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Sample records for sami people

  1. Survival of Sami cancer patients

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    Leena Soininen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30 and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20, indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  2. What is known about the health and living conditions of the indigenous people of northern Scandinavia, the Sami?

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    Per Sjölander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sami are the indigenous ethnic population of northern Scandinavia. Their health condition is poorly known, although the knowledge has improved over the last decade.The aim was to review the current information on mortality, diseases, and risk factor exposure in the Swedish Sami population.Health-related research on Sami cohorts published in scientific journals and anthologies was used to compare the health condition among the Sami and the majority non-Sami population. When relevant, data from the Sami populations in Swedish were compared with corresponding data from Norwegian and Finnish Sami populations.Life expectancy and mortality patterns of the Sami are similar to those of the majority population. Small differences in incidences of cancer and cardiovascular diseases have been reported. The traditional Sami lifestyle seems to contain elements that reduce the risk to develop cancer and cardiovascular diseases, e.g. physical activity, diet rich in antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids, and a strong cultural identity. Reindeer herding is an important cultural activity among the Sami and is associated with high risks for accidents. Pain in the lower back, neck, shoulders, elbows, and hands are frequent among both men and women in reindeer-herding families. For men, these symptoms are related to high exposure to terrain vehicles, particularly snowmobile, whereas for women psychosocial risk factors seem to more important, e.g. poor social support, high effort, low reward, and high economical responsibilities.Although the health condition of the Sami population appears to be rather similar to that of the general Swedish population, a number of specific health problems have been identified, especially among the reindeer-herding Sami. Most of these problems have their origin in marginalization and poor knowledge of the reindeer husbandry and the Sami culture in the majority population. It is suggested that the most sustainable measure to

  3. Song, Poetry and Images in Writing: Sami Literature

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    Harald Gaski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is an overview of Sami literature, past and present, with a specific emphasis on the connection between tradition and innovation, in which literature is regarded in a broader sense than only limited to the written word. Thus the relationship between the traditional epic yoik songs and contemporary poetry is being dealt with, as is the multimedia approach that several Sami artists have chosen for their creative expression. It is almost more the rule than an exemption that Sami artists express themselves through the use of more than only one medium. Through the introduction to Sami literature, the reader also gets acquainted with the history and the culture of the Sami, who are the indigenous people of the northern regions of Scandinavia, Finland and the Kola peninsula in Russia.

  4. Ethical and methodological issues in research with Sami experiencing disability.

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    Melbøe, Line; Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Johnsen, Bjørn-Eirik; Fedreheim, Gunn Elin; Dinesen, Tone; Minde, Gunn-Tove; Rustad, Marit

    2016-01-01

    A study of disability among the indigenous Sami people in Norway presented a number of ethical and methodological challenges rarely addressed in the literature. The main study was designed to examine and understand the everyday life, transitions between life stages and democratic participation of Norwegian Sami people experiencing disability. Hence, the purpose of this article is to increase the understanding of possible ethical and methodological issues in research within this field. The article describes and discusses ethical and methodological issues that arose when conducting our study and identifies some strategies for addressing issues like these. The ethical and methodological issues addressed in the article are based on a qualitative study among indigenous Norwegian Sami people experiencing disability. The data in this study were collected through 31 semi-structured in-depth interviews with altogether 24 Sami people experiencing disability and 13 next of kin of Sami people experiencing disability (8 mothers, 2 fathers, 2 sister and 1 guardian). The researchers identified 4 main areas of ethical and methodological issues. We present these issues chronologically as they emerged in the research process: 1) concept of knowledge when designing the study, 2) gaining access, 3) data collection and 4) analysis and accountability. The knowledge generated from this study has the potential to benefit future health research, specifically of Norwegian Sami people experiencing disability, as well as health research concerning indigenous people in general, providing scientific-based insight into important ethical and methodological issues in research with indigenous people experiencing disability.

  5. "Being Sami Is My Strength": Contemporary Sami Artists

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    Ruokonen, Inkeri; Eldridge, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this case study was to discover how three Sami artists present their culture in their arts and how their art grows from Sami traditions. Our first purpose was to find out how they use their art forms' roots to create new ideas. The other purpose of this study was to bring into discussion the importance of a minority culture's arts in…

  6. Marginalisation and cardiovascular disease among rural Sami in Northern Norway: a population-based cross-sectional study.

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    Eliassen, Bent-Martin; Melhus, Marita; Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild

    2013-05-29

    Like other indigenous peoples, the Sami have been exposed to the huge pressures of colonisation, rapid modernisation and subsequent marginalisation. Previous studies among indigenous peoples show that colonialism, rapid modernisation and marginalisation is accompanied by increased stress, an unhealthy cardiovascular risk factor profile and disease burden. Updated data on the general burden of cardiovascular disease among the Sami is lacking. The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between marginalisation and self-reported lifetime cardiovascular disease (CVD) by minority/majority status in the rural Sami population of Norway. A cross-sectional population-based study (the SAMINOR study) was carried out in 2003-2004. The overall participation rate was 60.9% and a total of 4027 Sami individuals aged 36-79 years were included in the analyses. Data was collected by self-administrated questionnaires and a clinical examination. The logistic regression showed that marginalised Sami living in Norwegian dominated areas were more than twice as likely to report CVD as non-marginalised Sami living in Sami majority areas (OR 2.10, 95% CI: 1.40-3.14). No sex difference was found in the effects of marginalisation on self-reported life-time cardiovascular disease. Moderate to no intermediate effects were seen after including established CVD risk factors. This study showed that marginalised Sami living in Norwegian dominated areas were more than twice as likely as non-marginalised Sami from Sami majority areas to report lifetime cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moderate to no intermediate effects were seen after including established CVD risk factors, which suggest little difference in lifestyle related factors. Chronic stress exposure following marginalisation may however be a plausible explanation for some of the observed excess of CVD.

  7. Sami tourism in destination development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lise Smed

    2016-01-01

    through stakeholder collaboration in Jokkmokk, Sweden and Kautokeino, Norway. The study indicates that collaboration between destination marketing organisations and Sami stakeholders has been initiated and has improved destination marketing. Conflicts relating to indigenous identity and land use are more......Indigenous tourism has become an important component of the tourism industry. Previous indigenous tourism research has indicated three conflict areas that can have an impact on destination development - internal conflicts over indigenous identity, the use of indigenous culture in destination...... marketing, and land-use conflicts. To varying degrees these areas of conflict have been found to impact local and regional destination development in northern Europe. This paper draws on case studies to understand how conflicts in Sami tourism in local and regional destination development are addressed...

  8. Resilience among old Sami women

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    Aléx, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Artikkel som utforsker hvordan eldre kvinner forteller om sine erfaringer med helse og mangel på helse. There is lack of research on old indigenous women’s experiences. The aim of this study was to explore how old women narrate their experiences of wellbeing and lack of wellbeing using the salutogenetic concept of resilience. Interviews from nine old Sami women were analysed according to grounded theory with the following themes identified: contributing to resilience and wellbeing built up...

  9. 'The Finn line' - a historical curiosity or a juridicial rality? The Sami reindeer herders' land rights in southern Sami areas evaluated from land consolidation practice (In Norwegian with Summary in English

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    Øyvind Ravna

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes towards the land rights of Sami reindeer herders have changed considerably during the last 100 years. So, too, has consideration of how such rights should be treated by Land Consolidation Courts. This paper reviews changes in attitudes to the Sami land rights with respect to how these are considered in Land Con¬solidation Courts in southern Sami areas in Norway. The review also considers changing attitudes regarding the competence of Land Consolidation Courts to deal with such matters. There were several cases in the 20th Century in which Land Consolidation Courts treated Sami land rights in a restricted and unfortunate manner. Legal practice, however, was not always like that, evidenced by the so-called 'Finn line' (Norwegian: 'finnelinja' -'Finn' is an archaic name for Sami. This boundary was established during a land consolidation case in 1873 and was confirmed in 1883. At that time, Sami land rights were evidently accepted as appurtenant right in privately owned mountain pasture and the Sami were treated in the same way as others who enjoyed rights of usufruct on it. The regulation of 1883 included rules governing compensation for grazing damage on farming land. In particular, responsibility for grazing damage was divided between owners and the reindeer herders, providing these looked after their animals properly, 'The Finn line' subsequently achieved wider importance. The case of 1873¬1883 has been referred to several times as a valuable and valid precedent for a way in which to organize grazing conflicts in other Sami areas. It was used in 1964 as evidence of the special rights of Sami reindeer people in the Brekken common land case. The Sami won this case in 1968 and, in its judgement, the Norwegian Supreme Court of Justice emphasised the importance of the line (Rt. 1968, p. 394. Although, owing to changes in land use practices, the 'Finn line' no longer has any practical significance, its juridical significance remains

  10. Emotional, physical and sexual violence among Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: The SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

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    Eriksen, Astrid M A; Hansen, Ketil Lenert; Javo, Cecilie; Schei, Berit

    2015-08-01

    To assess the prevalence and investigate ethnic differences of emotional, physical and sexual violence among a population of both Sami and non-Sami in Norway. Our study was based on the SAMINOR 2 study, a population-based survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Central and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,296 participants: 2197 (19.4%) Sami respondents and 9099 (80.6 %) non-Sami respondents. Almost half of the Sami female respondents and one-third of the non-Sami female respondents reported any violence (any lifetime experience of violence). Sami women were more likely to report emotional, physical and sexual violence than non-Sami women. More than one-third of the Sami men compared with less than a quarter of non-Sami men reported having experienced any violence in their life. Sami men were more likely to report emotional and physical violence than non-Sami men. However, ethnicity was not significantly different regarding sexual violence experienced among men. Violence was typically reported to have occurred in childhood. Sami participants were more likely to report having experienced violence in the past 12 months. For all types of violence, the perpetrator was typically known to the victim. Regardless of gender, Sami respondents were more likely to report interpersonal violence. The prevalence of any violence was substantial in both ethnic groups and for both genders; it was highest among Sami women. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  11. Child-rearing in an indigenous Sami population in Norway: a cross-cultural comparison of parental attitudes and expectations.

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    Javo, Cecilie; Rønning, John A; Heyerdahl, Sonja

    2004-02-01

    Semi-structured interviews of 76 Sami mothers and 58 Sami fathers, and 86 Norwegian mothers and 58 Norwegian fathers of four-year olds, revealed consistent cross-cultural differences in parenting. ANCOVA results showed that parental permissiveness was higher in the Sami group. Moreover, the effect of ethnicity was different for boys and girls (mothers' reports). Co-sleeping and self-regulation of food and sleep were commonly practiced in the Sami, but not in the Norwegian families. Sami children were more socially independent than their Norwegian peers. Indirect or internal types of control were used more by Sami parents, and they were less tolerant of child aggression, in the form of temper tantrums and displays of jealousy. These patterns are similar to those found in other indigenous cultures in the circumpolar region. The results are discussed with reference to the Individualism-Collectivism dimension. The study challenges the Individualism-Collectivism construct for apparently confounding the individualism common in European liberalism with the individual autonomy commonly encountered among hunting-gathering peoples.

  12. The SAMI2 Open Source Project

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    Huba, J. D.; Joyce, G.

    2001-05-01

    In the past decade, the Open Source Model for software development has gained popularity and has had numerous major achievements: emacs, Linux, the Gimp, and Python, to name a few. The basic idea is to provide the source code of the model or application, a tutorial on its use, and a feedback mechanism with the community so that the model can be tested, improved, and archived. Given the success of the Open Source Model, we believe it may prove valuable in the development of scientific research codes. With this in mind, we are `Open Sourcing' the low to mid-latitude ionospheric model that has recently been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory: SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere). The model is comprehensive and uses modern numerical techniques. The structure and design of SAMI2 make it relatively easy to understand and modify: the numerical algorithms are simple and direct, and the code is reasonably well-written. Furthermore, SAMI2 is designed to run on personal computers; prohibitive computational resources are not necessary, thereby making the model accessible and usable by virtually all researchers. For these reasons, SAMI2 is an excellent candidate to explore and test the open source modeling paradigm in space physics research. We will discuss various topics associated with this project. Research supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Ethnic difference in the prevalence of angina pectoris in Sami and non-Sami populations: the SAMINOR study

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    Eliassen, Bent-Martin; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Melhus, Marita; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the population burden of angina pectoris symptoms (APS), self-reported angina and a combination of these, and explore potential ethnic disparity in their patterns. If differences in APS were found between Sami and non-Sami populations, we aimed at evaluating the role of established cardiovascular risk factors as mediating factors. Design Cross-sectional population-based study. Methods A health survey was conducted in 2003–2004 in areas with Sami and non-Sami populations (SAMINOR). The response rate was 60.9%. The total number for the subsequent analysis was 15,206 men and women aged 36–79 years (born 1925–1968). Information concerning lifestyle was collected by 2 self-administrated questionnaires, and clinical examinations provided data on waist circumference, blood pressure and lipid levels. Results This study revealed an excess of APS, self-reported angina and a combination of these in Sami relative to non-Sami women and men. After controlling for age, the odds ratio (OR) for APS was 1.42 (pangina and a combination of these in Sami women and men relative to non-Sami women and men. Established risk factors explained little or none of the ethnic variation in APS. In women, however, less moderate alcohol consumption and leisure-time physical activity in Sami may explain the entire ethnic difference. PMID:24422205

  14. Connecting and correcting : a case study of Sami healers in Porsanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Barbara Helen

    2007-01-01

    Connecting and Correcting is a case study of Sami healers in Porsanger, Finnmark, Norway, and focuses on two Coastal Sami healers, their worldview and healing practices. The cultural and historic context of Sami healing practices is explored, most notably Sami folk beliefs, the Laestadian branch of

  15. The influence of religious factors on drinking behavior among young indigenous Sami and non-Sami peers in northern Norway.

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    Spein, Anna Rita; Melhus, Marita; Kristiansen, Roald E; Kvernmo, Siv E

    2011-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that Laestadianism has contributed to the less drinking observed among indigenous Sami. This paper further investigates the bivariate protective influence of Sami ethnicity on youth drinking behavior using logistic regressions. We simultaneously controlled for the influence of religious revival movements (Laestadianism or evangelic) and religious importance (being personally Christian), in addition to socio-demographics and parental factors. Cross-sectional data from the 1994/95 North Norwegian Youth Study including 2,950 (675 Sami) 15-19 year-old high school students (RR: 85%) was used. Sami ethnicity was statistically significant for two out of six alcohol outcome measures, after adjustment for religiosity and other covariates, indicating less current drinking and party drinking. Religiousness was associated with higher youth and parental abstinence across ethnicities. Generally, stronger protective influences on drinking behavior were found for religious importance (being personally Christian) than religious affiliation (Laestadianism). The non-significance between Sami and non-Sami drinking may partly be explained by ethnic differences in religiosity, but also socio-demographics (e.g., residing in the Sami Highland) and parental factors (e.g., abstinence) contributed to such a result. Laestadianism`s profound impact on Sami culture, and its strong anti-alcohol norms may have contributed to a religious-socio-cultural context of abstinence.

  16. "You never know who are Sami or speak Sami" Clinicians' experiences with language-appropriate care to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Northern Norway.

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    Dagsvold, Inger; Møllersen, Snefrid; Stordahl, Vigdis

    2016-01-01

    The Indigenous population in Norway, the Sami, have a statutory right to speak and be spoken to in the Sami language when receiving health services. There is, however, limited knowledge about how clinicians deal with this in clinical practice. This study explores how clinicians deal with language-appropriate care with Sami-speaking patients in specialist mental health services. This study aims to explore how clinicians identify and respond to Sami patients' language data, as well as how they experience provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Sami language administrative districts. Data were collected using qualitative method, through individual interviews with 20 therapists working in outpatient mental health clinics serving Sami populations in northern Norway. A thematic analysis inspired by systematic text reduction was employed. Two themes were identified: (a) identification of Sami patients' language data and (b) experiences with provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients. Findings indicate that clinicians are not aware of patients' language needs prior to admission and that they deal with identification of language data and offer of language-appropriate care ad hoc when patients arrive. Sami-speaking participants reported always offering language choice and found more profound understanding of patients' experiences when Sami language was used. Whatever language Sami-speaking patients may choose, they are found to switch between languages during therapy. Most non-Sami-speaking participants reported offering Sami-speaking services, but the patients chose to speak Norwegian. However, a few of the participants maintained language awareness and could identify language needs despite a patient's refusal to speak Sami in therapy. Finally, some non-Sami-speaking participants were satisfied if they understood what the patients were saying. They left it to patients to address language problems, only to discover patients

  17. Traditional ecological knowledge among Sami reindeer herders in northern Sweden about vascular plants grazed by reindeer

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    Berit Inga

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional knowledge about how reindeer utilize forage resources was expected to be crucial to reindeer herders. Seventeen Sami reindeer herders in four reindeer herding communities in Sweden (“samebyar” in Swedish were interviewed about plants species considered to be important reindeer food plants in scientific literature. Among 40 plant species, which the informants were asked to identify and indicate whether and when they were grazed by reindeer, they identified a total of 21 plant taxa and five plant groups. They especially recognised species that were used as human food by the Sami themselves, but certain specific forage plants were also identified. Detailed knowledge of vascular plants at the species level was surprisingly general, which may indicate that knowledge of pasture resources in a detailed species level is not of vital importance. This fact is in sharp contradiction to the detailed knowledge that Sami people express for example about reindeer (as an animal or snow (as physical element. The plausible explanation is that observations of individual plant species are unnecessarily detailed information in large-scale reindeer pastoralism, because the animals graze freely under loose herding and border surveillance.

  18. Transit safety & security statistics & analysis 2002 annual report (formerly SAMIS)

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    2004-12-01

    The Transit Safety & Security Statistics & Analysis 2002 Annual Report (formerly SAMIS) is a compilation and analysis of mass transit accident, casualty, and crime statistics reported under the Federal Transit Administrations (FTAs) National Tr...

  19. Transit safety & security statistics & analysis 2003 annual report (formerly SAMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    The Transit Safety & Security Statistics & Analysis 2003 Annual Report (formerly SAMIS) is a compilation and analysis of mass transit accident, casualty, and crime statistics reported under the Federal Transit Administrations (FTAs) National Tr...

  20. The international biological program/human adaptability studies among the Skolt Sami in Finland (1966–1970

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    Henrik Forsius

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The population is increasingly lighter pigmented moving in a northward direction in Europe until reaching the Arctic Circle, where the Samis (Lapps are clearly more pigmented. Methods: In 1966–1970, we investigated a total of 689 subjects in the villages of Sevettijärvi and Nellim, including persons with mixed Sami and Finnish heritage; of these, 487 (242 males, 245 females had both parents classified as Skolt Sami. For estimation of the colour of the iris and hair, international scales were used. For translucency of the iris, pigmentation of the fundus was estimated in 3 different shades. The length and type of eyelashes were classified into 3 categories. To our knowledge, a simultaneous study of the pigmentation of eyebrows, eyelashes and eye fundus at different ages has not previously been published. Results: The age differences of iris colour were highly significant. Iris colour in children varied markedly, and they generally had lighter colours than later in life. Age and sex effects on the translucency of irises were found. Male irises were more translucent. Fundus pigmentation was scanty in the youngest age groups, with full pigmentation being reached at 20 years. Among young individuals hair colour darkens with increasing age. Eyebrow colour was slightly lighter for both sexes in the youngest age groups that in older cohorts. Women had longer eyelashes than males. Conclusions: The main factor of the lighter skin is a higher ability to synthesize vitamin D, providing superior protection against rickets. The Skolt Samis are more pigmented than other Nordic people. In earlier times they had problems with rickets but our studies did not show any essential symptoms of rickets today. Visual acuity among Skolt Samis was good. They had lower prevalence of myopia compared to Finns. The stronger pigmentation of Skolt Samis is probably due to their origin from darker Eastern populations. Since our investigations were made, the Skolt

  1. The international biological program/human adaptability studies among the Skolt Sami in Finland (1966-1970).

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    Forsius, Henrik; Eriksson, Aldur W; Fellman, Johan

    2012-04-16

    The population is increasingly lighter pigmented moving in a northward direction in Europe until reaching the Arctic Circle, where the Samis (Lapps) are clearly more pigmented. In 1966-1970, we investigated a total of 689 subjects in the villages of Sevettijärvi and Nellim, including persons with mixed Sami and Finnish heritage; of these, 487 (242 males, 245 females) had both parents classified as Skolt Sami. For estimation of the colour of the iris and hair, international scales were used. For translucency of the iris, pigmentation of the fundus was estimated in 3 different shades. The length and type of eyelashes were classified into 3 categories. To our knowledge, a simultaneous study of the pigmentation of eyebrows, eyelashes and eye fundus at different ages has not previously been published. The age differences of iris colour were highly significant. Iris colour in children varied markedly, and they generally had lighter colours than later in life. Age and sex effects on the translucency of irises were found. Male irises were more translucent. Fundus pigmentation was scanty in the youngest age groups, with full pigmentation being reached at 20 years. Among young individuals hair colour darkens with increasing age. Eyebrow colour was slightly lighter for both sexes in the youngest age groups that in older cohorts. Women had longer eyelashes than males. The main factor of the lighter skin is a higher ability to synthesize vitamin D, providing superior protection against rickets. The Skolt Samis are more pigmented than other Nordic people. In earlier times they had problems with rickets but our studies did not show any essential symptoms of rickets today. Visual acuity among Skolt Samis was good. They had lower prevalence of myopia compared to Finns. The stronger pigmentation of Skolt Samis is probably due to their origin from darker Eastern populations. Since our investigations were made, the Skolt Samis have been to a great part mixed with neighbouring

  2. Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group's access to somatic specialist health care (SHC: a retrospective study on general practitioners’ referrals

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    Jan Norum

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Sami people constitute the indigenous people in northern Norway. The objective of this study was to clarify whether they have a similar supply of somatic specialist health care (SHC as others. Methods: The referrals from general practitioners (GPs in the primary health care (PHC in the administration area of the Sami language law (8 municipalities were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities. Population data was accessed from Statistics Norway and the time period 2007–2010 was analysed. The main outcome was the number of referrals per 1,000 inhabitants according to age group, gender and place of living. Results: 504,292 referrals in northern Norway were indentified and the Sami and control group constituted 23,093 and 22,541 referrals, respectively. The major findings were a similar referral ratio (RR (1.14 and 1.17 (p = 0.624 and women more commonly referred (female/male ratio 1.45 and 1.41 in both groups. GPs in both groups were loyal to their local hospital trust. Conclusion: Inhabitants in Sami-speaking municipalities in northern Norway have a similar supply of SHC services as controls. Inter-municipal variation was significant in both groups.

  3. Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group's access to somatic specialist health care (SHC): a retrospective study on general practitioners’ referrals

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    Norum, Jan; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The Sami people constitute the indigenous people in northern Norway. The objective of this study was to clarify whether they have a similar supply of somatic specialist health care (SHC) as others. Methods The referrals from general practitioners (GPs) in the primary health care (PHC) in the administration area of the Sami language law (8 municipalities) were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities. Population data was accessed from Statistics Norway and the time period 2007–2010 was analysed. The main outcome was the number of referrals per 1,000 inhabitants according to age group, gender and place of living. Results 504,292 referrals in northern Norway were indentified and the Sami and control group constituted 23,093 and 22,541 referrals, respectively. The major findings were a similar referral ratio (RR) (1.14 and 1.17) (p =0.624) and women more commonly referred (female/male ratio 1.45 and 1.41) in both groups. GPs in both groups were loyal to their local hospital trust. Conclusion Inhabitants in Sami-speaking municipalities in northern Norway have a similar supply of SHC services as controls. Inter-municipal variation was significant in both groups. PMID:22456052

  4. Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group's access to somatic specialist health care (SHC): a retrospective study on general practitioners' referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-03-19

    The Sami people constitute the indigenous people in northern Norway. The objective of this study was to clarify whether they have a similar supply of somatic specialist health care (SHC) as others. The referrals from general practitioners (GPs) in the primary health care (PHC) in the administration area of the Sami language law (8 municipalities) were matched with a control group of 11 municipalities. Population data was accessed from Statistics Norway and the time period 2007-2010 was analysed. The main outcome was the number of referrals per 1,000 inhabitants according to age group, gender and place of living. 504,292 referrals in northern Norway were indentified and the Sami and control group constituted 23,093 and 22,541 referrals, respectively. The major findings were a similar referral ratio (RR) (1.14 and 1.17) (p = 0.624) and women more commonly referred (female/male ratio 1.45 and 1.41) in both groups. GPs in both groups were loyal to their local hospital trust. Inhabitants in Sami-speaking municipalities in northern Norway have a similar supply of SHC services as controls. Inter-municipal variation was significant in both groups.

  5. Prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among indigenous Sami and non-Sami in Northern- and Mid-Norway – the SAMINOR study

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    Ketil Lenert Hansen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main purpose of this work was to identify the prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk among Sami and non-Sami adults. Study design: A cross-sectional population-based study (the SAMINOR study. Data were collected by self-administrated questionnaires. Method: SAMINOR is a population-based study of health and living conditions conducted in 24 municipalities in Northern Norway during 2003 and 2004. The present study included 15,546 individuals aged between 36 and 79, whose ethnicity was categorized as Sami (33.4%, Kven (7.3% and Norwegian majority population (57.2%. Results: Sami respondents had a higher prevalence of self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk than the Norwegian majority population. The reporting was highest among Sami females (27.1%. Consumption of milk and dairy products (yoghurt and cheese was high among all the ethnic groups. However, significantly more Sami than non-Sami never (or rarely consume milk or cheese, and individuals who reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk had an significant lower intake of dairy products than those not reporting stomach symptoms after consuming dairy products. Sami reported general abdominal pain more often than the majority population. The adjusted models show a significant effect of Sami ethnicity in both men and women on self-reported stomach symptoms after consuming milk. In females, the odds ratio (OR=1.77 (p=0.001 and in males OR=1.64 (p=0.001. Conclusion: Our study shows that the Sami population reported more stomach symptoms after consuming milk, suggesting a higher prevalence of milk intolerance among the Sami population than the Norwegian majority population.

  6. Changes in Film Representations of Sami Culture and Identity

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    Anne Kari Skardhamar

    2008-02-01

    represents a totally different perspective by focusing on power relations, religious attitudes and ethical values. The language of the film is Sami. Finally, Gaup's most recent film, Kautokeinoopprøret (Kautokeino riot (2007, a narrative based on historical events, will be briefly discussed.

  7. Suicidal expressions in young Swedish Sami, a cross-sectional study

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    Lotta Omma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the experience of suicidal expressions (death wishes, life weariness, ideation, plans and attempts in young Swedish Sami, their attitudes toward suicide (ATTS, and experience of suicidal expressions and completed suicide in significant others and to compare with Swedes in general. Methods. A cross-sectional study comprising 516 Swedish Sami, 18–28 years of age together with an age and geographically matched reference group (n=218. Parts of the ATTS questionnaire have been used to cover different aspects of the suicidal complex.Data were analysed with regard to gender, occupation, counties and experience of negative societal treatment due to Sami background. Results. Both young Sami and young Swedes reported suicidal ideation, life weariness, and death wishes in a high degree (30–50%, but it was more common among the Sami. Having had plans to commit suicide showed a significant gender difference only in the Sami. The prevalence of suicide attempts did not differ significantly between Sami and Swedes. Subgroups of the Sami reported a higher degree of suicidal behaviour, Sami women and reindeer herders reported a 3, 5-fold higher odds of suicide attempts and a 2-fold higher odds having had plans committing suicide. Sami living in Vasterbotten/Jamtland/Vasternorrland and Sami with experience of ethnicity related bad treatment 2-fold higher odds of suicidal plans compared to those living in other counties. Conclusion. An increased occurrence of suicidal ideation/death wishes/life weariness in young Sami compared to young majority Swedes was found, but not an increased prevalence of suicide attempts and positive attitudes together with an increased awareness to handle suicide problems could be a contributing factor. Severe circumstances and experience of ethnicity-related bad treatment seems to contribute to increased levels of suicidal plans and attempts in subgroups of Sami.

  8. “You never know who are Sami or speak Sami” Clinicians’ experiences with language-appropriate care to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Northern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Dagsvold

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Indigenous population in Norway, the Sami, have a statutory right to speak and be spoken to in the Sami language when receiving health services. There is, however, limited knowledge about how clinicians deal with this in clinical practice. This study explores how clinicians deal with language-appropriate care with Sami-speaking patients in specialist mental health services. Objectives: This study aims to explore how clinicians identify and respond to Sami patients’ language data, as well as how they experience provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients in outpatient mental health clinics in Sami language administrative districts. Method: Data were collected using qualitative method, through individual interviews with 20 therapists working in outpatient mental health clinics serving Sami populations in northern Norway. A thematic analysis inspired by systematic text reduction was employed. Findings: Two themes were identified: (a identification of Sami patients’ language data and (b experiences with provision of therapy to Sami-speaking patients. Conclusion: Findings indicate that clinicians are not aware of patients’ language needs prior to admission and that they deal with identification of language data and offer of language-appropriate care ad hoc when patients arrive. Sami-speaking participants reported always offering language choice and found more profound understanding of patients’ experiences when Sami language was used. Whatever language Sami-speaking patients may choose, they are found to switch between languages during therapy. Most non-Sami-speaking participants reported offering Sami-speaking services, but the patients chose to speak Norwegian. However, a few of the participants maintained language awareness and could identify language needs despite a patient's refusal to speak Sami in therapy. Finally, some non-Sami-speaking participants were satisfied if they understood what the patients were saying

  9. Concurrent adversities and suicide attempts among Sami and non-Sami adolescents: the Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Study (NAAHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigstad, Bjørn; Kvernmo, Siv

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about connections between adolescent suicide attempts (SA) and concurrent adversities. In a cross-sectional study, the authors wanted to investigate prevalences, additive effects of adversities, family and peer relations, gender, divorce and poverty, and ethnic differences between Sami and non-Sami youth. In an adolescent community population encompassing 4881 adolescents of 15-16 years of age, youth with and without self-reports of attempted suicide the last year were compared on 12 concurrent adversities, on scales assessing family and peer functioning, and on sociodemographic variables. The prevalence of attempted suicide the last year was 5.3%, and more girls (8.8%) than boys (1.8%). All 12 concurrent adversities were strongly related to SA. The suicide attempters reported two and a half times as many adversities as non-attempters. A strong multiple additive relationship was found. Multivariately, among boys, the strongest risk factors were suicide among friends (OR = 9.4), and suicide in the family or in the neighbourhood (OR = 4.8). Among girls, sexual abuse (OR = 5.2) and parent mental problems (OR = 4.6) were strongest related to SA. Suicide attempters reported more divorce and poverty, more conflicts with parents, and less family support and involvement. Totally, Sami youth reported more SA and more concurrent adversities than non-Sami peers. Adolescent suicide attempters are heavily burdened with concurrent adversities. Clinicians should be aware of gender differences in risk factors, and should ask about abuse and suicide or attempts among relatives and peers. A family perspective in clinical work is needed.

  10. Immigration et crise d'identite dans l'Univers Romanesque de Sami ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immigration et crise d'identite dans l'Univers Romanesque de Sami Tchak. ... La littérature africaine du XXIème siècle a eu une grande transformation. Cela est dû au fait ... It is established that Sami Tchak takes profound interest in projecting and handling the themes of immigration and identity crisis in his novelistic world.

  11. Self-rated health among Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spein, Anna Rita; Pedersen, Cecilia Petrine; Silviken, Anne Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Self-rated health (SRH) and associated risk and protective correlates were investigated among two indigenous adolescent populations, Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami.......Self-rated health (SRH) and associated risk and protective correlates were investigated among two indigenous adolescent populations, Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami....

  12. Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid M. A. Eriksen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. Objective: The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. Design: The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5% and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%. Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. Results: Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model, and higher pain intensity. Conclusion: Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.

  13. SAMI3 Simulations of the Persistent May 1994 Plasmasphere Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, J.; Huba, J.; Borovsky, J.

    2017-12-01

    We use the Naval Research Laboratory SAMI3 ionosphere/plasmasphere model[1] to explore the physics of a long-lived plasmasphere plume. A plasmasphere plume is a storm feature that extends the cold plasma that is normally trapped by the geomagnetic field (the plasmasphere) outward towards the bow shock. In the case of the May 1994 storm, the storm and the plume continued for 12 days. For the model storm, we imposed a Kp-driven Volland/Stern-Maynard/Chen potential [2-4]. Results are compared to measurements of the cold ion density from the 1989-046 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit [5]. We find that many details of the observed plume are reproduced by SAMI3, but only if a background magnetosphere density is included as a boundary condition. We also find that high-speed, field aligned plasma flows contribute significantly to the observed plume density. [1] Huba, J. and J. Krall (2013), Modeling the plasmasphere with SAMI3, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 6-10, doi:10.1029/2012GL054300 [2] Volland, H. (1973), A semiempirical model of large-scale magnetospheric electric fields, Journal of Geophysical Research, 78, 171-180, doi:10.1029/JA078i001p00171 [3] Stern, D.P. (1975), The motion of a proton in the equatorial magnetosphere, Journal of Geophysical Research, 80, 595-599, doi:10.1029/JA080i004p00595 [4] Maynard, N.C., and A.J. Chen (1975), Isolated cold plasma regions: Observations and their relation to possible production mechanisms, Journal of Geophysical Research, 80, 1009-1013, doi:10.1029/JA080i007p01009 [5] Borovsky, J.E., D.T. Welling, M.F. Thomsen, and M.H. Denton (2014), Long-lived plasmaspheric drainage plumes: Where does the plasma come from?, Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, 119, 6496-6520, doi:10.1002/2014JA020228 Research supported by NRL base funds.

  14. Self-rated health among Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami adolescents: associated risk and protective correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spein, Anna Rita; Pedersen, Cecilia Petrine; Silviken, Anne Cathrine; Melhus, Marita; Kvernmo, Siv Eli; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Self-rated health (SRH) and associated risk and protective correlates were investigated among two indigenous adolescent populations, Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami. Cross-sectional data were collected from "Well-being among Youth in Greenland" (WBYG) and "The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study" (NAAHS), conducted during 2003-2005 and comprising 10th and 11th graders, 378 Inuit and 350 Sami. SRH was assessed by one single item, using a 4-point and 5-point scale for NAAHS and WBYG, respectively. Logistic regressions were performed separately for each indigenous group using a dichotomous measure with "very good" (NAAHS) and "very good/good" (WBYG) as reference categories. We simultaneously controlled for various socio-demographics, risk correlates (drinking, smoking, violence and suicidal behaviour) and protective correlates (physical activity, well-being in school, number of close friends and adolescent-parent relationship). A majority of both Inuit (62%) and Sami (89%) youth reported "good" or "very good" SRH. The proportion of "poor/fair/not so good" SRH was three times higher among Inuit than Sami (38% vs. 11%, p≤0.001). Significantly more Inuit females than males reported "poor/fair" SRH (44% vs. 29%, p≤0.05), while no gender differences occurred among Sami (12% vs. 9%, p≤0.08). In both indigenous groups, suicidal thoughts (risk) and physical activity (protective) were associated with poor and good SRH, respectively. In accordance with other studies of indigenous adolescents, suicidal thoughts were strongly associated with poorer SRH among Sami and Inuit. The Inuit-Sami differences in SRH could partly be due to higher "risk" and lower "protective" correlates among Inuit than Sami. The positive impact of physical activity on SRH needs to be targeted in future intervention programs.

  15. Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) of the plasma edge on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Roddy; Taylor, Gary; Brunner, Jakob; Ellis, Bob; Thomas, David

    2016-10-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system is a unique phased-array microwave camera with a +/-40° field of view in both directions. It can image cut-off surfaces corresponding to frequencies in the range 10-34.5GHz; these surfaces are typically in the plasma edge. SAMI operates in two modes: either imaging thermal emission from the plasma (often modified by its interaction with the plasma edge e.g. via BXO mode conversion) or ``active probing'' i.e. injecting a broad beam at the plasma surface and imaging the reflected/back-scattered signal. SAMI was successfully pioneered on the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy. SAMI has now been installed and commissioned on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The firmware has been upgraded to include real-time digital filtering, which enables continuous acquisition of the Doppler back-scattered active probing data. In this poster we shall present SAMI's analysis of the plasma edge on NSTX-U including measurements of the edge pitch angle on NSTX-U using SAMI's unique 2-D Doppler-backscattering capability.

  16. The health of young Swedish Sami with special reference to mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Omma

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the health of young Sami in Sweden and the relationship between health and experience of negative societal treatment due to ethnicity, as well as socio-demographic background factors. Study design. Cross-sectional population-based questionnaire study. Methods. A total of 876 persons aged 18–28 and involved in Sami associated activities were addressed, and 516 (59% responded to a questionnaire investigating physical health, mental health, and stress. Data were analyzed with regard to gender, family situation, occupation, education, enculturation factors and experience of being badly treated because of ethnicity. Results. A majority of the young Sami reported feeling healthy, but close to half of the group reported often having worries, often forgetting things and often experiencing lack of time for doing needed things. Women and those living alone reported a more negative health. Furthermore, half of the group had perceived bad treatment because of Sami ethnicity, and this was negatively associated with some aspects of mental health. Conclusion. The young Sami had a rather good and possibly slightly better health than other young Swedes, except regarding worries and stress. A high degree of bad treatment due to Sami ethnicity and its negative association with health, may partly explain the high degree of some health problems.

  17. Leczenie schizofrenii elektrowstrząsami oraz lekami przeciwpsychotycznymi, łącznie z elektrowstrząsami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Kołodziej‑Kowalska

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Elektrowstrząsy (EW były stosowane w leczeniu schizofrenii od czasu ich wynalezienia w 1938 roku. Wprowadzenie efektywnej farmakoterapii schizofrenii oraz zaburzeń nastroju doprowadziło do znacznego spadku ich wykonywania w latach 60. i 70. XX wieku. Stopniowe wykazanie ograniczeń skuteczności i występowanie objawów niepożądanych le‑ ków przeciwpsychotycznych doprowadziło w kolejnych dekadach do powrotu zainteresowania elektrowstrząsami jako metodą leczenia lekoopornej schizofrenii. Niestety, wskazania do zastosowania EW w schizofrenii i ich miejsce w algoryt‑ mach leczniczych są niejasne, głównie w związku z brakiem odpowiedniej jakości badań klinicznych. Kontrowersje zwią‑ zane z oceną efektywności EW w leczeniu schizofrenii, zwłaszcza opornej na farmakoterapię, znalazły odzwierciedlenie w różnicach w rekomendacjach wydawanych przez różne towarzystwa naukowe. Analiza danych z literatury (nieliczne badania randomizowane i otwarte, głównie badania retrospektywne i opisy kazuistyczne wykazuje, że strategia polegająca na leczeniu skojarzonym lekami przeciwpsychotycznymi i elektrowstrząsami jest efektywniejsza od każdej z tych metod z osobna. Badania sugerują także, że połączenie EW i klozapiny jest raczej bezpieczne i skuteczne; doniesienia oceniające połączenie z nowymi LPP drugiej generacji są nieliczne. Identyfikowano różne czynniki predykcyjne poprawy po leczeniu skojarzonym EW i LPP. Częsta jest konkluzja, że elektrowstrząsy w połączeniu z lekami przeciwpsychotyczny‑ mi mogą być rozważane jako opcja terapeutyczna u pacjentów, u których farmakoterapia wykazuje ograniczoną skutecz‑ ność. Profil objawów ubocznych terapii skojarzonej nie różni się od samych zabiegów EW, jest ona bezpieczna i dobrze tolerowana.

  18. Interview with Peter Samis and Mimi Michaelson, Authors of "Creating the Visitor-Centered Museum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, Susan

    2017-01-01

    "Creating the Visitor-Centered Museum" offers insight into why and how 10 case study museums have transformed to serve the needs of their public. Susan Spero interviews authors Peter Samis and Mimi Michaelson about the purpose of the book, their case study choices, the key characteristics of visitor-centered institutions and their…

  19. What can we talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom? Sami patients' experiences of language choice and cultural norms in mental health treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsvold, Inger; Møllersen, Snefrid; Stordahl, Vigdis

    2015-01-01

    The Sami in Norway have a legal right to receive health services adapted to Sami language and culture. This calls for a study of the significance of language choice and cultural norms in Sami patients' encounters with mental health services. To explore the significance of language and cultural norms in communication about mental health topics experienced by Sami patients receiving mental health treatment to enhance our understanding of linguistic and cultural adaptation of health services. Data were collected through individual interviews with 4 Sami patients receiving mental health treatment in Northern Norway. A systematic text reduction and a thematic analysis were employed. Two themes were identified:(I) Language choice is influenced by language competence, with whom one talks and what one talks about.Bilingualism was a resource and natural part of the participants' lives, but there were limited possibilities to speak Sami in encounters with health services. A professional working relationship was placed on an equal footing with the possibility to speak Sami. Sami patients' language choice in different communication situations is influenced by a complexity of social and cultural factors. Sami patients have varying opinions about and preferences for what they can talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom. Bilingualism and knowledge about both Sami and Norwegian culture provide latitude and enhanced possibilities for both patients and the health services. The challenge for the health services is to allow for and safeguard such individual variations within the cultural framework of the patients.

  20. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: A prototype data archive for Big Science exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Green, A. W.; Foster, C.; Scott, N.; Allen, J. T.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Sweet, S. M.; Hopkins, A. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bryant, J. J.; Croom, S. M.; Goodwin, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    We describe the data archive and database for the SAMI Galaxy Survey, an ongoing observational program that will cover ≈3400 galaxies with integral-field (spatially-resolved) spectroscopy. Amounting to some three million spectra, this is the largest sample of its kind to date. The data archive and built-in query engine use the versatile Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5), which precludes the need for external metadata tables and hence the setup and maintenance overhead those carry. The code produces simple outputs that can easily be translated to plots and tables, and the combination of these tools makes for a light system that can handle heavy data. This article acts as a contextual companion to the SAMI Survey Database source code repository, samiDB, which is freely available online and written entirely in Python. We also discuss the decisions related to the selection of tools and the creation of data visualisation modules. It is our aim that the work presented in this article-descriptions, rationale, and source code-will be of use to scientists looking to set up a maintenance-light data archive for a Big Science data load.

  1. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: spatially resolving the main sequence of star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medling, Anne M.; Cortese, Luca; Croom, Scott M.; Green, Andrew W.; Groves, Brent; Hampton, Elise; Ho, I.-Ting; Davies, Luke J. M.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Schaefer, Adam L.; Taylor, Edward; Zafar, Tayyaba; Bekki, Kenji; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bloom, Jessica V.; Brough, Sarah; Bryant, Julia J.; Catinella, Barbara; Cecil, Gerald; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Driver, Simon P.; Federrath, Christoph; Foster, Caroline; Goldstein, Gregory; Goodwin, Michael; Hopkins, Andrew; Lawrence, J. S.; Leslie, Sarah K.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Owers, Matt S.; McDermid, Richard; Richards, Samuel N.; Sharp, Robert; Scott, Nicholas; Sweet, Sarah M.; Taranu, Dan S.; Tescari, Edoardo; Tonini, Chiara; van de Sande, Jesse; Walcher, C. Jakob; Wright, Angus

    2018-04-01

    We present the ˜800 star formation rate maps for the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey based on H α emission maps, corrected for dust attenuation via the Balmer decrement, that are included in the SAMI Public Data Release 1. We mask out spaxels contaminated by non-stellar emission using the [O III]/H β, [N II]/H α, [S II]/H α, and [O I]/H α line ratios. Using these maps, we examine the global and resolved star-forming main sequences of SAMI galaxies as a function of morphology, environmental density, and stellar mass. Galaxies further below the star-forming main sequence are more likely to have flatter star formation profiles. Early-type galaxies split into two populations with similar stellar masses and central stellar mass surface densities. The main-sequence population has centrally concentrated star formation similar to late-type galaxies, while galaxies >3σ below the main sequence show significantly reduced star formation most strikingly in the nuclear regions. The split populations support a two-step quenching mechanism, wherein halo mass first cuts off the gas supply and remaining gas continues to form stars until the local stellar mass surface density can stabilize the reduced remaining fuel against further star formation. Across all morphologies, galaxies in denser environments show a decreased specific star formation rate from the outside in, supporting an environmental cause for quenching, such as ram-pressure stripping or galaxy interactions.

  2. What can we talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom? Sami patients' experiences of language choice and cultural norms in mental health treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Dagsvold

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Sami in Norway have a legal right to receive health services adapted to Sami language and culture. This calls for a study of the significance of language choice and cultural norms in Sami patients’ encounters with mental health services. Objectives: To explore the significance of language and cultural norms in communication about mental health topics experienced by Sami patients receiving mental health treatment to enhance our understanding of linguistic and cultural adaptation of health services. Methods: Data were collected through individual interviews with 4 Sami patients receiving mental health treatment in Northern Norway. A systematic text reduction and a thematic analysis were employed. Findings: Two themes were identified:(I Language choice is influenced by language competence, with whom one talks and what one talks about.Bilingualism was a resource and natural part of the participants’ lives, but there were limited possibilities to speak Sami in encounters with health services. A professional working relationship was placed on an equal footing with the possibility to speak Sami.(II Cultural norms influence what one talks about, in what way and to whom.However, norms could be bypassed, by talking about norm-regulated topics in Norwegian with health providers. Conclusion: Sami patients’ language choice in different communication situations is influenced by a complexity of social and cultural factors. Sami patients have varying opinions about and preferences for what they can talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom. Bilingualism and knowledge about both Sami and Norwegian culture provide latitude and enhanced possibilities for both patients and the health services. The challenge for the health services is to allow for and safeguard such individual variations within the cultural framework of the patients.

