WorldWideScience

Sample records for samarium 130

  1. Conductometric investigations on samarium soaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrotra, K.N.; Chauhan, Mithlesh; Shukla, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The critical micelle concentration (CMC), degree of dissociation and dissociation constant of samarium soaps (valerate, caproate, caprylate and caprate) in a mixture of 60 per cent benzene and 40 per cent methanol were determined by using conductometric measurements. The soaps behaved as simple electrolyte in dilute solutions and the CMC was found to decrease with increasing chainlength of the fatty acid constituent of the soap. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Labeling fish with an activable element through their diet. [samarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michibata, Hitoshi (Toyama Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-10-01

    Stable samarium, one of the rare earth elements, was fed to medaka (Oryzias latipes) and goldfish (Carassius auratus). The concentration of samarium in the labeled fish was determined by neutron activation analysis. In O. latipes, samarium was detectable even 1 yr after the labeled diet was eaten. In C. auratus, samarium was retained in the fifth brachial arch, scales, and gills.

  3. Implementation of an analytical technique for Samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, N.

    2004-01-01

    Since the Samarium presents the same chemical properties that the plutonium, it has been used as homologous in studies that allow us to know the behavior that the plutonium presents in solution, with the advantage of working with an inactive and not very dangerous element. At the moment studies of sorption of plutonium or samarium are made on some mineral matrices that present certain surface properties. Due to the low concentrations that are used in the studies of sorption of samarium on those reagent substrates, their detection becomes very difficult for the conventional analysis media. The luminescence is a technique that can detect lower concentrations, smaller at 1 X 10 - 2 M, but when fluorofors are used this limit of detection increases in several orders of magnitude. In this work it has been used the arsenazo-III as fluorofor agent since it reacts in a specific way with the samarium, forming a complex that presents a proportional luminescence to the concentration of the present samarium. The advantage of making the quantification of samarium by luminescence is that it can use the same instrumental equipment to determine the speciation of the samarium sipped in the zircon. (Author)

  4. Laser spectroscopy of atomic samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkov, L.M.; Melik-Pashaev, D.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Samarium spectrum was studied with a purpose to find transitions to be used in experiments on parity nonconservation. Macaluso-Corbino effect - Faraday rotation near resonance was used for the search and study of spectral lines. We have identified previously unknown energy levels belonging to the 4f 5 6s 2 5 D term: 15914.55(3) cm -4 (J=1), 17864.29(3) cm -4 (J=2), 20195.76(3) cm -4 (J=3). M1-transitions to these levels from the levels of the ground 4f 5 6s 2 7 F term were observed. There are several peculiarities of these transitions which are due to the fact that they occut within an inner 4f 5 -shell, particularly, a very small presuure broadening by inert gases. 44 refs.; 17 figs.; 7 tabs

  5. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  6. A NOVEL SAMARIUM COMPLEX WITH INTERESTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    delocalized π-electrons of the pyridyl rings obtains increasing attention in ... BaSO4 plate was used as a reference (100% reflectance), on which the finely ground .... several are samarium-containing complex with bipy [41-45]. Figure 2.

  7. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Walker, P.M.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Evans, D.E.; Grant, I.S.; England, J.G.; Fawcett, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144 Sm and 154 Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  8. Nonlinear Faraday rotation in samarium vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkov, L.M.; Melik-Pashaev, D.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments on nonlinear magnetic optical (Faraday) rotation on resonance transitions of atomic samarium are described. Measurements were carried out on transitions with different angular momenta of upper and lower states: 1→0, 0→1 and 1→1. Qualitative explanations of observed phenomena are given

  9. Thermal diffusivity of samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, W.; Wan, C.L.; Xu, Q.; Wang, J.D.; Qu, Z.X.

    2007-01-01

    We synthesized samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions and determined their thermal diffusivities, Young's moduli and thermal expansion coefficients, which are very important for their application in thermal barrier coatings. Samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions have extremely low thermal diffusivity between 20 and 600 deg. C. The solid solutions have lower Young's moduli and higher thermal expansion coefficients than those of pure samarium and gadolinium zirconates. This combination of characteristics is promising for the application of samarium and gadolinium zirconates in gas turbines. The mechanism of phonon scattering by point defects is discussed

  10. Investigation of samarium solubility in the magnesium based solid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokhlin, L.L.; Padezhnova, E.M.; Guzej, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    Electric resistance measurements and microscopic analysis were used to investigate the solubility of samarium in a magnesium-based solid solution. The constitutional diagram Mg-Sm on the magnesium side is of an eutectic type with the temperature of the eutectic transformation of 542 deg C. Samarium is partly soluble in solid magnesium, the less so, the lower is the temperature. The maximum solubility of samarium in magnesium (at the eutectic transformation point) is 5.8 % by mass (0.99 at. %). At 200 deg C, the solubility of samarium in magnesium is 0.4 % by mass (0.063 at. %)

  11. Anodic dissolution of samarium in acetonitrile solution of acetylacetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, N.N.; Dik, T.A.; Trebnikov, A.G.; Shirokij, V.L.

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical dissolution of metal samarium in acetonitrile medium in the presence of 0.1 M tetraethylammoniumbromide and 0.9 M acetylacetone (HAA) in argon atmosphere under a voltage of 3 V was considered for studying feasibility of electrochemical synthesis of samarium β-diketonates. Using IR and mass spectrometry, thermal and elementary analyses it was ascertained that, depending on cathode and anode areas ratio, anodic dissolution of samarium can give rise to formation of complexes of bi- and trivalent samarium featuring the composition Sm 4 (AA) 8 · 3HAA, Sm(AA) 3 · HAA and Sm(AA) 3 · 4HAA [ru

  12. Crystallization of Yttrium and Samarium Aluminosilicate Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Lago, Diana Carolina; Prado, Miguel Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Aluminosilicate glasses containing samarium and yttrium (SmAS and YAS glasses) exhibit high glass transition temperatures, corrosion resistance, and glass stability on heating which make them useful for technological applications. Yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres are currently being used for internal selective radiotherapy of liver cancer. During the preparation process, crystallization needs to be totally or partially avoided depending on the final application. Thus knowing the cry...

  13. Plasma sprayed samarium--cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, M.C.; Janowiecki, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Samarium--cobalt permanent magnets were fabricated by arc plasma spraying. This process involves the injection of relatively coarse powder particles into a high-temperature gas for melting and spraying onto a substrate. The technique is being investigated as an economical method for fabricating cobalt--rare earth magnets for advanced traveling wave tubes and cross-field amplifiers. Plasma spraying permits deposition of material at high rates over large areas with optional direct bonding to the substrate, and offers the ability to fabricate magnets in a variety of shapes and sizes. Isotropic magnets were produced with high coercivity and good reproducibility in magnetic properties. Post-spray thermal treatments were used to enhance the magnetic properties of sprayed deposits. Samarium--cobalt magnets, sprayed from samarium-rich powder and subjected to post-spray heat treatment, displayed energy products in excess of 9 million gauss-oersteds and coercive forces of approximately 6000 oersteds. Bar magnet arrays were constructed by depositing magnets on ceramic substrates. (auth)

  14. Synthesis of samarium, europium and ytterbium acetylenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochkarev, M.N.; Fedorova, E.A.; Glushkova, N.V.; Protchenko, A.V.; Druzhkov , O.N.; Khorshev, S.Ya.

    1995-01-01

    Ethynyl complexes of samarium, europium and ytterbium were prepared by interaction of naphthalinides of metals with acetylene in tetrahydrofuran. The compounds are isolated in the form of dark-coloured pyrophore powders. Data of magnetic measurements suggest that in the course of the reaction Sm(2) is oxidized completely to Sm(3), Yb(2) transforms into Yb(3) partially, whereas europium preserves its initial bivalent state. Hydrolysis of the compounds prepared provides acetylene, ethylene, ethane and hydrogen which indicates the presence of acethylenide Ln 2 C 2 and hydride LnH groupings (Ln = Sm, Eu, Yb). 9 refs., 2 tabs

  15. High purity samarium oxide from mixed rare earth carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Carlos A. da S.; Seneda, Jose A.; Vasconcellos, Mari E. de; Pedreira Filho, Walter dos R.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and economical chemical process for the production of highly pure samarium oxides is discussed. The raw material, which was used in the form of rare earth carbonates was produced industrially from the chemical treatment of Brazilian monazite. Ion exchange chromatography was performed using a strong cationic resin that is typically employed in water treatment processes to fractionate rare earth elements (REE) without the use of retention ions. Under these conditions, 99.9% pure Sm 2 O 3 was eluted using the ammonium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) at a controlled pH. The EDTA-samarium complex was separated from EDTA and then precipitated as oxalate and fired to samarium oxide. Molecular absorption spectrophotometry was used to monitor the samarium content during the proposed process, and sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to certify the purity of the samarium oxide. Typical samarium oxide obtained from the proposed procedure contained the following contaminants in micrograms per gram: Sc (20.90); Y (11.80); La (8.4); Ce (4.3); Pr (2.5); Nd (5.1); Eu (94); Gd (114); Tb (3.6); Dy (2.5), Ho (2.3); Er (3.0); Tm (2.3); Yb (38,2); Lu (25.6). The high-purity samarium oxides produced in the present study can be used as an alternative to imported products in research and development applications. (author)

