 16,538 males and females aged 36-79 years participated and gave informed consent for medical research. This study involved a total of 7822 female and 7290 male participants. Sami affiliation was reported by 5141 participants (34%). The prevalence of MetS was high in both ethnic groups independent of which WC cut-off value was used. No ethnic differences in prevalence of diabetes mellitus were demonstrated. However, ethnicity appeared to affect diabetes treatment, which was more prevalent among Sami than non-Sami women. In this study, there was no ethnic difference in diabetes prevalence, but ethnicity appeared to affect diabetes treatment. Tablet treatment was more commonly in use among Sami women than among non-Sami women. We demonstrated a high share of negative metabolic components. These metabolic components have important health implications. Therefore, determining preventive initiatives is important in the primary and specialist healthcare system. These initiatives must be made culture and linguistic specific, in order to reduce differences and improve health status in the whole population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Thrilled at @Bristol Kathy Sykes in conversation with Liz Whitelegg. Kathy Sykes is Senior Science Consultant at @Bristol - a new area on Bristol's Harbourside with a Science Centre Explore, a Wildlife Centre Wildscreen, with sculptures and fountains. Kathy was one of five people in 1999 to be awarded an IOP Public Awareness of Physics award. Dr Kathy Sykes What attracted you to Physics in the first place? It was really when I discovered that Physics was all about making models of the world, because then suddenly the ability to be creative became important. I liked the idea that you could have a picture of the world that might work quite well but you could always replace that with a better one. That was what made science come alive and make it seem like something that I'd really love to be involved in, rather than science as a stale body of facts that I needed to learn. I was much more interested in ideas than in facts. I think that finding out about 'models' happened around the time I was discovering quantum mechanics and how the act of observing something can actually affect the outcome. I found it incredibly exciting - especially how that changed the whole philosophy of science. I also had a fantastic teacher in physics and I owe an awful lot to him. He just swooped in at the last moment when I was considering giving it up so that made an enormous difference. After my degree I went to teach maths and physics A-level in Zimbabwe with the VSO, and it was partly wanting to share my excitement with other people about physics that made me want to go and teach abroad. When I came back and began my PhD in Physics at Bristol University, I missed teaching and thought it was important to get the public more involved in science and debates about science. My supervisor, Pete Barham, was doing lots of this himself, and he helped and encouraged me enormously. I can't thank him enough. Did you consider teaching as a career? Well I like having the carpet whipped away from

  4. What can we talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom? Sami patients' experiences of language choice and cultural norms in mental health treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Dagsvold

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Sami in Norway have a legal right to receive health services adapted to Sami language and culture. This calls for a study of the significance of language choice and cultural norms in Sami patients’ encounters with mental health services. Objectives: To explore the significance of language and cultural norms in communication about mental health topics experienced by Sami patients receiving mental health treatment to enhance our understanding of linguistic and cultural adaptation of health services. Methods: Data were collected through individual interviews with 4 Sami patients receiving mental health treatment in Northern Norway. A systematic text reduction and a thematic analysis were employed. Findings: Two themes were identified:(I Language choice is influenced by language competence, with whom one talks and what one talks about.Bilingualism was a resource and natural part of the participants’ lives, but there were limited possibilities to speak Sami in encounters with health services. A professional working relationship was placed on an equal footing with the possibility to speak Sami.(II Cultural norms influence what one talks about, in what way and to whom.However, norms could be bypassed, by talking about norm-regulated topics in Norwegian with health providers. Conclusion: Sami patients’ language choice in different communication situations is influenced by a complexity of social and cultural factors. Sami patients have varying opinions about and preferences for what they can talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom. Bilingualism and knowledge about both Sami and Norwegian culture provide latitude and enhanced possibilities for both patients and the health services. The challenge for the health services is to allow for and safeguard such individual variations within the cultural framework of the patients.

  5. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    ASE: Attend, Socialize, Enjoy Bob Kibble reflects on the enriching effects of the annual meeting Bob Kibble is a teacher trainer at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. I remember my first ASE meeting in Reading. Perhaps in 1978 or thereabouts. I had been teaching for a few years and thought I'd check out this local convention of science teachers. It was indeed a revelation that so many people had so much to say about teaching science. There was talk about N and F levels and the 'I level grill'. Someone had ordered something called a BBC machine (later revealed to me as the latest in hi-tech teaching). I remember it well. But it was a lonely affair for a recent recruit. People seemed to know each other and there was much friendly exchanging. However, nobody knew me and I knew nobody else. The professional revelations were accompanied by a personal isolation. A strange set of memories indeed for a new recruit, unskilled and clumsy in the social arena. Bob practising for the ASE singalong session this year. This year I went to the ASE Centenary meeting in Guildford, my sixteenth ASE annual meeting. Things have changed since the early days. Thursday started with a formal Cathedral service in celebration of 100 years of the ASE. I sat next to a lady from Oxford and behind my good friend Dave from Croydon. Things snowballed from there. I went to a workshop on the water cycle and was brought face to face with my own misconceptions about the life story of a water molecule. Got a freebie coloured bracelet as well. Thanks Margaret. A chap from Bournemouth gave me loads of ideas about how best to set up a shared lesson observation scheme as well as how to run a professional development workshop. Thanks Stuart. At a third session I joined Brenda from Cambridge and we spent an enjoyable hour discovering ways to approach the teaching of light and in particular Ibn al Haytham's revelations courtesy of a chap from Kingston. That afternoon I was invited to present a talk to

  6. Cooperation between Magnesium and Metabolite Controls Collapse of the SAM-I Riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Susmita; Onuchic, José N; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2017-07-25

    The S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-I riboswitch is a noncoding RNA that regulates the transcription termination process in response to metabolite (SAM) binding. The aptamer portion of the riboswitch may adopt an open or closed state depending on the presence of metabolite. Although the transition between the open and closed states is critical for the switching process, its atomistic details are not well understood. Using atomistic simulations, we calculate the effect of SAM and magnesium ions on the folding free energy landscape of the SAM-I riboswitch. These molecular simulation results are consistent with our previous wetlab experiments and aid in interpreting the SHAPE probing measurements. Here, molecular dynamics simulations explicitly identify target RNA motifs sensitive to magnesium ions and SAM. In the simulations, we observe that, whereas the metabolite mostly stabilizes the P1 and P3 helices, magnesium serves an important role in stabilizing a pseudoknot interaction between the P2 and P4 helices, even at high metabolite concentrations. The pseudoknot stabilization by magnesium, in combination with P1 stabilization by SAM, explains the requirement of both SAM and magnesium to form the fully collapsed metabolite-bound closed state of the SAM-I riboswitch. In the absence of SAM, frequent open-to-closed conformational transitions of the pseudoknot occur, akin to breathing. These pseudoknot fluctuations disrupt the binding site by facilitating fluctuations in the 5'-end of helix P1. Magnesium biases the landscape toward a collapsed state (preorganization) by coordinating pseudoknot and 5'-P1 fluctuations. The cooperation between SAM and magnesium in stabilizing important tertiary interactions elucidates their functional significance in transcription regulation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Mortality patterns in geographical areas with a high vs. low Sami population density in Arctic Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustad, Magritt; Pettersen, Torunn; Melhus, Marita; Lund, Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to study mortality patterns in the population in different geographical locations in northern Norway on the basis of Sami population density. Mortality statistics by sex and age from 1991 to 2006 were obtained from Statistics Norway. Mortality rates, including infant mortality rates, were compared across geographical locations. The data material was divided into within and outside the the geographical areas of the Sami Development Fund (SUF) and into coastal and inland residence. Differences in mortality rates were tested by chi-quadrate tests. Overall, no pronounced difference in mortality rate was found in the population between geographical areas. For men, mortality rates differed only between geographical residence in the time intervals 1991-95 and 1996-2000 for the age groups 45-59 years and 60-74 years, respectively, with outside SUF area, inland having the lowest rate. For women, there were no differences between geographical areas except for the age group 60-74 years in the time period 1991-95, where SUF coast had the highest mortality rate. For the SUF area, men had the lowest probabilities for surviving the age of 74 years and women had among the highest. No geographical difference was found in infant mortality. During the time period 1991-2006, the outside SUF area, inland had an average infant mortality rate of 1.8/1000 per year, and for SUF coast it was 6.2/1000 per year. This difference was, however, not significant (p = 0.08). Overall, mortality rates were similar across geographical areas with low and with high Sami population density. However, indications of geographical differences in infant mortality should be investigated further.

  8. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    microscopes, chemical analyses etc. The NHM has big labs—like a university—in the basement. I write papers, give talks... For the public galleries of the NHM my group provides expert input to exhibitions-when the meteorite pavilion was recently refurbished we suggested a layout, wrote text and selected samples, but this was then 'edited' by the exhibition designers. I'm also working on a new website with virtual meteorite specimens. As an expert on Martian meteorites I often get interviewed by the media: for example, I am on a new Channel 4 programme called Destination Mars. I have also just finished a general interest book—it's called Search for Life; the NHM have just published it (in March). And do you get to go to exciting places? As a researcher I go to conferences I am just off to the States this week. I went to Antarctica ten years ago meteorite collecting and I am hoping to go to Australia this year. It is good fun but they really do need an expert who can recognise a meteorite. I'll be going to the Nullarbor region of Australia for 2 3 weeks depending on the weather if it's too green there is too much grass, so you can't see the meteorites. How do you find people respond to meteorites? People love touching rocks from outer space, especially primary school children. You can see how they are burnt on the outside. When you feel the weight of them it really brings it home: iron meteorites are heavy! They'll often say 'Wow, it fell from the sky' as they glance upwards, half expecting another one to come crashing through the ceiling. Everyone finds it amazing that a solid object has come as if from nowhere. And they are so old. They can't believe how old they are. We want to know where we come from. There is always lots of media coverage about what is happening in the sky (eclipses and the like). It's there and it's a bit of a mystery. If we can get to grips with how our planets and how our own Sun formed it can put us in the picture as to where we have come from and

  9. Self-mutilation and suicidal behaviour in Sami and Norwegian adolescents: prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvernmo, Siv; Rosenvinge, Jan H

    2009-06-01

    To study the prevalence and psychosocial and ethnocultural correlates of self-mutilation and/or suicidal behaviour in Indigenous Sami and majority Norwegian adolescents in north Norway. A cross-sectional questionnaire study. A total of 487 students, aged 13-16 years in 21 junior high schools and 247 parents participated in this school based questionnaire study conducted in 1990 in Finnmark, the county in Norway with the highest suicide rates. Sociodemographics, substance use, thriving at school, ethnocultural factors such as ethnic context, ethnic identity, ethnic language competence and ethnic parentage, self-reported as well as parent-reported behavioural/emotional problems were assessed. Self-mutilation and/or suicidal attempts within the last 6 months were reported by 12.5% of the adolescents and 14.8% reported having suicidal thoughts. In univariate analyses, significant gender differences occurred for both ethnic groups, with more girls reporting self-mutilation and suicidal behaviour. However, in logistic regression analyses adjusting for all other significant variables, the gender difference disappeared. No significant ethnic differences occurred in prevalence. Although factors associated with self-mutilation and suicidal behaviour varied between Sami and Norwegian adolescents, self-reported anxiety/depression was a strong and significant correlate to both self-mutilation/suicide attempts and suicidal thoughts in both ethnic groups. Parents reported less emotional/behavioural problems associated with self-mutilation and/or suicidal behaviour than the adolescents did. Ethnic identification in Sami and ethnic context in Norwegian adolescents occurred in independent analyses as significantly related to self-mutilation and/or suicidal behaviour, but turned insignificant when adjusting for all other significant variables. In contrast to several other Indigenous groups the prevalence of self-mutilation and/or suicidal behaviour did not differ between Sami and

  10. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    the war Hoyle returned to Cambridge, but kept in close contact with his collaborators. Fred Hoyle was a canny and media-savvy scientist, 40 years before such things were recognized. Martin Rees said after his death '[He] also had other dimensions to his career, his inventiveness and skill as a communicator'. It is hard to realize now the impact that Hoyle's broadcasts had in post-war Britain. His programmes for the BBC on The Nature of the Universe won greater audiences than such unlikely rivals as Bertrand Russell and Tommy Handley. Even today many people recall how they were affected by listening to these broadcasts. Hoyle used one of his broadcasts to ridicule the hot explosion theory. He referred to the idea of a 'big bang as fanciful'. Unfortunately the name stuck, much to Hoyle's chagrin. In the 1950s Hoyle began a fruitful collaboration with Willy Fowler of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Hoyle was interested in the origin of the chemical elements. Hans Bethe, Charles Critchfield and Karl-Frederich von Weizsäcker had calculated in 1939 how stars could turn protons into helium nuclei by nuclear fusion. Part of the Vela supernova remmant, the debris left after the type of massive explosion in which Hoyle predicted that heavy nuclei were formed. (© Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Anglo-Australian Observatory.) Building on earlier collaboration with Ed Saltpeter, Hoyle used data supplied by Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge and, working with Fowler, began to piece together how the elements were formed. By looking at very large stars near the end of their lives and examining their chemical composition, they noticed that the abundances of elements almost exactly corresponded to those with a low nuclear capture cross section. Hoyle argued that all of the elements in our bodies had been formed in stars that had been and gone before our solar system had even formed. In their classic paper the elements are produced by three basic methods. The

  11. The right of indigenous peoples to education in their own language – Greenlanders in Denmark and in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsborg-Andersen, Ayo; Khalaf, Bassah

    2018-01-01

    Both language and culture are interdependent pillars on which the identity of a people is maintained, including indigenous peoples. Without the appropriate linguistic terminology available to express indigenous philosophies and concepts, indigenous peoples lose some of their ability to accurately...... and in Denmark. As a part of this examination the paper also gives an overview of history of the Greenlandic school system. Finally the paper compares the current situation of Greenlanders in Denmark with the Sami peoples in Norway....

  12. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: gas content and interaction as the drivers of kinematic asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, J. V.; Croom, S. M.; Bryant, J. J.; Schaefer, A. L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Callingham, J.; Cortese, L.; Federrath, C.; Scott, N.; Sande, J. van de; D'Eugenio, F.; Sweet, S.; Tonini, C.; Allen, J. T.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; Lorente, N.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Sharp, R.

    2018-02-01

    In order to determine the causes of kinematic asymmetry in the Hα gas in the SAMI Galaxy Survey sample, we investigate the comparative influences of environment and intrinsic properties of galaxies on perturbation. We use spatially resolved Hα velocity fields from the SAMI Galaxy Survey to quantify kinematic asymmetry (\\overline{v_{asym}}) in nearby galaxies and environmental and stellar mass data from the GAMA survey. We find that local environment, measured as distance to nearest neighbour, is inversely correlated with kinematic asymmetry for galaxies with log (M_*/M_⊙ )>10.0, but there is no significant correlation for galaxies with log (M_*/M_⊙ )galaxies (log (M_*/M_⊙ )galaxies. We propose that secular effects derived from gas fraction and gas mass may be the primary causes of asymmetry in low mass galaxies. High gas fraction is linked to high σ m/V (where σm is Hα velocity dispersion and V the rotation velocity), which is strongly correlated with \\overline{v_{asym}}, and galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) dwarf galaxies may lead to asymmetric distribution of gas clouds, leading to increased relative turbulence.

  13. The Making of Sami Ethnography: Contested Authorities and Negotiated Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kuutma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution analyzes the interplay of ethnographic and poetic agendas, the negotiation of synergetic or conflicting objectives in the production and editing of a seminal representation of the Sámi, Muitalus sámiid birra. My main focus is on the collaborative effort of the publication process, to investigate the emergence and negotiation of representational authority, of cultural poetics, of social and cultural critique, in order to defy the preconception of a passive informant of a cultural experience. The Sámi narrator Johan Turi is discussed, instead, as an active agent in providing a voice to the Sámi people in the collaborative process of ethnography writing. My approach is interdisciplinary, being inspired by different inquiries in anthropology and cultural history, while adding a subjective interpretation in discerning the production of a multifaceted ethnographic representation, both by the cultural insider and the inquisitive outsider.

  14. The Making of Sami Ethnography: Contested Authorities and Negotiated Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kuutma

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This contribution analyzes the interplay of ethnographic and poetic agendas, the negotiation of synergetic or conflicting objectives in the production and editing of a seminal representation of the Sámi, Muitalus sámiid birra. My main focus is on the collaborative effort of the publication process, to investigate the emergence and negotiation of representational authority, of cultural poetics, of social and cultural critique, in order to defy the preconception of a passive informant of a cultural experience. The Sámi narrator Johan Turi is discussed, instead, as an active agent in providing a voice to the Sámi people in the collaborative process of ethnography writing. My approach is interdisciplinary, being inspired by different inquiries in anthropology and cultural history, while adding a subjective interpretation in discerning the production of a multifaceted ethnographic representation, both by the cultural insider and the inquisitive outsider.

  15. Johan Turi?s animal, mineral, vegetable cures and healing practices: an in-depth analysis of Sami (Saami) folk healing one hundred years ago

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas A. DuBois; Lang, Jonathan F

    2013-01-01

    Background The healing knowledge of a Sami (Saami) hunter and reindeer herder was surveyed as a window into the concepts of health, healing, and disease in early twentieth-century Sapmi (Northern Sweden). The two books of Johan Turi (1854?1936)?An Account of the Sami (1910) and Lappish Texts (1918?19) were examined to determine the varieties of recorded zootherapeutic, mineral, chemical, and ethnobotanical lore, as well as the therapeutic acts, identified conditions, and veterinary knowledge ...

  16. Sami in the History of the Norwegian-Russian Borderland: Factor of Tension or Regional Integration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav I. Goldin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is based of an extensive array of documents and cartographic materials of the leading archives of the Russian Federation and Norway. The authors focus their attention on the history of Russian-Norwegian border and the Sami aspect of its development. On the Scandinavian continent, the population of frontier areas was often a factor of political tension, but the ethnic picture of the Russian-Norwegian borderland distinguished by the fact that the frontier status of the Skolt was the integration factor for the formation of economic cooperation between the border provinces of Russia and Norway. This thesis the authors explain by the peculiarities of the States policy regarding the border territories, ethnic groups, economic activities and economic interaction of Skolt with other communities, as well as their perception of own inhabited space.

  17. Equatorial spread F studies using SAMI3 with two-dimensional and three-dimensional electrostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Aveiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents a study of equatorial F region irregularities using the NRL SAMI3/ESF model, comparing results using a two-dimensional (2-D and a three-dimensional (3-D electrostatic potential solution. For the 3-D potential solution, two cases are considered for parallel plasma transport: (1 transport based on the parallel ambipolar field, and (2 transport based on the parallel electric field. The results show that the growth rate of the generalized Rayleigh–Taylor instability is not affected by the choice of the potential solution. However, differences are observed in the structures of the irregularities between the 2-D and 3-D solutions. Additionally, the plasma velocity along the geomagnetic field computed using the full 3-D solution shows complex structures that are not captured by the simplified model. This points out that only the full 3-D model is able to fully capture the complex physics of the equatorial F region.

  18. Wisdom in the Poetry of Muḥmood Sami al Barodi(Arabic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Khansa’ Muḥammad Dieb al Jaji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Muḥmood Sami al Barodi is a famous poet who was named the Resurrector of poetry in the early times when many poets of the old era were the cause of the decline in poetry. His poems had been studied from many aspects and by many scholars but no one ever spoke about al Barodi’s writings about wisdom. This article is focusing on the verses and poems that focus on the meaning of wisdom and everything that relate to it. He talked about the importance of wisdom in the poems as he encouraged the other poets to give attention to this meaning. Some published books and articles helped me write this article but I haven’t found any of them that gave this point enough significance though his poetry is full of verses about wisdom and so I chose to write about it..

  19. Cross-cultural music cognition: cognitive methodology applied to North Sami yoiks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, C L; Toivanen, P; Eerola, T; Toiviainen, P; Järvinen, T; Louhivuori, J

    2000-07-14

    This article is a study of melodic expectancy in North Sami yoiks, a style of music quite distinct from Western tonal music. Three different approaches were taken. The first approach was a statistical style analysis of tones in a representative corpus of 18 yoiks. The analysis determined the relative frequencies of tone onsets and two- and three-tone transitions. It also identified style characteristics, such as pentatonic orientation, the presence of two reference pitches, the frequency of large consonant intervals, and a relatively large set of possible melodic continuations. The second approach was a behavioral experiment in which listeners made judgments about melodic continuations. Three groups of listeners participated. One group was from the Sami culture, the second group consisted of Finnish music students who had learned some yoiks, and the third group consisted of Western musicians unfamiliar with yoiks. Expertise was associated with stronger veridical expectations (for the correct next tone) than schematic expectations (based on general style characteristics). Familiarity with the particular yoiks was found to compensate for lack of experience with the musical culture. The third approach simulated melodic expectancy with neural network models of the self-organizing map (SOM) type (Kohonen, T. (1997). Self-organizing maps (2nd ed.). Berlin: Springer). One model was trained on the excerpts of yoiks used in the behavioral experiment including the correct continuation tone, while another was trained with a set of Finnish folk songs and Lutheran hymns. The convergence of the three approaches showed that both listeners and the SOM model are influenced by the statistical distributions of tones and tone sequences. The listeners and SOM models also provided evidence supporting a core set of psychological principles underlying melody formation whose relative weights appear to differ across musical styles.

  20. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: energy sources of the turbulent velocity dispersion in spatially resolved local star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Federrath, Christoph; Yuan, Tiantian; Bian, Fuyan; Medling, Anne M.; Shi, Yong; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julia J.; Brough, Sarah; Catinella, Barbara; Croom, Scott M.; Goodwin, Michael; Goldstein, Gregory; Green, Andrew W.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel N.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the energy sources of random turbulent motions of ionized gas from H α emission in eight local star-forming galaxies from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. These galaxies satisfy strict pure star-forming selection criteria to avoid contamination from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or strong shocks/outflows. Using the relatively high spatial and spectral resolution of SAMI, we find that - on sub-kpc scales, our galaxies display a flat distribution of ionized gas velocity dispersion as a function of star formation rate (SFR) surface density. A major fraction of our SAMI galaxies shows higher velocity dispersion than predictions by feedback-driven models, especially at the low SFR surface density end. Our results suggest that additional sources beyond star formation feedback contribute to driving random motions of the interstellar medium in star-forming galaxies. We speculate that gravity, galactic shear and/or magnetorotational instability may be additional driving sources of turbulence in these galaxies.

  1. Using an artificial neural network to classify multicomponent emission lines with integral field spectroscopy from SAMI and S7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, E. J.; Medling, A. M.; Groves, B.; Kewley, L.; Dopita, M.; Davies, R.; Ho, I.-T.; Kaasinen, M.; Leslie, S.; Sharp, R.; Sweet, S. M.; Thomas, A. D.; Allen, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Bryant, J. J.; Croom, S.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A.; Konstantantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; McElroy, R.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Shastri, P.

    2017-09-01

    Integral field spectroscopy (IFS) surveys are changing how we study galaxies and are creating vastly more spectroscopic data available than before. The large number of resulting spectra makes visual inspection of emission line fits an infeasible option. Here, we present a demonstration of an artificial neural network (ANN) that determines the number of Gaussian components needed to describe the complex emission line velocity structures observed in galaxies after being fit with lzifu. We apply our ANN to IFS data for the S7 survey, conducted using the Wide Field Spectrograph on the ANU 2.3 m Telescope, and the SAMI Galaxy Survey, conducted using the SAMI instrument on the 4 m Anglo-Australian Telescope. We use the spectral fitting code lzifu (Ho et al. 2016a) to fit the emission line spectra of individual spaxels from S7 and SAMI data cubes with 1-, 2- and 3-Gaussian components. We demonstrate that using an ANN is comparable to astronomers performing the same visual inspection task of determining the best number of Gaussian components to describe the physical processes in galaxies. The advantage of our ANN is that it is capable of processing the spectra for thousands of galaxies in minutes, as compared to the years this task would take individual astronomers to complete by visual inspection.

  2. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Data Release One with emission-line physics value-added products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew W.; Croom, Scott M.; Scott, Nicholas; Cortese, Luca; Medling, Anne M.; D'Eugenio, Francesco; Bryant, Julia J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Allen, J. T.; Sharp, Rob; Ho, I.-Ting; Groves, Brent; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Mannering, Elizabeth; Harischandra, Lloyd; van de Sande, Jesse; Thomas, Adam D.; O'Toole, Simon; McDermid, Richard M.; Vuong, Minh; Sealey, Katrina; Bauer, Amanda E.; Brough, S.; Catinella, Barbara; Cecil, Gerald; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Driver, Simon P.; Federrath, Christoph; Foster, Caroline; Goodwin, Michael; Hampton, Elise J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jones, D. Heath; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Liske, Jochen; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Mould, Jeremy; Obreschkow, Danail; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel N.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Schaefer, Adam L.; Sweet, Sarah M.; Taranu, Dan S.; Tescari, Edoardo; Tonini, Chiara; Zafar, T.

    2018-03-01

    We present the first major release of data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey. This data release focuses on the emission-line physics of galaxies. Data Release One includes data for 772 galaxies, about 20 per cent of the full survey. Galaxies included have the redshift range 0.004 < z < 0.092, a large mass range (7.6 < log M*/ M⊙ < 11.6), and star formation rates of ˜10-4 to ˜101M⊙ yr-1. For each galaxy, we include two spectral cubes and a set of spatially resolved 2D maps: single- and multi-component emission-line fits (with dust-extinction corrections for strong lines), local dust extinction, and star formation rate. Calibration of the fibre throughputs, fluxes, and differential atmospheric refraction has been improved over the Early Data Release. The data have average spatial resolution of 2.16 arcsec (full width at half-maximum) over the 15 arcsec diameter field of view and spectral (kinematic) resolution of R = 4263 (σ = 30 km s-1) around H α. The relative flux calibration is better than 5 per cent, and absolute flux calibration has an rms of 10 per cent. The data are presented online through the Australian Astronomical Observatory's Data Central.

  3. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: the intrinsic shape of kinematically selected galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cortese, L.; McDermid, R. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Bryant, J.; Croom, S. M.; Goodwin, M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Scott, N.; Taranu, D. S.; Tonini, C.; Zafar, T.

    2017-11-01

    Using the stellar kinematic maps and ancillary imaging data from the Sydney AAO Multi Integral field (SAMI) Galaxy Survey, the intrinsic shape of kinematically selected samples of galaxies is inferred. We implement an efficient and optimized algorithm to fit the intrinsic shape of galaxies using an established method to simultaneously invert the distributions of apparent ellipticities and kinematic misalignments. The algorithm output compares favourably with previous studies of the intrinsic shape of galaxies based on imaging alone and our re-analysis of the ATLAS3D data. Our results indicate that most galaxies are oblate axisymmetric. We show empirically that the intrinsic shape of galaxies varies as a function of their rotational support as measured by the `spin' parameter proxy λ _{R_e}. In particular, low-spin systems have a higher occurrence of triaxiality, while high-spin systems are more intrinsically flattened and axisymmetric. The intrinsic shape of galaxies is linked to their formation and merger histories. Galaxies with high-spin values have intrinsic shapes consistent with dissipational minor mergers, while the intrinsic shape of low-spin systems is consistent with dissipationless multimerger assembly histories. This range in assembly histories inferred from intrinsic shapes is broadly consistent with expectations from cosmological simulations.

  4. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: the low-redshift stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, J. V.; Croom, S. M.; Bryant, J. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Schaefer, A. L.; Cortese, L.; Hopkins, A. M.; D'Eugenio, F.; Scott, N.; Glazebrook, K.; Tonini, C.; McElroy, R. E.; Clark, H. A.; Catinella, B.; Allen, J. T.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; Lorente, N.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Sharp, R.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) for a morphologically and kinematically diverse sample of galaxies from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey using two-dimensional spatially resolved H α velocity maps and find a well-defined relation across the stellar mass range of 8.0 kinematic H α asymmetry of all galaxies in the sample, and find a correlation between scatter (i.e. residuals off the TFR) and asymmetry. This effect is pronounced at low stellar mass, corresponding to the inverse relationship between stellar mass and kinematic asymmetry found in previous work. For galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) 9.5 the fraction is 10 ± 1 per cent. We use 'simulated slits' to directly compare our results with those from long slit spectroscopy and find that aligning slits with the photometric, rather than the kinematic, position angle, increases global scatter below the TFR. Further, kinematic asymmetry is correlated with misalignment between the photometric and kinematic position angles. This work demonstrates the value of 2D spatially resolved kinematics for accurate TFR studies; integral field spectroscopy reduces the underestimation of rotation velocity that can occur from slit positioning off the kinematic axis.

  5. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: global stellar populations on the size-mass plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Nicholas; Brough, S.; Croom, Scott M.; Davies, Roger L.; van de Sande, Jesse; Allen, J. T.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julia J.; Cortese, Luca; D'Eugenio, Francesco; Federrath, Christoph; Ferreras, Ignacio; Goodwin, Michael; Groves, Brent; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Lawrence, Jon S.; Medling, Anne M.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel; Robotham, A. S. G.; Tonini, Chiara; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2017-12-01

    We present an analysis of the global stellar populations of galaxies in the SAMI (Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph) Galaxy Survey. Our sample consists of 1319 galaxies spanning four orders of magnitude in stellar mass and includes all morphologies and environments. We derive luminosity-weighted, single stellar population equivalent stellar ages, metallicities and alpha enhancements from spectra integrated within one effective radius apertures. Variations in galaxy size explain the majority of the scatter in the age-mass and metallicity-mass relations. Stellar populations vary systematically in the plane of galaxy size and stellar mass, such that galaxies with high stellar surface mass density are older, more metal rich and alpha enhanced than less dense galaxies. Galaxies with high surface mass densities have a very narrow range of metallicities; however, at fixed mass, the spread in metallicity increases substantially with increasing galaxy size (decreasing density). We identify residual correlations with morphology and environment. At fixed mass and size, galaxies with late-type morphologies, small bulges and low Sérsic n are younger than early type, high n, high bulge-to-total galaxies. Both age and metallicity show small residual correlations with environment; at fixed mass and size, galaxies in denser environments or more massive haloes are older and somewhat more metal rich than those in less dense environments. We connect these trends to evolutionary tracks within the size-mass plane.

  6. Comparisons of the NRL SAMI3 Physics-Based Ionospheric Model with Global Ionosonde and GPS Electron Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Tondwalkar, A.; McDonald, S. E.; Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Emmert, J. T.; Drob, D. P.; Lean, J.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is conducting an interdisciplinary physics-based Space Weather model development and validation program called the Integrated Sun-Earth System for the Operational Environment (ISES-OE). In contrast to other geospace integration efforts, a key aspect of ISES is determining the extent to which current models capture the climate of the ionosphere and thermosphere. Until now, complementary long-term simulations using physics-based ionosphere models have not been performed. As part of this program, numerous runs of the physics-based SAMI3 model have been made and compared to global measurements of electron density. The data sets includes: 1) Ionosonde NmF2 and hmF2 measurements, 2) GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) measurements and others. This presentation compares electron density data with SAMI3 and other models during much of Solar Cycle 23 and the ascending phase of Cycle 24. Previous work has concentrated on the Whole Heliospheric Interval (WHI) from February 19 - April 19, 2008 [Lean et al., 2014]. This solar minimum period with extremely low solar activity was used to test the validity of the SAMI3 simulations of the base-state ionosphere. Several modifications to SAMI3 were incorporated including updates to the Solar EUV fluxes, the NRL MSIS neutral atmospheric model parameterization at Solar Minimum and compensating for variations in the Sun-to-Earth distance. Data and model comparisons during times of higher solar activity will be presented with an emphasis on understanding the effects of coupling of the neutral atmosphere, neutral winds and driving electric fields on our ability to model the measured global electron density data. We examine responses to solar EUV radiation and geomagnetic activity, and semiannual and annual oscillations that all induce geospace variability. Lean, J. L., S. E. McDonald, J. D. Huba, J. T. Emmert, D. P. Drob, and C. L. Siefring (2014), Geospace variability during the 2008-2009 Whole Heliosphere

  7. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: kinematics of dusty early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, R.; Bekki, K.; Cortese, L.; Couch, W. J.; Sansom, A. E.; van de Sande, J.; Bryant, J. J.; Foster, C.; Croom, S. M.; Brough, S.; Sweet, S. M.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J. M.; Wong, O. I.; Groves, B. A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Richards, S. N.; Goodwin, M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, large samples of visually classified early-type galaxies (ETGs) containing dust have been identified using space-based infrared observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. The presence of large quantities of dust in massive ETGs is peculiar as X-ray haloes of these galaxies are expected to destroy dust in ˜107 yr (or less). This has sparked a debate regarding the origin of the dust: Is it internally produced by asymptotic giant branch stars, or is it accreted externally through mergers? We examine the 2D stellar and ionized gas kinematics of dusty ETGs using integral field spectroscopy observations from the SAMI Galaxy Survey, and integrated star formation rates, stellar masses and dust masses from the GAMA survey. Only 8 per cent (4/49) of visually classified ETGs are kinematically consistent with being dispersion-supported systems. These 'dispersion-dominated galaxies' exhibit discrepancies between stellar and ionized gas kinematics, either offsets in the kinematic position angle or large differences in the rotational velocity, and are outliers in star formation rate at a fixed dust mass compared to normal star-forming galaxies. These properties are suggestive of recent merger activity. The remaining ˜90 per cent of dusty ETGs have low velocity dispersions and/or large circular velocities, typical of 'rotation-dominated galaxies'. These results, along with the general evidence of published works on X-ray emission in ETGs, suggest that they are unlikely to host hot, X-ray gas consistent with their low M* when compared to dispersion-dominated galaxies. This means that dust will be long-lived and thus these galaxies do not require external scenarios for the origin of their dust content.

  8. Analysis of the economic adaptation of Sami reindeer management. Reindeer; source of income or cultural linkage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Labba

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this partial study is to analyse how the economies of different Sami reindeer management households are structured, and how the adaptation is structured if profit maximation is a goal. Earlier research demonstrates that different regions provides various terms. Consequently there exists a different economic structure among different households. Based on a selection of households from districts /villages from a range of geographical locations, management patterns, and region size, different economic structures are searched for. Households with similar economic structures are grouped in categories. The standard deviation confirms whether the grouping in categories. Sami Reindeer Management in Norway and Sweden has during the period from 1992/93 to 2002/03 provided recognized slaughterhouses with an even quantum of meat supply. That indicates that it probably is the same set of factors that influence the slaughter quantities of both countries. The relationship between the stock value of reindeer and the commercial value of reindeer meat, with in each household, suggests whether there is an accumulation in herd size and its magnitude. The herd increment depends on the competitive situation between the households in the district/village. As a single household cannot influence wholesale price of reindeer meat, the sales quantum is the single factor that can influence total sales. The efforts to increase herd size, due to the competitive situation, prevent the household from a maximum slaughter quantum, which thereby reduce the returns from reindeer management. Common factors for the different structures are sought for. The indication is that nether sale price of reindeer meat or line of politics influence sales quantum. The Sami reindeer herding seams to be a way of life were the size of the reindeer herd is in focus.Analys av den samiska renskötselns ekonomiska tillpassning. Renen, intäktskälla eller kulturfäste?Abstract in Swedish

  9. From conception to evaluation of mobile services for people with head injury: A participatory design perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussard, Pierre-Yves; Pigot, Hélène; Giroux, Sylvain

    2015-12-17

    Adults with cognitive impairments lack the means to organise their daily life, plan their appointments, cope with fatigue, and manage their budget. They manifest interest in using new technologies to be part of society. Unfortunately, the applications offered on smart phones are often beyond their cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to design a mobile cognitive assistant to enhance autonomy of people living with acquired traumatic brain injury. Participatory design methodologies guided this research by involving adults with cognitive impairments (CI) and their caregivers in the early stages of the design process. The population of the study is composed of four male adults who present cognitive impairments (three with head injury and one with stroke) and three caregivers. The first phase of this research was to design the Services Assistance Mobile and Intelligent (SAMI) application based on the needs expressed by the participants. During three focus groups, needs emerged concerning planning, health monitoring and money management and led to the implementation of assistive solutions on an Android mobile phone. During the second phase, the participants evaluated the mobile assistant SAMI at home for eight weeks. The results demonstrate that the participants were able to participate actively in the conception of SAMI and to use it successfully. People with CI showed a slight improvement in their life satisfaction. Due to the small number of participants, these promising results need to be confirmed by a larger-scale study.

  10. Self-reported impact on daily life activities related to temporomandibular disorders, headaches, and neck-shoulder pain among women in a Sami population living in Northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienna, Christina Storm; Wanman, Anders

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the influence of frequency, intensity, and duration of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), headaches, and neckshoulder pain (NSP) on Sami women's daily life. A further aim was to analyze the relationship between these symptoms and age. All 751 Sami women 21 to 70 years old registered in either the Swedish Sami Parliament's electoral register or registered as reindeer owners or herders and living north of the Arctic Circle in Sweden were sent a questionnaire regarding TMD symptoms, NSP, and headaches. In total, 487 women (65%) participated. The questionnaire focused on symptom frequency, duration, and intensity and whether these symptoms influenced activities of daily life. The symptom's interference with daily life activities was measured, respectively, with a numerical rating scale (NRS). The statistical analyses included multiple logistic regression analysis and Chi-square test. A P value symptoms in the jaw-face region to some degree disturbed their daily life, and for 6%, the interference was significant (≥ 5 on NRS). Duration of jaw pain, troublesome impaired jaw opening, and neck pain, together with a low education level, affected reports of whether symptoms of TMD influenced daily life. Almost half of the study population reported that headaches had a negative impact on their life. A similar pattern was reported for NSP. The prevalence of frequent and troublesome symptoms of TMD and headaches, but not NSP, showed a declining trend with age. TMD symptoms, headaches, and NSP negatively influence many Sami women's daily life. Factors related to pain had the greatest influence when these Sami women rated the related impairment.

  11. Human-animal agency in reindeer management: Sami herders' perspectives on Fennoscandian tundra vegetation dynamics under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B. C.; Horstkotte, T.; Utsi, T. A.; Larsson-Blind, Å.; Burgess, P.; Käyhkö, J.; Oksanen, L.; Johansen, B.

    2016-12-01

    Many primary livelihoods in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions are increasingly faced with accelerating effects of climate change and resource exploitation. The often close connection between indigenous populations and the dynamics of their respective territories allows them to make detailed observations of how these changes transform the landscapes where they practice their daily activities. Here, we report Sami reindeer herders' observations based on their long-term occupancy and use of contrasting pastoral landscapes in northern Fennoscandia. In particular, we focus on the capacity for various herd management regimes to prevent a potential transformation of open tundra vegetation to shrubland or woodland. Fennoscandian Sami herders did not confirm a substantial, rapid or large-scale transformation of treeless arctic-alpine areas into shrub- and/or woodlands as a consequence of climate change. However, where encroachment of open tundra landscapes has been observed, a range of drivers were deemed responsible. These included abiotic conditions, anthropogenic influences and the direct and indirect effects of reindeer. Mountain birch tree line advances were in some cases associated with reduced or discontinued grazing, depending on the seasonal significance of these particular areas. In the many places where tree line has risen, herding practices have by necessity adapted to these changes. Exploiting the capacity of reindeer grazing/browsing as a conservation tool offers new adaptive strategies of ecosystem management to counteract a potential encroachment of the tundra by woody plants. However, such novel solutions in environmental governance are confronted with difficult trade-offs involved in ecosystem management for ecologically reasonable, economically viable and socially desirable management strategies.