  3. What can we talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom? Sami patients' experiences of language choice and cultural norms in mental health treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsvold, Inger; Møllersen, Snefrid; Stordahl, Vigdis

    2015-01-01

    Background The Sami in Norway have a legal right to receive health services adapted to Sami language and culture. This calls for a study of the significance of language choice and cultural norms in Sami patients’ encounters with mental health services. Objectives To explore the significance of language and cultural norms in communication about mental health topics experienced by Sami patients receiving mental health treatment to enhance our understanding of linguistic and cultural adaptation of health services. Methods Data were collected through individual interviews with 4 Sami patients receiving mental health treatment in Northern Norway. A systematic text reduction and a thematic analysis were employed. Findings Two themes were identified: (I) Language choice is influenced by language competence, with whom one talks and what one talks about. Bilingualism was a resource and natural part of the participants’ lives, but there were limited possibilities to speak Sami in encounters with health services. A professional working relationship was placed on an equal footing with the possibility to speak Sami. (II) Cultural norms influence what one talks about, in what way and to whom. However, norms could be bypassed, by talking about norm-regulated topics in Norwegian with health providers. Conclusion Sami patients’ language choice in different communication situations is influenced by a complexity of social and cultural factors. Sami patients have varying opinions about and preferences for what they can talk about, in which language, in what way and with whom. Bilingualism and knowledge about both Sami and Norwegian culture provide latitude and enhanced possibilities for both patients and the health services. The challenge for the health services is to allow for and safeguard such individual variations within the cultural framework of the patients. PMID:25976741

  4. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Thrilled at @Bristol Kathy Sykes in conversation with Liz Whitelegg. Kathy Sykes is Senior Science Consultant at @Bristol - a new area on Bristol's Harbourside with a Science Centre Explore, a Wildlife Centre Wildscreen, with sculptures and fountains. Kathy was one of five people in 1999 to be awarded an IOP Public Awareness of Physics award. Dr Kathy Sykes What attracted you to Physics in the first place? It was really when I discovered that Physics was all about making models of the world, because then suddenly the ability to be creative became important. I liked the idea that you could have a picture of the world that might work quite well but you could always replace that with a better one. That was what made science come alive and make it seem like something that I'd really love to be involved in, rather than science as a stale body of facts that I needed to learn. I was much more interested in ideas than in facts. I think that finding out about 'models' happened around the time I was discovering quantum mechanics and how the act of observing something can actually affect the outcome. I found it incredibly exciting - especially how that changed the whole philosophy of science. I also had a fantastic teacher in physics and I owe an awful lot to him. He just swooped in at the last moment when I was considering giving it up so that made an enormous difference. After my degree I went to teach maths and physics A-level in Zimbabwe with the VSO, and it was partly wanting to share my excitement with other people about physics that made me want to go and teach abroad. When I came back and began my PhD in Physics at Bristol University, I missed teaching and thought it was important to get the public more involved in science and debates about science. My supervisor, Pete Barham, was doing lots of this himself, and he helped and encouraged me enormously. I can't thank him enough. Did you consider teaching as a career? Well I like having the carpet whipped away from

  5. Cooperation between Magnesium and Metabolite Controls Collapse of the SAM-I Riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Susmita; Onuchic, José N; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2017-07-25

    The S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-I riboswitch is a noncoding RNA that regulates the transcription termination process in response to metabolite (SAM) binding. The aptamer portion of the riboswitch may adopt an open or closed state depending on the presence of metabolite. Although the transition between the open and closed states is critical for the switching process, its atomistic details are not well understood. Using atomistic simulations, we calculate the effect of SAM and magnesium ions on the folding free energy landscape of the SAM-I riboswitch. These molecular simulation results are consistent with our previous wetlab experiments and aid in interpreting the SHAPE probing measurements. Here, molecular dynamics simulations explicitly identify target RNA motifs sensitive to magnesium ions and SAM. In the simulations, we observe that, whereas the metabolite mostly stabilizes the P1 and P3 helices, magnesium serves an important role in stabilizing a pseudoknot interaction between the P2 and P4 helices, even at high metabolite concentrations. The pseudoknot stabilization by magnesium, in combination with P1 stabilization by SAM, explains the requirement of both SAM and magnesium to form the fully collapsed metabolite-bound closed state of the SAM-I riboswitch. In the absence of SAM, frequent open-to-closed conformational transitions of the pseudoknot occur, akin to breathing. These pseudoknot fluctuations disrupt the binding site by facilitating fluctuations in the 5'-end of helix P1. Magnesium biases the landscape toward a collapsed state (preorganization) by coordinating pseudoknot and 5'-P1 fluctuations. The cooperation between SAM and magnesium in stabilizing important tertiary interactions elucidates their functional significance in transcription regulation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Experiences of well-being among Sami and Roma women in a Swedish context

    OpenAIRE

    Aléx, Lena; Lehti, Arja

    2013-01-01

    Artikkel basert på intervju med eldre samiske kvinner og middeladrende Rom kvinner i Sverige. Our aim was to explore the experiences of well-being and lack of well-being among middle-aged and older women belonging to two national minority groups in Sweden. Interviews from nine older Sami women and four middle-aged Roma women were analyzed using grounded theory with the following categories identified: contributing to well-being (with the subcategories belonging to a healthy family, being s...

  7. People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Aref

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to analyze a part of the findings of documentation survey and field work carried out for five years in two cities and 67villages in Komeijan region of Markazi province, Iran, from some new perspectives such as ritual morphography, dramatic origin studies, eastern Scapegoat’s and anthropology of rituals. Using methods of current, and interviewing with 119 of the eldest native settlers ,as informants, and regarding the biochronology of man’s life in this region from the primitive form to civility which have been assigned to go back from the third millennium B.C.up to the present time, the morphography of 48 popular Dramatic Rituals has been determined. Among the findings of the study, one of the Archetypal Dramatic rituals, called Qaraiskurmah in the field of Anthropology of rituals, is Scapegoat’s. All these show the high IQ, innovative mind, and creative artistic tastes of the people in this region of Iran, whether they are Turkish, Persia, or Tats speakers.

  8. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    ASE: Attend, Socialize, Enjoy Bob Kibble reflects on the enriching effects of the annual meeting Bob Kibble is a teacher trainer at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. I remember my first ASE meeting in Reading. Perhaps in 1978 or thereabouts. I had been teaching for a few years and thought I'd check out this local convention of science teachers. It was indeed a revelation that so many people had so much to say about teaching science. There was talk about N and F levels and the 'I level grill'. Someone had ordered something called a BBC machine (later revealed to me as the latest in hi-tech teaching). I remember it well. But it was a lonely affair for a recent recruit. People seemed to know each other and there was much friendly exchanging. However, nobody knew me and I knew nobody else. The professional revelations were accompanied by a personal isolation. A strange set of memories indeed for a new recruit, unskilled and clumsy in the social arena. Bob practising for the ASE singalong session this year. This year I went to the ASE Centenary meeting in Guildford, my sixteenth ASE annual meeting. Things have changed since the early days. Thursday started with a formal Cathedral service in celebration of 100 years of the ASE. I sat next to a lady from Oxford and behind my good friend Dave from Croydon. Things snowballed from there. I went to a workshop on the water cycle and was brought face to face with my own misconceptions about the life story of a water molecule. Got a freebie coloured bracelet as well. Thanks Margaret. A chap from Bournemouth gave me loads of ideas about how best to set up a shared lesson observation scheme as well as how to run a professional development workshop. Thanks Stuart. At a third session I joined Brenda from Cambridge and we spent an enjoyable hour discovering ways to approach the teaching of light and in particular Ibn al Haytham's revelations courtesy of a chap from Kingston. That afternoon I was invited to present a talk to

  9. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    microscopes, chemical analyses etc. The NHM has big labs—like a university—in the basement. I write papers, give talks... For the public galleries of the NHM my group provides expert input to exhibitions-when the meteorite pavilion was recently refurbished we suggested a layout, wrote text and selected samples, but this was then 'edited' by the exhibition designers. I'm also working on a new website with virtual meteorite specimens. As an expert on Martian meteorites I often get interviewed by the media: for example, I am on a new Channel 4 programme called Destination Mars. I have also just finished a general interest book—it's called Search for Life; the NHM have just published it (in March). And do you get to go to exciting places? As a researcher I go to conferences I am just off to the States this week. I went to Antarctica ten years ago meteorite collecting and I am hoping to go to Australia this year. It is good fun but they really do need an expert who can recognise a meteorite. I'll be going to the Nullarbor region of Australia for 2 3 weeks depending on the weather if it's too green there is too much grass, so you can't see the meteorites. How do you find people respond to meteorites? People love touching rocks from outer space, especially primary school children. You can see how they are burnt on the outside. When you feel the weight of them it really brings it home: iron meteorites are heavy! They'll often say 'Wow, it fell from the sky' as they glance upwards, half expecting another one to come crashing through the ceiling. Everyone finds it amazing that a solid object has come as if from nowhere. And they are so old. They can't believe how old they are. We want to know where we come from. There is always lots of media coverage about what is happening in the sky (eclipses and the like). It's there and it's a bit of a mystery. If we can get to grips with how our planets and how our own Sun formed it can put us in the picture as to where we have come from and

  10. Induced abortion on demand and birth rate in Sami-speaking municipalities and a control group in Finnmark, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Norum

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this study was to analyze the birth and induced abortion on demand (IAD rate among women in Sami-speaking communities and a control group in Finnmark County, Norway. Methods. The 6 northern municipalities included in the administration area of the Sami language law (study group were matched with a control group of 9 municipalities. Population data (numbers, sex and age were accessed from Statistics Norway. Data on birth rate and IAD during the time period 1999–2009 were derived from the Medical Birth Registry (MBR of Norway. Data on number of women in fertile age (15–44 years were obtained from Statistics Norway. Between 2001 and 2008, this age group was reduced by 12% (Sami and 23% (controls, respectively. Results. Finnmark County has a high IAD rate and 1 in 4 pregnancies (spontaneous abortions excluded ended in IAD in the study and control groups. The total fertility rate per woman was 1.94 and 1.87 births, respectively. There was no difference between groups with regard to the IAD/birth ratio (P=0.94 or general fertility rate GFR (P=0.82. Conclusions. Women in the Sami-majority area and a control group in Finnmark County experienced a similar frequency of IAD and fertility rate.

  11. The Making of Sami Ethnography: Contested Authorities and Negotiated Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kuutma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution analyzes the interplay of ethnographic and poetic agendas, the negotiation of synergetic or conflicting objectives in the production and editing of a seminal representation of the Sámi, Muitalus sámiid birra. My main focus is on the collaborative effort of the publication process, to investigate the emergence and negotiation of representational authority, of cultural poetics, of social and cultural critique, in order to defy the preconception of a passive informant of a cultural experience. The Sámi narrator Johan Turi is discussed, instead, as an active agent in providing a voice to the Sámi people in the collaborative process of ethnography writing. My approach is interdisciplinary, being inspired by different inquiries in anthropology and cultural history, while adding a subjective interpretation in discerning the production of a multifaceted ethnographic representation, both by the cultural insider and the inquisitive outsider.

  12. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    the war Hoyle returned to Cambridge, but kept in close contact with his collaborators. Fred Hoyle was a canny and media-savvy scientist, 40 years before such things were recognized. Martin Rees said after his death '[He] also had other dimensions to his career, his inventiveness and skill as a communicator'. It is hard to realize now the impact that Hoyle's broadcasts had in post-war Britain. His programmes for the BBC on The Nature of the Universe won greater audiences than such unlikely rivals as Bertrand Russell and Tommy Handley. Even today many people recall how they were affected by listening to these broadcasts. Hoyle used one of his broadcasts to ridicule the hot explosion theory. He referred to the idea of a 'big bang as fanciful'. Unfortunately the name stuck, much to Hoyle's chagrin. In the 1950s Hoyle began a fruitful collaboration with Willy Fowler of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Hoyle was interested in the origin of the chemical elements. Hans Bethe, Charles Critchfield and Karl-Frederich von Weizsäcker had calculated in 1939 how stars could turn protons into helium nuclei by nuclear fusion. Part of the Vela supernova remmant, the debris left after the type of massive explosion in which Hoyle predicted that heavy nuclei were formed. (© Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Anglo-Australian Observatory.) Building on earlier collaboration with Ed Saltpeter, Hoyle used data supplied by Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge and, working with Fowler, began to piece together how the elements were formed. By looking at very large stars near the end of their lives and examining their chemical composition, they noticed that the abundances of elements almost exactly corresponded to those with a low nuclear capture cross section. Hoyle argued that all of the elements in our bodies had been formed in stars that had been and gone before our solar system had even formed. In their classic paper the elements are produced by three basic methods. The

  13. The right of indigenous peoples to education in their own language – Greenlanders in Denmark and in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsborg-Andersen, Ayo; Khalaf, Bassah

    2018-01-01

    Both language and culture are interdependent pillars on which the identity of a people is maintained, including indigenous peoples. Without the appropriate linguistic terminology available to express indigenous philosophies and concepts, indigenous peoples lose some of their ability to accurately...... and in Denmark. As a part of this examination the paper also gives an overview of history of the Greenlandic school system. Finally the paper compares the current situation of Greenlanders in Denmark with the Sami peoples in Norway....

  14. Wisdom in the Poetry of Muḥmood Sami al Barodi(Arabic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Khansa’ Muḥammad Dieb al Jaji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Muḥmood Sami al Barodi is a famous poet who was named the Resurrector of poetry in the early times when many poets of the old era were the cause of the decline in poetry. His poems had been studied from many aspects and by many scholars but no one ever spoke about al Barodi’s writings about wisdom. This article is focusing on the verses and poems that focus on the meaning of wisdom and everything that relate to it. He talked about the importance of wisdom in the poems as he encouraged the other poets to give attention to this meaning. Some published books and articles helped me write this article but I haven’t found any of them that gave this point enough significance though his poetry is full of verses about wisdom and so I chose to write about it..

  15. Sami in the History of the Norwegian-Russian Borderland: Factor of Tension or Regional Integration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav I. Goldin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is based of an extensive array of documents and cartographic materials of the leading archives of the Russian Federation and Norway. The authors focus their attention on the history of Russian-Norwegian border and the Sami aspect of its development. On the Scandinavian continent, the population of frontier areas was often a factor of political tension, but the ethnic picture of the Russian-Norwegian borderland distinguished by the fact that the frontier status of the Skolt was the integration factor for the formation of economic cooperation between the border provinces of Russia and Norway. This thesis the authors explain by the peculiarities of the States policy regarding the border territories, ethnic groups, economic activities and economic interaction of Skolt with other communities, as well as their perception of own inhabited space.

  16. Equatorial spread F studies using SAMI3 with two-dimensional and three-dimensional electrostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Aveiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents a study of equatorial F region irregularities using the NRL SAMI3/ESF model, comparing results using a two-dimensional (2-D and a three-dimensional (3-D electrostatic potential solution. For the 3-D potential solution, two cases are considered for parallel plasma transport: (1 transport based on the parallel ambipolar field, and (2 transport based on the parallel electric field. The results show that the growth rate of the generalized Rayleigh–Taylor instability is not affected by the choice of the potential solution. However, differences are observed in the structures of the irregularities between the 2-D and 3-D solutions. Additionally, the plasma velocity along the geomagnetic field computed using the full 3-D solution shows complex structures that are not captured by the simplified model. This points out that only the full 3-D model is able to fully capture the complex physics of the equatorial F region.

  17. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: gas content and interaction as the drivers of kinematic asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, J. V.; Croom, S. M.; Bryant, J. J.; Schaefer, A. L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Callingham, J.; Cortese, L.; Federrath, C.; Scott, N.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Sweet, S.; Tonini, C.; Allen, J. T.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; Lorente, N.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Sharp, R.

    2018-05-01

    In order to determine the causes of kinematic asymmetry in the Hα gas in the SAMI (Sydney-AAO Multi-object IFS) Galaxy Survey sample, we investigate the comparative influences of environment and intrinsic properties of galaxies on perturbation. We use spatially resolved Hα velocity fields from the SAMI Galaxy Survey to quantify kinematic asymmetry (\\overline{v_asym}) in nearby galaxies and environmental and stellar mass data from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We find that local environment, measured as distance to nearest neighbour, is inversely correlated with kinematic asymmetry for galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) > 10.0, but there is no significant correlation for galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) < 10.0. Moreover, low-mass galaxies [log (M*/M⊙) < 9.0] have greater kinematic asymmetry at all separations, suggesting a different physical source of asymmetry is important in low-mass galaxies. We propose that secular effects derived from gas fraction and gas mass may be the primary causes of asymmetry in low-mass galaxies. High gas fraction is linked to high σ _m/V (where σm is Hα velocity dispersion and V the rotation velocity), which is strongly correlated with \\overline{v_asym}, and galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) < 9.0 have offset \\overline{σ _m/V} from the rest of the sample. Further, asymmetry as a fraction of dispersion decreases for galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) < 9.0. Gas mass and asymmetry are also inversely correlated in our sample. We propose that low gas masses in dwarf galaxies may lead to asymmetric distribution of gas clouds, leading to increased relative turbulence.

  18. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide, pH, oxygen and other variables collected from time series observations using SAMI-CO2, SAMI-pH, and other instruments from Buoy NH-10 off the coast of Newport, Oregon, United States, at the near bottom depth of ~80 meters from 2011-08-16 to 2015-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0145162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains time series measurements of near bottom partial pressure of carbon dioxide, pH, dissolved oxygen that are measured from SAMI-CO2, and...

  19. Fencing the forest: early use of barrier fences in Sami reindeer husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Norstedt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Barrier fences are generally not considered to have been used in Sami reindeer husbandry in Sweden before the early 20th century. As a rule, they are thought to have been introduced with the transition from intensive to extensive herding that is assumed to have taken place at this time. However, in this study, we show that barrier fences were widely used in Gällivare, Jokkmokk and Arjeplog Municipalities from the mid-18th century onwards, especially in the forests. Until the early 20th century, these fences were built of local materials, mainly whole trees and boulders, and we therefore call them whole-tree fences. Some of the barrier fences were used during periods of loose supervision by herders who otherwise practised intensive methods, while others were built in a context of extensive herding, large herds and conflicts over land use. Extensive reindeer herding was thus practised in the area much earlier than usually presumed, and it overlapped with intensive herding in both time and space.

  20. First Results of Modeling Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics with the SAMI3 Plasmasphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, C. M.; Glocer, A.; Huba, J.; Fok, M. C. H.; Kang, S. B.; Buzulukova, N.

    2017-12-01

    The radiation belts were one of the first discoveries of the Space Age some sixty years ago and radiation belt models have been improving since the discovery of the radiation belts. The plasmasphere is one region that has been critically important to determining the dynamics of radiation belt populations. This region of space plays a critical role in describing the distribution of chorus and magnetospheric hiss waves throughout the inner magnetosphere. Both of these waves have been shown to interact with energetic electrons in the radiation belts and can result in the energization or loss of radiation belt electrons. However, radiation belt models have been historically limited in describing the distribution of cold plasmaspheric plasma and have relied on empirically determined plasmasphere models. Some plasmasphere models use an azimuthally symmetric distribution of the plasmasphere which can fail to capture important plasmaspheric dynamics such as the development of plasmaspheric drainage plumes. Previous work have coupled the kinetic bounce-averaged Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model used to model ring current and radiation belt populations with the Block-adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATSRUS) global magnetohydrodynamic model to self-consistently obtain the magnetospheric magnetic field and ionospheric potential. The present work will utilize this previous coupling and will additionally couple the SAMI3 plasmasphere model to better represent the dynamics on the plasmasphere and its role in determining the distribution of waves throughout the inner magnetosphere. First results on the relevance of chorus, hiss, and ultralow frequency waves on radiation belt electron dynamics will be discussed in context of the June 1st, 2013 storm-time dropout event.

  1. Analysis of the economic adaptation of Sami reindeer management. Reindeer; source of income or cultural linkage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Labba

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this partial study is to analyse how the economies of different Sami reindeer management households are structured, and how the adaptation is structured if profit maximation is a goal. Earlier research demonstrates that different regions provides various terms. Consequently there exists a different economic structure among different households. Based on a selection of households from districts /villages from a range of geographical locations, management patterns, and region size, different economic structures are searched for. Households with similar economic structures are grouped in categories. The standard deviation confirms whether the grouping in categories. Sami Reindeer Management in Norway and Sweden has during the period from 1992/93 to 2002/03 provided recognized slaughterhouses with an even quantum of meat supply. That indicates that it probably is the same set of factors that influence the slaughter quantities of both countries. The relationship between the stock value of reindeer and the commercial value of reindeer meat, with in each household, suggests whether there is an accumulation in herd size and its magnitude. The herd increment depends on the competitive situation between the households in the district/village. As a single household cannot influence wholesale price of reindeer meat, the sales quantum is the single factor that can influence total sales. The efforts to increase herd size, due to the competitive situation, prevent the household from a maximum slaughter quantum, which thereby reduce the returns from reindeer management. Common factors for the different structures are sought for. The indication is that nether sale price of reindeer meat or line of politics influence sales quantum. The Sami reindeer herding seams to be a way of life were the size of the reindeer herd is in focus.Analys av den samiska renskötselns ekonomiska tillpassning. Renen, intäktskälla eller kulturfäste?Abstract in Swedish

  2. Rasked vestlused. Kuidas ma talle seda ütlen / Irene Metsis, Sami Seppänen, Peep Sooman ; intervjueerinud Heli Lehtsaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Metsis, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Skanska EMV administratsioonijuhi Irene Metsise, AS-i Elisa Eesti tegevdirektori Sami Seppäneni ja Pindi Kinnisvara juhatuse liikme Peep Soomani soovitused negatiivse sõnumi edastamiseks töötajale. Vt. samas: 4 nõuannet juhile, kuidas end keeruliseks vestluseks ette valmistada

  3. From conception to evaluation of mobile services for people with head injury: A participatory design perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussard, Pierre-Yves; Pigot, Hélène; Giroux, Sylvain

    2018-07-01

    Adults with cognitive impairments lack the means to organise their daily life, plan their appointments, cope with fatigue, and manage their budget. They manifest interest in using new technologies to be part of society. Unfortunately, the applications offered on smart phones are often beyond their cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to design a mobile cognitive assistant to enhance autonomy of people living with acquired traumatic brain injury. Participatory design methodologies guided this research by involving adults with cognitive impairments (CI) and their caregivers in the early stages of the design process. The population of the study is composed of four male adults who present cognitive impairments (three with head injury and one with stroke) and three caregivers. The first phase of this research was to design the Services Assistance Mobile and Intelligent (SAMI) application based on the needs expressed by the participants. During three focus groups, needs emerged concerning planning, health monitoring and money management and led to the implementation of assistive solutions on an Android mobile phone. During the second phase, the participants evaluated the mobile assistant SAMI at home for eight weeks. The results demonstrate that the participants were able to participate actively in the conception of SAMI and to use it successfully. People with CI showed a slight improvement in their life satisfaction. Due to the small number of participants, these promising results need to be confirmed by a larger-scale study.

  4. Aboveground and belowground legacies of native Sami land use on boreal forest in northern Sweden 100 years after abandonment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Ostlund, Lars; Kichenin, Emilie; Wardle, David A

    2014-04-01

    Human activities that involve land-use change often cause major transformations to community and ecosystem properties both aboveground and belowground, and when land use is abandoned, these modifications can persist for extended periods. However, the mechanisms responsible for rapid recovery vs. long-term maintenance of ecosystem changes following abandonment remain poorly understood. Here, we examined the long-term ecological effects of two remote former settlements, regularly visited for -300 years by reindeer-herding Sami and abandoned -100 years ago, within an old-growth boreal forest that is considered one of the most pristine regions in northern Scandinavia. These human legacies were assessed through measurements of abiotic and biotic soil properties and vegetation characteristics at the settlement sites and at varying distances from them. Low-intensity land use by Sami is characterized by the transfer of organic matter towards the settlements by humans and reindeer herds, compaction of soil through trampling, disappearance of understory vegetation, and selective cutting of pine trees for fuel and construction. As a consequence, we found a shift towards early successional plant species and a threefold increase in soil microbial activity and nutrient availability close to the settlements relative to away from them. These changes in soil fertility and vegetation contributed to 83% greater total vegetation productivity, 35% greater plant biomass, and 23% and 16% greater concentrations of foliar N and P nearer the settlements, leading to a greater quantity and quality of litter inputs. Because decomposer activity was also 40% greater towards the settlements, soil organic matter cycling and nutrient availability were further increased, leading to likely positive feedbacks between the aboveground and belowground components resulting from historic land use. Although not all of the activities typical of Sami have left visible residual traces on the ecosystem after

  5. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: a new method to estimate molecular gas surface densities from star formation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federrath, Christoph; Salim, Diane M.; Medling, Anne M.; Davies, Rebecca L.; Yuan, Tiantian; Bian, Fuyan; Groves, Brent A.; Ho, I.-Ting; Sharp, Robert; Kewley, Lisa J.; Sweet, Sarah M.; Richards, Samuel N.; Bryant, Julia J.; Brough, Sarah; Croom, Scott; Scott, Nicholas; Lawrence, Jon; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Goodwin, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Stars form in cold molecular clouds. However, molecular gas is difficult to observe because the most abundant molecule (H2) lacks a permanent dipole moment. Rotational transitions of CO are often used as a tracer of H2, but CO is much less abundant and the conversion from CO intensity to H2 mass is often highly uncertain. Here we present a new method for estimating the column density of cold molecular gas (Σgas) using optical spectroscopy. We utilize the spatially resolved Hα maps of flux and velocity dispersion from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. We derive maps of Σgas by inverting the multi-freefall star formation relation, which connects the star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR) with Σgas and the turbulent Mach number (M). Based on the measured range of ΣSFR = 0.005-1.5 {M_{⊙} yr^{-1} kpc^{-2}} and M=18-130, we predict Σgas = 7-200 {M_{⊙} pc^{-2}} in the star-forming regions of our sample of 260 SAMI galaxies. These values are close to previously measured Σgas obtained directly with unresolved CO observations of similar galaxies at low redshift. We classify each galaxy in our sample as 'star-forming' (219) or 'composite/AGN/shock' (41), and find that in 'composite/AGN/shock' galaxies the average ΣSFR, M and Σgas are enhanced by factors of 2.0, 1.6 and 1.3, respectively, compared to star-forming galaxies. We compare our predictions of Σgas with those obtained by inverting the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and find that our new method is a factor of 2 more accurate in predicting Σgas, with an average deviation of 32 per cent from the actual Σgas.

  6. Human-animal agency in reindeer management: Sami herders' perspectives on Fennoscandian tundra vegetation dynamics under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B. C.; Horstkotte, T.; Utsi, T. A.; Larsson-Blind, Å.; Burgess, P.; Käyhkö, J.; Oksanen, L.; Johansen, B.

    2016-12-01

    Many primary livelihoods in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions are increasingly faced with accelerating effects of climate change and resource exploitation. The often close connection between indigenous populations and the dynamics of their respective territories allows them to make detailed observations of how these changes transform the landscapes where they practice their daily activities. Here, we report Sami reindeer herders' observations based on their long-term occupancy and use of contrasting pastoral landscapes in northern Fennoscandia. In particular, we focus on the capacity for various herd management regimes to prevent a potential transformation of open tundra vegetation to shrubland or woodland. Fennoscandian Sami herders did not confirm a substantial, rapid or large-scale transformation of treeless arctic-alpine areas into shrub- and/or woodlands as a consequence of climate change. However, where encroachment of open tundra landscapes has been observed, a range of drivers were deemed responsible. These included abiotic conditions, anthropogenic influences and the direct and indirect effects of reindeer. Mountain birch tree line advances were in some cases associated with reduced or discontinued grazing, depending on the seasonal significance of these particular areas. In the many places where tree line has risen, herding practices have by necessity adapted to these changes. Exploiting the capacity of reindeer grazing/browsing as a conservation tool offers new adaptive strategies of ecosystem management to counteract a potential encroachment of the tundra by woody plants. However, such novel solutions in environmental governance are confronted with difficult trade-offs involved in ecosystem management for ecologically reasonable, economically viable and socially desirable management strategies.

  7. Temporal evolution of the EIA along 95°E as obtained from GNSS TEC measurements and SAMI3 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoti, Geetashree; Kalita, Bitap Raj; Hazarika, Rumajyoti; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay; Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra

    2018-06-01

    The total electron content (TEC) derived from GNSS measurements at a trans-hemispheric meridional chain of ground stations around 95°E longitude are used to study the quiet time inter-hemispheric structure and dynamics of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) during the period March 2015 to February 2016. The stations are Dibrugarh (27.5°N, 95°E, 43° dip), Kohima (25.6°N, 94.1°E, 39° dip), Aizawl (23.7°N, 92.8°E, 36° dip), Port Blair (11.63°N, 92.71°E, 9° dip) and Cocos Islands (12.2°S, 96.8°E, 43° dip). The observation shows that the northern crest of the EIA lies in the south of 23°N (Aizawl) in all seasons but recedes further south towards the equator during December solstice. The largest poleward expansion of the northern (southern) EIA is observed in the March equinox (December solstice). The equinoctial and hemispherical asymmetry of TEC is noted. The winter anomaly is observed in the northern hemisphere but not in the southern hemisphere. The highest midday TEC over any station is observed in the March equinox. The TEC in southern summer (December solstice) is significantly higher than that in the northern summer (June solstice). The observed northern EIA contracts equatorward in the postsunset period of solstice but the southern EIA persists late into the midnight in the December solstice. The asymmetry may be attributed to the different geographic location of the magnetically conjugate stations. The SAMI3 simulations broadly capture the EIA structure and the inter-hemispheric asymmetry during solstices. The difference between observations and the SAMI3 is higher in March equinox and December solstice. The higher E × B vertical drift in the 90-100°E sector and the large geographic-geomagnetic offset in observing stations may have contributed to the observed differences.

  8. Experiences of being a young male Sami reindeer herder: a qualitative study in perspective of mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Niclas; Ruong, Terje; Renberg, Ellinor Salander

    2013-01-01

    To explore experiences of what it is to be a young male Sami reindeer herder in Sweden, a group with previously known stigma and specific health issues, and to understand experiences in perspective of mental health. A qualitative content analysis was employed. Data were collected by in-depth interviews with 15 strategically selected reindeer herders aged 18-35 years old. The analysis resulted in 5 sub-themes: (a) being "inside" or "outside" is a question of identity; (b) a paradox between being free/bound; (c) an experience of various threats and a feeling of powerlessness; (d) specific norms for how a "real" reindeer herder should be; and (e) the different impacts and meanings of relations. The overarching theme is summarized thus: being a young reindeer herder means so many (impossible) dreams and conditions. Overall, the experience of the informants was that being a reindeer herder is a privileged position that also implies many impossibilities and unjust adversities they have no control over, and that there is nothing they can do but "bite the bullet or be a failure." Knowledge about this group's experiences can be used to understand difficulties faced by young reindeer herders and its consequences regarding mental health problems. This also implies a need for a broader perspective when discussing future interventions aimed at preventing mental health problems in this group.

  9. Experiences of being a young male Sami reindeer herder: a qualitative study in perspective of mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niclas Kaiser

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore experiences of what it is to be a young male Sami reindeer herder in Sweden, a group with previously known stigma and specific health issues, and to understand experiences in perspective of mental health. Methods. A qualitative content analysis was employed. Data were collected by in-depth interviews with 15 strategically selected reindeer herders aged 18–35 years old. Results. The analysis resulted in 5 sub-themes: (a being “inside” or “outside” is a question of identity; (b a paradox between being free/bound; (c an experience of various threats and a feeling of powerlessness; (d specific norms for how a “real” reindeer herder should be; and (e the different impacts and meanings of relations. The overarching theme is summarized thus: being a young reindeer herder means so many (impossible dreams and conditions. Overall, the experience of the informants was that being a reindeer herder is a privileged position that also implies many impossibilities and unjust adversities they have no control over, and that there is nothing they can do but “bite the bullet or be a failure.” Conclusions. Knowledge about this group's experiences can be used to understand difficulties faced by young reindeer herders and its consequences regarding mental health problems. This also implies a need for a broader perspective when discussing future interventions aimed at preventing mental health problems in this group.

  10. Autonomous Optofluidic Chemical Analyzers for Marine Applications: Insights from the Submersible Autonomous Moored Instruments (SAMI for pH and pCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ze Lai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The commercial availability of inexpensive fiber optics and small volume pumps in the early 1990's provided the components necessary for the successful development of low power, low reagent consumption, autonomous optofluidic analyzers for marine applications. It was evident that to achieve calibration-free performance, reagent-based sensors would require frequent renewal of the reagent by pumping the reagent from an impermeable, inert reservoir to the sensing interface. Pumping also enabled measurement of a spectral blank further enhancing accuracy and stability. The first instrument that was developed based on this strategy, the Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for CO2 (SAMI-CO2, uses a pH indicator for measurement of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2. Because the pH indicator gives an optical response, the instrument requires an optofluidic design where the indicator is pumped into a gas permeable membrane and then to an optical cell for analysis. The pH indicator is periodically flushed from the optical cell by using a valve to switch from the pH indicator to a blank solution. Because of the small volume and low power light source, over 8,500 measurements can be obtained with a ~500 mL reagent bag and 8 alkaline D-cell battery pack. The primary drawback is that the design is more complex compared to the single-ended electrode or optode that is envisioned as the ideal sensor. The SAMI technology has subsequently been used for the successful development of autonomous pH and total alkalinity analyzers. In this manuscript, we will discuss the pros and cons of the SAMI pCO2 and pH optofluidic technology and highlight some past data sets and applications for studying the carbon cycle in aquatic ecosystems.

  11. Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus feeding on lichens and mushrooms: traditional ecological knowledge among reindeer-herding Sami in northern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Inga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was performed in four reindeer-herding districts (Sami villages in northern Sweden. Reindeer herding Sami, born in 1950 or earlier, were interviewed about reindeer foraging behaviour on lichens and mushrooms, especially relating to non-summer grazing habits, and about characteristics of a good winter feeding ground. The informants claimed that lichens are preferably grazed in the wintertime, but that they also may be eaten in the summertime when the weather is cold and humid. Mushrooms were chosen in the autumn months August and September, but according to some informants mushrooms may also be eaten during late autumn (from Oct. when frozen and under the snow. The reindeer herders had different names for lichens, which in general terms describe their appearance and habitat. For mushrooms they only used one Sami name. Ground lichens preferred by reindeer are Cladonia species, while the nitrogen-fixing lichen species such as Nephroma arcticum and Stereocaulon pascale were said not to be preferred by the reindeer. Snow conditions are very important, and the less snow (and the softer it is, the better. Habitats where reindeer herders know from experience that snow conditions tend to be problematic, e.g. in moist and open areas with small trees, are used early in the winter (Oct.–Jan., before too much snow has accumulated. A good winter grazing area should have lichens. It is preferably a dry pine (Pinus sylvestris forest heath with large, old and wide-crowned trees to shelter the ground from snow and thereby ease the cratering by reindeer. Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: Renens (Rangifer tarandus tarandus bete av lavar och svampar: Traditionell ekologisk kunskap bland renskötande samer i norra Sverige Studien genomfördes i fyra renskötseldistrikt (samebyar i norra Sverige. Totalt 22 renskötande samer, födda 1950 eller tidigare, blev intervjuade om renens betande av lavar och svampar, renens vinterbete och om vad som karakt

  12. The multi-state energy landscape of the SAM-I riboswitch: A single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Christoph; Kobitski, Andrei Yu.; Samanta, Ayan; Jäschke, Andres; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2018-03-01

    RNA (ribonucleic acid) molecules are highly flexible biopolymers fluctuating at physiological temperatures among many different conformations that are represented by minima in a hierarchical conformational free energy landscape. Here we have employed single-molecule FRET (smFRET) to explore the energy landscape of the B. subtilis yitJ SAM-I riboswitch (RS). In this small RNA molecule, specific binding of an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) ligand in the aptamer domain regulates gene expression by inducing structural changes in another domain, the expression platform, causing transcription termination by the RNA polymerase. We have measured smFRET histograms over wide ranges of Mg2+ concentration for three RS variants that were specifically labeled with fluorescent dyes on different sites. In the analysis, different conformations are associated with discrete Gaussian model distributions, which are typically fairly broad on the FRET efficiency scale and thus can be extremely challenging to unravel due to their mutual overlap. Our earlier work on two SAM-I RS variants revealed four major conformations. By introducing a global fitting procedure which models both the Mg2+ concentration dependencies of the fractional populations and the average FRET efficiencies of the individual FRET distributions according to Mg2+ binding isotherms, we were able to consistently describe the histogram data of both variants at all studied Mg2+ concentrations. With the third FRET-labeled variant, however, we found significant deviations when applying the four-state model to the data. This can arise because the different FRET labeling of the new variant allows two states to be distinguished that were previously not separable due to overlap. Indeed, the resulting five-state model presented here consistently describes the smFRET histograms of all three variants as well as their variations with Mg2+ concentration. We also performed a triangulation of the donor position for two of the constructs

  13. Jsme opravdu sami?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 10 (2017) E-ISSN 1214-4029 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-05076S; GA ČR GA13-07724S Grant - others:Akademie věd - GA AV ČR(CZ) R200401721; Akademie věd - GA AV ČR(CZ) R200401521 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : methane on terrestrial planets * biomolecules * methane concentrations on Mars Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  14. Understanding "people" people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy; Waldroop, James

    2004-06-01

    Nearly all areas of business--not just sales and human resources--call for interpersonal savvy. Relational know-how comprises a greater variety of aptitudes than many executives think. Some people can "talk a dog off a meat truck," as the saying goes. Others are great at resolving interpersonal conflicts. Some have a knack for translating high-level concepts for the masses. And others thrive when they're managing a team. Since people do their best work when it most closely matches their interests, the authors contend, managers can increase productivity by taking into account employees' relational interests and skills when making personnel choices and project assignments. After analyzing psychological tests of more than 7,000 business professionals, the authors have identified four dimensions of relational work: influence, interpersonal facilitation, relational creativity, and team leadership. This article explains each one and offers practical advice to managers--how to build a well-balanced team, for instance, and how to gauge the relational skills of potential employees during interviews. To determine whether a job candidate excels in, say, relational creativity, ask her to describe her favorite advertising campaign, slogan, or image and tell you why she finds it to be so effective. Understanding these four dimensions will help you get optimal performance from your employees, appropriately reward their work, and assist them in setting career goals. It will also help you make better choices when it comes to your own career development. To get started, try the authors' free online assessment tool, which will measure both your orientation toward relational work in general and your interest level in each of its four dimensions.

  15. Sistema de control de gestión de riesgo para la prevención del lavado de activos en la cooperativa de ahorro y crédito Sumak Samy Ltda. de la ciudad de Ambato.

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo Sarabia, Patricia de las Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    1. Introducción. --2. Planteamiento de la Propuesta de Trabajo. --3. Marco Teórico. --4. Metodología. --5. Resultados. --6. Conclusiones y Recomendaciones. El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo fundamental el desarrollo de un Sistema de control de gestión de riesgo para la prevención del lavado de activos en la Cooperativa de Ahorro y Crédito Sumak Samy Ltda. en la ciudad de Ambato, el cual le permitirá a la cooperativa contar con el Nivel de riesgo de sus socios/clientes y aplicar polít...

  16. Evolution of Field-Aligned Electron and Ion Densities From Whistler Mode Radio Soundings During Quiet to Moderately Active Period and Comparisons With SAMI2 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A.; Sonwalkar, V. S.; Huba, J. D.

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge of field-aligned electron and ion distributions is necessary for understanding the physical processes causing variations in field-aligned electron and ion densities. Using whistler mode sounding by Radio Plasma Imager/Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (RPI/IMAGE), we determined the evolution of dayside electron and ion densities along L ˜ 2 and L ˜ 3 (90-4,000 km) during a 7 day (21-27 November 2005) geomagnetically quiet to moderately active period. Over this period the O+/H+ transition height was ˜880 ± 60 km and ˜1000 ± 100 km, respectively, at L ˜ 2 and L ˜ 3. The electron density varied in a complex manner; it was different at L ˜ 2 and L ˜ 3 and below and above the O+/H+ transition height. The measured electron and ion densities are consistent with those from Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and other past measurements, but they deviated from bottomside sounding and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 empirical model results. Using SAMI2 (Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) ionosphere model) with reasonably adjusted values of inputs (neutral densities, winds, electric fields, and photoelectron heating), we simulated the evolution of O+/H+ transition height and field-aligned electron and ion densities so that a fair agreement was obtained between the simulation results and observations. Simulation studies indicated that reduced neutral densities (H and/or O) with time limited O+-H charge exchange process. This reduction in neutral densities combined with changes in neutral winds and plasma temperature led to the observed variations in the electron and ion densities. The observation/simulation method presented here can be extended to investigate the role of neutral densities and composition, disturbed winds, and prompt penetration electric fields in the storm time ionosphere/plasmasphere dynamics.

  17. [Reduction of in-hospital mortality and improved secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction. First results from the registry of secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (SAMI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbe, U; Messer, C; Stammwitz, E; The, G S; Dietl, J; Bischoff, K-O; Schulten-Baumer, U; Tebbenjohanns, J; Gohlke, H; Bramlage, P

    2007-07-30

    In hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been reduced due to the availability of better therapeutic strategies. But there is still a gap between mortality rates in randomised trials and daily clinical practice. Thus, it was aim of the present registry to document the course and outcome of patients with AMI and to improve patient care by implementing recent guidelines. In a nationwide registry study in hospitals in Germany with a cardiology unit or an internal medicine department data on consecutive patients were recorded for six to twelve months at admission, discharge and during a follow-up of one year. From 02/2003 until 10/2004 a total of 5,353 patients with acute myocardial infarction (65.7 % male, mean age of 67.6 +/- 17.7 years; 55.1 % of them with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were included in the registry. Of the patients with STEMI, 76.6 % underwent acute intervention, 37.1 % had thrombolysis, 69.7 % percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). 40.0 % of those with non-Stemi (NSTEMI) had an acute intervention, 6.6 % thrombolysis, 73.5 % PTCA. Recommended secondary prevention consisted of ASS (93.2 %), beta-blockers (93.0 %), CSE-inhibitors (83.5 %), ACE-inhibitors (80.9 %) and clopidogrel (74.0 %). In-hospital mortality was 10.5 % (STEMI) and 7.4 % (NSTEMI). The 9 % mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in the hospitals participating in the SAMI registry is low compared to that in similar collectives. The high number of patients who had thrombofibrinolysis and coronary interventions as well as the early initiation of drug therapy contributed to these results. Medical treatment in the prehospital phase of these patients remains still insufficient and to a substantial extent contributes to the mortality of acute myocardial infarction.

  18. people | News

    Science.gov (United States)

    of Communication Fermilab news Search Useful links Symmetry magazine Interactions Interact people , people, building, Wilson Hall, farm, planter A John Deere planter is ready for work. Josh Frieman takes the experiment for the next two years. Controlled burn at Pine Street entrance May 9, 2018 Ryan

  19. People's Education (for People's Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thokozani Mathebula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The central feature of Athenian citizens' rights, that is, people's participation in government, is also enshrined in the South African Constitution. This article argues for the Athenian style of participatory democracy as a viable model of participation in governing South African schools. The author claims that 'people's education', which had its origins in the principles of the Freedom Charter¹ - was diluted during the negotiationsfor South Africa's new democratic government. As a result, the political and educational ideal of 'people's education for 'people's power' has given way to democratic elitism in post-apartheid South African schools.

  20. Little People of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information. World Dwarf Games 2017 Welcome to Little People of America Little People of America (LPA) is a nonprofit organization that provides support and information to people of short stature and their families. LPA is ...

  1. People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People with Disabilities Share Ending Chronic Homelessness Among People with Disabilities Last updated on May 31, 2018 We can end homelessness for people with disabilities in our communities who experience recurring ...

  2. Healthy Pets and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent the spread of germs between pets and people. Keep pets and their supplies out of the kitchen, and ... a local wildlife rehabilitation facility. More Information Healthy Pets Healthy People Clean Hands Save Lives! Stay Healthy at Animal ...

  3. Transgender People (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best support your child. For people who are transgender, the realization that they feel different from others also can be very difficult. They may face rejection, discrimination, and even anger from people who don't ...

  4. The 100 People Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Keri

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the 100 People Project and how the author integrates the project in her class. The 100 People Project is a nonprofit organization based in New York City. The organization poses the question: If there were only 100 people in the world, what would the world look like? Through the project, students were taught about ethics in…

  5. Introduction: people at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.C.W.; Jonge, de J.; Taris, A.W.; Peeters, M.; Jonge, de J.; Taris, T.

    2014-01-01

    For as long as mankind has existed, people have worked. Needless to say the nature of work has changed tremendously: our ancestors were mostly hunters and collectors, nowadays people work with data, ‘goods’ or other people, or provide services. What has not changed is that we still spend a

  6. Armin Karu on Baltian kasinokeisari / Sami Lotila

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lotila, Sami

    2008-01-01

    Kasiinokultuuri Eestisse toonud Olympic Casino omanik ja juht Armin Karu, kasiinoäri algusaastad ja areng Eestis. Hasartmängukorraldajate õigused ja võimalused Eestis ja Soomes. Edetabel: Eesti kasiinoäride top

  7. Power to the people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Looking for an edge in the highly competitive North Sea oil and gas market has sector companies turning to a sometimes overlooked asset - people. OE opens its latest north east Scotland review with a look at how the Investors in People programme is boosting some companies' 'business performance'. (Author)

  8. Psychodrama with Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Lynette; Robinson, Luther D.

    1971-01-01

    Observations based on psychodrama with deaf people, relating to interaction between people and the communication process, are made. How role training skills, which involve some of the skills of psychodrama, can be applied by professionals in vocational and social learning situations is illustrated. (KW)

  9. Older people. Courtesy entitles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calnan, Michael; Woolhead, Gillian; Dieppe, Paul

    2003-02-20

    A study of 72 people, with an average age of 72, showed that dignity--and lack of it--were key issues in their estimation of care. Concerns about lack of dignity centred on lack of privacy, mixed sex wards, forms of address and loss of independence. The study suggested that older people do not complain about care for fear of retaliation.

  10. People on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Audrey

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this 2-3 day lesson is to introduce students in Grades 2-4 to the idea that people move around the world for a variety of reasons. In this activity, students explore why people move through class discussion, a guided reading, and interviews. The teacher elicits student ideas using the compelling question (Dimension 1 of the C3…

  11. People and oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul F. Starrs

    2015-01-01

    While technical knowledge of oaks, acorns, habitat, wildlife, and woodland environments is evolving and a sought-after field of study, there are profound linkages, at once humanistic and artistic, where it comes to people and oaks. Looking at six distinct facets of humans and oak woodlands, this essay suggests that the bonds of people to place can be mediated by the...