  16. Plasma sprayed samarium--cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, M.C.; Janowiecki, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Samarium--Co permanent magnets were fabricated by arc plasma spraying. This process involves the injection of relatively coarse powder particles into a high temperature gas for melting and spraying onto a substrate. The technique is being investigated as an economical method for fabricating Co--rare earth magnets for advanced traveling wave tubes and cross-field amplifiers. Plasma spraying permits deposition of material at high rates over large areas with optional direct bonding to the substrate, and offers the ability to fabricate magnets in a variety of shapes and sizes. Isotropic magnets were produced with high coercivity and good reproducibility in magnetic properties. Post-spray thermal treatments were used to enhance the magnetic properties of sprayed deposits. Samarium--Co magnets, sprayed from Sm-rich powder and subjected to post-spray heat treatment, displayed energy products in excess of 9 million G-Oe and coercive forces of approximately 6000 Oe. Bar magnet arrays were constructed by depositing magnets on ceramic substrates

  17. Physico-chemical studies on samarium soaps in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrotra, K.N.; Chauhan, M.; Shukla, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The physico-chemical characteristics of samarium soaps (caproate and caprate) in solid state were investigated by IR, X-ray diffraction and TGA measurements. The IR results revealed that the fatty acids exist in dimeric state through hydrogen bonding and samarium soaps possess partial ionic character. The X-ray diffraction measurements were used to calculate the long spacings and the results confirmed the double layer structure of samarium soaps. The decomposition reaction was found kinetically of zero order and the values of energy of activation for the decomposition process for caproate and caprate were found to be 8,0 and 7,8 kcal mol -1 , respectively. (Authors)

  18. The ion-exchange obtaining of high purity samarium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzyska, W.; Soltysiak, I.; Cygan, J.

    1987-01-01

    The use of lactic acid - EDTA mixture as an eluent for the obtaining of high purity samarium oxide was studied. The studies were carried out at room temperature on cation exchange resin Wofatit KPS X 8. The best results were obtained for lactic acid (0,26 mol/dm 3 ) - EDTA (0,013 mol/dm 3 ) mixture at pH 3,3. As the result of 57% samarium concentrate elution with column load 1:3 and flow rate 0,4 cm/min, over 99% pure samarium oxide with 73% yield has been obtained. The yield of spectrally pure Sm 2 O 3 exceeded 45%. (author)

  19. Yellow-green electroluminescence of samarium complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behzad, Sara Karimi; Najafi, Ezzatollah [Department of Chemistry Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Mostafa M., E-mail: m-pouramini@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Janghouri, Mohammad; Mohajerani, Ezeddin [Laser Research Institute Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ng, Seik Weng [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-12-15

    Four novel samarium complexes were prepared by reacting samarium(III) nitrate with 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline, and 1,10-phenanthroline and utilized as emitting materials in the electroluminescence device. All complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, UV–vis and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopes and the molecular structure of a representative complex, [Sm{sub 2}(Me-HQ){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}] (1), was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Utilization of a π-conjugated (phenanthroline) ligand as a second ligand in the structure of the samarium complexes resulted in red shifts in both absorption and fluorescence spectra of complexes and moderately enhanced the photoluminescence intensity and the fluorescence quantum yield. The maximum emission peaks showed that a good correlation exists between the nature of the substituent group on the 8-hydroxyquinoline and the addition of the π-conjugated ligand in the structure of samarium complexes and emission wavelength. Devices with samarium(III) complexes with structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (90 nm)/PVK:PBD:Sm(III) complexes (75 nm)/Al (180 nm) were fabricated. In the electroluminescence (EL) spectra of the devices, a strong ligand-centered emission and narrow bands arising from the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}→{sup 6}H{sub J} transitions (J=7/2, 9/2, and 11/2) of the samarium ion were observed for the complexes. The electroluminescent spectra of the samarium complexes were red-shifted as compared with the PVK:PBD blend. We believe that the electroluminescence performance of OLED devices based on samarium complexes relies on overlaps between the absorption of the samarium compounds and the emission of PVK:PBD. This revealed that it is possible to evaluate the electroluminescence performance of the samarium compounds-doped OLED devices based on the emission of PVK:PBD and the absorption of the dopants. - Highlights: • Four novel photoluminescence samarium complexes have been synthesized.

  20. Role of samarium additions on the shape memory behavior of iron based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakoor, R.A.; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Kang, Kisuk

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The effect of samarium contents on shape memory behavior has been studied. → Addition of samarium increases the strength, c/a ratio and ε (hcp martensite). → Addition of samarium retards the nucleation of α (bcc martensite). → Improvement in shape memory effect with the increase in samarium contents. - Abstract: The effect of samarium contents on shape memory behavior of iron based shape memory alloys has been studied. It is found that the strength of the alloys increases with the increase in samarium contents. This effect can be attributed to the solid solution strengthening of austenite by samarium addition. It is also noticed that the shape memory effect increases with the increase in samarium contents. This improvement in shape memory effect presumably can be regarded as the effect of improvement in strength, increase in c/a ratio and obstruction of nucleation of α in the microstructure.

  1. Samarium ion exchanged montmorillonite for high temperature cumene cracking reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binitha, N.N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nano material Montmorillonite clay is cation exchanged with samarium and its catalytic influence in cumene cracking reaction is investigated. Effect of exchange with sodium ions on further exchange with samarium ions is also noted. Acidity measurements are done using TPD of ammonia. The retention of basic structure is proved from FTIR spectra and XRD patterns. Elemental analysis result shows that samarium exchange has occurred, which is responsible for the higher catalytic activity. Surface area and pore volume remains more or less unaffected upon exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates the enhanced thermal stability on exchanging. Cumene cracking reaction is carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed glass reactor at 673 K. The predominance of Bronsted acidity is confirmed from high selectivity to benzene. (author)

  2. Basis for developing samarium AMS for fuel cycle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Whitney, Scott M.; Tumey, Scott J.; Jordan Weaver, C.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of nuclear reactor fuel burnup indicates that the production of samarium isotopes can vary significantly with reactor type and fuel cycle. The isotopic concentrations of 146 Sm, 149 Sm, and 151 Sm are potential signatures of fuel reprocessing, if analytical techniques can overcome the inherent challenges of lanthanide chemistry, isobaric interferences, and mass/charge interferences. We review the current limitations in measurement of the target samarium isotopes and describe potential approaches for developing Sm-AMS. AMS sample form and preparation chemistry will be discussed as well as possible spectrometer operating conditions.

  3. 4f and 5d magnetism in samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stunault, A.; Bernhoeft, N.; Vettier, C.; Dumesnil, K.; Dufour, C.

    2001-01-01

    We report on resonant magnetic X-ray scattering studies of a samarium epitaxial film at the samarium L 3 edge. We observe one quadrupolar resonance below the edge, reflecting the polarization of the 4f electrons, and two dipolar resonances above the edge, related to the polarization of the 5d band. We demonstrate, by following the thermal evolution of resonant magnetic intensities of both types, that the polarization of the 4f and 5d electrons present exactly the same temperature dependence, even very close to the ordering temperature, in agreement with the RKKY model for long-range magnetic order in rare earths

  4. Behavior of Samarium III during the sorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez R, E.; Garcia G, N.; Garcia R, G.

    2004-01-01

    In this work the results of the behavior of samarium in solution are presented, in front of a fine powder of zirconium silicate (zircon). For that which is necessary to characterize the zircon, studying the crystallinity, the morphology, the surface area and the isoelectric point. The behavior of samarium in solution is studied by means of the elaboration of isotherm of sorption, using the technique by lots. One observes that to pH values of nearer to the isoelectric point (pH = 7.23) the process of sorption of the samarium begins, reaching a maximum to near pH at 9. The technique of luminescence is used to determine the concentration of the sipped samarium (phosphorescence) and also to make the speciation of the species formed in the surface of the zircon (phosphorescence). The results can be extrapolated with the plutonium when making the modeling of the migration of alpha emitting coming from the repositories of radioactive waste since both they have similar chemical properties (they are homologous). (Author)

  5. Studies on ultrasonic velocity and electrical conductivity of samarium soaps in non-aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrotra, K.N.; Chauhan, M.; Shukla, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The ultrasonic velocity of solutions of samarium soaps in non-aqueous medium has been measured at a constant temperature and the results have been used to evaluate the various acoustic parameters. The pre-micellar association and the formation of micelles in samarium soap solutions have been determined by conductometric measurements. The molar conductance at infinite dilution, degree of ionisation and ionisation constant have been evaluated. The results show that samarium soaps behave as weak electrolyte in dilute solutions. (Authors)

  6. Solubility isotherms in ternary systems of samarium nitrate, water and nitrates of amidopyrine, benzotriazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starikova, L.I.