  12. Sense of coherence and self-reported health among Roma people in Sweden – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Hassler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The Roma people have been known in Europe for a 1000 years, during which they have usually been the subject of discrimination and oppression leading to isolation, powerlessness and poor health. The objective of this study is to investigate the sense of coherence (SOC in relation to self-reported health among a group of Roma people in southwest Sweden. Study design. A cross-sectional, quantitative pilot study. Methods. A questionnaire was constructed based on the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 and Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13 and was distributed among Roma people in southwest Sweden (n = 102. Self-reported health was summarised in a physical score (PCS and a mental score (MCS. Comparisons were made with a general Swedish majority population and a Sami population. Results. The health scores were significantly lower among the Roma people compared to Swedes – PCS: Roma 46.0 (Swedes 52.0 and MCS: Roma 47.5 (Swedes 52.6. The SOC score for the Roma people (54.4 was significantly lower than that of the Swedes (65.2 and Sami (65.0. Conclusions. The low SOC with the Swedish majority society is a strong indication of the marginalisation and exclusion of the Roma people from mainstream society. Low scores in self-reported health among the Roma people also establishes the serious health risks the Roma people are experiencing through their present life situation.

  13. Are reproductive and somatic senescence coupled in humans? Late, but not early, reproduction correlated with longevity in historical Sami women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Samuli; Lummaa, Virpi; Jokela, Jukka

    2005-01-01

    Evolutionary theory of senescence emphasizes the importance of intense selection on early reproduction owing to the declining force of natural selection with age that constrains lifespan. In humans, recent studies have, however, suggested that late-life mortality might be more closely related to late rather than early reproduction, although the role of late reproduction on fitness remains unclear. We examined the association between early and late reproduction with longevity in historical post-reproductive Sami women. We also estimated the strength of natural selection on early and late reproduction using path analysis, and the effect of reproductive timing on offspring survival to adulthood and maternal risk of dying at childbirth. We found that natural selection favoured both earlier start and later cessation of reproduction, and higher total fe cundity. Maternal age at childbirth was not related to offspring or maternal survival. Interestingly, females who produced their last offspring at advanced age also lived longest, while age at first reproduction and total fecundity were unrelated to female longevity. Our results thus suggest that reproductive and somatic senescence may have been coupled in these human populations, and that selection could have favoured late reproduction. We discuss alternative hypotheses for the mechanisms which might have promoted the association between late reproduction and longevity. PMID:15875567

  14. The expression platform and the aptamer: cooperativity between Mg2+ and ligand in the SAM-I riboswitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennelly, Scott P.; Novikova, Irina V.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitch operation involves the complex interplay between the aptamer domain and the expression platform. During transcription, these two domains compete against each other for shared sequence. In this study, we explore the cooperative effects of ligand binding and Magnesium interactions in the SAM-I riboswitch in the context of aptamer collapse and anti-terminator formation. Overall, our studies show the apo-aptamer acts as (i) a pre-organized aptamer competent to bind ligand and undergo structural collapse and (ii) a conformation that is more accessible to anti-terminator formation. We show that both Mg2+ ions and SAM are required for a collapse transition to occur. We then use competition between the aptamer and expression platform for shared sequence to characterize the stability of the collapsed aptamer. We find that SAM and Mg2+ interactions in the aptamer are highly cooperative in maintaining switch polarity (i.e. aptamer ‘off-state’ versus anti-terminator ‘on-state’). We further show that the aptamer off-state is preferentially stabilized by Mg2+ and similar divalent ions. Furthermore, the functional switching assay was used to select for phosphorothioate interference, and identifies potential magnesium chelation sites while characterizing their coordinated role with SAM in aptamer stabilization. In addition, we find that Mg2+ interactions with the apo-aptamer are required for the full formation of the anti-terminator structure, and that higher concentrations of Mg2+ (>4 mM) shift the equilibrium toward the anti-terminator on-state even in the presence of SAM. PMID:23258703

  15. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: understanding observations of large-scale outflows at low redshift with EAGLE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tescari, E.; Cortese, L.; Power, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Ho, I.-T.; Crain, R. A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Croom, S. M.; Kewley, L. J.; Schaye, J.; Bower, R. G.; Theuns, T.; Schaller, M.; Barnes, L.; Brough, S.; Bryant, J. J.; Goodwin, M.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leslie, S. K.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Medling, A. M.; Richards, S. N.; Sweet, S. M.; Tonini, C.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents a study of galactic outflows driven by stellar feedback. We extract main-sequence disc galaxies with stellar mass 109 ≤ M⋆/ M⊙ ≤ 5.7 × 1010 at redshift z = 0 from the highest resolution cosmological simulation of the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) set. Synthetic gas rotation velocity and velocity dispersion (σ) maps are created and compared to observations of disc galaxies obtained with the Sydney-AAO (Australian Astronomical Observatory) Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), where σ-values greater than 150 km s-1 are most naturally explained by bipolar outflows powered by starburst activity. We find that the extension of the simulated edge-on (pixelated) velocity dispersion probability distribution depends on stellar mass and star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR), with low-M⋆/low-ΣSFR galaxies showing a narrow peak at low σ (∼30 km s-1) and more active, high-M⋆/high-ΣSFR galaxies reaching σ > 150 km s-1. Although supernova-driven galactic winds in the EAGLE simulations may not entrain enough gas with T <105 K compared to observed galaxies, we find that gas temperature is a good proxy for the presence of outflows. There is a direct correlation between the thermal state of the gas and its state of motion as described by the σ-distribution. The following equivalence relations hold in EAGLE: (i) low-σ peak ⇔ disc of the galaxy ⇔ gas with T <105 K; (ii) high-σ tail ⇔ galactic winds ⇔ gas with T ≥105 K.

  16. Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus feeding on lichens and mushrooms: traditional ecological knowledge among reindeer-herding Sami in northern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Inga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was performed in four reindeer-herding districts (Sami villages in northern Sweden. Reindeer herding Sami, born in 1950 or earlier, were interviewed about reindeer foraging behaviour on lichens and mushrooms, especially relating to non-summer grazing habits, and about characteristics of a good winter feeding ground. The informants claimed that lichens are preferably grazed in the wintertime, but that they also may be eaten in the summertime when the weather is cold and humid. Mushrooms were chosen in the autumn months August and September, but according to some informants mushrooms may also be eaten during late autumn (from Oct. when frozen and under the snow. The reindeer herders had different names for lichens, which in general terms describe their appearance and habitat. For mushrooms they only used one Sami name. Ground lichens preferred by reindeer are Cladonia species, while the nitrogen-fixing lichen species such as Nephroma arcticum and Stereocaulon pascale were said not to be preferred by the reindeer. Snow conditions are very important, and the less snow (and the softer it is, the better. Habitats where reindeer herders know from experience that snow conditions tend to be problematic, e.g. in moist and open areas with small trees, are used early in the winter (Oct.–Jan., before too much snow has accumulated. A good winter grazing area should have lichens. It is preferably a dry pine (Pinus sylvestris forest heath with large, old and wide-crowned trees to shelter the ground from snow and thereby ease the cratering by reindeer. Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: Renens (Rangifer tarandus tarandus bete av lavar och svampar: Traditionell ekologisk kunskap bland renskötande samer i norra Sverige Studien genomfördes i fyra renskötseldistrikt (samebyar i norra Sverige. Totalt 22 renskötande samer, födda 1950 eller tidigare, blev intervjuade om renens betande av lavar och svampar, renens vinterbete och om vad som karakt

  17. The multi-state energy landscape of the SAM-I riboswitch: A single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Christoph; Kobitski, Andrei Yu.; Samanta, Ayan; Jäschke, Andres; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2018-03-01

    RNA (ribonucleic acid) molecules are highly flexible biopolymers fluctuating at physiological temperatures among many different conformations that are represented by minima in a hierarchical conformational free energy landscape. Here we have employed single-molecule FRET (smFRET) to explore the energy landscape of the B. subtilis yitJ SAM-I riboswitch (RS). In this small RNA molecule, specific binding of an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) ligand in the aptamer domain regulates gene expression by inducing structural changes in another domain, the expression platform, causing transcription termination by the RNA polymerase. We have measured smFRET histograms over wide ranges of Mg2+ concentration for three RS variants that were specifically labeled with fluorescent dyes on different sites. In the analysis, different conformations are associated with discrete Gaussian model distributions, which are typically fairly broad on the FRET efficiency scale and thus can be extremely challenging to unravel due to their mutual overlap. Our earlier work on two SAM-I RS variants revealed four major conformations. By introducing a global fitting procedure which models both the Mg2+ concentration dependencies of the fractional populations and the average FRET efficiencies of the individual FRET distributions according to Mg2+ binding isotherms, we were able to consistently describe the histogram data of both variants at all studied Mg2+ concentrations. With the third FRET-labeled variant, however, we found significant deviations when applying the four-state model to the data. This can arise because the different FRET labeling of the new variant allows two states to be distinguished that were previously not separable due to overlap. Indeed, the resulting five-state model presented here consistently describes the smFRET histograms of all three variants as well as their variations with Mg2+ concentration. We also performed a triangulation of the donor position for two of the constructs

  18. Jsme opravdu sami?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 10 (2017) E-ISSN 1214-4029 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-05076S; GA ČR GA13-07724S Grant - others:Akademie věd - GA AV ČR(CZ) R200401721; Akademie věd - GA AV ČR(CZ) R200401521 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : methane on terrestrial planets * biomolecules * methane concentrations on Mars Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  19. Comparing results of high-resolution palaeoecological analyses with oral histories of land-use of a Sami reindeer herding pen in northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerling, Ilse M.; Edwards, Kevin J.; Schofield, James E.; Aronsson, Kjell-Åke

    2016-04-01

    Reindeer herding is a key component of Sami culture, but much is still unknown about its development both in the recent and more distant past due to the limited availability of historical and archaeological evidence. Pollen analysis provides a potential tool to supplement this lack of evidence through the detection and evaluation of landscape responses to the impact of reindeer pastoralism. In the boreal forests of northern Fennoscandia, localised forest clearance to create space for dwellings and livestock is presented in the palynological record as a decline in arboreal taxa and an increase in herbaceous taxa favoured by the increased light levels, resistance to soil trampling, and/or the increased soil nutrient levels provided by reindeer dung, domestic waste and ash from smudge fires. Oral histories of 20th century forest Sami reindeer herding at an abandoned reindeer herding pen (renvall) at Akkajävi, northern Sweden (66.9° N, 21.1° E), are integrated here with high-resolution palaeoecological reconstructions of the local vegetation to: (i) assess the sensitivity and value of various palynomorphs to the impacts of reindeer pastoralism; (ii) investigate whether the patterns seen in the palaeoecological record match the timing of activity at and abandonment of the site as understood from these oral histories. A peat monolith collected from within an annexe of the renvall was pollen analysed at a high resolution, supplemented with coprophilous fungal spore (livestock grazing/gathering), microscopic charcoal ([anthropogenic] burning) and sedimentological (loss-on-ignition; soil erosion) records. For the first time, this has allowed for the identification of multi-decadal cycles of use and abandonment of a renvall in the pollen record, but more obviously so in its coprophilous fungal spore archive, with the pattern and timing of changes at the site confirming events previously known only from oral histories. A second, paired profile was collected from the fen

  20. Predictors of long-term (10-year) mortality postmyocardial infarction: age-related differences. Soroka Acute Myocardial Infarction (SAMI) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakht, Ygal; Shiyovich, Arthur; Gilutz, Harel

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in elderly people. Over the past decades medical advancements in the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) led to improved survival and increased life expectancy. As short-term survival from AMI improves, more attention is being shifted toward understanding and improving long-term outcomes. To evaluate age-associated variations in the long-term (up to 10 years) prognostic factors following AMI in "real world" patients, focusing on improving risk stratification of elderly patients. A retrospective analysis of 2763 consecutive AMI patients according to age groups: ≤65 years (n=1230) and >65 years (n=1533). Data were collected from the hospital's computerized systems. The primary outcome was 10-year postdischarge all-cause mortality. Higher rates of women, non-ST-elevation AMI, and most comorbidities were found in elderly patients, while the rates of invasive treatment were lower. During the follow-up period, mortality rate was higher among the older versus the younger group (69.7% versus 18.6%). Some of the parameters included in the interaction multivariate model had stronger association with the outcome in the younger group (hyponatremia, anemia, alcohol abuse or drug addiction, malignant neoplasm, renal disease, previous myocardial infarction, and invasive interventions) while others were stronger predictors in the elderly group (higher age, left main coronary artery or three-vessel disease, and neurological disorders). The c-statistic values of the multivariate models were 0.75 and 0.74 in the younger and the elder groups, respectively, and 0.86 for the interaction model. Long-term mortality following AMI in young as well as elderly patients can be predicted from simple, easily accessible clinical information. The associations of most predictors and mortality were stronger in younger patients. These predictors can be used for optimizing patient care aiming at mortality reduction

  1. Unfamiliar People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzo David-West

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Unfamiliar People' is about defamiliarisation and estrangement. The title is a literal translation of the Korean word for 'strangers'. KSSR is the former name of Kazakhstan (Kazakh Soviet Socialist Republic, 1936-1991.

  2. Samernas folkhögskola och de samiska språken 1942–1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Hansson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sami folk high school and the Sami languages 1942–1990. The Swedish Mission Society – SMS (Svenska missionssällskapet – SMS, wanted to improve the opportunities’ for Sami youth in Sweden and therefore they started a folk high school (folkhögskola for the Sami in 1942. One of the aims of SMS was to help the Sámi to preserve and develop the Sami culture and languages. Over time Sami themes, the languages being one, became more prominent at the school. However some of the problems regarding the language teaching remained: the students wanted to learn different Sami languages, their linguistic skills varied a lot, and there was not that many students who wanted to learn Sami. Despite these problems, the teaching improved over the years and the Sami folk high school remained important for the Sami people during the researched period.

  3. Viron kultasuoni ehtyy / Sami Lotila

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotila, Sami

    2004-01-01

    Arengutest ja konkurentsist Eesti jaekaubandusturul, suurimate kaubakettide omanike Kesko, SOK, ICA ja ETK turuosad ja strateegiad. Oletatavad muutused turul Saksa jaeketi Lidl ja Leedu VP Market'i tulekul Eestisse

  4. Stopes people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachuku-king, S

    1996-01-01

    The author has been the director of programs of the Marie Stopes Society (MSS) in Sierra Leone since its creation in 1987. She was given full responsibility for the society's creation and development. Each day begins with a workplan. While troubleshooting is a major part of her job, most quotidian decisions are handled by project managers so that she can manage donor relations and strategic planning. She leaves her office door open on the belief that there should be no barrier between herself, her team, and her clients. Executive image is not important. Recent unrest in Sierra Leone has made life difficult for MSS. The clinic in Port Loko has been caught in the conflict several times. MSS will nonetheless do whatever it can to remain open. The organization has grown steadily since its creation in 1987 and has begun to provide services in Freetown to displaced people from rural areas.

  5. Ebishushani: people poses places

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrea Stultiens

    2014-01-01

    Ebifananyi II – People Poses Places Andrea Stultiens People Poses Places is the second part of Ebifananyi, a book series that visualises historical Ugandan photo collections. In People Poses Places we delve into the archive of the photographer Musa Katuramu. In the mid 1930s, teacher and carpenter

  6. Organizing homeless people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    People who are homeless belong to some of the most vulnerable, dispersed and disorganized groups in welfare societies. Yet in 2001, a national interest organization of homeless people was formed for the first time in Denmark. This article identifies the processes that facilitated the formation...... been homeless. The analysis may thus serve as a case of inspiration for activists and professionals who want to improve homeless people's opportunities for participation in other national settings....

  7. Older people. Courtesy entitles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calnan, Michael; Woolhead, Gillian; Dieppe, Paul

    2003-02-20

    A study of 72 people, with an average age of 72, showed that dignity--and lack of it--were key issues in their estimation of care. Concerns about lack of dignity centred on lack of privacy, mixed sex wards, forms of address and loss of independence. The study suggested that older people do not complain about care for fear of retaliation.

  8. Internet relationships: people who meet people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCown, J A; Fischer, D; Page, R; Homant, M

    2001-10-01

    Current research suggests that the Internet has become a popular medium for forming interpersonal relationships. Not only are many people developing cyberfriendships, but some move beyond virtual communication and interact more directly through telephone contact and face-to-face encounters. This pilot study examined the personality characteristics of 30 participants (17 men and 13 women) who were regular Internet users and who had used the Internet to meet people mainly through chat rooms. The findings of this study suggest that people who use the Internet meet others tend to be truthful in general in their interactions although both men and women often did not reveal their true names. Eighty percent of the subjects formed casual or friendly relationships, whereas 6% formed intimate or romantic relationships. Approximately one-third of the subjects made some form of offline contact, with 40% talking on the telephone and 33.3% meeting face-to-face. Furthermore, examination of personality styles indicated that cyberfriends tend to be socially skilled, have strong verbal skills, and demonstrate empathy for others. Most subjects were careful about protecting their anonymity, and none of the subjects who met face-to-face did so without first talking on the phone. This suggests that individuals who make friends via the Internet tend to take appropriate precautions and find this medium an effective and safe way to interact with others and to expand one's social system.

  9. Francis Gilbert“, Samy Zalatz' and Fayez Semidap

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evolutionary ecology, under many different guises in the literature: reciprocal adaptation, arms races, or the 'Red Queen' hypothesis. The strongly subdivided habitat of the Sinai mountains is an ideal place in which to study micro- coevolution, coevolutionary differences between populations of the same coevolved species.

  10. Armin Karu on Baltian kasinokeisari / Sami Lotila

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotila, Sami

    2008-01-01

    Kasiinokultuuri Eestisse toonud Olympic Casino omanik ja juht Armin Karu, kasiinoäri algusaastad ja areng Eestis. Hasartmängukorraldajate õigused ja võimalused Eestis ja Soomes. Edetabel: Eesti kasiinoäride top

  11. Viisnurkin suksi ei luiska / Sami Lotila

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotila, Sami

    2003-01-01

    Puidutöötlemisettevõte Viisnurk üritab mitmete ümberkorralduste ja struktuurimuutuste abil firma majanduslikku olukorda parandada. Viisnurk alustas koostööd Soome firmaga Exel. Diagramm: Viisnurga aktsiahinna muutused 1999-2002

  12. Trust is other people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckner, Naemi; Werner, Katharina; Subasi, Özge

    , the Internet is often experienced as a place of anonymity, and people are scared of the ’figurative creep’ lurking behind every dark corner. This view on online environments can be a reason for potential sharers not to use sharing platforms. To explore how people view such issues, we conducted an open...... concerning the interaction with strangers through the platform. Putting trust in an online sharing community seems to be the biggest obstacle that influences whether people draw away rather than move closer together and start collaborating in the sharing community. Here, we report on the main issues...

  13. Research with Arctic peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, H Sally; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2006-01-01

    Arctic peoples are spread over eight countries and comprise 3.74 million residents, of whom 9% are indigenous. The Arctic countries include Canada, Finland, Greenland (Denmark), Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the United States. Although Arctic peoples are very diverse, there are a variety...... entitled "Research with Arctic Peoples: Unique Research Opportunities in Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders". The meeting was international in scope with investigators from Greenland, Iceland and Russia, as well as Canada and the United States. Multiple health agencies from Canada and the United States...

  14. Practices and People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Schatzki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A perennial issue in social thought is the relationship of people to enveloping social phenomena such as structures, institutions, and systems. The present essay explores this relationship through the lens of practice theory. Theories of practice have said much about practices, a type of enveloping social phenomena, but relatively little about people. This general inattention probably has something to do with the fact that theorists of practice deny that they are individualists. The neglect is nonetheless surprising, for people are everywhere in the plenum of practices. The present essay aims to help address this situation, offering a way of thinking about practices and people according to which these two phenomena are equally real while mutually dependent and co-responsible for social life.

  15. OFDA People-Trak

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — People-Trak HRIS is a workforce management tool. It will provide tracking and management tools for recruiting, training, contact info, performance, travel monitoring...

  16. Connecting ageing people

    OpenAIRE

    Niemi, Ahti

    2013-01-01

    Age structure of population is changing worldwide both absolutely and relatively when people live longer and the entire number of population grows all the time. Ageing people need services in the future as much as they do currently. Resources to produce services are restricted both by economic reasons and amount of human workforce executing duties. To ensure adequacy of necessary level and amount of services it is necessary to allocate resources into producing the service actually and activat...

  17. Policing Transgender People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Miles-Johnson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Police policy documents often articulate strategies and approaches that police organizations want to implement in their efforts to break down barriers with minority groups. However, most police policy documents are written for police audiences and not for members of the public. Police policy documents serve as a reflection of the aspirations of the agency and not necessarily the practice of the officers. Differential policing has been a salient experience for members of transgender communities because, as individuals who express gender in ways that deviate from the norm, they have experienced numerous documented cases of police mismanaged practice. In Australia, achieving police reform in the area of policing of diverse community groups has been difficult as new initiatives implemented to educate police officers about diverse groups such as transgender communities are scarce. My study sought to analyze a police policy document to assess how one police agency’s policy aspires to shape police contact/experiences with transgender people and how this document might shape intergroup identity differences between transgender people and the police. It is argued that the policy document will negatively affect police perceptions of transgender people and may enhance adverse perceptions of intergroup difference between police and transgender people. I also argue that using this document to achieve police reform in the area of policing of transgender people will be problematic as the policy document lacks substantial procedural guidelines regarding interaction with transgender people and may not favorably constrain discretionary police power.

  18. Healthy pets, healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S K; Feinstein, L H; Heidmann, P

    1999-08-01

    Zoonoses, diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans, can pose serious health risks to immunocompromised people. Although pets can carry zoonoses, owning and caring for animals can benefit human health. Information exists about preventing transmission of zoonoses, but not all physicians and veterinarians provide adequate and accurate information to immunocompromised pet owners. This disease prevention/health promotion project provides physicians and veterinarians with information, created specifically to share with patients and clients, about the health risks and benefits of pet ownership. Further, "Healthy Pets, Healthy People" encourages communication between veterinarians, physicians, clients, and patients and can serve as a model program for a nation-wide effort to aid health professionals in making recommendations about pet ownership for immunocompromised people.

  19. Young people want honesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sue

    2017-08-09

    Young people with cancer want more honesty and better support from healthcare professionals. These are the findings of a study that covered more than 1,100 patients with cancer aged 13-24 from across the UK for three years after diagnosis.

  20. People's Theatre in Amerika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Karen Malpede

    A history of the people's theatre movement in this country from the early 1920s to the early 1970s, this book deals with the structural and thematic connections between the radical theatre of the twenties and thirties and current work of such revolutionary theatres as the Living Theatre, Open Theatre, Bread and Puppet Theatre, El Teatro Campesino,…

  1. Drugs and Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  2. Esperanto and Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Ilona

    1978-01-01

    Research has indicated that the elderly retain the ability to learn, and specifically to learn new languages. Furthermore, the increasingly greater proportion of old people in the population demands that their need for continued intellectual stimulation be met. In the absence of explicit motives for learning an ethnic language, Esperanto is a good…

  3. Plants and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Lynch

    2012-01-01

    Salal! Salmonberries! Sword ferns! The Northwest is home to a great number of native plant species that humans have used for centuries. Sadly, many local children are unaware of the history and culture connecting people and plants. Yet, from the beginning of time, plants have provided us food, medicine, and material for clothing, shelter, transportation, decoration,...

  4. HIV among Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Transgender People Format: Select One PDF [227K] ...

  5. The peopling of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The peopling of Greenland has a complex history shaped by population migrations, isolation and genetic drift. The Greenlanders present a genetic heritage with components of European and Inuit groups; previous studies using uniparentally inherited markers in Greenlanders have reported evidence of ...

  6. Leading clever people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffee, Rob; Jones, Gareth

    2007-03-01

    In an economy driven by ideas and intellectual know-how, top executives recognize the importance of employing smart, highly creative people. But if clever people have one defining characteristic, it's that they do not want to be led. So what is a leader to do? The authors conducted more than 100 interviews with leaders and their clever people at major organizations such as PricewaterhouseCoopers, Cisco Systems, Novartis, the BBC, and Roche. What they learned is that the psychological relationships effective leaders have with their clever people are very different from the ones they have with traditional followers. Those relationships can be shaped by seven characteristics that clever people share: They know their worth--and they know you have to employ them if you want their tacit skills. They are organizationally savvy and will seek the company context in which their interests are most generously funded. They ignore corporate hierarchy; although intellectual status is important to them, you can't lure them with promotions. They expect instant access to top management, and if they don't get it, they may think the organization doesn't take their work seriously. They are plugged into highly developed knowledge networks, which both increases their value and makes them more of a flight risk. They have a low boredom threshold, so you have to keep them challenged and committed. They won't thank you--even when you're leading them well. The trick is to act like a benevolent guardian: to grant them the respect and recognition they demand, protect them from organizational rules and politics, and give them room to pursue private efforts and even to fail. The payoff will be a flourishing crop of creative minds that will enrich your whole organization.

  7. Frailty in Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Summary Frailty is the most problematic expression of population ageing. It is a state of vulnerability to poor resolution of homeostasis following a stress and is a consequence of cumulative decline in multiple physiological systems over a lifespan. This cumulative decline erodes homeostatic reserve until relatively minor stressor events trigger disproportionate changes in health status, typically a fall or delirium. Landmark studies have developed valid models for frailty and these have allowed epidemiological studies that demonstrate the association of frailty with adverse health outcomes. New research is needed to develop more efficient methods to detect and severity grade frailty as part of routine clinical practice, particularly methods with utility for primary care. This would greatly inform the appropriate selection of older people for invasive procedures or medications and would be the basis for a paradigm shift in the care of frail older people towards a more appropriate goal-directed care. PMID:23395245

  8. Parasites, Plants, and People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marion; Moore, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Anthelminthic resistance is acknowledged worldwide and is a major problem in Aotearoa New Zealand, thus alternative parasite management strategies are imperative. One Health is an initiative linking animal, human, and environmental health. Parasites, plants, and people illustrate the possibilities of providing diverse diets for stock thereby lowering parasite burdens, improving the cultural wellbeing of a local community, and protecting the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Involving people. Project planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of community participation in any project. Participation means inclusion of the entire community affected by the work, which includes staff, clients, and the wider community. When projects target a particular situation or group of people, it is necessary to rely on the target groups' identification of their concerns and problems, priorities, and solutions. Senior managers and decision makers must be willing and able to accept the views of the participating community. When deciding about who in the community to involve in decisions, decision makers must first include those people who are directly affected by the decision. This may mean less influential persons, such as the sick, youth, drug users, or sex workers. Decision makers must include donors, managers, and leaders in the community whose active support is necessary for the success of the project. Project staff must deal with those who are threatened by the possibility of change by gaining their support or challenging their opposition. The people who will implement the decision must be involved. Communities reflect a variety of views, which may vary with people's age, race, workplace, religion, or family. Some groups are discriminated against, especially women. It is important to record the number of women staff and volunteers on the project, the nature of their decision making roles and work in project and communities activities, and the level of their education and literacy. It is key to identify women's roles at home and in the community. Employment opportunities for men and women should be located. It is also useful to record the ability of men and women to negotiate safe sexual behavior, the level of reported and unreported domestic violence, the legal status of women, women's income and access to credit, and the number of married or unmarried women with accessible reproductive health care.

  10. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Young scientists fly high Teenagers from Poland, Slovakia and the UK won first prizes at the annual European Union (EU) Contest for Young Scientists. Magdalena Bojarska's study of Hamiltonian cycles in generalized Halin graphs, Martin Tkác's insights on tilting bulk materials in railway cargo and Elisabeth Muller's project on lunar meteorites each garnered awards worth €7000 from the EU's Science in Society programme, which aims to encourage young people to pursue scientific careers.

  11. Comparing People with Bibliometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Bibliometric indicators, citation counts and/or download counts are increasingly being used to inform personnel decisions such as hiring or promotions. These statistics are very often misused. Here we provide a guide to the factors which should be considered when using these so-called quantitative measures to evaluate people. Rules of thumb are given for when begin to use bibliometric measures when comparing otherwise similar candidates.

  12. Reindeer Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Jukka O.

    2013-01-01

    In Finnish Lapland, like in other Northern European regions by the Arctic Sea, aboriginal Sami people still base much of their daily income on reindeer. Earlier the Sami people followed their reindeer herds more or less all the year round, in nomadic fashion. Moving to fixed dwellings has created a problem in herding and guarding the property of…

  13. Technology for helping people

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    The first THE Port hackathon problem-solving workshop was held at CERN from 31 October to 2 November in the framework of the 60th anniversary celebrations. The aim of the event was to develop technological projects that can help to solve the day-to-day needs of people living in areas of the planet that experience conflicts or natural disasters.   Collage of shots from THE Port hackathon. Credit: THE Port association The event was dedicated to humanitarian and social topics inspired by members of non-governmental organisations‬. “There is plenty of room for technology to help in humanitarian fields. That’s why we came up with the idea of bringing people together to work on these topics,” explains Ines Knäpper, Project Manager of THE Port hackathon. “We started six months ago setting up THE Port association.* The success of the event was only possible because of the joint effort of a team of roughly twenty people. They were inspired by the aim...

  14. Spirituality in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia San Martín Petersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality may be understood as a group of feelings, beliefs and actions that suppose a search for the transcendent, sacred or divine. As representations about an ultimate power, they contribute to the sense and purpose in life and orient peoples behavior, relationships, and ways to feel and think about reality and about themselves. Since either in the growing old process and in the evaluation of life that occurs when approaching to death it may emerge conflicts, confusion and suffering, people beliefs about what is beyond death, or the answers to the questions about what for and why of life, become determinants in elders well-being. Furthermore, considering that life expectancy has significantly increased, and that the ways of growing old are changing as well as what being old means, and this process advantages and disadvantages or problems, in it ́s different contexts, it ́s necessary to think old age over again, as well as the policies that affect the quality of life of this group of people. Therefore, every professional who assist elderly, specially mental health professionals, must consider the spiritual referents of the individual in order to give the best assistance in whatever problems may appear in the growing old process. 

  15. Do People "Pop Out"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M Mayer

    Full Text Available The human body is a highly familiar and socially very important object. Does this mean that the human body has a special status with respect to visual attention? In the current paper we tested whether people in natural scenes attract attention and "pop out" or, alternatively, are at least searched for more efficiently than targets of another category (machines. Observers in our study searched a visual array for dynamic or static scenes containing humans amidst scenes containing machines and vice versa. The arrays consisted of 2, 4, 6 or 8 scenes arranged in a circular array, with targets being present or absent. Search times increased with set size for dynamic and static human and machine targets, arguing against pop out. However, search for human targets was more efficient than for machine targets as indicated by shallower search slopes for human targets. Eye tracking further revealed that observers made more first fixations to human than to machine targets and that their on-target fixation durations were shorter for human compared to machine targets. In summary, our results suggest that searching for people in natural scenes is more efficient than searching for other categories even though people do not pop out.

  16. Territories, Peoples, Sovereignty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabino Cassese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nation States have three defining characteristics: government of a territory, rapport with a group of people and ownership of a sovereign power. All three of these characteristics are undergoing changes. Several developments involve a redefinition of the “State” and produce numerous contradictions, which can only be solved if we consider the historicity of both the phenomenal essence and the conceptual essence of the State. We need to rethink and reconceptualise the State within the context of the new tendencies and transformations delineated by globalisation.

  17. Astronomical activities with disabled people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, Amelia; Blay, Pere; Gallego Calvente, A. Teresa; Gómez, Miquel; Guirado, José Carlos; Lanzara, Mariana; Martínez Núñez, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    As we celebrate the International Year of Astronomy, we have been working on four different projects with the goal of making astronomy more accessible to people with special needs. These projects are 1) an astronomy book and web site for blind people, 2) an open source software for people with motor disabilities, 3) a planetarium program for the visually impaired and 4) educational material for intellectually disabled people.

  18. For the billion people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, J G

    1994-06-01

    Humans need food to survive. The encroachment of deserts, losses of water and generic and cultural resources, as well as climatic changes, however, threaten our long-term survival. Desertification in the world's arid and semiarid regions is one of the most serious problems our planet and its people face. It is one of the principal barriers to sustainable food security and sustainable livelihoods. Moreover, desertification is not a future threat, but an active local reality which needs to be reversed. Since World War II, an area the size of China and India combined has experienced moderate to extreme soil deterioration. More than 75% of this degradation has occurred in developing regions, mostly in arid and semiarid regions. The author explains how the UN Development Program is strengthening its capacity to help countries address desertification as we face the challenge of tripling world food output over the next 50 years given likely population increases.

  19. Resources, people: uneasy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-02

    Recently, population growth spurted ahead of the growth of the world's output of goods and services, whose yearly rise averaged only 1.6% from 1979-82. That difference means misery for millions of people. Many nations will be unable to provide enough jobs for its population. Living standards and incomes will plummet, and millions may starve. In developing nations, where population growth sometimes outpaces economic growth by 4 or 5 percentage points, the future looks particularly bleak. Worldwide the production of grain has managed to keep up with population growth, but Africa is undergoing the most explosive growth of any continent in history, and food output there just cannot keep up. Since 1970 the amount of grain available for each African dropped more than 11%. In order to produce more food, Africans need chemical fertilizer and farm machines. The problem is that most African countries are so short of cash that they cannot afford to buy the fertilizer and equipment they need to modernize their farming methods. Theirmain source of cash, besides loans, is from the export of goods and services. Many African nations saw those exports decline during the 1970s. The major element responsible for the deline is costly oil. The era of cheap oil ended in 1973. Exporting nations raised the price of a barrel of oil from about US$2-$12. The output of food, goods, and services slowed as farm and factory owners tried to adjust to the higher costs of energy. In 1979 the price of a barrel of oil moved past US$30, triggering a worldwide economic slump. At the same time the world's people were multiplying faster than the output of goods and services. The specter of large scale famine is real. In the early 1970s Bangladesh attributed nearly 800,000 deaths to diseases related to malnutrition. In 1972, after India's grain harvest failed, there were 829,000 more deaths than in 1971. The governments of both India and Bangladesh have made slowing population growth a major priority.

  20. Disabled people - rehabilitation with sport

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz, Łosień; Anna, Mędrak; Izabela, Bajerska; Paweł, Plaskacz; Aleksandra, Cebula; Katarzyna, Kniaziew-Gomoluch

    2017-01-01

    Sport was used to complement therapy in original form, improve of motor patterns and reeducate functions of people with disabilities. With a passing of time, sport evolved to integrated part of rehabilitation as an element of improvement. Moreover, he became as a tool to improve the social integration of people which finished the treatment or/and have deficits. We can notice the huge sport development of people with disabilities, which was initiated by Sir Ludwig Guttmann’s who claimed that ...

  1. Gastrointestinal care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremayne, Penny; Harrison, Penny

    2016-07-06

    This article discusses gastrointestinal (GI) healthcare in older people. It outlines the physiological changes that occur in the GI tract as a result of ageing, and discusses common GI disorders in older people. These GI disorders include dysphagia, gastrointestinal reflux disease, colorectal cancer, diverticular disease, constipation and anaemia. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the factors that may influence gastrointestinal health in older people, including nutrition, hydration and alcohol use, which are important considerations when delivering person-centred care.

  2. Education Game to Blind People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidya Oktorina Kusuma Sakti

    2015-11-01

    Now there are blind people who have their formal and informal education. Even though they cannot see, they can take benefit from another sense, like sense of hearing, palpability, smell, and taste. Their senses can be a modal to study. Developer games have their build game in audio to blind people too. Their game is variation between audio games and online games, so games can be used for blind people as an education tools. In this paper, there will be an explanation about how to facilitate blind people to study with paper

  3. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  4. People's Education (for People's Power)--A Promise Unfulfilled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathebula, Thokozani

    2013-01-01

    The central feature of Athenian citizens' rights, that is, people's participation in government, is also enshrined in the South African Constitution. This article argues for the Athenian style of participatory democracy as a viable model of participation in governing South African schools. The author claims that "people's education",…

  5. People's Education (for People's Power) — a promise unfulfilled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The central feature of Athenian citizens' rights, that is, people's participation in government, is also enshrined in the South African Constitution. This article argues for the Athenian style of participatory democracy as a viable model of participation in governing South African schools. The author claims that 'people's education', ...

  6. People's Education (for People's Power) — a promise unfulfilled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The central feature of Athenian citizens' rights, that is, people's participation in government, is also enshrined in the South African Constitution. This article argues for the Athenian style of participatory democracy as a viable model of participation in governing South African schools. The author claims that 'people's education', ...

  7. Chalearn looking at people 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escalera, Sergio; Fabian, Junior; Baro, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Following previous series on Looking at People (LAP) competitions [14, 13, 11, 12, 2], in 2015 ChaLearn ran two new competitions within the field of Looking at People: (1) age estimation, and (2) cultural event recognition, both in still images. We developed a crowd-sourcing application to collect...

  8. What Do Happy People Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John P.; Martin, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Little attention in the quality-of-life literature has been paid to data on the daily activity patterns of happy and less happy people. Using ratings-scale information from time-diary studies, this article examines the hypothesis that people who describe themselves as happier engage in certain activities more than those who describe themselves as…

  9. The People Make the Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Benjamin

    1987-01-01

    Presents a framework for understanding the etiology of organizational behavior, based on theory and research from interactional psychology, vocational psychology, industrial/organizational psychology, and organizational theory. Proposes that organizations are functions of the kinds of people they contain and that the people there are functions of…

  10. Young people and sexual orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Young people and sexual orientation The Netherlands Institute for Social Research ¦ SCP carries out regular research on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In this report, the focus is on young people in the Netherlands. The report addresses two issues:

  11. Young Peoples' Ideas of Infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, John

    2001-01-01

    Considers young peoples' views of infinity prior to instruction in the methods mathematicians use in addressing the subject of infinity. Presents a partially historical account of studies examining young peoples' ideas of infinity. Four sections address potential pitfalls for research in this area and the work of Piaget, issues concerning the…

  12. Drug Policy and Indigenous Peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Julian; Kapron, Mary

    2017-06-01

    This paper identifies the principal concerns of indigenous peoples with regard to current international treaties on certain psychoactive substances and policies to control and eradicate their production, trafficking, and sale. Indigenous peoples have a specific interest in the issue since their traditional lands have become integrated over time into the large-scale production of coca, opium poppy, and cannabis crops, in response to high demand from the American and European markets, among others. As a consequence, indigenous peoples are persecuted because of their traditional use of these and other plant-based narcotics and hallucinogens. They are also victims of the drug producers who remove them from their lands or forcibly recruit them into the production process. As indigenous peoples are caught in the violent world of illicit drug production, law enforcement often targets them first, resulting in disproportionate rates of criminalization and incarceration.

  13. Healthy People 2020: Sleep Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connected Tools & Resources Evidence-Based Resources Healthy People eLearning Program Planning Content Syndication Webinars & Events Webinars & Events ... the coming decade: Further evolution of biomedical sleep research Quantification of health risks associated with untreated SDB ...

  14. [Crisis intervention with elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzersdorfer, E

    2008-02-01

    This paper gives an overview about the most important aspects of crisis intervention, with special emphasis on crisis intervention with elderly people. First a review of the development of crisis intervention is given, including of some of the major concepts, with particular emphasis on psychoanalytic aspects of crisis intervention. Then a clinical case example of a crisis intervention with an elderly woman following a suicide attempt is given and discussed. The focus lies on the description of the transference-countertransference relationship, with attempts of pressing the therapist to comply with superficial, denying and minimizing fantasies. Peculiarities of crisis intervention with elderly people are highlighted: it is necessary to emphasize that elderly people are underrepresented in most crisis services, whereby they represent the group with the highest suicide risk. Peculiarities of elderly people still are not sufficiently met and they are created by a particularly wide range of aspects.