  12. Managing & Developing People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, Gill, Ed.

    This book presents ideas about and approaches to human resource management (HRM) in British further education (FE) colleges. Introductory material includes author biographies and a preface (Brain) on human resource issues in FE. "Investors in People" (Chambers) considers how working toward recognition as an Investor in People (a British…

  13. Disparities -- Healthy People 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health based on their racial or ethnic group; religion; socioeconomic status; gender; age; mental health; cognitive, sensory, ... Contact Us Site Map Accessibility Privacy Policy Disclaimers Freedom of Information Act Healthy People 2010 Archive Nondiscrimination ...

  14. People and Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NatureScope, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Discusses people's relationship with oceans, focusing on ocean pollution, use, and protective measures of the sea and its wildlife. Activities included are "Mythical Monsters"; "Globetrotters"; "Plastic in the Sea"; and "Sea of Many Uses." (RT)

  15. OFDA People-Trak

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — People-Trak HRIS is a workforce management tool. It will provide tracking and management tools for recruiting, training, contact info, performance, travel monitoring...

  16. Organizing homeless people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    People who are homeless belong to some of the most vulnerable, dispersed and disorganized groups in welfare societies. Yet in 2001, a national interest organization of homeless people was formed for the first time in Denmark. This article identifies the processes that facilitated the formation...... of the organization. It focuses on the importance of ideological and institutional conditions and changes, and it stresses the importance of alliances between progressive actors in the field and in the political-administrative system, in addition to the presence of dedicated activists among people who are or have...... been homeless. The analysis may thus serve as a case of inspiration for activists and professionals who want to improve homeless people's opportunities for participation in other national settings....

  17. Making people be healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Timothy Martin

    2009-09-01

    How are we supposed to decide the rights and wrongs of banning smoking in bars, restricting adverts for junk food, nagging people into being screened for cancers, or banning the sale of party pills? The aim of this paper is to think through the political ethics of trying to make people healthier through influencing or restricting their choices. This paper covers: (1) Paternalism. What it is, what it assumes. (2) The place of health in well-being, and how this makes paternalism problematic. (3) The mistakes people make in acting in their own interests, and the implications for pro-health paternalism. (4) Autonomy objections to paternalism. The paper (5) finishes on a note of hope, by commending the currently fashionable libertarian paternalism: trying to have one's carrot cake and eat it too. A persistent theme is that thinking sensibly about making people healthier needs subtlety, not broad, ringing declarations.

  18. People Are a Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Clarence

    1979-01-01

    This is a description of a model for demonstrating an approach to improving slums in Indonesia and the Philippines. The strategy of using people rather than financial capital as a resource is discussed. (SA)

  19. Marginalised people: solo exhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith-Vula, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    I was awarded the prestigious Sargant Fellowship at the British School in Rome (2001). My project involved bringing people at the margins of society, mainly Albanian refugees and immigrants, into locations where their destitution would appear incongruous in relation to displays of high art. My aim was to photograph these people, in settings that revealed their innate dignity, whilst challenging gallery visitors’ perceptions of appropriate audiences for high culture. I wanted to open my subje...

  20. Policing Transgender People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Miles-Johnson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Police policy documents often articulate strategies and approaches that police organizations want to implement in their efforts to break down barriers with minority groups. However, most police policy documents are written for police audiences and not for members of the public. Police policy documents serve as a reflection of the aspirations of the agency and not necessarily the practice of the officers. Differential policing has been a salient experience for members of transgender communities because, as individuals who express gender in ways that deviate from the norm, they have experienced numerous documented cases of police mismanaged practice. In Australia, achieving police reform in the area of policing of diverse community groups has been difficult as new initiatives implemented to educate police officers about diverse groups such as transgender communities are scarce. My study sought to analyze a police policy document to assess how one police agency’s policy aspires to shape police contact/experiences with transgender people and how this document might shape intergroup identity differences between transgender people and the police. It is argued that the policy document will negatively affect police perceptions of transgender people and may enhance adverse perceptions of intergroup difference between police and transgender people. I also argue that using this document to achieve police reform in the area of policing of transgender people will be problematic as the policy document lacks substantial procedural guidelines regarding interaction with transgender people and may not favorably constrain discretionary police power.

  1. Overview of session and situation in Fukushima. Stakeholder Involvement and the CRPPH: A Learning Process - From Chernobyl to Fukushima. Public dialogue and policy making: The UK's Science-wise programme. Post-Chernobyl experience: Sami reindeer herders in Norway. JAEC's initiative to encourage public understanding in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayano, Ryugo; Boyd, Mike; ); Mayall, Andrew; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya; Oughton, Deborah; Liland, Astrid; Skuterud, Lavrans; Eikelmann, Inger; Kawabuchi, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    situations and take decisions. Professionals may need to mount a steep learning curve to provide information and guidance in an accessible way, but engaging in the exchange and dialogue can lead to better, more effective protection decisions. Another example of the need for government, experts and local populations to work together on addressing radiological protection concerns was found in Norway following the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Ms Tomkiv highlighted the success of the Norwegian government's intervention with Sami reindeer herders, and discussed how a flexible approach, sensitive to stakeholder needs, produced decisions that significantly improved the livelihoods and also the well-being of these herders. Reindeer meat in Norway, a key food source for the Sami indigenous population, had high levels of radiation contamination following the accident. The Norwegian government provided compensation to farmers who lost their herd due to mandatory slaughter of animals with high exposure levels; raised the intervention level to 6000 Becquerel per kilogram for reindeer meat in Norway; changed slaughter season from winter to autumn; and fed reindeer caesium binders in order to prevent transfer of caesium into meat. These successful and effective protection decisions were built with and accepted by the Sami reindeer herders of Norway and allowed them to maintain their traditional livelihood and culture. Mr Kawabuchi, representing Japan's Atomic Energy Commission, described how the commission has worked to improve messaging and transparency regarding nuclear power. In response to the public's concern about nuclear safety following Fukushima, Japan's Atomic Energy Commission has promoted relations with the public through interactive dialogue, open meetings that are broadcast live on the internet, and a knowledge-based internet offering intended to be accessible to both the general public and experts

  2. Research with Arctic peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, H Sally; Bjerregaard, Peter; Chan, Hing Man

    2006-01-01

    Arctic peoples are spread over eight countries and comprise 3.74 million residents, of whom 9% are indigenous. The Arctic countries include Canada, Finland, Greenland (Denmark), Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the United States. Although Arctic peoples are very diverse, there are a variety...... of environmental and health issues that are unique to the Arctic regions, and research exploring these issues offers significant opportunities, as well as challenges. On July 28-29, 2004, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research co-sponsored a working group...... entitled "Research with Arctic Peoples: Unique Research Opportunities in Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders". The meeting was international in scope with investigators from Greenland, Iceland and Russia, as well as Canada and the United States. Multiple health agencies from Canada and the United States...

  3. Rehabilitation and older people.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, J.

    1996-01-01

    Rehabilitation is concerned with lessening the impact of disabling conditions. These are particularly common in older people and considerable health gain can be achieved by successful rehabilitation. Hospital doctors and general practitioners should be aware of the core principles of rehabilitation, be able to recognise rehabilitation need in their patients, and have sufficient knowledge of their local rehabilitation services to trigger the referral process.

  4. Drugs and Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  5. Esperanto and Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Ilona

    1978-01-01

    Research has indicated that the elderly retain the ability to learn, and specifically to learn new languages. Furthermore, the increasingly greater proportion of old people in the population demands that their need for continued intellectual stimulation be met. In the absence of explicit motives for learning an ethnic language, Esperanto is a good…

  6. Plants and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Lynch

    2012-01-01

    Salal! Salmonberries! Sword ferns! The Northwest is home to a great number of native plant species that humans have used for centuries. Sadly, many local children are unaware of the history and culture connecting people and plants. Yet, from the beginning of time, plants have provided us food, medicine, and material for clothing, shelter, transportation, decoration,...

  7. Pneumonia in Immunocompromised People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer and the chemotherapy drugs used to treat cancer Defects in white blood cells Diseases, such as AIDS Certain drugs (such as corticosteroids, chemotherapy drugs, and drugs used to treat autoimmune or connective tissue disorders) Causes In people with a weakened immune ...

  8. People who use

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. People who use. Three companies are employing the technologies in India. One company is in the advanced stages in being able to commercialize the products in Malaysia shortly. Some new collaborations are being built.

  9. People and renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenvald, Avo

    2002-01-01

    The use of renewable energy is tightly connected to solving social problems in Estonia by creating more new jobs. It is essential that Estonia should increase the use of biofuels. One of the biofuels, firewood, has been used already for centuries. For wider use of renewable energy in Estonia, it is not enough to rely only on enterprices. Rather, before any serious progress can take place, the state should create the appropriate legal environment. Due to its many social and environmental aspects, renewable energy is more important to the state than a sole enterprice. Unfortunately, Estonian government has been delaying its duties. Estonia has two resources that should be taken advantage of, fertile spare land and people still used to the country life. The country people would get work by growing different energy crops on the spare land. (author)

  10. Trust is other people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckner, Naemi; Werner, Katharina; Subasi, Özge

    concerning the interaction with strangers through the platform. Putting trust in an online sharing community seems to be the biggest obstacle that influences whether people draw away rather than move closer together and start collaborating in the sharing community. Here, we report on the main issues...... involving other participants in the hope to find appropriate ways to create trustful sharing environments that reassure potential participants rather than play into their fears....

  11. Do People Like Nudges?

    OpenAIRE

    Sunstein, Cass Robert

    2015-01-01

    n recent years, there has been a great deal of debate about the ethical questions associated with “nudges,” understood as approaches that steer people in certain directions while fully maintaining freedom of choice. Evidence about people’s views cannot resolve the ethical questions, but in democratic societies, those views will inevitably affect what governments are willing to do. Existing evidence, including a nationally representative survey conducted for this essay, supports five general c...

  12. Parasites, Plants, and People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marion; Moore, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Anthelminthic resistance is acknowledged worldwide and is a major problem in Aotearoa New Zealand, thus alternative parasite management strategies are imperative. One Health is an initiative linking animal, human, and environmental health. Parasites, plants, and people illustrate the possibilities of providing diverse diets for stock thereby lowering parasite burdens, improving the cultural wellbeing of a local community, and protecting the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Technology for helping people

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    The first THE Port hackathon problem-solving workshop was held at CERN from 31 October to 2 November in the framework of the 60th anniversary celebrations. The aim of the event was to develop technological projects that can help to solve the day-to-day needs of people living in areas of the planet that experience conflicts or natural disasters.   Collage of shots from THE Port hackathon. Credit: THE Port association The event was dedicated to humanitarian and social topics inspired by members of non-governmental organisations‬. “There is plenty of room for technology to help in humanitarian fields. That’s why we came up with the idea of bringing people together to work on these topics,” explains Ines Knäpper, Project Manager of THE Port hackathon. “We started six months ago setting up THE Port association.* The success of the event was only possible because of the joint effort of a team of roughly twenty people. They were inspired by the aim...

  14. Territories, Peoples, Sovereignty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabino Cassese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nation States have three defining characteristics: government of a territory, rapport with a group of people and ownership of a sovereign power. All three of these characteristics are undergoing changes. Several developments involve a redefinition of the “State” and produce numerous contradictions, which can only be solved if we consider the historicity of both the phenomenal essence and the conceptual essence of the State. We need to rethink and reconceptualise the State within the context of the new tendencies and transformations delineated by globalisation.

  15. Flu and People with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu and People with Diabetes Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), even ...

  16. 完美假期:游走拉普兰(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony; Ham; 寒星

    2017-01-01

    本期,咱们继续游走拉普兰,再一次感受那来自冰封荒野的呼唤。Inari:Best for Sami culture No one knows Lapland like its original inhabitants,the Sami people.They have probably lived as far north as you can go in Finland for the last 11,000 years,1)roaming with their reindeer across the icy plains.The quiet town of Inari serves as the capital for Finland’s Sami.The story of the Sami is not best reflected in

  17. Peopling Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Biehl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The field of Global Health brings together a vastly diverse array of actors working to address pressing health issues worldwide with unprecedented financial and technological resources and informed by various agendas. While Global Health initiatives are booming and displacing earlier framings of the field (such as tropical medicine or international health, critical analyses of the social, political, and economic processes associated with this expanding field — an “open source anarchy” on the ground — are still few and far between. In this essay, we contend that, among the powerful players of Global Health, the supposed beneficiaries of interventions are generally lost from view and appear as having little to say or nothing to contribute. We make the case for a more comprehensive and people-centered approach and demonstrate the crucial role of ethnography as an empirical lantern in Global Health. By shifting the emphasis from diseases to people and environments, and from trickle-down access to equality, we have the opportunity to set a humane agenda that both realistically confronts challenges and expands our vision of the future of global communities.

  18. Shielding: people and shelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krissdottir, M; Simon, J

    1977-01-01

    Housing is something that protects and defends. This book explores the ways in which humans have sought to defend themselves against physical dangers and to protect themselves against the imagined evils of the natural world by means of the shelters built. The book examines briefly the shelters built in ancient times, and shows how several basic types recurred in different ages and at different times. Following this there is a brief survey of the kinds of shelters built by the native peoples of Canada, depending on their environment--climate, the natural materials on hand--and the culture and life-style of each people. The next chapter explores the psychology of human beings, and how shelters should satisfy not only physical needs but psychological needs as well--the need for companionship and yet for privacy, space for children to play and community centers for adults to meet. The second half of the book looks at the dilemmas of housing today, and at various attempts around the world and in Canada to solve the problems--garden cities in England, the famous community of Tapiola in Finland, the technological innovations of Disneyland, new housing suburbs in Canada. There is a discussion of the problems of urban renewal, of overcoming the high cost of home-ownership--condominiums, cooperatives, owner-built homes, and the disadvantages of trailers--and of overcoming the energy crisis by building ecological houses.

  19. The peopling of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The peopling of Greenland has a complex history shaped by population migrations, isolation and genetic drift. The Greenlanders present a genetic heritage with components of European and Inuit groups; previous studies using uniparentally inherited markers in Greenlanders have reported evidence...... of a sex-biased, admixed genetic background. This work further explores the genetics of the Greenlanders by analysing autosomal and X-chromosomal data to obtain deeper insights into the factors that shaped the genetic diversity in Greenlanders. Fourteen Greenlandic subsamples from multiple geographical...... settlements were compared to assess the level of genetic substructure in the Greenlandic population. The results showed low levels of genetic diversity in all sets of the genetic markers studied, together with an increased number of X-chromosomal loci in linkage disequilibrium in relation to the Danish...

  20. People of the Delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, L.

    2007-09-15

    The potential impacts of both global warming and the $16 billion Mackenzie pipeline project on communities in the Mackenzie Delta were discussed. A consortium of oil and gas developers is now planning to exploit the natural gas reserves located near the mouth of the Delta, whose largest town is Inuvik. The project is expected to place a significant burden on the resources and infrastructure of the town, which currently has a population of 6000. The community, comprised of a diverse international population and an Inuit majority, is largely in favour of the pipeline project. The Inuvialuit people have invested a significant amount of time to ensure that the project, which was stalled due to land claims in 1977, benefits their communities. Public hearings are now being held to consider the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of the project. Separate hearings are also being held to consider the project's design. The pipeline project includes 3 natural gas production facilities, a gas-processing facility, a pipeline gathering system, a 480 km natural gas liquids pipeline to the Northwest Territories, and a 1220 km natural gas pipeline to northern Alberta. The pipeline will be buried to minimize environmental impacts. The project is expected to create 8200 jobs at the height of its construction. However, communities located near the site of the natural gas reserves, such as the town of Tuktoyaktuk are now threatened by soil erosion that has been attributed to global warming. 21 figs.

  1. People Capability Maturity Model. SM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    tailored so it consumes less time and resources than a traditional software process assessment or CMU/SEI-95-MM-02 People Capability Maturity Model...improved reputation or customer loyalty. CMU/SEI-95-MM-02 People Capability Maturity Model ■ L5-17 Coaching Level 5: Optimizing Activity 1...Maturity Model CMU/SEI-95-MM-62 Carnegie-Mellon University Software Engineering Institute DTIC ELECTE OCT 2 7 1995 People Capability Maturity

  2. Do People Want Optimal Deterrence?

    OpenAIRE

    Sunstein, Cass Robert; Schkade, David; Kahneman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Two studies test whether people believe in optimal deterrence. The first provides people with personal injury cases that are identical except for variations in the probability of detection and explores whether lower probability cases produce higher punitive damage awards and whether higher probability cases produce lower awards. No such effect is observed. The second asks people whether they agree or disagree with administrative and judicial policies that increase penalties when the probabili...

  3. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  4. People\\'s Participation in Rural Development: The Examples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    People\\'s Participation in Rural Development: The Examples from Mafikeng. PG Mpolokeng. Abstract. No Abstract Available African Journal of Political Science Vol.8(2) 2003: 55-86. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading .

  5. People's Education (for People's Power)--A Promise Unfulfilled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathebula, Thokozani

    2013-01-01

    The central feature of Athenian citizens' rights, that is, people's participation in government, is also enshrined in the South African Constitution. This article argues for the Athenian style of participatory democracy as a viable model of participation in governing South African schools. The author claims that "people's education",…

  6. How Do People Get AIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español How Do People Get AIDS? KidsHealth / For Teens / How Do People Get AIDS? Print en español ¿Cómo contrae alguien el SIDA? AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome , a disease that ...

  7. Effective Communication with Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Patrick; Elliott, David

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government established the Office for Youth (the Office) in September 2008 in an effort to engage with the young people of Australia. The Office will work with other government agencies to help young people reach their full potential; make effective transitions to adulthood as they continue to learn, start work, make decisions that…

  8. African Peoples and Western Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwauchi, P. Chike

    1972-01-01

    Argues that if the educational process is to be functionally relevant for the African peoples, it must be structured so as to maintain a dynamic pattern of continuity with the family and the cultural life patterns of the people. (Author/JM)

  9. Cognitive assessment of older people

    OpenAIRE

    Young, John; Meagher, David; MacLullich, Alasdair J

    2011-01-01

    peer-reviewed Cognitive assessment involves examination of higher cortical functions, particularly memory, attention, orientation, language, executive function (planning activities), and praxis (sequencing of activities). This article will focus on cognitive assessment of older people (those aged over about 65 years) in the context of possible dementia, delirium, and depression. These are common and serious clinical syndromes affecting older people, and accurate cognit...

  10. Disabled people - rehabilitation with sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Łosień

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sport was used to complement  therapy in original form, improve of motor patterns and reeducate functions of people with disabilities. With a passing of time, sport evolved to integrated part of rehabilitation as an element of improvement. Moreover, he became as a tool to improve the social integration of people which finished the treatment or/and have deficits. We can notice the huge sport development of people with disabilities, which was initiated by Sir Ludwig Guttmann’s who claimed that view of sport is equal for people with disabilities and able-bodied people. The quality of physical activity of people with disabilities is indicated by motor preparation, training and sport (wellness, nutritionist, sport and exercise psychologist which currently is all the same except individual approach to particular dysfunction of the person with disability. Sport allow to develop not only physical sphere, but also teaches social integration, teamwork skills, self-discipline, improves the quality of life and outcome of the  ADL scale (activities of daily living scale of people with disabilities which do sport actively. The variety of sports disciplines and ability to use appropriate orthopedic stuff allows to activate people with every kind of disabilities and dysfunction.

  11. Young people and sexual orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Young people and sexual orientation The Netherlands Institute for Social Research ¦ SCP carries out regular research on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In this report, the focus is on young people in the Netherlands. The report addresses two issues:

  12. What's different about older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crome, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Older people can be regarded as a marginalised group within society from a number of perspectives including that of health. When it comes to the use of medication older people have suffered from a double whammy. Not only are they more at risk from the adverse effects of drugs but also their involvement in clinical trials has been limited so that rational prescribing both to maximise benefit and to reduce risk has been problematic. Their special problems have been recognised formerly by the Department of Health in its NSF for Older People [National Service Framework for Older People. Department of Health, London (2001a)], [Medicines and Older People. Implementing medicines-related aspects of the NSF for Older People. Department of Health (2001b)]. Early studies focussed on compliance, the avoidance of poly-pharmacy and the high prevalence of adverse effects of drugs and the reasons for this. Studies in long-stay patients showed dramatic differences in pharmacokinetics between such older people and young healthy volunteers. Initially such differences were ascribed to age alone and the overall message became "start low and go slow". Studies in healthy older people then revealed that age differences in drug metabolism were, as a rule, not so marked although clearance of renally excreted drugs was reduced in line with the age associated decline in renal function. Including older people in clinical trials poses challenges. Many traditional trialists do not have ready access to older people, co-morbidity and poly-pharmacy are common and most people feel reluctant to ask older people to take part in complex and potentially hazardous trials. Concern about compliance is unwarranted. Adverse events may be more serious. Thus in a younger patient postural hypotension may make a subject unsteady but in an older subject the unsteadiness may lead to a fall, the fall to a fracture, and the fracture to poor recovery. The choice of end-points is crucial. Although reduction of

  13. French people and energy issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnais, L.

    2006-01-01

    An opinion poll made in France in 2006 shows that: - French people backs nuclear energy with a slight margin (45% versus 42%), - French people agrees with the electricity production policy led by the government, - about 4 people out of 10 expect a sharp increase in prices concerning car fuels, natural gas and heating fuels in a near future, on the other hand fewer people than in previous years are expecting a price rise for electricity. In this article some figures concerning the consumption of energy in France are given: - 230.000 jobs are directly or indirectly involved in the energy sector, this sector represents 5% of all investment, - a total bill of 24 milliard euros for the energy imports, and - energy spending represents 7.6% of the household budget. (A.C.)

  14. Drug Policy and Indigenous Peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Julian; Kapron, Mary

    2017-06-01

    This paper identifies the principal concerns of indigenous peoples with regard to current international treaties on certain psychoactive substances and policies to control and eradicate their production, trafficking, and sale. Indigenous peoples have a specific interest in the issue since their traditional lands have become integrated over time into the large-scale production of coca, opium poppy, and cannabis crops, in response to high demand from the American and European markets, among others. As a consequence, indigenous peoples are persecuted because of their traditional use of these and other plant-based narcotics and hallucinogens. They are also victims of the drug producers who remove them from their lands or forcibly recruit them into the production process. As indigenous peoples are caught in the violent world of illicit drug production, law enforcement often targets them first, resulting in disproportionate rates of criminalization and incarceration.

  15. French people and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Iribarne, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    On March 21, 2005, the French minister of industry gave to the author of this document, the mission to shade a sociological light on the radioactive wastes perception by French people. The objective of this study was to supply an additional information before the laying down in 2006 of the decisions about the management of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes. This inquiry, carried out between April 2004 and March 2005, stresses on the knowledge and doubts of the questioned people, on the vision they have of radioactive wastes and of their hazards, and on their opinion about the actors in concern (experts, nuclear companies, government, anti-nuclear groups, public). The last two parts of the report consider the different ways of waste management under study today, and the differences between the opinion of people living close to the Bure site and the opinion of people living in other regions. (J.S.)

  16. Anthrax, People and Dead Hippos

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-07

    Epidemiologist, Dr. Melissa Marx, discuses anthrax deaths in people who ate dead hippos.  Created: 11/7/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/7/2017.

  17. Flu and People with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu and People with Asthma Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Take Steps to Fight the Flu What is Asthma? Asthma is a lung disease that is caused ...

  18. Young People with a Twist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bo Wagner; Madsen, Diana Højlund

    The report is based on group interviews with 33 young people with ethnic minority backgrounds. They have been asked about their educational and vocational wishes and also touch on a number of issues such as family, gender equality, discrimination and integration.......The report is based on group interviews with 33 young people with ethnic minority backgrounds. They have been asked about their educational and vocational wishes and also touch on a number of issues such as family, gender equality, discrimination and integration....

  19. Young People Volunteering in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Riiser, Nina Milling

    2011-01-01

    Socio economic conditions in Uganda causes the youth to be caught between childhood and adulthood. They are young people moving towards adulthood, with no option of becoming independent. How does volunteering affect the youth and why does the youth volunteer? Does the youth get closer to adulthood by volunteering and what di they gain? Socio economic conditions in Uganda causes the youth to be caught between childhood and adulthood. They are young people moving towards adulthood, with no o...

  20. Chalearn looking at people 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escalera, Sergio; Fabian, Junior; Baro, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Following previous series on Looking at People (LAP) competitions [14, 13, 11, 12, 2], in 2015 ChaLearn ran two new competitions within the field of Looking at People: (1) age estimation, and (2) cultural event recognition, both in still images. We developed a crowd-sourcing application to collect...... by the participants of the competition. Details of the ChaLearn LAP competitions can be found at http://gesture.chalearn.org/....

  1. Young people in adult education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Mrgole

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of young people participating in adult education programmes has, in the recent years, raised the question of transfer from regular education system to labour market where a large proportion of young people remain socially marginalized and isolated. Young people in adult education are a special target group; in order to plan educational programmes properly, we need to be familiar with their specific characteristics. The article, on the level of a statistical data outline and its paradoxes, introduces the category of young people in adult education as an impact of system factors, and defines related problems in the register, which - for more thorough understanding - dictates sociologically and anthropologically directed analytical approach. The first effect of this, not solely pedagogical view, is presented in the second part of the article, where Mrgole proposes an analysis of educational needs definition and its dangerous consequences in original planning of educational programmes. The concluding part takes a wider perspective and treats the factors of early school-leaving of young people, taking into consideration direct experience in experimental educational programmes for the young. The article ends with an outline of basic elements which the planners of andragogical educational programmes intended for young people should consider in their planning to achieve effective curricula.

  2. ICT Interface Design for Ageing People and People with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jonathan; Mulvenna, Maurice D.; Martin, Suzanne; Stephens, Sharon; Burns, William

    Ageing population trends, rising healthcare costs and social and digital inclusion are all factors in the background to the problem of older adults interacting with technology. Approaches to address "physical accessibility" and "access to technology" issues, as well as training for existing systems are evident, yet a usability issue still prevails. The primary aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the research and literature and discuss the differing contexts in which older people and people with dementia interact with computerised systems and their associated issues.

  3. SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazire Diker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to question the living conditions of disabled people in the 21st century from  the framework of social justice. The concept of “social justice” has a long history, influenced  by the works of numerous writers including Rawls (1971, Miller (1999, Reeves (2005, Fainstein (2009, Marcuse (2009 and Harvey (1992, 2009 and by the recent debates on  inequality, diversity, segregation, exclusion, and discrimination. The debates on segregation, exclusion and discrimination are generally focused on inequalities in terms of economic,  ethnic and gender dimensions; however, in these debates, there is very little reference to unequal opportunities of disabled people. On the other hand, the diversity issue is generally discussed with respect to ethnic and cultural elements, again with very little concern for the  rights of disabled people. In many developing countries, including Turkey, a legal framework  for addressing disability issues has started to be put in place. Awareness among governments and society of the needs and rights of people with disabilities is growing. In the  last decade in Turkey, the difficulties faced by disabled people have started to be taken into  consideration seriously. Before that, the only information about the disabled population could  be obtained from General Population Census in Turkey. In 2002 “Turkey Disability Survey” was carried out collectively by the State Institute of Statistics and the Presidency of  Administration on Disabled People. In this survey, it has been targeted to estimate the number of disabled people and comprehend their socio-economic characteristics, their  problems in social life, expectations, types and causes of disability, regional differences and also the proportion of population having chronic illnesses. After this survey, many projects  have started to be realized in order to propose strategies for eliminating discrimination in  Turkey. In this paper, we will

  4. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    How and why we teach An interview with Mick Nott conducted by David Sang Mick Nott teaches at Sheffield Hallam University. He is editor of School Science Review, and over the last three years he has been organizing a website, book and display for the ASE's Science Teacher Festival. Mick Nott You studied Logic with Physics as your undergraduate degree course, at Sussex, at the end of the 1960s. Wasn't this a rather unusual choice? At school, I loved chemistry, particularly physical chemistry. However, physical chemistry didn't love me when I studied it at university. I grew resentful of the demands made on me with the overcrowded morning lecture programme that was mainly a board-copying exercise and the afternoon hours of labs. I felt stifled; there didn't seem to be any space to express oneself. I wanted a course that allowed me some freedom of thought. So in the summer of 1969 I transferred to the Logic with Physics course. Alongside our 'straight' physics we studied the history of topics like atomic and quantum theory, thermodynamics, mechanics from the Greeks to the Newtonian synthesis and we also had a couple of units in the sociology of science. Amongst the set texts of our first class in the summer of 1969 was Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Now well worn with its cover repaired by sticky tape, it still rests on my bookshelves. Reading Kuhn, I understood why I had been dissatisfied with my chemistry course. If I wanted to make it in chemistry I was going to have to conform to thinking exactly like all the other chemists. That wasn't for me. What attracted you into teaching? And where did you teach? I think it was a vocation in that, from the age of 15, I could imagine myself in the role and it was a job I could 'see' myself doing. Now thinking back I suppose it was an obvious way in which a working class child could transcend class barriers. I did my postgraduate teacher training at Sussex because it was assessed by coursework and classroom competence (in the early 1970s most such courses still had written examinations). I thought it was fantastic. We spent three days a week from October to May in one school. I had one regular third-year class every week and the rest of my teaching timetable varied from term to term. It was like being a 0.3/0.4 member of staff and for that one third-year class I had to do parents' evenings, reports etc. The teachers were paid to act as tutors for the preparation of schemes of work, lessons and tutorial work and they assessed my teaching. Teachers, tutors and trainees attended seminars together. My first teaching job was at Holland Park School in London, at a time when it was famous, perhaps even infamous! It was a real baptism of fire - over 2000 pupils, tens of different first languages, a real mix of class and ethnicity, and newly introduced mixed ability teaching for the first three years. We worked very hard writing schemes of work and developing worksheets and audiovisual materials but, on reflection, I am not sure that we were that effective in developing the science curriculum. I remember using Nuffield Combined Science with the first two years and that was in danger of becoming death by a thousand worksheets. After three years I went to teach in a small private school in Madrid for a year. I was the physics department and my title of Head of Physics meant I was in charge of myself. This was highly formative as a teacher - I had nobody to ask if I didn't understand some physics. As the school was poorly equipped I learned to make apparatus and be very resourceful. There was no pupils' practical work in school science in Spain at that time and I spent a lot of time in hardware stores and medical suppliers! After Spain all of my teaching career was in 11-18 mixed comprehensives, in Cheshire and then Peterborough, and I rose to the dizzy heights of Head of Science. By the time I left the school in Peterborough in 1986 we had established the curriculum framework for broad and balanced science for all to age 16. Did your undergraduate studies influence the way you taught science? I think they made me think critically about my teaching right from the start. Although there was much that I admired in the Nuffield approach, I felt that it was unrealistic to expect pupils to discover the whole of Physics for themselves in the time available! In 1973, 'Learning by discovery' was the slogan. My first lesson on my own was with a class of 32 children and 16 brightly illuminated ripple tanks in a dim laboratory. The pupils' task was to 'discover' that v = fλ. The familiar cry, 'What's supposed to happen, Sir?' arose around the room. At the end, as I removed the crocodile clips the pupils had stuck on my jacket, I had to tell them what the result should have been. Nowadays I am convinced that science has to be taught as well as it has to be learned. I don't go along with the teacher as solely a 'facilitator' of learning and the learning environment. Schooling is an enculturation into ways of thinking and important things to know. Teachers have a responsibility to set an agenda for their pupils, e.g. what is important for pupils to learn, why is it important and how does it contribute pupils' personal and social development as well as their potential development as a scientist. You played a big role in the Secondary Science Curriculum Review (SSCR) in the 1980s. What impact did that experience have on you? The SSCR started off as a democratic experiment, trying to 'hand' science curriculum development to class teachers. I worked for the project as an advisory teacher for a year developing problem-solving as a teaching strategy in lower secondary school science. I think the SSCR was crucial to the successful launching of broad and balanced science and the political battle to establish science as a core subject. Can you still discern the influence of the SSCR in today's National Curriculum? I don't think the present science curriculum is what the SSCR envisaged. However, many projects which were partly products of SSCR have had a profound impact (for example the CLIS project Suffolk Coordinated Science and NEAB Modular Science). I welcomed the inclusion of an attainment target on the nature of science (AT17) in the first version of the National Curriculum but it soon became weakened when the Science National Curriculum was revised. However, I think that some aspects have resurfaced in the new emphasis on ideas and evidence. I was involved in the writing of the Nuffield report, Beyond 2000: Science education for the future, and I think this has had an impact at the policy level, but its suggested strategies were not 'periphery to centre' which was the slogan of the SSCR. At Sheffield Hallam University, you have been involved in initial teacher training and you have also taught on undergraduate physics courses. What are your areas of interest in teaching and research today? I am interested in the history and culture of science education: Why do we teach science in the way we do? What are the roots of today's science curriculum? Knowing what we know about the past, how can we develop things in the future? You are now organizing the Science Teacher Festival, celebrating 100 years of the ASE and its forerunners. What made you think this was worth doing? There is an old saying that if we forget our history, we will be condemned to relive it, and I think it was Marx who said that there is no point in studying your past if you are not going to use it to change the future. Looking back through past decades of School Science Review, Physics Education and other journals, you can see the same arguments arising time and again - for example, can pupils learn their science through discovery/problem-solving/investigations? what methods of assessment match our science teaching objectives? should science be taught as general/integrated/separate sciences? These arguments have been with us throughout the past century and the 'winners' and 'losers' rise and fall! I think that to be a profession, we need to recognize our heritage and tradition. At the moment I get the impression that every year is Year Zero as some 'new' initiative starts. We can learn from the past, and next time we try an idea we should take it further, research it deeper and disseminate it wider than we did before.

  5. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Exploring Mercury PhD student Mark Bentley explains how and why he got involved Mark Bentley is studying for a PhD in planetary science. He is helping to design and build instruments for a forthcoming ESA mission to explore the surface of Mercury. Mark Bentley Space has excited and inspired me for as long as I can remember; my earliest memory of this is being allowed to stay up 'really late' to watch the Space Shuttle Columbia land in 1981, at the age of five. Science in general has always interested me. Although I probably didn't recognize it as such at the time, my fascination with collecting all sorts of equipment (or as my parents called it, 'junk') and finding out what made them tick was an early demonstration of this. At school it seemed natural to take science subjects (Physics, Chemistry and Maths A-levels) and then to consider University though physics was not my first thought. I was all set for the respectable career of computer science, not realizing that my space interests could lead anywhere, until I flicked through the first prospectus I received. By luck it was from Leicester University, and while computer science was offered it also had something called 'Physics with Space Science and Technology'. The rest, as they say, is history... After graduating I spent the following two years working for a UK company developing satellite simulators. But then I started thinking about doing a PhD attracted by the flexibility of directing my own research. I knew that I wanted something that involved space science and the element of discovery, but also something that looked at the engineering and technology of a space mission. The timing was fortuitous shortly after I committed myself to a PhD, the European Space Agency announced the selection of BepiColombo, a mission to Mercury, as one of its 'Cornerstone' (large scale) missions. Here was a mission big on science (no spacecraft has ever orbited Mercury, let alone landed on it) and technology as well! So that takes me to where I am now in my first year at the Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute of the Open University in Milton Keynes. If everything goes according to plan, three years later I will be Dr Bentley and know a whole lot more about Mercury! So what am I now? A physicist at heart, but I guess 'planetary scientist' is more accurate... The great thing about studying the planets is that the field can be stretched to encompass just about any aspect of science you care to choose from biology, through engineering, to physics and more. Planetary science fits well with the modern 'trend' for multidisciplinary research as well as being on the leading edge of modern science, and one of the most international areas of study. In studying our solar system we aim to learn more about the processes that formed the planets and ultimately life itself. For the foreseeable future the nine major bodies and their associated moons are our only glimpse back in time to the early life of our corner of the Universe. Over the past few decades, a relatively short period of time, we have expanded our understanding of the planets by orders of magnitude. Instruments like the Hubble Space Telescope have enabled more and more detailed images of both the near and far, whilst robotic space probes have extended scientists' senses to the far corners of the solar system. The two least studied planets lie at the two extreme ends of our system. Pluto sits at the outer edges of the solar system, a small icy ball that astronomers even argue about calling a planet. Mercury, messenger of the Gods, is a relative inferno, closer to the Sun than any other body. Mercury is not an easy target for spacecraft. Tucked deep in the Sun's gravitational well, any mission must lose about 60% of its orbital energy in order to match Mercury's orbit. The only spacecraft to visit Mercury to date was Mariner 10, a NASA mission flown in the mid-70s. It had far too much energy to enter orbit and could just make several quick passes, leaving an incomplete image of only half of the planet. This, and observations made from Earth, provide almost all of our knowledge of Mercury. Earth observations, however, are hampered by the planet's proximity to the Sun, making observations possible only at dawn and dusk. A mosaic of images of Mercury from the NASA Mariner 10 spacecraft. ©NASA In the mid-80s improved radar equipment allowed high resolution mapping of surface features from the Earth. Amongst the results were two tantalising mysteries: a large dome feature, similar in some ways to shield volcanoes seen on Mars, observed on the unimaged side of the planet and complex scattering of returned radar from distinct areas around the poles, suggesting that water ice may exist in craters there. Both NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) are now planning missions to Mercury. The US team are using a newly discovered trajectory that will allow them to reach Mercury using traditional chemical propulsion, incorporating various planetary flybys so-called 'gravity assist' manoeuvres. The European team, on the other hand, has proposed a much more complex mission. In order to get to Mercury, ESA have adopted a novel technology knows as 'solar electric propulsion' (SEP). The basic principle is that electrical energy is produced using solar cells, and this is used to accelerate ions of gas, producing a continuous, if low thrust. The upshot is that the mission is much less constrained by the alignment of the planets and other trajectory concerns and can complete the journey in only two and a half years. BepiColombo, ESA's Mercury mission, will actually consist of three spacecraft! The planetary orbiter will stay close to Mercury and perform remote sensing and mapping of the surface environment. The magnetospheric orbiter, now going to be built by the Institute for Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Japan, will fly in a highly eccentric orbit that takes it from within a few hundred kilometres of the surface to a distance of several planetary radii. This means it will fly in and out of the magnetosphere, the magnetic 'bubble' formed by interaction of the planetary magnetic field with the solar wind. The third and final element is termed the 'MSE' the Mercury Surface Element, or in plain terms a lander, and this is where my research comes in. There is only so much that remote observation can tell us about a planet. The only true way of verifying what we are seeing is to literally go and 'dig the dirt'. The lander on BepiColombo is designed to do just that, using inflated airbags to cushion its descent to the surface. This 'soft landing' will take place in the polar regions of Mercury, where the surface temperature is moderate—between -50 and +70 °C at the sub-solar point at Mercury's closest approach to the Sun the temperature can reach over 400 °C! It is the potential for making these surface measurements that forms my PhD research. There are a whole series of fundamental questions that scientists would like to answer about Mercury. For example: why is the planet much denser than the other 'terrestrial' bodies? And how has such a small planet got a magnetic field? The answers to these questions need data from several complementary sources. The first step is to identify the science goals, then look at what measurements could be made to resolve or constrain these questions, and finally consider the physics of obtaining this data. My project focuses on the surface and sub-surface material on the planet. The surface of Mercury, like the Moon, has been shaped by the impacts upon it and this is still very much in evidence from images of the planet. Craters of many different sizes are evident over most of the surface. These impacts also break up rocks on the surface and produce a finer distribution of particles, known as regolith. The stratigraphy of this material can therefore tell us something about the change in impact environment over time. A conceptual design of the BepiColombo Mercury Surface Element (lander) ©ESA. Conceptual image of the BepiColombo spacecraft at Mercury ©ESA. As well as being interesting in its own right, the regolith also interacts with almost all other aspects of the Mercurian environment. By analysing the regolith we will be able to find out about Mercury's thin atmosphere and also (because the magnetosphere affects the amount of solar wind hitting the planet's surface) changes in the magnetosphere. Planets like the Earth and Jupiter rely on an electrically conductive ionosphere to close the current systems generated by the magnetosphere. Some researchers believe that on Mercury these currents could flow through, or very close to, the surface itself! Designing and building instruments to work in an environment like the surface of Mercury is one of the major challenges I face. Not only must they be capable of surviving extremes of temperature and vibration they must also be small enough to fit into a total lander payload mass of just 7 kg and complete their investigations within the one week expected lifetime of the MSE. In order to take measurements in more than one place, the lander must be equipped with some limited form of mobility. A 'micro-rover' will be carried and deployed after landing, a miniature tracked vehicle that will carry instruments (probably an alpha x-ray spectrometer) to specific target rocks and areas around the lander. To keep things simple the rover will be physically and electronically connected to the lander by a flexible tether. The lander will also carry a 'mole', a slender cylinder (currently being developed for the Beagle-2 Mars lander) with an internal hammering mechanism. Once pushed into the top layer of soil the mole will be able to drive itself down, pushing aside or breaking small rocks, to a depth of several metres, taking measurements as it goes. Over the past few months we have been studying some of the instruments which could be carried by the mole. Concentrating on just one of these it is easy to see how quickly you run into problems! If the MSE lands near the poles, one of the most fascinating activities would be to look for evidence of water ice. In recent years researchers looking at life on the Earth have shown that if water is present, even in the most inhospitable of environments, life often finds a way to survive. The possibility of water on any planet is therefore an exciting prospect! One possible way to look for ice either at or near the surface is to extract a sample using the mole as it penetrates the regolith, heat it at a constant rate and record the amount of energy used to maintain that rate. This technique, differential scanning calorimetry, can observe phase changes in materials and so help to identify them. The technical challenges of performing even this simplistic analysis task are quite daunting. We have to design and build a sample acquisition mechanism that can withstand launch and landing and work at extreme temperatures, heat a sample down a borehole and reject excess heat and the electronics must fit into a 2 cm diameter by 50 cm long mole. So although BepiColombo will not launch until 2009 and will not arrive at Mercury until 2012, there's more than enough work to keep me busy until then!

  6. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Featuring relationships, personalities, interactions, environments and reputations involved in physics and education ON THE MAP (160) Greenhead College: getting great A-level results Kerry Parker PERSONALITY (161) Physics, sex and politics Lynda Williams, the Physics Chanteuse TEACHING ANECDOTES (163) Yuri Gagarin

  7. Of people, particles and prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Penny; Greene, Anne; Mears, Matt; Spacecadet1; Green, Christian; Hunt, Devin J.; Berglyd Olsen, Veronica K.; Ilya, Komarov; Pierpont, Elaine; Gillman, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    In reply to Louise Mayor's feature article “Where people and particles collide”, about the experiences of researchers at CERN who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), efforts to make LGBT CERN an officially recognized club, and incidents where posters advertising the club have been torn down or defaced (March pp31-36, http://ow.ly/YVP2Z).

  8. Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth Nettheim

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper begins by noting the low level of reference to Indigenous Australians in the Commonwealth Constitution at the start of Federation, and goes on to discuss the limits to what was achieved by the 1967 amendments. The situation represents a marked contrast with the USA and Canada in terms of treaties and constitutional recognition. In Australia, particularly during the period of the ‘Reconciliation’ process in the 1990s, important steps were taken by Indigenous Australians to identify items of ‘unfinished business’ in a ‘Statement of Indigenous Rights’. But there has been limited progress to meet these aspirations. And Australian law still lacks a tradition of recognition of human rights generally, let alone Indigenous rights. International law, too, largely lacked recognition of human rights, generally prior to the adoption in 1945 of the Charter of the United Nations. The brief references in the Charter were subsequently developed in a range of declarations and of treaties. These applied to people generally, with scant reference to Indigenous peoples. But, since the 1970s, there has been growing international recognition of the rights of Indigenous peoples under existing declarations and treaties. Since the 1990s, in particular, the UN system has established specific mechanisms for addressing such issues. On 13 September 2007, the General Assembly finally adopted a Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

  9. Communication Apprehension and People Orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Bob

    Assuming that different programs for communication apprehensive/avoidant students attract different types of students according to their needs and apprehension types, a study examined the relationship between communication apprehension (CA) and general people orientations, as measured by the Personal Record of Communication Apprehension-24…

  10. Evaluating IAQ effects on people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David; Tham, K. W.; Sekhar, C.

    2003-01-01

    "conclusive". From them, a small number of conclusions were drawn, and some very large gaps in our knowledge of this important area of research were identified. Taking these as the starting point, this paper formulates a strategy for evaluating IAQ effects on people. It formulates some critical hypotheses...

  11. WPSS: Watching people security services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Baan, J.; Borsboom, S.; Zon, K. van; Luo, X.; Loke, B.; Stoeller, B.; Kuilenburg, H. van; Dijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    To improve security, the number of surveillance cameras is rapidly increasing. However, the number of human operators remains limited and only a selection of the video streams are observed. Intelligent software services can help to find people quickly, evaluate their behavior and show the most

  12. How People Domesticated Amazonian Forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levis, C.; Flores, Bernardo; Moreira, Priscilla; Luize, Bruno G.; Alves, Rubana; Franco-Moraes, Juliano; Lins, Juliana; Konings, Evelien; Pena Claros, M.; Bongers, F.; Costa, Flavia; Clement, Charles

    2018-01-01

    For millennia, Amazonian peoples have managed forest resources, modifying the natural environment in subtle and persistent ways. Legacies of past human occupation are striking near archaeological sites, yet we still lack a clear picture of how human management practices resulted in the domestication

  13. People searching for people: analysis of a people search engine log

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, W.; Berendsen, R.; Kovachev, B.; Meij, E.; Balog, K.; de Rijke, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent years show an increasing interest in vertical search: searching within a particular type of information. Understanding what people search for in these "verticals" gives direction to research and provides pointers for the search engines themselves. In this paper we analyze the search logs of

  14. Stolen Identity : The Armenian People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Mihai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the factors that have shaped the Armenian identity over time, based on the main historical events and strategic actors who made their contribution to the becoming of the Armenian people and their identity. The central issue of the article is the Armenian genocide which had a major influence on the way that Armenians see themselves and the world around them, today. The study revealed that not only the genocide that happened almost a century ago, had a major impact on the Armenian identity, but also the current recognition or denial of facts by the contemporary world. In this respect, the role of the Diaspora proved priceless, because they were the ones that pressured their host countries to recognize the genocide and to support Armenia. The topic is presented form a phenomenological perspective, trying to capture the human experience in the way it was perceived by the Armenian people.