    1991-01-01

    Solubility in the system of samarium nitrate-amidopyrine nitrate-water at 25 and 50 deg C was studied. Solubility isotherms consist of three branches, corresponding to crystallization of samarium nitrate tetrahydrate, amidopyrine nitrate and congruently soluble compounds of Sm(NO 3 ) 3 · 2C 13 H 17 ON 3 ·HNO 3 composition. Its thermal behaviour was studied. The system of samarium nitrate-benzotriazole nitrate-water is referred to eutonic type

  7. Dependence of samarium-soil interaction on samarium concentration: Implications for environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Guinart, Oriol; Salaberria, Aitor; Vidal, Miquel; Rigol, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The sorption and desorption behaviour of samarium (Sm), an emerging contaminant, was examined in soil samples at varying Sm concentrations. The obtained sorption and desorption parameters revealed that soil possessed a high Sm retention capacity (sorption was higher than 99% and desorption lower than 2%) at low Sm concentrations, whereas at high Sm concentrations, the sorption-desorption behaviour varied among the soil samples tested. The fractionation of the Sm sorbed in soils, obtained by sequential extractions, allowed to suggest the soil properties (pH and organic matter solubility) and phases (organic matter, carbonates and clay minerals) governing the Sm-soil interaction. The sorption models constructed in the present work along with the sorption behaviour of Sm explained in terms of soil main characteristics will allow properly assessing the Sm-soil interaction depending on the contamination scenario under study. Moreover, the sorption and desorption K d values of radiosamarium in soils were strongly correlated with those of stable Sm at low concentrations (r = 0.98); indicating that the mobility of Sm radioisotopes and, thus, the risk of radioactive Sm contamination can be predicted using data from low concentrations of stable Sm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Optical properties of zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium oxide having the chemical composition Sm2O3(x). ZnO(40−x)V2O5(60)(where x = 0·1–0·5 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching method. The density of these glasses was measured by Archimedes method; the corresponding molar volumes have also been ...

  9. Chrome-free Samarium-based Protective Coatings for Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Legan; Cui, Xiufang; Yang, Yuyun; Lin, Lili; Xiao, Qiang; Jin, Guo

    The microstructure of chrome-free samarium-based conversion coating on magnesium alloy was investigated and the corrosion resistance was evaluated as well. The micro-morphology, transverse section, crystal structure and composition of the coating were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X- ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results reveal that the morphology of samarium conversion coating is of crack-mud structure. Tiny cracks distribute in the compact coating deposited by samarium oxides. XRD, EDS and XPS results characterize that the coating is made of amorphous and trivalent-samarium oxides. The potentiodynamic polarization curve, EIS and OCP indicate that the samarium conversion coating can improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys.

  10. Separation of lanthanum (3) and samarium (3) extraction with tributylphosphate in the solvent presence of solid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkevich, I.B.; Kolesnikov, A.A.; Bomshtejn, V.E.

    1990-01-01

    Lanthanum (3) and samarium (3) extraction from nitric acid solutions by tributylphosphate in the presence of solid phase has been investigated. An increase in samarium α-nitrate distribution factor in the presence of solid phase with a decrease in its concentration in the initial solution and with lanthanum nitrate concentration increase is detected. The greatest effect of separation is observed in samarium nitrate microregion. The method of quantitative extraction of samarium from lanthanum nitrate solutions with samarium-lanthanum separation factor exceeding 50 has been suggested

  11. Lanthanum (samarium) nitrate-4-aminoantipyrine nitrate-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starikova, L.I.; Zhuravlev, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    Using the isothermal method of cross-sections at 50 deg C systems lanthanum nitrate-4-aminoantipyrine nitrate-water (1), samarium nitrate-4-aminoantipyrine nitrate-water (2), are studied. Isotherms of system 1 consist of two crystallization branches of initial salt components. In system 2 formation of congruently soluble compounds of the composition Sm(No) 3 ) 3 xC 11 H 13 ON 3 xHNO 3 is established. Analytical, X-ray phase and thermogravimetric analysis of the isolated binary salt are carried out

  12. Implementation of an analytical technique for Samarium; Implementacion de una tecnica analitica para Samario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Since the Samarium presents the same chemical properties that the plutonium, it has been used as homologous in studies that allow us to know the behavior that the plutonium presents in solution, with the advantage of working with an inactive and not very dangerous element. At the moment studies of sorption of plutonium or samarium are made on some mineral matrices that present certain surface properties. Due to the low concentrations that are used in the studies of sorption of samarium on those reagent substrates, their detection becomes very difficult for the conventional analysis media. The luminescence is a technique that can detect lower concentrations, smaller at 1 X 10{sup -} {sup 2} M, but when fluorofors are used this limit of detection increases in several orders of magnitude. In this work it has been used the arsenazo-III as fluorofor agent since it reacts in a specific way with the samarium, forming a complex that presents a proportional luminescence to the concentration of the present samarium. The advantage of making the quantification of samarium by luminescence is that it can use the same instrumental equipment to determine the speciation of the samarium sipped in the zircon. (Author)

  13. Synthesis of samarium binding bleomycin - a possible NCT radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, B.M., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mendes, T.M.; Campos, T.P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a drug that has attractive features for the development of a new radiopharmaceutical, particularly with regard to neutron capture therapy (NCT) sensitized by Sm-149. It has the ability to chelate many metal ions. In vitro studies have shown that up to 78% of BLM present in a cell is accumulated inside the nucleus or in the nuclear membrane. In addition, this drug has higher affinity for tumor tissues than for normal tissues. Radioactive isotopes carried by this antibiotic would be taken preferentially to one important cellular targets DNA. Besides, BLM displays intrinsic anti-tumor activity - it is a chemotherapic antibiotic clinically used against some cancers. This study aimed to obtain bleomycin molecules bound to samarium (BLM-Sm) for NCT studies in vitro and in vivo. The binding technique employed in this work has great simplicity and low cost. Thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, fast protein liquid chromatography and analysis by ICP-AES were applied to verify the binding molecule. ICP-AES results showed the presence of samarium in the sample peaks related to BLM-Sm. However, efficiency and stability of this bond needs to be investigated. (author)

  14. Synthesis of samarium binding bleomycin - a possible NCT radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, B.M.; Mendes, T.M.; Campos, T.P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a drug that has attractive features for the development of a new radiopharmaceutical, particularly with regard to neutron capture therapy (NCT) sensitized by Sm-149. It has the ability to chelate many metal ions. In vitro studies have shown that up to 78% of BLM present in a cell is accumulated inside the nucleus or in the nuclear membrane. In addition, this drug has higher affinity for tumor tissues than for normal tissues. Radioactive isotopes carried by this antibiotic would be taken preferentially to one important cellular targets DNA. Besides, BLM displays intrinsic anti-tumor activity - it is a chemotherapic antibiotic clinically used against some cancers. This study aimed to obtain bleomycin molecules bound to samarium (BLM-Sm) for NCT studies in vitro and in vivo. The binding technique employed in this work has great simplicity and low cost. Thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, fast protein liquid chromatography and analysis by ICP-AES were applied to verify the binding molecule. ICP-AES results showed the presence of samarium in the sample peaks related to BLM-Sm. However, efficiency and stability of this bond needs to be investigated. (author)

  15. Preparation and examination of properties of samarium-153-EDTMP complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, M.; Garnuszek, P.; Lukasiewicz, A.; Wozniak, I.; Zulczyk, W.; Licinska, I.

    1995-01-01

    Preparation and properties of ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid (EDTMP) as well as some properties of 153 Sm-EDTMP chelate have been examined. The chelate formed by samarium-153 (46.3 h, β - -decay) with EDTMP exhibits high bone uptake and can be used for treatment of disseminated, painful skeletal metastases. The purity and stability of solutions of 153 Sm-EDTMP chelate were examined in a broad range of samarium concentration and 153 Sm specific activity. The complex under study was examined by radio-TLC, -electrophoresis and radio-HPLC. The results obtained suggest the small size of molecules of 153 Sm-EDTMP chelate as compared with molecules of ''free''EDTMP. The results of biodistribution of 153 Sm-EDTMP determined in rats indicate the quick blood clearance, high deposition of radioactivity in bone and quick excretion of radioactivity into urine. No specific uptake of 153 Sm-EDTMP in extra-skeletal organs was found. (author). 42 refs, 13 figs, 22 tabs

  16. Influence of tellurite on lifetime for samarium doped lanthanum lead borate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, A.; Eraiah, B.

    2018-04-01

    Samarium substituted tellurium lanthanum lead borate glass is prepared using melt quenching technique. Luminescence spectra have been recorded upon excitation with 402 nm various transitions from 4G5/2 level, for samarium doped tellurite glasses are studied and also lifetime for all the samples exhibit single exponential behaviour of decay curve. Luminescence spectra of present glasses show quenching effect due to cross-relation channels of samarium ions. The lifetime of glass samples decrease as the tellurite concentration is decreased. So, it evidences that to attain longer lifetime for lasing material one can tune the host by selecting concentration of tellurite.