  15. Anthrax, People and Dead Hippos

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-07

    Epidemiologist, Dr. Melissa Marx, discuses anthrax deaths in people who ate dead hippos.  Created: 11/7/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/7/2017.

  16. Young People with a Twist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bo Wagner; Madsen, Diana Højlund

    The report is based on group interviews with 33 young people with ethnic minority backgrounds. They have been asked about their educational and vocational wishes and also touch on a number of issues such as family, gender equality, discrimination and integration.......The report is based on group interviews with 33 young people with ethnic minority backgrounds. They have been asked about their educational and vocational wishes and also touch on a number of issues such as family, gender equality, discrimination and integration....

  17. Young people in adult education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Mrgole

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of young people participating in adult education programmes has, in the recent years, raised the question of transfer from regular education system to labour market where a large proportion of young people remain socially marginalized and isolated. Young people in adult education are a special target group; in order to plan educational programmes properly, we need to be familiar with their specific characteristics. The article, on the level of a statistical data outline and its paradoxes, introduces the category of young people in adult education as an impact of system factors, and defines related problems in the register, which - for more thorough understanding - dictates sociologically and anthropologically directed analytical approach. The first effect of this, not solely pedagogical view, is presented in the second part of the article, where Mrgole proposes an analysis of educational needs definition and its dangerous consequences in original planning of educational programmes. The concluding part takes a wider perspective and treats the factors of early school-leaving of young people, taking into consideration direct experience in experimental educational programmes for the young. The article ends with an outline of basic elements which the planners of andragogical educational programmes intended for young people should consider in their planning to achieve effective curricula.

  18. ICT Interface Design for Ageing People and People with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jonathan; Mulvenna, Maurice D.; Martin, Suzanne; Stephens, Sharon; Burns, William

    Ageing population trends, rising healthcare costs and social and digital inclusion are all factors in the background to the problem of older adults interacting with technology. Approaches to address "physical accessibility" and "access to technology" issues, as well as training for existing systems are evident, yet a usability issue still prevails. The primary aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the research and literature and discuss the differing contexts in which older people and people with dementia interact with computerised systems and their associated issues.

  19. Indigenous life expectancy in Sweden 1850-1899: Towards a long and healthy life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Karlsson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Previous research has shown that the health transition and demographical pattern of indigenous people has followed a different path compared to non-indigenous groups living in the same area with higher mortality rates and shortened life expectancy at birth. OBJECTIVE This paper draws attention to the development of life expectancy for the Sami and non-Sami during the colonization era (1850-1899. The paper will compare the development of life expectancy levels, infant mortality, and age-specific mortality between the Sami and the non-Sami population and analyze the main causes of death. METHODS The source material for this study is a set of data files from the Demographic Data Base (DDB at Umeå University. Life tables and calculations of values of life expectancies are calculated using period data. RESULTS The analysis reveals that the life expectancy at birth was remarkably lower for the Sami during the entire period, corresponding to a high infant mortality. When comparing life expectancy at birth with life expectancy at age one, Sami still had a lower life expectancy during the entire period. The analysis also reveals a lower proportion of deaths due to infections among the younger Sami. CONCLUSIONS The results paint a complex picture of the demographic transition in Sápmi. Neither the Sami nor the non-Sami population followed the same pattern of increased life expectancies at birth, as the Swedish population did in general. The negative consequences of colonization (high mortality, low life expectancy at birth hit the Sami and non-Sami populations, but at different time periods. COMMENTS The study includes the two northern parishes of Gällivare and Jukkasjärvi.

  20. Homicide perpetrated by older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overshott, Ross; Rodway, Cathryn; Roscoe, Alison; Flynn, Sandra; Hunt, Isabelle M; Swinson, Nicola; Appleby, Louis; Shaw, Jenny

    2012-11-01

    This study aims to describe the circumstances in which older people commit homicide, the form of assessment they undergo and to examine the proportion of those who suffer from mental illness. The study was carried out as part of the England and Wales National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness based on a five-year sample. The Inquiry was notified of the names of those over the age of 60 years convicted of homicide and also the details of the offence, sentencing and outcome in court by the Home Office. The Inquiry collected clinical data of those known to have had contact with mental health services from the responsible service and also retrieved psychiatric reports of those convicted. Homicide incidents perpetrated by older people typically involve a man killing his partner in an impulsive manner. The most common method was by using a sharp instrument (34%), followed by the use of a blunt instrument (26%). The use of firearms was rare (11%). Perpetrators aged 65 years and older were significantly more likely to kill a current or former spouse/partner and less likely to kill an acquaintance. Forty-four per cent of perpetrators over 65 years old suffered from depression at the time of the offence, whereas rates of schizophrenia and alcohol dependence were low. The information used in the study was extracted from a unique national database of homicide perpetrators. The characteristics and the circumstances of homicides perpetrated by older people are different to other age groups. An older-people homicide may be preventable if depression is identified early in older people. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazire Diker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to question the living conditions of disabled people in the 21st century from  the framework of social justice. The concept of “social justice” has a long history, influenced  by the works of numerous writers including Rawls (1971, Miller (1999, Reeves (2005, Fainstein (2009, Marcuse (2009 and Harvey (1992, 2009 and by the recent debates on  inequality, diversity, segregation, exclusion, and discrimination. The debates on segregation, exclusion and discrimination are generally focused on inequalities in terms of economic,  ethnic and gender dimensions; however, in these debates, there is very little reference to unequal opportunities of disabled people. On the other hand, the diversity issue is generally discussed with respect to ethnic and cultural elements, again with very little concern for the  rights of disabled people. In many developing countries, including Turkey, a legal framework  for addressing disability issues has started to be put in place. Awareness among governments and society of the needs and rights of people with disabilities is growing. In the  last decade in Turkey, the difficulties faced by disabled people have started to be taken into  consideration seriously. Before that, the only information about the disabled population could  be obtained from General Population Census in Turkey. In 2002 “Turkey Disability Survey” was carried out collectively by the State Institute of Statistics and the Presidency of  Administration on Disabled People. In this survey, it has been targeted to estimate the number of disabled people and comprehend their socio-economic characteristics, their  problems in social life, expectations, types and causes of disability, regional differences and also the proportion of population having chronic illnesses. After this survey, many projects  have started to be realized in order to propose strategies for eliminating discrimination in  Turkey. In this paper, we will

  2. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    How and why we teach An interview with Mick Nott conducted by David Sang Mick Nott teaches at Sheffield Hallam University. He is editor of School Science Review, and over the last three years he has been organizing a website, book and display for the ASE's Science Teacher Festival. Mick Nott You studied Logic with Physics as your undergraduate degree course, at Sussex, at the end of the 1960s. Wasn't this a rather unusual choice? At school, I loved chemistry, particularly physical chemistry. However, physical chemistry didn't love me when I studied it at university. I grew resentful of the demands made on me with the overcrowded morning lecture programme that was mainly a board-copying exercise and the afternoon hours of labs. I felt stifled; there didn't seem to be any space to express oneself. I wanted a course that allowed me some freedom of thought. So in the summer of 1969 I transferred to the Logic with Physics course. Alongside our 'straight' physics we studied the history of topics like atomic and quantum theory, thermodynamics, mechanics from the Greeks to the Newtonian synthesis and we also had a couple of units in the sociology of science. Amongst the set texts of our first class in the summer of 1969 was Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Now well worn with its cover repaired by sticky tape, it still rests on my bookshelves. Reading Kuhn, I understood why I had been dissatisfied with my chemistry course. If I wanted to make it in chemistry I was going to have to conform to thinking exactly like all the other chemists. That wasn't for me. What attracted you into teaching? And where did you teach? I think it was a vocation in that, from the age of 15, I could imagine myself in the role and it was a job I could 'see' myself doing. Now thinking back I suppose it was an obvious way in which a working class child could transcend class barriers. I did my postgraduate teacher training at Sussex because it was assessed by coursework and classroom competence (in the early 1970s most such courses still had written examinations). I thought it was fantastic. We spent three days a week from October to May in one school. I had one regular third-year class every week and the rest of my teaching timetable varied from term to term. It was like being a 0.3/0.4 member of staff and for that one third-year class I had to do parents' evenings, reports etc. The teachers were paid to act as tutors for the preparation of schemes of work, lessons and tutorial work and they assessed my teaching. Teachers, tutors and trainees attended seminars together. My first teaching job was at Holland Park School in London, at a time when it was famous, perhaps even infamous! It was a real baptism of fire - over 2000 pupils, tens of different first languages, a real mix of class and ethnicity, and newly introduced mixed ability teaching for the first three years. We worked very hard writing schemes of work and developing worksheets and audiovisual materials but, on reflection, I am not sure that we were that effective in developing the science curriculum. I remember using Nuffield Combined Science with the first two years and that was in danger of becoming death by a thousand worksheets. After three years I went to teach in a small private school in Madrid for a year. I was the physics department and my title of Head of Physics meant I was in charge of myself. This was highly formative as a teacher - I had nobody to ask if I didn't understand some physics. As the school was poorly equipped I learned to make apparatus and be very resourceful. There was no pupils' practical work in school science in Spain at that time and I spent a lot of time in hardware stores and medical suppliers! After Spain all of my teaching career was in 11-18 mixed comprehensives, in Cheshire and then Peterborough, and I rose to the dizzy heights of Head of Science. By the time I left the school in Peterborough in 1986 we had established the curriculum framework for broad and balanced science for all to age 16. Did your undergraduate studies influence the way you taught science? I think they made me think critically about my teaching right from the start. Although there was much that I admired in the Nuffield approach, I felt that it was unrealistic to expect pupils to discover the whole of Physics for themselves in the time available! In 1973, 'Learning by discovery' was the slogan. My first lesson on my own was with a class of 32 children and 16 brightly illuminated ripple tanks in a dim laboratory. The pupils' task was to 'discover' that v = fλ. The familiar cry, 'What's supposed to happen, Sir?' arose around the room. At the end, as I removed the crocodile clips the pupils had stuck on my jacket, I had to tell them what the result should have been. Nowadays I am convinced that science has to be taught as well as it has to be learned. I don't go along with the teacher as solely a 'facilitator' of learning and the learning environment. Schooling is an enculturation into ways of thinking and important things to know. Teachers have a responsibility to set an agenda for their pupils, e.g. what is important for pupils to learn, why is it important and how does it contribute pupils' personal and social development as well as their potential development as a scientist. You played a big role in the Secondary Science Curriculum Review (SSCR) in the 1980s. What impact did that experience have on you? The SSCR started off as a democratic experiment, trying to 'hand' science curriculum development to class teachers. I worked for the project as an advisory teacher for a year developing problem-solving as a teaching strategy in lower secondary school science. I think the SSCR was crucial to the successful launching of broad and balanced science and the political battle to establish science as a core subject. Can you still discern the influence of the SSCR in today's National Curriculum? I don't think the present science curriculum is what the SSCR envisaged. However, many projects which were partly products of SSCR have had a profound impact (for example the CLIS project Suffolk Coordinated Science and NEAB Modular Science). I welcomed the inclusion of an attainment target on the nature of science (AT17) in the first version of the National Curriculum but it soon became weakened when the Science National Curriculum was revised. However, I think that some aspects have resurfaced in the new emphasis on ideas and evidence. I was involved in the writing of the Nuffield report, Beyond 2000: Science education for the future, and I think this has had an impact at the policy level, but its suggested strategies were not 'periphery to centre' which was the slogan of the SSCR. At Sheffield Hallam University, you have been involved in initial teacher training and you have also taught on undergraduate physics courses. What are your areas of interest in teaching and research today? I am interested in the history and culture of science education: Why do we teach science in the way we do? What are the roots of today's science curriculum? Knowing what we know about the past, how can we develop things in the future? You are now organizing the Science Teacher Festival, celebrating 100 years of the ASE and its forerunners. What made you think this was worth doing? There is an old saying that if we forget our history, we will be condemned to relive it, and I think it was Marx who said that there is no point in studying your past if you are not going to use it to change the future. Looking back through past decades of School Science Review, Physics Education and other journals, you can see the same arguments arising time and again - for example, can pupils learn their science through discovery/problem-solving/investigations? what methods of assessment match our science teaching objectives? should science be taught as general/integrated/separate sciences? These arguments have been with us throughout the past century and the 'winners' and 'losers' rise and fall! I think that to be a profession, we need to recognize our heritage and tradition. At the moment I get the impression that every year is Year Zero as some 'new' initiative starts. We can learn from the past, and next time we try an idea we should take it further, research it deeper and disseminate it wider than we did before.

  3. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Exploring Mercury PhD student Mark Bentley explains how and why he got involved Mark Bentley is studying for a PhD in planetary science. He is helping to design and build instruments for a forthcoming ESA mission to explore the surface of Mercury. Mark Bentley Space has excited and inspired me for as long as I can remember; my earliest memory of this is being allowed to stay up 'really late' to watch the Space Shuttle Columbia land in 1981, at the age of five. Science in general has always interested me. Although I probably didn't recognize it as such at the time, my fascination with collecting all sorts of equipment (or as my parents called it, 'junk') and finding out what made them tick was an early demonstration of this. At school it seemed natural to take science subjects (Physics, Chemistry and Maths A-levels) and then to consider University though physics was not my first thought. I was all set for the respectable career of computer science, not realizing that my space interests could lead anywhere, until I flicked through the first prospectus I received. By luck it was from Leicester University, and while computer science was offered it also had something called 'Physics with Space Science and Technology'. The rest, as they say, is history... After graduating I spent the following two years working for a UK company developing satellite simulators. But then I started thinking about doing a PhD attracted by the flexibility of directing my own research. I knew that I wanted something that involved space science and the element of discovery, but also something that looked at the engineering and technology of a space mission. The timing was fortuitous shortly after I committed myself to a PhD, the European Space Agency announced the selection of BepiColombo, a mission to Mercury, as one of its 'Cornerstone' (large scale) missions. Here was a mission big on science (no spacecraft has ever orbited Mercury, let alone landed on it) and technology as well! So that takes me to where I am now in my first year at the Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute of the Open University in Milton Keynes. If everything goes according to plan, three years later I will be Dr Bentley and know a whole lot more about Mercury! So what am I now? A physicist at heart, but I guess 'planetary scientist' is more accurate... The great thing about studying the planets is that the field can be stretched to encompass just about any aspect of science you care to choose from biology, through engineering, to physics and more. Planetary science fits well with the modern 'trend' for multidisciplinary research as well as being on the leading edge of modern science, and one of the most international areas of study. In studying our solar system we aim to learn more about the processes that formed the planets and ultimately life itself. For the foreseeable future the nine major bodies and their associated moons are our only glimpse back in time to the early life of our corner of the Universe. Over the past few decades, a relatively short period of time, we have expanded our understanding of the planets by orders of magnitude. Instruments like the Hubble Space Telescope have enabled more and more detailed images of both the near and far, whilst robotic space probes have extended scientists' senses to the far corners of the solar system. The two least studied planets lie at the two extreme ends of our system. Pluto sits at the outer edges of the solar system, a small icy ball that astronomers even argue about calling a planet. Mercury, messenger of the Gods, is a relative inferno, closer to the Sun than any other body. Mercury is not an easy target for spacecraft. Tucked deep in the Sun's gravitational well, any mission must lose about 60% of its orbital energy in order to match Mercury's orbit. The only spacecraft to visit Mercury to date was Mariner 10, a NASA mission flown in the mid-70s. It had far too much energy to enter orbit and could just make several quick passes, leaving an incomplete image of only half of the planet. This, and observations m

  4. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Featuring relationships, personalities, interactions, environments and reputations involved in physics and education ON THE MAP (264) Kharkiv National University of Radioelectronics, Ukraine Kerry Parker STARTING OUT (265) Preparation, preparation, preparation Steven Chapman TEACHING ANECDOTES (266) Lise Meitner PERSONALITY (267) The Accidental Astronomer Kerry Parker talks to Marie Radbo, Astronomer

  5. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    INTERVIEW Interview: How Google conquered the sky Carol Christian and Alberto Conti work at the Space Telescope Science Institute (the home of Hubble) in Baltimore and co-created Sky in Google Earth. David Smith spoke to them between stage appearances at Astrofest

  6. Entrepreneurship among People with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Tamara

    This brief paper reviews the literature on entrepreneurship among people with disabilities. It notes that entrepreneurship by individuals with disabilities is often a consequence of disability discrimination in the workforce and provides both benefits and disadvantages such as independence and freedom from access-related obstacles (benefits) and…

  7. Sorting People In and Out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garsten, Christina; Jacobsson, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    and coding of disability at the Public Employment Service (PES). Based on interviews with staff at a rehabilitation unit in the Swedish Public Employment Service, the article analyses processes of evaluating work capacity for marginally employable people as part of the Employability Rehabilitation Programme......-employable becomes a disability and conversely, to be disabled can make one employable....

  8. Evaluating IAQ effects on people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David; Tham, K. W.; Sekhar, C.

    2003-01-01

    "conclusive". From them, a small number of conclusions were drawn, and some very large gaps in our knowledge of this important area of research were identified. Taking these as the starting point, this paper formulates a strategy for evaluating IAQ effects on people. It formulates some critical hypotheses...

  9. WPSS: Watching people security services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Baan, J.; Borsboom, S.; Zon, K. van; Luo, X.; Loke, B.; Stoeller, B.; Kuilenburg, H. van; Dijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    To improve security, the number of surveillance cameras is rapidly increasing. However, the number of human operators remains limited and only a selection of the video streams are observed. Intelligent software services can help to find people quickly, evaluate their behavior and show the most

  10. Policing Challenged and People's Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Thakur Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Peace, security, rule of law, and sustainable development are driving principles in a democratic notion of developing country like Nepal. "3Is": Injustice, Insecurity and Imbalance have been reflecting in the post transitional Nepal. The study came with the objectives of investigating the peoples' perceptions on the adaptation of…

  11. Theme: Pharmacology and Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, William; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue discusses maximizing the benefits and minimizing the risks of drug therapy for older people. It includes articles on psychoactive drugs, drug-related problems, medication compliance, geriatric psychopharmacotherapy, consumer guidelines, and outpatient prescriptions drug coverage as it relates to health care reform. (JOW)

  12. How Do People Get AIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people. Sharing of needles for tattoos, piercings, and body art can also lead to infection. Someone with HIV who shares a needle also shares the virus, which lives in the tiny amounts of blood ... a barrier to the body fluids that can be shared during sexual activity ( ...

  13. Of people, particles and prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Penny; Greene, Anne; Mears, Matt; Spacecadet1; Green, Christian; Hunt, Devin J.; Berglyd Olsen, Veronica K.; Ilya, Komarov; Pierpont, Elaine; Gillman, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In reply to Louise Mayor's feature article “Where people and particles collide”, about the experiences of researchers at CERN who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), efforts to make LGBT CERN an officially recognized club, and incidents where posters advertising the club have been torn down or defaced (March pp31-36, http://ow.ly/YVP2Z).

  14. Motivating young people for education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cort, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The article explores the issue of motivation in policy and practice. The argument is that the folk high schools and the tradition of liberal education offer a learning environment where a number of psychological needs are satisfied among the young people leading to a motivation for learning whereas...

  15. Mobility Assistance for Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Eck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a scooter supporting the mobility of older people. The scooter is equipped with a drive assistance system and a special scooter navigation system. The drive assistance system consists of a velocity controller, a steering controller, and a collision avoidance system. In this paper it is demonstrated how the challenging control and steering tasks are modified to increase safety for older people. A special scooter navigation system is presented, to support elderly people in navigating on a safe route through the city using sidewalks, pedestrian lights and crosswalks. For extended positioning requirements a hybrid positioning system was developed combining GPS, WLAN, and inertial sensor data. By combination of these technical improvements it is demonstrated how older people are able to preserve their self-determined and independent life. Usability research was done with focus groups in order to become familiar with global user demands and expectations towards a mobility assistance system. Results show that the system components are expected to assist the user in navigation, steering and speed control rather than to take complete control on the driving situation.

  16. Resilience and Young People Leaving Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Mike

    2008-01-01

    How do we promote the resilience of young people leaving care? This article explores this question by bringing together research findings on the resilience of young people from disadvantaged family backgrounds with research studies on young people leaving care. These findings are applied to young people during their journey to adulthood: their…

  17. Stolen Identity : The Armenian People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Mihai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the factors that have shaped the Armenian identity over time, based on the main historical events and strategic actors who made their contribution to the becoming of the Armenian people and their identity. The central issue of the article is the Armenian genocide which had a major influence on the way that Armenians see themselves and the world around them, today. The study revealed that not only the genocide that happened almost a century ago, had a major impact on the Armenian identity, but also the current recognition or denial of facts by the contemporary world. In this respect, the role of the Diaspora proved priceless, because they were the ones that pressured their host countries to recognize the genocide and to support Armenia. The topic is presented form a phenomenological perspective, trying to capture the human experience in the way it was perceived by the Armenian people.

  18. People Capability Maturity Model. SM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    SEI-95-MM-02 Acknowledgments include Eduardo Cadena ( Servicios en Informatica, Mexico), Nancy Chauncey (U.S. Army), Pat D. Delohery (Trecom...processes that work best is the heart of the Defined level (Level 3). The organization identifies the design, testing , inspection, 0-8 ■ People...been defined should usually be tested to ensure that they work as expected before being installed across the organization. After a successful trial

  19. How do people define moderation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanDellen, Michelle R; Isherwood, Jennifer C; Delose, Julie E

    2016-06-01

    Eating in moderation is considered to be sound and practical advice for weight maintenance or prevention of weight gain. However, the concept of moderation is ambiguous, and the effect of moderation messages on consumption has yet to be empirically examined. The present manuscript examines how people define moderate consumption. We expected that people would define moderate consumption in ways that justified their current or desired consumption rather than view moderation as an objective standard. In Studies 1 and 2, moderate consumption was perceived to involve greater quantities of an unhealthy food (chocolate chip cookies, gummy candies) than perceptions of how much one should consume. In Study 3, participants generally perceived themselves to eat in moderation and defined moderate consumption as greater than their personal consumption. Furthermore, definitions of moderate consumption were related to personal consumption behaviors. Results suggest that the endorsement of moderation messages allows for a wide range of interpretations of moderate consumption. Thus, we conclude that moderation messages are unlikely to be effective messages for helping people maintain or lose weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. State territoriality and beyond: an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mamadouh, V.D.; Knippenberg, H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses relationships between state territoriality, political fragmentation, cultural assimilation, and social movement; relationship among states, territoriality and indigenous people of the Sami homeland, politics of territorial identification of Anglo-Montrealers, (the Quebec problem), and

  1. Die Samen in der UdSSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Lukjantschenko

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The article offers a chronological overview of Sami people living in the area of the USSR, focusing on demography and population growth, from the earliest records dating to the ninth century until the 1980-ies.

  2. How to win friends and influence people

    CERN Document Server

    Carnegie, Dale

    2010-01-01

    For more than sixty years the rock-solid, time-tested advice in this book has carried thousands of now famous people up the ladder of success in their business and personal lives. With more than fifteen million copies sold, How to Win Friends and Influence People is one of the best known motivational books in history, with proven advice for achieving success in life. You’ll learn: three fundamental techniques in handling people; six ways to make people like you; twelve ways to win people to you way of thinking; nine ways to change people without arousing resentment; and much, much more!

  3. Vain osuuskauppa viihtyy Virossa / Sami Lotila, Anna-Liisa Lilius

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotila, Sami

    2006-01-01

    Soome Kesko Food müüs oma osaluse kaubandusketis Rimi Baltic Rootsi kontsernile ICA, mis on nüüd firma ainuomanik. Laiendavad ka Baltimaade jaekaubandusturu teised osalised Selver, SOK ja Leedu VP

  4. Modeling ray tracing through heating perturbed ionosphere with SAMI2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.; Huba, J. D.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present simulations of high frequency (HF) signals/rays tracing through perturbed ionosphere by combining the NRL ionosphere model [Huba, 2000] and the ray tracing program [Jones, 1966]. We show with modeling that by creating artificial disturbances to the ionosphere, i.e. heating-induced geomagnetic-field-aligned density ducts, the radio signal transmission may be deflected out of its original propagation path and may exit the top ionosphere through the density breach at the F2 peak layer. Our results show the possibility to control or disrupt the communication channels in the future.; The solid line shows deviated ray trace due to F2 layer breach created by heat-induced density ducts. The dashed line shows the original ray path when no disturbances present.

  5. The Sami Identity: A Souvenir or Something Living?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Meeri

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the notion of identity in relation to the options of cultural affiliation available to minority group members. In particular, the article addresses commentary made in relation to the implementation of national curriculum guidelines in indigenous literacy education settings. (Author/JL)

  6. Salwa Mohamed', Samy Zalatz, Hassan Fadl', Sohair Gadalla' &

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    records to the Egyptian fauna; 1 from Ebn Salam(Dakahliya) and 6 from. Sinai. These species are Cataglyphis minimus Collingwood, Monomorium carbonarium (Smith), Cardiocondyla wroughtonii Forel, Aphaenogaster phillipsi Wheeler, Aphaenogaster syriacum Emery, T etramorium brevicorne Bondroit and T etramorium ...

  7. Francis Gilbert * & Samy Zalat Introduction In collaboration with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Francis

    student:staff ratio is 14:1, of course with significant but not huge variation among disciplines. The total income of HE in the UK in 2004 was £ 16.9 billion (about LE 188 billion), only 60% of which comes from the UK government. The UK in general spends about 1.9% of its Gross National Product on science research.

  8. Prescribing for people in custody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Stephen; Blomgren, Donna; Roberts, Jill; Mackinnon, Tobias; Nicholls, Gary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY People who are, or have been, in custody often have multiple morbidities and multi-dimensional disadvantage. A thorough clinical evaluation and multidisciplinary approach will assist in managing these patients. Treatment plans should be pragmatic and simple, and explained in an understandable manner. Caution should be used in the prescription of any medicines that have the potential for abuse. There is also a risk of drug diversion. There is an increase in mortality after prisoners are released into the community. Preparations should therefore be made before release to ensure continuity of care. PMID:26648653

  9. Communicating with people with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James McKillop

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It can be very difficult to communicate with people with dementia. Each case requires its own unique handling. Not every scenario is covered, as many times your own judgment is what will work, best according to the circumstances. These can change from dawn to evening and from day to day. Never assume things will be the way they were the last time you communicated. Be on your guard. Be adaptable. The article will help get you started to think of your own ways to communicate.

  10. Food Safety for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants People at Risk of Foodborne Illness Food Safety for People with Cancer Share Tweet Linkedin ...

  11. Healthy People 2020 Tobacco Use Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Healthy People 2020 Tobacco Use Objectives. Healthy People...

  12. Social innovation for People-Centred Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars; P.K., Shajahan

    2013-01-01

    Social innovation is closely related to the people-centred development (PCD) framework of knowledge production. The discussion of PCD in this chapter particularly expands on the feature of empowerment and socio-political mobilization of people in social innovation......Social innovation is closely related to the people-centred development (PCD) framework of knowledge production. The discussion of PCD in this chapter particularly expands on the feature of empowerment and socio-political mobilization of people in social innovation...

  13. Judo and people with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Kunčič, Jera

    2013-01-01

    In graduation thesis we present how would judo as martial art with its elements impact developing independence of people with intellectual disabilities. In accordance with the object and problem of graduation thesis we present judo and its impacts on the general population and on people with intellectual disabilities, we study the impact of sport on people with intellectual disabilities, the meaning of developing independence for people with intellectual disabilities and to synthesize the pos...

  14. Moving On: Young People and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Kathryn; Chamberlain, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To help explain why some young people move from recreational drug use to substance abuse, twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with young people who had experienced problematic substance use. The data were supplemented by statistical data on 111 young people. The researchers found a variety of "structural" factors that help explain…

  15. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  16. Including People with Disabilities: An Indigenous Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Brown, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Being victims of racial prejudice, religious intolerance, poverty, disempowerment and language loss it could be expected that indigenous people would be supportive of the Inclusion Movement with its philosophy of valuing and acceptance of all people. This supposition is examined for Maori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand. In…

  17. Commentary Examination of young people's attitudes towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Young people's attitude towards entrepreneurship contributes tremendously to the rapid increase in innovation. Income and social economic status of people also have strong effect on innovation because in developing countries, stronger payment ability and higher income level enables more people to spend more on a ...

  18. Sex education and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Young people comprise up to 60% of Belize's total population of more than 200,000. Many of them have dropped out of school and simply loiter on the streets with little or nothing to do. The only nongovernmental organization in Belize providing family planning and sexual and reproductive health care services, the Belize Family Life Association (BFLA) is well aware of the many problems facing youth, such as AIDS, teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease, poverty, and gangs. In an effort to improve conditions for youth and to address their problems, the BFLA established a successful teen center in the Mesopotamia Area and the Belizean Youths with an Aim for Prosperity (BYAP), a project designed to foster and support entrepreneurship among a group comprised mainly of out-of-school at-risk youths. Population Concern is helping to fund reproductive health projects for youth in South Africa with the goal of reducing the prevalence of unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and unsafe abortion through reproductive health services and education. Young people are helping design the project by explaining their perceived needs to the project team. In Trinidad and Tobago, controversy followed the Family Planning Association of Trinidad and Tobago's (FPATT) recent launch of its annual Family Life Education Training program for teachers, while 2 recent hurricanes, unemployment, and illicit drug sales and use are some of the problems facing the Dominica Planned Parenthood Federation and Dominica's youth.

  19. The Sincerity of Questioned People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haller István

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applying questionnaires is one of the basic methodologies in sociology. Usually sociologists consider that choosing a representative sample and properly formulated questions, the results will show real characteristics of the society. But the following main question should always be analyzed: are people sincere? Psychology proved that we try to meet the society's expectation. In this way the answers do not represent the questioned person’s thought, but what they considered expect from society. The present study analyzes the sincerity of police officers, asked to complete a questionnaire for a scientific purpose, respecting the principle of anonymity. The results show that around 2/3 of the questioned persons did not give sincere answers, offering importance for an inexistent person (Schnade. By analyzing the answers to another question (the importance of the television and the bicycle for the questioned persons, it was found that insincere people could be not easily excluded: the sincerity is changing from question to question; some persons are sincere regarding a specific domain and not sincere in another domain.

  20. Prevalence of self-reported myocardial infarction in Sami and non-Sami populations: the SAMINOR study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eliassen, Bent-Martin; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Braaten, Tonje; Melhus, Marita; Broderstad, Ann R

    2015-01-01

    ...). The response rate was 60.9%. Information concerning lifestyle was collected by 2 self-administrated questionnaires, and clinical examinations provided anthropometric measurements, and data on blood pressure and lipid levels...

  1. Sami Seppänen : kõnehinna langus hakkab otsa saama / Sami Seppänen ; interv. Henrik Ilves

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Seppänen, Sami

    2007-01-01

    Elisa juhatuse esimehe hinnangul halvab hindade tõstmine ja siis ümberotsustamine mulje kogu mobiilside tegevusalast. Elisa ei kaalunud võimalust EMT sammuga - võtta kasutusele minutipõhine kõnearvestus - kaasa minna, kuid pole välistatud, et tulevikus Elisa seda teeb. Lisa: Konkurendid on sama meelt

  2. Radioactivity of people and foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANDERSON, E C; SCHUCH, R L; FISHER, W R; LANGHAM, W

    1957-06-28

    Measurements of the cesium-137 content of people and of foodstuffs indicate that this nuclide is unlikely to be a decisive factor in the long-term hazards from weapons testing and reactor waste disposal. The amount of cesium-137 now present in the population of the United States averages 0.006 microcurie and shows no marked dependence on geographic location. The average radiation dose received from cesium-137 is one-twentieth of that received from natural radiopotassium and 1 percent of the average total dose from all natural sources. Because of the short biological half-life of cesium of about 140 days, it does not accumulate in the body as does strontium-90. The study of the distribution of cesium-137 is being continued to furnish information on the mechanisms of the fallout process and provide a measure of the rate of fallout and of stratospheric storage.

  3. European courts and old people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, Graham P

    2013-09-01

    There are two major European Courts, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) and the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). The ECJ deals with legal matters, mainly involving the interpretation of EU law and ensuring that the law is applied evenly across all 27 EU member states. The ECHR aims to make certain that civil and political rights of citizens in the 46 member states of the Council of Europe are observed. Most cases involving older citizens are about social policy (such as pension arrangements, equality, age discrimination and mandatory retirement). There have been few cases dealing with patients' rights, long-term care or housing. Referrals of selected cases involving old people should be considered if their rights are not being protected. In this Commentary, there is an account of how these Courts have evolved, together with guidance on whom to refer, to which Court, and when and how referrals should be made.

  4. Does communication help people coordinate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Joveski, Zlatko; Yu, Sixie

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have consistently demonstrated that collective performance in a variety of tasks can be significantly improved by allowing communication. We present the results of the first experiment systematically investigating the value of communication in networked consensus. The goal of all tasks in our experiments is for subjects to reach global consensus, even though nodes can only observe choices of their immediate neighbors. Unlike previous networked consensus tasks, our experiments allow subjects to communicate either with their immediate neighbors (locally) or with the entire network (globally). Moreover, we consider treatments in which essentially arbitrary messages can be sent, as well as those in which only one type of message is allowed, informing others about a node's local state. We find that local communication adds minimal value: fraction of games solved is essentially identical to treatments with no communication. Ability to communicate globally, in contrast, offers a significant performance improvement. In addition, we find that constraining people to only exchange messages about local state is significantly better than unconstrained communication. We observe that individual behavior is qualitatively consistent across settings: people clearly react to messages they receive in all communication settings. However, we find that messages received in local communication treatments are relatively uninformative, whereas global communication offers substantial information advantage. Exploring mixed communication settings, in which only a subset of agents are global communicators, we find that a significant number of global communicators is needed for performance to approach success when everyone communicates globally. However, global communicators have a significant advantage: a small tightly connected minority of globally communicating nodes can successfully steer outcomes towards their preferences, although this can be

  5. Maximizing your return on people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Laurie; McMurrer, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Though most traditional HR performance metrics don't predict organizational performance, alternatives simply have not existed--until now. During the past ten years, researchers Laurie Bassi and Daniel McMurrer have worked to develop a system that allows executives to assess human capital management (HCM) and to use those metrics both to predict organizational performance and to guide organizations' investments in people. The new framework is based on a core set of HCM drivers that fall into five major categories: leadership practices, employee engagement, knowledge accessibility, workforce optimization, and organizational learning capacity. By employing rigorously designed surveys to score a company on the range of HCM practices across the five categories, it's possible to benchmark organizational HCM capabilities, identify HCM strengths and weaknesses, and link improvements or back-sliding in specific HCM practices with improvements or shortcomings in organizational performance. The process requires determining a "maturity" score for each practice, based on a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high). Over time, evolving maturity scores from multiple surveys can reveal progress in each of the HCM practices and help a company decide where to focus improvement efforts that will have a direct impact on performance. The authors draw from their work with American Standard, South Carolina's Beaufort County School District, and a bevy of financial firms to show how improving HCM scores led to increased sales, safety, academic test scores, and stock returns. Bassi and McMurrer urge HR departments to move beyond the usual metrics and begin using HCM measurement tools to gauge how well people are managed and developed throughout the organization. In this new role, according to the authors, HR can take on strategic responsibility and ensure that superior human capital management becomes central to the organization's culture.

  6. Secrets of over-indebted people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie BILLAUDEAU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, the economic and financial crisis is brought to light and it is now clear that many people are directly impacted by this phenomenon. However, a lot of situations are obviously hidden and in particular those concerning over-indebted people. These people often find that it is difficult to express the hardship they are going through and keep silent because is more comfortable for them. The media also does not tackle this burning issue because the complexity of some situations complicates the message. Therefore, a giant gap has appeared leaving over-indebted people entrapped in their secret. Starting from this hypothesis, this article will examine the results of a research conducted on the over-indebted people (survey on written press, analysis of TV broadcasts, analysis of records related to person in debts and responses of people in debts and the secrets that this phenomenon involves.

  7. Outreach: linking people with eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Ward

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Several years ago, I had the opportunity to accompany a team from an eye hospital as they went to several locations on what they called ‘outreach’. The primary purpose of these trips was to identify operable cataract patients. Many people attended these outreach clinics, but they identified very few cataracts. The second day, I made friends with a couple of primary school children and explained to them that I wanted to find some people who were blind. I asked them to take me through the village to find these people. With the help of these children, I found five blind people, three with operable cataracts. None of these ever came to the ‘outreach clinic’. From that day on, I was convinced that we needed a new paradigm, new ideas in order to connect these people with services. Some of the major barriers for blind people are actually within the first 100 metres of their front door.

  8. Social Anxiety among Chinese People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qianqian; Chang, Weining C

    2015-01-01

    The experience of social anxiety has largely been investigated among Western populations; much less is known about social anxiety in other cultures. Unlike the Western culture, the Chinese emphasize interdependence and harmony with social others. In addition, it is unclear if Western constructed instruments adequately capture culturally conditioned conceptualizations and manifestations of social anxiety that might be specific to the Chinese. The present study employed a sequence of qualitative and quantitative approaches to examine the assessment of social anxiety among the Chinese people. Interviews and focus group discussions with Chinese participants revealed that some items containing the experience of social anxiety among the Chinese are not present in existing Western measures. Factor analysis was employed to examine the factor structure of the more comprehensive scale. This approach revealed an "other concerned anxiety" factor that appears to be specific to the Chinese. Subsequent analysis found that the new factor-other concerned anxiety-functioned the same as other social anxiety factors in their association with risk factors of social anxiety, such as attachment, parenting, behavioral inhibition/activation, and attitude toward group. The implications of these findings for a more culturally sensitive assessment tool of social anxiety among the Chinese were discussed.

  9. Citizenship displayed by disabled people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Prado Carlino

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available By investigating the processes by which successful teachers become activate citizens and by listening to the diversity and richness of their life and formation stories, this work became possible. Its aim is to display some of the utterances of two Down Syndrome individuals and their active-citizenship activities. Their stories were told in the reports of two teachers when describing their personal and professional history, and were considered to be an integral part of it. Thus, some of the utterances and perceptions with which these two individuals elaborate their references, their worldview and their active-citizenship activity are evidenced in this paper. This article is based on the language conceptions of Vygotsky and Bakhtin who defend the idea that the group and the social mentality are ingrain in the individual. Hence, the history of one person reveals that of many others, since there is a deep link between the individual and the social in the formation of a subjective worldview. As a result, it can be easily seen that the utterances expressed by the participants in this research cannot be considered strictly individual because enunciation is social in nature. Despite the fact that the utterances are those of individuals, they manifest a collective reality. This demonstrates the real advantages and possibilities that deficient people get from their participation and intervention in society.

  10. PEOPLE BETWEEN REALITY AND CYBERSPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kortunov Vadim Vadimovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Having entered the XXI century, a century that is not coincidentally called "the information era" and "the age of high technology", the humanity faced with a new, hitherto unseen world of telecommunications. This world, in many ways, took the humanity by surprise. First, the advent of high-tech was pinned with the hopes for the birth of "post-industrial society", i.e. a society where a person gains freedom, creativity and maximum opportunity for self-realization, comfort and convenience. All the "dirty work" and manual labor were to be performed by high-tech machines, freeing person’s time for the solution of more interesting and worthy tasks. At that time, people did not and could not think about the problems and threats, that the age of global computerization and information would bring. Even the most brilliant minds of the XX century were not able to predict, and, all the more, to prevent the risks that in the XXI century have become quite tangible and relevant.