  15. Francis Gilbert * & Samy Zalat Introduction In collaboration with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Francis

    1 School of Biology, University Park, University of Nottingham, Nottingham ... UK is in general very good at scientific research, and why Egypt, in general, is not. The reasons concern the level and distribution method of funding, the way PhD ...

  16. Salwa Mohamed', Samy Zalatz, Hassan Fadl', Sohair Gadalla' &

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taxonomy of ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) collected by pitfall traps from Sinai and Delta region, Egypt ... of family Formicidae using pitfall traps in two regions: Sinai (represented by three ecologically different sites) and Delta region ...... University Press, New York. 663pp. Wheeler WM & Mann WM (1914) The ants ...

  17. A solenoidal and monocusp ion source (SAMIS) (abstract)ab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, E.J.; Brainard, J.P.; Draper, C.H.; Ney, R.H.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new magnetic monocusp ion source for single aperture applications such as neutron generators. Coupling solenoidal magnetic fields on both sides of a monocusp magnetic field has generated over 70% atomic deuterium ions at pressures as low as 0.4 Pa (3 mTorr). This article describes the performance and characteristics of the solenoidal and monocusp ion source. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. 77 FR 39245 - Sami Arshak Yanikian: Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... introduction of an unapproved drug in interstate commerce, in violation of sections 301(d), 505(a), and 303(a... against Mr. Yanikian for the misdemeanor offenses of introduction of an unapproved drug in interstate..., 2005, FDA sent Mr. Yanikian a warning letter regarding his marketing and sale of Novel natural...

  19. Sami russkije spravjatsja lutshshe / Sergei Ivanov ; interv. Andrei Babin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ivanov, Sergei, 1958-

    2006-01-01

    Riigikogu liige Sergei Ivanov vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad venekeelsete gümnaasiumide üleminekut osalisele eestikeelsele õppele ning rahvusvähemuste hariduse osakonna loomist haridus- ja teadusministeeriumis

  20. The Sami Identity: A Souvenir or Something Living?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Meeri

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the notion of identity in relation to the options of cultural affiliation available to minority group members. In particular, the article addresses commentary made in relation to the implementation of national curriculum guidelines in indigenous literacy education settings. (Author/JL)

  1. Antipsychotic prescribing in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Wendy; Curran, Stephen; Wattis, John

    2003-09-01

    Antipsychotic medications have made a significant contribution to the care of the mentally ill people over the past 50 years, with good evidence that both typical and atypical agents are effective in the treatment of schizophrenia and related conditions. In addition they are widely used to good effect in other disorders including psychotic depression, dementia and delirium. Both typical and atypical agents may cause severe side-effects and, in the elderly in particular, there is an increased propensity for drug interactions. If used with care, antipsychotics are usually well tolerated, especially the atypical drugs. Although antipsychotics are effective at reducing psychotic symptoms their limitations should be recognised. They do not 'cure' the underlying illness, and the management of psychotic and behavioural symptoms must take into consideration treatment of physical illness as well as psychosocial interventions. In addition, the antipsychotic effect may take one to two weeks to be evident so doses should not be increased too rapidly. Often small doses are effective in the elderly if they are given sufficient time to work. As our understanding of the mechanisms of psychosis improves it is hoped that new drugs will be developed with novel mechanisms of action with improved efficacy and reduced side-effects. There are several drugs in development, some sharing similarities to currently available agents whilst others have novel mechanisms of actions involving glutamate and nicotinic receptors. Pharmacogenetics is also likely to be increasingly important over the next few years. As the genetic basis of many psychiatric disorders becomes more clearly established it is likely that drugs specifically designed for particular sub-groups of receptors will be developed. Finally, although the pharmacological treatment of psychotic disorders in younger people has been given considerable attention, there is a paucity of good quality research on antipsychotic drug use in

  2. Working with young black people.

    OpenAIRE

    Sallah, Momodou; Howson, Carlton

    2007-01-01

    This is an important collection, integrating research with messages for practitioners in an area where there has as yet been insufficient material published. This book also formed the focal point for a major international conference in the Summer of 2006. As well as jointly editing the publication, the author contributed a chapter to it. Bringing together this work's different dimensions and perspectives, this book seeks to challenge both the accepted status quo of Black young people s neg...

  3. How do people define moderation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanDellen, Michelle R; Isherwood, Jennifer C; Delose, Julie E

    2016-06-01

    Eating in moderation is considered to be sound and practical advice for weight maintenance or prevention of weight gain. However, the concept of moderation is ambiguous, and the effect of moderation messages on consumption has yet to be empirically examined. The present manuscript examines how people define moderate consumption. We expected that people would define moderate consumption in ways that justified their current or desired consumption rather than view moderation as an objective standard. In Studies 1 and 2, moderate consumption was perceived to involve greater quantities of an unhealthy food (chocolate chip cookies, gummy candies) than perceptions of how much one should consume. In Study 3, participants generally perceived themselves to eat in moderation and defined moderate consumption as greater than their personal consumption. Furthermore, definitions of moderate consumption were related to personal consumption behaviors. Results suggest that the endorsement of moderation messages allows for a wide range of interpretations of moderate consumption. Thus, we conclude that moderation messages are unlikely to be effective messages for helping people maintain or lose weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dry mouth and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, W M

    2015-03-01

    Dry mouth is more common among older people than in any other age group. Appropriate definition and accurate measurement of dry mouth is critical for better understanding, monitoring and treatment of the condition. Xerostomia is the symptom(s) of dry mouth; it can be measured using methods ranging from single questions to multi-item summated rating scales. Low salivary flow (known as salivary gland hypofunction, or SGH) must be determined by measuring that flow. The relationship between SGH and xerostomia is not straightforward, but both conditions are common among older people, and they affect sufferers' day-to-day lives in important ways. The major risk factor for dry mouth is the taking of particular medications, and older people take more of those than any other age group, not only for symptomatic relief of various age-associated chronic diseases, but also in order to reduce the likelihood of complications which may arise from those conditions. The greater the number taken, the greater the associated anticholinergic burden, and the more likely it is that the individual will suffer from dry mouth. Since treating dry mouth is such a challenge for clinicians, there is a need for dentists, doctors and pharmacists to work together to prevent it occurring. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Self-Reported Internalization Symptoms and Family Factors in Indigenous Sami and Non-Sami Adolescents in North Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Margrethe; Turi, Anne Lene; Vitterso, Joar; Skre, Ingunn; Kvernmo, Siv

    2011-01-01

    Through differences in family socialization between indigenous and non-indigenous youth, there may be cultural differences in the impact of family factors on mental health outcome. Using structural equation modelling, this population-based study explored the relationship between symptoms of anxiety and depression and family factors in indigenous…

  6. Sami Seppänen : kõnehinna langus hakkab otsa saama / Sami Seppänen ; interv. Henrik Ilves

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Seppänen, Sami

    2007-01-01

    Elisa juhatuse esimehe hinnangul halvab hindade tõstmine ja siis ümberotsustamine mulje kogu mobiilside tegevusalast. Elisa ei kaalunud võimalust EMT sammuga - võtta kasutusele minutipõhine kõnearvestus - kaasa minna, kuid pole välistatud, et tulevikus Elisa seda teeb. Lisa: Konkurendid on sama meelt

  7. How to win friends and influence people

    CERN Document Server

    Carnegie, Dale

    2010-01-01

    For more than sixty years the rock-solid, time-tested advice in this book has carried thousands of now famous people up the ladder of success in their business and personal lives. With more than fifteen million copies sold, How to Win Friends and Influence People is one of the best known motivational books in history, with proven advice for achieving success in life. You’ll learn: three fundamental techniques in handling people; six ways to make people like you; twelve ways to win people to you way of thinking; nine ways to change people without arousing resentment; and much, much more!

  8. People learn other people's preferences through inverse decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jern, Alan; Lucas, Christopher G; Kemp, Charles

    2017-11-01

    People are capable of learning other people's preferences by observing the choices they make. We propose that this learning relies on inverse decision-making-inverting a decision-making model to infer the preferences that led to an observed choice. In Experiment 1, participants observed 47 choices made by others and ranked them by how strongly each choice suggested that the decision maker had a preference for a specific item. An inverse decision-making model generated predictions that were in accordance with participants' inferences. Experiment 2 replicated and extended a previous study by Newtson (1974) in which participants observed pairs of choices and made judgments about which choice provided stronger evidence for a preference. Inverse decision-making again predicted the results, including a result that previous accounts could not explain. Experiment 3 used the same method as Experiment 2 and found that participants did not expect decision makers to be perfect utility-maximizers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. WPSS: watching people security services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Henri; Baan, Jan; Borsboom, Sander; van Zon, Kasper; Luo, Xinghan; Loke, Ben; Stoeller, Bram; van Kuilenburg, Hans; Dijk, Judith

    2013-10-01

    To improve security, the number of surveillance cameras is rapidly increasing. However, the number of human operators remains limited and only a selection of the video streams are observed. Intelligent software services can help to find people quickly, evaluate their behavior and show the most relevant and deviant patterns. We present a software platform that contributes to the retrieval and observation of humans and to the analysis of their behavior. The platform consists of mono- and stereo-camera tracking, re-identification, behavioral feature computation, track analysis, behavior interpretation and visualization. This system is demonstrated in a busy shopping mall with multiple cameras and different lighting conditions.

  10. Motivating young people for education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cort, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The article explores the issue of motivation in policy and practice. The argument is that the folk high schools and the tradition of liberal education offer a learning environment where a number of psychological needs are satisfied among the young people leading to a motivation for learning whereas...... policy is based primarily on controlling forms of regulation counterproductive to the political objective of making 95% of a youth cohort complete upper secondary education. Liberal education may in other words be a case of good practice worth emulating in youth education policy....

  11. Communicating with people with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James McKillop

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It can be very difficult to communicate with people with dementia. Each case requires its own unique handling. Not every scenario is covered, as many times your own judgment is what will work, best according to the circumstances. These can change from dawn to evening and from day to day. Never assume things will be the way they were the last time you communicated. Be on your guard. Be adaptable. The article will help get you started to think of your own ways to communicate.

  12. People who live for quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This book introduces the case of model of quality management. There are a lot of titles and people's example such as with dogged perseverance by Kang, Beom Sik in SK industry, come back to company which he submitted his resignation by Kim, Byeong Hui in Hyundai Heavy industries, I want to be the world best by Yeon, Sang Jin in Geum Ho industry, a good beginning is half the battle by Kwon, Bok Sik in KIA company, employee satisfaction is quality management by Hong, Sun Gyeom, in Dong Yang piston, and praying for all by Kim, Youn Ja in Lotte department store.

  13. Healthy People 2020 Tobacco Use Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Healthy People 2020 Tobacco Use Objectives. Healthy People...

  14. Social innovation for People-Centred Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars; P.K., Shajahan

    2013-01-01

    Social innovation is closely related to the people-centred development (PCD) framework of knowledge production. The discussion of PCD in this chapter particularly expands on the feature of empowerment and socio-political mobilization of people in social innovation...

  15. How Do People Cope with Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... topic are answered in this section. How do people cope with muscular dystrophy (MD)? Although MD presents ... improve health and quality of life. Almost all people with any form of MD experience a worsening ...

  16. Young Idea People Mix with Old Idea People to Make the World Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M.

    2017-12-01

    Groups of young idea people come to eat, drink, and talk about new ideas that old idea people are working on to change the world for the better. The ideas may fix our body and mind, make our lives easier or harder, and more. The young idea people lead, learn, listen and act, so they can become old idea people. The young idea people scare the old idea people because their ideas are different. And, sometimes, the young idea people have new ideas that the old idea people have not thought about. When this happens it makes the old idea people happy and better at their work. The old idea people get to go places and share their ideas around the world. They make good money and have fun lives. They write about their work and can be well known, or not. The young idea people learn from the old idea people how they can be like them. Together the young and old idea people build things and talk about crazy ideas that may come to be. Sometimes the old idea people talk too much and don't listen. They use big words that can be hard to understand. But, the young idea people help them learn to use known words so everyone learns. We know the young idea people learn and grow from this act and they grow happier about their life. We also know that the old idea people get happy that the young idea people are so bright.

  17. [People's interest in health information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, K; Wirz, J

    2005-11-01

    Well-informed citizens and patients regard health policy innovations as a key element when it comes to reforms in the health service--both in health economics and with regard to prevention issues. We evaluated the data provided by the 2003 Telephone Health Survey (GSTel03) to examine demographic and social distinctions in the use of different information sources. At the same time we examined whether there are any population-related differences in people's interest in health information depending on their levels of health awareness, attitudes to prevention and related modes of behaviour. The data generated by the survey show that there is considerable interest in health-related topics. Only 2% of the people questioned used no information sources for this purpose. In addition to more traditional media (books, newspapers, information from pharmacies), information provided by health insurance companies and via the Internet is becoming increasingly important. With the exception of the Internet, all other sources of information are used more frequently by women than by men, and demand for most of the information media increases with age. The frequency of information use and the number of different media used increase from the lower to the upper strata of society. As far as selected variables of health-related behaviour are concerned (smoking, sport, alcohol), the results show a link between a more positive attitude to health and a greater interest in information.

  18. Helping Young People Engage with Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Maggie; Sykes, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    There can be multiple benefits of scientists engaging with young people, including motivation and inspiration for all involved. But there are risks, particularly if scientists do not consider the interests and needs of young people or listen to what they have to say. We argue that "dialogue" between scientists, young people and teachers…

  19. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  20. Moving On: Young People and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Kathryn; Chamberlain, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To help explain why some young people move from recreational drug use to substance abuse, twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with young people who had experienced problematic substance use. The data were supplemented by statistical data on 111 young people. The researchers found a variety of "structural" factors that help explain…

  1. Including People with Disabilities: An Indigenous Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Brown, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Being victims of racial prejudice, religious intolerance, poverty, disempowerment and language loss it could be expected that indigenous people would be supportive of the Inclusion Movement with its philosophy of valuing and acceptance of all people. This supposition is examined for Maori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand. In…

  2. Commentary Examination of young people's attitudes towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Young people's attitude towards entrepreneurship contributes tremendously to the rapid increase in innovation. Income and social economic status of people also have strong effect on innovation because in developing countries, stronger payment ability and higher income level enables more people to spend more on a ...

  3. People: the keys to profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, R L

    1996-02-01

    Various studies report that investment in people pays off two to one over other capital investments. Because business is fundamentally a matter of relations among human beings, training is essential for the development of the practice staff to effectively work together and give quality service to clients. Interpersonal skills are essential, as illustrated in the Gallop Poll organization discovery that most customer service in America is poor and that much of it is awful. This report enumerates five steps to aid in the development of the practice staff to be able to meet the expectations of the client so that each client visit is a pleasant, educational, and rewarding experience. The five steps are (1) developing rapport, (2) creating a professional presence, (3) focusing on getting and giving information, (4) showing how much you care, and (5) placing a high priority on staff training.

  4. Safe foods for allergic people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørhede, Pia; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Bennett, L.

    Introduction Recently a 7-year-old British boy died after drinking pineapple & coconut juice drink. The boy was allergic to milk. The juice drink contained milk, which was declared in the ingredient list as required in the labelling law. The mother to the boy did not read the ingredient list......, as she did not expect to find milk in a juice drink. The juice drink had pictures of pineapple and coconut but none of milk despite that it contained greater amounts of milk than coconut. At the moment the British authorities investigate if the company behind the juice drink has broken the law. How can...... allergy in 10 different European languages. Conclusion: If the company behind the pineapple & coconut fruit juice had asked an allergy expert for advice or had thought about allergic people themselves during the development of their product, the tragic story probably could have been avoided. An expert...

  5. Do transgender people get old?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Sammarco Antunes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to understand transgender aging context in Brazil. Normal and abnormal were especially created by biological sciences. For being considered deviants, transgender people are not seen as human beings. They end up living in violent environments. Their life expectancy is low. Many of them do not believe to reach old age. They face a lot of prejudice and death threat. Those who get to what we call old age are considered survivals. This investigation was able to show satisfactorily their demands and needs. To be considered visible, they have to count on public policies to give them existence since their childhood. That way, we believe they will reach what we call old age with respect and dignity, already assured by theUniversal Human Rights.

  6. Explaining Sad People's Memory Advantage for Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Peter J; Marquardt, Zoe; Young, Isabel; Goodenough, Imogen

    2017-01-01

    Sad people recognize faces more accurately than happy people (Hills et al., 2011). We devised four hypotheses for this finding that are tested between in the current study. The four hypotheses are: (1) sad people engage in more expert processing associated with face processing; (2) sad people are motivated to be more accurate than happy people in an attempt to repair their mood; (3) sad people have a defocused attentional strategy that allows more information about a face to be encoded; and (4) sad people scan more of the face than happy people leading to more facial features to be encoded. In Experiment 1, we found that dysphoria (sad mood often associated with depression) was not correlated with the face-inversion effect (a measure of expert processing) nor with response times but was correlated with defocused attention and recognition accuracy. Experiment 2 established that dysphoric participants detected changes made to more facial features than happy participants. In Experiment 3, using eye-tracking we found that sad-induced participants sampled more of the face whilst avoiding the eyes. Experiment 4 showed that sad-induced people demonstrated a smaller own-ethnicity bias. These results indicate that sad people show different attentional allocation to faces than happy and neutral people.

  7. Maximizing your return on people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Laurie; McMurrer, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Though most traditional HR performance metrics don't predict organizational performance, alternatives simply have not existed--until now. During the past ten years, researchers Laurie Bassi and Daniel McMurrer have worked to develop a system that allows executives to assess human capital management (HCM) and to use those metrics both to predict organizational performance and to guide organizations' investments in people. The new framework is based on a core set of HCM drivers that fall into five major categories: leadership practices, employee engagement, knowledge accessibility, workforce optimization, and organizational learning capacity. By employing rigorously designed surveys to score a company on the range of HCM practices across the five categories, it's possible to benchmark organizational HCM capabilities, identify HCM strengths and weaknesses, and link improvements or back-sliding in specific HCM practices with improvements or shortcomings in organizational performance. The process requires determining a "maturity" score for each practice, based on a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high). Over time, evolving maturity scores from multiple surveys can reveal progress in each of the HCM practices and help a company decide where to focus improvement efforts that will have a direct impact on performance. The authors draw from their work with American Standard, South Carolina's Beaufort County School District, and a bevy of financial firms to show how improving HCM scores led to increased sales, safety, academic test scores, and stock returns. Bassi and McMurrer urge HR departments to move beyond the usual metrics and begin using HCM measurement tools to gauge how well people are managed and developed throughout the organization. In this new role, according to the authors, HR can take on strategic responsibility and ensure that superior human capital management becomes central to the organization's culture.

  8. Renal transplantation in Mapuche people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiles, R; Beltrán, R; Jerez, V; Droguett, M A; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated higher concentrations of some histocompatibility antigens in Mapuche people compared with non-Mapuche Chileans in the renal transplantation program. With the aim of evaluating whether those antigenic differences might induce differences in the outcomes of renal transplantation among patients belonging to that ethnic group, we reviewed HLA studies and at least 6 months follow-up of all patients with a first kidney transplant between 1980 and 2006. The 248 patients had a mean age of 37.6 years, 40% were females, and 48% had living related donors. The mean kidney follow-up was 90 months and patient follow-up was 106 months. Thirty-nine patients (16%) were classified as Mapuche, according to their surnames, including 16 women with overall mean age of 34.5 years, and 14 had been transplanted from a living related donor. Mapuche patients received organs with better HLA matching expressed as number of identities (3.4 +/- 0.1 versus 2.8 +/- 0.1 among non-Mapuche; P or = 3 compatibilities was significantly higher (Mapuche 38% versus non-Mapuche 22%; P Mapuche; and 83% and 65%, respectively, for non-Mapuche. Patient survival rates were 97% at 5 years and 86% at 10 years in the Mapuche group versus 91% and 79%, respectively, in the non-Mapuche group; both results were not significantly different. Our results showed similar outcomes of kidney and patient survivals among Mapuche people even when they received organs with better HLA matches.

  9. People's perception of LILW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Polic, Marko

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Social acceptability of the radioactive waste repository presents a great problem in every country with such a waste. Even if people agree with the need for its construction, the chosen location should be far from their homes (NIMBY). The reasons for such attitudes were attributed to different causes: uneducated public, differences in understanding of radioactivity and risk by experts and lay public, risk communication problems, lack of credibility and social trust, etc. While in earlier days public was blamed for its irrationality, and need for education and information was emphasized, today it is realized that public trust is extremely important if effective risk communication is to be achieved. It is also recognized that it is not so much the content of the risk message itself, as the lack of trust to those responsible for provision of information that is behind this opposition. Perhaps we could apply here Petty and Caciopo's elaboration likelihood model of persuasion, with credibility as a factor in peripheral route of persuasion. Nevertheless also general lowering of social trust should explain social non-agreement. This lack of trust in experts and political institutions is perhaps caused by outwitting public in earlier years, its bad experiences with responsible officials, dangerous accidents (e.g. TMI, Chernobyl), increased influence that professions have over people's welfare, a greater value placed on equality and better educated public, etc. In 1996 the ARAO re-initiated the search for a LILW repository location with a new, so-called combined approach to the site selection, where the technical, geologically led process is combined with participation of local community. In order to get information on people's perception of the LILW repository construction, their willingness to accept it and factors that influence the acceptability, several surveys have been conducted. Groups of experts and lay persons answered the questionnaires. The results of

  10. The Norwegian Educational System, the Linguistic Diversity in the Country and the Education of Different Minority Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ÖZERK

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity has always been and still is one of the current issues in the Norwegian educational system. Norwegian is the official language of the country, but, there have been several distinct dialects and two official written Norwegian languages in the country since 1885. One of them is Bokmål and the other is Nynorsk. There has also been an indigenous Sami people with three different Sami languages in the country: Northern Sami, Lulesami and Southern Sami in the country. At the same time there are two national minority groups, Kvens and the Roma people, who have their own languages. In addition about 200 languages are represented among linguistic minority children with immigrant parents/grandparents. This linguistic diversity means that almost 15% of Norway’s population of 5 million has another first language than Norwegian. This paper gives a brief account of policies and challenges related to multilingualism and multilingual education in the Norwegian educational system.

  11. The Norwegian educational system, the linguistic diversity in the country and the education of different minority groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ÖZERK

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity has always been and still is one of the current issues in the Norwegian educational system. Norwegian is the official language of the country, but, there have been several distinct dialects and two official written Norwegian languages in the country since 1885. One of them is Bokmål and the other is Nynorsk. There has also been an indigenous Sami people with three different Sami languages in the country: Northern Sami, Lulesami and Southern Sami in the country. At the same time there are two national minority groups, Kvens and the Roma people, who have their own languages. In addition about 200 languages are represented among linguistic minority children with immigrant parents/grandparents. This linguistic diversity means that almost 15% of Norway’s population of 5 million has another first language than Norwegian. This paper gives a brief account of policies and challenges related to multilingualism and multilingual education in the Norwegian educational system.

  12. The People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, M.

    1990-01-01

    Concern about the proliferation of nuclear weapons has undergone a perceptible shift in focus. As the contributions to this book attest, we are placing more emphasis on the multiplication of sources for weapons-related materials and technology, the growth of sophisticated industrial and engineering capabilities in threshold states, and the condition of latent---or potential---proliferation they can create. A cardinal feature of this picture is the role played by new suppliers in the nuclear marketplace who offer a variety of materials, equipment, and services that cover an impressive span of the fuel cycle. Most prominent among them is the People's Republic of China. China is in the forefront of our attention for several notable reasons. It is, for one thing, a weapons state possessing a significant nuclear force comprising hundreds of warheads and a formidable array of delivery systems (including ballistic missiles and nuclear submarines). The size and composition of its forces bespeaks a sophisticated set of resource, engineering, and manufacturing capabilities covering uranium processing and enrichment, heavy water, fuel fabrication, warhead design, plutonium reprocessing, and nuclear waste management. This formidable military program, dating back to the 1950s, has endowed the PRC with extensive experience in nearly all facets of nuclear operations and management

  13. Citizenship displayed by disabled people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Prado Carlino

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available By investigating the processes by which successful teachers become activate citizens and by listening to the diversity and richness of their life and formation stories, this work became possible. Its aim is to display some of the utterances of two Down Syndrome individuals and their active-citizenship activities. Their stories were told in the reports of two teachers when describing their personal and professional history, and were considered to be an integral part of it. Thus, some of the utterances and perceptions with which these two individuals elaborate their references, their worldview and their active-citizenship activity are evidenced in this paper. This article is based on the language conceptions of Vygotsky and Bakhtin who defend the idea that the group and the social mentality are ingrain in the individual. Hence, the history of one person reveals that of many others, since there is a deep link between the individual and the social in the formation of a subjective worldview. As a result, it can be easily seen that the utterances expressed by the participants in this research cannot be considered strictly individual because enunciation is social in nature. Despite the fact that the utterances are those of individuals, they manifest a collective reality. This demonstrates the real advantages and possibilities that deficient people get from their participation and intervention in society.

  14. Social Anxiety among Chinese People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qianqian; Chang, Weining C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of social anxiety has largely been investigated among Western populations; much less is known about social anxiety in other cultures. Unlike the Western culture, the Chinese emphasize interdependence and harmony with social others. In addition, it is unclear if Western constructed instruments adequately capture culturally conditioned conceptualizations and manifestations of social anxiety that might be specific to the Chinese. The present study employed a sequence of qualitative and quantitative approaches to examine the assessment of social anxiety among the Chinese people. Interviews and focus group discussions with Chinese participants revealed that some items containing the experience of social anxiety among the Chinese are not present in existing Western measures. Factor analysis was employed to examine the factor structure of the more comprehensive scale. This approach revealed an “other concerned anxiety” factor that appears to be specific to the Chinese. Subsequent analysis found that the new factor—other concerned anxiety—functioned the same as other social anxiety factors in their association with risk factors of social anxiety, such as attachment, parenting, behavioral inhibition/activation, and attitude toward group. The implications of these findings for a more culturally sensitive assessment tool of social anxiety among the Chinese were discussed. PMID:26380367

  15. Social Anxiety among Chinese People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qianqian; Chang, Weining C

    2015-01-01

    The experience of social anxiety has largely been investigated among Western populations; much less is known about social anxiety in other cultures. Unlike the Western culture, the Chinese emphasize interdependence and harmony with social others. In addition, it is unclear if Western constructed instruments adequately capture culturally conditioned conceptualizations and manifestations of social anxiety that might be specific to the Chinese. The present study employed a sequence of qualitative and quantitative approaches to examine the assessment of social anxiety among the Chinese people. Interviews and focus group discussions with Chinese participants revealed that some items containing the experience of social anxiety among the Chinese are not present in existing Western measures. Factor analysis was employed to examine the factor structure of the more comprehensive scale. This approach revealed an "other concerned anxiety" factor that appears to be specific to the Chinese. Subsequent analysis found that the new factor-other concerned anxiety-functioned the same as other social anxiety factors in their association with risk factors of social anxiety, such as attachment, parenting, behavioral inhibition/activation, and attitude toward group. The implications of these findings for a more culturally sensitive assessment tool of social anxiety among the Chinese were discussed.

  16. Social Anxiety among Chinese People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experience of social anxiety has largely been investigated among Western populations; much less is known about social anxiety in other cultures. Unlike the Western culture, the Chinese emphasize interdependence and harmony with social others. In addition, it is unclear if Western constructed instruments adequately capture culturally conditioned conceptualizations and manifestations of social anxiety that might be specific to the Chinese. The present study employed a sequence of qualitative and quantitative approaches to examine the assessment of social anxiety among the Chinese people. Interviews and focus group discussions with Chinese participants revealed that some items containing the experience of social anxiety among the Chinese are not present in existing Western measures. Factor analysis was employed to examine the factor structure of the more comprehensive scale. This approach revealed an “other concerned anxiety” factor that appears to be specific to the Chinese. Subsequent analysis found that the new factor—other concerned anxiety—functioned the same as other social anxiety factors in their association with risk factors of social anxiety, such as attachment, parenting, behavioral inhibition/activation, and attitude toward group. The implications of these findings for a more culturally sensitive assessment tool of social anxiety among the Chinese were discussed.

  17. Secrets of over-indebted people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie BILLAUDEAU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, the economic and financial crisis is brought to light and it is now clear that many people are directly impacted by this phenomenon. However, a lot of situations are obviously hidden and in particular those concerning over-indebted people. These people often find that it is difficult to express the hardship they are going through and keep silent because is more comfortable for them. The media also does not tackle this burning issue because the complexity of some situations complicates the message. Therefore, a giant gap has appeared leaving over-indebted people entrapped in their secret. Starting from this hypothesis, this article will examine the results of a research conducted on the over-indebted people (survey on written press, analysis of TV broadcasts, analysis of records related to person in debts and responses of people in debts and the secrets that this phenomenon involves.

  18. The relationship of French people with energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Jean-Daniel; Potereau, Julien; Gautier, Antoine

    2017-12-01

    This Power Point document presents graphs and tables containing results of a survey performed on the relationship French people have with energy. After a presentation of the survey methodology, it addresses how France commitment in the struggle against climate change is perceived (French people think that their country could do better), which perceptions French people have of stakes and of the French energy policy (the management of the energy issue is perceived as perfectible, and French people have a positive view on energy transition and on the development of renewable energies), and which investments French people stand for (French people are in favour of a more important role of Europe and of citizen cooperatives in the field of energy)

  19. Deafblind people, communication, independence, and isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Marion

    2013-10-01

    This paper discusses issues related to communication, independence, and isolation for an understudied group of deaf people who also have visual impairments. The discussion is based on the experiences of 28 deafblind people in 6 different countries, obtained from interviews that were carried out as part of a larger research project on travel issues. However, the similarities in experiences between countries were stronger than the differences. In particular, barriers to communication and inadequate support, with resulting problems of isolation and depression, were found in all the countries. Equally, deafblind people in all the countries were interested in being involved in and contributing to society and supporting other people, particularly through organizations of blind and deafblind people. This runs counter to the tendency to present deafblind and other disabled people purely as recipients of support rather than also as active participants in society. However, there were some differences in the support available in the different countries.

  20. Health and People with Usher syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlqvist, Moa

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis concerns people with Usher syndrome (USH) and their health. People with USH have a congenital hearing loss of various degrees and an eye disease with a progressive course; for some, the balance is also affected. Three clinical groups have been identified 1, 2 and 3, and 13 genes have currently been identified. USH is the most common cause of deafblindness. Clinical knowledge and the limited research that exists have shown that people with deafblindness can experience diffic...

  1. Management Mangrove Experiences Form Coastal People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indah, P. N.; Radianto, I.; Abidin, Z.; Amir, I. T.; Pribadi, D. U.

    2018-01-01

    The mangrove area has an important meaning in beach ecosystem, both from ecological and economical aspects. For this, the rehabilitation of mangrove forest is done as one effort that aims to maintain and return the mangrove forest function as one of life system supporters, especially in beach area. The most respondent ages of coast people of Gending, Pajarakan, dan Kraksaan districts, Probolinggo Regency are between 30 to 59 years old, i.e. as 86 people or 95.55% indicates that coast people are productive ages so they can be hoped very potential for having role in supporting mangrove ecosystem management of Probolinggo Regency coast. The average respondent educational rates are mostly Elementary School to Senior High School, i.e. as 76 people. Generally, human resources of coast people have relatively good education level. Thereby, it can be hoped to have positive potencies for the role of coast people themselves toward the mangrove ecosystem management support of Probolinggo Regency coast. The average most respondents have family burdens two and three people as six people or 6.67 percent. But, there are still three respondents who have not have family burdens. Generally, more and more members help in respondent’s jobs. The mangrove ecosystem management strategy of Probolinggo Regency coast is by involving people role (people and people figures) and governmental supports through the models of mangrove forest management strategy, the model of embankment cultivation management by entering mangrove as input resources of production facilities, and ecotourism management by the purpose of improving people income.

  2. Sexual health for people with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastgate, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    People with intellectual disability experience the same range of sexual needs and desires as other people. However, they experience many difficulties meeting their needs. They may be discouraged from relieving sexual tension by masturbating. They face a high risk of sexual abuse. They are likely not to be offered the full range of choices for contraception and sexual health screening. Poor education and social isolation may increase their risk of committing sexual offences. However, with appropriate education and good social support, people with intellectual disability are capable of safe, constructive sexual expression and healthy relationships. Providing such support is an essential part of supporting people with intellectual disability.

  3. Responses to Change Helping People Make Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing state of many organizations is one of change. People who experience major change tend to exhibit one of four patterns of response: entrenched, overwhelmed, poser, or learner. As a leader, you need to understand the patterns of response that people express and to customize intervention strategies to help them make the transition. People can pass through a given response stage and move to one that is more effective--especially if you provide timely intervention and support. This guidebook will help you understand how people, including yourself, are responding to change and what you c

  4. Putting people into the picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, J

    1989-01-01

    In an interview with the newly appointed head of the Population, Women, and Natural Resources Program of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Dr. Pietronella van den Oever reflects on the concern about natural resources and working with women, rural development, and agricultural extension projects. She considers her job to have three main objectives: 1) to try to increase the in-house knowledge among the staff about population matters and also in the country where they work; 2) to conceptualize the linkages between the sustainable use of natural resources and demographic variables because of the struggle to integrate population concerns into programs (the example of Zaire is given, which had the same level of fertility and maternal mortality as Mali with very few resources; this shows the lack of knowledge and the effect of resources on population); 3) to test the practical application of joint policies, strategies, and projects relating to conservation of natural resources and population. This can be done if population and natural resources projects are integrated. As a start a population reference library will be set up and a population data tape will be produced for staff who travel to various countries. Other initiatives will be the formation of a committee on population/resources links, and the field testing of the unit's Population, Resources, and Development Guidebook, particularly in relation to Pakistan's national conservation strategy. Eventually a work book is hoped to be developed from this for those wanting to plan their natural resources. In addition, the program is helping to plan the Africa Women's Assembly in Harare, Zimbabwe, to be held in February 1990. The objective is to involve local people in conserving nature. Since women are heavily involved in agriculture, they should be educated to use resources in a sustainable way.

  5. Needs of people with severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study reviews conceptual and methodological issues of needs for care among people with severe mental illness (SMI) and presents data on their prevalence, correlates and consequences for mental health care. Method: Focus is on the definition of the concept of need as what people can

  6. Group Counseling for People with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Hanoch; Wilson, Lisa M.; Pullo, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Group counseling has been used with a wide range of people who have physical disorders including psychosomatic conditions, sensory (visual and auditory) disabilities, neuromuscular and orthopedic impairments, and life-threatening diseases. The needs and concerns of these people can be generally delineated as physical, psychological, social,…

  7. The Musical Taste of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozgot, V. G.

    2014-01-01

    Data from a longitudinal survey of the musical tastes of young people distinguish five basic vectors of its development: an orientation toward the Western paradigm; young people's unlimited amount of time spent in the consumption of music; the indiscriminate nature of their music interests; the influence that a person's membership in a particular…

  8. Cognitive Changes among Institutionalized Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jose I.; Menacho, Inmaculada; Alcalde, Concepcion; Marchena, Esperanza; Ruiz, Gonzalo; Aguilar, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of different cognitive training procedures in elderly people was studied. Two types of methods to train cognitive and memory functions were compared. One method was based on new technologies and the other one on pencil-and-paper activities. Thirty-six elderly institutionalized people aged 68-94 were trained. Quantitative and memory…

  9. Physical exercise for people with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Luise; Dam, Gitte; Rinnov, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of physical exercise versus no intervention for people with cirrhosis.......This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of physical exercise versus no intervention for people with cirrhosis....

  10. How People Get Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing Seoul Virus Infection in Pet Rats and People FAQs: Seoul Virus Cleaning Up After Pet Rodents to Reduce the Risk of Seoul Virus ... Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Panama, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Can pets ... rodents into contact with people if they catch such animals and carry them ...

  11. The Human Element: Believing in People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Peter S.

    1996-01-01

    Suggestions for developing a creative and synergistic organization include the following: believe that people want to do their effective best in their work; communicate with people face-to-face; share virtually all information regularly and freely; use humor to create an upbeat work atmosphere; and always establish a timeline when asking someone…

  12. Predicting survival in oldest old people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taekema, Diana G.; Gussekloo, J.; Westendorp, Rudi G J; De Craen, Anton J M; Maier, Andrea B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Measures of physical performance are regarded as useful objective clinical tools to estimate survival in elderly people. However, oldest old people, aged 85 years or more, are underrepresented in earlier studies and frequently unable to perform functional tests. We studied the association

  13. [From care to consideration of disabled people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chossy, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    The law of 11th February 2005 relating to the equality of the rights and opportunities, participation and citizenship of disabled people was a major step forward. Nevertheless, more progress is needed to ensure more consideration is given to disabled people.

  14. "Guns do not kill, people do!"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemche, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Bible does not kill, but many people who have read the Bible (in their way) have killed, virtually or in real.......The Bible does not kill, but many people who have read the Bible (in their way) have killed, virtually or in real....

  15. Technologies in older people's care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson Marchesoni, Maria; Axelsson, Karin; Fältholm, Ylva; Lindberg, Inger

    2017-03-01

    The tension between care-based and technology-based rationalities motivates studies concerning how technology can be used in the care sector to support the relational foundation of care. This study interprets values related to care and technologies connected to the practice of good care. This research study was part of a development project aimed at developing innovative work practices through information and communication technology. Participants and research context: All staff (n = 18) working at two wards in a care facility for older people were asked to participate in interviews, and 12 accepted. We analysed the data using latent content analysis in combination with normative analysis. Ethical considerations: The caregivers were informed that participation was voluntary and that they could drop out at any time without providing any explanation. Four values were identified: 'presence', 'appreciation', 'competence' and 'trust'. Caregivers wanted to focus on care receivers as unique persons, a view that they thought was compromised by time-consuming and beeping electronic devices. Appraising from next-of-kin and been seen as someone who can contribute together with knowledge to handle different situations were other desires. The caregivers also desired positive feedback from next-of-kin, as they wanted to be seen as professionals who have the knowledge and skills to handle difficult situations. In addition, the caregivers wanted their employer to trust them, and they wanted to work in a calm environment. Caregivers' desire for disturbance-free interactions, being valued for their skills and working in a trustful working environment were interpreted as their base for providing good care. The caregivers' arguments are based on caring rationality, and sometimes they felt the technological rationality interfered with their main mission, providing quality care. Introducing new technology in caring should support the caring relationship. Although society's overall

  16. Image and Video for Hearing Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aran Oya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a global overview of image- and video-processing-based methods to help the communication of hearing impaired people. Two directions of communication have to be considered: from a hearing person to a hearing impaired person and vice versa. In this paper, firstly, we describe sign language (SL and the cued speech (CS language which are two different languages used by the deaf community. Secondly, we present existing tools which employ SL and CS video processing and recognition for the automatic communication between deaf people and hearing people. Thirdly, we present the existing tools for reverse communication, from hearing people to deaf people that involve SL and CS video synthesis.

  17. GIS Application Management for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongkaw, Sasalak

    2017-08-01

    This research aimed to develop and design Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for facilitating disabled people by presenting some useful disabled information on the Google Map. The map could provide information about disabled types of people such as blind, deaf and physical movement. This research employed the Multiview 2 theory and method to plan and find out the problems in real world situation. This research used many designing data structure methods such as Data Flow Diagram, and ER-Diagram. The research focused into two parts: server site and client site which included the interface for Web-based application. The clear information of disable people on the map was useful for facilitating disabled people to find some useful information. In addition, it provided specialized data for company and government officers for managing and planning local facilities for disabled people in the cities. The disable could access the system through the Internet access at any time by using mobile or portable devices.

  18. Comparative study of laterality in people with fragile X syndrome, people with intellectual disabilities, and people with typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niort, Jannick; Hernández Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2017-07-01

    Following on from the studies by McManus and Cornish [(1997). Fractionating handedness in mental retardation: What is the role of the cerebellum? Laterality, 2(2), 81-89] and Cornish, Pigram, and Shaw [(1997). Do anomalies of handedness exist in children with fragile-X syndrome? Laterality, 2(2), 91-101], the aim of this paper was to determine laterality in people with fragile X syndrome (FXS). The sample comprised three study groups: the first with 30 people with FXS (mean age 17.9 years), the second 34 people with various intellectual disabilities (ID, mean age 20.9 years), and the third 160 people with typical development (mean age 14.7 years). Laterality was assessed with a test adapted for this study. The results confirm the preponderance of right-handedness (93.3%) in people with FXS and present new data regarding footedness and sensory dominance (eyedness and earedness), indicating inconsistent footedness and ocular cross-dominance. Almost three-quarters (73.5%) of people with other ID were right-handed. The results corroborate those of McManus and Cornish (1997). People with FXS tend to be right-handed but have ocular cross-dominance.

  19. Consumption patterns and why people fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Recreational and subsistence fishing play major roles in the lives of any people, although their importance in urban areas is often underestimated. There are fish and shellfish consumption advisories in the new York-New Jersey harbor estuary, particularly in the waters of the Newark Bay Complex. This paper examines fishing behavior, consumption patterns, and the reasons that people fish in the Newark Bay Complex. I test the null hypotheses that there are no differences among Asians, Blacks, Hispanics, and whites in consumption patterns for fish and crabs and in the reasons that they fish or crab. Most people either fished or crabbed, but not both. People who fish and crab ate more grams of crab than fish in a given meal; people who crab only consumed more grams of crab at a meal than those who fish only consumed of fish. Although 30% or more of the people who fished and crabbed in the Newark Bay Complex did not eat their self-caught fish or crabs 8-25% of the people ate more than 1500 g/month. Some people angling in the Newark Bay Complex are eating crabs at a rate well over 1500 g/month, and about 70% are eating crabs even though there is a total ban on both harvest and consumption because of the health risks from dioxin. Consumption patterns were negatively correlated with mean income and positively correlated with mean age. Most people rated relaxation and being outdoors the highest reasons or angling, although on an open-ended question they usually listed recreation. There were no ethnic differences in reasons for angling, although other studies have shown ethnic differences in consumption. Obtaining fish or crabs to eat, give away, trade, or sell were rated low, suggesting that consumption advisories fail partly because people are not primarily fishing or food

  20. Older people in the information society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Marcinkiewicz-Wilk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the situation of older people in the information society. In the theoretical part of article phenomena of aging population and information society were described. This paper includes results of research conducted in qualitative strategy. The method of collecting data was biographical method. The method for data processing was qualitative content analysis. In the research 2 older, educationally active people took part. Results of research shows how older people understand the information society and what risk and opportunities they notice in this new reality. Narratives of the respondents indicated that education is of crucial importance for participation in the information society. Older people who take part in lifelong learning cope better with the new reality than people who do not learn. Based on the research results we can point out areas of education which should be development. Moreover, it is visible that educational activity of older people is very important in adaptation to the information society. Narratives of seniors indicate reasons for the lack of educational activity of other seniors. According to this, it can be specified what action should be undertaken to prevent the exclusion of older people in this new reality

  1. Urban Bird Feeding: Connecting People with Nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T C Cox

    Full Text Available At a time of unprecedented biodiversity loss, researchers are increasingly recognizing the broad range of benefits provided to humankind by nature. However, as people live more urbanized lifestyles there is a progressive disengagement with the natural world that diminishes these benefits and discourages positive environmental behaviour. The provision of food for garden birds is an increasing global phenomenon, and provides a readily accessible way for people to counter this trend. Yet despite its popularity, quite why people feed birds remains poorly understood. We explore three loosely defined motivations behind bird feeding: that it provides psychological benefits, is due to a concern about bird welfare, and/or is due to a more general orientation towards nature. We quantitatively surveyed households from urban towns in southern England to explore attitudes and actions towards garden bird feeding. Each household scored three Likert statements relating to each of the three motivations. We found that people who fed birds regularly felt more relaxed and connected to nature when they watched garden birds, and perceived that bird feeding is beneficial for bird welfare while investing time in minimising associated risks. Finally, feeding birds may be an expression of a wider orientation towards nature. Overall, we found that the feelings of being relaxed and connected to nature were the strongest drivers. As urban expansion continues both to threaten species conservation and to change peoples' relationship with the natural world, feeding birds may provide an important tool for engaging people with nature to the benefit of both people and conservation.

  2. Indigenous people's detection of rapid ecological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Shankar; Lauer, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    When sudden catastrophic events occur, it becomes critical for coastal communities to detect and respond to environmental transformations because failure to do so may undermine overall ecosystem resilience and threaten people's livelihoods. We therefore asked how capable of detecting rapid ecological change following massive environmental disruptions local, indigenous people are. We assessed the direction and periodicity of experimental learning of people in the Western Solomon Islands after a tsunami in 2007. We compared the results of marine science surveys with local ecological knowledge of the benthos across 3 affected villages and 3 periods before and after the tsunami. We sought to determine how people recognize biophysical changes in the environment before and after catastrophic events such as earthquakes and tsunamis and whether people have the ability to detect ecological changes over short time scales or need longer time scales to recognize changes. Indigenous people were able to detect changes in the benthos over time. Detection levels differed between marine science surveys and local ecological knowledge sources over time, but overall patterns of statistically significant detection of change were evident for various habitats. Our findings have implications for marine conservation, coastal management policies, and disaster-relief efforts because when people are able to detect ecological changes, this, in turn, affects how they exploit and manage their marine resources. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. Older peoples' lived experiences after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    add to the load of wellbeing-challenges after HF. Evidence-based knowledge in order to address the wellbeing of older people and the challenges they meet in changing times after HF is needed for professionals. Aim To explore the support older people with HF may need to optimize their wellbeing during...... striving for wellbeing in an active daily life after HF; steering-group meetings clarify clinical questions regarding functional ability after HF. This knowledge is the basis for developing the interview guide used when interviewing 13 at-home-living older people with limited functional ability prior...

  4. Utilitarianism, poverty and development of disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier de França, Inacia Sátiro; Freitag Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the influences of human development factors in the experience of disabled people based on social scenarios of inequality. The data collected were standardized and allocated in thematic categories. The analysis was based on liberal utilitarianism. The conclusion is that there is legislation in Brazil that guarantees the disabled people's development in areas such as health, education and work. However despite the attempts of decision makers in combating discriminatory behaviors and the theory based on equity, these people still face difficulties in breaking the barrier of poverty and achieving all humans rights deserved.