  17. Resonances of coherent population trapping in samarium vapours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolachevsky, Nikolai N; Akimov, A V; Kiselev, N A; Papchenko, A A; Sorokin, Vadim N; Kanorskii, S I

    2001-01-01

    Resonances of coherent population trapping were detected in atomic vapours of the rare-earth element samarium. The coherent population trapping was produced by two external-cavity diode lasers (672 and 686 nm) in a Λ-system formed by the three levels of 154 Sm: the 4f 6 6s 2 ( 7 F 0 ) ground state, the first fine-structure 4f 6 6s 2 ( 7 F 1 ) sublevel of the ground state and the 4f 6 ( 7 F)6s6p( 3 P o ) 9 F o 1 upper level. The dependence of the spectral shapes and resonance contrasts on the polarisation of the laser beams and the direction of the applied magnetic field was studied. The obtained results were analysed. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Optical and physical properties of samarium doped lithium diborate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumantharaju, N.; Sardarpasha, K. R.; Gowda, V. C. Veeranna

    2018-05-01

    Sm3+ doped lithium di-borate glasses with composition 30Li2O-60B2O3-(10-x) PbO, (where 0 molar volume with samarium ion content indicates the openness of the glass structure. The gradual increase in average separation of boron-boron atoms with VmB clearly indicates deterioration of borate glass network, which in turn leads to decrease in the oxygen packing density. The replacements of Sm2O3 for PbO depolymerise the chain structure and that would increase the concentration of non-bridging oxygens. The marginal increase of optical band gap energy after 1.0 mol.% of Sm2O3 is explained by considering the structural modification in lead-borate. The influence of Sm3+ ion on physical and optical properties in lithium-lead-borate glasses is investigated and the results were discussed in view of the structure of borate glass network.

  19. Magnetic behavior study of samarium nitride using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Narayan N.; Mankad, Venu H.; Dabhi, Shweta D.; Patel, Anjali; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, the state-of-art density functional theory is employed to study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of samarium nitride (SmN). We have performed calculation for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states in rock-salt phase. The calculated results of optimized lattice parameter and magnetic moment agree well with the available experimental and theoretical values. From energy band diagram and electronic density of states, we observe a half-metallic behaviour in FM phase of rock salt SmN in while metallicity in AFM I and AFM III phases. We present and discuss our current understanding of the possible half-metallicity together with the magnetic ordering in SmN. The calculated phonon dispersion curves shows dynamical stability of the considered structures. The phonon density of states and Eliashberg functional have also been analysed to understand the superconductivity in SmN.

  20. New reduced variant in gadolinium and samarium monoxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bist, B M.S.; Kumar, J; Srivastava, O N [Banaras Hindu Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics

    1977-01-01

    A new reduced phase has been observed in the thin films of gadolinium and samarium monoxides. This phase results on imparting an annealing treatment to the monoxides and is formed as a result of the creation and ordering of vacancies in the oxygen sublattice. The new phase has been analysed to possess a rhombohedral unit cell with lattice parameters a/sub R/ = a/sub 0/ square root of (3/2) and c/sub R/ = a/sub 0/ square root of 3 (based on hexagonal axes, a/sub 0/ being the lattice parameter of the fundamental zinc blende type unit cell of the monoxide). Based on the proposed structure, the new phase can be assigned the solid state chemical formula RO/sub x/ where R = Gd, Sm and x = 0.66.

  1. Biodistribution study of 153Sm-EDTMP produced by irradiation of natural and enriched Samarium, in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meftahi, M.; Bahrami Samani, A.; Babaei, M. H.; Shamsaei Zafarghandi, M.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M.

    2010-01-01

    ''1 53 Sm-EDTMP is one of the well known radiopharmaceuticals for pain palliation of bone metastases. Despite that, it is used just in a few countries. It is due to some reasons like being costly enriched samarium that usually used as target for irradiation and short half-life of 153 Sm. In this investigation, certain amounts of radiopharmaceuticals prepared by irradiation of enriched and natural samarium were injected to some normal rats. Then, the rodents were sacrificed and some of their organs were removed. All of the mentioned stages were performed in order to consider the possibility of exploiting natural samarium instead of enriched samarium by study of biodistribution of both radiopharmaceuticals in various organs especially in bone as the target tissue. At the end, the acceptable results were obtained using natural samarium in comparison with the enriched samarium from the point of view of the biodistribution studies.

  2. Samarium-153-EDTMP in the metastatic bone pain treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins Filho, M.L.M.; Santos, A.O.; Nappi, A.P.B.; Meirelles, M.B.; Arouca, P.T.; Ramos, C.D.; Etchebehere, E.C.S.C.; Teixeira, L.C.; Netto Junior, N.R.; D'Ancona Cal; Camargo, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Bone metastasis is the most reason of pain in prostate and mammary cancer patients. The Samarium-153-EDTMP has been showed as an alternative to the treatment of the metastasis bone pain. With the objective to evaluate the use of the Sm-153-EDTMP as a systemic therapy for the metastasis bone pain, 30 patients (19 male, 11 female, average age of 64,5 years) were studied. 19 patients with prostate cancer and 11 with mammary cancer. All the patients presented previous bone scintiscanning with multiple metastasis; interruption of the chemotherapy or radiotherapy for two or more weeks and leukocyte count higher than 2,000 leukocytes/mm 3 and platelets higher than 80,000/mm 3 . The patients were classified previously to the radioisotope therapy, as far the intensity of the pain in a scale from 0 to 10 is concerned. All the patients received 37 MBq/kg (1m Ci/kg) of weight of Sm-153-EDTMP by venous via. The evaluation 6 weeks after the therapy showed complete or partial pain relief in 22 patients (73,3%). Complete or partial pain relief has been obtained in 91,0% (10 in 11) of the patients with mammary cancer and in 62,2% (12 in 19) of the patients with prostate cancer. Transitory leukopenia (lower than 2,000 leukocytes/mm 3 ) and platelet count (lower than 80,000/mm 3 ) occurred in 33,3% of the patients. 8 patients (26,7%) did not responded to the therapy. The therapy with Samarium-153-EDTMP is a simple, safe and efficient method in the treatment of the bone pain caused by metastasis

  3. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castrillejo, Y.; Fernandez, P.; Medina, J.; Hernandez, P.; Barrado, E.

    2011-01-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) ↔ Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al 3 Sm and Al 2 Sm.

  4. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillejo, Y., E-mail: ycastril@qa.uva.es [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Fernandez, P. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Medina, J. [Dept Fisica Materia Condensada Cristalografia y Mineralogia, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C.P. 42076 Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Barrado, E. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) {r_reversible} Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al{sub 3}Sm and Al{sub 2}Sm.

  5. Australian manufacture of QuadrametTM (Samarium-153 EDTMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, N.R.; Whitwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Quadramet T (Samarium-153 EDTMP) has been shown overseas to be potentially useful in the palliation of painful osteoblastic skeletal metastases and has been approved this year for general marketing in the USA. Australian Radioisotopes (ARI) has licensed this product from the Australian patent holders, Dow Chemical. Within the facilities of ARI, a hot cell has been dedicated to this product and fitted out to manufacture it weekly on a cycle related to the operating cycle of the Australian reactor HIFAR. Due to neutron flux limitations of HIFAR, the local formulation has an elemental Samarium content up to 200μg/mL whereas the overseas formulation has a level of 20-46μg/mL. All other specifications of the two products are essentially the same. In 1995 and 1996 a small clinical trial with 19 patients was held which demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic behaviour was also essentially the same by measuring blood clearance rates and skeletal uptake dynamics. Soft tissue uptake was also qualitatively determined. The ARI version is now the subject of an application for general marketing within Australia. Some useful characteristics of this agent are: almost complete excretion or fixation in the skeleton within 6 hours, rapid onset of clinical effect, applicability in most cases where an abnormal diagnostic bone scan correlates with painful sites, dosage can be tailored to individual patient uptake due to easy dose measurement and retreatment is quite possible. The use of this class of agents in pain palliation continues to increase. Australian manufacture of Quadramet TM provides a further option in the management of these difficult cases

  6. Fluorimetric determination of samarium(III) and europium(III) in neodymium oxide by separation with a resin column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaorong Liu; Jian Meng (Beijing Research Institute of Chemical Engineering and Metallurgy (China)); Wenhua Liu (General Research Institute for Non-Ferrous Metals (China))

    1992-08-24

    When thenoyltrifluoroacetone-phenanthroline-Triton X-100 is used to determine samarium(III) and europium(III) fluorimetrically, only a limited amount of neodymium(III) can be tolerated. By using an on- line separation which can partially separate neodymium(III) from samarium(III), a practical and convenient method was developed to detect samarium(III) at concentrations >0.05% and europium(III) at concentrations >0.005% in neodymium oxide. (author). 7 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs.