  11. Social Anxiety among Chinese People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qianqian; Chang, Weining C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of social anxiety has largely been investigated among Western populations; much less is known about social anxiety in other cultures. Unlike the Western culture, the Chinese emphasize interdependence and harmony with social others. In addition, it is unclear if Western constructed instruments adequately capture culturally conditioned conceptualizations and manifestations of social anxiety that might be specific to the Chinese. The present study employed a sequence of qualitative and quantitative approaches to examine the assessment of social anxiety among the Chinese people. Interviews and focus group discussions with Chinese participants revealed that some items containing the experience of social anxiety among the Chinese are not present in existing Western measures. Factor analysis was employed to examine the factor structure of the more comprehensive scale. This approach revealed an “other concerned anxiety” factor that appears to be specific to the Chinese. Subsequent analysis found that the new factor—other concerned anxiety—functioned the same as other social anxiety factors in their association with risk factors of social anxiety, such as attachment, parenting, behavioral inhibition/activation, and attitude toward group. The implications of these findings for a more culturally sensitive assessment tool of social anxiety among the Chinese were discussed. PMID:26380367

  12. ENERGY REGULATION IN YOUNG PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J. Dodd

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity in young people is now realised as a worldwide crisis of epidemic proportion. The aetiology of this disease suggests a disruption in regulation of energy at the population level, leading to a positive energy balance and excess adiposity. The relative contribution of food intake and physical inactivity remains to be elucidated. Treatment interventions have aimed to create a deficit in energy balance through manipulation of physical activity, behavioural components or, to a lesser extent, dietary modification. Whether such intervention is maintained in the long-term is as yet unclear, however it seems a combination of therapies is optimal. Mindful of a mismatch between energy intake and expenditure, recent work has begun to examine the acute relationship between physical activity and food intake in children. Initial findings suggest a short-term delay in compensation through energy intake for exercise- induced energy expenditure. The overarching study of energy regulation in children and adolescents is clearly multifaceted in nature and variables to be assessed or manipulated require careful consideration. The collection of paediatric physical activity, energy expenditure and food intake data is a time-consuming process, fraught with potential sources of error. Investigators should consider the validity and reliability of these and other issues, alongside the logistics of any proposed study. Despite these areas of concern, recent advances in the field should provide exciting opportunities for future research in paediatric energy regulation on a variety of levels

  13. Social Anxiety among Chinese People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experience of social anxiety has largely been investigated among Western populations; much less is known about social anxiety in other cultures. Unlike the Western culture, the Chinese emphasize interdependence and harmony with social others. In addition, it is unclear if Western constructed instruments adequately capture culturally conditioned conceptualizations and manifestations of social anxiety that might be specific to the Chinese. The present study employed a sequence of qualitative and quantitative approaches to examine the assessment of social anxiety among the Chinese people. Interviews and focus group discussions with Chinese participants revealed that some items containing the experience of social anxiety among the Chinese are not present in existing Western measures. Factor analysis was employed to examine the factor structure of the more comprehensive scale. This approach revealed an “other concerned anxiety” factor that appears to be specific to the Chinese. Subsequent analysis found that the new factor—other concerned anxiety—functioned the same as other social anxiety factors in their association with risk factors of social anxiety, such as attachment, parenting, behavioral inhibition/activation, and attitude toward group. The implications of these findings for a more culturally sensitive assessment tool of social anxiety among the Chinese were discussed.

  14. Chapter Sixteen. Indigenous Peoples and Hunting Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Scott

    2017-01-01

    INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND HUNTING RIGHTS The incorporation of indigenous hunter-gatherer peoples and their territories into modern nation-states, historically without their informed consent, has long provided human rights challenges to states and local communities. In the evolving international human rights regime, it has been slowly recognized that indigenous peoples have inherent rights due to their presence on and use of their traditional territories prior to the arrival of the modern nation-...

  15. Treating obesity in people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M

    Obesity in people with learning disabilities should not be dismissed as untreatable. Such people have the same right to a healthy weight as the rest of the population. Equally, they should have the right to remain overweight if they so choose, provided their choice is an informed one. This paper reviews the reasons people with learning disabilities may become obese, addresses how this problem may be tackled and highlights some of the ethical issues involved in weight reduction for this client group.

  16. Use of bibliotherapy with drug addicted people

    OpenAIRE

    Tmejová, Hana

    2013-01-01

    This work named 'The use of bibliotherapy in people with drug addiction' deals with bibliotherapy in specific kind of people who are drug addicts. In the work is shown theoretical knowledge of the problems with drug addiction, the issues of bibliotherapy and the experience in usually used techniques of bibliotherapy with the drug-addicted people. The work also contains lists of appropriate literature with the topic of addiction from a different perspective. The main aim of this work is to sug...

  17. The Norwegian Educational System, the Linguistic Diversity in the Country and the Education of Different Minority Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ÖZERK

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity has always been and still is one of the current issues in the Norwegian educational system. Norwegian is the official language of the country, but, there have been several distinct dialects and two official written Norwegian languages in the country since 1885. One of them is Bokmål and the other is Nynorsk. There has also been an indigenous Sami people with three different Sami languages in the country: Northern Sami, Lulesami and Southern Sami in the country. At the same time there are two national minority groups, Kvens and the Roma people, who have their own languages. In addition about 200 languages are represented among linguistic minority children with immigrant parents/grandparents. This linguistic diversity means that almost 15% of Norway’s population of 5 million has another first language than Norwegian. This paper gives a brief account of policies and challenges related to multilingualism and multilingual education in the Norwegian educational system.

  18. The Norwegian educational system, the linguistic diversity in the country and the education of different minority groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ÖZERK

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity has always been and still is one of the current issues in the Norwegian educational system. Norwegian is the official language of the country, but, there have been several distinct dialects and two official written Norwegian languages in the country since 1885. One of them is Bokmål and the other is Nynorsk. There has also been an indigenous Sami people with three different Sami languages in the country: Northern Sami, Lulesami and Southern Sami in the country. At the same time there are two national minority groups, Kvens and the Roma people, who have their own languages. In addition about 200 languages are represented among linguistic minority children with immigrant parents/grandparents. This linguistic diversity means that almost 15% of Norway’s population of 5 million has another first language than Norwegian. This paper gives a brief account of policies and challenges related to multilingualism and multilingual education in the Norwegian educational system.

  19. Access to Internet of People With Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Fatoş Subaşıoğlu

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has producted a revolution in the world of Internet and computer technology for many disabled people. Especially, with the help of adaptive technology, for example, deaf-blind people can communicate over telephone networks and severely visaully impaired people can read a computer screen directly with the help of speech synthesis or automatically generated Braille displays. People with physical disabilities can use personel computers by blowing. It’s even possible to cont...

  20. Whales Are Big With Little People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommers, John J.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is a discussion on why people should study whales. Background information, learning activities appropriate for different subject areas, and whale-related teaching materials are included. (DC)

  1. Older People, Mobile Communication and Risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loredana Ivan; Mireia Fernandez-Ardevol

    2017-01-01

    Starting from Beck’s concept of reflexivity, the paper investigates differences in risk perception regarding wireless technologies expressed by older people living in Romania and Catalonia (Spain...

  2. Responses to Change Helping People Make Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing state of many organizations is one of change. People who experience major change tend to exhibit one of four patterns of response: entrenched, overwhelmed, poser, or learner. As a leader, you need to understand the patterns of response that people express and to customize intervention strategies to help them make the transition. People can pass through a given response stage and move to one that is more effective--especially if you provide timely intervention and support. This guidebook will help you understand how people, including yourself, are responding to change and what you c

  3. Rockets and People. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Boris E; Siddiqi, Asif A. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Much has been written in the West on the history of the Soviet space program but few Westerners have read direct first-hand accounts of the men and women who were behind the many Russian accomplishments in exploring space.The memoirs of Academician Boris Chertok, translated from the original Russian, fills that gap.Chertok began his career as an electrician in 1930 at an aviation factory near Moscow.Twenty-seven years later, he became deputy to the founding figure of the Soviet space program, the mysterious Chief Designer Sergey Korolev. Chertok s sixty-year-long career and the many successes and failures of the Soviet space program constitute the core of his memoirs, Rockets and People. These writings are spread over four volumes. This is volume I. Academician Chertok not only describes and remembers, but also elicits and extracts profound insights from an epic story about a society s quest to explore the cosmos. In Volume 1, Chertok describes his early years as an engineer and ends with the mission to Germany after the end of World War II when the Soviets captured Nazi missile technology and expertise. Volume 2 takes up the story with the development of the world s first intercontinental ballistic missile ICBM) and ends with the launch of Sputnik and the early Moon probes. In Volume 3, Chertok recollects the great successes of the Soviet space program in the 1960s including the launch of the world s first space voyager Yuriy Gagarin as well as many events connected with the Cold War. Finally, in Volume 4, Chertok meditates at length on the massive Soviet lunar project designed to beat the Americans to the Moon in the 1960s, ending with his remembrances of the Energiya-Buran project.

  4. Evaluating Youth Work with Vulnerable Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Andy; Cartmel, Fred; Powney, Janet; Hall, Stuart

    This report presents the results of an 18-month research project that studied the effectiveness of youth work with vulnerable young people. The research, representing six distinct geographical areas of Scotland characterized by disadvantage, focused on young people aged 13 to 16. In each neighborhood, the project examined the experiences of young…

  5. Human Rights and People with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdekin, Brian

    1995-01-01

    This lecture transcript discusses human rights issues related to people with disabilities in Australia, focusing on concepts of discrimination, legislation, and social justice. Findings from recent federal inquiries into homeless children and mental illness highlight major deficits in services for people with disabilities. (Author/DB)

  6. Disabled people and E-inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, S. (Siqi)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The fast developing technologies can benefit disabled people from many ways. However, it also formed new gap to them and caused their lives to be marginalized by the digital society. The purpose of this research was to find out issues and problems disabled people meet in the e-Society. A literature study was conducted as the research method by...

  7. Unlikely Alliances: Friendship & People with Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, John; O'Brien, Connie Lyle

    This discussion of friendship in the lives of people with developmental disabilities raises questions which probe the nature of friendship, friendship between people with and without disabilities, and the special challenges involved in making and keeping friends. First, four dimensions of friendship are identified and discussed: (1) attraction…

  8. The Musical Taste of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozgot, V. G.

    2014-01-01

    Data from a longitudinal survey of the musical tastes of young people distinguish five basic vectors of its development: an orientation toward the Western paradigm; young people's unlimited amount of time spent in the consumption of music; the indiscriminate nature of their music interests; the influence that a person's membership in a particular…

  9. People's perceptions of managed and natural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur W. Magill

    1995-01-01

    Research was undertaken to identify the opinions of what people saw in slides of managed and unmanaged landscapes. Most people were attracted by natural landscape features. Clearcuts were reported less frequently than roads, but dislike of them was more than 30 percent greater. Natural openings, bare areas, and sparse tree cover also were disliked.

  10. 'Conservationists' and the 'Local People' in Biodiversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on biodiversity in Africa show its rapid loss and degradation. This is commonly explained with non-sustainable use by local people. Across Africa, extensive systems of protected areas (PAs) have been established to mitigate this trend. Creation of PAs, however, resulted in manifold conflicts with people who depend ...

  11. Needs of people with severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study reviews conceptual and methodological issues of needs for care among people with severe mental illness (SMI) and presents data on their prevalence, correlates and consequences for mental health care. Method: Focus is on the definition of the concept of need as what people can

  12. Food patterns of Polish older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadolowska, L.; Danowska-Oziewicz, M.; Niedzwiedzka, E.

    2006-01-01

    Food patterns of Polish older people were separated and described. The research included 422 people aged 65+ years, living in 5 geographical locations. Participants of the study were selected in quota sampling. Criteria for recruitment included sex, age (65-^74 or 75+ years) and family status...

  13. Why People with Autism Avoid Eye Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of social or personal indifference, many people with autism say eye contact causes them discomfort or stress, the study authors noted. The new research traces the problem to part of the brain that triggers ... people with and without autism looked at images of faces either freely or ...

  14. Overactive bladder syndrome in older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagg, A.S.; Cardozo, L.; Chapple, C.R.; Ridder, D. de; Kelleher, C.; Kirby, M.; Milsom, I.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The overactive bladder symptom complex (OAB) is the commonest cause of urinary incontinence in older people, and is usually due to underlying detrusor overactivity, and as such is a treatable condition. Older people are a heterogeneous group, which includes fit community-dwelling individuals and

  15. Labor Migration by Russian Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man'shin, R. V.; Timoshenko, O. V.; Pis'mennaia, E. E.

    2009-01-01

    Russia's young people have become active participants in processes of migration. After the fall of the USSR, young people began to travel outside Russia in substantially greater numbers. At the present time, young Russians can be found in all kinds of regions and countries of the world. They are getting an education in foreign universities and…

  16. Asset Building for and by Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverly, Sondra G.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the four preceding articles on youth and saving, identifies policy and program implications, and suggests directions for future scholarship. It is clear that saving is difficult for many people and throughout the life course. Efforts to help young people accumulate assets might encourage saving by parents, encourage saving…

  17. Enhancing Participation of Indigenous People to Address ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New research will help indigenous peoples in Latin America tackle the inequity, racial discrimination, and other barriers they face in accessing their right to health care. Geographic and language barriers, combined with ethnic and racial discrimination, are some of the reasons why indigenous peoples experience social ...

  18. Literacy for Deaf People Seeking Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryall, Gordon

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on the literacy problems of deaf people who are seeking employment. The article argues for the provision of adequate English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) literacy skills training, makes programming recommendations, and suggests employment strategies that deaf people need. (12 references) (Author/CK)

  19. "Guns do not kill, people do!"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemche, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Bible does not kill, but many people who have read the Bible (in their way) have killed, virtually or in real.......The Bible does not kill, but many people who have read the Bible (in their way) have killed, virtually or in real....

  20. Physical exercise for people with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Luise; Dam, Gitte; Rinnov, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of physical exercise versus no intervention for people with cirrhosis.......This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of physical exercise versus no intervention for people with cirrhosis....

  1. Technologies in older people's care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson Marchesoni, Maria; Axelsson, Karin; Fältholm, Ylva; Lindberg, Inger

    2017-03-01

    The tension between care-based and technology-based rationalities motivates studies concerning how technology can be used in the care sector to support the relational foundation of care. This study interprets values related to care and technologies connected to the practice of good care. This research study was part of a development project aimed at developing innovative work practices through information and communication technology. Participants and research context: All staff (n = 18) working at two wards in a care facility for older people were asked to participate in interviews, and 12 accepted. We analysed the data using latent content analysis in combination with normative analysis. Ethical considerations: The caregivers were informed that participation was voluntary and that they could drop out at any time without providing any explanation. Four values were identified: 'presence', 'appreciation', 'competence' and 'trust'. Caregivers wanted to focus on care receivers as unique persons, a view that they thought was compromised by time-consuming and beeping electronic devices. Appraising from next-of-kin and been seen as someone who can contribute together with knowledge to handle different situations were other desires. The caregivers also desired positive feedback from next-of-kin, as they wanted to be seen as professionals who have the knowledge and skills to handle difficult situations. In addition, the caregivers wanted their employer to trust them, and they wanted to work in a calm environment. Caregivers' desire for disturbance-free interactions, being valued for their skills and working in a trustful working environment were interpreted as their base for providing good care. The caregivers' arguments are based on caring rationality, and sometimes they felt the technological rationality interfered with their main mission, providing quality care. Introducing new technology in caring should support the caring relationship. Although society's overall

  2. Older peoples' lived experiences after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    Background Older people's hip fracture (HF) may occur due to osteoporosis, impaired balance or other health problems. For the individual, the experience of changes in wellbeing and/or changes in a recent active everyday-life; new health problems such as dependency, pain and a fear of falling may...... add to the load of wellbeing-challenges after HF. Evidence-based knowledge in order to address the wellbeing of older people and the challenges they meet in changing times after HF is needed for professionals. Aim To explore the support older people with HF may need to optimize their wellbeing during...... by the philosophies of Heidegger and Gadamer to explore older people´s lived experiences through repeated interviews; and applying an existential framework of wellbeing where meaning and health can be understood as a balancing of mobility and dwelling. Results The systematic review reveals older peoples´ worries when...

  3. Image and Video for Hearing Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Burger

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a global overview of image- and video-processing-based methods to help the communication of hearing impaired people. Two directions of communication have to be considered: from a hearing person to a hearing impaired person and vice versa. In this paper, firstly, we describe sign language (SL and the cued speech (CS language which are two different languages used by the deaf community. Secondly, we present existing tools which employ SL and CS video processing and recognition for the automatic communication between deaf people and hearing people. Thirdly, we present the existing tools for reverse communication, from hearing people to deaf people that involve SL and CS video synthesis.

  4. GIS Application Management for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongkaw, Sasalak

    2017-08-01

    This research aimed to develop and design Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for facilitating disabled people by presenting some useful disabled information on the Google Map. The map could provide information about disabled types of people such as blind, deaf and physical movement. This research employed the Multiview 2 theory and method to plan and find out the problems in real world situation. This research used many designing data structure methods such as Data Flow Diagram, and ER-Diagram. The research focused into two parts: server site and client site which included the interface for Web-based application. The clear information of disable people on the map was useful for facilitating disabled people to find some useful information. In addition, it provided specialized data for company and government officers for managing and planning local facilities for disabled people in the cities. The disable could access the system through the Internet access at any time by using mobile or portable devices.

  5. Image and Video for Hearing Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aran Oya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a global overview of image- and video-processing-based methods to help the communication of hearing impaired people. Two directions of communication have to be considered: from a hearing person to a hearing impaired person and vice versa. In this paper, firstly, we describe sign language (SL and the cued speech (CS language which are two different languages used by the deaf community. Secondly, we present existing tools which employ SL and CS video processing and recognition for the automatic communication between deaf people and hearing people. Thirdly, we present the existing tools for reverse communication, from hearing people to deaf people that involve SL and CS video synthesis.

  6. Medication prescribing in frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Ruth E; O'Mahony, M Sinead; Woodhouse, Kenneth W

    2013-03-01

    While some people remain fit and active as they grow older, others experience complex problems: disease, dependency and disability. Frailty is a term used to describe this latter group, capturing differences in health status among older people. Many frail older people have multiple chronic co-morbidities and functional impairments and, according to guidelines for the management of individual conditions, should be prescribed long lists of medications. However, older people (particularly those who are frail) are often excluded from drug trials, and treatment decisions are therefore based on evidence extrapolated from more robust patient groups with fewer physiological deficits. The risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) increases with increasing patient frailty, and polypharmacy has negative consequences above and beyond the risks of individual drugs. Increasing numbers of medications are associated with a higher likelihood of non-adherence and a significantly greater risk of ADRs. Older people taking five or more medications are at higher risk of delirium and falls, independent of medication indications. This is a short review of the different approaches to defining and measuring frailty. We summarise the factors contributing to ADRs in frail older people and describe the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics changes associated with ageing and frailty. By considering goals of care for frail older people, we explore how the appropriateness of medication prescribing for older people could be improved. Since all physicians are likely to provide care for this group of vulnerable patients, understanding the concept of frailty may help to optimise medication prescribing for older people. The incorporation of frailty measures into future clinical studies of drug effects and pharmacokinetics is important if we are to improve medication use and guide drug doses for fit and frail older people.

  7. Designing to Fit People of Different Sizes: One Product Can Indeed Fit Nearly All People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    People interact with products and vehicles in a physical manner. They push lawn mowers, they hold mixers, and they drive cars and trucks. This interaction is greatly improved when there is a physical, dimensional match between the people and the products and vehicles they use. However, people vary in size and shape. The study and application of…

  8. Indigenous people's detection of rapid ecological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Shankar; Lauer, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    When sudden catastrophic events occur, it becomes critical for coastal communities to detect and respond to environmental transformations because failure to do so may undermine overall ecosystem resilience and threaten people's livelihoods. We therefore asked how capable of detecting rapid ecological change following massive environmental disruptions local, indigenous people are. We assessed the direction and periodicity of experimental learning of people in the Western Solomon Islands after a tsunami in 2007. We compared the results of marine science surveys with local ecological knowledge of the benthos across 3 affected villages and 3 periods before and after the tsunami. We sought to determine how people recognize biophysical changes in the environment before and after catastrophic events such as earthquakes and tsunamis and whether people have the ability to detect ecological changes over short time scales or need longer time scales to recognize changes. Indigenous people were able to detect changes in the benthos over time. Detection levels differed between marine science surveys and local ecological knowledge sources over time, but overall patterns of statistically significant detection of change were evident for various habitats. Our findings have implications for marine conservation, coastal management policies, and disaster-relief efforts because when people are able to detect ecological changes, this, in turn, affects how they exploit and manage their marine resources. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. Urban Bird Feeding: Connecting People with Nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel T C; Gaston, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    At a time of unprecedented biodiversity loss, researchers are increasingly recognizing the broad range of benefits provided to humankind by nature. However, as people live more urbanized lifestyles there is a progressive disengagement with the natural world that diminishes these benefits and discourages positive environmental behaviour. The provision of food for garden birds is an increasing global phenomenon, and provides a readily accessible way for people to counter this trend. Yet despite its popularity, quite why people feed birds remains poorly understood. We explore three loosely defined motivations behind bird feeding: that it provides psychological benefits, is due to a concern about bird welfare, and/or is due to a more general orientation towards nature. We quantitatively surveyed households from urban towns in southern England to explore attitudes and actions towards garden bird feeding. Each household scored three Likert statements relating to each of the three motivations. We found that people who fed birds regularly felt more relaxed and connected to nature when they watched garden birds, and perceived that bird feeding is beneficial for bird welfare while investing time in minimising associated risks. Finally, feeding birds may be an expression of a wider orientation towards nature. Overall, we found that the feelings of being relaxed and connected to nature were the strongest drivers. As urban expansion continues both to threaten species conservation and to change peoples' relationship with the natural world, feeding birds may provide an important tool for engaging people with nature to the benefit of both people and conservation.

  10. Earthquake Protection Measures for People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gountromichou, C.; Kourou, A.; Kerpelis, P.

    2009-04-01

    The problem of seismic safety for people with disabilities not only exists but is also urgent and of primary importance. Working towards disability equality, Earthquake Planning and Protection Organization of Greece (E.P.P.O.) has developed an educational scheme for people with disabilities in order to guide them to develop skills to protect themselves as well as to take the appropriate safety measures before, during and after an earthquake. The framework of this initiative includes a number of actions have been already undertaken, including the following: a. Recently, the main guidelines have been published to help people who have physical, cognitive, visual, or auditory disabilities to cope with a destructive earthquake. Of great importance, in case of people with disabilities, is to be prepared for the disaster, with several measures that must be taken starting today. In the pre-earthquake period, it is important that these people, in addition to other measures, do the following: - Create a Personal Support Network The Personal Support Network should be a group of at least three trustful people that can assist the disabled person to prepare for a disastrous event and to recover after it. - Complete a Personal Assessment The environment may change after a destructive earthquake. People with disabilities are encouraged to make a list of their personal needs and their resources for meeting them in a disaster environment. b. Lectures and training seminars on earthquake protection are given for students, teachers and educators in Special Schools for disabled people, mainly for informing and familiarizing them with earthquakes and with safety measures. c. Many earthquake drills have already taken place, for each disability, in order to share good practices and lessons learned to further disaster reduction and to identify gaps and challenges. The final aim of this action is all people with disabilities to be well informed and motivated towards a culture of earthquake

  11. People Recognition: A Historical/Anthropological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Using current neurological and neuropsychological literature, and the analysis of different cultural and historical conditions, people recognition is analyzed. Different “subsystems” or “modules” could be involved in individuals' recognition: living versus non-living, own species versus other species, familiar versus non-familiar, males versus females, and individual identification versus emotional identification. Not only visual, but also auditory and even olfactory information may be involved in people recognition. Visual information involved in people recognition is proposed to include not only the perception of faces, but also the perception of whole body and gait, clothes, emotional expressions, and individual marks.

  12. Utilitarianism, poverty and development of disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier de França, Inacia Sátiro; Freitag Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the influences of human development factors in the experience of disabled people based on social scenarios of inequality. The data collected were standardized and allocated in thematic categories. The analysis was based on liberal utilitarianism. The conclusion is that there is legislation in Brazil that guarantees the disabled people's development in areas such as health, education and work. However despite the attempts of decision makers in combating discriminatory behaviors and the theory based on equity, these people still face difficulties in breaking the barrier of poverty and achieving all humans rights deserved.

  13. Features of suicide in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jugović Aleksandar L.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide rates in young people have increased during the past three decades in the world. This paper summarizes current knowledge about main features of suicide in young people. The paper applies a case study method and statistical method. Risk factor domains which may contribute to suicidal behaviour include individual and personal vulnerabilities, family adversity, exposure to stressful life events and social, cultural and contextual factors. Frequently, suicidal behaviours in young people appear to be a consequence of multiple risk factors. Comprehensive multi-sectoral approach in prevention of suicide, including both health and non-health sectors, e.g. education, police, justice, religion, law, politics, the media.

  14. The power of people in mobile testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayato Kamasudo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most Americans remember the legendary Lech Walesa speech in Congress, which began with the phrase "We, the people..." [1], and which emphasized the power of a united group of people. Some years later, Howe created the term "crowdsourcing" [2], and this idea began its dynamic development, and even incorporated to software testing. This article presents some of the pros and cons of using the power of the people in the world of mobile testing, from experiences collected in the realization of several projects using standard and outsourced methods.

  15. [Sleep health education for elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Soichiro; Nishiyama, Akiko

    2015-06-01

    Successful aging is characterized by minimal age-associated loss of the physiological functions of sleep and circadian clock. Sleep health education is necessary to have normal, quality nighttime sleep and full daytime alertness. Elderly people show changes of sleep parameters, accompanied by increased napping. Many studies have reported that daytime sleepiness or napping in elderly people could have potentially serious effects such as dementia and life-style related diseases. The main topics of sleep health education for elderly people are as follows: Right knowledge of sleep mechanism, understanding the bad influence of excessive napping, the effects of light on the circadian rhythm and negative effects of caffeine, alcohol and television.

  16. Products for Security Screening of People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Security Systems Products for Security Screening of People Share ...

  17. HBR's 10 must reads on managing people

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2011-01-01

    ... them. If you read nothing else on managing people, read these articles. We've combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles and selected the most important ones to help you maximize your employee's performance...

  18. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  19. "All Our Relations": Respecting People and Scholarship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jonas Greve; Neilson, Alison; Spannring, Reingaard

    simple and complex, drew us to seek a circle of renewal and remembering of life and lives that may have been forgotten at times within ESER.The phrase “all our/my relations” comes from indigenous worldviews and practices of honouring all the people who have come before you as well as the other living...... with complex histories and inequities (Glass, Scott & Price, 2012; Sund & Öhman, 2014). We will respect people and scholarship via three main currents of discussion:The role of love in ESER“Ignored concepts” - Research and extensive discourse that gets ignored when defining questions that assume people...... are selfish and have never cooperated to protect the commons, or are not politically active (Gaiser, Rijke & Spanning, 2010) uncritical acceptance of people/nature dichotomy, uncritical use of education as transferring information from expert to ignorant.Political dimensions of ESER (postcolonial lens, global...

  20. How Do People Cope with Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Muscular Dystrophy: Other FAQs Basic information for topics, such as “ ... in this section. How do people cope with muscular dystrophy (MD)? Although MD presents many challenges in many ...

  1. Mortality in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Pauline; Lauer, Emily; Hoghton, Matt

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews why an understanding of mortality data in general, and in relation to people with intellectual disabilities in particular, is an important area of concern, and introduces the papers in this Special Edition.

  2. Agents That Negotiate Proficiently with People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Sarit

    Negotiation is a process by which interested parties confer with the aim of reaching agreements. The dissemination of technologies such as the Internet has created opportunities for computer agents to negotiate with people, despite being distributed geographically and in time. The inclusion of people presents novel problems for the design of autonomous agent negotiation strategies. People do not adhere to the optimal, monolithic strategies that can be derived analytically, as is the case in settings comprising computer agents alone. Their negotiation behavior is affected by a multitude of social and psychological factors, such as social attributes that influence negotiation deals (e.g., social welfare, inequity aversion) and traits of individual negotiators (e.g., altruism, trustworthiness, helpfulness). Furthermore, culture plays an important role in their decision making and people of varying cultures differ in the way they make offers and fulfill their commitments in negotiation.

  3. Psychotherapy with people with developmental disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zafošnik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available People with developmental disabilities can experience any psychological abnormalitiy and psychiatric illness as do people without developmental disabilities. Due to different diagnostic criteria, assessment procedures and instruments, we lack definite prevalence rates for people with developmental disabilities, also suffering from mental health problems, eventhough most studies place the rate at 20 to 40%. One of the possible treatment alternatives for augmenting psychological well-being is psychotherapy, but is extremely rarely used for people with severe and profound disabilities, where speech cannot be the main therapeutic medium. So, those that are included in the psychotherapuetic process are predominantly clients with mild developmental disabilities, and they are mostly in cognitive-behavioral therapy. Recently, two models of (psychotherapy for persons with severe and profound developmental disabilities were developed: developmental-dynamic relationship therapy and attachment-based behaviour therapy for children. Conceptually, they both originate form developmental psychoanalytic theories.

  4. Health Care Access Among Deaf People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    .... The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health...

  5. The Nagoya Protocol and Indigenous Peoples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maria Yolanda Teran

    2016-01-01

      This article is about Indigenous peoples' involvement in the Nagoya Protocol negotiations from 2006 to 2010, as well as in its implementation to stop biopiracy in order to protect Pachamama, Mother...

  6. Older people, food and satisfaction with life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Moira; Raats, Monique M.; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses food-related satisfaction with life of older people, identifying some of the determinants and barriers to satisfaction with food-related quality of life, and discusses possible ways of enhancing older people's quality of life in the domain of food. Despite being strongly as...... of health, social networks, income and skills change. Changes in resources can be expected to have an impact on satisfaction with life....

  7. Producing the voice of socially excluded people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Esben

    2003-01-01

    An investigation of the practices of outreach workers, when they try to build bridges between drug addicts and homeless people living in the streets and welfare and health care institutions. The article uses tools from discourse analysis and governmentality analysis......An investigation of the practices of outreach workers, when they try to build bridges between drug addicts and homeless people living in the streets and welfare and health care institutions. The article uses tools from discourse analysis and governmentality analysis...

  8. The Occupational Wellbeing of People Experiencing Homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Yvonne; Gray, M.; McGinty, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a study that utilised an occupational perspective to explore how wellbeing was achieved and sustained by the occupations of people experiencing homelessness in Australia. Thirty three in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with homeless individuals in a regional city in Australia. Data from the interviews were thematically analysed to understand the relationship between wellbeing, as defined by the individual, and the occupations engaged in by people exp...

  9. Caring for older people. Community services: health.

    OpenAIRE

    Pushpangadan, M.; Burns, E.

    1996-01-01

    Many frail or disabled elderly people are now being maintained in the community, partially at least as a consequence of the Community Care Act 1993. This paper details the work of the major health professionals who are involved in caring for older people in the community and describes how to access nursing, palliative care, continence, mental health, Hospital at Home, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, equipment, and optical, dental, and dietetic services. In many areas, services are evolvi...

  10. Neglect of Older People in Humanitarian Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unni Karunakara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adapted from Keynote Address at the Association for Anthropology and Gerontology conference, Florida International University, Miami. February 7, 2015. An earlier version of this paper titled “Humanitarian assistance for older people: does it matter?” (June 2012 was presented to Doctors Without Borders for discussion, and later published in PLoS Medicine (December 2012; 9(12:e1001357 as “Ending Neglect of Older People in the Response to Humanitarian Emergencies.”1

  11. Access to Internet of People With Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatoş Subaşıoğlu

    2000-06-01

    blowing. It’s even possible to control computers by using the voice. However, currently, the largest problem is that WWW pages are increasingly developed with pictures, images, audio and video clips carrying much of the information. For this reason, the aims of this article are twofold: first, to give some information about products of adaptive technologies for people with disabilities, and second, to give some design examples about Web pages for this people.

  12. Older people and smartwatches, initial experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales Climent, Andrea; Fernández Ardèvol, Mireia; Comunello, Francesca; Mulargia, Simone; Ferran Ferrer, Núria

    2017-01-01

    While wearable technologies, such as smartwatches, are seen as an opportunity to solve some problems often related to older people (65+), e.g. emergencies, physical activity, or isolation, little is known about how older people would domesticate such new technologies. In this study we provided eleven older individuals with smartwatches and tracked their expectations and initial experiences using two interviews. According to our preliminary findings, previous experience with ICTs along with op...

  13. Sexuality of people with intestinal ostomy

    OpenAIRE

    Danyelle Braga Rodrigues Cardoso; Camilo Eduardo Almeida; Mary Elizabeth de Santana; Dione Seabra de Carvalho; Helena Megumi Sonobe; Namie Okino Sawada

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to describe the experience of sexuality and other everyday life aspects for people with intestinal ostomy. Methods: qualitative, descriptive study with ten participants of the Specialized Reference Unit who gave interviews with inductive content analysis. Results: the established themes were Physical, emotional and socio-cultural changes, Changes in the exercise of sexuality of people with intestinal ostomy and Importance of the interdisciplinary support of the new sexuality. These...

  14. Seeking place: young people, homelessness and violence

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Lucinda May

    2017-01-01

    This thesis draws upon in-depth qualitative interviews with 33 young people in Melbourne, Australia, to examine the impact of homelessness, violence and policing on their sense of self, place and belonging. Specifically, this research highlights the pervasive presence of violence and policing in homeless young people’s lives, and argues that these experiences exclude young people from public and private spaces that are important to them, undermine their sense of belonging as citizens, and vio...

  15. People with intellectual disabilities and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Janet; Chadwick, Darren; Baines, Susannah; Emerson, Eric; Hatton, Chris

    2017-03-12

    Dysphagia (difficulties in eating, drinking or swallowing) is associated with serious health complications and psychosocial sequelae. This review aims to summarise the state of the evidence regarding dysphagia in people with intellectual disabilities (excluding prevalence), identify gaps in the evidence base and highlight future research priorities. Studies published from 1 January 1990 to 19 July 2016 were identified using Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, Web of Science, email requests and cross citations. Studies were reviewed narratively in relation to identified themes. A total of 35 studies were included in the review. Themes identified were as follows: health conditions associated with dysphagia; mortality; health service use; practice and knowledge in supporting people with intellectual disabilities and dysphagia; intervention effectiveness and quality of life. Dysphagia is associated with respiratory infections and choking and may be under-recognised. Silent aspiration is common and may go unnoticed. Management practices exist, but there are few intervention studies and no randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and hence, the effectiveness of these is currently unclear. Dysphagia is a key concern in relation to people with intellectual disabilities. There is urgent need for research on the management of dysphagia in people with intellectual disabilities, including mealtime support offered, positioning, dietary modification and impact on wellbeing. Implications for Rehabilitation Dysphagia is common in people with intellectual disabilities, associated with serious health risks and may be under-recognised. Caregivers of people with intellectual disabilities should be educated about dysphagia. There is an urgent need for research on improving the management of dysphagia in people with intellectual disabilities. Improved recognition and management of dysphagia may reduce the occurrence of associated health conditions and reduce hospital admissions and premature death

  16. Continence advice by telehealth for young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Caroline; Henderson, Lisa; Levy, Sharon

    Children and young people operate in an advanced technological world where new, exciting opportunities exist for remote interactions. To engage with these service users, we set up a nurse-led telehealth facility that enabled young people with spina bifida to access specialist continence service from home. This article describes efforts to embed this innovation into practice and offer insight to some of the challenges we faced in the process. It offers practical guidance on setting up similar services.

  17. Social Capital and Stratification of Young People

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Behtoui

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the impact of social capital on the status attainment process of young people at the start of their careers and examines how social class, gender and ethnicity affect the accumulation of social capital and thereby labour market stratification of young people. A sample of young Swedes graduating from vocational schools and universities between 2005 and 2006, was surveyed via the telephone about their experiences acquiring jobs. Two research questions are posed: (i) Which c...

  18. Suicide in older people: Revisioning new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuter, Kate; Procter, Nicholas; Evans, David; Jaworski, Katrina

    2016-04-01

    This discussion paper identifies and examines several tensions inherent in traditional approaches to understanding older people's suicide. Predicted future increases in the absolute number of elderly suicides are subject to careful interpretation due to the underreporting of suicides in older age groups. Furthermore, a significant number of studies of older people's death by suicide examine risk factors or a combination of risk factors in retrospect only, while current approaches to suicide prevention in the elderly place disproportionate emphasis on the identification and treatment of depression. Taken together, such tensions give rise to a monologic view of research and practice, ultimately limiting our potential for understanding older people's experience of suicide and suicidal behaviour. New approaches are necessary if we are to move beyond the current narrow focus that prevails. Fresh thinking, which draws on older people's experience of attempting to die by suicide, might offer critical insight into socially-constructed meanings attributed to suicide and suicidal behaviour by older people. Specifically, identification through research into the protective mechanisms that are relevant and available to older people who have been suicidal is urgently needed to effectively guide mental health nurses and health-care professionals in therapeutic engagement and intervention. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. The labor market for people 50+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia LUCIUS

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of ageing society and its influence on shaping economy is one of the priorities in political discussions nowadays. The trend of increasing population of 50+ years old people is visible in most of the highly developed European countries. This situation induces countries with changing demographical structure to implement solutions that will extend the job activity of people in the immobile age. The best example is Germany, where the introduction of structural reforms in the labor market employment in the 55+ group increased in 10 years by 20%. Effective management of the community of older people is necessary to keep the balance in economy. Many examples of good case practices from chosen European countries point an important role of education in this process. Education is a tool that aims to support older people in functioning on the job market and increase employers’ awareness of changes and solutions that need to be implemented in their companies. Customized forms of employment are another instrument of increasing job activity of older people. They let employers adjust the time, place of work, job description and form of payment according to the employer’s and employee’s preferences. Though, the most significant instrument is reduction of unemployment benefits for people who are qualified to take job activity. In this case one of the solutions is applying temporary benefits that stimulate active job hunting. The mentioned activities, to ensure their efficiency, should be supported by adequate law regulations.

  20. Sudden Death in Young People--Heart Problems Often Blamed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden death in young people: Heart problems often blamed Sudden death in young people is rare, but those at ... causes and treatments. By Mayo Clinic Staff Sudden death in people younger than 35, often due to ...