  5. Improving care for people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sue

    2014-11-25

    People with learning disabilities have poorer health than the general population and experience health inequalities - partly as a result of problems with accessing health services. Health services have a duty to address health inequalities, by making reasonable adjustments to their services so they are more accessible to people with learning disabilities, but this does not always happen. Failure to make reasonable adjustments can have significant adverse effects for people with learning disabilities and their families. Nurses are well placed to implement reasonable adjustments, many of which are simple to do and can save lives.

  6. Flu Vaccine and People with Egg Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pandemic Other Flu Vaccine and People with Egg Allergies Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... for Recommendations This page contains information about egg allergy and flu vaccination. Summary: CDC and its Advisory ...

  7. Sex and Prevention Concerns for Positive People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with any comments or concerns. February 17, 2011 Sex and prevention concerns for positive people Facebook Twitter ... partner, and vice versa. The reality of safer sex You put yourself at risk for infections through ...

  8. Older people, personal hygiene, and skin care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    Skin health is essential for well being in older people. Personal hygiene is fundamental to skin health, but a lack of evidence exists about effective practices. An evidence base, disseminated through nursing education and patient health promotion, must be developed.

  9. Psychotherapy with people with developmental disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zafošnik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available People with developmental disabilities can experience any psychological abnormalitiy and psychiatric illness as do people without developmental disabilities. Due to different diagnostic criteria, assessment procedures and instruments, we lack definite prevalence rates for people with developmental disabilities, also suffering from mental health problems, eventhough most studies place the rate at 20 to 40%. One of the possible treatment alternatives for augmenting psychological well-being is psychotherapy, but is extremely rarely used for people with severe and profound disabilities, where speech cannot be the main therapeutic medium. So, those that are included in the psychotherapuetic process are predominantly clients with mild developmental disabilities, and they are mostly in cognitive-behavioral therapy. Recently, two models of (psychotherapy for persons with severe and profound developmental disabilities were developed: developmental-dynamic relationship therapy and attachment-based behaviour therapy for children. Conceptually, they both originate form developmental psychoanalytic theories.

  10. People's Judgments About Classic Property Law Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeScioli, Peter; Karpoff, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    People's judgments about property shape how they relate to other people with respect to resources. Property law cases can provide a valuable window into ownership judgments because disputants often use conflicting rules for ownership, offering opportunities to distinguish these basic rules. Here we report a series of ten studies investigating people's judgments about classic property law cases dealing with found objects. The cases address a range of issues, including the relativity of ownership, finder versus landowner rights, object location, objects below- versus above-ground, mislaid versus lost objects, contracts between landowners and finders, and the distinction between public and private space. The results show nuanced patterns in ownership judgments that are not well-explained by previous psychological theories. Also, people's judgments often conflict with court decisions and legal principles. These empirical patterns can be used to generate and test novel hypotheses about the intuitive logic of ownership.

  11. Older people, food and satisfaction with life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Moira; Raats, Monique M.; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses food-related satisfaction with life of older people, identifying some of the determinants and barriers to satisfaction with food-related quality of life, and discusses possible ways of enhancing older people's quality of life in the domain of food. Despite being strongly...... associated with life, and heavily contributing to the quality of life, food has so far been neglected and not much research has been conducted into people's satisfaction with their food-related life and its relationship to overall life satisfaction. As people age, their goals and available resources in terms...... of health, social networks, income and skills change. Changes in resources can be expected to have an impact on satisfaction with life....

  12. Mortality in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Pauline; Lauer, Emily; Hoghton, Matt

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews why an understanding of mortality data in general, and in relation to people with intellectual disabilities in particular, is an important area of concern, and introduces the papers in this Special Edition.

  13. GOD AND THE SUFFERING OF HIS PEOPLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Philosophically the problem of suffering gives a rational ... and adds that, the only legitimate response to .... can give ourselves in times of suffering is that ... Emotionally, people suffer hurt inside, ... death, and the evils that affect our world,.

  14. Sibling advocates of people with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Li, Eria Ping

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the experience of the first generation of sibling advocates in Hong Kong. A qualitative approach was adopted and six sibling advocates of people with intellectual disabilities from one non-government organization were interviewed. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method and content analysis. Findings revealed that the six participants were reactive in the process of taking up the caregiver responsibility and they performed three functions: to advocate for more service provision, to improve service quality, and to facilitate communication between individual service units and family members of people with intellectual disabilities. All of the participants expressed that they needed support from service providers when they tried to function as the sibling advocates. Strategies to promote the involvement of siblings of people with intellectual disabilities as advocates are discussed and it is expected that more siblings of people with intellectual disabilities will be supported to have a higher level of involvement in advocacy.

  15. Producing the voice of socially excluded people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Esben

    2003-01-01

    An investigation of the practices of outreach workers, when they try to build bridges between drug addicts and homeless people living in the streets and welfare and health care institutions. The article uses tools from discourse analysis and governmentality analysis...

  16. People, Land and Water: Participatory Development Communication ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... ... and offers insights and lessons from research and experience in the field. ... 2000), and Involving the Community: A Guide to Participatory Development ... IDRC is now accepting applications for this year's Trees and People: ...

  17. Nurse Educator Attitudes Toward People With Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lori; Houser, Rick

    As educators strongly influence the attitudes of their students, the purpose of this study was to determine nurse educator attitudes toward people with disabilities. Inadequate education of health professionals is a known barrier to care for people with disability. Continuing calls for improved education of health professionals compel an assessment of nurse educator attitudes. This was a cross-sectional, correlational web-based survey of nurse educators (n = 126). Nurse educator attitudes were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. Nurse educators held discriminatory attitudes toward people with disabilities, though most preferred a biopsychosocial model of disability. Forty-four percent lacked knowledge of disability-related aims, objectives, or outcomes within the curriculum. To advance equity in health care, nurse educators must confront personal bias and teach competent care of people with disabilities.

  18. EMPOWERING GIRLS AND CONNECTING PEOPLE THROUGH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    through a school social work intervention and connecting the people who will support the ... best legacy we can bequeath children has been an old .... Some 14 million women and girls between ages 15 and ... Harmful traditional practices.

  19. Glucocorticosteroids for people with alcoholic hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Chavdar S; Varganova, Daria L; Casazza, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcoholic hepatitis is a form of alcoholic liver disease, characterised by steatosis, necroinflammation, fibrosis, and potential complications to the liver disease. Typically, alcoholic hepatitis presents in people between 40 and 50 years of age. Alcoholic hepatitis can be resolved...... if people abstain from drinking, but the risk of death will depend on the severity of the liver damage and abstinence from alcohol. Glucocorticosteroids are used as anti-inflammatory drugs for people with alcoholic hepatitis. Glucocorticosteroids have been studied extensively in randomised clinical trials...... in order to assess their benefits and harms. However, the results have been contradictory. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of glucocorticosteroids in people with alcoholic hepatitis. SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials through electronic searches in Cochrane Hepato-Biliary's (CHB) Controlled...

  20. Eating Tips for People with Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People with Cirrhosis Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For Veterans and the Public Veterans and the Public Home Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis C Home Getting ...

  1. HBR's 10 must reads on managing people

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2011-01-01

    ... them. If you read nothing else on managing people, read these articles. We've combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles and selected the most important ones to help you maximize your employee's performance...

  2. Agents That Negotiate Proficiently with People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Sarit

    Negotiation is a process by which interested parties confer with the aim of reaching agreements. The dissemination of technologies such as the Internet has created opportunities for computer agents to negotiate with people, despite being distributed geographically and in time. The inclusion of people presents novel problems for the design of autonomous agent negotiation strategies. People do not adhere to the optimal, monolithic strategies that can be derived analytically, as is the case in settings comprising computer agents alone. Their negotiation behavior is affected by a multitude of social and psychological factors, such as social attributes that influence negotiation deals (e.g., social welfare, inequity aversion) and traits of individual negotiators (e.g., altruism, trustworthiness, helpfulness). Furthermore, culture plays an important role in their decision making and people of varying cultures differ in the way they make offers and fulfill their commitments in negotiation.

  3. Dietary management of older people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClinchy, Jane

    2018-05-02

    Diabetes UK's revised nutrition guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes, published recently, encourage education in self-management and include additional guidance for older people with diabetes. The incidence of diabetes in older people is increasing. Many older people with diabetes are healthy and mobile, and live in the community, but a number are frail and living in care homes. Those who are frail are at increased risk of malnutrition from a range of causes. Older people with diabetes should be assessed for malnutrition risk and referred to a dietitian if required. Management of these patients focuses on foods that are high in protein and energy foods. A case study gives an example of how a community nurse may be involved.

  4. Emotional Disorders in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES EMOTIONAL DISORDERS IN PEOPLE WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS This fact sheet presents the current research on emotional disorders in multiple sclerosis (MS) and summarizes the ...

  5. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  6. Evacuation characteristics of visually impaired people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Janne Gress; Dederichs, Anne

    2015-01-01

    speed depends on the degree of vision loss. The design of the building environment is important for the ability to orientation for people with reduced sight. Walls and handrails are important for the orientation possibilities for people with visual impairments. Furthermore, obstacles placed......-D). The mean free walking speed descending stairs for category C and D were found to be comparable with values found in Danish and Swedish guidelines. The walking speed of people with visible impairments was not affected by an increasing density on stairs to the same extent as the walking speed of able......-bodied adults. It was found that people with visual impairments were able to uphold a higher walking speed descending stairs than able-bodied adults for increasing person density. The initial walking speed on horizontal planes is lower than the value suggested by the N&M-model. The horizontal mean free walking...

  7. Destination Memory Impairment in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Gopie, Nigel; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Hasher, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are assumed to have poor destination memory— knowing to whom they tell particular information—and anecdotes about them repeating stories to the same people are cited as informal evidence for this claim. Experiment 1 assessed young and older adults’ destination memory by having participants tell facts (e.g., “A dime has 118 ridges around its edge”) to pictures of famous people (e.g., Oprah Winfrey). Surprise recognition memory tests, which also assessed confidence, revealed that o...

  8. The Occupational Wellbeing of People Experiencing Homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Yvonne; Gray, M.; McGinty, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a study that utilised an occupational perspective to explore how wellbeing was achieved and sustained by the occupations of people experiencing homelessness in Australia. Thirty three in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with homeless individuals in a regional city in Australia. Data from the interviews were thematically analysed to understand the relationship between wellbeing, as defined by the individual, and the occupations engaged in by people exp...

  9. Smart Homes Design for People with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Amiribesheli, Mohsen; Bouchachia, Abdelhamid

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a user-centred approach for designing and developing smart homes for people with dementia. In contrast to most of the existing literature related to dementia, the present approach aims at tailoring the system to the specific needs of dementia using a scenario-based methodology. Scenarios are based on typical dementia symptoms which are collected from research literatures and validated by dementia caregivers. They portray the common behaviour of people with dementia. ...

  10. Social network for people with food intolerances

    OpenAIRE

    Ponce Alboques, Judit

    2017-01-01

    The concepts behind “social networking” are nothing new – humans have always been social beings, looking for ways to connect and interact with each other – but they have taken a new meaning in today's society. Social network sites are a phenomenon of great importance; many people feel better interacting online. This fact, together with the recent increase of people with food allergies and intolerances, have an interesting connection. In recent years the healthy life style has become fashionab...

  11. Cyanotype: Workshops for people with early dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Sáez, María del Carmen; Gutiérrez-Párraga, Teresa; Saavedra Macías, Francisco Javier (Coordinador); Español Nogueiro, Alicia (Coordinador); Arias Sánchez, Samuel (Coordinador); Calderón García, Marina (Coordinador)

    2017-01-01

    The workshop "Cyanotype: Workshops for people with early dementia", carried out at the 5th International Conference on Health Humanities introduced the cyanotype. The cyanotype is a 19th century photographic technique that the research project used as a way for preventing the decline of faculties of people living with diseases that provoke memory loss. The activities carried out in the cyanotype workshop at the Conference were based on the creation of photographic images that could be interve...

  12. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. LIFE AND DEATH AMONGST INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Felipe Beltrão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the frequent rights violations perpetrated against indigenous peoples, which affect people and territories, compromising their lives and even their right to mourn the dead, it is imperative to understand the care and concerns of the indigenous towards life and death. Thus, we propose to analyze ethnographic narratives about the Apinayé, Ka'apor, Tapirapé, Tembé, Tenetehara, Terena and Asurini, in order to discuss the caring of people, considering the context of funerary rituals. The texts analyzed are able to reveal: (1 the existence (or not of the practice; (2 the specific contexts in which the funeral rites are (or not practiced; and (3 the meanings that the practice gain in ethnically differentiated societies. The narratives of indigenous peoples are included in order to attempt to make the peoples that nowadays find themselves accused by both the media and (reportedly pro-life organizations “be heard”. Therefore, using the classical literature we study the heritage of ritual practices, which besides confering dignity to the dead, indicate that life is the greater good among indigenous peoples.

  14. Health care reform and people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batavia, A I

    1993-01-01

    As a group, people with disabilities or chronic conditions experience higher-than-average health care costs and have difficulty gaining access to affordable private health insurance coverage. While the Americans with Disabilities Act will enhance access by prohibiting differential treatment without sound actuarial justification, it will not guarantee equal access for people in impairment groups with high utilization rates. Health care reform is needed to subsidize the coverage of such individuals. Such subsidization can be achieved under either a casualty insurance model, in which premiums based on expected costs are subsidized directly, or a social insurance model, in which low-cost enrollees cross-subsidize high-cost enrollees. Cost containment provisions that focus on the provider, such as global budgeting and managed competition, will adversely affect disabled people if providers do not have adequate incentives to meet these people's needs. Provisions focusing on the consumer, such as cost sharing, case management, and benefit reductions, will adversely affect disabled people if they unduly limit needed services or impose a disproportionate financial burden on disabled people.

  15. Sudden Death in Young People--Heart Problems Often Blamed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden death in young people: Heart problems often blamed Sudden death in young people is rare, but those at ... causes and treatments. By Mayo Clinic Staff Sudden death in people younger than 35, often due to ...

  16. POVERTY IN AND ABOUT THE AMERINDIOS PEOPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Oquendo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Poverty has come to be understood as the lack of income to cover basic needs. The World Bank (2002 defined it as hunger, while ECLAC (2000 within a more relative framework, he said, consists of "lack of economic and social resources that the referential society considers basic." Are indigenous peoples considered poor according to these conceptual frameworks? The episteme of the indigenous peoples is built with another language / language which will fit into these paradigms. However, work as an activity, as action is the universal difference between man and animals. The man when he works uses the language because the work itself is a language and constitutes the tool to organize and benefit from nature. The language of Amerindian peoples has been displaced by modernism. How does Amerindian peoples participate in the work if their language does not participate in the institutions of wage-labor societies? With these questions I will address the differentiality of the term poverty in and on Amerindian peoples.

  17. Emotion recognition in Chinese people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chetwyn C H; Wong, Raymond; Wang, Kai; Lee, Tatia M C

    2008-01-15

    This study examined whether people with paranoid or nonparanoid schizophrenia would show emotion-recognition deficits, both facial and prosodic. Furthermore, this study examined the neuropsychological predictors of emotion-recognition ability in people with schizophrenia. Participants comprised 86 people, of whom: 43 were people diagnosed with schizophrenia and 43 were controls. The 43 clinical participants were placed in either the paranoid group (n=19) or the nonparanoid group (n=24). Each participant was administered the Facial Emotion Recognition task and the Prosodic Recognition task, together with other neuropsychological measures of attention and visual perception. People suffering from nonparanoid schizophrenia were found to have deficits in both facial and prosodic emotion recognition, after correction for the differences in the intelligence and depression scores between the two groups. Furthermore, spatial perception was observed to be the best predictor of facial emotion identification in individuals with nonparanoid schizophrenia, whereas attentional processing control predicted both prosodic emotion identification and discrimination in nonparanoid schizophrenia patients. Our findings suggest that patients with schizophrenia in remission may still suffer from impairment of certain aspects of emotion recognition.

  18. THE ASSERTIVENESS OF PEOPLE WHO PRACTICE KARATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szark-Eckardt Miroslawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Assertiveness is the ability to express your thoughts, beliefs and opinions without the feeling of internal tension, that is why it is a desired trait of character. One of the examples of sports disciplines in which assertiveness can play a desired role is karate. One of the aims of this paper was to answer the question, whether the act of doing karate influences the level of assertiveness among people who practice it and to compare the results with the level of assertiveness declared by people who do other sports. The method applied in this paper was the diagnostics survey, while the tool was the questionnaire form based on the Rathus Assertiveness Scale. 50 students who practice karate on regular basis and 50 students who do other sports participated in the research. It is undeniable that the level of assertiveness among people who practice karate is higher in comparison to people who do other sports. Karate doers, both men and women obtained better results compared to the second group of sportsmen/women. This regularity can be observed among men, but it is more perceptible among women. As the research presents, people who attend karate trainings at least three times a week are characterized by a higher level of assertiveness in comparison to those who attend the training once a week.

  19. Internet Usage among Children and Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karayagiz Muslu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Computers have occupied increasingly central roles in children’s world with the advance of technology. They have proved to be an ideal companion for children in developing and developed countries who spend most of their time at school or home with computers. As a measure of development and modernization, technology has made people’s lives easier and contributed positively to social well-being so far while it has also brought about some problems and threats stemming from irresponsible use of Internet. Unmonitored use of Internet may cause damages in children’s and young people’s physical, psychological, social and cognitive development. It seems imperative to assure that children and young people can benefit from computers and Internet resources effectively and productively while measures for appropriate and safe use of Internet are to be taken into serious consideration. Therefore, the government offices and institutions should lay stress upon the issue; education professionals and parents should be well-informed and regularly updated; and finally children and young people should be educated and monitored to achieve a better and efficient use of Internet. In this paper, has been mentioned to negative effect of internet usage on physical, psychosocial and cognitive health of children and young people. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(5.000: 445-450

  20. Health care for people with disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Leturia Arrazola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of disabled people aren’t or don’t feel ill, and despite that they should be taken care of by the general medical services as many other citizens, most of them need a more intense and frequent health care. This is explained by a higher prevalence of some medical conditions as well as a higher risk of comorbidity among the people with disabilities (in comparison to the general population. At the moment there are many problems concerning accessibility, underdiagnose and overtreatment. National health systems should be able to offer all their services adapted to disabled people in order to obtain results for this group that are similar to those of the rest of the population. To achieve this objective it is necessary to improve professional competencies and skills and develop some specific health programmes.

  1. Food patterns of Polish older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadolowska, L.; Danowska-Oziewicz, M.; Niedzwiedzka, E.

    2006-01-01

    Food patterns of Polish older people were separated and described. The research included 422 people aged 65+ years, living in 5 geographical locations. Participants of the study were selected in quota sampling. Criteria for recruitment included sex, age (65-^74 or 75+ years) and family status...... (living alone or living with other people). Respondents were asked questions about consumption of 55 food products. The factor analysis allowed for separating 21 food patterns. They included from 1 to 3 groups of products, intake of which was mutually dependant. Big number of separated food patterns...... and small number of products fonning joint food patterns speak in advocacy of relatively small reciprocal relationship between different food items consumed by the seniors in Poland....

  2. Document recognition serving people with disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchterman, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Document recognition advances have improved the lives of people with print disabilities, by providing accessible documents. This invited paper provides perspectives on the author's career progression from document recognition professional to social entrepreneur applying this technology to help people with disabilities. Starting with initial thoughts about optical character recognition in college, it continues with the creation of accurate omnifont character recognition that did not require training. It was difficult to make a reading machine for the blind in a commercial setting, which led to the creation of a nonprofit social enterprise to deliver these devices around the world. This network of people with disabilities scanning books drove the creation of Bookshare.org, an online library of scanned books. Looking forward, the needs for improved document recognition technology to further lower the barriers to reading are discussed. Document recognition professionals should be proud of the positive impact their work has had on some of society's most disadvantaged communities.

  3. Quality of care for people with multimorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Michaela L.; Høst, Dorte; Christensen, Mikkel B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity is becoming increasingly prevalent and presents challenges for healthcare providers and systems. Studies examining the relationship between multimorbidity and quality of care report mixed findings. The purpose of this study was to investigate quality of care for people ...... includes formally assigned responsibility for care coordination, a change in the financial incentive structure towards a system rewarding high quality care and care focusing on prevention of disease exacerbation, as well as implementing shared medical record systems.......BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity is becoming increasingly prevalent and presents challenges for healthcare providers and systems. Studies examining the relationship between multimorbidity and quality of care report mixed findings. The purpose of this study was to investigate quality of care for people...... with multimorbidity in the publicly funded healthcare system in Denmark. METHODS: To investigate the quality of care for people with multimorbidity different groups of clinicians from the hospital, general practice and the municipality reviewed records from 23 persons with multimorbidity and discussed them in three...

  4. Building creative environments and leading creative people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wantland, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that everything starts with people. The key strategy for the renewal of the petroleum industry is to discover and implement the innate creativity of its people. The corporation is the vehicle through which people express their creative spirit and abilities, and leadership is the catalyst of change, renewal, and transformation required. Leaders must build environments to foster the increased need for innovation, teamwork, technical competitiveness, and improved flow of information. The leader must create, manage, and defend an environment that supports the creative capacity of the workforce and realizes the mission of the group. He or she must have the insight to develop a compelling vision instead of a meeting agenda, dynamic teams instead of task forces and committees, and to share that vision in a compelling way. In turn the individual contributors must take a larger responsibility for planning and managing their careers and must continuously seek ways to increase their value and influence in their organizations

  5. Four billion people facing severe water scarcity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Mesfin M; Hoekstra, Arjen Y

    2016-02-01

    Freshwater scarcity is increasingly perceived as a global systemic risk. Previous global water scarcity assessments, measuring water scarcity annually, have underestimated experienced water scarcity by failing to capture the seasonal fluctuations in water consumption and availability. We assess blue water scarcity globally at a high spatial resolution on a monthly basis. We find that two-thirds of the global population (4.0 billion people) live under conditions of severe water scarcity at least 1 month of the year. Nearly half of those people live in India and China. Half a billion people in the world face severe water scarcity all year round. Putting caps to water consumption by river basin, increasing water-use efficiencies, and better sharing of the limited freshwater resources will be key in reducing the threat posed by water scarcity on biodiversity and human welfare.

  6. Access to mobile communications by older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Toan; Irizarry, Carol; Garrett, Rob; Downing, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    To investigate how older people effectively identify, select and learn to use mobile communications technologies to enhance communication and safety, and support independent living. One hundred and fifty-three older South Australians participated in a purpose-designed survey questionnaire. Older people relied on family and friends for information and advice (76%), and their children's assistance with buying (45%) and learning to use (48%) new technology. The most preferred learning method was face-to-face training (56%). Less than half (44%) were interested in trying out new designs/applications, functions and capabilities that could assist with independent living. The highest need was for personal security and emergencies (88%). Findings suggest that the family and friends of older people play an important role in identifying, selecting and learning to use mobile communication technologies. The safety and emergency capabilities of mobile communications technologies were more important than having functions that could assist with independent living. © 2014 ACOTA.

  7. Communication Support for People with ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beukelman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS experience a motor speech disorder, such as dysarthria, as the disease progresses. At some point, 80 to 95% of people with ALS are unable to meet their daily communication needs using natural speech. Unfortunately, once intelligibility begins to decrease, speech performance often deteriorates so rapidly that there is little time to implement an appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC intervention; therefore, appropriate timing of referral for AAC assessment and intervention continues to be a most important clinical decision-making issue. AAC acceptance and use have increased considerably during the past decade. Many people use AAC until within a few weeks of their deaths.

  8. PTSD in older bereaved people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-01-01

      Late life bereavement has been associated with psychological problems, mainly depression. A few studies indicated that Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was an important issue to investigate in late life bereavement reactions. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of PTSD in recently...... bereaved elderly people compared to married controls and to investigate whether the loss of a spouse in old age, in contrast with earlier assumptions, could lead to PTSD. Two hundred and ninety six Danish elderly bereaved people (mean age 73 years, 113 males) were chosen from national registers and were...... subsequently assessed two months post-bereavement. They were compared with a control group of 276 married elderly people. The prevalence of PTSD and depression were measured through a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that 16% of the bereaved and 4% of the control group had a PTSD diagnosis (ES=.35...

  9. Emergency warning for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkovich, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The intent of this article is to assess the current state of Emergency Warning capabilities in the United States and make recommendations on what needs to be done to cost effectively establish a National Emergency Warning System to best serve the people of the United States, including those with disabilities. As part of this assessment, terminology will be defined, existing systems will be examined, critical needs and functions will be explained, and recommendations made for a system to deliver emergency messages to those people immediately at risk from natural and human-caused disasters in a timely and effective manner, regardless of location or situational circumstance. The assessment will include the needs and available technologies for delivering emergency warnings to people with disabilities, which are generally little understood, poorly addressed, and often ignored.

  10. Chernobyl liquidators. The people and the doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, Oleg V.; Steinhaeusler, Friedrich; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger

    2000-01-01

    This study is an attempt to evaluate the data available from the scientific literature concerning clean-up workers, or so-called liquidators, of the Chernobyl accident. There are several different definitions of liquidators: Legal definitions of 'liquidators'. Their importance rests on the fact that some state Chernobyl registers are based on these definitions. Definitions from various scientific reports. Definitions for the purpose, which have been published in scientific papers and books. The simplified definition of liquidators would be people who were directly involved in clean-up operations in the exclusion zone in 1986-1991. Estimations of the number of liquidators vary from 100 000 to 800 000 people. Four major cohorts of liquidators are now split among Russia (168,000 people), Belarus (63,500 people), Ukraine (123,536 people) and the Baltic States (about 15,000 people from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania). The definition of liquidator and the formation of cohort are the most critical factor in liquidator-related studies and not enough attention is paid to this matter by researchers. The term 'liquidator' describes a very heterogeneous group of people. Liquidators may be grouped according to work performed in the exclusion zone or affiliation to various organisations. The majority of liquidators in 1986-1987 were conscripts and reservists of the Soviet Union Army. According to data from Russian National Medical and Dosimetric Registry, 76% of liquidators were 25-39 years old at the moment of arrival to the Chernobyl area. Only about 1% of liquidators was women. From the results of biodosimetry we know that the average accumulated dose estimation for the liquidator group is about 0.2 Gy. The official documented average dose from the Russian National Medical Dosimetric Registry is 0.13 Gy. However, the liquidator group contains some overexposed subgroups with a higher accumulated dose. Individual dosimetry is only available for small subgroups of liquidators

  11. Controlling young people through treatment and punishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Tea Torbenfeldt

    2015-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates how both treatment and punishment is part of controlling young people involved in crime in the Danish welfare state. Lately there has been an increase in the use of confinement in young offenders institutions and thus a turn towards stricter punishments for crime. However......, treatment aiming at rehabilitation is still an integrated part of the system and the organization of the young offenders institutions. For the young people subjected to control both treatment and punishment are regarded as effective means of risk-control but there are also limitations and unintended results...

  12. Jobless. Unemployment and young people's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, S L; Taylor, R J; Kerr, C B

    1998-03-02

    Morrell, Taylor and Kerr, from the University of Sydney's Department of Public Health, review the evidence of an association between unemployment and psychological and physical ill-health in young people aged 15-24 years. Aggregate data show youth unemployment and youth suicide to be strongly associated. Youth unemployment is also associated with psychological symptoms, such as depression and loss of confidence. Effects on physical health have been less extensively studies; however, there is some evidence for an association with raised blood pressure. Finally, the prevalence of lifestyle risk factors (cannabis use and, less consistently, tobacco and alcohol consumption) is higher in unemployed compared with employed young people.

  13. Ecology of people and animals: postradiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozkina, T.S.; Rutkovskaya, Zh.A.

    2008-01-01

    A significant weakening of the antioxidant defense system along with the accumulation of lipid peroxidation product were noted in the organism of animals and people after long staying in contaminated zone as well as of rats which Cs-137. The most reduced content of non-enzyme antioxidants: vitamins A, E, C and carotenes. The correction of antioxidant status was used of 'Resiston' (inclusive vitamins A, E, C and β-carotenes). It was established in the experiments that new antioxidant complex has expressive antioxidant properties. The application of 'Resiston' strengthens the antioxidant protection of organism animals and people after the external and internal irradiation. (authors)

  14. Chernobyl liquidators. The people and the doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyakov, Oleg V. [Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom); Steinhaeusler, Friedrich [University of Salzburg, Institute of Physic and Biophysics, Salzburg (Austria); Trott, Klaus-Ruediger [Univ. of London, Queen Mary and Westfield College, St. Bartholomew' s and the Royal London Hospital School of Medicine and Dentistry, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    This study is an attempt to evaluate the data available from the scientific literature concerning clean-up workers, or so-called liquidators, of the Chernobyl accident. There are several different definitions of liquidators: Legal definitions of 'liquidators'. Their importance rests on the fact that some state Chernobyl registers are based on these definitions. Definitions from various scientific reports. Definitions for the purpose, which have been published in scientific papers and books. The simplified definition of liquidators would be people who were directly involved in clean-up operations in the exclusion zone in 1986-1991. Estimations of the number of liquidators vary from 100 000 to 800 000 people. Four major cohorts of liquidators are now split among Russia (168,000 people), Belarus (63,500 people), Ukraine (123,536 people) and the Baltic States (about 15,000 people from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania). The definition of liquidator and the formation of cohort are the most critical factor in liquidator-related studies and not enough attention is paid to this matter by researchers. The term 'liquidator' describes a very heterogeneous group of people. Liquidators may be grouped according to work performed in the exclusion zone or affiliation to various organisations. The majority of liquidators in 1986-1987 were conscripts and reservists of the Soviet Union Army. According to data from Russian National Medical and Dosimetric Registry, 76% of liquidators were 25-39 years old at the moment of arrival to the Chernobyl area. Only about 1% of liquidators was women. From the results of biodosimetry we know that the average accumulated dose estimation for the liquidator group is about 0.2 Gy. The official documented average dose from the Russian National Medical Dosimetric Registry is 0.13 Gy. However, the liquidator group contains some overexposed subgroups with a higher accumulated dose. Individual dosimetry is only available for small

  15. Managing change and people in libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, Tinker

    2009-01-01

    Managing Change and People in Libraries is designed to help library staff find options and compromises to personnel and management problems associated with the constant changes faced in libraries today. This text looks at theories of management, how people and processes change the stresses faced, how to analyze problems, find directions for change to be used and learn how to change negatives into positives in the workplace. The book is designed to help readers find direction and purpose in working practice.Theories explained through real life examplesAlternatives devel

  16. Improving library services to people with disabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Deines-Jones, Courtney

    2007-01-01

    The book takes account of the key fact that to maximize their potential, people must have lifelong access to the information and services offered through books and libraries. Whether to address concerns of an ageing population or to enable all citizens to contribute fully through meaningful education and work opportunities, more emphasis is being given to promoting library services to people who have disabilities. This book is a compendium of articles focused on serving adults with disabilities in an international setting. From this book, librarians, policy makers and constituents will underst

  17. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  18. Levels And Spectra Of Aircraft Noise And People\\'s Reactions In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of sound levels and spectral distribution as well as people\\'s reactions to aircraft noise in three Nigerian international airports have been conducted. The study comprised physical measurements and social survey. Results show that maximum octave band pressure levels (BPLs) for Margaret Ekpo, Port Harcourt and ...

  19. Attitudes towards People with Disabilities--What Do People with Intellectual Disabilities Have to Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr McEvoy, Sandra; Keenan, Emer

    2014-01-01

    Attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities have traditionally been very negative, resulting in people with intellectual disabilities being treated badly by other. This claim was explored by conducting focus groups with adults who have an intellectual disability to find out about their everyday experiences in different places and using…

  20. Hobbies of Retired People in the People's Republic of China: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun-Chen

    1990-01-01

    Described and analyzed hobbies of over 500 individuals in the People's Republic of China. Results indicated there were significant differences between the hobbies of retired and younger people; reading was the hobby most preferred; and gender, age, education, and previous occupation were factors that most influenced the retired person's choice of…

  1. China's People-to-people Diplomacy and Its Importance to China-EU Relations: A Historical Institutionalism Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available People-to-people exchange has become a heated topic of the Chinese foreign policy. Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, China has established people-to-people dialogues with the United States, the European Union, the United Kingdom, France and Russia. In 2012, China and the EU established a high-level dialogue for people-to-people exchange, making people-to-people exchange the third pillar of China-EU relations. However, China is not a newcomer to people-to-people exchanges with Europe. Why does China launch the people-to-people diplomacy? Is it a plus or a must for China as well as for China-EU relations? The author reviews the history and current situation of China's people-to-people exchange and investigates China’s motivations behind the policy. Using the historical institutionalism as an approach, this paper argues that people-to-people diplomacy is a key component of the contemporary Chinese foreign policy towards Europe. China has long been an unequal counterpart to Europe since the 1840s. After the development of bilateral political and economic cooperation in the past four decades, people-to-people diplomacy is the last part that China needs to finish in order to regain equal status with Europe. In addition, it is also a step towards realising the "great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation".

  2. What differs between happy and unhappy people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliterna-Lipovčan, Ljiljana; Prizmić-Larsen, Zvjezdana

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the determinants (demographic, personal, behavioural, and social) by which happy and unhappy people differ. The primary sample from which the participants were chosen was a representative sample of Croatian citizens (N = 4000). On the basis of the distribution of overall happiness the sample of the highest (the happy group) and the lowest 10 % of participants (the unhappy group) were selected. The happy group (N = 400) represented the upper end of the happiness distribution, while the unhappy group (N = 400) represented the lower end of the distribution. The questionnaire included demographic characteristics (age, gender, income, and education), ratings of subjective health status, satisfaction with specific personal and national domains (IWI-International Wellbeing Index), trust in people, and trust in institutions. Frequency of various leisure activities, and involvement in the community life were also reported. The differences in examined variables were analysed between the two groups. Results showed that the happy individuals were younger, with higher income, and with higher education than unhappy ones. After controlling for age, income, and education level, the happy people were found to be more satisfied with personal and national wellbeing domains, of better subjective health status, reported higher trust in people and institutions, and were more engaged in leisure activities and community life than the unhappy ones.

  3. A Year's Turning: Young People Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, I. V., Ed.

    This book is an anthology of unedited verse and prose written by 14- and 15-year-old students. The book is intended for teachers in training, for their tutors, and for all teachers of English. The verses are classified as undirected and directed poems about nature, places, war, the Egyptian Tomb, up and back again, and people. The prose is…

  4. People with Learning Disabilities and "Active Ageing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Liam; Boxall, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Background: People (with and without learning disabilities) are living longer. Demographic ageing creates challenges and the leading policy response to these challenges is "active ageing". "Active" does not just refer to the ability to be physically and economically active, but also includes ongoing social and civic engagement…

  5. Evacuation of People with Visual Impairments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Janne Gress

    . The interview study revealed that people with disabilities visit all kind of buildings. It is therefore not possible to neglect their presence in buildings while ensuring equal egress for all occupants. It is also found that building elements such as stairs, signage, doors e.t.c., which are essential elements...

  6. Automatic Estimation of Movement Statistics of People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ægidiussen Jensen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Henrik Anker; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Automatic analysis of how people move about in a particular environment has a number of potential applications. However, no system has so far been able to do detection and tracking robustly. Instead, trajectories are often broken into tracklets. The key idea behind this paper is based around...

  7. [Elderly people and removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de

    2009-01-01

    The most frequently reported disadvantages of removable partial dentures are the more demanding daily oral hygiene self-care, especially for people who already experience difficulties in self-care, and the possible harmful influence on the remaining dentition. These disadvantages can be expressed in

  8. Credibility in Mindfulness Training for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Harriet

    2018-01-01

    Providing the evidence-base to establish whether mindfulness for young people is beneficial is undoubtedly more challenging than it has been for adults. First of all there are the practical difficulties in training teachers to deliver mindfulness well. Yet this is what needs to be done; teachers with the class management and pedagogical expertise…

  9. Dakota and Ojibwe People in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Frances

    1977-01-01

    A biographical sketch of Frances Densmore, ethnologist of Native American music, and seven articles describing the lives of the Dakota and Ojibwe people as Densmore saw them are presented. The biographical sketch recounts Ms. Densmore's study of Ojibwe music and her ability to copy songs from memory when listening to them at fairs or attending…

  10. HIV Among People Aged 50 and Over

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012;102(8):1516-26. National Institute on Aging. HIV, AIDS, and older people . Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health; 2016. Accessed September 14, 2017. Lindau ST, Schumm LP, Laumann EO, Levinson W, O’Muircheartaigh CA, Waite LJ. A study of sexuality and health among older adults in the United ...

  11. Education for Older People in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, Andrea; Lamura, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    This article provides information on trends in formal and informal adult education in Italy, with a particular focus on the older learners (over 65). Main providers, programs, objectives/motivations, and financial and legal framework are described. In general, over-65-year-old people were found to be underrepresented in participation. They were…

  12. The Coming Age of People Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Brigitte

    1976-01-01

    Notes a chasm between cultural and occupational aspirations (for self-realization) and the existing job market. Suggests the opening of a new sector of people work, e.g. services for the very young and very old, urban and community task forces, political participation groups, agencies for intergroup conflict resolution, etc. (JT)

  13. Young People in Britain. CRE Factsheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission for Racial Equality, London (England).

    This factsheet provides information about young people from ethnic minorities in Britain. In spring 1997, 48% of the ethnic minority population of Britain was under 24 years of age, in comparison with 31% of the White population. Twenty-two percent of the ethnic minority population was of compulsory school age, compared with 14% of the White…

  14. Distance Education for People with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakou, Maria; Manousou, Evaggelia

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the standards of higher Distance Education, focusing on the Hellenic Open University, for people who have visual impairments, so that it becomes fully accessible and thus helps reduce social exclusion. Specifically, it aims to study the operational context of Distance Education, the possibilities that modern technology provides…

  15. Speech and Hearing Problems among Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstenson, Blue

    1978-01-01

    Findings from speech and hearing tests of older people in South Dakota community senior programs indicate the need for better testing and therapy procedures. Lipreading may be more effective than hearing aids, and factors other than hearing may be involved. Some problems and needs are noted. (MF)

  16. TB Testing for People Living with HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-23

    Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, explains why it is important for people living with HIV to be tested for TB.  Created: 7/23/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/23/2012.

  17. Information needs of people with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ming Ley; Armour, Carol; LeMay, Kate; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-06-01

    To describe the information needs of a group of Australians with asthma and the extent to which their needs had been met. A self-administered survey was completed by people with asthma either presenting at community pharmacies or registered with a medical research institute database. The survey questions were developed based on a review of the literature, and included questions regarding participants' information needs about their asthma, their sources of asthma information and the extent to which these information needs had been met. The responses concerning information needs were analysed thematically. Responses concerning sources of asthma information and the extent to which needs were met were analysed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Seventy-one people completed the survey. Key information needs that were identified included medications, management of asthma, asthma triggers, cure, aetiology of asthma and latest research. A third of participants reported having only 'very little', 'a little' or 'some' of their information needs met. The most common source of information was from a doctor (94% respondents), followed by a pharmacist or pharmacy assistant (56%). Insights into the information needs of people with asthma have been provided. In light of the level of unmet information needs of people with asthma, and the types of information sought, pharmacists are in an ideal position to close the information gap and promote optimal asthma self-management practices. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. EMPOWERING GIRLS AND CONNECTING PEOPLE THROUGH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    through a school social work intervention and connecting the people ... All students. (638) who attended the intervention workshop constituted the sample for the study. Data was collected through questionnaires administered after a presentation of the “unknown burden” of .... and high expectations of school performance.

  19. Resolving person names in web people search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balog, K.; Azzopardi, L.; de Rijke, M.; King, I.; Baeza-Yates, R.

    2009-01-01

    Disambiguating person names in a set of documents (such as a set of web pages returned in response to a person name) is a key task for the presentation of results and the automatic profiling of experts. With largely unstructured documents and an unknown number of people with the same name the

  20. When CERN goes out to meet people

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    2014-01-01

    Giving lectures about high-energy physics and particle accelerators to the public is an activity that several people from CERN enjoy and pursue all around the globe. Sometimes, this happens on the moose and pony trails, as Pauline Gagnon recounts…   CERN is really a unique place and people want to hear more about what we do. With the internet, people are keeping abreast of the latest scientific developments and many crave the opportunity to meet scientists and find out more about what is going on at CERN. So do not hesitate to contact local colleges and astronomy clubs. Get yourself invited to talk about our research. Last autumn, I gave a series of public lectures all around the province of Québec (Canada) and in the Shetland Islands (Northern Scotland). Both tours took me to remote areas where I was amazed to see the public interest for lectures in physics. In Québec, one of my six stops was Chibougamau, a town of 7500 people (and probably as many moose) locat...

  1. Older people's experiences of dream coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadensten, Barbro

    2009-12-01

    Recalling and talking about dreams could initiate dream work among older people and provide an opportunity for self-confrontation and personal growth, which could in turn promote gerotranscendental development. The present article describes older people's opinions about participating in a dream-coaching group; it also briefly describes the theoretical foundation of dream coaching. The study aim was to investigate older people's experience of participating in a dream-coaching group based on Jungian psychology. A descriptive design was used. Retrospective interviews were explored using qualitative content analysis. The participants were satisfied with the arrangement of the dream-coaching groups. All participants believed that they had recalled their dreams and thought much more about their dreams during the period in which the dream-coaching group met. Three diverse appraisals of participating in a dream-coaching group, which had different effects on the participants, were identified: "An activity like any other activity," "An activity that led to deeper thoughts about the meaning of dreams," and "An activity that led to deeper thoughts both about the meaning of dreams and about how dreams can improve one's understanding of the life situation." It is possible to arrange dream-coaching groups for older people and could be a way to promote personal development using this type of intervention. The study provides some guidance as to how such a group could be organized, thus facilitating use of dream-coaching groups in gerontological care.

  2. The people of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tredici, R. del.

    1982-01-01

    Compilation of 51 interviews with people of the most various social classes of the surrounding of TMI immediately and some time after the accident. Interviews of the year 1981, e.g. with Dr. Tokuhata, functionary in the Ministry of Health of Pa, on a pretended increase of infant mortality after the accident, are not contained in the original American edition. (HP) [de

  3. Sexting and Young People: Experts' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Shelley; Sanci, Lena; Temple-Smith, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Young people's "sexting"--defined by the "Macquarie Dictionary Online" (2010) as the sending and receiving of sexually explicit images via mobile phones--has become a focus of much media reporting; however, research regarding the phenomenon is in its infancy. This paper reports on the first phase of a study to understand this activity more…

  4. Crisis and Communication among Rural Poor People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Ganjar Runtiko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the crisis is often multiple on people in rural poverty that secluded and away from the reach of government. Main factor cannot be ignored in crisis is communication. Prolonged crisis will occur when the channels of communication in society clogged. This study establishes three specific targets: (1 To obtain a comprehensive overview of the rural poor people’s knowledge about the crisis and the potential impact, (2 To discover crisis problems faced by the rural people poor, (3 To enlist communication problems in a crisis situation. This study used a qualitative method with a case study approach. Research data collect by conducting FGD of 40 informants selected based on purposive sampling, furthermore eight people were interviewed in depth, plus other supporting informant. The results of the research show people on those two locations have understood the crisis based on their experience of dealing with it. They believe the economic crisis as the first aspect that must be resolved. The completion of crisis should consider indigenous wisdom to avoid a new crisis.

  5. Managing effective partnerships in older people's services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Henk

    The integration of older people's services is a challenge to all countries with an ageing population. Although it is widely acknowledged that acute care, long-term care, social care, housing, leisure, education and other services should all operate in a more 'joined-up manner', achieving this in

  6. Global Stories of People Working for Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragman, June; Szasz, Michael

    Developed by a Canadian volunteer organization, this textbook for high school and adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and literacy students explores current international events and social issues using both personal and global perspectives. It includes personal stories of people's lives, discussions of social and political issues in a wider…

  7. The People Side of Performance Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Richard F.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses 11 keys to the personal side of performance improvement, including positive attitude, high self esteem and positive self-image, communication skills, lifelong learning, caring about other people, health and well-being, motivation, goal setting, relaxation, visualization, and personal value system. (LRW)

  8. Low-level radiation risks in people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goloman, M.; Filjushkin, V. lgor

    1993-01-01

    Using the limited human data plus the relationships derived from the laboratory, a leukemia risk model has been developed as well as a suggested model for other cancers in people exposed to low levels of radiation. Theoretical experimental and epidemiological evidence will be presented in an integrated stochastic model for projection of radiation-induced cancer risks

  9. Criminal Justice Research Is about People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, John P.

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that the Golden Age of criminal justice research has ended with an impending era of austerity. Reviews the work done in the past forty years and recommends a return to the people-oriented research that characterized the Chicago School of the early '20s rather than systems research. (Author/JAC)

  10. New Perspectives on People and Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The aim of this book is to elucidate the role of forests as part of a landscape in the life of people. Most landscapes today are cultural landscapes that are influenced by human activity and that in turn have a profound effect on our understanding of and identification with a place. The book...

  11. Employment of Handicapped People in Leisure Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, David M.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    In response to the need for up-to-date information on employment opportunities for handicapped people in the leisure occupations, a national survey was conducted to determine both existing levels of employment and employer practices. The survey was sent to 500 agencies and businesses representing four leisure occupational subclusters: travel,…

  12. Polypharmacy and older people - the GP perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Hendriksen, C

    2005-01-01

    and to consider different approaches when evaluating evidence of risk and benefit for the individual. Old people are facing a considerable risk of adverse drug reactions and recent initiatives, including the Continuous Medical Educational Efforts Programme, address issues of inappropriate prescribing practices...

  13. Older People of Tomorrow: A Psychosocial Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    Attempts to narrow the scope of present uncertainties about the older population by sketching a psychosocial profile of the older people of tomorrow based on what is known today. Focuses on the baby boom generation and the interplay between personal attributes they could bring to late life and the social and physical environment in which they…

  14. Engaging older people with participatory design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacono, I.; Marti, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a design case focusing on participatory design (PD) with older people. We experimented with PD techniques to foster engagement with participants in development of a graphical user interface (GUI) for controlling a robotic system in a smart home environment. The tenet of our approach is

  15. Structural Connectivity Networks of Transgender People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Küblböck, Martin; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Although previous investigations of transsexual people have focused on regional brain alterations, evaluations on a network level, especially those structural in nature, are largely missing. Therefore, we investigated the structural connectome of 23 female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF)

  16. Access to Employment: People with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    Reports the findings of Lou Harris and Associates (1987) on what employers are doing to employ people with disabilities and what their experiences with disabled employees have been. Presents strategies that provide a model for addressing the needs of the disabled population and provide them with opportunities. (JS)

  17. People of Samoa: Building Bridges of Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT. Language Research Center.