  7. Fluorimetric determination of samarium(III) and europium(III) in neodymium oxide by separation with a resin column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaorong Liu; Jian Meng; Wenhua Liu

    1992-01-01

    When thenoyltrifluoroacetone-phenanthroline-Triton X-100 is used to determine samarium(III) and europium(III) fluorimetrically, only a limited amount of neodymium(III) can be tolerated. By using an on- line separation which can partially separate neodymium(III) from samarium(III), a practical and convenient method was developed to detect samarium(III) at concentrations >0.05% and europium(III) at concentrations >0.005% in neodymium oxide. (author). 7 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. Sorption-desorption of samarium in Febex bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Guinart, O.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Fernandez-Poyatos, P.; Alba, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The chemical and physical nature of the clay is a key issue in the design of engineered barriers. The FEBEX bentonite is one of the clays candidates to be used in engineered barriers in deep geology repositories (DGR). Here, its performance was tested with respect to the sorption-desorption of samarium, which is a lanthanide that, besides being considered as a natural analogue of actinides, may also be present in high level radioactive waste in the form of the radioactive isotope 151 Sm. FEBEX bentonite was used in this study. This is a di-octahedral smectite, with isomorphic substitutions in tetrahedral and octahedral sheets. Its theoretical cation exchange capacity value is 1500 meq kg -1 . Sorption isotherms were obtained for Sm in the range of initial concentrations of 0.01 and 9 meq l -1 . Tests were carried out in deionized water and in a medium simulating the composition of interstitial water. Sorption tests were performed equilibrating 30 ml of the Sm solution with 0.2 g of clay. After a contact time of 24 hours, supernatants were decanted off after centrifugation. The quantification of the concentration of Sm in the initial and final solutions allowed us to quantify the Sm equilibrium concentration (C eq ), the fraction sorbed in the FEBEX bentonite (C sorb ) and to derive the sorption K d data. Desorption tests were applied to determine the desorption K d and the percentage of Sm reversibly sorbed. Desorption tests were performed with the bentonite residue from the sorption step, under the same experimental conditions, but without Sm. Powder X-ray diffractograms were obtained from 3 to 70 deg. 2θ with a step of 0.05 deg. and a counting time of 3 s. The crystalline phases were identified using the computer program X'Pert HighScore. The morphology of the samples was analyzed by SEM at 20 kV. An EDX system was fitted to the SEM equipment to perform chemical analyses of the samples using a Si/Li detector

  9. Determination of 0.01–0.1% of samarium in 40–100 mg of lead chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterdenbos, J.; Jütte, B.A.H.G.; Schuring, J.

    1971-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of 5–25 μg of samarium in about 40 mg of lead chloride, based on the removal of the lead by electrolysis and determination of the samarium by extraction with PAN and measurement of the extinction of the complex at 552 nm.

  10. Samarium (III Selective Membrane Sensor Based on Tin (IV Boratophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok S. K. Kumar

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A number of Sm (III selective membranes of varying compositions using tin (IV boratophosphate as electroactive material were prepared. Polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene and epoxy resin were used as binding materials. Membrane having composition of 40% exchanger and 60% epoxy resin exhibited best performance. This membrane worked well over a wide concentration range of 1x10-5M to 1x10-1 M of samarium ions with a Super-Nernstian slope of 40 mV/decade. It has a fast response time of less than 10 seconds and can be used for at least six months without any considerable divergence in potentials. The proposed sensor revealed good selectivities with respect to alkali, alkaline earth, some transition and rare earth metal ions and can be used in the pH range of 4.0-10.0. It was used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Sm (III ions against EDTA. Effect of internal solution was studied and the electrode was successfully used in non-aqueous media, too.

  11. Structural phase transition and electronic properties in samarium chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, Y. S., E-mail: yspanwar2011@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govt. New Science College Dewas-455001 (India); Aynyas, Mahendra [Department of Physics, C.S.A. Govt. P.G. College, Sehore, 466001 (India); Pataiya, J.; Sanyal, Sankar P. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal, 462026 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The electronic structure and high pressure properties of samarium monochalcogenides SmS, SmSe and SmTe have been reported by using tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The total energy as a function of volume is evaluated. It is found that these monochalcogenides are stable in NaCl-type structure under ambient pressure. We predict a structural phase transition from NaCl-type (B{sub 1}-phase) structure to CsCl-type (B{sub 2}-type) structure for these compounds. Phase transition pressures were found to be 1.7, 4.4 and 6.6 GPa, for SmS, SmSe and SmTe respectively. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed that these compounds exhibit metallic character. The calculated values of equilibrium lattice parameter and phase transition pressure are in general good agreement with available data.

  12. Magnetoresistance of samarium in the 4.2-300 K range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubitsyn, V.A.; Shalashov, V.F.

    1980-01-01

    Electric conductivity, transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance of polycrystalline samarium with the purity of 99.9% in the 4.2-300 K temperature range and in magnetic fields up to 50 ke, are measured. The constituent of specific electric conductivity caused by spin disorder is 30.7 μOhmxcm, m*/m=2.6, the exchange parameter is G=3.1 eVxA 3 . Both transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance are positive at 4.2 K; and the increase of temperature reveals a number of anomalies, evidently conditioned by the alteration of samarium magnetic structure

  13. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mandiwana, V

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available the biodistribution of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing samarium-153 oxide ([(sup153)Sm]Sm(sub2)O(sub3)) in vivo to prove that orally administered nanoparticles alter the biodistribution of a drug. These were then activated in a nuclear...

  14. Expedient Method for Samarium(II) Iodide Preparation Utilizing a Flow Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voltrová, Svatava; Šrogl, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2013), s. 394-396 ISSN 0936-5214 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12013 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : flow * samarium * iodide * reduction Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.463, year: 2013

  15. Collective effects in even-mass samarium isotopes by polarized-proton scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit, R.M.A.L.; Hall, van P.J.; Klein, S.S.; Moonen, W.H.L.; Nijgh, G.J.; Overveld, van C.W.A.M.; Poppema, O.J.

    1993-01-01

    The even-mass samarium isotopes 148,...,152Sm have been investigated by polarized proton scattering at 20.4 MeV beam energy. The data have been analysed with an 'extended' optical model, where the intensities of the first maxima of the main inelastic channels are fitted in a coupled-channels

  16. Identification of the lines in the L emission spectrum of cerium and samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, B.D.; Singh, D.

    1992-01-01

    The occurrence of a line at 2.1556 A in the L emission spectrum of cerium and two lines at 1.6679 and 1.8379 A in the L emission spectrum of samarium, reported many years ago, has remained a puzzle. These have now been identified as EXAFS minima occurring at the L absorption edges of the respective elements. (author)

  17. ppt level detection of samarium(III) with a coated graphite sensor based on an antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Rezapour, Morteza; Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Haghgoo, Soheila

    2004-07-01

    N-[2-[4-[[[(Cyclohexylamino)carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]phenyl]ethyl]-5-methyl pyrazine carboxamide (glipizid) was explored as an electro-active material for preparing a polymeric membrane-based sensor selective to samarium ions. The membrane incorporated 30% poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), 53% benzyl acetate (BA), 11% glipizid and 6% sodium tetraphenyl borate. When coated on the surface of a graphite electrode, it exhibits Nernstian responses in the concentration range of 1.0 x 10(-5) to 1.0 x 10(-10) M, with a detection limit of 8.0 x 10(-11)M samarium. The electrode shows high selectivity towards samarium over several cations (alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions), and specially lanthanide ions. The proposed sensor has a very short response time (pH range for at least ten weeks. It was used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of Sm(III) ions with an EDTA solution, and for determination of samarium in binary and ternary mixtures.

  18. Diffusion of samarium into cobalt in the reduction-diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas Nogueira, P. de; Neto, F.B.; Landgraf, F.J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of metallic cobalt in samarium-cobalt powders is a major cause for low magnetic properties in magnets. This paper intends to investigate the effect of time and temperature in the microstructure of powders produced by reduction-diffusion. This process, developed for the production of rare earth-transition metal alloys, consists on the reduction of the rare earth oxide with metallic calcium (or calcium hydride) and its subsequent diffusion into the cobalt particle. In the present work, a mixture of samarium oxide, cobalt powder and metallic calcium was heated to 1100 or 1200 C for 2 or 4 hours in a tubular furnace under one atmosphere of purified argon. The material thereof obtained, a sintered mass is disintegrated by aqueous crepitation. The powder was evaluated in terms of its chemical composition, its samarium yield and the intermetallic compounds present. The samarium, oxygen and calcium content of the powders produced were adequate for magnet production. However, despite the massive formation of the SmCo 5 compound after 2 hours at 1100 C, final homogeneity is attained only after 4 hours at 1200 C, with the presence of SmCo 5 and Sm 2 Co 7 and the absence of the Sm 5 Co 19 compound. Also, metallic cobalt and Sm 2 Co 17 were observed in the materials produced after 2 hours at 1100 or 1200 C. (orig.)

  19. Pressure and irradiation effects on transport properties of samarium compounds with instable valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morillo, J.