  1. Meeting the needs of young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), recognizing its responsibility to assist young people in fulfilling their roles as parents, citizens, and leaders, seeks to improve the quality of life of young people by advocating and promoting, especially to governments and other organizations, measures that will respond to their total human needs, including the provision of education and employment opportunities. IPPF, as a family planning organization, can contribute directly to the preparation of young people for responsible parenthood and to meeting their fertility related needs. Family planning associations (FPAs) are encouraged to initiate, strengthen, or support programs which respond to the needs of young people. Priority should be given to meeting the needs of the most disadvantaged groups, with emphasis on out of school and rural youth, slum dwellers, youth in urban industrialized areas, and abandoned adolescents and children, with special attention to the early group adolescent age group. The involvement of young people as active partners in IPPF's work is essential for its efforts to promote and sustain commitment to family planning at policymaking and community levels in the years ahead and to prepare the next generation of leaders within the Federation. Population, family life, and sex education, including family planning and reproductive health management, provide in both formal and nonformal settings, are the cornerstone of youth programs. FPAs should look for ways to remove legal, administrative, and other barriers to the availability of adequate education and services. As pregnancy poses special hazards for adolescents, particularly those under age 16, services should cater to the special circumstances in which adolescent childbearing is taking place. No single contraceptive method can be regarded satisfactory for adolescents as a group, but each method may have a place in adolescent services. Several factors, such as age, parity, and

  2. Partner Selection for People with Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Claire; Terry, Louise; Popple, Keith

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to understand the characteristics that adults with intellectual disabilities look for in a partner. There have been numerous studies that have explored partner selection for people without intellectual disabilities, but no research that specifically identified the traits valued in a partner by people with intellectual disabilities. In-depth interviews were conducted with eleven participants across two UK sites. All participants were adults with an intellectual disability who had been in a relationship with a partner for over a year. The narratives were analysed utilizing hermeneutic phenomenology, guided by the theory of Van Manen (1990). The findings highlighted that, regardless of age, participant's relationships typically developed within a segregated environment for people with intellectual disabilities over the past 10 years. People with intellectual disabilities expressed a wish to be loved, to be treated kindly and to have companionship. However, they did not place high value on attributes such as financial security, social status or intelligence. The research demonstrated how poorly integrated people with intellectual disabilities are within mainstream society. Desired characteristics and expectations for participant's relationships were rooted in a shared history and culture, which was shaped by their intellectual disability and support needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. THE ASSERTIVENESS OF PEOPLE WHO PRACTICE KARATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szark-Eckardt Miroslawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Assertiveness is the ability to express your thoughts, beliefs and opinions without the feeling of internal tension, that is why it is a desired trait of character. One of the examples of sports disciplines in which assertiveness can play a desired role is karate. One of the aims of this paper was to answer the question, whether the act of doing karate influences the level of assertiveness among people who practice it and to compare the results with the level of assertiveness declared by people who do other sports. The method applied in this paper was the diagnostics survey, while the tool was the questionnaire form based on the Rathus Assertiveness Scale. 50 students who practice karate on regular basis and 50 students who do other sports participated in the research. It is undeniable that the level of assertiveness among people who practice karate is higher in comparison to people who do other sports. Karate doers, both men and women obtained better results compared to the second group of sportsmen/women. This regularity can be observed among men, but it is more perceptible among women. As the research presents, people who attend karate trainings at least three times a week are characterized by a higher level of assertiveness in comparison to those who attend the training once a week.

  4. POVERTY IN AND ABOUT THE AMERINDIOS PEOPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Oquendo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Poverty has come to be understood as the lack of income to cover basic needs. The World Bank (2002 defined it as hunger, while ECLAC (2000 within a more relative framework, he said, consists of "lack of economic and social resources that the referential society considers basic." Are indigenous peoples considered poor according to these conceptual frameworks? The episteme of the indigenous peoples is built with another language / language which will fit into these paradigms. However, work as an activity, as action is the universal difference between man and animals. The man when he works uses the language because the work itself is a language and constitutes the tool to organize and benefit from nature. The language of Amerindian peoples has been displaced by modernism. How does Amerindian peoples participate in the work if their language does not participate in the institutions of wage-labor societies? With these questions I will address the differentiality of the term poverty in and on Amerindian peoples.

  5. Improving mental health in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Helen; Purcell, Rosemary; Goldstone, Sherilyn; McGorry, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    The gap between unmet need and access to care for mental ill-health is wider for adolescents and young people aged 12-25 years than any other age group worldwide. This age group is the peak time of onset for many mental disorders including mood, substance abuse and psychotic disorders. Effective interventions in primary or specialist care are likely to be most cost-effective at this age. Yet in most countries there are few opportunities for young people and their families to gain access to treatment and care for mental ill-health and preventive interventions. This is especially important for young people exposed to trauma and adversity. Few countries give sufficient attention to safeguarding and improving the mental health of young people and few have developed policies and programs to support this. Policy and practice changes suitable for each country have two essential starting points: improved understanding of youth mental health within communities; and involving young people and their families in decisions that affect them. Using information technology to assist care is another desirable feature of modern service development suitable for any environment. New directions and models of care to respond to better awareness and help-seeking and new approaches to health promotion are being developed in several countries, and psychiatrists have a central role in supporting these developments.

  6. Internet Usage among Children and Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karayagiz Muslu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Computers have occupied increasingly central roles in children’s world with the advance of technology. They have proved to be an ideal companion for children in developing and developed countries who spend most of their time at school or home with computers. As a measure of development and modernization, technology has made people’s lives easier and contributed positively to social well-being so far while it has also brought about some problems and threats stemming from irresponsible use of Internet. Unmonitored use of Internet may cause damages in children’s and young people’s physical, psychological, social and cognitive development. It seems imperative to assure that children and young people can benefit from computers and Internet resources effectively and productively while measures for appropriate and safe use of Internet are to be taken into serious consideration. Therefore, the government offices and institutions should lay stress upon the issue; education professionals and parents should be well-informed and regularly updated; and finally children and young people should be educated and monitored to achieve a better and efficient use of Internet. In this paper, has been mentioned to negative effect of internet usage on physical, psychosocial and cognitive health of children and young people. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(5.000: 445-450

  7. Everyday meal preparation for people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Mette Kathrine Friis; Nejsum, Hanne Lindberg; Bendtsen, Trine Vase

    When people are diagnosed with dementia everyday activities like meal preparation will gradually become more difficult. A recipe is a support for meal preparation but as dementia develops, it seems that following a recipe can be a challenge. In Denmark health professionals often use meal...... preparation as an activity for people with dementia but they have no combined material to base the planning of the activity on. The thesis of this project is that when persons with dementia is involved in cooking his or her own meal meal preparation it will contribute to the feeling of content and meaning...... in everyday life. Furthermore getting the appropriate and nutritious food will be a step in the right direction regarding prevention of malnutrition. The aim of this project is to develop a guide to increase the possibility for people with dementia to continue everyday life through participating in meal...

  8. Health care for people with disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Leturia Arrazola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of disabled people aren’t or don’t feel ill, and despite that they should be taken care of by the general medical services as many other citizens, most of them need a more intense and frequent health care. This is explained by a higher prevalence of some medical conditions as well as a higher risk of comorbidity among the people with disabilities (in comparison to the general population. At the moment there are many problems concerning accessibility, underdiagnose and overtreatment. National health systems should be able to offer all their services adapted to disabled people in order to obtain results for this group that are similar to those of the rest of the population. To achieve this objective it is necessary to improve professional competencies and skills and develop some specific health programmes.

  9. PTSD in older bereaved people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-01-01

      Late life bereavement has been associated with psychological problems, mainly depression. A few studies indicated that Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was an important issue to investigate in late life bereavement reactions. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of PTSD in recently...... bereaved elderly people compared to married controls and to investigate whether the loss of a spouse in old age, in contrast with earlier assumptions, could lead to PTSD. Two hundred and ninety six Danish elderly bereaved people (mean age 73 years, 113 males) were chosen from national registers and were...... subsequently assessed two months post-bereavement. They were compared with a control group of 276 married elderly people. The prevalence of PTSD and depression were measured through a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that 16% of the bereaved and 4% of the control group had a PTSD diagnosis (ES=.35...

  10. Resolving Person Names in Web People Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Krisztian; Azzopardi, Leif; de Rijke, Maarten

    Disambiguating person names in a set of documents (such as a set of web pages returned in response to a person name) is a key task for the presentation of results and the automatic profiling of experts. With largely unstructured documents and an unknown number of people with the same name the problem presents many difficulties and challenges. This chapter treats the task of person name disambiguation as a document clustering problem, where it is assumed that the documents represent particular people. This leads to the person cluster hypothesis, which states that similar documents tend to represent the same person. Single Pass Clustering, k-Means Clustering, Agglomerative Clustering and Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis are employed and empirically evaluated in this context. On the SemEval 2007 Web People Search it is shown that the person cluster hypothesis holds reasonably well and that the Single Pass Clustering and Agglomerative Clustering methods provide the best performance.

  11. Four billion people facing severe water scarcity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Mesfin M; Hoekstra, Arjen Y

    2016-02-01

    Freshwater scarcity is increasingly perceived as a global systemic risk. Previous global water scarcity assessments, measuring water scarcity annually, have underestimated experienced water scarcity by failing to capture the seasonal fluctuations in water consumption and availability. We assess blue water scarcity globally at a high spatial resolution on a monthly basis. We find that two-thirds of the global population (4.0 billion people) live under conditions of severe water scarcity at least 1 month of the year. Nearly half of those people live in India and China. Half a billion people in the world face severe water scarcity all year round. Putting caps to water consumption by river basin, increasing water-use efficiencies, and better sharing of the limited freshwater resources will be key in reducing the threat posed by water scarcity on biodiversity and human welfare.

  12. Controlling young people through treatment and punishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates how both treatment and punishment is part of controlling young people involved in crime in the Danish welfare state. Lately there has been an increase in the use of confinement in young offenders institutions and thus a turn towards stricter punishments for crime. However......, treatment aiming at rehabilitation is still an integrated part of the system and the organization of the young offenders institutions. For the young people subjected to control both treatment and punishment are regarded as effective means of risk-control but there are also limitations and unintended results...... of exclusion and marginalization. When seeking to control young people involved in crime, the Danish social welfare state is not only social and humane but also exclusionary and at times inhumane....

  13. Communication Support for People with ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beukelman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS experience a motor speech disorder, such as dysarthria, as the disease progresses. At some point, 80 to 95% of people with ALS are unable to meet their daily communication needs using natural speech. Unfortunately, once intelligibility begins to decrease, speech performance often deteriorates so rapidly that there is little time to implement an appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC intervention; therefore, appropriate timing of referral for AAC assessment and intervention continues to be a most important clinical decision-making issue. AAC acceptance and use have increased considerably during the past decade. Many people use AAC until within a few weeks of their deaths.

  14. Palliative care for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Elizabeth L

    2010-01-01

    The number of people with dementia will rise dramatically over the next 20 years. Currently, one in three people over the age of 65 will die with dementia. A PubMed search using MeSH headings for 'dementia' AND 'palliative care' and for specific areas, i.e. enteral feeding. National reports, UK guidelines and policies were also consulted. Advanced dementia is now being perceived as a 'terminal illness' with a similar symptom burden and prognosis to advanced cancer. People with dementia have poor access to good quality end-of-life care. Interventions such as antibiotics, fever management policies and enteral tube feeding remain in use despite little evidence that they improve quality of life or other outcomes. Research is required on the effectiveness of 'holistic' palliative care, outcome measures and the impact on carers and families.

  15. Young people's attitudes towards illicit drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Karina; Østergaard, Jeanette; Reese, Sidsel

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Previous studies indicate that young people who have positive attitudes towards illicit drugs are more inclined to experiment with them. The first aim of our study was to identify the sociodemographic and risk behaviour characteristics of young people (16-24 years) with positive attitudes...... towards illicit drug use. The second aim was to identify the characteristics of young people with positive attitudes towards illicit drugs among those who had never tried drugs, those who had tried cannabis but no other illicit drugs, and those who regularly used cannabis and/or had tried other illicit...... drugs. METHODS: The analysis was based on a population-based survey from 2013 ( N = 3812). Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the association between sociodemographic and risk behaviour characteristics and positive attitudes towards illicit drugs. RESULTS: Young men had twice the odds...

  16. Constipation in older people: A consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Anton; Mattace-Raso, Francesco; Neri, Maria Cristina; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Rey, Enrique; Rogers, June

    2017-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a serious medical condition that affects 30%-40% of people over 60 years old. Although not normally life threatening, constipation reduces quality of life by the same extent as diabetes and osteoarthritis. There are currently no Europe-wide guidelines for treating constipation in older people, although there is some country-level guidance for the general population. We have evaluated the existing guidance and best clinical practice to improve the care of older people with constipation. European healthcare professionals working in gastroenterology, geriatrics, nursing and pharmacology discussed the treatment of constipation in older people and reviewed existing guidance on the treatment of constipation in the general population. This manuscript represents the consensus of all authors. Most general guidance for constipation treatment recommends increased dietary fibre, fluid intake and exercise; however, this is not always possible in older patients. Although a common first-line treatment, bulk-forming laxatives are unsuitable for older people because of an associated need to increase fluid intake, osmotic laxatives are likely to be the most suitable laxative type for older patients. Treatment is often hampered by reluctance to talk about bowel problems so healthcare providers should proactively identify older constipated patients who are self-medicating or not receiving treatment. With certain modifications, general treatment guidelines can be applied to older people with constipation, although specific guidelines are still required for this age group. Awareness of constipation, its complications and treatment options need to be increased among healthcare providers, patients and carers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Hospital doctors' attitudes towards older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, S; Logiudice, D; Schwarz, J; Brand, C

    2011-04-01

    Ageism among health professionals is increasingly recognized, but few studies investigated hospital doctors' attitudes towards older people. The aims of this study were to investigate hospital doctors' attitudes towards older people and to determine whether factors, which were identified in studies on other health professionals, influence hospital doctors' attitudes. Hospital doctors who worked in General Medicine or Aged Care units in two tertiary public hospitals in metropolitan Victoria, Australia, in 2008 were surveyed with Fraboni's Scale of Ageism (FSA), a validated instrument used to investigate attitudes towards older people. Demographic data from participants were collected. Of the 235 questionnaires distributed, 122 were returned (overall response rate 51.9%). Response rate was highest among consultants (80.4%), followed by registrars (64.1%) and lowest among interns and residents (35.2%). The mean FSA score attained by the respondents was 61.5 (SD 11.0), representing a point between a neutral and a positive disposition. Doctors' characteristics that were associated with more positive attitudes towards older people included age of 30years or older (P < 0.001), female gender (P= 0.003), more senior in position (P < 0.001), postgraduate years of 10 or more (P < 0.001), previous working experience in Aged Care (P < 0.001), interest in Aged Care (P < 0.001) and more frequent social contacts with healthy older people (P < 0.001). Hospital doctors of different demographic features and background characteristics display different attitudes towards older people. These findings can be used to inform future development of undergraduate and postgraduate medical curricula and form a basis for future studies on the effectiveness of these interventions in improving doctors' attitudes. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Levels And Spectra Of Aircraft Noise And People\\'s Reactions In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of sound levels and spectral distribution as well as people\\'s reactions to aircraft noise in three Nigerian international airports have been conducted. The study comprised physical measurements and social survey. Results show that maximum octave band pressure levels (BPLs) for Margaret Ekpo, Port Harcourt and ...

  19. Sonar bat for visually impaired people

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrero Rodríguez, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Visually impaired people have many difficulties when traveling because it is impossible for them to detect obstacles that stand in their way. Bats instead of using the sight to detect these obstacles use a method based on ultrasounds, as their sense of hearing is much more developed than that of sight. The aim of the project is to design and build a device based on the method used by the bats to detect obstacles and transmit this information to people with vision problems to improve the...

  20. Improving library services to people with disabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Deines-Jones, Courtney

    2007-01-01

    The book takes account of the key fact that to maximize their potential, people must have lifelong access to the information and services offered through books and libraries. Whether to address concerns of an ageing population or to enable all citizens to contribute fully through meaningful education and work opportunities, more emphasis is being given to promoting library services to people who have disabilities. This book is a compendium of articles focused on serving adults with disabilities in an international setting. From this book, librarians, policy makers and constituents will underst

  1. Managing change and people in libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, Tinker

    2009-01-01

    Managing Change and People in Libraries is designed to help library staff find options and compromises to personnel and management problems associated with the constant changes faced in libraries today. This text looks at theories of management, how people and processes change the stresses faced, how to analyze problems, find directions for change to be used and learn how to change negatives into positives in the workplace. The book is designed to help readers find direction and purpose in working practice.Theories explained through real life examplesAlternatives devel

  2. Evacuation characteristics of visually impaired people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Janne Gress; Dederichs, Anne

    2015-01-01

    -D). The mean free walking speed descending stairs for category C and D were found to be comparable with values found in Danish and Swedish guidelines. The walking speed of people with visible impairments was not affected by an increasing density on stairs to the same extent as the walking speed of able......-bodied adults. It was found that people with visual impairments were able to uphold a higher walking speed descending stairs than able-bodied adults for increasing person density. The initial walking speed on horizontal planes is lower than the value suggested by the N&M-model. The horizontal mean free walking...

  3. Usages of people names as cohesive elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Sipavicius Seide

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on usages of people names (proper name, nickname and pseudonym as cohesive elements. In this brief study, some usages of people names which ocurred in journalistic texts are analysed from an onomastic point of view. Emphasis  is placed on cultural, social and historic values of such usages. Data presented are parcial results of a broader research whose objective is to analyse textually and rethorically lexical cohesion tools observed in a sample of journalistic texts published by three Brazilian magazines (Istoé, Época and Veja during the second semester of 2008.

  4. Enabling sexual expression in people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youell, Jane

    2015-12-09

    Dementia remains a significant health and social care concern in the UK. Cases of dementia are expected to increase exponentially because more people are living longer. In response, the government has issued a set of policies and guidance to better meet the needs of those living with dementia. However, one important relational aspect is notably absent from most policy documents: sexuality. This can be a complicated issue in relationships affected by dementia. This article analyses the literature and uses case studies to provide practical guidance to nurses in relation to sexual expression in people with dementia.

  5. China's People-to-people Diplomacy and Its Importance to China-EU Relations: A Historical Institutionalism Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available People-to-people exchange has become a heated topic of the Chinese foreign policy. Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, China has established people-to-people dialogues with the United States, the European Union, the United Kingdom, France and Russia. In 2012, China and the EU established a high-level dialogue for people-to-people exchange, making people-to-people exchange the third pillar of China-EU relations. However, China is not a newcomer to people-to-people exchanges with Europe. Why does China launch the people-to-people diplomacy? Is it a plus or a must for China as well as for China-EU relations? The author reviews the history and current situation of China's people-to-people exchange and investigates China’s motivations behind the policy. Using the historical institutionalism as an approach, this paper argues that people-to-people diplomacy is a key component of the contemporary Chinese foreign policy towards Europe. China has long been an unequal counterpart to Europe since the 1840s. After the development of bilateral political and economic cooperation in the past four decades, people-to-people diplomacy is the last part that China needs to finish in order to regain equal status with Europe. In addition, it is also a step towards realising the "great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation".

  6. Character Education: Better Students, Better People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Maurice, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The application of social-emotional and character development (SECD) in classrooms is about teaching, practicing, and modeling essential personal and civic life habits and skills that are almost universally understood as making people good human beings. Among these habits are respect, responsibility, integrity, caring, fairness, and constructive…

  7. Housing Accessibility Methodology Targeting Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina

    activities. Barriers in the environment can limit or hinder activity performance. Therefore, older people are sensitive to the accessibility of the environment. To ensure housing accessibility, it is critical that professionals are provided with valid and reliable assessment instruments to identify...

  8. Library Automation Design for Visually Impaired People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtay, Nilufer; Bicil, Yucel; Celebi, Sait; Cit, Guluzar; Dural, Deniz

    2011-01-01

    Speech synthesis is a technology used in many different areas in computer science. This technology can bring a solution to reading activity of visually impaired people due to its text to speech conversion. Based on this problem, in this study, a system is designed needed for a visually impaired person to make use of all the library facilities in…

  9. Garbology: Detective Work in People's Trash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching PreK-8, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Defines garbology (a combination of garbage and archaeology) as being about people and the information one can learn about them from their trash. Provides guidelines for selection and handling of trash for analysis by students. Describes a group of second graders tracing a family's information through their trash and coming to a better…

  10. After Columbine: How People Mourn Sudden Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Jonathan D.

    2003-01-01

    Responses to the rampage killings at Columbine High School were analyzed at the national level, the level of the community, and that of the family. In many cases people responded by undertaking "grief projects." It is suggested that these projects are best understood within the context of Worden's task model of mourning. (Contains 31…

  11. Music for Engaging Young People in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong-Clinch, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Two music programs were developed specifically to meet therapeutic objectives for newly arrived immigrant and refugee students and for adolescent boys in a residential care facility. The author's observations justify further research to establish whether music can support and nurture the social, physical and mental wellbeing of young people,…

  12. Older people's experiences of dream coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadensten, Barbro

    2009-12-01

    Recalling and talking about dreams could initiate dream work among older people and provide an opportunity for self-confrontation and personal growth, which could in turn promote gerotranscendental development. The present article describes older people's opinions about participating in a dream-coaching group; it also briefly describes the theoretical foundation of dream coaching. The study aim was to investigate older people's experience of participating in a dream-coaching group based on Jungian psychology. A descriptive design was used. Retrospective interviews were explored using qualitative content analysis. The participants were satisfied with the arrangement of the dream-coaching groups. All participants believed that they had recalled their dreams and thought much more about their dreams during the period in which the dream-coaching group met. Three diverse appraisals of participating in a dream-coaching group, which had different effects on the participants, were identified: "An activity like any other activity," "An activity that led to deeper thoughts about the meaning of dreams," and "An activity that led to deeper thoughts both about the meaning of dreams and about how dreams can improve one's understanding of the life situation." It is possible to arrange dream-coaching groups for older people and could be a way to promote personal development using this type of intervention. The study provides some guidance as to how such a group could be organized, thus facilitating use of dream-coaching groups in gerontological care.

  13. People Types & Tiger Stripes. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gordon D.

    This book presents one method for identifying mind-sets, learning styles, and motivation patterns, and using the patterns in planning instruction and other helping processes, with the objective of helping people find and use their strengths to ameliorate weaknesses. The approach presented is based on Carl Jung's ideas about psychological types, as…

  14. Canine aggression toward unfamiliar people and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Lore I

    2008-09-01

    Aggression toward unfamiliar dogs and people is a common problem arising most commonly from fear and territoriality. A number of factors contribute to its development, including socialization deficits, hormones, and genetic and neurophysiologic components. These factors are discussed in this article, as are management and behavior modification approaches for controlling aggression.

  15. Are people adapted to their own glasses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, W.D.; Brenner, E.; Sousa, R.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Negative lenses, either in the form of glasses or contact lenses, can correct nearsightedness. Unlike contact lenses, glasses do not only correct, but also induce optic distortions. In the scientific literature, it has often been assumed that people who wear corrective glasses instantaneously

  16. Cooling water contamination - the people issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spowart, G. [Loy Yang Power, Taralgon, Vic. (Australia)

    2000-06-01

    This paper looks at the people management issues surrounding the discovery of potentially lethal organisms on an industrial site. While the discussion relates to Legionella and Naegleria fowleri at Loy Yang Power, the concepts could equally be applied to other situations where a health and safety issue may have industrial relations consequences. (orig.)

  17. TB Testing for People Living with HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-23

    Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, explains why it is important for people living with HIV to be tested for TB.  Created: 7/23/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/23/2012.

  18. furthering cooperation between people and institutions for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between people and institutionsfin' sustainablefin'est management. Keywords: Multi-stalielu)lder, Participation, ... Platforms, as participation strategies, that bring relevant actors together have undoubtedly been important ... development plan were to: (i) provide sources of income, revenue and other socio-eultural benefits.

  19. Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and Globalization

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This book brings together very insightful analyses of indigenous experience and strategies in the context of globalization from several continents and a number of theoretical perspectives. There are broad similarities making this a common struggle but the solutions arise from people solving problems in local contexts.

  20. Rehabilitation of memory for people's names

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milders, M.V.; Deelman, B.G.; Berg, I.J.

    In a training study, memory-impaired patients were taught strategies to improve the learning of new names and the retrieval of familiar people's names. To improve new name learning, the patients were encouraged to give more meaning to a person's name, without requiring an explicit association

  1. Medication Adherence in People With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ju Young; Habermann, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the United States. Because there is no cure for PD currently, pharmacological therapy is the mainstay of PD symptom management. Despite the importance of medication adherence in PD, several studies have reported medication nonadherence and/or suboptimal adherence. This literature review provides an overview of medication adherence issues in people with PD. Articles were identified for this study using computerized database searches and journal hand searches. Of the 72 medication adherence articles reviewed, the following articles were eligible for this review: (a) 10 articles measuring medication adherence in people with PD, (b) four medication adherence intervention articles, and (c) six studies of medication adherence in hospitalized settings. The importance of adherence assessment and strategies in improving medication adherence are discussed with the goal of improving symptom management and clinical outcomes in people with PD. Because medication taking is a complex and multifaceted phenomena, patient-centered, theory-driven interventions are needed to improve medication adherence and quality of care and life in people with PD.

  2. Advocacy for People with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebuhar, John

    In this paper, the author, who identifies himself as HIV positive, discusses his work as a counselor and advocate for people with AIDS. Background information on AIDS, from the first reported case in 1981 to current treatments, is provided. The use of revitalization counseling with AIDS patients, that is counseling that brings new life to an…

  3. Understanding delayed presentation among people diagnosed with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally, late presentation with advanced disease among people diagnosed with cancer is a major concern to oncology, to government health ministries and to cancer service organisations. The phenomenon is thought to be more pronounced in Sub Saharan Africa. This paper draws from a wider phenomenological study ...

  4. Systems for Providing Aids for Disabled People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The report summarizes a meeting of the World Health Organization's Working Group on Systems for Provision of Aids for Disabled Persons. The meeting was convened to discuss technical aids and ergonomic measures to bring greater independence to disabled people and the need to systematize services for the disabled in their own environments. Following…

  5. Indigenous knowledge systems, drought and people's resilience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because drought has numerous effects on people and the environment, it has received the attention of several scholars and policy makers. It leads to the disruption of the normal functioning of society causing human, material and environmental losses which at times exceeds the ability and capabilities to cope with its effects ...

  6. Marijuana: Implications of Use by Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Uses survey and interview data and recent findings to consider the marijuana problem in the following areas: marijuana use at an early age and for negative reasons; drug effects leading to learning impairment and school behavior problems; young people lacking accurate information; and usage leading to other drug use. (Author/RC)

  7. Leading People: Leadership in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The issue of leadership in mathematics education--always a matter of some contention--has been complicated by developments in the field over the past half century or so. When mathematics education began to emerge as an academic field at the beginning of the twentieth century, so few people were seriously concerned with either its practice or its…

  8. Hypertension in people living with HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zoest, Rosan A.; van den Born, Bert-Jan H.; Reiss, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review This review describes what is known concerning the burden of hypertension among people living with HIV (PLHIV), and also addresses relevant topics with respect to its risk factors and clinical management. Recent findings Hypertension is highly prevalent in HIV-positive populations,

  9. Experiences of deafblind people about health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Valderas, Carmen; Macías-Seda, Juana; Gil-García, Eugenia

    Deafblindness is a disability resulting from the combination of visual and auditory sensory impairments, which can manifest in different levels causing special communication problems. Deafblind people have special needs that derive from difficulties in sensing, understanding, attention and a lack of the skills required to function effectively in society. Deafblindness requires specialized services, personnel specifically trained in its care and special methods for communication. The main objective of this study is to explore the experiences of deafblind people in relation to health care throughout their lives. This study was developed at the St. Angela de la Cruz Centre, belonging to the Association of Parents of Deafblind People in Spain. Phenomenological qualitative study, through semi-structured interviews with deafblind people at the St. Ángela de la Cruz Centre, Salteras (Seville), carried out in 2015, with the help of interpreters in Spanish sign language. Topics covered in the interviews refer to facilities, human resources, time waiting and health care. Coinciding statements were obtained, where the participants point out architectural and educational barriers in health care and stand out better if the professionals know sign language. It can be highlighted that healthcare professionals lack knowledge of all aspects of deafblindness, sign language in particular, and there is a shortage of signs and information for the deafblind. Moreover, alternatives are required to reduce waiting times and improve direct communication with health professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. How Young People Interpret Teachers' Sanctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Manfred

    Results of four experiments concerning the way young people interpret an intended or expressed sanction (praise or blame) from a teacher are presented. The intention of the four studies was to expose the flaws in Meyer's 1984 attempted explanations of such interpretation, in which sanctions are paradoxically received by the student as an…

  11. People, Land and Water: Participatory Development Communication ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Used increasingly widely in resource management, this process is known as participatory development communication (PDC). ... IDRC's support of BetterEvaluation, an international collaboration to improve evaluation practice and theory, has resulted in an online guide for an often overlooked group of people who greatly.

  12. Young People and Migration from Contemporary Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Young Polish migrants to the UK are often portrayed as being highly educated and mobile: willing nomads who are privileged to be able to take advantage of new opportunities for travel and work abroad offered by European Union membership. However, there are also less well-educated young people who adopt migration as a livelihood strategy in…

  13. Seven Billion People: Fostering Productive Struggle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Jaclyn M.

    2018-01-01

    How can a cognitively demanding real-world task such as the Seven Billion People problem promote productive struggle "and" help shape students' mathematical dispositions? Driving home from school one evening, Jaclyn Murawska heard a commentator on the radio announce three statements: (1) experts had determined that the world population…

  14. Critical Caring for People and Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindel, Alexandra; Tolbert, Sara

    2017-01-01

    What role does caring play in environmental education? The development of caring relationships in formal school settings remains a foundational yet underexamined concept in environmental education research. This study examines the role of caring relationships between people and place in an urban high school in the United States. We draw upon…

  15. Education for Older People in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, Andrea; Lamura, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    This article provides information on trends in formal and informal adult education in Italy, with a particular focus on the older learners (over 65). Main providers, programs, objectives/motivations, and financial and legal framework are described. In general, over-65-year-old people were found to be underrepresented in participation. They were…

  16. People and Places Forum Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2015, the Twin Ports-based People and Places Work Group (PPWG) coordinated a special gathering to bring together researchers and scholars from diverse fields to discuss environment-human research, scholarship and collaboration opportunities. Hosted by the US Environme...

  17. Fascinating mathematical people interviews and memoirs

    CERN Document Server

    Alexanderson, Gerald L.

    2011-01-01

    Fascinating Mathematical People is a collection of informal interviews and memoirs of sixteen prominent members of the mathematical community of the twentieth century, many still active. The candid portraits collected here demonstrate that while these men and women vary widely in terms of their backgrounds, life stories, and worldviews, they all share a deep and abiding sense of wonder about mathematics.

  18. When CERN goes out to meet people

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    2014-01-01

    Giving lectures about high-energy physics and particle accelerators to the public is an activity that several people from CERN enjoy and pursue all around the globe. Sometimes, this happens on the moose and pony trails, as Pauline Gagnon recounts…   CERN is really a unique place and people want to hear more about what we do. With the internet, people are keeping abreast of the latest scientific developments and many crave the opportunity to meet scientists and find out more about what is going on at CERN. So do not hesitate to contact local colleges and astronomy clubs. Get yourself invited to talk about our research. Last autumn, I gave a series of public lectures all around the province of Québec (Canada) and in the Shetland Islands (Northern Scotland). Both tours took me to remote areas where I was amazed to see the public interest for lectures in physics. In Québec, one of my six stops was Chibougamau, a town of 7500 people (and probably as many moose) locat...

  19. HIV Among People Aged 50 and Over

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among People Aged 50 and Over Language: English ( ...

  20. People v. Winston: Sports and the Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degelman, Charles; Hayes, Bill

    This lesson plan uses students' interest in sports to teach good citizenship. With its focus on rules, responsibility, conflict resolution, and teamwork, the unit emphasizes the development of critical thinking, decision-making, and citizenship skills in young people. This lesson plan is part of a series of fully prepared, interactive classroom…

  1. Strategies in preventive care for older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drewes, Yvonne Marijke

    2013-01-01

    The aim of preventive care traditionally refers to measures taken to prevent disease and injury. However, for vulnerable older people the aim to maintain independence and wellbeing seems to be appropriate. Although a 'gold standard' to stratify for vulnerability in the general older population is

  2. Distance Education for People with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakou, Maria; Manousou, Evaggelia

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the standards of higher Distance Education, focusing on the Hellenic Open University, for people who have visual impairments, so that it becomes fully accessible and thus helps reduce social exclusion. Specifically, it aims to study the operational context of Distance Education, the possibilities that modern technology provides…

  3. When elderly people give warning of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjølseth, Ildri; Ekeberg, Øivind

    2012-09-01

    The study has a dual objective: (1) to investigate the extent to which, and how and to whom, elderly people gave warning (according to the definition of the term given by the American Association of Suicidology) prior to suicide; (2) to investigate how these warnings were perceived by the recipients of them, and what reactions the recipients had to the warnings. This is a psychological autopsy study based on qualitative interviews. Sixty-three informants were interviewed about 23 suicides by individuals aged over 65 in Norway. The informants comprised relatives, general practitioners (GPs) and home-based care nurses. In general, the analysis of the interviews follows the systematic text condensation method. The interviews contained four main themes regarding reactions to the warnings: "not taken seriously," "helplessness," "exhaustion," and "acceptance." A total of 14 of the 23 elderly people gave warning before the suicides occurred. The warnings were given to relatives (11), home-based care nurses (5), and GPs (2). Even though more than half of the elderly people had given warning (most frequently to relatives) before the suicide, the warnings did not initiate preventive measures. Together with passive attitudes, the lack of recognition of both the risk of suicide and the opportunities for treatment prevented possible measures being implemented. The paper discusses the grounds for the reactions as well as how suicide warnings given by elderly people can be taken seriously.

  4. Working in the People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnulle, Linda

    Primarily the result of observations made during an eighteen-day tour of the People's Republic of China (conducted by Professor Eugene Gilliom at Ohio State University), this paper examines working conditions and attitudes toward work in China. Focus in the first half of the paper is on motivation to work in China and how it differs from U.S.…

  5. Social Capital and Stratification of Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Behtoui

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the impact of social capital on the status attainment process of young people at the start of their careers and examines how social class, gender and ethnicity affect the accumulation of social capital and thereby labour market stratification of young people. A sample of young Swedes graduating from vocational schools and universities between 2005 and 2006, was surveyed via the telephone about their experiences acquiring jobs. Two research questions are posed: (i Which characteristics (class, gender and ethnicity affect young people's access to more social capital? (ii How is social capital rewarded in the labour market? The results show that being female, coming from the lower social classes and being a member of a stigmatized immigrant groupare associated with a substantial social capital deficit. When socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds as well as the human capital of respondents are controlled, social capital is positively associated with salary level. The results indicate that social capital is a significant factor in the stratification process of young people.

  6. EMPOWERING GIRLS AND CONNECTING PEOPLE THROUGH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    due to an “unknown burden”. The unknown unexpected burden comprises people, poverty, pregnancy, diseases, illiteracy and maltreatment. The purpose of the paper is to examine ..... McDonald and John P. Flynn. Chicago, Lyceum Books. Kretzmann, J. P. and McKnight, J., 1993. Building communities from the inside out.

  7. Release Kids to the Right People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoria, David P.

    1986-01-01

    To ensure that children are released to the right people during the school day, Livonia Primary School (New York) devised a student identification card for parents. Parents can give the card or identification number to a friend, relative, or baby-sitter picking up a child--an improved security arrangement. (MLH)

  8. Sexting and Young People: Experts' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Shelley; Sanci, Lena; Temple-Smith, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Young people's "sexting"--defined by the "Macquarie Dictionary Online" (2010) as the sending and receiving of sexually explicit images via mobile phones--has become a focus of much media reporting; however, research regarding the phenomenon is in its infancy. This paper reports on the first phase of a study to understand this activity more…

  9. Structural Connectivity Networks of Transgender People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Küblböck, Martin; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Although previous investigations of transsexual people have focused on regional brain alterations, evaluations on a network level, especially those structural in nature, are largely missing. Therefore, we investigated the structural connectome of 23 female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF)

  10. Speech and Hearing Problems among Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstenson, Blue

    1978-01-01

    Findings from speech and hearing tests of older people in South Dakota community senior programs indicate the need for better testing and therapy procedures. Lipreading may be more effective than hearing aids, and factors other than hearing may be involved. Some problems and needs are noted. (MF)

  11. Tracking people by learning their appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Deva; Forsyth, David A; Zisserman, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    An open vision problem is to automatically track the articulations of people from a video sequence. This problem is difficult because one needs to determine both the number of people in each frame and estimate their configurations. But, finding people and localizing their limbs is hard because people can move fast and unpredictably, can appear in a variety of poses and clothes, and are often surrounded by limb-like clutter. We develop a completely automatic system that works in two stages; it first builds a model of appearance of each person in a video and then it tracks by detecting those models in each frame ("tracking by model-building and detection"). We develop two algorithms that build models; one bottom-up approach groups together candidate body parts found throughout a sequence. We also describe a top-down approach that automatically builds people-models by detecting convenient key poses within a sequence. We finally show that building a discriminative model of appearance is quite helpful since it exploits structure in a background (without background-subtraction). We demonstrate the resulting tracker on hundreds of thousands of frames of unscripted indoor and outdoor activity, a feature-length film ("Run Lola Run"), and legacy sports footage (from the 2002 World Series and 1998 Winter Olympics). Experiments suggest that our system 1) can count distinct individuals, 2) can identify and track them, 3) can recover when it loses track, for example, if individuals are occluded or briefly leave the view, 4) can identify body configuration accurately, and 5) is not dependent on particular models of human motion.

  12. [Implementation of telemedicine in indigenous people?s healthcare in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, Zaira Zambelli; dos Anjos Scherer, Magda Duarte; Diehl, Eliana Elisabeth

    2014-08-01

    The Brazilian National Telemedicine Program in indigenous healthcare assists health professionals working in remote areas in strengthening the healthcare provided to indigenous populations. The current study aimed to analyze the implementation of the National Telemedicine Program in indigenous people's health, from the perspective of health administrators. This was a qualitative exploratory descriptive study using document analysis and open-ended interviews with 10 administrators. Content analysis resulted in two categories: the program's process implementation and the potential of telemedicine for indigenous people's healthcare. The results emphasize the importance of dialogue between all institutions involved and the construction of a democratic forum for evaluating this process and related decision-making: resumption of the program's implementation and subsequently its expansion and improvement of the available resources and the search for other applicable strategies for indigenous people's health. A broad discussion on this topic is recommended that involves the indigenous people's strategies for social control.

  13. Priorities for children and young people - opportunities and challenges for children and young people's nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fiona

    2016-05-09

    Across Europe children's nurses today face many challenges, including rising childhood obesity, the soaring incidence of issues with the mental health of children and young people, the effects of social media, child maltreatment and the impact of poverty, war and conflict on children and families. There are opportunities for children's nurses to undertake new roles and to influence both policy and practice to improve the health outcomes of children and young people, and thereby the future health of the population.

  14. Polypharmacy and older people - the GP perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Hendriksen, C

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that problems with compliance rise exponentially when more that 4 drugs are prescribed. The rising use of prescription medicine forces the GP to balance the benefit of evidence group-based appropriate drug use against the problems arising when medication is given to older people...... is recommended at every encounter, and time consuming comprehensive follow-up will be demanded, 'polypharmacy consultations' surely will be built into GP contracts in the future. The authors state that a number of pharmacological regimens for older people are outperformed by non-pharmacological treatment...... alternatives involving competent individualised counselling and public provision of easy (transportation) possibilities for joining centres offering staff and equipment for physical and social activity (including basal aids for hearing and sight)....

  15. Intelligent Interfaces to Empower People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betke, Margrit

    Severe motion impairments can result from non-progressive disorders, such as cerebral palsy, or degenerative neurological diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Multiple Sclerosis (MS), or muscular dystrophy (MD). They can be due to traumatic brain injuries, for example, due to a traffic accident, or to brainstem strokes [9, 84]. Worldwide, these disorders affect millions of individuals of all races and ethnic backgrounds [4, 75, 52]. Because disease onset of MS and ALS typically occurs in adulthood, afflicted people are usually computer literate. Intelligent interfaces can immensely improve their daily lives by allowing them to communicate and participate in the information society, for example, by browsing the web, posting messages, or emailing friends. However, people with advanced ALS, MS, or MD may reach a point when they cannot control the keyboard and mouse anymore and also cannot rely on automated voice recognition because their speech has become slurred.

  16. Quality of care for people with multimorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Michaela L.; Høst, Dorte; Christensen, Mikkel B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity is becoming increasingly prevalent and presents challenges for healthcare providers and systems. Studies examining the relationship between multimorbidity and quality of care report mixed findings. The purpose of this study was to investigate quality of care for people...... with multimorbidity in the publicly funded healthcare system in Denmark. METHODS: To investigate the quality of care for people with multimorbidity different groups of clinicians from the hospital, general practice and the municipality reviewed records from 23 persons with multimorbidity and discussed them in three...... focus groups. Before each focus group, clinicians were asked to review patients' medical records and assess their care by responding to a questionnaire. Medical records from 2013 from hospitals, general practice, and health centers in the local municipality were collected and linked for the 23 patients...