    The purpose of this communication learning aid is to help Americans become more effective in understanding and communicating with people of another culture. This publication discusses some differences encountered in Samoa in such things as food, laws, customs, religion, language, dress and basic attitudes. It is designed to prepare the traveller…

  18. Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Linda Tuhiwai

    From the vantage point of indigenous peoples, the term "research" is inextricably linked to European imperialism and colonialism. In this book, an indigenous researcher calls for the decolonization of research methods. The first part of the book critically examines the historical and philosophical bases of Western research; Western…

  19. Seven Billion People: Fostering Productive Struggle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Jaclyn M.

    2018-01-01

    How can a cognitively demanding real-world task such as the Seven Billion People problem promote productive struggle "and" help shape students' mathematical dispositions? Driving home from school one evening, Jaclyn Murawska heard a commentator on the radio announce three statements: (1) experts had determined that the world population…

  20. Experiences of deafblind people about health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Valderas, Carmen; Macías-Seda, Juana; Gil-García, Eugenia

    Deafblindness is a disability resulting from the combination of visual and auditory sensory impairments, which can manifest in different levels causing special communication problems. Deafblind people have special needs that derive from difficulties in sensing, understanding, attention and a lack of the skills required to function effectively in society. Deafblindness requires specialized services, personnel specifically trained in its care and special methods for communication. The main objective of this study is to explore the experiences of deafblind people in relation to health care throughout their lives. This study was developed at the St. Angela de la Cruz Centre, belonging to the Association of Parents of Deafblind People in Spain. Phenomenological qualitative study, through semi-structured interviews with deafblind people at the St. Ángela de la Cruz Centre, Salteras (Seville), carried out in 2015, with the help of interpreters in Spanish sign language. Topics covered in the interviews refer to facilities, human resources, time waiting and health care. Coinciding statements were obtained, where the participants point out architectural and educational barriers in health care and stand out better if the professionals know sign language. It can be highlighted that healthcare professionals lack knowledge of all aspects of deafblindness, sign language in particular, and there is a shortage of signs and information for the deafblind. Moreover, alternatives are required to reduce waiting times and improve direct communication with health professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Cancer survival among Alaska Native people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Sarah H; Meisner, Angela L W; Zimpelman, Garrett L; Barry, Marc; Wiggins, Charles L

    2018-03-26

    Recent cancer survival trends among American Indian and Alaska Native (AN) people are not well understood; survival has not been reported among AN people since 2001. This study examined cause-specific survival among AN cancer patients for lung, colorectal, female breast, prostate, and kidney cancers. It evaluated whether survival differed between cancers diagnosed in 1992-2002 (the earlier period) and cancers diagnosed in 2003-2013 (the later period) and by the age at diagnosis (<65 vs ≥65 years), stage at diagnosis (local or regional/distant/unknown), and sex. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate univariate and multivariate-adjusted cause-specific survival for each cancer. An improvement was observed in 5-year survival over time from lung cancer (hazard ratio [HR] for the later period vs the earlier period, 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.97), and a marginally nonsignificant improvement was observed for colorectal cancer (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-1.01). Site-specific differences in survival were observed by age and stage at diagnosis. This study presents the first data on cancer survival among AN people in almost 2 decades. During this time, AN people have experienced improvements in survival from lung and colorectal cancers. The reasons for these improvements may include increased access to care (including screening) as well as improvements in treatment. Improving cancer survival should be a priority for reducing the burden of cancer among AN people and eliminating cancer disparities. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  2. Are People With Whiplash-Associated Neck Pain Different from People With Nonspecific Neck Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anstey, Ricci; Kongsted, Alice; Kamper, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study with cross sectional and longitudinal analyses. Background The clinical importance of a history of whiplash associated disorder (WAD) in people with neck pain remains uncertain. Objective To compare people with WAD to people with non......-specific neck pain, in terms of their baseline characteristics, and pain and disability outcomes over 1 year. Methods Consecutive patients with neck pain presenting to a secondary care spine centre answered a comprehensive self-report questionnaire and underwent a physical examination. Patients were classified...

  3. Case 3. "Jiang Tao v. Chengdu Branch, People's People's Bank of China": Opinion by the People's Court in Wuhou District, Chengdu, Sichuan Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese Education and Society, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the decision of the People's Court in Wuhou District, Chengdu, Sichuan Province on the Jiang Tao v. Chengdu Branch, People's People's Bank of China case. Jiang Tao, the plaintiff, claimed that the defendant Chengdu Branch placed an announcement in the "Chengdu Business Daily" to "recruit tellers for Chengdu…

  4. Review Paper: Rehabilitation of Blind People and People With Low Vision in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Pashmdarfard

    2016-06-01

    Discussion: Proper assessment of the visually disabled is required to implement the appropriate intervention technique. Occupational therapists need to pay special attention to the visually disabled people

  5. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    changing burden of chronic diseases in old age. Chronic disease and most oral diseases share common risk factors. Globally, poor oral health amongst older people has been particularly evident in high levels of tooth loss, dental caries experience, and the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, xerostomia...... and oral precancer/cancer. The negative impact of poor oral conditions on the quality of life of older adults is an important public health issue, which must be addressed by policy-makers. The means for strengthening oral health programme implementation are available; the major challenge is therefore...... to translate knowledge into action programmes for the oral health of older people. The World Health Organization recommends that countries adopt certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly. National health authorities should develop policies and measurable goals and targets for oral health...

  6. Projection Mapping User Interface for Disabled People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelšvartas, Julius; Simutis, Rimvydas; Maskeliūnas, Rytis

    2018-01-01

    Difficulty in communicating is one of the key challenges for people suffering from severe motor and speech disabilities. Often such person can communicate and interact with the environment only using assistive technologies. This paper presents a multifunctional user interface designed to improve communication efficiency and person independence. The main component of this interface is a projection mapping technique used to highlight objects in the environment. Projection mapping makes it possible to create a natural augmented reality information presentation method. The user interface combines a depth sensor and a projector to create camera-projector system. We provide a detailed description of camera-projector system calibration procedure. The described system performs tabletop object detection and automatic projection mapping. Multiple user input modalities have been integrated into the multifunctional user interface. Such system can be adapted to the needs of people with various disabilities.

  7. Working with dying people: Crises and compensations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. McKay

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available In dying and death situations health providers need to be aware of their approach toward death and their work so that they can sustain both themselves and their patterns in offering competent service. Those who work constantly with dying people need to explore (i their motives in exposing such work, (ii the vocational goals they set themselves, (iii how they regard their own and their patients’ deaths, (iv what defences they use to protect themselves from the emotional impact of dying and death, and (v what means they employ in managing stress and burnout. This article discusses these core issues and makes practical suggestions for health providers in caring for themselves and dying people.

  8. Optimising nutrition for older people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Delwyn

    This article explores interventions that can be undertaken to establish and maintain adequate nutritional intake in older people with dementia. This is often a problem, particularly in the later stages of the disease. A literature review was conducted, which identified 12 articles for inclusion. Most of these articles described interventions to maintain adequate nutritional intake in older adults with dementia. Although no standardised intervention was reported, some approaches did appear to be more successful than others. Further research is required on how nurses and nursing assistants can help older people with dementia to maintain adequate nutrition. Staff need more time and training to improve nutritional intake in this group of patients. In addition, enhanced vigilance with respect to eating difficulties and food consumption is necessary.

  9. Do green products make us better people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar, Nina; Zhong, Chen-Bo

    2010-04-01

    Consumer choices reflect not only price and quality preferences but also social and moral values, as witnessed in the remarkable growth of the global market for organic and environmentally friendly products. Building on recent research on behavioral priming and moral regulation, we found that mere exposure to green products and the purchase of such products lead to markedly different behavioral consequences. In line with the halo associated with green consumerism, results showed that people act more altruistically after mere exposure to green products than after mere exposure to conventional products. However, people act less altruistically and are more likely to cheat and steal after purchasing green products than after purchasing conventional products. Together, our studies show that consumption is connected to social and ethical behaviors more broadly across domains than previously thought.

  10. People-oriented Information Visualization Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Bolun

    2018-04-01

    In the 21st century with rapid development, in the wake of the continuous progress of science and technology, human society enters the information era and the era of big data, and the lifestyle and aesthetic system also change accordingly, so the emerging field of information visualization is increasingly popular. Information visualization design is the process of visualizing all kinds of tedious information data, so as to quickly accept information and save time-cost. Along with the development of the process of information visualization, information design, also becomes hotter and hotter, and emotional design, people-oriented design is an indispensable part of in the design of information. This paper probes information visualization design through emotional analysis of information design based on the social context of people-oriented experience from the perspective of art design. Based on the three levels of emotional information design: instinct level, behavior level and reflective level research, to explore and discuss information visualization design.

  11. Housing Accessibility Methodology Targeting Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina

    accessibility problems before the planning of housing intervention strategies. It is also critical that housing standards addressing accessibility intended to accommodate people with functional limitations are valid in the sense that their definitions truly support accessibility. However, there is a paucity...... of valid and reliable assessment instruments targeting housing accessibility, and in-depth analysis of factors potentially impacting on reliability in complex assessment situations is remarkably absent. Moreover, the knowledge base informing the housing standards appears to be vague. We may therefore...... reasonably question the validity of the housing standards addressing accessibility. This thesis addresses housing accessibility methodology in general and the reliability of assessment and the validity of standards targeting older people with functional limitations and a dependence on mobility devices...

  12. Young people's participation in physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Frydendal; Ottesen, Laila; Thing, Lone Friis

    regarding physical activity. 469 students participated in the survey. It is carried out through the online program SurveyXact. The data is processed in SPSS, and subsequently discussed. The primary results reveal that spare time jobs have a large impact on young people’s participation in physical activity......; Shame has an immense influence on the girls’ participation in physical activity; The offers regarding physical activity, provided by the school, appeal more to the boys and the students who are already physically active. Consequently, the students express a wish to have more influence on physical...... of young people today. This means that participation in physical activity cannot be discussed independently, but must always be viewed within the context of the lives of young people today....

  13. Nutrition and oral status in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Yoshida

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reviewed the relationship between oral status and nutritional disorders such as obesity and sarcopenia. A literature search was performed using PubMed to find articles published in and after 2000 by using the following search terms: elderly, nutrition, tooth, tooth loss, mastication, and oral function. Although the literature search revealed that further well-designed studies are difficult controlling all confounding factors thought to influence nutritional status, it may be concluded that tooth loss leads to decreased vegetable and fruit intake and results in nutritional disturbance. This was especially prominent in elderly people who required nursing care. Moreover, although it is becoming clear that not wearing dentures increases the risk of undernutrition, the effect of denture therapy remains debatable. Elderly people in need of nursing care should be studied in future investigations on the relationship between nutrition and oral status because this population is at risk of malnutrition considering both functional and structural problems.

  14. Euro Banknote Recognition System for Blind People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunai Dunai, Larisa; Chillarón Pérez, Mónica; Peris-Fajarnés, Guillermo; Lengua Lengua, Ismael

    2017-01-20

    This paper presents the development of a portable system with the aim of allowing blind people to detect and recognize Euro banknotes. The developed device is based on a Raspberry Pi electronic instrument and a Raspberry Pi camera, Pi NoIR (No Infrared filter) dotted with additional infrared light, which is embedded into a pair of sunglasses that permit blind and visually impaired people to independently handle Euro banknotes, especially when receiving their cash back when shopping. The banknote detection is based on the modified Viola and Jones algorithms, while the banknote value recognition relies on the Speed Up Robust Features (SURF) technique. The accuracies of banknote detection and banknote value recognition are 84% and 97.5%, respectively.

  15. Intelligent Interfaces to Empower People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betke, Margrit

    Severe motion impairments can result from non-progressive disorders, such as cerebral palsy, or degenerative neurological diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Multiple Sclerosis (MS), or muscular dystrophy (MD). They can be due to traumatic brain injuries, for example, due to a traffic accident, or to brainstem strokes [9, 84]. Worldwide, these disorders affect millions of individuals of all races and ethnic backgrounds [4, 75, 52]. Because disease onset of MS and ALS typically occurs in adulthood, afflicted people are usually computer literate. Intelligent interfaces can immensely improve their daily lives by allowing them to communicate and participate in the information society, for example, by browsing the web, posting messages, or emailing friends. However, people with advanced ALS, MS, or MD may reach a point when they cannot control the keyboard and mouse anymore and also cannot rely on automated voice recognition because their speech has become slurred.

  16. Projection Mapping User Interface for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Maskeliūnas, Rytis

    2018-01-01

    Difficulty in communicating is one of the key challenges for people suffering from severe motor and speech disabilities. Often such person can communicate and interact with the environment only using assistive technologies. This paper presents a multifunctional user interface designed to improve communication efficiency and person independence. The main component of this interface is a projection mapping technique used to highlight objects in the environment. Projection mapping makes it possible to create a natural augmented reality information presentation method. The user interface combines a depth sensor and a projector to create camera-projector system. We provide a detailed description of camera-projector system calibration procedure. The described system performs tabletop object detection and automatic projection mapping. Multiple user input modalities have been integrated into the multifunctional user interface. Such system can be adapted to the needs of people with various disabilities. PMID:29686827

  17. Projection Mapping User Interface for Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Gelšvartas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Difficulty in communicating is one of the key challenges for people suffering from severe motor and speech disabilities. Often such person can communicate and interact with the environment only using assistive technologies. This paper presents a multifunctional user interface designed to improve communication efficiency and person independence. The main component of this interface is a projection mapping technique used to highlight objects in the environment. Projection mapping makes it possible to create a natural augmented reality information presentation method. The user interface combines a depth sensor and a projector to create camera-projector system. We provide a detailed description of camera-projector system calibration procedure. The described system performs tabletop object detection and automatic projection mapping. Multiple user input modalities have been integrated into the multifunctional user interface. Such system can be adapted to the needs of people with various disabilities.

  18. Participation of Aboriginal peoples in resource development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, J.; Snow, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The means by which the petroleum industry can establish a successful relationship with Aboriginal people and their community are described. It was emphasized that industry and Aboriginals must define training, employment and business objectives jointly for the longer term. Suncor's Oil Sands Group operates in an area considered to be traditional lands by the First Nation and Metis people of Fort McKay. Suncor recognizes its responsibilities to Fort McKay and has taken the approach to support Aboriginal community development through written agreements and protocols which identify the social, economic, environmental and political issues that are important to them. The Memorandum of Understanding between Suncor Energy Oil Sands, Fort McKay First Nation, and Fort McKay Metis Local 122 is used as an example of one major company's initiatives to establish a mutually supportive and interdependent relationship

  19. Corporeality in the communication of young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornélia Jakubíková

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study describes communication of young people with the emphasis on its content dedicated to corporeality and determines a content-based classification of topics from a normative perspective: what topics are regular, intimate, or tabooed; participants; and gender differences. The study is divided into parts, which thematically describe: starting points, research, sample; communication content and topics; participants in communication; gender differences; factors of communication and the language of communication. The study is elaborated on the basis of information coming from professional literature and field research conducted by semi-structured interviews with university students and university educated people – 15 women and 15 men in age 22–28 (year of birth 1987–1993 coming from an urban environment in Slovakia.

  20. Sexuality among People with Physical Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Elbozan Cumurcu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical disability is termed as disturbance or defect which impede or eliminate human body’s ability by disturbing human structure and shape. Physical disability may occur due to neonatal, natal or postnatal causes. People with physical disability have some natural needs as everyone. They are known to have difficulties in many areas of life. In society, sexual lives of these individuals are treated as an unknown and ignored issue, and moreover it has been assumed that they have no such needs. Disabled patients experience many troubles in their life domains including sexuality. This article provides information about physical disability and sexuality, and difficulties with which disabled people faces in their sexual life and overviews literature on this topic.

  1. Sexuality of people with intestinal ostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Braga Rodrigues Cardoso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the experience of sexuality and other everyday life aspects for people with intestinal ostomy. Methods: qualitative, descriptive study with ten participants of the Specialized Reference Unit who gave interviews with inductive content analysis. Results: the established themes were Physical, emotional and socio-cultural changes, Changes in the exercise of sexuality of people with intestinal ostomy and Importance of the interdisciplinary support of the new sexuality. These changes are linked to body image, the self-esteem and interpersonal relationships with the partner, family and friends, going beyond the visible with the emergence of fear, rejection, difficulty with new relationships, body shame, embarrassment by the collector equipment, fear of the sexual act causes damage to the stoma and difficult to talk about the condition. Conclusion: the ostomy condition requires adaptation process, requiring trained interdisciplinary team in physiological and psychosocial problems resulting from surgical and therapeutic adjuvant treatment, which hinder the sexuality of these individuals.

  2. Behavioral finance: Finance with normal people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meir Statman

    2014-06-01

    Behavioral finance substitutes normal people for the rational people in standard finance. It substitutes behavioral portfolio theory for mean-variance portfolio theory, and behavioral asset pricing model for the CAPM and other models where expected returns are determined only by risk. Behavioral finance also distinguishes rational markets from hard-to-beat markets in the discussion of efficient markets, a distinction that is often blurred in standard finance, and it examines why so many investors believe that it is easy to beat the market. Moreover, behavioral finance expands the domain of finance beyond portfolios, asset pricing, and market efficiency and is set to continue that expansion while adhering to the scientific rigor introduced by standard finance.

  3. Mediating Tragedy: Facebook, Aboriginal Peoples and Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Lee Carlson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Some Australian Aboriginal communities experience suicide rates that are among the highest in the world. They are also, however, avid social media users—approximately 20% higher than the national average. This article presents some preliminary findings from a current national study, funded by the Australian Research Council, titled Aboriginal identity and community online: a sociological exploration of Aboriginal peoples’ use of online social media. The purpose of the study is to gain insights into how Aboriginal peoples utilise and interact on social media, and how these technologies can assist with suicide prevention strategies. It found that Aboriginal people are engaging with Facebook to both seek and offer help for issues relating to suicide and self-harm. An existing continuum of suicide prevention strategies was evident—from light emotional support to direct suicide intervention involving health services. These strategies can be leveraged to implement effective and appropriate suicide prevention programs.

  4. Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sandra M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental disorders worldwide and have a striking impact on global disease burden. Although depression has consistently been found to increase mortality; the role of anxiety disorders in predicting mortality risk is unclear. AIMS......: To assess mortality risk in people with anxiety disorders. METHOD: We used nationwide Danish register data to conduct a prospective cohort study with over 30 million person-years of follow-up. RESULTS: In total, 1066 (2.1%) people with anxiety disorders died during an average follow-up of 9.7 years....... The risk of death by natural and unnatural causes was significantly higher among individuals with anxiety disorders (natural mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51; unnatural MRR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.20-2.73) compared with the general population. Of those who died from unnatural causes, 16.5% had...

  5. Euro Banknote Recognition System for Blind People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Dunai Dunai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a portable system with the aim of allowing blind people to detect and recognize Euro banknotes. The developed device is based on a Raspberry Pi electronic instrument and a Raspberry Pi camera, Pi NoIR (No Infrared filter dotted with additional infrared light, which is embedded into a pair of sunglasses that permit blind and visually impaired people to independently handle Euro banknotes, especially when receiving their cash back when shopping. The banknote detection is based on the modified Viola and Jones algorithms, while the banknote value recognition relies on the Speed Up Robust Features (SURF technique. The accuracies of banknote detection and banknote value recognition are 84% and 97.5%, respectively.

  6. Sixth Conference on China-ASEAN People-to-People Friendship Organizations Held in Bangkok

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>With the theme of "Opportunities and Challenges of China-ASEAN Friendly Cooperation", the Sixth Conference on China-ASEAN People-to-People Friendship Organizations organized by the Thai-Chinese Friendship Association was held in Bangkok August 18 and 19. A delegation of China-ASEAN Association led by its president Gu Xiulian joined about 200 representatives from friendship-with-China organizations in 10 ASEAN countries.

  7. Priorities for children and young people - opportunities and challenges for children and young people's nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fiona

    2016-05-09

    Across Europe children's nurses today face many challenges, including rising childhood obesity, the soaring incidence of issues with the mental health of children and young people, the effects of social media, child maltreatment and the impact of poverty, war and conflict on children and families. There are opportunities for children's nurses to undertake new roles and to influence both policy and practice to improve the health outcomes of children and young people, and thereby the future health of the population.

  8. Planning successful change incorporating processes and people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui

    Implementing change is a core element of developing healthcare practice. While planning the practical aspects of change is vital, so too is considering how people will perceive and be affected by an innovation, including what individuals and teams will gain or lose, who the opinion leaders will be and the influence of workplace culture. The aim of this article is to highlight some of the considerations that may be useful in planning successful change.

  9. Improving Customer Satisfaction: A People CMM Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-11

    Work Environment Customer Relationship Management Program 19 Improving Customer Satisfaction: A People CMM Perspective P. Buttles, S. McGraw, D...Professional in 2009 and Customer Care Manager in July 2006. He has a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Pittsburgh and a bachelor of science...conferences throughout the United States and Europe. He has as a bachelor of science degree in management . 4 Improving Customer Satisfaction: A

  10. Healthy people, malaria and South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Mark K

    2012-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Healthy People 2020 goals call for a reduction in the number of cases of malaria in the United States. Historically, South Dakota has had a low incidence of this infection, but a demographic shift has poised the state for a potential increase in the number of cases. The reasons for this are reviewed, and proactive steps that can be taken to avoid this rise are presented.

  11. Coping Strategies in People Attempting Suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Bazrafshan, Mohammad-Rafi; Jahangir, Fereidun; Mansouri, Amir; Kashfi, Seyyed Hannan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Having a set of effective coping skills can prevent suicidal behavior by increasing self-control and self-direction. This study examines coping styles used by suicidal patients. Objectives: The researchers in this study try to identify coping strategies used by suicide attempters admitted to Shiraz Shahid Faghihi Hospital emergency room. Materials and Methods: This is a analytical cross-sectional study. Participants consisted of 50 suicide-attempted people admitted to Shiraz Faghi...

  12. Ethnobotany of the Yoreme People and Environs

    OpenAIRE

    Semotiuk, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The Yoreme people of northwestern Mexico have a vibrant body of traditional knowledge and practices (TKP) related to natural landscapes amidst drastic technological changes in the region. This apparent contrast presents an exemplar model system to conduct ethnobotanical studies on traditional knowledge and practice dynamics. Using a range of methods from in person surveys, vegetation surveys, geographic data analysis, and biochemical assays, I sought to gain insight as to how TKP change and a...

  13. Gait, mobility, and falls in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwind, Yves Josef

    2012-01-01

    My doctoral thesis contributes to the understanding of gait, mobility, and falls in older people. All presented projects investigated the most prominent and sensitive markers for fall-related gait changes, that is gait velocity and gait variability. Based on the measurement of these spatio-temporal gait parameters, particularly when using a change-sensitive dual task paradigm, it is possible to make conclusions regarding walking, balance, activities of daily living, and falls in o...

  14. [Physical activities adapted to homeless people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainguet, Brigitte

    2018-03-01

    Around ten homeless people were invited to take part in a programme of physical activities to improve their health status. Only motricity and walking pathways were followed assiduously for eight weeks. The assessment of the physical condition and quality of life showed an improvement in these areas, in particular for one of the participants. However, the lack of motivation and assiduity remains an obstacle to regular activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Finding Objects for Assisting Blind People

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Chucai; Flores, Roberto W.; Chincha, Ricardo; Tian, YingLi

    2013-01-01

    Computer vision technology has been widely used for blind assistance, such as navigation and wayfinding. However, few camera-based systems are developed for helping blind or visually-impaired people to find daily necessities. In this paper, we propose a prototype system of blind-assistant object finding by camera-based network and matching-based recognition. We collect a dataset of daily necessities and apply Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) featu...

  16. Correlates of constipation in people with Parkinson's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, H; Kaye, J; Kimber, A; Storey, L; Egan, M; Qiao, Y; Trend, P

    2011-02-01

    To investigate clinical, demographic and dietary factors associated with constipation in a sample of community dwelling people with Parkinson's disease, recruited through a specialist outpatient clinic. Partners/carers provided a convenience control group. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire (background information, diet and exercise, activities of daily living: mobility and manual dexterity, health-related quality of life (SF-12), stool frequency and characteristics, extent of concern due to constipation, laxative taking), and a four-week stool diary. The Rome criterion was used to determine constipation status. Multiple regression methods were used to explore the correlates of constipation. Baseline data were provided by 121 people with Parkinson's, (54 controls), of whom 73% (25%) met the Rome criterion. Prospective diary data from 106 people with Parkinson's (43 controls) showed lower proportions: 35% (7%) meeting the Rome criterion. Among all study subjects, i.e. Parkinson's patients and controls taken together, the presence of constipation is predicted by having Parkinson's disease (p = .003; odds ratio 4.80, 95% CI 1.64-14.04) and mobility score (p = .04; odds ratio 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.31), but not by dietary factors. Amongst people with Parkinson's constipation is predicted by number of medications (p = .027). Laxative taking masks constipation, and is significantly associated with wearing protection against bowel incontinence (p = .009; odds ratio 4.80, 95% CI: 1.48-15.52). Constipation is disease-related, not a lifestyle factor. More research is needed on optimal management and laxative use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. People's Republic of China's Technological Capability

    OpenAIRE

    Jon Sigurdson

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of the People's Republic of China in the global economy by exemplifying industrial sectors where it has established a strong competitive advantage. The author accounts for China's growth by looking at factors such as direct foreign investment and investment in research and development. This paper discusses several economic sectors including the textile, electronics, semiconductor, and aircraft industries as cases where China has upgraded its technological p...

  18. Balance control in elderly people with osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Chen, Chao-Yin; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Rong-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a prevalent health concern among older adults and is associated with an increased risk of falls that incur fracture, injury, or mortality. Identifying the risk factors of falls within this population is essential for the development of effective regimes for fall prevention. Studies have shown that muscle quality and good posture alignments are critical for balance control in elderly individuals. People with osteoporosis often have muscle weakness and increased spine kyphosis l...

  19. Illness narratives of people who are homeless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Håkanson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple illnesses are common in all homeless populations. While most previous studies have focused on experiences of mental illness, there is a scarcity of studies about experiences of bodily illness among people who are homeless. This study aimed to explore illness narratives of people who are homeless, and how homelessness as a social context shapes the experience of multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions. The design was a qualitative single-case study, using interpretive description. Data were generated through interviews, with nine participants who were homeless rough sleepers in Stockholm, Sweden, recruited while receiving care in a support home for homeless people with complex care needs. The findings revealed experiences of illness embedded in narratives about falling ill, being ill, and the future. The particularity of these illness narratives and the way that they are shaped by homelessness give rise to several observations: the necessity of a capable body for survival; chaos and profound solitude in illness and self-care management; ambiguous feelings about receiving care, transitioning from independence, and “freedom” in the streets to dependency and being institutionalized; and finally, the absence of hope and desire for recovery or a better future. The narratives are discussed from the perspective of Frank's four types of illness stories (restitution, chaos, quest, and testimony. The findings stress that to provide appropriate care and support to people who are homeless and have multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions, health care professionals need to be informed both about the individual's biography and about the circumstances under which illness and self-care takes place in the streets.

  20. Public attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities: a qualitative comparison of white British & South Asian people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Sarah; Scior, Katrina

    2012-03-01

    National and international polices promote the acceptance, integration and inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities into mainstream society. However, there is little systematic research into general population attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities, and even less research, which considers the impact of culture on attitudes. The aim of this study was to explore how young people from White British and South Asian backgrounds differ in their attitudes towards people with intellectual disabilities and above all, how they arrive at their beliefs. A qualitative design utilizing focus groups and individual interviews with White British and South Asian adolescents aged 16-19 years (N = 61) was employed. Questionnaire data were collected to compare this sample to findings from a larger study run concurrently (Attitudes to people with intellectual disabilities: a cross cultural study. Thesis, University College London). Interview and focus group data were analysed using thematic analysis. Thematic analysis yielded five themes and pointed to widespread confusion about the concept of 'intellectual disability', not helped by the continuing invisibility of people with intellectual disabilities in the media. Participants expressed many positive beliefs, yet closer analysis revealed that underlying these may be more ambivalent or even hostile attitudes. Key differences between the two cultural groups are discussed. The findings highlight the need for raising public awareness and the importance of culturally sensitive support. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. People's Republic of China joins ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Yuping

    2003-01-01

    The People's Republic of China is the largest developing country with a projected population of 1.6 - 2 billion people and an energy consumption growing from the current 1.3 Billion Tons Coal Equivalent (TCE) to more than 4 Billion TCE by 2050. This large demand needs to be accommodated in a sustainable way, requiring energy generation in an environmentally friendly way. Fusion is one of the most promising candidates to solve this important issue. This explains why in the second half of 2002, the ITER Participants' delegations to the ITER Negotiations received expression of interest from the People's Republic of China in the possibility of Chinese participation in ITER, including joining the ongoing Negotiations. The speed with which the Chinese authorities had made their decision to participate in the ITER Negotiations was impressive. The Prime Minister and the State Council had already confirmed their decision to apply to join ITER as soon as possible, and Mr. Xu Guanhua, Chinese Minister of Science and Technology, wrote on behalf of his government, on 10 January 2003, to the four heads of delegation in the ITER Negotiations, requesting that China participate in the present ITER Negotiations, pointing out that China intends to provide a substantial contribution to the Project, comparable to what is currently envisaged by some of the participants in the present Negotiations

  2. Suicidal behavior among homeless people in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Kae; Morikawa, Suimei; Awata, Shuichi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the frequency and correlates of suicidal behavior among homeless people in Japan. A face-to-face survey was conducted in two districts of Tokyo, Japan, with 423 subjects who resided on streets and riversides and in urban parks and stations (street homeless) or who were residents of shelters, cheap hotels, or welfare homes for homeless people (sheltered homeless). When questioned about suicidal ideation in the previous 2 weeks, 51 subjects (12.2% of valid responses) had a recurring wish to die, 29 (6.9%) had frequent thoughts of suicide, and 22 (5.3%) had made suicide plans. In addition, 11 (2.9%) subjects had attempted suicide in the previous 2 weeks and 74 (17.7%) reported that they had ever attempted suicide. In univariate logistic regression analyses, street homelessness, lack of perceived emotional social support, poor subjective health perception, visual impairment, pain, insomnia, poor mental well-being, and current depression were significantly associated with recurrent thoughts of suicide in the previous 2 weeks. Among these, current depression had the greatest significance. In multivariate logistic regression analyses after controlling for depression, street homelessness and lack of perceived emotional social support were significantly associated with recurrent thoughts of suicide in the previous 2 weeks. Comprehensive interventions including housing and social support as well as mental health services might be crucial as effective strategies for suicide prevention among homeless people.

  3. Neuroimaging studies in people with gender incongruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Guillamon, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The current review gives an overview of brain studies in transgender people. First, we describe studies into the aetiology of feelings of gender incongruence, primarily addressing the sexual differentiation hypothesis: does the brain of transgender individuals resemble that of their natal sex, or that of their experienced gender? Findings from neuroimaging studies focusing on brain structure suggest that the brain phenotypes of trans women (MtF) and trans men (FtM) differ in various ways from control men and women with feminine, masculine, demasculinized and defeminized features. The brain phenotypes of people with feelings of gender incongruence may help us to figure out whether sex differentiation of the brain is atypical in these individuals, and shed light on gender identity development. Task-related imaging studies may show whether brain activation and task performance in transgender people is sex-atypical. Second, we review studies that evaluate the effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on the brain. This type of research provides knowledge on how changes in sex hormone levels may affect brain structure and function.

  4. The experience of people with oculocutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmuso B.J. Pooe- Monyemore

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the experiences of people with oculocutaneous albinism in South Africa. Oculocutaneous albinism is an inherited disorder characterised by the defective production of melanin, with little or no pigmentation in the skin, hair and eyes. This condition is found globally, with a high prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa and in clusters in South America. People with this condition are often stigmatised and discriminated against owing to myths and superstitions held by the public about the condition. To date no studies have explored the psychosocial aspects of oculocutaneous albinism. A qualitative study was conducted in Johannesburg, South Africa during 2007 where a purposive sample of 15 members of the black population with oculocutaneous albinism participated in in-depth individualphenomenological interviews. One central question was posed to facilitate the interviews: Could you please share your experience as a person with albinism? Data from the interviews were analysed using Collaizi’s qualitative data analysis method and three main themesemerged: (1 perceptions of the internal environment, for example the self; (2 experiences in the external environment, for example family and community; and (3 the need for selfdevelopment and growth based on their experiences. Recommendations are made to enhance the self-concept of and promote a sense of belonging, self-development and growth in people with oculocutaneous albinism.

  5. Everyday meal preparation for people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Mette Kathrine Friis; Nejsum, Hanne Lindberg; Bendtsen, Trine Vase

    When people are diagnosed with dementia everyday activities like meal preparation will gradually become more difficult. A recipe is a support for meal preparation but as dementia develops, it seems that following a recipe can be a challenge. In Denmark health professionals often use meal preparat......When people are diagnosed with dementia everyday activities like meal preparation will gradually become more difficult. A recipe is a support for meal preparation but as dementia develops, it seems that following a recipe can be a challenge. In Denmark health professionals often use meal...... preparation as an activity for people with dementia but they have no combined material to base the planning of the activity on. The thesis of this project is that when persons with dementia is involved in cooking his or her own meal meal preparation it will contribute to the feeling of content and meaning...... preparation. The guide includes ideas for constructing recipes, methods for planning and guiding the process and examples of utensils that can increase the ability to cook in the persons own home or in an institutionalized setting. This supports the person with dementia both nutritionally, cognitively...

  6. Is it good to make happy people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachels, Stuart

    1998-04-01

    Would it be good, other things being equal, for additional people to exist whose lives would be worth living? I examine and reject several arguments for the answer that it would not be good; then I offer opposing arguments that I believe are more successful. Thus, I agree with utilitarians who say that it is better for there to be more happy people. Next I argue for the stronger claim that the happiness of potential people is as important as that of adults. Potential quality of life, then, matters in a host of bioethical issues: abortion, commercial surrogacy, the treatment of defective newborns, and so on. What is the practical upshot of all this? I reject the idea that we must do whatever is necessary to prolong life worth living. But I also reject the view that the side-effects of overpopulation always outweigh the value of realizing potential happiness. So I advocate a middle position, which I do not identify precisely. Even from this middle position, however, potential happiness is more important that is commonly assumed in bioethics.

  7. What People Talk About in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Mary Lou

    This chapter examines what people talk about in virtual worlds, employing protocol analysis. Each of two scenario studies was developed to assess the impact of virtual worlds as a collaborative environment for a specific purpose: one for learning and one for designing. The first designed a place in Active Worlds for a course on Web Site Design, having group learning spaces surrounded by individual student galleries. Student text chat was analyzed through a coding scheme with four major categories: control, technology, learning, and place. The second studied expert architects in a Second Life environment called DesignWorld that combined 3D modeling and sketching tools. Video and audio recordings were coded in terms of four categories of communication content (designing, representation of the model, awareness of each other, and software features), and in terms of synthesis comparing alternative designs versus analysis of how well the proposed solution satisfies the given design task. Both studies found that people talk about their avatars, identity, and location in the virtual world. However, the discussion is chiefly about the task and not about the virtual world, implying that virtual worlds provide a viable environment for learning and designing that does not distract people from their task.

  8. Barometer 2015: French people and renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheau, Frederic; Bonnesoeur, Cecil; Ciangura, Claire; Broun, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    This document presents and comments results of a survey on the relationship between French people and renewable energies. After a discussion of the context (low oil prices, opportunity to invest the induced saving in renewable energies) and of some key figures of the survey, some methodological aspects are briefly indicated, and results are graphically presented. A first set of issues addresses the energy context as it is perceived by French people: will to see a development of different energy sectors (renewable, natural gas, nuclear, shale gas, coal, oil) in France, opinions on renewable energies, opinion on household energy bill, use of the home-produced photovoltaic energy. The second set concerns how French people are equipped in terms of renewable energies: type of equipment in primary residence, comparison between owners and renters, intention to equip the primary residence with such apparatuses within a more or less short period of time. The third set of issues addresses renovation projects and the RGE quality label: knowledge of this label and of financial supports, perceived complexity of the sector, preference for labelled professionals, will to install a renewable energy device. The last set addresses the confidence in equipment and installers. All these results are graphically compared with those obtained by the four previous surveys

  9. From CERN people to the world

    CERN Multimedia

    Sophie Louise Hetherton

    2014-01-01

    Created by filmmaker Liz Mermin, a new YouTube series puts the spotlight on CERN people. This set of short films offers new insight into the daily lives of CERN physicists.   The new online video series, CERN people, takes you behind the headlines of some of the biggest physics breakthroughs of our time, capturing the invention and discovery in the lives of CERN’s scientists. “CERN offered a fascinating blend of people from so many different backgrounds combined with exciting and groundbreaking physics,” says filmmaker Liz Mermin. “So, my aim was to show the real-life characters – the ones that stay up all night analysing data and tweaking the code for the experiments – and communicate their passion for particle physics.” The films give a first-hand experience of what it’s like day-to-day at CERN by showing the ups and downs of working at the frontier of modern science. For the participants, it was an excellent opport...

  10. Destination memory impairment in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopie, Nigel; Craik, Fergus I M; Hasher, Lynn

    2010-12-01

    Older adults are assumed to have poor destination memory-knowing to whom they tell particular information-and anecdotes about them repeating stories to the same people are cited as informal evidence for this claim. Experiment 1 assessed young and older adults' destination memory by having participants tell facts (e.g., "A dime has 118 ridges around its edge") to pictures of famous people (e.g., Oprah Winfrey). Surprise recognition memory tests, which also assessed confidence, revealed that older adults, compared to young adults, were disproportionately impaired on destination memory relative to spared memory for the individual components (i.e., facts, faces) of the episode. Older adults also were more confident that they had not told a fact to a particular person when they actually had (i.e., a miss); this presumably causes them to repeat information more often than young adults. When the direction of information transfer was reversed in Experiment 2, such that the famous people shared information with the participants (i.e., a source memory experiment), age-related memory differences disappeared. In contrast to the destination memory experiment, older adults in the source memory experiment were more confident than young adults that someone had shared a fact with them when a different person actually had shared the fact (i.e., a false alarm). Overall, accuracy and confidence jointly influence age-related changes to destination memory, a fundamental component of successful communication. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Wearable computing: Will it make people prosocial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiopoulos, Eleni; Risko, Evan F; Foulsham, Tom; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that people who wear an eye tracker modify their natural looking behaviour in a prosocial manner. This change in looking behaviour represents a potential concern for researchers who wish to use eye trackers to understand the functioning of human attention. On the other hand, it may offer a real boon to manufacturers and consumers of wearable computing (e.g., Google Glass), for if wearable computing causes people to behave in a prosocial manner, then the public's fear that people with wearable computing will invade their privacy is unfounded. Critically, both of these divergent implications are grounded on the assumption that the prosocial behavioural effect of wearing an eye tracker is sustained for a prolonged period of time. Our study reveals that on the very first wearing of an eye tracker, and in less than 10 min, the prosocial effect of an eye tracker is abolished, but by drawing attention back to the eye tracker, the implied presence effect is easily reactivated. This suggests that eye trackers induce a transient social presence effect, which is rendered dormant when attention is shifted away from the source of implied presence. This is good news for researchers who use eye trackers to measure attention and behaviour; and could be bad news for advocates of wearable computing in everyday life. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Telerehabilitation for people with low vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Ava K; Wykstra, Stephanie L; Yoshinaga, Patrick D; Li, Tianjing

    2015-08-31

    Low vision affects over 300 million people worldwide and can compromise both activities of daily living and quality of life. Rehabilitative training and vision assistive equipment (VAE) may help, but some visually impaired people have limited resources to attend in-person visits at rehabilitation clinics. These people may be able to overcome barriers to care through remote, Internet-based consultation (i.e., telerehabilitation). To compare the effects of telerehabilitation with face-to-face (e.g., in-office or inpatient) vision rehabilitation services for improving vision-related quality of life and reading speed in people with visual function loss due to any ocular condition. Secondary objectives are to evaluate compliance with scheduled rehabilitation sessions, abandonment rates for visual assistive equipment devices, and patient satisfaction ratings. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015 Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1980 to June 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2015), PubMed (1980 to June 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any language restriction or study design filter in the electronic searches; however, we restricted the searches from 1980 onwards because the Internet was not introduced to the public until 1982. We last searched the electronic databases on 15 June 2015. We planned to include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials (CCTs) in which participants were diagnosed with low vision and were undergoing low vision rehabilitation using an Internet, web-based technology compared with an approach based on in-person consultations. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts, and then full-text articles against

  13. People into Employment: supporting people with disabilities and carers into work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arksey, Hilary

    2003-05-01

    Carers and people with disabilities are two disadvantaged groups at risk of social exclusion. Work is an important route to social inclusion, but carers and people with disabilities are under-represented in the work force. The present paper reports key findings from a new study that evaluated People into Employment (PIE), a pilot employment project in the north-east of England designed to support people with disabilities, carers and former carers in gaining mainstream work. The study aimed to identify what clients, partner agencies and employers perceived to be PIE's most important services, its strengths and areas where there was scope for further development. The study collected quantitative and qualitative data at the mid-point and at the end of the project through two questionnaire surveys, and interviews with PIE clients, the project development officer, partner agencies and employers. Drawing on the 'pathway model', the findings show that PIE's interventions included mobilising, matching, mediating and supporting activities. Key ingredients in PIE's success include: tailor-made job-search activities and training; adjusting the pace at which people move towards sustained employment; recognising and responding to the differing needs of people with disabilities, carers and former carers; confidence boosting; accompanying clients to job interviews; good job matching; and ongoing practical and emotional support for both clients and employers. Rudimentary calculations suggest that the cost per job to the project is less than the cost per job for large national projects. Overall, these findings illustrate how access to employment via flexible job-search services geared up to the local labour market can successfully promote social inclusion for carers and people with disabilities.

  14. Motivated mind perception: treating pets as people and people as animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Nicholas; Schroeder, Juliana; Waytz, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Human beings have a sophisticated ability to reason about the minds of others, often referred to as using one's theory of mind or mentalizing. Just like any other cognitive ability, people engage in reasoning about other minds when it seems useful for achieving particular goals, but this ability remains disengaged otherwise. We suggest that understanding the factors that engage our ability to reason about the minds of others helps to explain anthropomorphism: cases in which people attribute minds to a wide range of nonhuman agents, including animals, mechanical and technological objects, and supernatural entities such as God. We suggest that engagement is guided by two basic motivations: (1) the motivation to explain and predict others' actions, and (2) the motivation to connect socially with others. When present, these motivational forces can lead people to attribute minds to almost any agent. When absent, the likelihood of attributing a mind to others, even other human beings, decreases. We suggest that understanding the factors that engage our theory of mind can help to explain the inverse process of dehumanization, and also why people might be indifferent to other people even when connecting to them would improve their momentary wellbeing.

  15. The Comparison between Conceived Stress and Personality traits, in People Suffering from Migraine and Healthy People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Peymannia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Migraine is a common familial disease and is diagnosed with recurring throbbing headache. Investigation of biological and psychological factors in the initiation and aggravation of migraine headaches have shown that there is a relationship between the psychological factors, personality, and migraine headache. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the conceived stress and Personality traits between ill persons suffering from Migraine and healthy people. Methods: This is an analytical cross-sectional study which involves a sample including 30 migrainours and 30 healthy people. The migraine-suffering participants were chosen among the people who referred to specialized clinic of migraine in Ardabil in the first half of 2012. The study participants filled the Eysenck's personality questionnaire and Kohen' s Perceived stress scale. Descriptive statistics as well as MANOVA were utilized to analyze the research data. Results: The results showed that migraine-suffering participants conceived the stress negatively (P<0.01, F=11 compared to healthy participants. Moreover, migrainours scored significantly higher in regard to Neuroticism score compared to healthy people (P<0.05, F=5.91. Also, there was a significant difference between migrainours and healthy people in their extroversion score (P<0.05, F=6.57. Conclusion: According to the study findings, it appears that migraine patients are more vulnerable to the neurotic disease. Therefore, considering the psychological and personality characteristics may impact on the prognosis of disease.