    1981-01-01

    Electron transport properties in samarium compounds with instable valence are studied in this thesis: from SmS in its integer valence phases at common pressure to SmB 6 compound IV at common pressure through SmSsub(1-x)Psub(x) (x 6 is presented [fr

  20. Adsorption and the initial stages of samarium condensation on iridium coated by graphite monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, R.M.; Tontegode, A.Ya.; Yusifov, F.K.

    1978-01-01

    Adsorption and the initial stages of vacuum samarium condensation on iridium coated by graphite monolayer (valent-saturated neutral substrate) were studied by the thermodesorption mass-spectrometry and thermoemission methods, and were compared with samarium adsorption and condensation on iridium. Desorption heat of samarium atoms with thin coating of Ir-C, equal to E approximately 1.9 eV has been determined. For desorption with Ir E is approximately 6 eV. Such a great difference in desorption heats is connected with the reduction of covalent constituent of adsorption bond in a neutral substrate. Samarium on Ir-C is found to be condensated in two states: loosely bound and tightly bound which sharply differ in properties. The tightly bound state is characterized by abnormally low vapour pressure. Possible nature of this state is discussed. Double effect on the condensation of the substrate valent saturation is noted. On the one hand, the reduction of the particle bond with the substrate decreases their concentration on the surface, preventing condensation. On the other hand, the release of the valent eloctrons of adatous brings about strong lateral interaction between them, which in its turn, promotes condensation during eased migration on the neutral substrate

  1. Samarium-153 Oksabifor in the treatment of metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodyannikova, O.; Voit, N.; Sukach, G.; Sagan, D.

    2015-01-01

    patients - reducing the number of foci and the level of radiopharmaceutical uptake in them. Conclusions: radionuclide therapy in patients with BM can effectively suppress pain and significantly reduce the number of analgesics. Post-treatment patients, life quality statistically significantly improved. Samarium-153 has the ability to reduce BM number and intensity of radiopharmaceutical accumulation in spots in the control study. (authors)

  2. The samarium Grignard reaction. In situ formation and reactions of primary and secondary alkylsamarium(III) reagents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curran, D.P.; Totleben, M.J. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1992-07-15

    This work shows that primary and secondary radicals are rapidly reduced in THF/HMPA to form primary- and secondary-alkylsamarium reagents. The primary- and secondary-radicals can be formed either by direct SmI{sup 2} reductions of primary- and secondary-halides or by a previous rapid radical cyclization. The samarium reagents have moderate stability in solution, and they react with a variety of typical electrophiles, including aldehydes and ketones. The work further shows that organosamarium intermediates can be involved in the traditional samarium Barbier reaction of aldehydes and ketones conducted in THF/HMPA. A new procedure called the {open_quotes}samarium Grignard{close_quotes} method is introduced, and it is suggested that this new procedure will have considerably more scope and generality than the samarium Barbier reaction. 37 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Influence of pretreatment temperature cycling on the radiating defect formation in silicon doped by samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurakhmanov, K.P.; Nazyrov, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The raise of thermal and radiation stability as it is known, is one of actual problems of physics semiconductors. Recently it is established, that the rare-earth elements (REE) raise a stability of silicon to exterior action. In this connection the investigation of silicon doped REE by samarium and influence on its properties of heat treatments and radiation exposure is important. In sectional operation the outcomes of investigations of influence of samarium on thermal (600 degree C are reduced; 600 deg. + 900 deg. C; 900 deg. C; 900 deg. C + 600 deg. C; 1100 deg. C; 600 deg. C + 900 deg. C + 1100 deg. C; 900 deg. C + 600 deg. C + 1100 deg. C) thermal defect formation and radiation defect formation (exposure of γ-quanta 60 Co) both in beforehand wrought, and in thermally unfinished samples. After each cycle of heat treatments samples cool fast (throwing off in oil) or slowly (together with the furnace). Doping n-silicon REE by gadolinium and samarium was carried out during cultivation. The concentration of gadolinium and samarium in silicon, on sectional of a neutron-activation analysis was equaled 10 14 - 10 18 cm -3 . As control is model monocrystal silicon such as KEP-15/50. Para-meters of deep levels originating in control and doped REE samples, both past heat treatment or temperature cycling, and irradiated by the γ-quanta are defined by methods of a capacity spectroscopy: DLTS and IRC. The obtained outcomes have shown, that in irradiated with the γ-quanta 60 Co deep levels samples are formed with energies: E C -0,17 eV, E C -0,32 eV, EC-0,41 eV. Thus the parameters of deep levels vary depending on requirements of prestress heat treatment. For example heat treatment at 600 deg. C essentially increments a velocity of introduction of and centre (deep level of E C -0,17 eV), in comparison with a velocity of introduction of this level in samples with prestress heat treatment at 900 deg. C. In samples n-Si doped by samarium effectiveness of formation

  4. Myocardial imaging with cesium-130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, P.V.; Resnekov, L.; Stark, V.; Odeh, N.

    1984-01-01

    Recently comparative studies using nitrogen-13 ammonia and cesium-130 have shown strikingly different myocardial localization patterns in the same subjects with ischemic heart disease. Initial localization of ammonia, an avidly extracted agent, reflects the perfusion pattern in viable myocardial tissue. The myocardial localization of cesium ion, taking place more slowly over 15 to 20 minutes, is apparently much less flow dependent, causing uptake defects shown with ammonia to be largely filled in. Cesium thus appears to provide information on the extent of the viable myocardial mass, apart from perfusion. Cesium-130 (t1/2 30 m) decays by positron emission and electron capture. The whole body radiation absorbed dose, assuming uniform distribution, is 24 mrad/mCi. While abundant production of Cs-130 results from proton bombardment of natural xenon [Xe-130(rho,n)Cs-130] at 15 MeV, small amounts of Cs-129, -131, and -132 are also produced, and enriched Xe-130 is not available. Alternatively almost completely uncontaminated Cs-130 is available by alpha bombardment of natural I-127. Anhydrous sodium iodide is dissolved in acetone and a thin layer (≅20 mg per centimeter squared) is evaporated onto the gold plated tip of the internal target backing which is oscillated vertically to spread out the area upon which the beam is incident. The target surface is inclined 2.5 degrees to the beam giving a power density of about 400 watts per centimeter squared at 100μA which is adequately handled by water cooling. A 30-minute bombardment yields 4 to 5 mCi of Cs-130 which is dissolved directly from the target. This approach appears to offer a new and helpful method for evaluating ischemic heart disease by permitting evaluation of viable myocardial mass

  5. Solar nebula heterogeneity in p-process samarium and neodymium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Rasmus; Sharma, Mukul

    2006-11-03

    Bulk carbonaceous chondrites display a deficit of approximately 100 parts per million (ppm) in 144Sm with respect to other meteorites and terrestrial standards, leading to a decrease in their 142Nd/144Nd ratios by approximately 11 ppm. The data require that samarium and neodymium isotopes produced by the p process associated with photodisintegration reactions in supernovae were heterogeneously distributed in the solar nebula. Other samarium and neodymium isotopes produced by rapid neutron capture (r process) in supernovae and by slow neutron capture (s process) in red giants were homogeneously distributed. The supernovae sources supplying the p- and r-process nuclides to the solar nebula were thus disconnected or only weakly connected.

  6. Ultrasonic and viscosimetric studies of samarium laurate in benzene-dimethylsulfoxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrotra, K.N.; Anis, M.

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic and viscosity measurements of samarium laurate in benzene-DMSO mixtures of different compositions (7:3 and 1:1 V/V) have been used to determine the critical micelle concentration (CMC), soap-solvent interaction, and various acoustic parameters of the system. The values of critical micelle concentration increase with increasing amount of DMSO in the solvent mixtures. The viscosity results have been explained on the basis of equations proposed by Einstein, Vand. Moulik, and Jones-Dole. The values of CMC for samarium laurate obtained from the viscosity measurements are in agreement with the results obtained from ultrasonic measurements. The results show that the soap molecules do not aggregate appreciably below CMC there is a marked change in the aggregation behaviour at CMC. (author)

  7. Removal of trivalent samarium from aqueous solutions by activated biochar derived from cactus fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loukia Hadjittofi; Styliana Charalambous; Ioannis Pashalidis

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of activated biochar fibres obtained fromOpuntia Ficus Indica regarding the sorption of trivalent samarium (Sm(III)) from aqueous solutions was investigated by batch experiments. The effect of various physicochemical parameters (e.g. pH, initial metal concentration, ionic strength, temperature and contact time) on the Sm(III) adsorption was studied and the surface species were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy prior to and after the lanthanide sorption. The experimental results showed that the acti-vated biochar fibres possessed extraordinary sorption capacity for Sm(III) in acidic solutions (qmax=90 g/kg, pH 3.0) and near neutral solutions (qmax=350 g/kg, pH 6.5). This was attributed to the formation of samarium complexes with the surface carboxylic moieties, available in high density on the lamellar structures of the bio-sorbent.