  17. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    and oral precancer/cancer. The negative impact of poor oral conditions on the quality of life of older adults is an important public health issue, which must be addressed by policy-makers. The means for strengthening oral health programme implementation are available; the major challenge is therefore...... changing burden of chronic diseases in old age. Chronic disease and most oral diseases share common risk factors. Globally, poor oral health amongst older people has been particularly evident in high levels of tooth loss, dental caries experience, and the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, xerostomia...... to translate knowledge into action programmes for the oral health of older people. The World Health Organization recommends that countries adopt certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly. National health authorities should develop policies and measurable goals and targets for oral health...

  18. Why do people favour alternative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahpush, M

    1999-06-01

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate the determinants of attitudes towards alternative medicine. The study also examined the dimensionality of dissatisfaction with conventional medicine. The data was based on a telephone survey of a random sample of 787 Victorians. The survey was conducted in 1997-8. Principle component analysis showed that dissatisfaction with conventional medicine has two distinct dimensions, one relating to the medical outcome and the other relating to the medical encounter. Multiple regression results showed that neither of these dimensions explain people's attitudes towards alternative medicine. Instead, a substantial proportion of variance in this variable was explained by a set of values that include faith in natural remedies, subscribing to a holistic view of health, consumerism and believing in individual responsibility. The main reason people favour alternative medicine is their health-related values and beliefs. Health policies of the future should take into account values and cultural change.

  19. [Alcohol consumption among traveling Chilean older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung Bin C; Rojas, Verónica A; Zalaquett, Macarena R; Torres, Romina S; Ramírez, Cristián C; Román, Fernando O; Carrasco, Marcela G; Gac, Homero E; Valderrama, Sebastián C; Marín, Pedro Paulo L

    2014-12-01

    Problems associated with alcohol consumption are prevalent in Chile, but little is known about the situation in the elderly. To perform a screening to detect alcohol-related problems and risks in the Chilean older people who travel. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) questionnaire was answered by 1,076 travelers aged 60 to 93 years (66% females), who participated in trips organized by the Chilean National Tourism Service (SERNATUR). Seventy six percent of respondents acknowledged to have ingested an alcoholic drink during the last month. The average AUDIT score was of 2.2 ± 2.6. Only 3.7% of the sample had a score equal or higher than eight, considered as risky use. Within this last group, 60% had symptoms of alcohol dependence. A higher alcohol consumption was associated with male gender (p traveling older people, there was a high prevalence of alcohol consumption, and nearly 4% of respondents had alcohol related problems.

  20. Mediating Tragedy: Facebook, Aboriginal Peoples and Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Lee Carlson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Some Australian Aboriginal communities experience suicide rates that are among the highest in the world. They are also, however, avid social media users—approximately 20% higher than the national average. This article presents some preliminary findings from a current national study, funded by the Australian Research Council, titled Aboriginal identity and community online: a sociological exploration of Aboriginal peoples’ use of online social media. The purpose of the study is to gain insights into how Aboriginal peoples utilise and interact on social media, and how these technologies can assist with suicide prevention strategies. It found that Aboriginal people are engaging with Facebook to both seek and offer help for issues relating to suicide and self-harm. An existing continuum of suicide prevention strategies was evident—from light emotional support to direct suicide intervention involving health services. These strategies can be leveraged to implement effective and appropriate suicide prevention programs.

  1. Sexuality of people with intestinal ostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Braga Rodrigues Cardoso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the experience of sexuality and other everyday life aspects for people with intestinal ostomy. Methods: qualitative, descriptive study with ten participants of the Specialized Reference Unit who gave interviews with inductive content analysis. Results: the established themes were Physical, emotional and socio-cultural changes, Changes in the exercise of sexuality of people with intestinal ostomy and Importance of the interdisciplinary support of the new sexuality. These changes are linked to body image, the self-esteem and interpersonal relationships with the partner, family and friends, going beyond the visible with the emergence of fear, rejection, difficulty with new relationships, body shame, embarrassment by the collector equipment, fear of the sexual act causes damage to the stoma and difficult to talk about the condition. Conclusion: the ostomy condition requires adaptation process, requiring trained interdisciplinary team in physiological and psychosocial problems resulting from surgical and therapeutic adjuvant treatment, which hinder the sexuality of these individuals.

  2. Young people's drug use: facts and feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, C; Price, J F

    1998-01-01

    The study aimed to quantify the major findings of a previous qualitative study on drug use and young people. Findings are reported on drug use; views on the use of cannabis; amphetamines and heroin; and the relationship between these views and reported drug use. Reported usage and feelings about drug use are discussed in relation to the extent to which drug use can be considered to be 'normalised'. There is only weak evidence that normalisation, even of cannabis use, is true for young people towards the end of their compulsory schooling. However the findings provide some evidence for both sides in the 'normalisation debate' against a backdrop of apparent increasing use of drugs. Until more evidence is available, the normalisation debate will continue.

  3. Euro Banknote Recognition System for Blind People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Dunai Dunai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a portable system with the aim of allowing blind people to detect and recognize Euro banknotes. The developed device is based on a Raspberry Pi electronic instrument and a Raspberry Pi camera, Pi NoIR (No Infrared filter dotted with additional infrared light, which is embedded into a pair of sunglasses that permit blind and visually impaired people to independently handle Euro banknotes, especially when receiving their cash back when shopping. The banknote detection is based on the modified Viola and Jones algorithms, while the banknote value recognition relies on the Speed Up Robust Features (SURF technique. The accuracies of banknote detection and banknote value recognition are 84% and 97.5%, respectively.

  4. Sexuality among People with Physical Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Elbozan Cumurcu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical disability is termed as disturbance or defect which impede or eliminate human body’s ability by disturbing human structure and shape. Physical disability may occur due to neonatal, natal or postnatal causes. People with physical disability have some natural needs as everyone. They are known to have difficulties in many areas of life. In society, sexual lives of these individuals are treated as an unknown and ignored issue, and moreover it has been assumed that they have no such needs. Disabled patients experience many troubles in their life domains including sexuality. This article provides information about physical disability and sexuality, and difficulties with which disabled people faces in their sexual life and overviews literature on this topic.

  5. Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sandra M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    . The risk of death by natural and unnatural causes was significantly higher among individuals with anxiety disorders (natural mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51; unnatural MRR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.20-2.73) compared with the general population. Of those who died from unnatural causes, 16.5% had......BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental disorders worldwide and have a striking impact on global disease burden. Although depression has consistently been found to increase mortality; the role of anxiety disorders in predicting mortality risk is unclear. AIMS......: To assess mortality risk in people with anxiety disorders. METHOD: We used nationwide Danish register data to conduct a prospective cohort study with over 30 million person-years of follow-up. RESULTS: In total, 1066 (2.1%) people with anxiety disorders died during an average follow-up of 9.7 years...

  6. Corporeality in the communication of young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornélia Jakubíková

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study describes communication of young people with the emphasis on its content dedicated to corporeality and determines a content-based classification of topics from a normative perspective: what topics are regular, intimate, or tabooed; participants; and gender differences. The study is divided into parts, which thematically describe: starting points, research, sample; communication content and topics; participants in communication; gender differences; factors of communication and the language of communication. The study is elaborated on the basis of information coming from professional literature and field research conducted by semi-structured interviews with university students and university educated people – 15 women and 15 men in age 22–28 (year of birth 1987–1993 coming from an urban environment in Slovakia.

  7. Euro Banknote Recognition System for Blind People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunai Dunai, Larisa; Chillarón Pérez, Mónica; Peris-Fajarnés, Guillermo; Lengua Lengua, Ismael

    2017-01-20

    This paper presents the development of a portable system with the aim of allowing blind people to detect and recognize Euro banknotes. The developed device is based on a Raspberry Pi electronic instrument and a Raspberry Pi camera, Pi NoIR (No Infrared filter) dotted with additional infrared light, which is embedded into a pair of sunglasses that permit blind and visually impaired people to independently handle Euro banknotes, especially when receiving their cash back when shopping. The banknote detection is based on the modified Viola and Jones algorithms, while the banknote value recognition relies on the Speed Up Robust Features (SURF) technique. The accuracies of banknote detection and banknote value recognition are 84% and 97.5%, respectively.

  8. Illness narratives of people who are homeless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Håkanson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple illnesses are common in all homeless populations. While most previous studies have focused on experiences of mental illness, there is a scarcity of studies about experiences of bodily illness among people who are homeless. This study aimed to explore illness narratives of people who are homeless, and how homelessness as a social context shapes the experience of multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions. The design was a qualitative single-case study, using interpretive description. Data were generated through interviews, with nine participants who were homeless rough sleepers in Stockholm, Sweden, recruited while receiving care in a support home for homeless people with complex care needs. The findings revealed experiences of illness embedded in narratives about falling ill, being ill, and the future. The particularity of these illness narratives and the way that they are shaped by homelessness give rise to several observations: the necessity of a capable body for survival; chaos and profound solitude in illness and self-care management; ambiguous feelings about receiving care, transitioning from independence, and “freedom” in the streets to dependency and being institutionalized; and finally, the absence of hope and desire for recovery or a better future. The narratives are discussed from the perspective of Frank's four types of illness stories (restitution, chaos, quest, and testimony. The findings stress that to provide appropriate care and support to people who are homeless and have multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions, health care professionals need to be informed both about the individual's biography and about the circumstances under which illness and self-care takes place in the streets.

  9. Affordable warmth: Housing strategies for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jill; Dhesi, Surindar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose\\ud \\ud \\ud The purpose of this paper is to consolidate policy, research, evidence and good practice around strategies tackling fuel poverty and affordable warmth for older people aged over 60 to support the development of more effective services for this life course stage and to tackle physical and mental health inequalities.\\ud \\ud \\ud \\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach\\ud \\ud \\ud We consolidate current policy, research, evidence and examples of good practice in exploring effective ...

  10. The common bipolar phenotype in young people

    OpenAIRE

    Rock, Philippa L; Chandler, Rebecca A.; Harmer, Catherine J.; Rogers, Robert D.; Goodwin, Guy M

    2013-01-01

    Background Mood elevation is common in adolescents and young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of a bipolar diagnosis and co-morbidity in individuals identified by online screening for experience of (hypo)manic symptoms in order to better define the common bipolar phenotype in young people. Methods Survey data regarding experience of (hypo)manic symptoms and occurrence of co-morbidities were analysed for 106 students satisfying criteria for probable bipolar syndr...

  11. Does the Internet make people happier?

    OpenAIRE

    Pénard, Thierry; POUSSING Nicolas; Suire, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    As people are spending more time online, it is important to evaluate the impact of Internet use on individual well-being. Internet use yields direct utility and economic returns (e.g. better job, higher productivity) that may increase life sa-tisfaction. But the Internet might also have detrimental effects (addiction, social isolation, e.g.). This paper empirically examines the relation between Internet use and subjective well-being. Using Luxemburgish data from a European so-cial survey, we ...

  12. Modeling eating disorders of cognitive impaired people

    OpenAIRE

    Coronato, Antonio; De Pietro, Giuseppe; Augusto, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Millions of people all around the world suffer from eating\\ud disorders, known as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, pica, and others. When eating disorders coexist with other mental health disorders, eating disorders often go undiagnosed and untreated; a low number of sufferers\\ud obtain treatment for the eating disorder. Unfortunately, eating disorders have also the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, upwards of 20%.\\ud \\ud This paper focuses on monitoring eating disorders of cogn...

  13. Social Wellbeing of Elderly People in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Frolova Elena A.; Malanina Veronika A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the research in the field of measurement and evaluation of the elderly’s social wellbeing. The main characteristics of international methods for evaluating older people’s wellbeing are critically discussed. The paper also contains some preliminary results of the sociological survey on wellbeing of the elderly conducted in Tomsk city (Siberia, Russia). Social factors, such as communication with other people, family care, providing support for friends and nei...

  14. Illness narratives of people who are homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Öhlén, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Multiple illnesses are common in all homeless populations. While most previous studies have focused on experiences of mental illness, there is a scarcity of studies about experiences of bodily illness among people who are homeless. This study aimed to explore illness narratives of people who are homeless, and how homelessness as a social context shapes the experience of multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions. The design was a qualitative single-case study, using interpretive description. Data were generated through interviews, with nine participants who were homeless rough sleepers in Stockholm, Sweden, recruited while receiving care in a support home for homeless people with complex care needs. The findings revealed experiences of illness embedded in narratives about falling ill, being ill, and the future. The particularity of these illness narratives and the way that they are shaped by homelessness give rise to several observations: the necessity of a capable body for survival; chaos and profound solitude in illness and self-care management; ambiguous feelings about receiving care, transitioning from independence, and "freedom" in the streets to dependency and being institutionalized; and finally, the absence of hope and desire for recovery or a better future. The narratives are discussed from the perspective of Frank's four types of illness stories (restitution, chaos, quest, and testimony). The findings stress that to provide appropriate care and support to people who are homeless and have multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions, health care professionals need to be informed both about the individual's biography and about the circumstances under which illness and self-care takes place in the streets.

  15. Gait, mobility, and falls in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwind, Yves Josef

    2012-01-01

    My doctoral thesis contributes to the understanding of gait, mobility, and falls in older people. All presented projects investigated the most prominent and sensitive markers for fall-related gait changes, that is gait velocity and gait variability. Based on the measurement of these spatio-temporal gait parameters, particularly when using a change-sensitive dual task paradigm, it is possible to make conclusions regarding walking, balance, activities of daily living, and falls in o...

  16. Improving Customer Satisfaction: A People CMM Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-11

    Work Environment Customer Relationship Management Program 19 Improving Customer Satisfaction: A People CMM Perspective P. Buttles, S. McGraw, D...Professional in 2009 and Customer Care Manager in July 2006. He has a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Pittsburgh and a bachelor of science...conferences throughout the United States and Europe. He has as a bachelor of science degree in management . 4 Improving Customer Satisfaction: A

  17. Suicide among young people in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan-Davidson, Meaghen; Sanhueza, Antonio; Espinosa, Isabel; Escamilla-Cejudo, José Antonio; Maddaleno, Matilde

    2014-03-01

    To examine suicide mortality trends among young people (10-24 years of age(1)) in selected countries and territories of the Americas. An ecological study was conducted using a time series of suicide mortality data from 19 countries and one territory in the Region of the Americas from 2001 to 2008, comprising 90.3% of the regional population. The analyses included age-adjusted suicide mortality rates, average annual variation in suicide mortality rates, and relative risks for suicide, by age and sex. The mean suicide rate for the selected study period and countries/territory was 5.7/100,000 young people (10-24 years), with suicide rates higher among males (7.7/100,000) than females (2.4/100,000). Countries with the highest total suicide mortality rates among young people (10-24 years) were Guyana, Suriname, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Chile, and Ecuador; countries with the lowest total suicide mortality rates included Mexico, Venezuela, Cuba, and Brazil, and the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico. During this period, there was a significant increase in suicide mortality rates among young people in the following countries: Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Suriname; countries with significant decreases in suicide mortality rates included Canada, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, and Venezuela. The three leading suicide methods in the Americas were hanging, firearms, and poisoning. Some countries of the Americas have experienced a rise in adolescent and youth suicide during the study period, with males at a higher risk of committing suicide than females. Adolescent and youth suicide policies and programs are recommended, to curb this problem. Methodological limitations are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlates of constipation in people with Parkinson's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, H; Kaye, J; Kimber, A; Storey, L; Egan, M; Qiao, Y; Trend, P

    2011-02-01

    To investigate clinical, demographic and dietary factors associated with constipation in a sample of community dwelling people with Parkinson's disease, recruited through a specialist outpatient clinic. Partners/carers provided a convenience control group. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire (background information, diet and exercise, activities of daily living: mobility and manual dexterity, health-related quality of life (SF-12), stool frequency and characteristics, extent of concern due to constipation, laxative taking), and a four-week stool diary. The Rome criterion was used to determine constipation status. Multiple regression methods were used to explore the correlates of constipation. Baseline data were provided by 121 people with Parkinson's, (54 controls), of whom 73% (25%) met the Rome criterion. Prospective diary data from 106 people with Parkinson's (43 controls) showed lower proportions: 35% (7%) meeting the Rome criterion. Among all study subjects, i.e. Parkinson's patients and controls taken together, the presence of constipation is predicted by having Parkinson's disease (p = .003; odds ratio 4.80, 95% CI 1.64-14.04) and mobility score (p = .04; odds ratio 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.31), but not by dietary factors. Amongst people with Parkinson's constipation is predicted by number of medications (p = .027). Laxative taking masks constipation, and is significantly associated with wearing protection against bowel incontinence (p = .009; odds ratio 4.80, 95% CI: 1.48-15.52). Constipation is disease-related, not a lifestyle factor. More research is needed on optimal management and laxative use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Older people and ill fitting shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Suzanne L; Leese, G P; McMurdo, M E T

    2002-06-01

    Foot health is an important issue in older people. Inappropriate shoes increase the risk of callous and ulcer formation, as well as increasing the risk of falls. There are no data defining the size of this problem. The aim of the study was to investigate the proportion of elderly people on a general rehabilitation ward wearing incorrectly sized shoes and to look for the presence of complications. Sixty five consecutive patients (mental state questionnaire score >6) admitted to a rehabilitation ward had their foot length and width measured, and the size of their current footwear recorded. Sensation was tested with a standard 10 g monofilament. The presence of ulceration was noted. Foot pain was recorded by the patient on a visual analogue scale. Any history of diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, or peripheral neuropathy was noted. The median age of the subjects was 82 (range 64-93). Six (9%) had a history of diabetes, seven (11%) had symptomatic peripheral vascular disease, and 17 (26%) had sensory impairment. Ten patients (15%) had foot ulceration present, and 47 patients (72%) had ill fitting shoes (a discrepancy in length of more than half a British shoe size fitting or more than one British width fitting, 7 mm). Incorrect shoe length was significantly associated with the presence of ulceration (odds ratio (OR) = 10.04, p = 0.016). Presence of ulceration was significantly associated with a history of peripheral vascular disease (OR = 11.56, p = 0.008). Pain was significantly associated with incorrect shoe length (p = 0.0238) and with sensory impairment (p = 0.0314). Most older people on a rehabilitation ward wore ill fitting shoes. An association was found between ill fitting shoes and self reported pain, and between ill fitting shoes and ulcer formation. A straightforward assessment of footwear in older people could improve comfort and avoid preventable foot disorders.

  20. 'Touching people in relationships': a qualitative study of close relationships for people with an intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Faye; Bowden, Keith; McKenzie, Karen; Quayle, Ethel

    2013-12-01

    To explore the experiences and perceptions of close and sexual relationships of people with an intellectual disability. Positive interpersonal relationships are beneficial for people with an intellectual disability, acting as a protective barrier against, social stigma and negative outcomes such as physical and mental health problems. The social networks of people with an intellectual disability are, however, often more restricted than those of the general population. There has been very little research exploring the views and experiences of people with an intellectual disability about social and sexual relationships. Exploratory study using a qualitative research design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 (6 male, 4 female) participants. Data were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. 'Touching other people in relationships' was identified as a superordinate theme. The theme was represented by five subthemes: 'Is wrong'; 'Unsafe to talk about'; 'Suggesting is safe'; 'No freedom or fun'; and 'Being touched'. The findings presented are drawn from a larger qualitative study. The findings highlight the importance of touch and sexual behaviours in the close relationships of participants. Negative perceptions were observed to surround sexual behaviours. Rules and restrictions regarding physical contact were also described. Disseminating these findings may increase awareness of the importance of physical contact in the close relationships of people with an intellectual disability and promote positive support arrangements. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Disabled People as Culturally Relevant Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Pritchard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper contends that disabled teachers are in such short supply as to be invisible even amongst minority teachers from already vastly marginalised populations. This is not simply because discriminatory practices are embedded within employment policies of educational systems, but deeply held socio-cultural attitudes also prevent disabled people accessing and attaining basic and later, higher levels of academic achievement. The central argument here is a simple one; disabled people as teachers offer a unique knowledge standpoint, challenge the animosity of dominant cultural beliefs around disability as analogous with passivity or non-achieving, and provide a source of resistance, solace and resolution for students they teach. Disabled people as educators enact exemplary pedagogic justice and socially inclusive practice. The aim of this paper is to explore the benefits to students and places of higher education alike of embracing both the person and the role of the teacher with disability as culturally relevant educators. Keywords: minority teachers, marginality, disability, cultural relevance, higher education

  2. From CERN people to the world

    CERN Multimedia

    Sophie Louise Hetherton

    2014-01-01

    Created by filmmaker Liz Mermin, a new YouTube series puts the spotlight on CERN people. This set of short films offers new insight into the daily lives of CERN physicists.   The new online video series, CERN people, takes you behind the headlines of some of the biggest physics breakthroughs of our time, capturing the invention and discovery in the lives of CERN’s scientists. “CERN offered a fascinating blend of people from so many different backgrounds combined with exciting and groundbreaking physics,” says filmmaker Liz Mermin. “So, my aim was to show the real-life characters – the ones that stay up all night analysing data and tweaking the code for the experiments – and communicate their passion for particle physics.” The films give a first-hand experience of what it’s like day-to-day at CERN by showing the ups and downs of working at the frontier of modern science. For the participants, it was an excellent opport...

  3. [Characteristics of heat illness in older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Mitsunaga; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Kitagawa, Yoshimi

    2008-05-01

    As summer become hotter due to rapid climate change, older people suffering from heat illness are increasing. The aim of our study was to examine the characteristics of older people who suffered from heat illness. We analyzed the 65 years or older patients admitted for acute care of Nagoya Ekisaikai Hospital via the emergency department (ED) during the summer seasons of 2006 and 2007. Demographic data, functional status, use situation of care services, climate of the onset day, use of an air conditioners, and cognitive status, length of hospital stay and disposition following their discharge were recorded. During the study period, 104 patients visited the ED because of heat illness. Twenty older patients were admitted for acute care. In hospitalized patients, the mean length of stay was 27.5+/-18.6 days. Sixty percent of patients were discharged to long-term care facilities (12/20). Sixteen patients suffered from heat illness inside their home. Most of the patients had characteristics such as living alone or with their spouses only (14/16), cognitive dysfunction (12/16), lack or no use of an air conditioner (11/16) , no use of care service (11/16) , and preserved functional status (10/16) . Many older patients suffered from heat illness in their home, and their ED visits were associated with prolonged admissions and post-discharge institutionalizations. It is important to give education to prevent heat illness in older people.

  4. Treatment of suicidal people around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruffaerts, Ronny; Demyttenaere, Koen; Hwang, Irving; Chiu, Wai-Tat; Sampson, Nancy; Kessler, Ronald C; Alonso, Jordi; Borges, Guilherme; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Karam, Elie G; Kawakami, Norito; Kostyuchenko, Stanislav; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herber; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Scott, Kate M; Stein, Dan J; Tomov, Toma; Viana, Maria Carmen; Nock, Matthew K

    2011-07-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death worldwide; however, little information is available about the treatment of suicidal people, or about barriers to treatment. To examine the receipt of mental health treatment and barriers to care among suicidal people around the world. Twenty-one nationally representative samples worldwide (n=55 302; age 18 years and over) from the World Health Organization's World Mental Health Surveys were interviewed regarding past-year suicidal behaviour and past-year healthcare use. Suicidal respondents who had not used services in the past year were asked why they had not sought care. Two-fifths of the suicidal respondents had received treatment (from 17% in low-income countries to 56% in high-income countries), mostly from a general medical practitioner (22%), psychiatrist (15%) or non-psychiatrist (15%). Those who had actually attempted suicide were more likely to receive care. Low perceived need was the most important reason for not seeking help (58%), followed by attitudinal barriers such as the wish to handle the problem alone (40%) and structural barriers such as financial concerns (15%). Only 7% of respondents endorsed stigma as a reason for not seeking treatment. Most people with suicide ideation, plans and attempts receive no treatment. This is a consistent and pervasive finding, especially in low-income countries. Improving the receipt of treatment worldwide will have to take into account culture-specific factors that may influence the process of help-seeking.

  5. The experience of people with oculocutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmuso B.J. Pooe- Monyemore

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the experiences of people with oculocutaneous albinism in South Africa. Oculocutaneous albinism is an inherited disorder characterised by the defective production of melanin, with little or no pigmentation in the skin, hair and eyes. This condition is found globally, with a high prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa and in clusters in South America. People with this condition are often stigmatised and discriminated against owing to myths and superstitions held by the public about the condition. To date no studies have explored the psychosocial aspects of oculocutaneous albinism. A qualitative study was conducted in Johannesburg, South Africa during 2007 where a purposive sample of 15 members of the black population with oculocutaneous albinism participated in in-depth individualphenomenological interviews. One central question was posed to facilitate the interviews: Could you please share your experience as a person with albinism? Data from the interviews were analysed using Collaizi’s qualitative data analysis method and three main themesemerged: (1 perceptions of the internal environment, for example the self; (2 experiences in the external environment, for example family and community; and (3 the need for selfdevelopment and growth based on their experiences. Recommendations are made to enhance the self-concept of and promote a sense of belonging, self-development and growth in people with oculocutaneous albinism.

  6. Wearable computing: Will it make people prosocial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiopoulos, Eleni; Risko, Evan F; Foulsham, Tom; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that people who wear an eye tracker modify their natural looking behaviour in a prosocial manner. This change in looking behaviour represents a potential concern for researchers who wish to use eye trackers to understand the functioning of human attention. On the other hand, it may offer a real boon to manufacturers and consumers of wearable computing (e.g., Google Glass), for if wearable computing causes people to behave in a prosocial manner, then the public's fear that people with wearable computing will invade their privacy is unfounded. Critically, both of these divergent implications are grounded on the assumption that the prosocial behavioural effect of wearing an eye tracker is sustained for a prolonged period of time. Our study reveals that on the very first wearing of an eye tracker, and in less than 10 min, the prosocial effect of an eye tracker is abolished, but by drawing attention back to the eye tracker, the implied presence effect is easily reactivated. This suggests that eye trackers induce a transient social presence effect, which is rendered dormant when attention is shifted away from the source of implied presence. This is good news for researchers who use eye trackers to measure attention and behaviour; and could be bad news for advocates of wearable computing in everyday life. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  7. The Nagoya Protocol and Indigenous Peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Yolanda Teran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about Indigenous peoples’ involvement in the Nagoya Protocol negotiations from 2006 to 2010, as well as in its implementation to stop biopiracy in order to protect Pachamama, Mother Earth, and to ensure our survival and the survival of coming generations. The Nagoya Protocol is an international instrument that was adopted in Nagoya, Japan in October 2010 by the Conference of Parties (COP 10 and ratified by 51 countries in Pyeongchang, South Korea in October 2014 at COP 12. This protocol governs access to genetic resources and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from their utilization (access and benefit sharing [ABS]. It has several articles related to Indigenous peoples and traditional knowledge, as well as: The interrelation and inseparable nature between genetic resources and traditional knowledge; The diversity of circumstances surrounding traditional knowledge ownership, including by country; The identification of traditional knowledge owners; The declaration of Indigenous peoples' human rights; and The role of women in the biodiversity process. In addition, this protocol lays out obligations on access, specifically participation in equitable benefit sharing, the accomplishment of prior and informed consent, and the mutually agreed terms and elaboration of a national legal ABS framework with the participation of Indigenous peoples and local communities in order to have well-defined roles, responsibilities, and times of negotiations.

  8. Suicidal behavior among homeless people in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Kae; Morikawa, Suimei; Awata, Shuichi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the frequency and correlates of suicidal behavior among homeless people in Japan. A face-to-face survey was conducted in two districts of Tokyo, Japan, with 423 subjects who resided on streets and riversides and in urban parks and stations (street homeless) or who were residents of shelters, cheap hotels, or welfare homes for homeless people (sheltered homeless). When questioned about suicidal ideation in the previous 2 weeks, 51 subjects (12.2% of valid responses) had a recurring wish to die, 29 (6.9%) had frequent thoughts of suicide, and 22 (5.3%) had made suicide plans. In addition, 11 (2.9%) subjects had attempted suicide in the previous 2 weeks and 74 (17.7%) reported that they had ever attempted suicide. In univariate logistic regression analyses, street homelessness, lack of perceived emotional social support, poor subjective health perception, visual impairment, pain, insomnia, poor mental well-being, and current depression were significantly associated with recurrent thoughts of suicide in the previous 2 weeks. Among these, current depression had the greatest significance. In multivariate logistic regression analyses after controlling for depression, street homelessness and lack of perceived emotional social support were significantly associated with recurrent thoughts of suicide in the previous 2 weeks. Comprehensive interventions including housing and social support as well as mental health services might be crucial as effective strategies for suicide prevention among homeless people.

  9. Is it good to make happy people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachels, Stuart

    1998-04-01

    Would it be good, other things being equal, for additional people to exist whose lives would be worth living? I examine and reject several arguments for the answer that it would not be good; then I offer opposing arguments that I believe are more successful. Thus, I agree with utilitarians who say that it is better for there to be more happy people. Next I argue for the stronger claim that the happiness of potential people is as important as that of adults. Potential quality of life, then, matters in a host of bioethical issues: abortion, commercial surrogacy, the treatment of defective newborns, and so on. What is the practical upshot of all this? I reject the idea that we must do whatever is necessary to prolong life worth living. But I also reject the view that the side-effects of overpopulation always outweigh the value of realizing potential happiness. So I advocate a middle position, which I do not identify precisely. Even from this middle position, however, potential happiness is more important that is commonly assumed in bioethics.

  10. FUTURO REMOTO 2015: researchers meet people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Maddalena; Fedele, Alessandro; Esposito, Roberta; Torello, Vincenzo; Nave, Rosella; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Russo, Massimo; Alessio, Giuliana; Gaudiosi, Germana; Nappi, Rosa; Belviso, Pasquale; Carandente, Antonio; De Cesare, Walter; Sansivero, Fabio; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Borgstrom, Sven; Milano, Girolamo; Pasquale Ricciardi, Giovanni; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    As participant of the 29th Edition of the cultural initiative "Futuro Remoto 2015", the INGV section of Naples Osservatorio Vesuviano has realized a temporary exhibition aimed to build bridges between the scientific community and the public. The event, a festival of art, culture, science and technology, has taken place on October 15th - 19th 2015, in Naples, Italy, in the city center, and was organized by "Città della Scienza", the science center of the city of Naples, belonging to the ECSITE netwok.. The total number of visitors was about 130.000 people. It was a free and open access event, funded by public institutions. Sharing their scientific expertise with the public, in the "Terra" ("Earth") stand the INGV-OV researchers have shown, with interactive labs, how progress in technology and research develope and allow a better understanding of the dynamic processes and of the evolution of our planet. Popularizing science, when widely accessible to the people, make the knowledge not remaining confined to an elite, being efficiently spread in society, with deep implications in the social role of researchers. Practical activities and labs, dialogues and interaction with researchers of INGV-OV have allowed young and adult public, schools, students, experts or simply curious people to deepen burning issues in an area exposed to high seismic and volcanic risk.

  11. Pharmacological treatment of diabetes in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, W M; Florez, H

    2014-12-01

    The pharmacological management of diabetes in older people is complex and challenging. It requires a comprehensive understanding of the individual beyond the diabetes itself. Through the ageing years, the older individual presents with diabetes-related and non-related comorbidities and complications, develops functional limitations and psychological issues, and may lack social support and access to care. A disturbance in these categories, known as the four geriatric domains, will negatively affect diabetes self-management and self-efficacy, leading to poor outcomes and complications. Furthermore, older people with diabetes may be more interested in the management of other chronic conditions such as pain or impaired mobility, and diabetes may be lower in their list of priorities. Proper education must be provided to the older individual and caregivers, with continuous monitoring and counselling, especially when pharmacological interventions offer risks of side effects, adverse reactions and interactions with other medications. Informed shared medical decisions will help to improve adherence to the regimen; however, such discussions ought to be based on the best evidence available, which is unfortunately limited in this age group. We performed a review focused on pharmacological agents and summarize current evidence on their use for the treatment of diabetes in older people. We encourage clinicians to investigate and incorporate the four geriatrics domains in the selection and monitoring of these agents. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Neuroimaging studies in people with gender incongruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Guillamon, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The current review gives an overview of brain studies in transgender people. First, we describe studies into the aetiology of feelings of gender incongruence, primarily addressing the sexual differentiation hypothesis: does the brain of transgender individuals resemble that of their natal sex, or that of their experienced gender? Findings from neuroimaging studies focusing on brain structure suggest that the brain phenotypes of trans women (MtF) and trans men (FtM) differ in various ways from control men and women with feminine, masculine, demasculinized and defeminized features. The brain phenotypes of people with feelings of gender incongruence may help us to figure out whether sex differentiation of the brain is atypical in these individuals, and shed light on gender identity development. Task-related imaging studies may show whether brain activation and task performance in transgender people is sex-atypical. Second, we review studies that evaluate the effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on the brain. This type of research provides knowledge on how changes in sex hormone levels may affect brain structure and function.

  13. Motivated mind perception: treating pets as people and people as animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Nicholas; Schroeder, Juliana; Waytz, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Human beings have a sophisticated ability to reason about the minds of others, often referred to as using one's theory of mind or mentalizing. Just like any other cognitive ability, people engage in reasoning about other minds when it seems useful for achieving particular goals, but this ability remains disengaged otherwise. We suggest that understanding the factors that engage our ability to reason about the minds of others helps to explain anthropomorphism: cases in which people attribute minds to a wide range of nonhuman agents, including animals, mechanical and technological objects, and supernatural entities such as God. We suggest that engagement is guided by two basic motivations: (1) the motivation to explain and predict others' actions, and (2) the motivation to connect socially with others. When present, these motivational forces can lead people to attribute minds to almost any agent. When absent, the likelihood of attributing a mind to others, even other human beings, decreases. We suggest that understanding the factors that engage our theory of mind can help to explain the inverse process of dehumanization, and also why people might be indifferent to other people even when connecting to them would improve their momentary wellbeing.

  14. Managing the wetlands. People and rivers: Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, P

    1993-01-01

    At the current population growth rate in Africa, the population will reach 1 billion by 2010. Water is needed to sustain these people, yet rainfall in Africa is erratic. Africans are already confronting a shortage of freshwater. Agriculture supports 66% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa. Sound agricultural development is needed to curb rural-urban migration, but a constant supply of freshwater is essential. Major rivers (the Limpopo in southern Africa and the Save/Sabi in Zimbabwe and Mozambique) now flow only seasonally. The flows of the Chari-Logona, the Nile, and the Zambezi are falling. Continual mismanagement of Africa's river basins coupled with current projections of global climate change will expand desiccation. All but the White Nile and the Zaire rivers flood seasonally every year, thereby expanding Africa's wetlands. Wetlands have been targeted for development projects (e.g., hydroelectric projects and large dams), largely to meet urban-industrial demands. Development planners tend to ignore the economic value of the wetlands. For example, the Niger Inland Delta sustains 550,000 people, 1 million cattle, and 1 million sheep. Wetlands replenish ground water and serve as natural irrigation. River basin planning often results in environmentally disastrous schemes which do not understand local management practices. Hydrologists, engineers, geologists, and economics design these schemes, but sociologists, anthropologists, and development experts should be included. The unfinished Jonglei Canal in southern Sudan would have adversely affected 400,000 pastoralists. The Volta River Authority's Akosombo Dam displaced 84,000 people and flooded the most productive agricultural land in Ghana. A sustainable future in Africa depends on understanding the interactions of human uses and the ways in which they relate to the natural variations in river flow. The IUCN Wetlands Programme, based on the principles of the World Conservation Strategy, is working with

  15. Resilience and vision impairment in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thetford, Clare; Bennett, Kate M; Hodge, Suzanne; Knox, Paul C; Robinson, Jude

    2015-12-01

    Some people fare better than others when faced with adversity; they appear to be more 'resilient'. This article explores the concept of resilience in the context of vision impairment using two linked sets of narrative interview data from 2007 to 2010. Three case studies were analysed in detail using a framework approach based upon a social-ecological model of resilience and vision impairment. Within the model a range of assets and resources are identified which influence an individual's capacity for resilience. A set of criteria were used to establish the extent to which each individual appeared to be resilient at each point in time. Analysis revealed that it is not merely the presence or absence of individual, social, and community resources - but how these resources interact with each other - that influences resilience and can create a risk to wellbeing. To possess only some of these resources is not sufficient; there is a co-dependency between these resources which requires the presence of other resources for resilience to be achieved. Resilience is not a fixed state; individuals can become more or less resilient as their circumstances and resources change over time. We suggest that the concept of resilience has much to offer the field of vision impairment as it allows the identification of enablers as well as areas of barriers to improving people's health and wellbeing and suggests further opportunities for service providers to engage with clients, even those who appear to be supported, as people's social, economic and emotional landscapes continue to change over time, rather than identifying deficit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. How do people live in the Anthropocene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Libby

    2016-04-01

    While geologists have focused their efforts on which changes in the strata might constitute a functional shift out of the present epoch, environmental humanities scholars, museums and creative artists have taken up the Anthropocene as a concept raising new moral and practical dilemmas. A central concern is with how people adapt and live creatively in a world that is functioning beyond the physical planetary boundaries defined by the Holocene. This paper will provide an overview of the lively scholarly and popular debates on the question of what it means, ethically, to be human in an Age of Humans. Major questions include the question of who are 'we' in the Anthropocene, and how the conditions of the putative new epoch will affect 'more-than-human-others'. Creative and justice activist responses to the Anthropocene typically distinguish among humans, focusing not on the causes, but rather on concerns of the people on the receiving end of global change (for example, the Small Islands Developing States (SIDS) group of 39+8). Some are concerned about the collateral effects of technological 'fixes' for energy transformations and climate, and others about economic shifts and market-based incentives. As a historian of ideas, I explore the multiple paths by which people have come to the Anthropocene concept, and the uses to which it has already been put, even before a final decision is made on its formal status. The Anthropocene already arouses anxiety about 'the future'. One big idea that is shared across activists and scholars (and not just those in the humanities) is the question of enabling hopeful responses. A diversity of creative projects for living in the Anthropocene, which can contribute to coping with the stress of accelerating global change, is essential to this.

  17. Automatic Estimation of Movement Statistics of People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ægidiussen Jensen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Henrik Anker; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    the notion that people need not be detected and tracked perfectly in order to derive useful movement statistics for a particular scene. Tracklets will suffice. To this end we build a tracking framework based on a HoG detector and an appearance-based particle filter. The detector is optimized by learning...... a scene model allowing for a speedup of the process together with a significantly reduced false positive rate. The developed system is applied in two different scenarios where it is shown that useful statistics can indeed be extracted....

  18. Loneliness and Social Isolation among Eldely People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Püllüm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Social isolation is defined as the process of people losing their contacts with other social resources or their willingness to participate. Social isolation is a grave and widespread problem among seniors in society causing many harmful health conditions. Social isolation may be prevented by defining risk factors in seniors and leading them to suitable resources. The elderly should be encouraged to share their experiences and continue to produce for as long as possible, so that they are prevented from feeling isolated from society and the continuity of their economic productivity is ensured.

  19. People management as indicator of business excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haffer, Rafal; Kristensen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to show the importance of people management as a key indicator of business excellence based on four research projects, conducted on the samples of Polish (in the years 2004-2005 and 2006-2007) and Danish companies (in 1999 and 2005). Design/methodology/approach – EFQM...... it possible to compare developing Polish and developed Danish companies in their initiatives aiming at business excellence. Findings – The results indicate significant negligence in the management of human resources as one of the initiatives towards business excellence of Polish enterprises before Poland...