  16. Do stock prices drive people crazy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Liang; Chen, Chin-Shyan; Liu, Tsai-Ching

    2015-03-01

    This is the first research to examine a potential relation between stock market volatility and mental disorders. Using data on daily incidences of mental disorders in Taiwan over 4000 days from 1998 through 2009 to assess the time-series relation between stock price movements and mental disorders, we observe that stock price fluctuation clearly affects the hospitalization of mental disorders. We find that during a 12-year follow-up period, a low stock price index, a daily fall in the stock price index and consecutive daily falls in the stock price index are all associated with greater of mental disorders hospitalizations. A 1000-point fall in the TAIEX (Taiwan Stock Exchange Capitalization Weighted Stock Index) increases the number of daily mental disorders hospitalizations by 4.71%. A 1% fall in the TAIEX in one single day increases daily hospitalizations for mental disorders by 0.36%. When the stock price index falls one consecutive day, it causes a daily increase of approximately 0.32% hospitalizations due to mental disorders on that day. Stock price index is found to be significant for both gender and all age groups. In addition, daily change is significant for both gender and middle-age groups, whereas accumulated change is significant for males and people aged 45-64. Stockholdings can help people accumulate wealth, but they can also increase mental disorders hospitalizations. In other words, stock price fluctuations do drive people crazy. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  17. Lifestyle factors of people with exceptional longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpathak, Swapnil N; Liu, Yingheng; Ben-David, Orit; Reddy, Saritha; Atzmon, Gil; Crandall, Jill; Barzilai, Nir

    2011-08-01

    To assess lifestyle factors including physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and dietary habits in men and women with exceptional longevity. Retrospective cohort study. A cohort of community-dwelling Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with exceptional longevity defined as survival and living independently at age 95 and older. Four hundred seventy-seven individuals (mean 97.3 ± 2.8, range 95-109; 74.6% women) and a subset of participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) I (n = 3,164) representing the same birth cohort as a comparison group. A trained interviewer administrated study questionnaires to collect information on lifestyle factors and collected data on anthropometry. People with exceptional longevity had similar mean body mass index (men, 25.4 ± 2.8 kg/m² vs 25.6 ± 4.0 kg/m² , P=.63; women, 25.0 ± 3.5 kg/m² vs 24.9 ± 5.4 kg/m² ; P = .90) and a similar proportion of daily alcohol consumption (men, 23.9 vs 22.4, P = .77; women, 12.1 vs 11.3, P = .80), of regular physical activity (men: 43.1 vs 57.2; P = .07; women: 47.0 vs 44.1, P = .76), and of a low-calorie diet (men: 20.8 vs 21.1, P=.32; women: 27.3 vs 27.1, P=.14) as the NHANES I population. People with exceptional longevity are not distinct in terms of lifestyle factors from the general population, suggesting that people with exceptional longevity may interact with environmental factors differently than others. This requires further investigation. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Health and Roma People in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perihan Elif Ekmekçi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The research and published literatüre on Roma health in Turkey is much more limited than in other European countries. Among these, there are hardly any published literature focusing on the health status, health indicators and health behaviors. Aims: The aim of this research is to describe the perceptions of health-related concepts and access and the use of health services and social determinants of the health of Roma people in Turkey. Study Design: Descriptive qualitative survey. Methods: The participants were chosen by random sampling. The semi-structured interview topic guide was developed from sources such as advice from the Romani community leaders, published evidence and personal experience from previous work with Roma communities. Non-directive open ended questions allowed the exploration of their health status, how they conceptualize health and disease, their level of awareness on the impact of social determinants of health, on their health status and the access and use of health services. The data analysis was based on grounded theory. Analysis proceeded in four steps: 1. Reading and examining the transcripts separately using open coding, 2. Extracting the key words and codes from the transcripts and sorting them into categories, 3. Rereading the transcripts by using selective coding, and 4. Examining the categories derived from the open coding systematically and determining the concepts summarizing the material. Results: The survey results are compatible with the existing literature on Roma health and reveal that 1 there is a tight link between the lack of social determinants of health and the poor health status of Roma people 2 socioeconomic factors and cultural norms of the ethnic minority are suspicious factors 3 comparative and systematic research is needed to illuminate the actual health gaps and causal factors for them. Conclusion: The research proves that the need for comparative and systematic research in Turkey to

  19. How do people live in the Anthropocene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Libby

    2016-04-01

    While geologists have focused their efforts on which changes in the strata might constitute a functional shift out of the present epoch, environmental humanities scholars, museums and creative artists have taken up the Anthropocene as a concept raising new moral and practical dilemmas. A central concern is with how people adapt and live creatively in a world that is functioning beyond the physical planetary boundaries defined by the Holocene. This paper will provide an overview of the lively scholarly and popular debates on the question of what it means, ethically, to be human in an Age of Humans. Major questions include the question of who are 'we' in the Anthropocene, and how the conditions of the putative new epoch will affect 'more-than-human-others'. Creative and justice activist responses to the Anthropocene typically distinguish among humans, focusing not on the causes, but rather on concerns of the people on the receiving end of global change (for example, the Small Islands Developing States (SIDS) group of 39+8). Some are concerned about the collateral effects of technological 'fixes' for energy transformations and climate, and others about economic shifts and market-based incentives. As a historian of ideas, I explore the multiple paths by which people have come to the Anthropocene concept, and the uses to which it has already been put, even before a final decision is made on its formal status. The Anthropocene already arouses anxiety about 'the future'. One big idea that is shared across activists and scholars (and not just those in the humanities) is the question of enabling hopeful responses. A diversity of creative projects for living in the Anthropocene, which can contribute to coping with the stress of accelerating global change, is essential to this.

  20. Effective computer training for people with disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Farbeh-Tabrizi

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of computer courses at Methodist City Action computer school for students with psychological and physical disabilities and discusses the motivation behind developing these courses and the original research and development which led to their establishment. It also outlines methods of delivery and the impact of these courses on the students\\' quality of life, independence, social inclusion, literacy, numeracy and employment status. This research was carried out by using available literature found from local libraries and Internet, interviews and classroom observations, and concludes that there is an apparent lack of participation in tertiary education from people with disabilities in New Zealand.

  1. Heart diseases and strokes in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the relevance of the problem associated with the diagnosis and treatment of stroke in young patients aged 15-45 years. It considers the major causes of acute cerebrovascular accidents in young people, including pregnant women. Diseases, such patent foramen ovale, mitral valve prolapse, infective endocarditis, and postpartum cardiomyopathy, are described in detail. The basic principles of the diagnosis and therapy of ischemic stroke at a young age are given. The mainstay of therapy for acute ischemic stroke is stated to include two procedures: reperfusion and neuronal protection.

  2. Happy-People-Pills for All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Walker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    It is argued that we have a moral duty to create, and make available, advanced pharmacological agents to boost the happiness of those in the normal, i.e., the non-depressed, range of happiness. Happiness, conceived as a propensity to positive moods, is a quantitative trait with a sizeable genetic component. One means to boost the happiness of those in the normal range is to test the efficacy of antidepressants for enhancement. A second possibility is to model new pharmacologicals based on the genetics of the happiest amongst us, that is, the hyperthymic. The suggestion, in other words, is to “reverse engineer” the hyperthymic: to investigate what makes the hyperthymic genetically and physiologically different and then put what they have into pill form. To the ‘Brave New World’ objection, that there is more to wellbeing than happiness and that taking happy-people-pills will require the sacrifice of these other aspects of wellbeing, it is countered that contemporary social science research supports the view that happiness promotes achievement in the ‘higher’ endeavors of humanity, including work, love and virtue. In other words, happiness promotes acquisition of traits valued by perfectionists. Those born with genes for hyperthymia, on average, tend to be doubly blessed: they are happier and achieve more than the rest of the population. Happy-people-pills are a means to allow everyone else to share in this good

  3. Developing people for the new nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, C.; Fluke, R.; Moya, R.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of having high-calibre people and the urgency in ensuring adequate numbers of knowledgeable staff has been recognized in the nuclear industry world wide. This paper describes how Nuclear Safety Solutions Limited is addressing these challenges by adopting a pro-active approach to training and development. This paper describes the integrated processes and tools used to ensure: adequate numbers of appropriately qualified staff to meet current and projected business needs, suitably qualified staff are assigned to projects for clients, and individual staff development. NSS uses a Qualification and Experience (Q and E) Registry to ensure the proper functioning of these processes. (author)

  4. French people addressing environmental hazards (Eser 2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautard, Eric; Moreau, Sylvain; Bottin, Anne; Kraszewski, Marlene; Fretin, David; Carriere, Celine; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-07-01

    This publication presents the results of a survey, conducted towards the end of 2013, of 4,700 people resident in metropolitan France and its 'departements d'outre-mer' (DOM - overseas departments). The aim of the survey was to ascertain how French people perceive natural hazards (flooding, earthquakes, climate events, cyclones, etc.) and technological hazards (industrial and nuclear) to which they may be exposed. Questioned as to whether or not they felt exposed to one or several environmental hazards in their place of residence, French people's answers varied somewhat depending on the hazard invoked and place of residence. A strong feeling of exposure was expressed most frequently in the DOM. Respondents in both metropolitan France and DOM think that atmospheric pollution is a significant hazard (56%) but their opinions diverge partially where other hazards are concerned. Natural hazards (earthquakes and flooding) are cited most frequently overseas, whereas technological hazards (industrial and nuclear) are primarily metropolitan concerns. Climate change related hazards are seen as a threat by 56% of overseas respondents and by 42% in the mother country. In general, one-third of French people think that they are exposed to more than two environmental hazards. Unlike the younger members of the population, only one-quarter of respondents of 65 years of age or over felt exposed to three or more hazards. From municipal level databases providing information on exposure to flooding and technological and climate-related hazards, the survey indicates that a large majority of respondents living in these municipalities either do not feel at risk from existing hazards or feel that the risk is low (see figure below). It is in the area of climate-related hazards that awareness of threat seems to be highest in France, and more particularly in the DOM. In the face of the flooding that could affect them, overseas populations are more aware of this natural

  5. Loneliness and Social Isolation among Eldely People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Püllüm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Social isolation is defined as the process of people losing their contacts with other social resources or their willingness to participate. Social isolation is a grave and widespread problem among seniors in society causing many harmful health conditions. Social isolation may be prevented by defining risk factors in seniors and leading them to suitable resources. The elderly should be encouraged to share their experiences and continue to produce for as long as possible, so that they are prevented from feeling isolated from society and the continuity of their economic productivity is ensured.

  6. The relationship of French people to energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, Jean-Daniel; Potereau, Julien; Gautier, Antoine; Lavernhe, Laurence

    2017-12-01

    This document presents and comments results of a survey performed online in November 2017. Asked questions related to what French people were thinking about what their country could do better in the field of struggle against global warming, to their perception of energy and of related challenges, to their opinion on energy transition and on the development of renewable energies, and to the role of Europe and of citizen cooperatives in the field of energy. A text first discusses and comments results, and a second part presents the survey methodology, and graphs illustrating answers to the various questions on these issues

  7. Revealing myths about people, energy and buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.; Moezzi, M.

    2000-05-01

    In this essay we take a closer look at some energy myths, focusing on the ways energy professionals and the public alike, talk, write and teach about how energy affects the way in which we design, operate, retrofit and inhabit buildings. What myths about people, energy and buildings are current today? Who tells these myths and why do we believe them? How do myths affect our behavior? Myths are a way of understanding the world we live in. They may represent incomplete understanding, or be based on premises that are scientifically not valid, but they help us understand and explain how the world works, and we shape our behavior accordingly.

  8. Finding Objects for Assisting Blind People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chucai; Flores, Roberto W; Chincha, Ricardo; Tian, Yingli

    2013-07-01

    Computer vision technology has been widely used for blind assistance, such as navigation and wayfinding. However, few camera-based systems are developed for helping blind or visually-impaired people to find daily necessities. In this paper, we propose a prototype system of blind-assistant object finding by camera-based network and matching-based recognition. We collect a dataset of daily necessities and apply Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) feature descriptors to perform object recognition. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our prototype system.

  9. Smart pill dispenser for dependent people

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Grau, Guillermo de

    2015-01-01

    Many medical errors are due to the fact that people in charge of patient or elder’s medication have to deal with sorting huge amounts of pills each day. This paper consists on the conception, design and creation of a pillbox prototype intended to solve this deficiency in the medical area as it has the ability of sorting out the pills by itself as well as many other advanced features, with this device being intended to be used by hospitals or retirement homes. For the design of this device ope...

  10. Developing people for the new nuclear generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, C.; Fluke, R.; Moya, R.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of having high-calibre people and the urgency in ensuring adequate numbers of knowledgeable staff has been recognised in the nuclear industry world wide. This paper describes how NSS is addressing these challenges by adopting a pro-active approach to training and development. This paper describes the integrated processes and tools used to ensure: adequate numbers of appropriately qualified staff to meet current and projected business needs; suitably qualified staff are assigned to projects for clients, and individual staff development. NSS uses a Qualification and Experience (Q and E) Registry to ensure the proper functioning of these processes. (author)

  11. Accessible Article: Involving People with Learning Disabilities in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Ruth; Tattersall, John; Dunn, Jo; Boycott-Garnett, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This is an article that talks about our research about sex and relationships for people with learning disabilities. It talks about how people with learning disabilities have been fully involved in the research. (Contains 2 footnotes.)

  12. South African Muslim students' attitudes to people with HIV / AIDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    to people with HIV scale, with students indicating positive attitudes to people with HIV. Higher religiosity was ... Whilst research in the 1990s indicated a gender difference in AIDS-related ..... Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of.

  13. What People with Lactose Intolerance Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lactose Intolerance Need to Know About Osteoporosis What People With Lactose Intolerance Need to Know About Osteoporosis ... 2 hours after eating dairy products containing lactose, people with lactose intolerance start to develop stomach cramps ...

  14. People at High Risk of Developing Flu-Related Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other People at High Risk of Developing Flu–Related Complications ... related complications if they get sick with influenza. People at High Risk for Developing Flu-Related Complications ...

  15. For People with Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor For People With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor Isabel ... a doctor with expertise in osteoporosis. For many people, finding a doctor who is knowledgeable about osteoporosis ...

  16. Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Blind or Visually Impaired Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Category All ... Territory Other (International) Organization Name Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Browse All ...

  17. Attending to others: how digital technologies direct young people's nightlife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Truong

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available It is a growing phenomenon that young people use mobile information and communication technologies during their nightlife. This article offers an empirical examination of how young people's nightlife is shaped by engagement with the mobile phone application WhatsApp. Drawing on Sara Ahmed's phenomenological concept of orientation, I examine how WhatsApp extends young people's nightlife and how young people become orientated therein. On the one hand, I show that nightlife acquires new boundaries and fixities that encourage young people to direct their attention towards missing social relations and absent nightlife places. On the other hand, I find that young people create new perceptions of how to inhabit and spend leisure time and space. I argue that digital technologies reorientate young people, which I suggest offers novel means of addressing young people's contemporary nightlife practices, places, spaces, and social relations.

  18. Mental health issues and discrimination among older LGBTI people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Jean; Dow, Briony; Maude, Phillip; Purchase, Rachel; Whyte, Carolyn; Barrett, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    LGBT is an acronym used to describe people from diverse sexual orientation or gender identity, people that are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. LGBT people do not constitute a single group nor does each individual "group" constitute a homogeneous unity. However, as higher rates of depression and/or anxiety have been observed in older LGBT people, compared to their heterosexual counterparts (Guasp, 2011) there is a need to raise the profile of mental health issues amongst these groups. The additional letter I is also often included in the acronym LGBTI as intersex people are often included as another gender diverse group. However, there is very little research that includes intersex people and none on older intersex people's mental health so this editorial is restricted to consideration of older LGBT people.

  19. Review of occupational therapy for people with chronic pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, Katie

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pain is a significant health-care problem. This review aims to critically analyse occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain and identify significant factors influencing the future development of occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain.

  20. Older People with Learning Disabilities:Workforce issues

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, S; Manthorpe, J

    2005-01-01

    The life expectancy of people with learning disabilities has increased substantially. Services for older people with learning disabilities are provided by various sectors and practitioners (generic health and social care, or specialist learning disability or old age). The literature suggests that practitioners do not feel well-equipped to support people with learning disabilities as they grow older, and older people's services do not always have the opportunity to share experiences and skills...

  1. Nutritional habits of elderly people living at home

    OpenAIRE

    Premoš, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a process that is accompanied by biological, psychological and social changes. These changes can affect the nourishment of elderly people. Elderly people are becoming less independent with years and more dependent on others. Family members, to whom the elderly people trust the most, offer them assistance. On the market, there are various services that provide assistance in different cases. In the diploma work I have been investigating how the elderly people eat, which foods are u...

  2. Bark-peeling, food stress and tree spirits - the use of pine inner bark for food in Scandinavia and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lars Ostlund; Lisa Ahlberg; Olle Zackrisson; Ingela Bergman; Steve Arno

    2009-01-01

    The Sami people of northern Scandinavia and many indigenous peoples of North America have used pine (Pinus spp.) inner bark for food, medicine and other purposes. This study compares bark-peeling and subsequent uses of pine inner bark in Scandinavia and western North America, focusing on traditional practices. Pine inner bark contains substances - mainly carbohydrates...

  3. Three Principles to REVISE People's Unethical Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayal, Shahar; Gino, Francesca; Barkan, Rachel; Ariely, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Dishonesty and unethical behavior are widespread in the public and private sectors and cause immense annual losses. For instance, estimates of U.S. annual losses indicate $1 trillion paid in bribes, $270 billion lost due to unreported income, and $42 billion lost in retail due to shoplifting and employee theft. In this article, we draw on insights from the growing fields of moral psychology and behavioral ethics to present a three-principle framework we call REVISE. This framework classifies forces that affect dishonesty into three main categories and then redirects those forces to encourage moral behavior. The first principle, reminding, emphasizes the effectiveness of subtle cues that increase the salience of morality and decrease people's ability to justify dishonesty. The second principle, visibility, aims to restrict anonymity, prompt peer monitoring, and elicit responsible norms. The third principle, self-engagement, increases people's motivation to maintain a positive self-perception as a moral person and helps bridge the gap between moral values and actual behavior. The REVISE framework can guide the design of policy interventions to defeat dishonesty. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. People and Places Forum Workshop Report | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2015, the Twin Ports-based People and Places Work Group (PPWG) coordinated a special gathering to bring together researchers and scholars from diverse fields to discuss environment-human research, scholarship and collaboration opportunities. Hosted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the group approached and invited over 150 individuals from eight regional universities. The goals were to learn who was doing or interested in doing applied research on human-environment interactions, who might have students to engage in work, who might partner with the Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve (Reserve), USEPA, University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resource Research Institute (NRRI), Minnesota and Wisconsin Sea Grant Institutes (Sea Grant), and other partnering institutes and who might be interested in ecosystem services work in particular. A pre-gathering survey collected initial information about this community and the adapted, open-space design gathering allowed for even more data collection about potential new colleagues to engage in the work of understanding people and place in our region. This summary reviews some of findings and presents what may be considered the beginning of a network directory to encourage and facilitate interdisciplinary research and collaboration. This report outlines the process to identify and reach out to health, social science, and humanities scholars to participate in environmental research w

  5. An FPGA-Based People Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Clark

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an FPGA-based system for detecting people from video. The system is designed to use JPEG-compressed frames from a network camera. Unlike previous approaches that use techniques such as background subtraction and motion detection, we use a machine-learning-based approach to train an accurate detector. We address the hardware design challenges involved in implementing such a detector, along with JPEG decompression, on an FPGA. We also present an algorithm that efficiently combines JPEG decompression with the detection process. This algorithm carries out the inverse DCT step of JPEG decompression only partially. Therefore, it is computationally more efficient and simpler to implement, and it takes up less space on the chip than the full inverse DCT algorithm. The system is demonstrated on an automated video surveillance application and the performance of both hardware and software implementations is analyzed. The results show that the system can detect people accurately at a rate of about 2.5 frames per second on a Virtex-II 2V1000 using a MicroBlaze processor running at 75 MHz, communicating with dedicated hardware over FSL links.

  6. Radioactivity of people in Finland in 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Suomela, M.; Illukka, E.; Pusa, S.

    1989-08-01

    The atmospheric nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s, '60s and '70s caused global radioactive fallout. After the reactor accident at Chernobyl on April 26, 1986, radioactive fallout was carried by by air streams to most parts of Europe. In 1987 radionuclides causing internal contamination were transported to man only via different foodchains and no longer via inhalation, as had happened immediately after the Chernobyl accident. To determine the level of radionuclides in the body and to estimate the internal radiation doses caused by the Chernobyl accident, whole-body counting measurements were performed. Ten different groups of people were measured during 1987. Three were local reference groups, two groups of radiation workers, one a population group representing the whole country and four groups representing those with special dietary habits. The weighted mean 137 Cs body burden in the population group was 2000 Bq at the end of 1987, the minimum body burden being 200 Bq and the maximum 10000 Bq. The measurement results showed that the maximum body burdens were reached in the summer 1987. The groups with special diets did not necessarily follow this pattern. The mean effective dose equivalents delivered in 1987 to people in Finland, estimated by using the measurement results of the population group, was 0.08 mSv, the corresponding dose equivalent in 1986 bein 0.06 mSv

  7. Telecare and older people: who cares where?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Christine; Roberts, Celia; Mort, Maggie

    2011-02-01

    'Telecare solutions' are seen as a potential means of addressing the future care needs of ageing societies in Western economies. The development of these remote care systems runs in parallel with policies aimed at 'ageing in place'; and is targeted at supporting the perceived care needs of frail older people within the home. Drawing on ethnographic and deliberative panel data from European Community funded research, we consider how these developments contribute to a reshaping of the place and experience of care for older people. We do so by addressing the ways in which remote care systems can, firstly, act to change the experience of home; and secondly, re-order the place of care-work and responsibilities to care as new actors become enrolled within the care network and existing care-givers take on differing roles and responsibilities. Finally, we consider how this paper contributes to conceptual debates around institution and extitution - that is, the de-territorialisation of the physical structure of the institution and its re-manifestation through new spaces and times that seek to end interior and exterior distinctions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radioactivity of people in Finland in 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Suomela, M.; Illukka, E.; Pusa, S.

    1991-03-01

    After the reactor accident at Chernobyl radioactive fallout was carried by air streams to most parts of Europe. In 1988 radionuclides causing internal contamination were transported to man only via foodchains and no longer via inhalation, as had happened immediately after the Chernobyl accident. To determine the level of radionuclides in the body and to estimate the internal radiation doses caused by the Chemobyl accident, whole-body counting measurements were performed. Nine different groups of people were measured during 1988. Three were local reference groups, two groups of radiation workers, one a population group representing the whole country and three groups representing those with special dietary habits. The weighted mean 137 Cs body burden in the population group was 1300 Bq at the end of 1988, the minimum body burden being 50 Bq and the maximum 7700 Bq. The measurement data showed that the maximum body burdens were reached in summer 1987. The group with special diets did not necessarily follow this pattern. The mean effective dose equivalents delivered to people in Finland in 1988, estimated by using the measurement data on the population goup, was 0.05 mSv the corresponding dose equivalent in 1987 being 0.08 mSv

  9. Why do people consult the doctor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S M; Roland, M O

    1996-02-01

    Symptoms are an everyday part of most peoples' lives and many people with illness do not consult their doctor. The decision to consult is not based simply on the presence or absence of medical problems. Rather it is based on a complex mix of social and psychological factors. This literature review seeks to explore some of the pathways to care and those factors associated with low and high rates of consultation. The paper examines the impact of socioeconomic and demographic factors on consultation rates and, using a revised version of the Health Belief Model, it highlights the psychological factors which influence decisions to seek medical care. Barriers which can inhibit consultation are discussed, as the decision to seek care will only result in a consultation if there is adequate access to care. Whilst poor health status and social disadvantage increase both "objective" medical need and in turn, consultation rates, a range of other social and psychological factors have been shown to influence consulting behaviour.

  10. New Vaccines for the World's Poorest People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Strych, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The 2000 Millennium Development Goals helped stimulate the development of life-saving childhood vaccines for pneumococcal and rotavirus infections while greatly expanding coverage of existing vaccines. However, there remains an urgent need to develop new vaccines for HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, as well as for respiratory syncytial virus and those chronic and debilitating (mostly parasitic) infections known as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The NTDs represent the most common diseases of people living in extreme poverty and are the subject of this review. The development of NTD vaccines, including those for hookworm infection, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, is being led by nonprofit product development partnerships (PDPs) working in consortia of academic and industrial partners, including vaccine manufacturers in developing countries. NTD vaccines face unique challenges with respect to their product development and manufacture, as well as their preclinical and clinical testing. We emphasize global efforts to accelerate the development of NTD vaccines and some of the hurdles to ensuring their availability to the world's poorest people.

  11. Impression mismanagement : People as inept self-presenters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinmetz, J.F.; Sezer, O.; Sedikides, C.

    2017-01-01

    People routinely manage the impressions they make on others, attempting to project a favorable self-image. The bulk of the literature has portrayed people as savvy self-presenters who typically succeed at conveying a desired impression. When people fail at making a favorable impression, such as when

  12. Parental Attitudes and Young People's Online Sexual Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbring, Emma; Hallberg, Jonas; Bohlin, Margareta; Skoog, Therése

    2015-01-01

    Parental attitudes towards young people's sexuality in traditional (i.e. non-online media) settings have been associated with young people's sexual activities. In this study, we explored the association between key parent and youth characteristics and parental attitudes towards young people's online sexual activities. We also examined the…

  13. Financial situation of people living with HIV in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, W.; Dreezen, C.; Borleffs, J.; Dijkgraaf, M.; Borchert, M.; de Graeve, D.; Hemmer, R.; Fleerackers, Y.; Colebunders, R.

    2002-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the financial situation of people living with HIV in Europe. Two surveys using an anonymous questionnaire were organized in Europe among people living with HIV, the first in 1996-97 and the second in 1998-99. One thousand one hundred and sixty-one people from the

  14. Neighbors Connected; Exploring Recruitment of Dutch Older People for Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lezwijn, J.; Vaandrager, L.; Wagemakers, A.; Koelen, M.; Woerkum, van C.

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of older people to engage in actions aimed at promoting health is an issue that does not receive much attention within health promotion practice. Many activities for older people are organized; however, less socially active older people do not participate in such activities. The aim

  15. Acceptability for French People of Physician-Assisted Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frileux, Stephanie; Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz; Antonini, Sophie; Mullet, Etienne; Sorum, Paul Clay

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to understand better how people judge the acceptability of physician-assisted suicide (PAS). We found that, for people in France of all ages and for elderly people with life-threatening illnesses, acceptability is an additive combination of the number of requests for PAS, the patient's age, the amount of physical suffering, and the…

  16. 31 CFR 515.574 - Support for the Cuban People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Support for the Cuban People. 515.574..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.574 Support for the Cuban People. (a) Specific licenses....560(c) and other transactions that are intended to provide support for the Cuban people including, but...

  17. Older people dying with dementia: a nationwide study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, K.; van den Block, L.; Echteld, M.; Boffin, N.; Bilsen, J.; van Casteren, V.; Deliens, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Large-scale nationwide data describing the end-of-life characteristics of older people with dementia are lacking. This paper describes the dying process and end-of-life care provided to elderly people with mild or severe dementia in Belgium. It compares with elderly people dying without

  18. Developing Support for Siblings of Young People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Sally; Meyer, Donald

    2008-01-01

    In the USA and UK, at least one in ten children and young people have special health, developmental and mental health concerns. Most of these people have typically developing brothers and sisters. As the people who, over the course of their lifetimes together, will be most involved with their siblings with special needs, it is important that…

  19. Supportive Housing in Foster Care: The Views of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Kyttälä, Minna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Finnish young people's experiences of supportive housing. Supportive housing is an after-care programme that should support the transition from foster care to independent adulthood. It is directed mainly at young people who have been taken into foster care by social workers. The sample consisted of 39 young people (23…

  20. Alternative Spaces of "Work" and Inclusion for Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Wilton, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Western governments have emphasized paid work as a key route to social inclusion for disabled people. Although the proportion of disabled people in "mainstream" employment has increased in recent decades, rates remain significantly below those for non-disabled people. Moreover, disabled workers continue to face discrimination and a lack of…

  1. Perceived stigma and associated factors among people with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epilepsy is the world's most common neurological disorder, affecting approximately 69 million people worldwide. Perceived stigma affects many domains of the lives of people with epilepsy. However, in Ethiopia there is dearth of study on perceived stigma specifically among people with epilepsy. Objective: To ...

  2. Tolerance for uncertainty in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHRYSTYNA KACHMARYK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study. The aim of the paper is a comparison of tolerance to uncertainty in two groups of elderly: the students of the University of the Third Age (UTA and older people who are not enrolled but help to educate grandchildren. A relation to uncertainty was shown to influence on decision making strategy of elderly that indicates on importance of the researches. Methods. To obtain the objectives of the paper the following methods were used: 1 Personal change readiness survey (PCRS adapted by Nickolay Bazhanov and Galina Bardiyer; 2 Tolerance Ambiguity Scale (TAS adapted by Galina Soldatova; 3 Freiburg personality inventory (FPI and 4 The questionnaire of self-relation by Vladimir Stolin and Sergej Panteleev. 40 socially involved elderly people were investigated according the above methods, 20 from UTA and 20 who are not studied and served as control group. Results. It was shown that relations of tolerance to uncertainty in the study group of students of the University of the Third Age substantially differ from relations of tolerance to uncertainty in group of older people who do not learn. The majority of students of the University of the Third Age have an inherent low tolerance for uncertainty, which is associated with an increase in expression personality traits and characteristics in self-relation. The group of the elderly who are not enrolled increasingly shows tolerance of uncertainty, focusing on the social and trusting relationship to meet the needs of communication, and the ability to manage their own emotions and desires than a group of Third Age university students. Conclusions. The results of experimental research of the third age university student’s peculiarities of the tolerance to uncertainty were outlined. It was found that decision making in the ambiguity situations concerning social interaction is well developed in elderly who do not study. The students of the University of Third Age have greater needs in

  3. People matter: tomorrow's workforce for tomorrow's world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easmon, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The focus of any health service, now and into the future, should be people delivering safe, quality care to people; care that covers not just diagnosis and treatment, but the whole experience that patients and their carers have of the service. Workforce development, the process by which the current and future workforce is planned and trained, must be related to current and future patterns of service delivery and take account of financial reality. It cannot exist in isolation. Despite employing 1.3 million people, upon whom up to 70% of its budget is spent, the NHS has been curiously relaxed about the workforce development of both its staff in training and of those trained staff who, with the impact of demographic change and the increasing speed of technological progress, will need to adapt to new ways of working and learn new skills. Given that the NHS has been repeatedly criticised by the Health Select Committee for its failure to link workforce planning and development with service and financial planning, and that inadequate staffing has been a feature of a number of recent organizational failures, how is this to be achieved? Some NHS organisations have been shown to be poor employers with a culture of bullying and fear and the use of suspensions and financial settlements bound to gagging clauses to remove whistleblowers. Gender and ethnic discrimination is an issue not yet fully resolved. Furthermore with the demographic changes around the increasing needs of an elderly population, the introduction of new technology and the increasing interdependency of health and social care, there is a need for a clear vision as to how the future NHS will be structured and developed. Fewer large specialist centres are likely, combined with local, community oriented integrated services with appropriate specialist support. Decisions need to be taken about this in time to give workforce development processes time to plan the best skill mix combinations and to develop clinicians

  4. Postboard : Free-form tangible messaging for people with aphasia (and other people)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Mahmud, A.; Dijkhuis, S.Q.; Blummel, L.; Elberse, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the design of a communication system for people with aphasia. It consists of pairs of physical whiteboards that are connected over the internet. This allows users to combine any personal language skills with visuals and already existing materials at hand. The design has been

  5. Older People and Social Connectedness: How Place and Activities Keep People Engaged

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene H. Yen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how older adults perceive and navigate their neighborhoods, we examined the implications of activity in their neighborhoods for their health. We interviewed 38 adults (ages 62–85 who lived in San Francisco or Oakland, California. Seven key themes emerged: (1 people express a wide range of expectations for neighborliness, from “we do not bother each other” to “we have keys to each other’s houses”, (2 social distance between “other” people impede a sense of connection, (3 ethnic differences in living arrangements affect activities and activity locations, (4 people try to stay busy, (5 people able to leave their homes do many activities outside their immediate residential neighborhoods, (6 access to a car is a necessity for most, and (7 it is unusual to plan for the future when mobility might become limited. Multiple locations influence older adults’ health, including residential neighborhoods. Older adults value mobility, active lives, and social connections.

  6. On interviewing people with pets: reflections from qualitative research on people with long-term conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sara; Ziebland, Sue

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that pets are associated with physiological, psychological and social benefits for humans. Much of this research has come from western countries, where there have been consistent calls for greater engagement with pet ownership and health. Drawing on a secondary analysis of 61 in-depth interviews with people, or carers of people, with long-term conditions, we explore how pets feature in people's narrative accounts of their experiences. Our findings demonstrate the multifaceted nature of people's relationships with pets, and the embedded and embodied ways in which human-nonhuman interactions are played out in narratives of chronic illness. Our study differs from other work on pets and health in that, by returning to the interview video recordings, we were able to explore the sometimes three-way interactions, the co(a)gency, between participants, pets and researchers. Pets were often presented as important family members, yet the researchers' responses to the presence or talk about pets was often markedly different from their reactions to other household members. We conclude with cautioning against the downgrading of pets in narrative health research. Narrative approaches may invite participants to talk about what is important to them, yet they clearly have limitations in practice. © 2015 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Young People's Voices: Disciplining Young People's Participation in Decision-Making in Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, education and family policy in the UK has sought to incorporate the views of children and young people through an active participation agenda, in the fulfilment of children's rights under the obligations of the UN Convention for the Rights of the Child. Drawing on empirical evidence, this paper suggests that this aspiration is…

  8. Being a Deaf Role Model: Deaf People's Experiences of Working with Families and Deaf Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys M.

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of being a deaf role model have been little explored in the literature. This paper explores the role of the deaf role model as perceived by d/Deaf adults who carried out this role, when working with deaf young people, parents of deaf children, and professionals who work with them. The data were collected from part of the evaluation…

  9. Young people, parents and radical right voting. The case of the Swiss People's Party

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, H.R.; Voorpostel, M.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly found that young people tend to adopt the political party choice of their parents. However, far less is known about the applicability of this theory when investigating radical right support. Using the Swiss Household panel data (1999e2007), this study empirically identifies the

  10. Do jobs follow people or people follow jobs? A meta-analysis of Carlino–Mills studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstra, Gerke J.; Van Dijk, Jouke; Florax, Raymond J. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Do jobs follow people or people follow jobs? A meta-analysis of Carlino–Mills studies. Spatial Economic Analysis. This study examines the classic question as to whether ‘jobs follow people’ or ‘people follow jobs’ by performing a meta-analysis of 321 results from 64 Carlino–Mills studies. It is

  11. What Do Older People Learn from Young People? Intergenerational Learning in "Day Centre" Community Settings in Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Damian

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses what motivates older people to attend "day centres" in Malta and what they believe that they derive from young people who carry out their placements at these day "centres" These young people, who are aged 16-17, attend a vocational college in Malta and are studying health and social care. The study is based…

  12. Rehabilitation and indigenous peoples: the Māori experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Matire

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous peoples often have the worst health status in comparison to non-indigenous people in their own nations; urgent action to address the health inequities for indigenous people is required. The role of rehabilitation in addressing health and disability inequities is particularly important due to the health need of indigenous peoples; the unequal distribution of health determinants; and disparities in access to, quality of care through and outcomes following rehabilitation. This article will present a perspective for Māori, the indigenous peoples of New Zealand, on a framework for improving rehabilitation services for Māori and ultimately their health and wellbeing.

  13. People-centric sensing in assistive healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannetsos, Thanassis; Dimitriou, Tassos; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2011-01-01

    , we discuss the latest advances in security and privacy protection strategies that hold promise in this new exciting paradigm. We hope this work will better highlight the need for privacy in people-centric sensing applications and spawn further research in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons......As the domains of pervasive computing and sensor networking are expanding, there is an ongoing trend towards assistive living and healthcare support environments that can effectively assimilate these technologies according to human needs. Most of the existing research in assistive healthcare...... follows a more passive approach and has focused on collecting and processing data using a static-topology and an application-aware infrastructure. However, with the technological advances in sensing, computation, storage, and communications, a new era is about to emerge changing the traditional view...

  14. Young people, drinking and social class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Analytical concepts such as 'bounded consumption' or 'controlled loss of control' have been applied to characterise contemporary youth intoxication. This article argues that this kind of cultural diagnosis benefits from being related to a focus on differences in social class. It is shown that in ......Analytical concepts such as 'bounded consumption' or 'controlled loss of control' have been applied to characterise contemporary youth intoxication. This article argues that this kind of cultural diagnosis benefits from being related to a focus on differences in social class. It is shown...... people to construct social class-related identities: mainstream youngsters continually confirm their taken-for-granted normality, and mainstream breakers resist the mainstream hegemonic (school) culture which usually defies them. In conclusion, bounded consumption, corresponding with contemporary ideals...

  15. People management as indicator of business excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haffer, Rafal; Kristensen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to show the importance of people management as a key indicator of business excellence based on four research projects, conducted on the samples of Polish (in the years 2004-2005 and 2006-2007) and Danish companies (in 1999 and 2005). Design/methodology/approach – EFQM...... it possible to compare developing Polish and developed Danish companies in their initiatives aiming at business excellence. Findings – The results indicate significant negligence in the management of human resources as one of the initiatives towards business excellence of Polish enterprises before Poland...... Excellence Model indicators were used as the evaluation criteria for the studies. The data were next estimated as a structural equation model by partial least squares using SmartPLS software. That estimation was conducted on the model of the Danish Business Excellence Index methodology. Presented data make...

  16. KT gets even closer to CERN people

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    For several years, the Knowledge Transfer (KT) group has been helping CERN people to disseminate their results, know-how and technologies to new fields of application. This may be anything from working with a school, hospital or a company through a licence or collaboration agreement, to securing CERN’s intellectual property rights or even starting a company. In order to maximise the impact of CERN’s work and to provide a service adapted to its users’ needs, the KT group has launched a survey.   Assessing the needs and wishes of the CERN personnel with regard to knowledge transfer activities: this is the goal of the survey that the KT group has launched this week. “Science and engineering are key disciplines in tackling the fundamental challenges facing the planet, such as energy, security, climate change, the sustainability of natural resources and economic resilience,” says Thierry Lagrange, head of the Finance, Procurement and Knowledge Transfer...

  17. Cockpit resource management training at People Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Keith D.; Jensen, Doug

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986 in a continuing effort to maintain and improve flight safety and solve some Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) problems, People Express implemented a new CRM training program. It is a continuously running program, scheduled over the next three years and includes state-of-the-art full-mission simulation (LOFT), semi-annual seminar workshops and a comprehensive academic program authored by Robert W. Mudge of Cockpit Management Resources Inc. That program is outlined and to maximize its contribution to the workshop's goals, is organized into four topic areas: (1) Program content: the essential elements of resource management training; (2) Training methods: the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches; (3) Implementation: the implementation of CRM training; and (4) Effectiveness: the effectiveness of training. It is confined as much as possible to concise descriptions of the program's basic components. Brief discussions of rationale are included, however no attempt is made to discuss or review popular CRM tenets or the supporting research.

  18. Young people's anticipation regarding education and job

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tilde Mette; Lundby, Astrid Arbjerg

    ’ decision making competences, but also to an guide the students towards certain educations that is seen to fit the society’s future need for work force, especially vocational education and science education. Despite these initiatives increasing number of students choose to go to gymnasium – and less......In Denmark there is significant political attention towards leading young people faster through the education system. Through new policies and benefit structures the government aims to reduce the number of gap years in the transition between general upper secondary education (‘gymnasium......’) and higher education. At the same time a political reform has made it more difficult to take on leave, switch education and do work experience during the studies. Simultaneously there is increasing attention on student guidance on all educational levels. The aim is on one hand to improve the students...

  19. Inclusive Educative Technologies, for people with disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echenique, AM; Graffigna, JP; Pérez, E.; López, N.; Piccinini, D.; Fernández, H.; Garcés, A.

    2016-04-01

    The conventional educational environment imposes barriers to education for people with disabilities, limiting their rights, which is a non-discriminative education. In turn, hampers their access to other rights and creates huge obstacles to realize their potential and participate effectively in their communities. In this sense Assistive Technology provides alternative solutions, in order to compensate for a lost or diminished ability. Thus the necessary assistance is provided to perform tasks, including those related to education, improving the inclusion. In this paper some researches had been made in the Gabinete de TecnologiaMedica, in the Facultad de Ingenieria of the Universidad Nacional de San Juan in order to solve this problem. The researchers are classified by type of disability; sensory (visual and auditory) or motor. They have been designed, developed and experienced through various prototypes that have given satisfactory results. It had been published in national and international congresses of high relevance.

  20. Genomic view on the peopling of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Rakesh; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2012-10-01

    India is known for its vast human diversity, consisting of more than four and a half thousand anthropologically well-defined populations. Each population differs in terms of language, culture, physical features and, most importantly, genetic architecture. The size of populations varies from a few hundred to millions. Based on the social structure, Indians are classified into various caste, tribe and religious groups. These social classifications are very rigid and have remained undisturbed by emerging urbanisation and cultural changes. The variable social customs, strict endogamy marriage practices, long-term isolation and evolutionary forces have added immensely to the diversification of the Indian populations. These factors have also led to these populations acquiring a set of Indian-specific genetic variations responsible for various diseases in India. Interestingly, most of these variations are absent outside the Indian subcontinent. Thus, this review is focused on the peopling of India, the caste system, marriage practice and the resulting health and forensic implications.

  1. What people really think about nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-03-15

    Nuclear power is a reliable, baseload, low-carbon energy source that can contribute to the fight against climate change. It is also competitive and can help reduce energy dependency. It is vital that politicians take the lead and implement bold decisions regarding the energy mix. Developments in Finland and the UK show that if the political decision to include nuclear in the energy mix is taken and information is communicated in an open, inclusive and democratic way, people tend to become more favourable to nuclear power. The March 2011 accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan had an impact on public opinion towards nuclear power. Yet the results of opinion polls carried out throughout Europe after the accident show that opinion is polarised and country specific.

  2. Emotional convergence between people over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cameron; Keltner, Dacher; John, Oliver P

    2003-05-01

    The authors propose that people in relationships become emotionally similar over time--as this similarity would help coordinate the thoughts and behaviors of the relationship partners, increase their mutual understanding, and foster their social cohesion. Using laboratory procedures to induce and assess emotional response, the authors found that dating partners (Study 1) and college roommates (Studies 2 and 3) became more similar in their emotional responses over the course of a year. Further, relationship partners with less power made more of the change necessary for convergence to occur. Consistent with the proposed benefits of emotional similarity, relationships whose partners were more emotionally similar were more cohesive and less likely to dissolve. Discussion focuses on implications of emotional convergence and on potential mechanisms.

  3. Balance control in elderly people with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Hsu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a prevalent health concern among older adults and is associated with an increased risk of falls that incur fracture, injury, or mortality. Identifying the risk factors of falls within this population is essential for the development of effective regimes for fall prevention. Studies have shown that muscle quality and good posture alignments are critical for balance control in elderly individuals. People with osteoporosis often have muscle weakness and increased spine kyphosis leading to vertebral fractures and poor balance control, or even falls. Therefore, improving muscle quality, strengthening weak muscles, and correcting postural alignment are essential elements for the prevention of falls and fractures in older adults with osteoporosis. This review reports the necessary information regarding the critical factors of balance control in older adults with osteoporosis, as well as testing the clinical innovations of exercise training to improve the long-term prognosis of osteoporosis in this vulnerable population.

  4. Commonwealth Edison operating experience: the people factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soth, L.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1955, Commonwealth Edison's nuclear commitment has evolved into three operating stations, another in startup, and two more under construction. Paralleling this evolution has been the investment in the personnel resources to operate, maintain, and manage these facilities. The personnel resource, its training and development, is the foundation for safe operation at any nuclear plant - the people factor. The personnel requirement at Edison has expanded and evolved with each station to meet ever increasing regulatory requirements. An extensive training organization has been developed to emphasize the importance of the man side of the human factors man/machine interface. Personnel errors are investigated to identify and correct the root causes, and outstanding personnel performance is recognized by the Company

  5. STAGING THROUGH PROTOTYPING WITH PARTIALLY BLINDED PEOPLE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    self-sufficient. Studies show that visual impaired persons rarely are involved in designing such technologies, which in many cases causes them to be excluded from everyday activities. We discuss how a design team applied collaborative methods and prototypes as boundary objects in dialogue with visually...... impaired people aiming including them as user of a self-service technology. The use of material objects from the very start of the design process contributed to a process in which the designers and visually impaired persons co-designed a new user interface that would enable these actors to collect and send...... parcels through ‘døgnbox’, an self-service, touchscreen-based postal system in Denmark (Nielsen et al. 2015). We describe how the design team used a variety of material objects to interest, enrol and mobilise the visually impaired actors in design processes (Callon 1986). We also discuss how...

  6. Suicide in elderly people: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza; Cavalcante, Fátima Gonçalves

    2010-08-01

    A literature review was carried out focusing on the main factors associated with suicidal ideation, attempts and completed suicide in elders. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PsychINFO, SciELO and Biblioteca Virtual em Violência e Saúde da BIREME (BIREME's Violence and Health Virtual Library), referring to the period from 1980 to 2008. Fifty-two references were selected and analyzed. They showed a strong relationship among suicide ideation, attempt and completion in elderly individuals, which results from the interaction of complex physical, mental, neurobiological and social factors. Suicide associated with depression in the elderly can be prevented, provided the person is properly treated. In Brazil, it is necessary to invest in research, given the persistent increase in suicide rates among aged people, especially among males.

  7. Investigating how everyday people experience security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg

    In this paper I propose a method for analyzing everyday people's experiences with IT-security. I furthermore report how I applied the method. The proposal is motivated by work of other researchers and their efforts to get beyond secure behavior, and to get an insight in secure or insecure...... experiences that everyday users of technology encounter. The background for introducing this method is a project under the heading of IT Security for Citizens, which bridges between research competencies in HCI and security. In this project we develop methods and concepts to analyze digital signature systems...... and security sensible systems in a broad sense, from the point of view of contemporary CHI. The project includes literature studies of usable security, as well as empirical investigations and design work. This paper reports on my method to target user experiences of and with security technology....