  8. Enhanced electron-lattice coupling under uniaxial stress in layered double hydroxides intercalated with samarium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ta-Ryeong

    2004-01-01

    We have applied uniaxial stress to samarium complexes by intercalating them into the gallery of a layered material and by using a diamond-anvil cell at 28 K. Although uniaxial stress reduces symmetry and removes degeneracy, the overall number of photoluminescence (PL) peaks evidently decreased with the application of uniaxial stress. This contradictory observation is explained by an increased electron-lattice coupling strength under uniaxial stress. This behavior is also confirmed by time-resolved PL data.

  9. Synthesis of samarium complexes with the derivative binder of Schiff Quinolinic base. Characterization and photophysical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas H, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we determined the metal: binder stoichiometry of the species formed during the UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration of the derivative binder of Schiff quinolinic base, L1 with the samarium nitrate pentahydrate in methanol. Statistical analysis of the data allowed proposing the metal: binder stoichiometry for the synthesis of the complexes which was one mole of samarium salt by 2.5 moles of binder and thus favor the formation of complexes with 1M: 1L and 1M: 2L stoichiometries. They were synthesized in aqueous-organic medium (water-ethanol), isolated and purified two complexes with stoichiometry 1 Sm: 1 L1, complex 1 and 1 Sm: 2 L1, complex 2. The overall yield of the reaction was 76%. The characterization of the formed complexes was performed by visible ultraviolet spectrometry (UV/Vis), nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), thermal gravimetric analysis with differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC), and radial distribution function. These complexes were studied by fluorescence and emission phosphorescence at variable temperature. Spectroscopic techniques used in both solution and solid demonstrated the formation and stability of these complexes. In addition XP S indicated that in both complexes the samarium retains its oxidation state 3+. Luminescence studies indicated that there is intra-binding charge transfer which decreases the transfer of light energy from the binder to the samarium. Based on the experimental results, L1 binder molecules and complexes 1 and 2 were modeled that demonstrated the proposed Nc for each complex, as well as allowed to visualize the structural arrangement of the molecules, complexes and binder. (Author)

  10. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz F, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  11. Impact of educational strategies in positioning Samarium-153 EDTMP as a treatment for metastatic bone pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminario, C.; Morales, R.; Castro, M.; Cano, R.A.; Mendoza, G.

    2005-01-01

    To educate is a difficult task but its results make efforts worthwhile. Many patients in Peru suffer from intractable bone pain due to metastases. Since 1993 radionuclides were used to palliate bone pain due to metastases in Peru. First, with the help of the IAEA, Peru participated in a clinical trial using Phosphorus 32 and Strontium 89. Then, efforts were performed to produce Samarium 153 EDMTP locally, which was achieved in 1995. Nevertheless, years passed and Samarium use did not increase proportionally to the needs of people with cancer and bone pain, mainly the poor. Educational strategies have been proven useful for delivering solutions to many health problems in other diseases and also in cancer. Health education makes patients and their relatives assume responsible care of their problems. The purpose of this work was to increase Samarium EDTMP use as palliative treatment in patients with bone pain due to metastases, using educational strategies as means to change attitudes towards this health problem. In September 2003, a task group conducted studies in order to apply several methods to achieve the goal of increasing Samarium EDTMP use. Educational strategies employed were performed to provide verbal and written information to patients, physicians, medical students, residents, pain specialists, oncologists and neurologists, as well as general public. Verbal information included radio interviews, television spots and a phone number (in charge of two secretaries, prepared for answering and if not possible, a physician was in charge of attending patient consultation), e-mail and a web page for consultation. Written material was delivered to several newspapers, including clinical use of Samarium, possibilities of being elected for treatment, benefits and risks and a photography of the product. Politics of the institution producing Samarium changed, in order to achieve minimum cost of the product and it was delivered to all publics at the lowest cost for a year

  12. 9 CFR 130.49 - Exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemptions. 130.49 Section 130.49 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE USER... services, including, but not limited to, tests and diagnostic reagents specified in §§ 130.14 through 130...

  13. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry analysis of lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium oxides for rare earths impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reino, L.C.P.; Lordello, A.R.

    1990-09-01

    An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry method is described for the determination of Sm, Eu, La, Gd, Dy, Pr, Ho, Nd, Tb and Y in purified oxides of lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium. The method enables a simple, precise and readily available determination. Dissolution of the samples is achieved with diluted hydrochloric acid (1:1). The solutions are diluted to volume for a concentration of 1mg/ml. The lowest determination limit is 0,01% for most elements and 0,05 or 0,1% for a few rare earths in samarium and gadolinium matrices. Lanthanum, Samarium and Gadolinium concentrates with purity grade of 99,9%, 99,6% and 99,8%, respectively, can be analysed by this procedure. (author)

  14. Synthesis and structure of unprecedented samarium complex with bulky bis-iminopyrrolyl ligand via intramolecular C=N bond activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Suman; Anga, Srinivas; Harinath, Adimulam; Panda, Tarun K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (India); Pada Nayek, Hari [Department of Applied Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, (ISM) Dhanbad, Jharkhand (India)

    2017-12-29

    An unprecedentate samarium complex of the molecular composition [{κ"3-{(Ph_2CH)N=CH}{sub 2}C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N}{κ"3-{(Ph_2CHN=CH)(Ph_2CHNCH)C_4H_2N}Sm}{sub 2}] (2), which was isolated by the reaction of a potassium salt of 2,5-bis{N-(diphenylmethyl)-iminomethyl}pyrrolyl ligand [K(THF){sub 2}{(Ph_2CH)N=CH}{sub 2}C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N] (1) with anhydrous samarium diiodide in THF at 60 C through the in situ reduction of imine bond is presented. The homoleptic samarium complex [[κ{sup 3}-{(Ph_2CH)-N=CH}{sub 2}C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N]{sub 3}Sm] (3) can also be obtained from the reaction of compound 1 with anhydrous samarium triiodide (SmI{sub 3}) in THF at 60 C. The molecular structures of complexes 2 and 3 were established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The molecular structure of complex 2 reveals the formation of a C-C bond in the 2,5-bis{N-(diphenylmethyl)iminomethyl}pyrrole ligand moiety (Ph{sub 2}Py{sup -}). However, complex 3 is a homoleptic samarium complex of three bis-iminopyrrolyl ligands. In complex 2, the samarium ion adopts an octahedral arrangement, whereas in complex 3, a distorted three face-centered trigonal prismatic mode of nine coordination is observed around the metal ion. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Superdeformed bands in 130Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T.; Boston, A.J.; Joss, D.T.; Nolan, P.J.; Shepherd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Four superdeformed bands have been assigned to 130 Ce following a high-statistics γ-ray study using the EUROGAM II spectrometer. The strongest band exhibits two distinct backbends which, in one scenario, may be interpreted as crossings between high-j N = 6 neutron orbitals (νi 13/2 ) and low-j N = 4 orbitals (νd 3/2 ) in an unpaired system. (author)

  16. Radon measurements in 130 schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peake, R.T.; Schmidt, A.; MacWaters, J.T.; Chmelynski, H.

    1990-01-01

    During the winter of 1989, Rn screening measurements were made in 130 schools distributed across the United States. The primary purpose of the paper is to identify schools suitable for a year-long follow-up study, the results of which will be used to update EPA's guidance for Rn testing in schools. The 130 schools were selected nonrandomly using school characteristics and accessibility in areas where there were known or suspected Rn problems in homes. Levels found in this screening study may indicate the potential for Rn problems in US schools. Over half of the 130 schools tested had at least one radon measurement ≥4 pCi/L, and nearly 20% of the 3028 rooms measured ≥4 pCi/L. The number of rooms ≥4 pCi/L is often three rooms or less. However, schools with more than five rooms ≥4 pCi/L are common in some areas. The data include schools that could be typical of much of the US school population as well as schools which exhibit extreme radon problems, such as those tested in Nashville, TN and Spokane, WA

  17. X-ray spectrum in the range (6-12) A emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louzon, Einat; Henis, Zohar; Levi, Izhak; Hurvitz, Gilad; Ehrlich, Yosi; Fraenkel, Moshe; Maman, Shlomo; Mandelbaum, Pinchas

    2009-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the x-ray spectrum emitted by laser-produced plasma of samarium (6-12 A) is presented, using ab initio calculations with the HULLAC relativistic code and isoelectronic considerations. Resonance 3d-nf (n=4 to 7), 3p-4d, 3d-4p, and 3p-4s transitions in Ni samarium ions and in neighboring ionization states (from Mn to Zn ions) were identified. The experiment results show changes in the fine details of the plasma spectrum for different laser intensities.

  18. Peculiarities of electronic, phonon and magnon subsystems of lanthanum and samarium tetraborides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, V.V., E-mail: vvnovikov@mail.ru; Mitroshenkov, N.V.; Matovnikov, A.V.