  20. Religion is the Opium of the People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Esther Oluffa

    2015-01-01

    Marx is notorious for his claim that religion is the opium of the people and thus become famous as one of modern thought's most uncompromising critics of religion. In this article I look deeper into the philosophical connotations of Marx's opium metaphor by presenting and discussing other prominent......Marx's shift from 1845 onwards to a focus on economic theory. The interpretation also underscores that even though Marx thought the criticism of religion was in the main complete within German philosophy he continued to make use of religiously coloured language in order to further the revolutionary agenda...

  1. Heart diseases and strokes in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the relevance of the problem associated with the diagnosis and treatment of stroke in young patients aged 15-45 years. It considers the major causes of acute cerebrovascular accidents in young people, including pregnant women. Diseases, such patent foramen ovale, mitral valve prolapse, infective endocarditis, and postpartum cardiomyopathy, are described in detail. The basic principles of the diagnosis and therapy of ischemic stroke at a young age are given. The mainstay of therapy for acute ischemic stroke is stated to include two procedures: reperfusion and neuronal protection.

  2. Revealing myths about people, energy and buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.; Moezzi, M.

    2000-05-01

    In this essay we take a closer look at some energy myths, focusing on the ways energy professionals and the public alike, talk, write and teach about how energy affects the way in which we design, operate, retrofit and inhabit buildings. What myths about people, energy and buildings are current today? Who tells these myths and why do we believe them? How do myths affect our behavior? Myths are a way of understanding the world we live in. They may represent incomplete understanding, or be based on premises that are scientifically not valid, but they help us understand and explain how the world works, and we shape our behavior accordingly.

  3. Older People's Mobility: Segments, Factors, Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Siren, Anu

    2015-01-01

    demographic, health-related, or transport-related factors. This paper reviews these studies and compares the segments of older people that different studies have identified. First, as a result of a systematic comparison, we identified four generic segments: (1) an active car-oriented segment; (2) a car...... people’s travel behaviour. Based on this, we proposed a theoretical model on how the different determinants work together to form the four mobility patterns related to the identified segments. Finally, based on current trends and expectations, we assessed which segments are likely to increase or decrease...

  4. Abuse of elderly people by their carers.

    OpenAIRE

    Homer, A. C.; Gilleard, C.

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the prevalence of abuse of elderly people by their carers and the characteristics of abusers and the abused. DESIGN--Information on abuse and risk factors was collected over six months from carers and patients. Risk factors were identified in the abused group and compared with those in a non-abused control group. SETTING--Carers were interviewed at home; patients were examined in the wards of Putney and Barnes geriatric hospitals, London. SUBJECTS--All patients referred f...

  5. Effective computer training for people with disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Farbeh-Tabrizi

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of computer courses at Methodist City Action computer school for students with psychological and physical disabilities and discusses the motivation behind developing these courses and the original research and development which led to their establishment. It also outlines methods of delivery and the impact of these courses on the students\\' quality of life, independence, social inclusion, literacy, numeracy and employment status. This research was carried out by using available literature found from local libraries and Internet, interviews and classroom observations, and concludes that there is an apparent lack of participation in tertiary education from people with disabilities in New Zealand.

  6. Mindfulness May Be Helpful for People with Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mindfulness May Be Helpful for People With Ulcerative Colitis Share: © Jupiter Images Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), ... and decrease perceived stress in people with ulcerative colitis. These findings come from a small pilot study ...

  7. Review of occupational therapy for people with chronic pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, Katie

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pain is a significant health-care problem. This review aims to critically analyse occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain and identify significant factors influencing the future development of occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain.

  8. How Can Music Help People Who Have Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help? How can music help people who have Alzheimer's disease? Answers from Jonathan Graff-Radford, M.D. ... provide emotional and behavioral benefits for people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. Musical memories ...

  9. Psychiatric Assessment and Follow-up of Young People after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Jan-Feb 2014 | Vol 4 | Issue 1 | ... and social assessment of young people following a serious physical assault as assessed by a ... Following media interest in violence amongst young people,.

  10. Mental health issues and discrimination among older LGBTI people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Jean; Dow, Briony; Maude, Phillip; Purchase, Rachel; Whyte, Carolyn; Barrett, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    LGBT is an acronym used to describe people from diverse sexual orientation or gender identity, people that are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. LGBT people do not constitute a single group nor does each individual "group" constitute a homogeneous unity. However, as higher rates of depression and/or anxiety have been observed in older LGBT people, compared to their heterosexual counterparts (Guasp, 2011) there is a need to raise the profile of mental health issues amongst these groups. The additional letter I is also often included in the acronym LGBTI as intersex people are often included as another gender diverse group. However, there is very little research that includes intersex people and none on older intersex people's mental health so this editorial is restricted to consideration of older LGBT people.

  11. Food Safety for People with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants People at Risk of Foodborne Illness Food Safety for People with HIV/AIDS Share Tweet ...

  12. Are People With Whiplash-Associated Neck Pain Different from People With Nonspecific Neck Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anstey, Ricci; Kongsted, Alice; Kamper, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study with cross sectional and longitudinal analyses. Background The clinical importance of a history of whiplash associated disorder (WAD) in people with neck pain remains uncertain. Objective To compare people with WAD to people with non......-specific neck pain, in terms of their baseline characteristics, and pain and disability outcomes over 1 year. Methods Consecutive patients with neck pain presenting to a secondary care spine centre answered a comprehensive self-report questionnaire and underwent a physical examination. Patients were classified...... into either WAD or non-specific neck pain groups. We compared the outcomes of baseline characteristics of the 2 groups, as well as pain intensity and activity limitation at 6 and 12-month follow-up. Results 2578 participants were included in the study. Of these 488 (19%) were classified as having WAD...

  13. Supportive Housing in Foster Care: The Views of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Kyttälä, Minna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Finnish young people's experiences of supportive housing. Supportive housing is an after-care programme that should support the transition from foster care to independent adulthood. It is directed mainly at young people who have been taken into foster care by social workers. The sample consisted of 39 young people (23…

  14. Institutional ethnography for people in a vulnerable and oppressed situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsbro, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    Among the particularly oppressed people in modern society are the people with communicative, mental or social disabilities stemming from brain injuries, developmental disorders and mental illness such as schizophrenia. These people are in many ways marginalized in modern society where social...... are discourses referring to pedagogical theories, diagnostic systems and the concept of evidence....

  15. Perceived stigma and associated factors among people with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epilepsy is the world's most common neurological disorder, affecting approximately 69 million people worldwide. Perceived stigma affects many domains of the lives of people with epilepsy. However, in Ethiopia there is dearth of study on perceived stigma specifically among people with epilepsy. Objective: To ...

  16. Toward a Model of Vocational Development of People with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    Focusing on people with disabilities, evaluates vocational development theories, evaluates relevant research, describes scale of vocational development, and suggests model of vocational development. Review of studies suggests that people with acquired disabilities tended to choose occupations consistent with predisability plans, while people with…

  17. Resisting Participation: Critiquing Participatory Research Methodologies with Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Participatory methodologies are increasingly employed in research with young people. These practices stem from a desire to reduce problematic distributions of power in research and to construct knowledge with young people rather than for them. This paper examines research conducted with a small group of young people experiencing exclusion from…

  18. Etiological Attributions Of Alms-Begging Among People With Special ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many people opine that the society, religious persuasions, the government and beggars themselves are causal agents of begging behaviour among people with special needs. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating differential etiological attributions of alms-begging among people with special needs in Oyo State, ...

  19. Parental Attitudes and Young People's Online Sexual Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbring, Emma; Hallberg, Jonas; Bohlin, Margareta; Skoog, Therése

    2015-01-01

    Parental attitudes towards young people's sexuality in traditional (i.e. non-online media) settings have been associated with young people's sexual activities. In this study, we explored the association between key parent and youth characteristics and parental attitudes towards young people's online sexual activities. We also examined the…

  20. Acceptability for French People of Physician-Assisted Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frileux, Stephanie; Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Antonini, Sophie; Mullet, Etienne; Sorum, Paul Clay

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to understand better how people judge the acceptability of physician-assisted suicide (PAS). We found that, for people in France of all ages and for elderly people with life-threatening illnesses, acceptability is an additive combination of the number of requests for PAS, the patient's age, the amount of physical suffering, and the…

  1. People of Nia: The Story of a Black Graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggins, Lynette Danley; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.; Parks, E. Reginald

    2001-01-01

    People of Nia is a cultural commencement designed to honor and embrace Black students who have successfully completed their college degrees at a predominantly White college or university. This article discusses this unique campus celebration, presents the history of People of Nia, and describes how People of Nia is presented on one predominantly…

  2. Alternative Spaces of "Work" and Inclusion for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Wilton, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Western governments have emphasized paid work as a key route to social inclusion for disabled people. Although the proportion of disabled people in "mainstream" employment has increased in recent decades, rates remain significantly below those for non-disabled people. Moreover, disabled workers continue to face discrimination and a lack of…

  3. Attributes Related to Attitudes toward People with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Joanne; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 162 adult members of the general public evaluated their attitudes toward people with disabilities. Among results was that the number of movies viewed about people with disabilities was positively associated with number of discussions and with positive attitudes toward people with disabilities. Gender was also significantly related to…

  4. Impression mismanagement : People as inept self-presenters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinmetz, J.F.; Sezer, O.; Sedikides, C.

    2017-01-01

    People routinely manage the impressions they make on others, attempting to project a favorable self-image. The bulk of the literature has portrayed people as savvy self-presenters who typically succeed at conveying a desired impression. When people fail at making a favorable impression, such as when

  5. An FPGA-Based People Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Clark

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an FPGA-based system for detecting people from video. The system is designed to use JPEG-compressed frames from a network camera. Unlike previous approaches that use techniques such as background subtraction and motion detection, we use a machine-learning-based approach to train an accurate detector. We address the hardware design challenges involved in implementing such a detector, along with JPEG decompression, on an FPGA. We also present an algorithm that efficiently combines JPEG decompression with the detection process. This algorithm carries out the inverse DCT step of JPEG decompression only partially. Therefore, it is computationally more efficient and simpler to implement, and it takes up less space on the chip than the full inverse DCT algorithm. The system is demonstrated on an automated video surveillance application and the performance of both hardware and software implementations is analyzed. The results show that the system can detect people accurately at a rate of about 2.5 frames per second on a Virtex-II 2V1000 using a MicroBlaze processor running at 75 MHz, communicating with dedicated hardware over FSL links.

  6. New Vaccines for the World's Poorest People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Strych, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The 2000 Millennium Development Goals helped stimulate the development of life-saving childhood vaccines for pneumococcal and rotavirus infections while greatly expanding coverage of existing vaccines. However, there remains an urgent need to develop new vaccines for HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, as well as for respiratory syncytial virus and those chronic and debilitating (mostly parasitic) infections known as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The NTDs represent the most common diseases of people living in extreme poverty and are the subject of this review. The development of NTD vaccines, including those for hookworm infection, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, is being led by nonprofit product development partnerships (PDPs) working in consortia of academic and industrial partners, including vaccine manufacturers in developing countries. NTD vaccines face unique challenges with respect to their product development and manufacture, as well as their preclinical and clinical testing. We emphasize global efforts to accelerate the development of NTD vaccines and some of the hurdles to ensuring their availability to the world's poorest people.

  7. Insulin resistance syndrome in Australian aboriginal people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, K G; Best, J D; McDermott, R; Green, E A; Piers, L S; O'Dea, K

    1997-01-01

    1. Like many indigenous populations, Australian Aboriginal people have developed high rates of obesity, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and cardiovascular and renal disease following the transition from a traditional to an 'urbanized' lifestyle. These conditions tend to cluster as part of the insulin resistance syndrome. 2. The prevalence of overweight people and obesity in Australian Aboriginal populations ranges from 0% in communities with a traditionally orientated lifestyle to well over 50% in the worst affected communities. There is a predominantly central pattern of fat deposition in both men and women, which is associated with greater insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk than is peripheral fat deposition. 3. Data from four previously published, population-based surveys in Aboriginal communities were combined to give a cohort of 1079 subjects of 15 years and older. Several conditions of the insulin resistance syndrome had a strong, positive association with increasing body mass index (BMI): NIDDM (both cross-sectionally and longitudinally), hypertension, dyslipidaemia and albuminuria. Remaining lean (BMI physical activity and improve dietary quality are likely to be the major means by which conditions associated with insulin resistance can be prevented in Aboriginal populations.

  8. Do People with Schizophrenia Lack Emotional Intelligence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Sara; Kettler, Lisa; Burton, Cassandra; Galletly, Cherrie

    2012-01-01

    Social cognition is a domain of cognitive function that includes the ability to understand and manage social interactions. Emotional intelligence (EI) has been identified as a component of social cognition and is defined as the ability to identify, use, understand, and manage emotions. Neurocognitive impairments are known to be associated with poorer social function in people with schizophrenia, but less is known about the relationships between EI, neurocognition, and social function. The current study assessed EI using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) in 20 people with schizophrenia and 20 controls. The schizophrenia group had significantly lower scores on all measures of EI and demonstrated poorer neurocognition and social functioning than controls. The difference between schizophrenia and control groups was greatest for the Understanding Emotions Branch of the MSCEIT. The neurocognition score and total EI score accounted for 18.3% of the variance in social function in the control group and 9.1% of the variance in social function in the schizophrenia group. Our results suggest that a total EI score is not a useful predictor of overall social function and it may be more clinically useful to develop an individual profile of social cognitive abilities, including EI, to form a remediation program. PMID:23304499

  9. Do People with Schizophrenia Lack Emotional Intelligence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Dawson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Social cognition is a domain of cognitive function that includes the ability to understand and manage social interactions. Emotional intelligence (EI has been identified as a component of social cognition and is defined as the ability to identify, use, understand, and manage emotions. Neurocognitive impairments are known to be associated with poorer social function in people with schizophrenia, but less is known about the relationships between EI, neurocognition, and social function. The current study assessed EI using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT in 20 people with schizophrenia and 20 controls. The schizophrenia group had significantly lower scores on all measures of EI and demonstrated poorer neurocognition and social functioning than controls. The difference between schizophrenia and control groups was greatest for the Understanding Emotions Branch of the MSCEIT. The neurocognition score and total EI score accounted for 18.3% of the variance in social function in the control group and 9.1% of the variance in social function in the schizophrenia group. Our results suggest that a total EI score is not a useful predictor of overall social function and it may be more clinically useful to develop an individual profile of social cognitive abilities, including EI, to form a remediation program.

  10. Anticipated discrimination among people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçok, A; Brohan, E; Rose, D; Sartorius, N; Leese, M; Yoon, C K; Plooy, A; Ertekin, B A; Milev, R; Thornicroft, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of anticipated discrimination in people with schizophrenia (n = 732) from 27 countries in the International Study of Discrimination and Stigma Outcomes (INDIGO). Anticipated discrimination was assessed through four questions of Discrimination and Stigma Scale. Twenty-five individuals were identified at each site who were reasonably representative of all such treated cases within the local area. Sixty-four per cent of the participants reported that they had stopped themselves from applying for work, training or education because of anticipated discrimination. Seventy-two per cent of them reported that they felt the need to conceal their diagnosis. Expecting to be avoided by others who know about their diagnosis was highly associated with decisions to conceal their diagnosis. Those who concealed their diagnosis were younger and more educated. The participants who perceived discrimination by others were more likely to stop themselves from looking for a close relationship. Anticipated discrimination in finding and keeping work was more common in the absence than in the presence of experienced discrimination, and the similar findings applied to intimate relationships. This study shows that anticipated discrimination among people with schizophrenia is common, but is not necessarily associated with experienced discrimination. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Tobacco cessation interventions for young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, G M; Stanton, A

    2006-10-18

    Teenage smoking prevalence is around 15% in developing countries (with wide variation from country to country), and around 26% in the UK and USA. Although most tobacco control programmes for adolescents are based around prevention of uptake, there are also a number of initiatives to help those who want to quit. Since those who do not smoke before the age of 20 are significantly less likely to start as adults, there is a strong case for programmes for young people that address both prevention and treatment. To evaluate the effectiveness of strategies that help young people to stop smoking tobacco. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's Specialized Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsyclNFO, ERIC, CINAHL, and the bibliographies of identified trials. We also searched the 'grey' literature (unpublished materials), and contacted authors and experts in the field where necessary. Types of studies: Randomized controlled trials, cluster-randomized controlled trials and controlled trials. Young people, aged less than 20, who are regular tobacco smokers. Types of interventions: The interventions ranged from simple ones such as pharmacotherapy, targeting individual young people, through complex programmes targeting people or organizations associated with young people (for example, their families or schools), or the community in which young people live. We included cessation programmes but excluded programmes primarily aimed at prevention of uptake. Types of outcome measures: The primary outcome was smoking status at six months follow up, among those who smoked at baseline. We report the definition of cessation used in each trial (e.g seven- or thirty-day point prevalence abstinence, or sustained or prolonged abstinence), and we preferred biochemically verified cessation when that measure was available. Both authors independently assessed the eligibility of candidate trials identified by the searches, and

  12. People and Places Forum Workshop Report | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2015, the Twin Ports-based People and Places Work Group (PPWG) coordinated a special gathering to bring together researchers and scholars from diverse fields to discuss environment-human research, scholarship and collaboration opportunities. Hosted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the group approached and invited over 150 individuals from eight regional universities. The goals were to learn who was doing or interested in doing applied research on human-environment interactions, who might have students to engage in work, who might partner with the Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve (Reserve), USEPA, University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resource Research Institute (NRRI), Minnesota and Wisconsin Sea Grant Institutes (Sea Grant), and other partnering institutes and who might be interested in ecosystem services work in particular. A pre-gathering survey collected initial information about this community and the adapted, open-space design gathering allowed for even more data collection about potential new colleagues to engage in the work of understanding people and place in our region. This summary reviews some of findings and presents what may be considered the beginning of a network directory to encourage and facilitate interdisciplinary research and collaboration. This report outlines the process to identify and reach out to health, social science, and humanities scholars to participate in environmental research w

  13. Infinite possibility: clowning with elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Selena Clare

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, there has been aplentitude of research into the health benefits of humor and laughter for healthy, sick, or depressed adults and children as well as for senior citizens. Medical research supports our human instinct that people who smile and laugh are happy, whereas those who are inexpressive are usually not happy. Research shows that humor stimulus results in mirth, which elicits a primarily emotional response with psychological efects, and laughter, which elicits a physical response with physiological effects. The many physiological benefits of laughter in older adults have been clearly demonstrated. Yet much of the medical research is based on experiments using funny videos and cartoons for humor sessions. I argue that "clowning around" with elderly people brings greater benefits than laughter alone. These benefits are clearly evident, though they may not be scientifically measurable: When the game is rooted in the patient's own imagination, thereby giving agency to a powerless individual it is many times more personal and transformative. In this article, I focus on my experiences with older adults while working with Clowns Without Borders and Risaterapia as well as on my own relationship with my grandfather. I provide a framework for why humanitarian clowning and the principles behind it can be incredibly well suited for working with the elderly.

  14. Obesity in peoples of the African diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, R; McFarlane-Anderson, N; Bennett, F; Fraser, H; McGee, D; Cooper, R; Forrester, T

    1996-01-01

    People of African descent in the Caribbean and the USA originated from the Bight of Benin in West Africa. Although these populations share a common genetic heritage, they now live under different socioeconomical conditions. Assuming genetic similarity, a cross-cultural examination of these peoples in West Africa, the Caribbean and the USA may attenuate the effect of genetic factors and allow the assessment of environmental contributions to a biological outcome. We carried out an epidemiological survey to determine the prevalence of hypertension and the contribution of risk factors to the variation in blood pressure. We measured the height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and blood pressure of adults in Nigeria, Cameroon, Jamaica, St. Lucia, Barbados and the USA. In urban populations there was a trend towards increasing weight, height, body mass index, and proportions of those overweight and obese going from West Africa to the USA, with the Caribbean being intermediate. The prevalence of hypertension lay on a similar gradient. Given a common genetic susceptibility, urbanization and western acculturation are therefore associated with increasing hypertension and obesity.

  15. Internal migration of people in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, M N

    1979-07-01

    The Kingdom of Nepal is divided geographically into 3 distinct regions: the Mountain, the Hill, and the Plain. The average rate of population growth from 1961 to 1971 was 2.1%, but recent data suggest that it has now increased to 2.5%. 94% of the labor force is employed in agriculture. With the present rate of internal migration the Plain Region will be supporting approximately 35% of the total population (excluding the population immigrating from other countries) in 1981, and 39% in 1991. If the same migration pattern continues, the population distribution among the geographic regions will stabilize around 95% in the Plain, 4% in the Hill, and 1% in the Mountain. Such an unequal distribution of population will inevitably produce a tremendous stress on the physical environment as well as on the political, social, and economic system of the country. Soil erosion, landslides, floods, and a lowering of the water table in the Hill have resulted; the fertility of the soil has been depleted, if not exhausted. In view of these facts, the author recommends large-scale concurrent programs: 1) to introduce afforestation and horticulture in the Hill; 2) to improve agriculture; 3) to establish small-scale rural industries in order to release people from the agricultural sector; 4) to restrict migration and the family size through proper corrective feedbacks; and 5) to raise the people's awareness and participation in environmental conservation.

  16. Vitamin status of elderly people in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, D; Stehle, P

    1999-05-01

    In the last decade several attempts (Nationale Verzehrsstudie, NVS; Verbundstudie Ernährungserhebung und Risikofaktoren-Analytik, VERA: Bethanien-Ernährungsstudie, BEST) have been made to assess the nutritional status of the elderly in Germany. A careful evaluation of those data describing the vitamin status clearly indicate that healthy older people are not at higher risk for vitamin deficiency compared to younger adults. The results of the NVS showed that, except for folic acid, mean intake of all vitamins exceeded 80% of the current recommendations. Only 5% of blood vitamin concentrations analyzed in a subpopulation (VERA-Study) were founded to be below the physiological range. Only the incidence of low cobalamin values increased with age, presumably due to gastrointestinal problems (atrophic gastritis). In contrast, geriatric patients showed markedly lower vitamin blood concentrations compared to healthy subjects of the same age (BEST-Study). This might be explained by physical and mental deterioration, handicaps, chronic diseases and multiple chronic drug use. Underrepresentation of very old people, lack of reliable reference values for biomarkers and uncertainties in data collection may have contributed to misinterpretations. Representative studies are needed to objectively assess the nutritional status of the elderly population in Germany.

  17. Understanding Why People Enjoy Loud Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, David; Fremaux, Guy

    2017-11-01

    Sounds at levels that can injure the ear are regarded as enjoyable by many people. In many societies, a common form of this behavior is listening to loud music, either via personal audio systems or at music venues. Drawing on theory from the literature around loud sound and emotional responses to music, and combining it with concepts of physiological sound adaptation and classical conditioning, we developed a model of the process that may underlie people's enjoyment of loud sound, particularly loud music in nightclubs. The Conditioning, Adaptation, and Acculturation to Loud Music (CAALM) model proposes that the benefits associated with loud sound, alongside other desirable aspects of nightclubs, provide the unconditioned stimuli. Over time regular clubbers become conditioned to enjoy loud sound in itself. Exposure to loud sound also causes adaptation within the auditory system, so there is both a desire for, and tolerance of, loud sound during leisure time. This sets up an expectation of loud music as a cultural norm, and staff of leisure venues, who are themselves part of that culture, set music levels to meet customer expectations; and a cycle is perpetuated. This theory may be a useful consideration for health promotion and hearing conservation interventions.

  18. A Cognitive Model for Aggregating People's Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael D.; Steyvers, Mark; Miller, Brent

    2014-01-01

    We develop a cognitive modeling approach, motivated by classic theories of knowledge representation and judgment from psychology, for combining people's rankings of items. The model makes simple assumptions about how individual differences in knowledge lead to observed ranking data in behavioral tasks. We implement the cognitive model as a Bayesian graphical model, and use computational sampling to infer an aggregate ranking and measures of the individual expertise. Applications of the model to 23 data sets, dealing with general knowledge and prediction tasks, show that the model performs well in producing an aggregate ranking that is often close to the ground truth and, as in the “wisdom of the crowd” effect, usually performs better than most of individuals. We also present some evidence that the model outperforms the traditional statistical Borda count method, and that the model is able to infer people's relative expertise surprisingly well without knowing the ground truth. We discuss the advantages of the cognitive modeling approach to combining ranking data, and in wisdom of the crowd research generally, as well as highlighting a number of potential directions for future model development. PMID:24816733

  19. Limitations of How We Categorize People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Wallat

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Social policy researchers and policy rules and regulation writers have not taken advantage of advances in assessing ways in which social representations of ideas about people can convey alternative explanations of social life. During the past decade a growing number of scholars have considered how representational practices and the representations that are outcomes of such practices have value. Neglecting to consider representational practices has consequences including failure to mobilize and sustain alternative ideologies that reject narrow perspectives on families and communities. As evidenced by recent OMB rulings on census categories, the dominant sense of meaning of population—and hence family and community—is quite similar to the 17th century sense of people as objects of a particular category in a place from which samples can be taken for statistical measurement. However, the contrastive analysis presented in this paper points out how sustained attention to consequences of use of sets of information categories collected to enumerate population to inform social policy can still materialize. In the wake of federal welfare reform, policy makers are particularly interested in questions of benefit relative to social service delivery and community revitalization. The presentation includes lessons learned from several dozen family, youth, school and community research projects.

  20. Bark-peeling, food stress and tree spirits - the use of pine inner bark for food in Scandinavia and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lars Ostlund; Lisa Ahlberg; Olle Zackrisson; Ingela Bergman; Steve Arno

    2009-01-01

    The Sami people of northern Scandinavia and many indigenous peoples of North America have used pine (Pinus spp.) inner bark for food, medicine and other purposes. This study compares bark-peeling and subsequent uses of pine inner bark in Scandinavia and western North America, focusing on traditional practices. Pine inner bark contains substances - mainly carbohydrates...

  1. How to provide for the primary health care needs of homeless people: what do homeless people in Leicester think?

    OpenAIRE

    Hewett, N C

    1999-01-01

    The best means of improving access to primary health care for homeless people remains controversial, but the debate may be informed by the opinions of homeless people. A questionnaire asked users of a homeless drop-in centre to choose between the options of facilitated access to mainstream primary health care or special provision for homeless people. While both models of care were endorsed, 84% of homeless people preferred a special homeless service.

  2. Exercise programs for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Dorothy; Forbes, Scott C; Blake, Catherine M; Thiessen, Emily J; Forbes, Sean

    2015-04-15

    This is an update of our previous 2013 review. Several recent trials and systematic reviews of the impact of exercise on people with dementia are reporting promising findings. Primary objectiveDo exercise programs for older people with dementia improve their cognition, activities of daily living (ADLs), neuropsychiatric symptoms, depression, and mortality? Secondary objectivesDo exercise programs for older people with dementia have an indirect impact on family caregivers' burden, quality of life, and mortality?Do exercise programs for older people with dementia reduce the use of healthcare services (e.g. visits to the emergency department) by participants and their family caregivers? We identified trials for inclusion in the review by searching ALOIS (www.medicine.ox.ac.uk/alois), the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialised Register, on 4 September 2011, on 13 August 2012, and again on 3 October 2013. In this review, we included randomized controlled trials in which older people, diagnosed with dementia, were allocated either to exercise programs or to control groups (usual care or social contact/activities) with the aim of improving cognition, ADLs, neuropsychiatric symptoms, depression, and mortality. Secondary outcomes related to the family caregiver(s) and included caregiver burden, quality of life, mortality, and use of healthcare services. Independently, at least two authors assessed the retrieved articles for inclusion, assessed methodological quality, and extracted data. We analysed data for summary effects. We calculated mean differences or standardized mean difference (SMD) for continuous data, and synthesized data for each outcome using a fixed-effect model, unless there was substantial heterogeneity between studies, when we used a random-effects model. We planned to explore heterogeneity in relation to severity and type of dementia, and type, frequency, and duration of exercise program. We also evaluated adverse events. Seventeen

  3. Do jobs follow people or people follow jobs? A meta-analysis of Carlino–Mills studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstra, Gerke J.; Van Dijk, Jouke; Florax, Raymond J. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Do jobs follow people or people follow jobs? A meta-analysis of Carlino–Mills studies. Spatial Economic Analysis. This study examines the classic question as to whether ‘jobs follow people’ or ‘people follow jobs’ by performing a meta-analysis of 321 results from 64 Carlino–Mills studies. It is

  4. Elderly people's definition of quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Flávio M F; Ferraz, Marcos P T; Marc, Norton; Escosteguy, Norma U; Moriguchi, Emílio H

    2003-03-01

    Senescence for some elderly people is a phase of with development and satisfaction, whereas for others is a negative stage of life. The determinants of a good quality of life in old age vary from person to person. The aims of this study were to identify 1) the prevalence of octogenarian people who evaluate their current life as being mainly characterized by a positive quality and 2) which were the domains that they identified as being the determinants of this positive quality. A same parallel study was conducted with subjects who evaluated senescence as a preponderantly negative experience. A random and representative sample of 35% of the octogenarian people, living residing in the community, was selected among the dwellers of the city of Veranópolis, state of Rio Grande do Sul. A semi-structured questionnaire on quality of life quality was applied as well as the scale of depressive symptoms Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the index of general health Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS). Slightly more than half of the studied sample (57%) defined their current quality of life with positive evaluations, whereas 18% presented a negative evaluation of it. A group 0f 25% defined their current lives as neutral or having both values (positive and negative). Those who were dissatisfied presented more health problems according to the CIRS and more depressive symptoms when evaluated by the GDS. Satisfied subjects ones had different reasons to justify this state, however, the dissatisfied had mainly the lack of health as a reason for their suffering. The main source of reported daily well-being was the involvement with rural or domestic activities. Among the interviewed, lack of health was the main source for not presenting well-being, although there was interpersonal variability regarding what each subject considered as loss of health. Possibly, for the elderly subjects a negative quality of life is equivalent to loss of health and a positive life quality is

  5. Experiences of people living with HIV and people living close to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heleen French

    2014-07-14

    Jul 14, 2014 ... not cause HIV transmission (Busza 1999). In a study by Watson (2008), a community-based .... jects was done by a panel made up of invited relevant stakeholders in the community and the researchers .... be an active reality within the broader community: 'If we can reach more people, stigma will reduce in ...

  6. On interviewing people with pets: reflections from qualitative research on people with long-term conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sara; Ziebland, Sue

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that pets are associated with physiological, psychological and social benefits for humans. Much of this research has come from western countries, where there have been consistent calls for greater engagement with pet ownership and health. Drawing on a secondary analysis of 61 in-depth interviews with people, or carers of people, with long-term conditions, we explore how pets feature in people's narrative accounts of their experiences. Our findings demonstrate the multifaceted nature of people's relationships with pets, and the embedded and embodied ways in which human-nonhuman interactions are played out in narratives of chronic illness. Our study differs from other work on pets and health in that, by returning to the interview video recordings, we were able to explore the sometimes three-way interactions, the co(a)gency, between participants, pets and researchers. Pets were often presented as important family members, yet the researchers' responses to the presence or talk about pets was often markedly different from their reactions to other household members. We conclude with cautioning against the downgrading of pets in narrative health research. Narrative approaches may invite participants to talk about what is important to them, yet they clearly have limitations in practice. © 2015 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Catholic Institute for Deaf People, Co. Dublin

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2006-01-01

    A Vision for Change details a comprehensive model of mental health service provision for Ireland. It describes a framework for building and fostering positive mental health across the entire community and for providing accessible, community-based, specialist services for people with mental illness.\\r\

  8. Postboard : Free-form tangible messaging for people with aphasia (and other people)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Mahmud, A.; Dijkhuis, S.Q.; Blummel, L.; Elberse, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the design of a communication system for people with aphasia. It consists of pairs of physical whiteboards that are connected over the internet. This allows users to combine any personal language skills with visuals and already existing materials at hand. The design has been

  9. Crime Wave And Public Confidence In Oodua People\\'s Congress In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increase in violent crimes, insecurity to lives and property and the inability of the police to effectively curb crime led to Oodua Peoples Congress (OPC) incursion in crime control in South Western Nigeria. In spite of the public recognition of the organization as an effective mechanism of crime control, opinions are divided ...

  10. Young people, parents and radical right voting. The case of the Swiss People's Party

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, H.R.; Voorpostel, M.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly found that young people tend to adopt the political party choice of their parents. However, far less is known about the applicability of this theory when investigating radical right support. Using the Swiss Household panel data (1999e2007), this study empirically identifies the

  11. Interventions aimed at increasing knowledge and improving attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities among lay people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewooruttun, Leila; Scior, Katrina

    2014-12-01

    Despite policies aimed at ensuring equal rights and maximising respect and social inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities, in their daily lives many continue to face negative attitudes and discrimination within society. Misconceptions about what it means to have an intellectual disability and about the capabilities of people with intellectual disabilities appear widespread, and may contribute to prejudice and discrimination. This review provides a summary and evaluation of empirical interventions aimed at increasing knowledge and targeting negative attitudes towards this population among lay people of working age. An electronic search using PsycINFO, Web of Science and PubMed identified 22 English language studies published between 1990 and early 2014 that reported a specific intervention with a lay population sample. The majority of studies reported promising outcomes, particularly those aimed at increasing knowledge of intellectual disability through education. Support for the positive influence of contact with people with intellectual disabilities was demonstrated across several interventions. Interventions delivered at least partly by individuals with intellectual disabilities, and educational interventions appear to hold the most promise. The evidence is limited though by the weaknesses of measurement tools employed. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Universal design in housing for people with disabilities: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Kalkhalah Shahrom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Housing standard for disabled people is a new dimension in quality of life. To the disabled people who are housebound, the house is the central focus of their existence. Over the last ten years, more focused studies have been conducted on the relationship between housing and people with disabilities. This paper reveals the needs of universal design in housing for disabled people and policies that can be improved. The main focus is on housing design for people with disabilities that begins with an overview on housing needs concept, theory and model, and followed by the topics on housing crisis for disabled people. These reviews looked at the existing literatures on universal design in residential remodeling including the principles of universal design, housing features, design, space and accessibility. It concludes by providing housing strategy for people with disabilities including disabled rights, information and advocacy from various countries.

  13. Social Security and the Elderly People\\'s Pathology in Tehran: A Sociological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Sheykhi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present paper attempts to appraise the quality of life of the elderly people in Tehran city with special reference to their social security and pathology. In this research, different dimensions of material, social, well-being and food conditions of the elderly people are assessed. While the universe of research is the elderly people of Tehran city, in that, the human rights, the elderly dignity, and the gradual decline of their social security are studied. Similarly, seeking various dimensions of the lives of the elderly is one of the main aims of the study, i.e. The age groups who gradually lose their physical and mental self-reliance, and as a result, their dependency on others and various services enhances. Methods & Materials: The universe of study in this research is the city if Tehran. In that, in an empirical method, 500 elderly people have randomly been selected and referred to, and in the process of which the intended data have been collected through questionnaires. Results: Findings indicate that ageing pyramid shrinks and narrows at the age of 60 and over, and from that age on, only 60 percent of the elderly have their spouses. Similarly, another research finding reflects the economic, social, and remedial conditions of these people. Findings also show the amount of emotional and material supports that the elderly receive from their children. Conclusion: Research reached the conclusion that the young elderly or those born in 1320/1942 and beyond, under the current social, economic and cultural conditions, i.e. with new needs and expectations, are highly different from those of previous generations with special reference to Tehran. To meet such needs, relevant resources must intervene.

  14. What people really think about nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-03-15

    Nuclear power is a reliable, baseload, low-carbon energy source that can contribute to the fight against climate change. It is also competitive and can help reduce energy dependency. It is vital that politicians take the lead and implement bold decisions regarding the energy mix. Developments in Finland and the UK show that if the political decision to include nuclear in the energy mix is taken and information is communicated in an open, inclusive and democratic way, people tend to become more favourable to nuclear power. The March 2011 accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan had an impact on public opinion towards nuclear power. Yet the results of opinion polls carried out throughout Europe after the accident show that opinion is polarised and country specific.

  15. KT gets even closer to CERN people

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    For several years, the Knowledge Transfer (KT) group has been helping CERN people to disseminate their results, know-how and technologies to new fields of application. This may be anything from working with a school, hospital or a company through a licence or collaboration agreement, to securing CERN’s intellectual property rights or even starting a company. In order to maximise the impact of CERN’s work and to provide a service adapted to its users’ needs, the KT group has launched a survey.   Assessing the needs and wishes of the CERN personnel with regard to knowledge transfer activities: this is the goal of the survey that the KT group has launched this week. “Science and engineering are key disciplines in tackling the fundamental challenges facing the planet, such as energy, security, climate change, the sustainability of natural resources and economic resilience,” says Thierry Lagrange, head of the Finance, Procurement and Knowledge Transfer...

  16. REHABILITATION PROGRAMS FOR PEOPLE WITH NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Zupan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular diseases are inherited, chronic, degenerative and progressive. The main characteristics of neuromuscular diseases are: muscular weakness, contractures, scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, cardiac affection, nutrition disturbances, dependence on the help of others, possible social isolation and physiological problems. Appropriate rehabilitation programs should influence all mentioned characteristics. A special unit for rehabilitation of patients with neuromuscular diseases within the Institute for rehabilitation of the Republic of Slovenia was established in 1993 at the initiative of the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Slovenia. The main aim of this establishment was to try to guide the patient and his family through the course of the disease. The article describes the work of the mentioned unit. Different clinical rehabilitation programs for people with neuromuscular diseases are presented and some research results of the unit are mentioned.

  17. Investigating how everyday people experience security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg

    experiences that everyday users of technology encounter. The background for introducing this method is a project under the heading of IT Security for Citizens, which bridges between research competencies in HCI and security. In this project we develop methods and concepts to analyze digital signature systems...... and security sensible systems in a broad sense, from the point of view of contemporary CHI. The project includes literature studies of usable security, as well as empirical investigations and design work. This paper reports on my method to target user experiences of and with security technology.......In this paper I propose a method for analyzing everyday people's experiences with IT-security. I furthermore report how I applied the method. The proposal is motivated by work of other researchers and their efforts to get beyond secure behavior, and to get an insight in secure or insecure...

  18. People-centric sensing in assistive healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannetsos, Thanassis; Dimitriou, Tassos; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2011-01-01

    As the domains of pervasive computing and sensor networking are expanding, there is an ongoing trend towards assistive living and healthcare support environments that can effectively assimilate these technologies according to human needs. Most of the existing research in assistive healthcare...... follows a more passive approach and has focused on collecting and processing data using a static-topology and an application-aware infrastructure. However, with the technological advances in sensing, computation, storage, and communications, a new era is about to emerge changing the traditional view...... sensing devices enabling thousands new personal, social, and public sensing applications. In this paper, we discuss our vision for people-centric sensing in assistive healthcare environments and study the security challenges it brings. This highly dynamic and mobile setting presents new challenges...

  19. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning.

  20. Balance control in elderly people with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Hsu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a prevalent health concern among older adults and is associated with an increased risk of falls that incur fracture, injury, or mortality. Identifying the risk factors of falls within this population is essential for the development of effective regimes for fall prevention. Studies have shown that muscle quality and good posture alignments are critical for balance control in elderly individuals. People with osteoporosis often have muscle weakness and increased spine kyphosis leading to vertebral fractures and poor balance control, or even falls. Therefore, improving muscle quality, strengthening weak muscles, and correcting postural alignment are essential elements for the prevention of falls and fractures in older adults with osteoporosis. This review reports the necessary information regarding the critical factors of balance control in older adults with osteoporosis, as well as testing the clinical innovations of exercise training to improve the long-term prognosis of osteoporosis in this vulnerable population.