  8. Informal Caregivers Assisting People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunfeng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify characteristics of informal caregivers, caregiving, and people with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving this assistance that are associated with the strength of the care-giver/care recipient relationship. Data were collected in a national survey of informal caregivers and analyzed using an ordered logistic regression model to identify factors associated with caregiver perceptions of the strength of the relationship with the person with MS. The overall health of the person with MS was significantly associated with caregiver perceptions that providing assistance strengthened the caregiver/care recipient relationship, with poor health having a negative impact on the relationship. A spousal relationship between the caregiver and the person with MS was associated with significantly lower perceptions of a strengthened relationship. Conversely, caregiver perceptions that MS symptoms interfered with the independence of the person with MS in daily life were associated with caregiver perceptions of a strengthened relationship. Longer duration of caregiving and more hours per week spent providing assistance also were associated with a stronger relationship. In contrast, we found a significant negative association between caregiver perceptions that assisting the person with MS was burdensome and the strength of the relationship. Similarly, higher levels of education among caregivers tended to have a significantly negative impact on the caregiver/care recipient relationship. Our findings highlight the importance of addressing the needs and concerns of spousal caregivers. Health professionals who treat informal caregivers, as well as those treating people with MS, should be sensitive to the impact caregiving has on caregivers, especially spouses providing assistance. PMID:24453723

  9. Overloaded circuits: why smart people underperform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallowell, Edward M

    2005-01-01

    Frenzied executives who fidget through meetings, lose track of their appointments, and jab at the "door close" button on the elevator aren't crazy--just crazed. They suffer from a newly recognized neurological phenomenon that the author, a psychiatrist, calls attention deficit trait, or ADT. It isn't an illness; it's purely a response to the hyperkinetic environment in which we live. But it has become epidemic in today's organizations. When a manager is desperately trying to deal with more input than he possibly can, the brain and body get locked into a reverberating circuit while the brain's frontal lobes lose their sophistication, as if vinegar were added to wine. The result is black-and-white thinking; perspective and shades of gray disappear. People with ADT have difficulty staying organized, setting priorities, and managing time, and they feel a constant low level of panic and guilt. ADT can be controlled by engineering one's environment and one's emotional and physical health. Make time every few hours for a "human moment;" a face-to-face exchange with a person you like. Get enough sleep, switch to a good diet, and get adequate exercise. Break down large tasks into smaller ones, and keep a section of your work space clear. Try keeping a portion of your day free of appointments and e-mail. The author recommends that companies invest in amenities that contribute to a positive atmosphere. Leaders can also help prevent ADT by matching employees' skills to tasks. When managers assign goals that stretch people too far or ask workers to focus on what they're not good at, stress rises. ADT is a very real threat to all of us. If we don't manage it, it will manage us.

  10. Delirium in elderly people: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia eMartins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present review aims to highlight this intricate syndrome, regarding diagnosis, pathophysiology, etiology, prevention and management in elderly people. The diagnosis of delirium is based on clinical observations, cognitive assessment, detailed family history, physical and neurological examination. Clinically, delirium occurs in hyperactive, hypoactive or mixed forms, based on psychomotor behaviour. As an acute confusional state, it is characterized by a rapid onset of symptoms, fluctuating course and an altered level of consciousness, global disturbance of cognition or perceptual abnormalities and evidence of a physical cause.In spite of pathophysiological mechanisms of delirium remaining unclear, current evidence suggests that disruption of neurotransmission, inflammation or acute stress responses might all contribute to the development of this ailment.It usually occurs as a result of a complex interaction of multiple risk factors, such as cognitive impairment/dementia, current hip fracture and presence of severe illness.Despite all of the above, delirium is frequently under-recognized and often misdiagnosed by health professionals. In particular, this happens due to its fluctuating nature, its overlap with dementia and the scarcity of routine formal cognitive assessment in general hospitals.It is also associated with multiple adverse outcomes that have been well documented, such as increased hospital stay, function/cognitive decline, institutionalization and mortality.In this context, early identification of delirium will be essential. Timely and optimal management of people with delirium, should be performed with identification of possible underlying causes, dealing with a suitable care environment and improving education of health professionals. All these can be important factors, which contribute to a decrease in adverse outcomes associated with delirium.

  11. Risk factors of fall in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijana Avdić

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Falls are the leading accidental cause of death among elderly people in their homes. Falls and their consequences are the primary reason in 40% of admissions to hospitals for people older than 65 years. The study population consisted of 77 randomly selected patients of both genders older then 65 years. Each patient was tested in his/her home and was completely informed about the methodology and the goals of investigation. Based on the exclusion criteria, three patients were excluded from the study, which means the investigation was conducted on 27 males (35.06% and 50 females (64.94% with the average age being 71.23 ± 5.63 years.For each patient, a specially prepared questionnaire about risk factors was filled in. The sum of affirmative answers represented a relative index of fall risk. All patients were evaluated through Folstein’s Mini-Mental State Examination Test that is suitable for on-sight use in patient’s home. The score value over 20 excludes dementias, delirium, schizophrenia and affective disorders.Considering the values of the risk factor, scores obtained by the questionnaire and MMSE test scores, statistically significant differences were found between males and females (p < 0.005, respectively p < 0.01, “fallers” and “non-fallers” (p < 0.001, respectively p < 0.01, while considering the relation to the way of living (alone or with family, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05.

  12. Friendship in people with schizophrenia: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Ellen Wan-Yuk; Boardman, Jed; Craig, Tom

    2012-08-01

    To explore the quantitative and qualitative aspects of friendship in people with schizophrenia. To examine emotional and behavioural commitment, experiences of stigma, and the impact of illness factors that may affect the making and keeping of friends. The difference in the perception between the researcher and participants of the presence of problems in friendships was also investigated. The size and quality of the social networks of 137 people with established schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, aged 18-65 in one geographical area of southeast England was ascertained using a semi-structured interview. Qualitative aspects of friendship were measured using objective, pre-determined, investigator-rated criteria. The mean number of friends reported by respondents was 1.57. Men were less likely to report friendships than women (29 vs. 53%, χ (2) = 13.51, df 1, p friendships was generally good. Emotional commitment to friendship and mistrust were more important than current clinical state in determining whether or not the participant has friends. Most of those without friends did not see the lack of friendship as a problem. The researcher was up to three times more likely to report a problem than the participant. The friendship network size was found to be small but the quality of friendship mostly positive and highly valued. The majority of friendships were with other service users made during attendances at day hospitals and drop-in centres thus underscoring the importance of this service provision. Psychosocial intervention programmes need to take into account psychological factors that impact upon friendship.

  13. Do Social Networks Differ? Comparison of the Social Networks of People with Intellectual Disabilities, People with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other People Living in the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselt-Goverts, A. E.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Hendriks, A. H. C.; Wegman, K. M.; Teunisse, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the similarities and differences in social network characteristics, satisfaction and wishes with respect to the social network between people with mild or borderline intellectual disabilities (ID), people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and a reference group. Data were gathered from 105 young adults…

  14. Glucocorticosteroids for people with alcoholic hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Chavdar S; Varganova, Daria L; Casazza, Giovanni; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Gluud, Christian

    2017-11-02

    Alcoholic hepatitis is a form of alcoholic liver disease, characterised by steatosis, necroinflammation, fibrosis, and potential complications to the liver disease. Typically, alcoholic hepatitis presents in people between 40 and 50 years of age. Alcoholic hepatitis can be resolved if people abstain from drinking, but the risk of death will depend on the severity of the liver damage and abstinence from alcohol. Glucocorticosteroids are used as anti-inflammatory drugs for people with alcoholic hepatitis. Glucocorticosteroids have been studied extensively in randomised clinical trials in order to assess their benefits and harms. However, the results have been contradictory. To assess the benefits and harms of glucocorticosteroids in people with alcoholic hepatitis. We identified trials through electronic searches in Cochrane Hepato-Biliary's (CHB) Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, and Science Citation Index Expanded. We looked for ongoing or unpublished trials in clinical trials registers and pharmaceutical company sources. We also scanned reference lists of the studies retrieved. The last search was 20 October 2016. Randomised clinical trials assessing glucocorticosteroids versus placebo or no intervention in people with alcoholic hepatitis, irrespective of year, language of publication, or format. We considered trials with adult participants diagnosed with alcoholic hepatitis, which could have been established through clinical or biochemical diagnostic criteria or both. We defined alcoholic hepatitis as mild (Maddrey's score less than 32) and severe (Maddrey's score 32 or more). We allowed co-interventions in the trial groups, provided they were similar. We followed Cochrane and CHB methodology, performing the meta-analyses using Review Manager 5 and Trial Sequential Analysis. We presented the results of dichotomous outcomes as risk ratios (RR) and those of the continuous outcomes as mean difference (MD). We applied both the fixed

  15. Perceptions of disaster preparedness among older people in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Myoungran; Lee, Mijung; Tullmann, Dorothy

    2016-03-01

    Older people are a major vulnerable population. During disasters, given their physical frailty, lower social status, loss of medications and medical care, the vulnerability of older people increases. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of older people in Korea on various aspects of disaster preparedness to better understand their special needs and to facilitate appropriate disaster planning. The study was qualitative and used focus group interviews with 12 older people in one major city and one rural area of South Korea. Four themes were identified by the analysis of the interviews: defenceless state, reality of accepting limitations, strong will to live, importance of disaster preparedness governmental efforts for the older people. Findings indicated that preparation of shelters and transportation was critical to help older people survive in times of disasters and suggested that there should be active involvement of the government in terms of disaster planning, managing and preparing older people for disasters. In addition, healthy older people can be assets to disaster relief efforts by providing practical and emotional support for the most fragile older people. Older people can also provide knowledge of their special needs to the government to improve their disaster response policy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Are People With Whiplash-Associated Neck Pain Different From People With Nonspecific Neck Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Ricci; Kongsted, Alice; Kamper, Steven; Hancock, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study with cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Background The clinical importance of a history of whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) in people with neck pain remains uncertain. Objective To compare people with WAD to people with nonspecific neck pain, in terms of their baseline characteristics and pain and disability outcomes over 1 year. Methods Consecutive patients with neck pain who presented to a secondary-care spine center answered a comprehensive self-report questionnaire and underwent a physical examination. Patients were classified into a group of either those with WAD or those with nonspecific neck pain. We compared the outcomes of baseline characteristics of the 2 groups, as well as pain intensity and activity limitation at follow-ups of 6 and 12 months. Results A total of 2578 participants were included in the study. Of these, 488 (19%) were classified as having WAD. At presentation, patients with WAD were statistically different from patients without WAD for almost all characteristics investigated. While most differences were small (1.1 points on an 11-point pain-rating scale and 11 percentage points on the Neck Disability Index), others, including the presence of dizziness and memory difficulties, were substantial. The between-group differences in pain and disability increased significantly (Pneck pain. Conclusion People referred to secondary care with WAD typically had more self-reported pain and disability and experienced worse outcomes than those with nonspecific neck pain. Caution is required when interpreting the longitudinal outcomes due to lower-than-optimal follow-up rates. Level of Evidence Prognosis, level 2. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(10):894-901. Epub 3 Sep 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6588.

  17. An attentional bias for LEGO® people using a change detection task: Are LEGO® people animate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe, Mitchell R P; Cullen, Rachael; Baltaretu, Bianca; Campos, Melissa; Michalski, Natalie; Sri Satgunarajah, Suja; Cadieux, Michelle L; Pachai, Matthew V; Shore, David I

    2016-09-01

    Animate objects have been shown to elicit attentional priority in a change detection task. This benefit has been seen for both human and nonhuman animals compared with inanimate objects. One explanation for these results has been based on the importance animate objects have served over the course of our species' history. In the present set of experiments, we present stimuli, which could be perceived as animate, but with which our distant ancestors would have had no experience, and natural selection could have no direct pressure on their prioritization. In the first experiment, we compared LEGO® "people" with LEGO "nonpeople" in a change detection task. In a second experiment, we attempt to control the heterogeneity of the nonanimate objects by using LEGO blocks, matched in size and colour to LEGO people. In the third experiment, we occlude the faces of the LEGO people to control for facial pattern recognition. In the final 2 experiments, we attempt to obscure high-level categorical information processing of the stimuli by inverting and blurring the scenes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Young people's leisure time: Gender differences

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    Marina Videnović

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, topics relating to young peoples leisure time have become increasingly more present in academic literature. Among the numerous studies that delve into this subject, results point towards a relationship between the way teenagers spend their leisure time and their gender. In this study we wanted to answer the question if gender differences were evident in the way secondary school students in Serbia spent their leisure time. This problem was not looked into in more detail among secondary school students in Serbia. We conducted a survey on a sample of 922 secondary school teenagers from the 1st to 4th grade(ages 15–19 from nine Serbian towns. Research in this field commonly uses the rating scale. In this paper we have constructed an instrument that represents a methodological innovation in approaching a particular set of problems. It was a questionnaire. The task was to name all the activities they participated in, and the time frame in which the activities took place, over the course of one weekday and the Saturday of the previous week. The activities which best differentiate these two groups of surveyed teenagers are: sports, studying, computer use, spending time at friends’ homes and grooming. We did not discover differences in participating in creative activities while foreign studies show that such activities are more typical for girls.

  19. Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Older People

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    Sabrina Garasto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at reviewing age-related changes in kidney structure and function, methods for estimating kidney function, and impact of reduced kidney function on geriatric outcomes, as well as the reliability and applicability of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in older patients. CKD is associated with different comorbidities and adverse outcomes such as disability and premature death in older populations. Creatinine clearance and other methods for estimating kidney function are not easy to apply in older subjects. Thus, an accurate and reliable method for calculating eGFR would be highly desirable for early detection and management of CKD in this vulnerable population. Equations based on serum creatinine, age, race, and gender have been widely used. However, these equations have their own limitations, and no equation seems better than the other ones in older people. New equations specifically developed for use in older populations, especially those based on serum cystatin C, hold promises. However, further studies are needed to definitely accept them as the reference method to estimate kidney function in older patients in the clinical setting.

  20. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today.

  1. Bereavement process of people with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia MUÑIZ FERNÁNDEZ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is focused on detecting the support needs of people with intellectual disabilities during the bereavement process in order to guide about professional interventions and practices aimed to provide more adequate individualized support to their real needs. The sample consists of 93 adults with ID, with ages ranging from 21 to 72 years old (M = 49.9; SD = 11.79, who have suffered the loss of a significant person. The professionals who worked with them and knew them well completed two questionnaires: Staff Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ and Bereavement Needs Assessment (BNAT. Beside descriptive analyses, results were analyzed according to several variables (i.e., gender, age, level of intellectual disability, and level of dependency. Level of intellectual disability and level of dependency were the ones that resulted significant. In order to provide the best answer to their needs, good practices are suggested such as facilitating the understanding of loss, helping them express feelings and emotions, dealing with each case individually, and encouraging to continue education about death.

  2. Wearable Smart System for Visually Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jasim Ramadhan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a wearable smart system to help visually impaired persons (VIPs walk by themselves through the streets, navigate in public places, and seek assistance. The main components of the system are a microcontroller board, various sensors, cellular communication and GPS modules, and a solar panel. The system employs a set of sensors to track the path and alert the user of obstacles in front of them. The user is alerted by a sound emitted through a buzzer and by vibrations on the wrist, which is helpful when the user has hearing loss or is in a noisy environment. In addition, the system alerts people in the surroundings when the user stumbles over or requires assistance, and the alert, along with the system location, is sent as a phone message to registered mobile phones of family members and caregivers. In addition, the registered phones can be used to retrieve the system location whenever required and activate real-time tracking of the VIP. We tested the system prototype and verified its functionality and effectiveness. The proposed system has more features than other similar systems. We expect it to be a useful tool to improve the quality of life of VIPs.

  3. Currency features for visually impaired people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Sandra L.; Legge, Gordon E.; Shannon, Robert R.; Baer, Norbert S.

    1996-03-01

    The estimated 3.7 million Americans with low vision experience a uniquely difficult task in identifying the denominations of U.S. banknotes because the notes are remarkably uniform in size, color, and general design. The National Research Council's Committee on Currency Features Usable by the Visually Impaired assessed features that could be used by people who are visually disabled to distinguish currency from other documents and to denominate and authenticate banknotes using available technology. Variation of length and height, introduction of large numerals on a uniform, high-contrast background, use of different colors for each of the six denominations printed, and the introduction of overt denomination codes that could lead to development of effective, low-cost devices for examining banknotes were all deemed features available now. Issues affecting performance, including the science of visual and tactile perception, were addressed for these features, as well as for those features requiring additional research and development. In this group the committee included durable tactile features such as those printed with transparent ink, and the production of currency with holes to indicate denomination. Among long-range approaches considered were the development of technologically advanced devices and smart money.

  4. Promoting people's health: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitkamp, P

    1998-01-01

    Promoting health underlines the right of each individual to the highest attainable standard of health. It stresses the importance of the participation of people and recognizes different sociocultural values and beliefs that are prevalent throughout the world. Working on health development has a sustainable effect only when done comprehensively: personal development, community development, organizational development, and political development. The international conferences that have marked the way of health promotion have been goal posts of an energetic movement to strengthen health worldwide. The Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion has been a worldwide source of guidance for health promotion through its five strategies: building health policy, creating supportive elements, strengthening community action, developing personal skills, and reorienting health services. Moreover, the Jakarta Declaration on "Leading Health Promotion into the 21st Century" identifies five priorities in the next millennium: 1) promote social responsibility for health; 2) increase investments for health development; 3) consolidate and expand partnerships for health; 4) increase community capacity and empower the individual in matters of health; and 5) secure an infrastructure for health promotion. Increasing the investment in health development calls for the need to find new mechanisms for funding as well as reorienting existing resources towards health promotion and health education.

  5. Designing Documents for People to Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sless

    Full Text Available This article reports on the work of Communication Research Institute (CRI, an international research center specializing in communication and information design. With the support of government, regulators, industry bodies, and business—and with the participation of people and their advocates—CRI has worked on over 200 public document design projects since it began as a small unit in 1985. CRI investigates practical methods and achievable standards for designing digital and paper public documents, including forms; workplace procedural notices; bills, letters, and emails sent by organizations; labels and instructions that accompany products and services; and legal and financial documents and contracts. CRI has written model grammars for the document types it designs, and the cumulative data from CRI projects has led to a set of systematic methods for designing public-use documents to a high standard. Through research, design, publishing, and advocacy, CRI works to measurably improve the ordinary documents we all have to use. Keywords: Information design, Design methods, Design standards, Communication design, Design diagnostic testing, Design research

  6. Preventing social isolation in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterell, Natalie; Buffel, Tine; Phillipson, Christopher

    2018-07-01

    The extent of social isolation amongst older people has emerged as a major concern for health and social policy. Although the social and health outcomes of social isolation are well documented, evidence regarding the prevention of isolation in later life remains scarce. This article addresses this by presenting the findings from a literature review focusing on the identification, assessment, prevention, and intervention strategies relevant to social isolation in older age. The paper first addresses the issues of identification and assessment, using an ecological framework to identify the risk factors for social isolation at four levels: individual, relationship, community, and societal. It then reviews different types of interventions to reduce or prevent social isolation in later life, including one-to-one, group, service provision, technology-based, neighbourhood, and structural interventions. The paper discusses both the opportunities and the constraints associated with these different approaches. The discussion highlights future directions for research, emphasising the need for a cultural change from 'cure' to 'prevention' of social isolation across the life-course, and the importance of acknowledging greater diversity within the ageing population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The most influential people in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Recently Modern Healthcare released the 2016 listing of their annual most influential people in Healthcare (1. Leading the list is President Barack Obama for his Affordable Care Act. The list consists of a monotonous list of bureaucrats, politicians, large healthcare chain CEOs , insurance company CEOs, health interest organizations (American Hospital Association, America's Health Insurance Plans Healthcare, etc., professional organizations (American Medical Association, American Nurses Association, etc., nongovernmental healthcare interest organizations (Joint Commission, National Quality Forum, etc. and vendors (Epic, McKesson, etc.. From the Southwest the list includes at least 11 hospital chain CEOs including 1 from Arizona, 3 from Colorado and 7 from California. Striking is the lack of influential healthcare professionals who made the list. Only two are leading academicians-Atul Gawande, a surgeon and author at Harvard, and Robert Wachter, an internist and pioneer in the hosptialist movement at University of California San Francisco. John Noseworthy (Mayo Clinic ...

  8. Spinifex People as Cold War Moderns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Castillo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Verdana;} Aboriginal Australian contemporary artists create works that express indigenous traditions as well as the unprecedented conditions of global modernity. This is especially true for the founders of the Spinifex Arts Project, a collective established in 1997 to create so-called “government paintings”: the large-scale canvases produced as documents of land tenure used in negotiations with the government of Western Australia to reclaim expropriated desert homelands. British and Australian nuclear testing in the 1950s displaced the Anangu juta pila nguru, now known to us as the Spinifex people, from their nomadic lifeworld. Exodus and the subsequent struggle to regain lost homelands through paintings created as corroborating evidence for native title claims make Spinifex canvases not simply expressions of Tjukurpa, or “Dreamings,” but also artifacts of the atomic age and its impact on a culture seemingly far from the front lines of cold war conflict.

  9. [Participation of People with Epilepsy in Sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2017-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) have been discouraged from participating in exercise and sports because of the fear of inducing seizures or increasing seizure frequency, risks associated with such activities, stigma, and overprotection. Recently, there has been a shift in the medical recommendations toward encouraging, rather than restricting, participation. Cases of exercise-induced seizures are rare. Physical activity can exert beneficial actions, such as a reduction in seizure susceptibility and the number of seizures, improvement in quality of life (QOL), and better social integration. The antiepileptogenic and neuroprotective effects of exercise in epilepsy have been shown. The majority of sports are safe for PWE to participate in when special attention is paid to seizure control, direct supervision, etc. Human and animal studies have supported the use of exercise as a therapy for epilepsy, complementary to standard treatments. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy offers general guidelines concerning the participation of PWE in sports activities. Sports are divided into three categories based on the potential risk of injury or death. Engaging in physical exercise and sports activities has positive effects for PWE. The ILAE propose to use the regulations governing the issuance of fitness certificates for driving as a possible guide. The decision to participate in sports is based on whether the benefit outweighs the risk.

  10. Falls and depression in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Alin; Toubin, Sandrine; Mourey, France; D'Athis, Philippe; Manckoundia, Patrick; Pfitzenmeyer, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common risk factors for falls, but links between falls and depression are still unclear. Few studies have examined the relationship between depression and gait alteration, which may increase the risk of fall. This study aims to assess a possible relationship between depression, postural and gait abnormalities, and falls. We conducted a 1-year prospective study on patients >/=70 years who were admitted to a geriatric unit for 'spontaneous' unexplained falls. Patients were tested for depression using the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Their motor performances were assessed using the Mini Motor Test (MMT), which is an easy direct-observation test, validated in France, for assessment of frail old people who present with severe postural and gait impairment. This scale is composed of 4 categories of items: (1) abilities in bed; (2) quality of the sitting position; (3) abilities in the standing position, and (4) quality of gait. Sixty-nine patients were included. Depression was found in 46 patients (66.7%). The MMT score was higher in the non-depressed fallers (NDF) group (GDS 10; p predispose to falls. In clinical practice, more attention should be given to old fallers concerning diagnosis and treatment of associated depression. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Edward B. Aveling: the people's Darwin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paylor, Suzanne

    2005-06-01

    By the late-19th century, evolutionary theory, known by most people as Darwinism, had earned a reputation as an atheistic theory that challenged religious orthodoxy. From recent historical work we now know a great deal about how those with religious convictions received Darwinian ideas, and the role that professional scientists played in styling and communicating 'Darwinism' to the wider public and between themselves. However, relatively little is known about how Darwinian ideas were received and used by avowedly irreligious groups, and how these groups set about communicating their own version of Darwinism to a public hungry for cheap and accessible science. The activities of the Secularist Edward Bibbins Aveling, a prolific popularizer of Darwinian ideas in the late-19th century, offer a unique insight into this relatively uncharted territory. His work helped to develop the polemic of popular irreligious groups and imbue Darwinism with overtly atheistic connotations; it also engendered unprecedented support for atheism from the general public, and challenged the monopoly that some professional scientists enjoyed over imparting serious scientific knowledge to them.

  12. Environmental Factors Affecting Where People Geocache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Golbeck

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor leisure activities are important for public health as well as family cohesiveness, yet environmental factors may easily affect someone’s ability to participate in such activities. We explored this with a focus on the social web-based treasure hunt game called Geocaching. We collected data on all US and Canadian geocaches from OpenCaching.com and conducted an online survey with twenty geocachers as a follow-up to our data analysis. Data analysis showed that geocaches were more often found in areas that were wealthier, better educated, younger, and more urban, and had higher population density and better weather. Survey results showed similar trends: Most people actively thought about where they would cache and tried to minimize risks, despite cache hiders thinking less about these concerns. These results further emphasize the importance of environmental factors when it comes to participation in outdoor activities and leads to Human–Computer Interaction design implications for location-based online social activities.

  13. Wearable Smart System for Visually Impaired People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Ali Jasim

    2018-03-13

    In this paper, we present a wearable smart system to help visually impaired persons (VIPs) walk by themselves through the streets, navigate in public places, and seek assistance. The main components of the system are a microcontroller board, various sensors, cellular communication and GPS modules, and a solar panel. The system employs a set of sensors to track the path and alert the user of obstacles in front of them. The user is alerted by a sound emitted through a buzzer and by vibrations on the wrist, which is helpful when the user has hearing loss or is in a noisy environment. In addition, the system alerts people in the surroundings when the user stumbles over or requires assistance, and the alert, along with the system location, is sent as a phone message to registered mobile phones of family members and caregivers. In addition, the registered phones can be used to retrieve the system location whenever required and activate real-time tracking of the VIP. We tested the system prototype and verified its functionality and effectiveness. The proposed system has more features than other similar systems. We expect it to be a useful tool to improve the quality of life of VIPs.

  14. Power lifting: people meeting the population challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, L

    1994-12-01

    Whereas population pressures are usually associated with developing countries, developed countries like the US also suffer from population-associated problems. For example, in some US cities the infant mortality rate is worse than in the developing world. US policy-makers have found it useful to apply some of the programs used successfully in the developing world to problems at home. Efforts to increase the availability of health care services and education have led to the creation of the Healthy Start program in Baltimore, Maryland, which uses community residents to motivate their peers and provides counseling on family planning, education, and employment. In Oregon, an AIDS-prevention program, which makes condoms more accessible to teenagers, has been transplanted from Zaire. Chattanooga, Tennessee, has used techniques from Brazil to design public transportation systems and improve air quality. In communities across the country, activists are working to instill power in local residents as they seek ways to improve the environment and promote economic health. Modeled on an initiative in Bangladesh, community-run loan programs allow the development of microenterprises which help people develop self-employment opportunities. When women take part in these activities and become successfully employed, their children are given what is usually their first example of parental employment and a reason to hope for a better future.

  15. Professional activity of people with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Staniszewska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to determine the occupational activity of epileptic patients. Particular attention was paid to employment of people with epilepsy, the way the workplace is informed about the disease, impact of education on employment opportunities and the relationship between clinical type of epilepsy and professional activity. Material and Methods: Patients were recruited from the neurological outpatient clinic in Warszawa and asked to fill in a customized questionnaire, containing questions on their socio-demographic, clinical and employment status. Results: The study included 197 adult patients with epilepsy (64 professionally active and 133 inactive. As many as 47.7% of respondents declared that the disease impeded their employment, and 77.2% admitted that the occurrence of seizure at work had negatively affected their comfort. As many as 42.2% professionally active respondents had revealed the disease at work. There was a statistically significant difference between individuals with primarily generalized seizures and those with partial and secondarily generalized seizures (30.61% vs. 2.63%, p 0.05. Neither current work status had impact on opinions about difficulties in finding a job (p > 0.05. Conclusions: Epilepsy is a great obstacle to finding and maintaining employment. Less than 1/2 of patients inform the workplace about their illness, mainly due to previous negative experiences. Since education significantly enables the employment, programs aimed at promoting vocational activation of patients should facilitate access to learning. Med Pr 2015;66(3:343–350

  16. Consumer panel study on elderly people's wishes concerning services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkila, Noora; Litja, Heli; Aalto, Leena; Saari, Arto

    2010-01-01

    This study informs on the wishes and needs of elderly people themselves regarding services for the elderly. The data for the study were gathered using a consumer panel method. Elderly people desire assistance in heavy cleaning chores, in outdoor activities and in carrying out their personal business. Elderly people felt that there should be more recreational services available. Elderly people link aging with feelings of insecurity and loneliness. Becoming a service user for the first time is felt to be a very difficult step to take, and so this decision is postponed as long as possible. The elderly people desire a service for assessing their individual service needs in an organized, expert and objective fashion. The study indicates that elderly people value the human contact gained through service provision. The consumer panel method for collecting data was successful. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Auditory Memory deficit in Elderly People with Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahidipour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in elderly people. Functional side effects of hearing loss are various. Due to the fact that hearing loss is the common impairment in elderly people; the importance of its possible effects on auditory memory is undeniable. This study aims to focus on the hearing loss effects on auditory memory.   Materials and Methods: Dichotic Auditory Memory Test (DVMT was performed on 47 elderly people, aged 60 to 80; that were divided in two groups, the first group consisted of elderly people with hearing range of 24 normal and the second one consisted of 23 elderly people with bilateral symmetrical ranged from mild to moderate Sensorineural hearing loss in the high frequency due to aging in both genders.   Results: Significant difference was observed in DVMT between elderly people with normal hearing and those with hearing loss (P

  18. Seniors-on-line: introducing older people to technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, C; Downing, A; Elford, C

    1997-03-01

    Retired Engineers are playing an important role in ensuring that older people are not excluded from the benefits of technological advances. Technology is playing an increasingly important role in the lives of older people as it is incorporated into assistive devices, home security, access to health care, banking, communication and many other areas. However, if older people are unfamiliar with new technologies and find them daunting, they may not benefit fully from these advances. In order to minimize difficulties arising from unfamiliarity with technology, an introductory computer course was offered to people aged 55 and over. Teaching methods appropriate to the needs of older people were used: small classes, students and instructors from same age cohort, slow pace of presentation and ample opportunity to ask questions. Retired Engineers make up the majority of instructors. Three hundred and sixty nine older people have participated in the course and most plan to continue using a computer.

  19. Rural older people had lower mortality after accidental falls than non-rural older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang JW

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jen-Wu Huang,1,2 Yi-Ying Lin,2,3 Nai-Yuan Wu,4 Yu-Chun Chen5–7 1Department of Surgery, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Yilan, Taiwan; 2Institute of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Pediatrics, Heping Fuyou Branch, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Biomedical Informatics, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Medical Research and Education, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Yilan, Taiwan; 6Faculty of Medicine and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Objective: This study aimed to investigate the mortality rate after falls of rural and non-rural older people and to explore the risk factors of mortality after falls among older people. Patients and methods: This population-based case–control study identified two groups from a nationwide claim database (National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan: a rural group and a non-rural group, which included 3,897 and 5,541 older people, respectively, who were hospitalized for accidental falls (The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification: E880–E888 during 2006–2009. Both groups were followed up for 4 years after falls. Four-year cumulative all-cause mortality rate after falls was calculated, and the demographic factor, comorbidity, and medications were considered as the potential risk factors of mortality after falls. Results: The rural group had a significantly higher frequency of fall-related hospitalizations (7.4% vs 4.3%, P<0.001, but a lower 4-year cumulative all-cause mortality rate after falls than the non-rural group (8.8% vs 23.4%, P<0.001. After adjusting for age, gender, comorbidity, and medication use, the rural group had

  20. Validity of the People Risk Framework: Evidence from the FSA

    OpenAIRE

    Chrysostomou, Xenia

    2013-01-01

    The recent Global Financial Crisis was the ultimate manifestation for the recognition and appreciation of people risk, one of the dimensions constituting operational risk, highlighting the necessity of people risk management within the financial industry. In recognition of the magnitude of its impact, ‘people risk’ became a ’hot’ topic amongst the financial regulators, which resulted in the stipulation of assigning capital reserves, exclusively dedicated to its coverage. However, the nature o...

  1. 'HAs fail to consult Irish people in UK'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-10

    Health authorities are failing to consult local people on their health needs, a conference on the mental health of Irish people living in the UK heard last week. Consulting Irish people was often only 'symbolic', despite the requirements of the NHS and Community Care Act, conference Chair Padraic Kenna, Director of Innisfree Housing Association, told delegates. 'The Irish caught the boat in the 1950s only to miss the boat ever since,' he said.

  2. Subjective daytime functioning assessment in people with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Karol; Nowicka-Sauer, Katarzyna; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Rutkowski, Marcin; Bandosz, Piotr; Nowicki, Zbigniew

    2017-10-29

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and severity of subjective daytime functioning impairment among people with insomnia complaints. Another goal was to establish its relationships with age, gender, type and duration of subjective insomnia. Study group consisted of NATPOL study participants - 2,413 people (1,245 women and 1,168 men) aged 18-79. We extracted group with declared insomnia complaints, consisting of 1,221 people (736 women and 485 men) aged 18-79. Data on insomnia symptoms characteristics, their duration and subjective functioning impairment were further analyzed. Functioning impairment was declared by 825 people (67.7% of those who declared subjective insomnia) and it was more common in women. It was most common among people with insomnia complaints lasting over two weeks - 72.4%. In people with symptoms lasting less than two weeks or for a few days it was 70.7% and 64.9% respectively. People with insomnia symptoms lasting over two weeks accounted for 20% of group with severe functioning impairment. For shorter duration of symptoms it was 8.6% and 6.9% respectively. Among people with mild functioning impairment, persons with symptoms lasting for a few days and less than two weeks were predominant - 32.5% and 35.3% respectively. In people aged 18-24 years mild functioning impairment was predominant (66.66%). Subjective daytime functioning impairment is common in people declaring insomnia symptoms. It is more common in women and its prevalence and intensity are greater in people with longer duration of sleep problems. Its prevalence is not correlated with age and it is the mildest in people aged 18-24.

  3. TOF Imaging in Smart Room Environments towards Improved People Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðmundsson, Sigurjón Árni; Larsen, Rasmus; Aanæs, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    In this Paper we present the use of Time-of-Flight (TOF) cameras in Smart-rooms and how this leads to improved results in segmenting the people in the room from the background and consequently better 3D reconstruction of the people. A calibrated rig of one Swissranger SR3100 Time-of-flight range ...... regional artifacts and therefore a more robust input for higher level applications such people tracking or human motion analysis....

  4. PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE TOWARDS PARTICIPATION OF DISABLED PEOPLE IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Roha, Abdul Rasid Aida; Fatt, Ong Tah

    2017-01-01

     AbstractDesire to be accepted by other people is one of the basic human needs. Social isolation or rejection is very stressful to person with disabilities. Social acceptance by normal people towards physical activity participation for the disabled plays a vital role in motivating them to be more physically active. A review of literature indicated that there are several factors that influence public acceptance towards participation of people with disabilities in physical activity. The pr...

  5. Finding people and their utterances in social media

    OpenAIRE

    Weerkamp, W.; Chen, H.-H.; Efthimiadis, E.N.; Savoy, J.; Crestani, F.; Marchand-Millet, S.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in usage of content creation platforms of various forms, has led to a huge number of people sharing their utterances. These so-called social media are attractive for many applications, and offering access to the information contained in them is the goal of my research. Given the two main ingredients of social media, people and their utterances, I explore ways of improving finding either of these. My research is divided into three parts: (i) finding utterances; (ii) finding people...

  6. Peopling the past: New perspectives on the ancient Maya

    OpenAIRE

    Robin, Cynthia

    2001-01-01

    The new direction in Maya archaeology is toward achieving a greater understanding of people and their roles and their relations in the past. To answer emerging humanistic questions about ancient people's lives Mayanists are increasingly making use of new and existing scientific methods from archaeology and other disciplines. Maya archaeology is bridging the divide between the humanities and sciences to answer questions about ancient people previously considered bey...

  7. Peopling the past: new perspectives on the ancient Maya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C

    2001-01-02

    The new direction in Maya archaeology is toward achieving a greater understanding of people and their roles and their relations in the past. To answer emerging humanistic questions about ancient people's lives Mayanists are increasingly making use of new and existing scientific methods from archaeology and other disciplines. Maya archaeology is bridging the divide between the humanities and sciences to answer questions about ancient people previously considered beyond the realm of archaeological knowledge.

  8. Health of children and young people in secure settings

    OpenAIRE

    Mooney, Ann; Statham, J.; Storey, P.

    2007-01-01

    This small-scale descriptive study was commissioned by the Children and Young People's Public Health team within the Department of Health, in partnership with Offender Health, in order to inform preparation and implementation of an Offender Health Strategy document for children and young people. The overall aim was to review what is currently known about healthcare for children and young people in the secure estate, covering all three types of settings (Young Offender Institution, Secure Trai...

  9. Serious Leisure and People with Orthopedic Impairment: Benefits and Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Manolya AKSATAN; Zehra Gökçe SEL

    2017-01-01

    There are many people around the world who have different types of disabilities. Understanding their needs is the first step of developing policies to increase their quality of life and satisfaction. Leisure is an essential need of disabled people and it plays an important role in disabled people’s lives. The purpose of this study is to gain a deep understanding on the serious leisure activities of people with orthopedic impairment, and also both benefits and constraints ...

  10. Health Needs Assessment of Older People in an Agricultural Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normah Che Din

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Psychological factors had the main influence on health functioning of the older people of FELDA. Physical health needs of the older people in FELDA were determined mainly by psychological, nutritional, and lifestyle factors, whereas mental health needs were determined mainly by psychological, socioeconomic, and social factors. FELDA has vast resources to utilize for the running and maintaining of health programs for their older people as well as for evaluating and monitoring the effectiveness of health programs.

  11. The Representation of Older People in East Asian Television Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieler, Michael; Ivanov, Alex; Hagiwara, Shigeru

    2017-06-01

    In this study, 432 television advertisements from Hong Kong, Japan, and South Korea were analyzed to determine their representations of older people. Findings demonstrate that in East Asian advertisements, older people are highly underrepresented, appear in major roles, mostly alongside younger people, and older men clearly outnumber older women. The other variables investigated (i.e., setting and product categories) led to no conclusive findings for the three societies. In short, our study, employing ethnolinguistic vitality theory to analyze television advertisements, demonstrates how East Asian societies greatly marginalize older people. Potential effects of such representations are discussed using social cognitive theory and cultivation theory.

  12. Epidemiology and the people's health: theory and context

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krieger, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    .... It is about how myriad aspects of people's lives--involving work, dignity, desire, love, play, conflict, discrimination, and injustice--become literally incorporated biologically into our bodies...

  13. Young people's time use and maternal employment in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, Killian

    2009-12-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between young people's time use and maternal employment in the United Kingdom (UK). Two dimensions of young people's time use are important for understanding the impact of maternal employment. The first of these is family context. This concerns the time young people are near their parents or not. The second relates to young people's activity patterns. Combining information from both dimensions is necessary to provide a comprehensive overview of the impact of maternal employment on young people's time use. The paper demonstrates that young people's time use is associated with maternal employment both in terms of activity patterns and family context. Young people with employed mothers spend more time alone with a father, and more time with neither parent. More specifically, young people with mothers employed full time (FT) spend significantly more time watching TV than those whose mothers are not employed, especially when they are not near any parents. There is a negative association between FT maternal employment and the time young people spend in achievement-related activities, concentrated in time when alone with a mother. Unlike time in leisure activities or time watching TV, time in achievement-related activities when in the presence of a father does not increase to compensate for the loss in time spent in achievement-related activities when alone with a mother.

  14. E-inclusion: Digital equality - young people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsson, H; Bolic-Baric, V; Lidström, H

    2015-01-01

    The United Nations' position is that digital access is a matter involving equality between groups of people, the securing of democratic rights, and equal opportunities for all citizens. This study investigates digital equality in school and leisure between young people with and without disabilities. A cross-sectional design with group comparisons was applied. Participants were young people (10-18 years of age) with disabilities (n=389) and a reference group in about the same ages. Data were collected by a survey focusing on access to and engagement in ICT activities in school and during leisure time. The results demonstrated young people with disabilities had restricted participation in computer use in educational activities, in comparison to young people in general. During leisure time young people with disabilities had a leading position compared to the reference group with respect to internet use in a variety of activities. Beneficial environmental conditions at home (and the reverse in schools) are discussed as parts of the explanation for the differing engagement levels at home and in school, and among young people with disabilities and young people in general. Schools need to prioritise use of ICT by young people with disabilities.

  15. Going beyond the most exposed people in a dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjerpe, Thomas; Broed, Robert [Facilia AB, Gustavslundsvaegen 151C, SE-167 51 Bromma (Sweden); Ikonen, Ari T.K. [Environmental Research and Assessment, EnviroCase, Ltd., Hallituskatu 1 D 4, FI-28 100 Pori (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    The dose assessment in a long-term radiation safety assessment often focus on assessing dose of a representative person to be used for determining compliance with a radiation dose constraint. This representative person is often assumed to receive a dose that is representative of the most exposed people, i.e., the more highly exposed individuals in the population. This is not always sufficient, the Finnish regulations for disposal of nuclear waste has radiation dose constraint to the most exposed people as well as for larger groups of exposed people. This work presents the methodology to assessing dose of a representative person for a larger group of exposed people as applied by Posiva in the TURVA-2012 safety case for the spent nuclear fuel disposal at Olkiluoto. In addition, annual doses from the set of biosphere calculation cases analysed in TURVA-2012 are presented and discussed. Special focus is given on explaining the differences in exposure levels and exposure routes between the estimated annual doses to representative persons for most exposed people and a larger exposed group. The results show that the annual doses to a larger group of people ranges from one to three orders of magnitude below the annual doses to the most exposed people. Furthermore, the exposure route related to food ingestion is less significant for the larger group of people compared to the most exposed people and that the exposure route related to water ingestion shows the opposite behaviour. (authors)

  16. Increasing participation of people with learning disabilities in bowel screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jonathan

    2018-03-08

    Learning disability nurses have a key role in addressing the health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities. People with learning disabilities are less likely to participate in bowel screening than other sectors of the population, despite there being evidence of this population being at an increased risk of developing bowel cancer. There are a range of barriers at individual and systemic levels that impact on participation in bowel screening by people with learning disabilities. Actions to address these barriers have been identified in the literature and learning disability nurses are a key agent of change in enabling people with learning disabilities to participate in the national screening programmes.

  17. What is important in the surroundings in order to extend the healthy life period? A regional study of 19 older women in a northern part of Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minde, Gunn-Tove; Sæterstrand, Torill M

    2013-01-01

    Participating in a community with other retired individuals to increase life quality can be possible for the older persons. Cultural and ethnical background is important for their social identity. To identify what the informants think is important in their surroundings in order to extend their healthy life period. A structured questionnaire developed by the OCIN network. Nineteen elderly women aged 75 years or more were interviewed. This regional survey is a pilot study in Norway. The data were collected during 2 periods, in 2009 and 2010. The data are analyzed using a result scheme prepared by the network OCIN. Our findings show that this is a group of elderly women that are concerned with promoting their own health. The participants wish to take care of themselves, so they do not become a burden for society and the local authorities. The findings of this study suggest that participation in the local context is important for promoting health and well-being among elderly in all ethnicities. For the Sami elderly, this is particularly important because meeting equal-minded people helps them maintain their Sami identity. In the Sami culture and among the Sami elderly, it is important to be "strong" and "healthy". Due to these norms, the elderly Sami women try to live with their illnesses and are less eager to go to the doctor when they are seriously ill.

  18. The work market awake for aged people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maya Goto Uyehara

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available At the end of XX century, the old age theme has been approached due to concern of the society with the quality of man’s life in the aging process and the fact of seniors correspond to a growing representative portion of the population in the quantitative point of view. So the aging changes in a problem that wins expressiveness and legitimacy in the field of the daily current concerns. This article intends to demonstrate that the work can articulate other life projects for the seniors and to avoid psychic pathologies in the old age that can appear due to the loss of personal identity, to the involvement lack in motivated activities or starting from the adoption of inadequate consumption ways or lifestyles. For this, this article assumes a line of preventive character explanation under two slopes: the first refers to the fact that, if the work ennobles the man, he must acquire or improve this individual competences, adapting them to the new demands of the job market to get a job, or even to reactivate his professional life because new life projects. The second slope follows the direction of the discovery of the seniors’ potentialities for the companies, which can adapt the qualities [and limitations] of this workers category to the various functions in the organization. The Brazilian entrepreneur needs to be attentive to the image of his company and the differential competitive that can distinguish it of the other companies. And this can be to employee senior people or to maintenance it in the company personnel staff.

  19. Science@NASA: Direct to People!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Ronald J.; Adams, Mitzi; Gallagher, Dennis; Whitaker, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Science@NASA is a science communication effort sponsored by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. It is the result of a four year research project between Marshall, the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications and the internet communications company, Bishop Web Works. The goals of Science@NASA are to inform, inspire, and involve people in the excitement of NASA science by bringing that science directly to them. We stress not only the reporting of the facts of a particular topic, but also the context and importance of the research. Science@NASA involves several levels of activity from academic communications research to production of content for 6 websites, in an integrated process involving all phases of production. A Science Communications Roundtable Process is in place that includes scientists, managers, writers, editors, and Web technical experts. The close connection between the scientists and the writers/editors assures a high level of scientific accuracy in the finished products. The websites each have unique characters and are aimed at different audience segments: 1. http://science.nasa.gov. (SNG) Carries stories featuring various aspects of NASA science activity. The site carries 2 or 3 new stories each week in written and audio formats for science-attentive adults. 2. http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov. Features stories from SNG that are recast for a high school level audience. J-Track and J-Pass applets for tracking satellites are our most popular product. 3. http://kids. msfc.nasa.gov. This is the Nursemaids site and is aimed at a middle school audience. The NASAKids Club is a new feature at the site. 4. http://www.thursdaysclassroom.com . This site features lesson plans and classroom activities for educators centered around one of the science stories carried on SNG. 5. http://www.spaceweather.com. This site gives the status of solar activity and its interactions with the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  20. Teaching People and Machines to Enhance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthouzoz, Floraine Sara Martianne

    Procedural tasks such as following a recipe or editing an image are very common. They require a person to execute a sequence of operations (e.g. chop onions, or sharpen the image) in order to achieve the goal of the task. People commonly use step-by-step tutorials to learn these tasks. We focus on software tutorials, more specifically photo manipulation tutorials, and present a set of tools and techniques to help people learn, compare and automate photo manipulation procedures. We describe three different systems that are each designed to help with a different stage in acquiring procedural knowledge. Today, people primarily rely on hand-crafted tutorials in books and on websites to learn photo manipulation procedures. However, putting together a high quality step-by-step tutorial is a time-consuming process. As a consequence, many online tutorials are poorly designed which can lead to confusion and slow down the learning process. We present a demonstration-based system for automatically generating succinct step-by-step visual tutorials of photo manipulations. An author first demonstrates the manipulation using an instrumented version of GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) that records all changes in interface and application state. From the example recording, our system automatically generates tutorials that illustrate the manipulation using images, text, and annotations. It leverages automated image labeling (recognition of facial features and outdoor scene structures in our implementation) to generate more precise text descriptions of many of the steps in the tutorials. A user study finds that our tutorials are effective for learning the steps of a procedure; users are 20-44% faster and make 60-95% fewer errors when using our tutorials than when using screencapture video tutorials or hand-designed tutorials. We also demonstrate a new interface that allows learners to navigate, explore and compare large collections (i.e. thousands) of photo manipulation