  1. Screening for Malnutrition in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonnet, Sophie; Rolland, Yves

    2015-08-01

    Malnutrition risk increases with age and level of care. Despite significant medical advances, malnutrition remains a significant and highly prevalent public health problem of developed countries. Earlier identification and appropriate nutrition support may help to reverse or halt the malnutrition trajectory and the negative outcomes associated with poor nutritional status. A nutrition screening process is recommended to help detect people with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) or at malnutrition risk. Evidence supports that oral nutritional supplements and dietary counseling can increase dietary intake and improve quality of life in elderly with PEM or at malnutrition risk. This article examines nutritional screening and assessment tools designated for older adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Suicide in elderly people: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza; Cavalcante, Fátima Gonçalves

    2010-08-01

    A literature review was carried out focusing on the main factors associated with suicidal ideation, attempts and completed suicide in elders. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PsychINFO, SciELO and Biblioteca Virtual em Violência e Saúde da BIREME (BIREME's Violence and Health Virtual Library), referring to the period from 1980 to 2008. Fifty-two references were selected and analyzed. They showed a strong relationship among suicide ideation, attempt and completion in elderly individuals, which results from the interaction of complex physical, mental, neurobiological and social factors. Suicide associated with depression in the elderly can be prevented, provided the person is properly treated. In Brazil, it is necessary to invest in research, given the persistent increase in suicide rates among aged people, especially among males.

  3. Evacuation of People with Visual Impairments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Janne Gress

    since the model is based on data for this group. Likewise, the theoretical model is conservative estimate for the hearing impaired participants moving on horizontal planes. For all tested subpopulations the walking speed decreased with increasing person density, but the visually impaired participants...... and with a special focus on blind and visually impaired people. An experimental program is designed to obtain data on walking speeds horizontally and descending stairs, interaction between participants and their interaction with the building environment. Experiments are conducted in different buildings including...... for a safe and easy evacuation, challenge the movement for occupants having an impairment. Quantitative results on reaction times, walking speeds horizontally and descending stairs are also obtained from the experiments. It is found that N&M model correlates with results found able-bodied. This is expected...

  4. Young people's anticipation regarding education and job

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tilde Mette; Lundby, Astrid Arbjerg

    struggle in the decision making process because they see educational and vocational choices as definitive and therefore are afraid to take a ‘wrong’ turn. They seem to think of their educational pathway as linear with no room for detours. This can appear paradoxical on a labour market described as both......In Denmark there is significant political attention towards leading young people faster through the education system. Through new policies and benefit structures the government aims to reduce the number of gap years in the transition between general upper secondary education (‘gymnasium......’) and higher education. At the same time a political reform has made it more difficult to take on leave, switch education and do work experience during the studies. Simultaneously there is increasing attention on student guidance on all educational levels. The aim is on one hand to improve the students...

  5. Redistricting and the Will of the People

    CERN Document Server

    Mattingly, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a non-partisan probability distribution on congressional redistricting of North Carolina which emphasizes the equal partition of the population and the compactness of districts. When random districts are drawn and the results of the 2012 election were re-tabulated under the drawn districtings, we find that an average of 7.6 democratic representatives are elected. 95% of the randomly sampled redistrictings produced between 6 and 9 Democrats. Both of these facts are in stark contrast with the 4 Democrats elected in the 2012 elections with the same vote counts. This brings into serious question the idea that such elections represent the "will of the people." It underlines the ability of redistricting to undermine the democratic process, while on the face allowing democracy to proceed.

  6. STAGING THROUGH PROTOTYPING WITH PARTIALLY BLINDED PEOPLE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    self-sufficient. Studies show that visual impaired persons rarely are involved in designing such technologies, which in many cases causes them to be excluded from everyday activities. We discuss how a design team applied collaborative methods and prototypes as boundary objects in dialogue with visually...... impaired people aiming including them as user of a self-service technology. The use of material objects from the very start of the design process contributed to a process in which the designers and visually impaired persons co-designed a new user interface that would enable these actors to collect and send...... parcels through ‘døgnbox’, an self-service, touchscreen-based postal system in Denmark (Nielsen et al. 2015). We describe how the design team used a variety of material objects to interest, enrol and mobilise the visually impaired actors in design processes (Callon 1986). We also discuss how...

  7. Measuring fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipchase, S Y; Lincoln, N B; Radford, K A

    2003-07-22

    To compare methods of assessing fatigue. Cross sectional. Community. Forty Multile Sclerosis (MS) patients and 20 healthy controls. Fatigue questionnaires, SDSA dot cancellation test, finger tapping test, TEA Lottery. The MS patients had significantly higher levels of fatigue than the controls on the Task Induced Fatigue Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale and Fatigue Impact Scale. The Task Induced Fatigue Scale completed whilst imagining oneself driving and the Fatigue Assessment Instrument did not differentiate between MS patients and controls. Finger tapping differentiated between MS patients and controls but there was no significant difference between MS patients and controls on visual and auditory concentration tests. A factor analysis indicated that questionnaire measures of fatigue were interrelated but independent of objective test performance. Questionnaire measures can be used to assess fatigue in people with MS. The FSS differentiated MS patients from controls and is relatively short. It was therefore recommended for clinical use.

  8. Young people's participation in physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Frydendal; Ottesen, Laila; Thing, Lone Friis

    ; Shame has an immense influence on the girls’ participation in physical activity; The offers regarding physical activity, provided by the school, appeal more to the boys and the students who are already physically active. Consequently, the students express a wish to have more influence on physical...... activity and health in their environment. Furthermore, most of the students would like to become healthier or more active, and they see the school and their parents as important factors in helping them get there. Conclusively, aspects like school, leisure, spare time jobs and cultural norms shape the lives......The paper presents the results of a questionnaire survey conducted in a Danish Gymnasium. The purpose of the survey was to gain knowledge on the perspectives of the students regarding physical education, exercise and health. Other studies have examined the views of young people regarding PE...

  9. Inclusive Educative Technologies, for people with disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echenique, AM; Graffigna, JP; Pérez, E.; López, N.; Piccinini, D.; Fernández, H.; Garcés, A.

    2016-04-01

    The conventional educational environment imposes barriers to education for people with disabilities, limiting their rights, which is a non-discriminative education. In turn, hampers their access to other rights and creates huge obstacles to realize their potential and participate effectively in their communities. In this sense Assistive Technology provides alternative solutions, in order to compensate for a lost or diminished ability. Thus the necessary assistance is provided to perform tasks, including those related to education, improving the inclusion. In this paper some researches had been made in the Gabinete de TecnologiaMedica, in the Facultad de Ingenieria of the Universidad Nacional de San Juan in order to solve this problem. The researchers are classified by type of disability; sensory (visual and auditory) or motor. They have been designed, developed and experienced through various prototypes that have given satisfactory results. It had been published in national and international congresses of high relevance.

  10. Delirium in elderly people: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia eMartins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present review aims to highlight this intricate syndrome, regarding diagnosis, pathophysiology, etiology, prevention and management in elderly people. The diagnosis of delirium is based on clinical observations, cognitive assessment, detailed family history, physical and neurological examination. Clinically, delirium occurs in hyperactive, hypoactive or mixed forms, based on psychomotor behaviour. As an acute confusional state, it is characterized by a rapid onset of symptoms, fluctuating course and an altered level of consciousness, global disturbance of cognition or perceptual abnormalities and evidence of a physical cause.In spite of pathophysiological mechanisms of delirium remaining unclear, current evidence suggests that disruption of neurotransmission, inflammation or acute stress responses might all contribute to the development of this ailment.It usually occurs as a result of a complex interaction of multiple risk factors, such as cognitive impairment/dementia, current hip fracture and presence of severe illness.Despite all of the above, delirium is frequently under-recognized and often misdiagnosed by health professionals. In particular, this happens due to its fluctuating nature, its overlap with dementia and the scarcity of routine formal cognitive assessment in general hospitals.It is also associated with multiple adverse outcomes that have been well documented, such as increased hospital stay, function/cognitive decline, institutionalization and mortality.In this context, early identification of delirium will be essential. Timely and optimal management of people with delirium, should be performed with identification of possible underlying causes, dealing with a suitable care environment and improving education of health professionals. All these can be important factors, which contribute to a decrease in adverse outcomes associated with delirium.

  11. Michael Tooley on possible people and promising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhse, H

    1993-01-01

    This critique takes issue with the arguments that Michael Tooley forwarded in "Abortion and Infanticide" to further the notion that the destruction of potential persons is not immoral. In particular, the author focuses on Tooley's presupposition that it is not wrong to prevent the existence of additional persons who are likely to lead happy lives. The writings of Derek Parfit are called upon to provide examples upon which the criticism of Tooley is based. Particular attention is paid to two scenarios proposed by Parfit: one in which a pregnant woman would be wrong to refuse a simple treatment to prevent a handicap in her baby and the other in which a woman planning to become pregnant is advised to wait three months before becoming pregnant to allow herself time to recover from a condition which would result in her having a handicapped child. Parfit suggests that it would be wrong of the woman not to wait. Of course, the problem inherent in the second scenario is that the woman would harm her potential handicapped child by not allowing its conception. Tooley's reconciliation of the problems posed by Parfit are based on the morality involved in making and keeping promises. The author reviews Tooley's attempt to justify his views in this way and concludes that Tooley's reasoning fails, in part because promising is only a social institution, and morality also encompasses basic values. If one accepts Tooley's argument that there is an obligation to refrain from bringing wretched people into the world, then one must also accept the reverse: an obligation exists to bring additional happy people into the world. In this case, both abortion and infanticide are wrong.

  12. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in homeless people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldmäe, Margit; Zilmer, Mihkel; Viigimaa, Margus; Zemtsovskaja, Galina; Tomberg, Karel; Kaart, Tanel; Annuk, Margus

    2011-08-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which is highest in Eastern Europe including Estonia. Accumulating evidence suggests that life-style is associated with the development of CVD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the informative power of common CVD-related markers under unhealthy conditions. Subjects (n = 51; mean age 45 years; 90% men) were recruited from a shelter for homeless people in Tallinn, Estonia, and consisted of persons who constantly used alcohol or surrogates, smoked, and were in a bad physical condition (amputated toes, necrotic ulcers, etc.). Blood pressure, pulse rate, and waist circumference were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The following markers were measured in blood serum: total cholesterol (TChol), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-Chol), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-Chol), plasma triglycerides (TG), apolipoproteins A-l (ApoA1) and B (ApoB), lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), glucose (Gluc), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), serum carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Except smoking, the anamnestic information considering eating habits, declared alcohol consumption and medication intake were not included in the analysis due to the low credibility of self-reported data. More than half of the investigated patients had values of measured markers (hsCRP, TChol, LDL-Chol, TG, HbA1c, ApoA1, ApoB, Lp(a), Gluc) within normal range. Surprisingly, 100% of subjects had HDL-Chol within endemic norm. This study demonstrates that traditional markers, commonly used for prediction and diagnosis and treatment of CVD, are not always applicable to homeless people, apparently due to their aberrant life-style.

  13. "In talking to people, simplicity is best".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano, G

    1994-08-01

    A trained nurse and midwife explains the origin of her motivation to become involved in family planning and describes the people who have influenced and guided her, her training and experience, and lessons learned over the years. She learned much from her mother who, through ignorance and a lack of health care and quick intervention, lost many children. From the years of practice following her training in England, the author learned that services must be taken to the people and learned about using a community- based distribution approach to promote family planning instead of relying exclusively upon a hospital. It became clear that women could be trained about family planning as well as the causes of high infant mortality like malaria, convulsions, and diarrhea. 171 voluntary village health workers were thus trained in 1979 to provide family planning and treat common illness in Oyo State, easing the entry of family planning into the rural area. 264 male and female vendors in 39 markets in Oyo State were subsequently trained in 1985 to provide family planning education, treatment of common illnesses, oral contraceptives, condoms, foam, and referral for other methods. The author stresses the need, based upon her experience, to discuss menstruation and pregnancy, and the importance of antenatal care, postnatal care, and infant welfare in simple words and notions with families in Nigeria. Although families will not understand the notion of overpopulation, they will acknowledge the need to ensure a mother's health and survival. The author serves on the Technical Advisory Committee for Family Health International's Women's Studies Project.

  14. Peopling the Tibetan plateau: insights from archaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldenderfer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of the genome of modern Tibetans have revealed the existence of genes thought to provide an adaptive advantage for life at high elevation. Extrapolating from this discovery, some researchers now argue that a Tibetan-Han split occurred no more than 2750 yr ago. This date is implausible, and in this paper I review the archaeological data from the Tibetan plateau as one means by which to examine the veracity of this assertion. Following a review of the general state of knowledge of Tibetan prehistory, which is unfortunately only at its beginnings, I first examine the data that speak to the initial peopling of the plateau and assess the evidence that traces of their presence can be seen in modern Tibetans today. Although the data are sparse, both archaeology and genetics suggest that the plateau was occupied in the Late Pleistocene, perhaps as early as 30,000 yr ago, and that these early peoples have left a genetic signature in modern Tibetans. I then turn to the evidence for later migrations and focus on the question of the timing of the establishment of permanent settled villages on the plateau. Three areas of the plateau-northeastern Qinghai, extreme eastern Tibet, and the Yarlung Tsangpo valley-have evidence of permanent settlements dating from ca. 6500, 5900, and 3750 yr ago, respectively. These data are not consonant with the 2750 yr ago date for the split and suggest at a minimum that the plateau has been occupied substantially longer and, further, that multiple migrations at different times and from different places have created a complex mosaic of population history. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  15. Friendship in people with schizophrenia: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Ellen Wan-Yuk; Boardman, Jed; Craig, Tom

    2012-08-01

    To explore the quantitative and qualitative aspects of friendship in people with schizophrenia. To examine emotional and behavioural commitment, experiences of stigma, and the impact of illness factors that may affect the making and keeping of friends. The difference in the perception between the researcher and participants of the presence of problems in friendships was also investigated. The size and quality of the social networks of 137 people with established schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, aged 18-65 in one geographical area of southeast England was ascertained using a semi-structured interview. Qualitative aspects of friendship were measured using objective, pre-determined, investigator-rated criteria. The mean number of friends reported by respondents was 1.57. Men were less likely to report friendships than women (29 vs. 53%, χ (2) = 13.51, df 1, p friendships was generally good. Emotional commitment to friendship and mistrust were more important than current clinical state in determining whether or not the participant has friends. Most of those without friends did not see the lack of friendship as a problem. The researcher was up to three times more likely to report a problem than the participant. The friendship network size was found to be small but the quality of friendship mostly positive and highly valued. The majority of friendships were with other service users made during attendances at day hospitals and drop-in centres thus underscoring the importance of this service provision. Psychosocial intervention programmes need to take into account psychological factors that impact upon friendship.

  16. Characteristics of Falls Among Institutionalized Elderly People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Akbari Kamrani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Falls by elderly people area frequent cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in institutionalized elders. to describe the features of falls among institutionalized elderly people. Methods & Materials: characteristics of falls in the preceding six months (March 2006 - September 2006 that occurred among elder lies (aged over 60years with normal physical function and cognitive status, who lived at Kahrizak Institute, along term nursing home in Tehran, were surveyed and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the patients with falls was 76.9 yrs. These numbers of falls had occurred among 29 elders that 48.3% were women and 51.7% were men. 57.6% off alls were simple and elders could standup immediately independently. 42.4% of falls needed to help for standup, 2 elder person (2.6% had sever consequence of fall and had fractures. (Skull fracture, head trauma & hip fracture 30.3% of falls occurred in yard, 28.9% at room, 18.4%inhallway, 14.5% at WC, .3.9%at bathroom, and 3.9% at lunch saloon. Analysis of the time of falls showed: 45.3% of falls occurred at 7bl2 am, 13.2% at the lunch time (12bI4, 17% at 14b19, 11.3%at night (19b4 am, and 13.2% at 4b7 am. Conclusion: falls among elder lies occur mainly outside of room. And occur at the time of maximum activities, for example at morning; also falls have been happened more in subjects older, and occasionally result in sever injury such as head trauma, skull fracture, femur and pelvis fracture and cause more mortality and morbidity. Control of environmental risk factors could be protective factors against falls.

  17. Health hybrid concept analysis in old people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi Noughabi, Ahmadali; Alhani, Fatemeh; Piravi, Hamid

    2013-10-31

    It seems necessary to study the health status of this age group to promote their health and prevent disease as well as care planning. In order to achieve this goal, a clear definition of the concept of elderly health is essential. Hybrid concept analysis, our research design, utilizes both theoretical analysis of literature and empirical observation to define a concept. We chose the hybrid concept analysis method because its inclusion of old people perspectives enriches the limited health research literature. The method consists of three phases: theory, fieldwork, and analysis. In comparison, we can conclude that health in the elderly people is something more than the absence of illness and 4 physical, mental, social and spiritual domains which are referred to in the definition of a theoretical stage are supported by the findings. The relative health was also proposed against the complete welfare and comfort for the elderly and it showed that their expectations are less than their ages. In addition, the elderly have expressed the family as a preference and the researcher believes that this theme is context based because it has emerged following the interview. Since the family has a special place according to the Iranian culture and religion and the family health is a priority in their health. In addition, the daily activities have been raised as a major theme that can be considered as the physical health but the elderly have expressed it apart from the physical health. Health among the old is a concept that is affected by genetic, environmental, healthcare services and lifestyle-related factors and involves proportional physical, mental, social, familial, spiritual, and economical welfare along with the ability to handle daily life activities which is measurable through medical and functional approaches.

  18. Do Social Networks Differ? Comparison of the Social Networks of People with Intellectual Disabilities, People with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other People Living in the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselt-Goverts, A. E.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Hendriks, A. H. C.; Wegman, K. M.; Teunisse, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the similarities and differences in social network characteristics, satisfaction and wishes with respect to the social network between people with mild or borderline intellectual disabilities (ID), people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and a reference group. Data were gathered from 105 young adults…

  19. Memory rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Nair, Roshan; Martin, Kristy-Jane; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2016-03-23

    This is an update of the Cochrane review 'Memory rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis' (first published in the Cochrane Library 14 March 2012, Issue 3). Impairments in cognitive function, particularly memory, are common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and can potentially affect their ability to complete functional activities. There is evidence from single-case or small group studies that memory rehabilitation can be beneficial for people with MS, but findings from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews have been inconclusive. To determine whether people with MS who received memory rehabilitation showed: 1. better outcomes in their memory functions compared to those given no treatment or receiving a placebo control; and 2. better functional abilities, in terms of activities of daily living, mood, and quality of life, than those who received no treatment or a placebo. We searched the Trials Specialised Register of the Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis and Rare Diseases of the CNS Group (2 June 2015) and the following electronic databases: The NIHR Clinical Research Network Portfolio database (NIHR CRN) (from 2010 to June 2015), The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (2010 to June 2015), British Nursing Index (BNI) (2010 to June 2015), PsycINFO (2011 to June 2015), and CAB Abstracts (2010 to June 2015). Start dates for the electronic databases coincided with the last search for the previous review. We handsearched relevant journals and reference lists. We selected RCTs or quasi-randomised trials of memory rehabilitation or cognitive rehabilitation for people with MS in which a memory rehabilitation treatment group was compared to a control group. Selection was conducted independently first and then confirmed through group discussion. We excluded studies that included participants whose memory deficits were the result of conditions other than MS unless we could identify a subgroup of participants with MS with separate

  20. The health and welfare of dogs belonging to homeless people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leonard Williams

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of homeless people own dogs, with these animals contributing to the well-being of their owners by providing emotional support and in many cases, a reason for living as well as acting as what might be termed a social catalyst improving bonds between their owners. Yet many consider that homeless people should not be allowed, let alone encouraged to keep a dog. They consider that living with a homeless people must have a negative impact on the dog’s health and welfare compared to that of a dog owned by people with a home. Here we sought to determine the health and welfare of dogs owned by homeless people, comparing 50 dogs owned by homeless people with 50 owned by people living in a home. In contradistinction to the negative view noted above, we found that dogs owned by homeless people were healthy animals, less likely to be obese, had fewer behaviour issues such as aggression to strangers and separation anxiety when compared to dogs owned by people living in a conventional home. We suggest that these findings should be taken into account when deciding whether a homeless person with a dog should be allowed into a hostel, and indeed the general attitude of the public to homeless people living with a dog by their side on the street

  1. Perceptions of disaster preparedness among older people in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Myoungran; Lee, Mijung; Tullmann, Dorothy

    2016-03-01

    Older people are a major vulnerable population. During disasters, given their physical frailty, lower social status, loss of medications and medical care, the vulnerability of older people increases. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of older people in Korea on various aspects of disaster preparedness to better understand their special needs and to facilitate appropriate disaster planning. The study was qualitative and used focus group interviews with 12 older people in one major city and one rural area of South Korea. Four themes were identified by the analysis of the interviews: defenceless state, reality of accepting limitations, strong will to live, importance of disaster preparedness governmental efforts for the older people. Findings indicated that preparation of shelters and transportation was critical to help older people survive in times of disasters and suggested that there should be active involvement of the government in terms of disaster planning, managing and preparing older people for disasters. In addition, healthy older people can be assets to disaster relief efforts by providing practical and emotional support for the most fragile older people. Older people can also provide knowledge of their special needs to the government to improve their disaster response policy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Environmental problems in the People`s Republic of China: Current magnitude and possible control options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadtti, N.; Biang, C.A.; Poch, L.A.; Tompkins, M.M.

    1995-09-01

    The People`s Republic of China has been undergoing rapid economic development over the past several decades. This development has taken place with little or no attention being paid to its environmental consequences. This situation has resulted in severe contamination of the air, water, and soil resources of China, with attendant damage to human and natural populations. This report determines the major causes of air, water, and soil pollution in China and assesses their extent and magnitude. It then examines the impacts of the pollutants on various components of the human and natural environment. It identifies possible regulatory and ameliorative options available to China to deal with these pollution problems and provides information on specific strategies and the costs associated with their implementation. The objective is to shed light on China`s pollution control and remediation requirements in the near future.

  3. People overestimate their willingness to reject potential romantic partners by overlooking their concern for other people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Samantha; Teper, Rimma; MacDonald, Geoff

    2014-12-01

    Mate preferences often fail to correspond with actual mate choices. We present a novel explanation for this phenomenon: People overestimate their willingness to reject unsuitable romantic partners. In two studies, single people were given the opportunity to accept or decline advances from potential dates who were physically unattractive (Study 1) or incompatible with their dating preferences (Study 2). We found that participants were significantly less willing to reject these unsuitable potential dates when they believed the situation to be real rather than hypothetical. This effect was partially explained by other-focused motives: Participants for whom the scenario was hypothetical anticipated less motivation to avoid hurting the potential date's feelings than participants actually felt when they believed the situation to be real. Thus, other-focused motives appear to exert an influence on mate choice that has been overlooked by researchers and laypeople alike. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Auditory Memory deficit in Elderly People with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidipour, Zahra; Geshani, Ahmad; Jafari, Zahra; Jalaie, Shohreh; Khosravifard, Elham

    2013-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in elderly people. Functional side effects of hearing loss are various. Due to the fact that hearing loss is the common impairment in elderly people; the importance of its possible effects on auditory memory is undeniable. This study aims to focus on the hearing loss effects on auditory memory. Dichotic Auditory Memory Test (DVMT) was performed on 47 elderly people, aged 60 to 80; that were divided in two groups, the first group consisted of elderly people with hearing range of 24 normal and the second one consisted of 23 elderly people with bilateral symmetrical ranged from mild to moderate Sensorineural hearing loss in the high frequency due to aging in both genders. Significant difference was observed in DVMT between elderly people with normal hearing and those with hearing loss (Pauditory verbal memory. This result depicts the importance of auditory intervention to make better communicational skills and therefore auditory memory in this population.

  5. The road barely taken: funerals, and people with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester-Jones, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    The topic of funerals within the life cycle approach to care in the U.K. remains largely absent. This small exploratory study sought to investigate how practitioners deal with this sensitive issue and to capture the views of older people with and without intellectual disabilities about funerals. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 40 service managers, and five focus groups for 26 people with and without intellectual disabilities were facilitated. Questionnaires were subjected to thematic content analysis; focus group data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Managers demonstrated confusion about organizing the funerals of people with intellectual disabilities. Few differences existed between the views of people with and without intellectual disabilities in relation to funerals and a number of core themes were identified including the lack of opportunities to attend funerals. More thought and practical interventions are needed to support vulnerable people to participate in the funerals of people they know. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Auditory Memory deficit in Elderly People with Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahidipour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in elderly people. Functional side effects of hearing loss are various. Due to the fact that hearing loss is the common impairment in elderly people; the importance of its possible effects on auditory memory is undeniable. This study aims to focus on the hearing loss effects on auditory memory.   Materials and Methods: Dichotic Auditory Memory Test (DVMT was performed on 47 elderly people, aged 60 to 80; that were divided in two groups, the first group consisted of elderly people with hearing range of 24 normal and the second one consisted of 23 elderly people with bilateral symmetrical ranged from mild to moderate Sensorineural hearing loss in the high frequency due to aging in both genders.   Results: Significant difference was observed in DVMT between elderly people with normal hearing and those with hearing loss (P

  7. David Duke, running for governor, proposes tattooing people with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-19

    Former Ku Klux Klan leader, David Duke, planning a second run for governor of Louisiana, said he would curb the AIDS epidemic by tattooing people who are infected with HIV. His suggestion is to put indelible, glow-in-the-dark tattoos on the genitals of people infected with HIV. According to Duke, it may sound very draconian but it would not demean people. He also believes that tattooing would be legal because courts have a history of supporting the quarantining and institutionalizing of people with infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. Duke said Cuba has had some success in using quarantines to reduce HIV infection, but he does not think it would work in the United States because it would cost too much. According to Duke, many people who get HIV from irresponsible behavior do not tell their partners that they have AIDS--these people are mad at the world and engage in dangerous behaviors even more.

  8. Professional activity of people with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Staniszewska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to determine the occupational activity of epileptic patients. Particular attention was paid to employment of people with epilepsy, the way the workplace is informed about the disease, impact of education on employment opportunities and the relationship between clinical type of epilepsy and professional activity. Material and Methods: Patients were recruited from the neurological outpatient clinic in Warszawa and asked to fill in a customized questionnaire, containing questions on their socio-demographic, clinical and employment status. Results: The study included 197 adult patients with epilepsy (64 professionally active and 133 inactive. As many as 47.7% of respondents declared that the disease impeded their employment, and 77.2% admitted that the occurrence of seizure at work had negatively affected their comfort. As many as 42.2% professionally active respondents had revealed the disease at work. There was a statistically significant difference between individuals with primarily generalized seizures and those with partial and secondarily generalized seizures (30.61% vs. 2.63%, p 0.05. Neither current work status had impact on opinions about difficulties in finding a job (p > 0.05. Conclusions: Epilepsy is a great obstacle to finding and maintaining employment. Less than 1/2 of patients inform the workplace about their illness, mainly due to previous negative experiences. Since education significantly enables the employment, programs aimed at promoting vocational activation of patients should facilitate access to learning. Med Pr 2015;66(3:343–350

  9. Why do people participate in epidemiological research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slegers, Claudia; Zion, Deborah; Glass, Deborah; Kelsall, Helen; Fritschi, Lin; Brown, Ngiare; Loff, Bebe

    2015-06-01

    Many assumptions are made about public willingness to participate in epidemiological research, yet few empirical studies have been conducted to ascertain whether such assumptions are correct. Our qualitative study of the public and of expert stakeholders leads us to suggest that people are generally prepared to participate in epidemiological research, particularly if it is conducted by a trusted public institution such as a government health department, charity, or university. However, there is widespread community distrust of research conducted or sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Individuals are prompted to take part if the study concerns an illness they or a family member or friend have personally experienced or if they believe the research will confer a widespread public benefit. Preferences vary about the mode of contact for the research to be conducted. Willingness to participate in telephone surveys has decreased in recent years, and this may be a consequence of an increase in calls to homes by telemarketers and market researchers. Participants also stressed the importance of knowing where their names and contact details were sourced and suggested that this information be available to prospective study participants as a matter of course in the first approach or letter. We provide valuable information to epidemiologists in designing studies.

  10. Loneliness and the health of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luanaigh, Conor O; Lawlor, Brian A

    2008-12-01

    The intense focus on major psychiatric disorders in both contemporary psychiatric research and clinical practice has resulted in the relative neglect of less definable constructs such as loneliness and how such entities might impact on health outcomes. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness among physicians and psychiatrists of the medical impact and biological effects of loneliness as well as making the argument that loneliness should be a legitimate therapeutic target. Using Pubmed we searched the literature for research and review papers looking at loneliness as a construct, how it is measured and its health effects. We reviewed the relevant papers and have summarized their main findings. Loneliness has strong associations with depression and may in fact be an independent risk factor for depression. Furthermore loneliness appears to have a significant impact on physical health being linked detrimentally to higher blood pressure, worse sleep, immune stress responses and worse cognition over time in the elderly. There is a relative deficiency in adequate evidence based treatments for loneliness. Loneliness is common in older people an is associated with adverse health consequences both from a mental and physical health point of view. There needs to be an increased focus on initiating intervention strategies targeting loneliness to determine if decreasing loneliness can improve quality of life and functioning in the elderly. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Historical Events and People in Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmor, C. Stewart

    This book is a selection of some of the papers given at a historical symposium sponsored by the Interdivisional Commission on History of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) during ihe International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) General Assembly held in Hamburg in 1983. Most of the papers are from a session on historical events or people, chaired by Schroder, but several are included from a related session on historical scientific records, chaired by J. Feynman (Boston College, Boston, Mass.). The articles cover a number of topics, such as biography. Fine examples here are the article on Balfour W. Currie (1902-1981), the Canadian upper atmosphere physicist (it is a pity that a photograph of h im was not included), or the article on Erich Regener (1881-1955), German pioneer in cosmic ray and upper atmosphere physics. Other articles concern the history of observatories (such as Ben Nevis) or the genesis of concepts (L. Biermann of t h e Max-Planck-Institut, Garching, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), on the solar wind). H. Schmidlin (Denzlingen, FRG) presents excellent “insider” comments on the development of early gravimeters; such comments should be studied by contemporary sociologists of science.

  12. [Drug therapy for older people : Choosing wisely].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehling, Martin

    2017-09-22

    Elderly people are the most rapidly growing sector of our society. Due to their multimorbidity they are exposed to a multitude of medications, which are accompanied by chances and risks. The problem of inappropriate medication in the elderly is exacerbated by the fact that only a holistic view can help these patients and that this is predominantly the responsibility of the general practitioner. The closely measured paid contact time is often insufficient to optimize complex medications. Clinically successfully tested aids in the form of lists give reason for hope: in particular, the positive/negative assessment of limitations of the elderly with respect to drugs by the STOPP/START criteria and the FORTA classification are clinically successful aids. Purely negative lists, such as the Beers or PRISCUS lists, have been disappointing in clinical application because they do not consider the needs, prognostic and particularly symptomatic importance and weighting of the diagnosis of patients. Further implementation of these aids to decision making should help to improve the problem of care of elderly patients in the field of drug treatment, even in IT systems.

  13. Personality attributes of Iranian people who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, R; Baziar, M; Bleek, B; Reuter, M; Montag, C

    2015-01-01

    Two recent studies from Australia and Germany have both shown that people who stutter (PWS) have elevated Neuroticism scores on the widely used NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) compared to individuals in a control sample. The two studies showed opposite results, however, for the personality traits Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. One reason for these opposing findings could be that the two studies were conducted in different cultural settings. Given that the effect of different cultural background on the relationship between the NEO-FFI and stuttering remains an open question, we investigated the NEO-FFI scores from 98 PWS and an age- and sex-matched control-group from a less widely studied cultural background (Iran). Overall, the present study showed, in line with a study from Germany, higher Agreeableness, but not Neuroticism, in PWS compared to normally fluent controls. To get further insights into these findings, we also contrasted both samples from Iran with a healthy matched sample from Germany. The resulting cross-cultural differences from these analyses are also discussed in the present paper. Although the present study is limited by a cross-sectional design, and so no causal conclusions can be drawn, the authors discuss whether the replicated elevated Agreeableness scores in PWS might represent a self-defense mechanism to cope with one's own speech handicap. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Young people's leisure time: Gender differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Videnović

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, topics relating to young peoples leisure time have become increasingly more present in academic literature. Among the numerous studies that delve into this subject, results point towards a relationship between the way teenagers spend their leisure time and their gender. In this study we wanted to answer the question if gender differences were evident in the way secondary school students in Serbia spent their leisure time. This problem was not looked into in more detail among secondary school students in Serbia. We conducted a survey on a sample of 922 secondary school teenagers from the 1st to 4th grade(ages 15–19 from nine Serbian towns. Research in this field commonly uses the rating scale. In this paper we have constructed an instrument that represents a methodological innovation in approaching a particular set of problems. It was a questionnaire. The task was to name all the activities they participated in, and the time frame in which the activities took place, over the course of one weekday and the Saturday of the previous week. The activities which best differentiate these two groups of surveyed teenagers are: sports, studying, computer use, spending time at friends’ homes and grooming. We did not discover differences in participating in creative activities while foreign studies show that such activities are more typical for girls.

  15. Currency features for visually impaired people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Sandra L.; Legge, Gordon E.; Shannon, Robert R.; Baer, Norbert S.

    1996-03-01

    The estimated 3.7 million Americans with low vision experience a uniquely difficult task in identifying the denominations of U.S. banknotes because the notes are remarkably uniform in size, color, and general design. The National Research Council's Committee on Currency Features Usable by the Visually Impaired assessed features that could be used by people who are visually disabled to distinguish currency from other documents and to denominate and authenticate banknotes using available technology. Variation of length and height, introduction of large numerals on a uniform, high-contrast background, use of different colors for each of the six denominations printed, and the introduction of overt denomination codes that could lead to development of effective, low-cost devices for examining banknotes were all deemed features available now. Issues affecting performance, including the science of visual and tactile perception, were addressed for these features, as well as for those features requiring additional research and development. In this group the committee included durable tactile features such as those printed with transparent ink, and the production of currency with holes to indicate denomination. Among long-range approaches considered were the development of technologically advanced devices and smart money.

  16. [Fear of falling in older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkodo Mekongo, Y P; De Breucker, S; Delvaux, N; Pepersack, T

    2007-01-01

    Fear of falling and poor physical performance are prominent symptoms in many older people. The prevalence of fear of falling in community-living elderly ranges between 12 % and 65 %, and is higher in women than men. It commonly occurs after falls, but it also occurs without a previous fall history. One of the major consequences of fear of falling is the restriction and avoidance of activities. However, not all elderly with fear of falling avoid activities in daily life. Some elderly only become cautious, which may be functional in preventing falls. Only a small percentage of elderly show a pattern of excessive fear and restriction of activities. The consequences of this pattern may, however, be debilitating and devastating. Excessive fear and avoidance may compromise the quality of life, and may result in a decline of physical capabilities and, ultimately, in an increased risk of falls, which may further fuel fear and avoidance. Future research should investigate whether individualised intervention strategies are efficient in preventing falls and activity-related fear of falling within this population in order to improve her quality of life.

  17. Listeners' attitude toward people with dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ofer; Levine-Yundof, Reut

    2013-07-01

    The human voice provides extensive information about the speaker, in addition to the intended linguistic message. Therefore, voice is an essential component in the process of forming an initial attitude toward the speaker. People with communication disorders are typically judged by listeners more negatively than those speaking normally. This trend, however, was not reported consistently regarding voice disorders. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine listeners' attitude toward dysphonic speakers. In addition, the impact of speaker's and listener's gender on these attitudes was also examined. Seventy-four naive listeners evaluated recorded voice samples of six dysphonic and six nondysphonic speakers. Evaluation was performed using a semantic differential scale with 12 bipolar items. In addition, factor analysis was performed to validate listeners' attitudes and allow generalization of the results. Statistically significant negative attitudes toward dysphonic speakers were found at all 12 scales (Pattitude toward speakers (P>0.05). These results were further enhanced and supported by a factor analysis performed based on the original attitude rating scores. Our findings provide empirical evidence for the negative attitudes with which dysphonic speakers are faced; demonstrating how women are affected by these attitudes more than men and highlight the importance of addressing and relating to these facets in the diagnostic and therapeutic process. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Can elderly people take their medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Anna G K; Parker, Marti G; Thorslund, Mats

    2005-11-01

    This study used performance tests to assess the cognitive, visual and physical abilities related to taking medicines in the elderly population. The study population consisted of the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD II), a nationally representative interview survey. SWEOLD II is a random sample of all community-based and institutionalized persons aged 77+ in Sweden. Five tests related to medication management were administered in the direct interviews (n=492): hand function (opening bottle), vision (reading label), and medication competence (comprehension and calculation). Results showed that 9.4% could not read instructions on a medicine container and 14.6% had difficulty opening a plastic flip-top medicine bottle. The three cognitive tests related to taking medicine resulted in 30.7, 47.4 and 20.1% errors. Combining all the tests revealed that 66.3% of the sample had at least one limitation of capacity related to taking medicine. There were no significant gender differences. Among those people who did not pass all the tests, 31.8% lived alone with no home-help. Taking medicines is a complex task and a large proportion of the Swedish elderly population has cognitive, visual or physical limitations that may hinder their ability to take medicines accurately. Awareness of these limitations is essential to concordance.

  19. The most influential people in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Recently Modern Healthcare released the 2016 listing of their annual most influential people in Healthcare (1. Leading the list is President Barack Obama for his Affordable Care Act. The list consists of a monotonous list of bureaucrats, politicians, large healthcare chain CEOs , insurance company CEOs, health interest organizations (American Hospital Association, America's Health Insurance Plans Healthcare, etc., professional organizations (American Medical Association, American Nurses Association, etc., nongovernmental healthcare interest organizations (Joint Commission, National Quality Forum, etc. and vendors (Epic, McKesson, etc.. From the Southwest the list includes at least 11 hospital chain CEOs including 1 from Arizona, 3 from Colorado and 7 from California. Striking is the lack of influential healthcare professionals who made the list. Only two are leading academicians-Atul Gawande, a surgeon and author at Harvard, and Robert Wachter, an internist and pioneer in the hosptialist movement at University of California San Francisco. John Noseworthy (Mayo Clinic ...

  20. Peer support for people with mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Alexandra Lourenço Campos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Peer support is a mutual aid system based on the belief that someone who faced/overcome adversity can provide support, encouragement and guidance to those who experience similar situations. Objective To conduct a systematic review that describes this concept and characterizes peer supporters, its practice and efficacy. Method Research on ISI Web of Science, EBSCO Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection and Medline databases (from 2001 to December 2013 was conducted using as keywords “mental illness”, “mental health”, “psychiatric disability”, “mental health services”, combined with “peer support”, “mutual support”, “self-help groups”, “consumers as providers”, “peer-run services”, “peer-run programs” and “social support”. Results We found 1,566 articles and the application of both the exclusion (studies with children, teenagers and elderly people; disease in comorbidity; peer support associated to physical illnesses or family members/caregivers and the inclusion criteria (full text scientific papers, peer support or similar groups directed for schizophrenia, depression, bipolar or psychotic disorders lead to 165 documents, where 22 were excluded due to repetition and 31 to incomplete text. We analyzed 112 documents, identifying as main peer support categories: characterization, peer supporter, practices and efficacy. Discussion Despite an increasing interest about this topic, there is no consensus, suggesting realizing more studies.