    2015-10-15

    Experimental research was carried out to study the temperature dependences of heat capacity C{sub p}(T = 2–300 K), lattice parameters a(T), and ≿(T), (5–300 K) of lanthanum and samarium tetraborides. A comparison with data obtained previously for LuB{sub 4} reveals the peculiar influence of lanthanide contraction and the rare-earths mass on the thermodynamic properties of rare earth tetraborides at low and high temperatures. Sharp anomalies were found in the heat capacity and thermal expansion for SmB{sub 4} at T{sub N} = 25.1 K, conditioned by the phase transition into antiferromagnetic state. The more poorly defined heat capacity anomaly around 7 K is referred to the quadrupole orbital fluctuation of the atomic magnetic moments for Sm{sup 3+} ions. The electronic, lattice, and magnetic contributions to the heat capacity and thermal expansion of samarium tetraboride were defined. Our approach makes it possible to adequately approximate the lattice components of heat capacity and thermal expansion by combining the Debye and Einstein contributions, which are based on the joint analysis of calorimetric and X-ray data. The influence of the frustration of the atomic magnetic moment system for Sm{sup 3+} ions on the thermodynamic characteristics of the samarium tetraboride magnetic phase transition was revealed. - Highlights: • The heat capacity and lattice parameters for LaB{sub 4} and SmB{sub 4} were determined at 2–300 K. • The anomalies of C{sub p}(T), a(T), c(T) for SmB{sub 4} due to the phase transition are revealed. • The lattice contributions to the thermal properties of LaB{sub 4} and SmB{sub 4} are analyzed.

  19. Separation of lanthanum from samarium on solid aluminum electrode in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Bin Ji; Mi-Lin Zhang; Xing Li; Xiao-Yan Jing; Wei Han; Yong-De Yan; Yun Xue; Zhi-Jian Zhang; Harbin Engineering University, Harbin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an electrochemical study on the separation of lanthanum from samarium on aluminum electrode at 773 K. The results from different electrochemical methods showed that Sm(III) and La(III) formed Al-Sm and Al-La intermetallic compounds on an aluminum electrode at electrode potential around -1.67 and -1.46 V, respectively. The electrochemical separation of lanthanum was carried out in LiCl-KCl-LaCl 3 -SmCl 3 melts on solid aluminum electrodes at 773 K by potentiostatic electrolysis at -1.45 V for 40 h and the separation efficiency was 99.1 %. (author)

  20. Determination of micro amounts of samarium and europium by analogue derivative spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, H.; Satoh, K.

    1982-01-01

    Derivative spectrophotometry using the analogue differentiation circuit was applied to the determination of samarium and europium at ppm levels. By measuring the second or the fourth derivative spectra of the characteristic absorption bands of both the rare earth ions around 400 nm, they can be determined directly and selectively in the presence of large amounts of most other rare earths without any prior separation. Further, aptly selecting conditions for the measurement of the derivative spectra, the simultaneous determination of both the rare earth elements was feasible. The principle and the characteristics of analogue derivative spectrophotometry are also described. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of samarium-153 and holmium-166-EDTMP in the normal baboon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louw, W.K.A.; Dormehl, I.C.; Rensburg, A.J. van; Hugo, N.; Alberts, A.S.; Forsyth, O.E.; Beverley, G.; Sweetlove, M.A.; Marais, J.; Loetter, M.G.; Aswegen, A. van

    1996-11-01

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals such as ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) complexes of samarium-153 and holmium-166 are receiving considerable attention for therapeutic treatment of bone metastases. In this study, using the baboon experimental model, multicompartmental analysis revealed that with regard to pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and skeletal localisation, {sup 166}Ho-EDTMP was significantly inferior to {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP and {sup 99m}Tc-MDP. A more suitable {sup 166}Ho-bone-seeking agent should thus be sought for closer similarity to {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP to exploit fully the therapeutic potential of its shorter half-life and more energetic beta radiation.

  2. Body composition analysis by DEXA by using dynamically changing samarium filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Arne; Baeksgaard, L; Hilsted, J

    1997-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has a high accuracy for body composition analysis but is influenced by beam hardening and other error sources in the extremes of measurement. To compensate for beam hardening, the Norland XR-36 introduces a dynamically changing samarium filtration system......). Scans of six healthy volunteers covered with combinations of beef and lard (approximately 5-15 kg) showed a good agreement (r = 0.99) between reference and DEXA values of added soft tissue mass and fat percentage. We conclude that the DEXA method (and, in particular, the Norland XR-36 using dynamic...

  3. Performance analysis of samarium cobalt P.M. synchronous motor fed from PWM inverters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.A.; Choudhury, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis and performance of samarium cobalt permanent magnet (P.M.) synchronous motors fed from two types of voltage source pulse width modulated (PWM) inverters. The analysis and test results on the steady state performance of a P.M. motor fed from PWM inverters are presented. PWM inverters are used in variable voltage variable frequency applications to avoid a double conversion process of ordinary inverters. In drives, they are used for voltage and speed regulation of motors. Use of modulation technique in inverters also allow to eliminate or minimize selected harmonics from the inverter output voltage

  4. Production of SmCo5 alloy by calciothermic reduction of samarium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, T.S.; Gupta, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Among the established permanent magnets, SmCo 5 magnet occupies the foremost position as it offers a unique combination of high energy product, coercivity and curie temperature. The SmCo 5 magnets are thus extensively used for high field applications. These are also best suited for use in environments where high demagnetizing field and high temperature are operative. Also, for applications where high performance and miniaturization are the over-riding considerations, the choice again falls on SmCo 5 magnets. The main deterrent to the widespread use of SmCo 5 magnet is its high cost. Both samarium and cobalt metals are high priced, and the magnets prepared from their directly melted alloy are thus naturally very expensive. An alternate process involving calcium reduction of their oxide intermediates has, therefore, been studied and the alloy prepared by this process has been evaluated and found satisfactory for magnet production. The process essentially involves compaction of the charge mix containing samarium oxide, cobalt oxide (or metal) and calcium metal and reduction of the charge compact at 1000-1300 degrees C in hydrogen atmosphere, followed by water and acid leaching, drying and classification

  5. Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts: fabrication, characterization, and application in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Yunjiao; Wang, Xue; Yang, Chao; Yi, Yanfeng

    2012-11-01

    Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts were synthesized by the in situ chemical oxidative surface polymerization technique based on the self-assembly of pyrrole on the surface of the amine-functionalized Sm2O3 nanobelts. The morphologies of the polypyrrole/samarium oxide (PPy/Sm2O3) nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscope. The UV-vis absorbance of these samples was also investigated, and the remarkable enhancement was clearly observed. The electrochemical behaviors of the PPy/Sm2O3 composites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The results indicated that the PPy/Sm2O3 composite electrode was fully reversible and achieved a very fast Faradaic reaction. After being corrected into the weight percentage of the PPy/Sm2O3 composite at a current density of 20 mA cm-2 in a 1.0 M NaNO3 electrolyte solution, a maximum discharge capacity of 771 F g-1 was achieved in a half-cell setup configuration for the PPy/Sm2O3 composites electrode with the potential application to electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors.

  6. Ekstraksi Pemisahan Neodimium dari Samarium, Itrium dan Praseodimium Memakai Tri Butil Fosfat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Veronica Purwani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of Nd(OH3 (neodymium hydroxide concentrate containing Y (yttrium, Sm (samarium and Pr (praseodymium as product of monazite processed has been done. The purpose of this study is to determine the separation of Nd from Y, Pr and Nd Sm in Nd concentrate. The aqueous phase was concentrated Nd (OH3 in HNO3 and extractant while organic phase was Tri Butyl Phosphate (TBP in kerosene. Parameters studied were pH and concentration feed, concentration of TBP in kerosene, extraction time and stirring speed. The result showed that the optimization of separation extraction neodymium from samarium, yttrium and praseodymium in Nd(OH3 concentrated with TBP, obtained the optimum condition of pH = 0.2, concentration of feed 100 g /L, concentration of TBP in kerosene 5%, extraction time 15 minutes and stirring speed 150 rpm. With the conditions, Separation Factor (SF obtained for Nd-Y, Nd-Pr, Nd-Sm are 2.242, 4.811, 4.002 respectively, while D and extraction efficiency of Nd are 0.236 and 19.07%.

  7. Thermomechanical behavior of Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni shape memory alloys modified with samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakoor, R.A.; Khalid, F. Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    The deformation and training behavior of Fe-14Mn-3Si-10Cr-5Ni (wt.%) shape memory alloys containing samarium addition has been studied in the iron-based shape memory alloys. It is noticed that thermomechanical treatment (training) has significant influence on proof stress, critical stress and shape memory behavior of the alloys. The improvement in shape memory behavior can be attributed to the decrease in the proof stress and critical stress which facilitates the formation of ε (hcp martensite). It is also observed that alloy 2 containing samarium undergoes less softening as compared to alloy 1 with training which inhibits the formation of α (bcc martensite) and thus enhances the shape memory behavior. The excessive thermomechanical treatment with increase in the training cycle has led to the formation of α (bcc martensite) along with ε (hcp martensite) in the alloy 1 which appeared to have decline in the shape memory effect. This has been demonstrated by the examination of microstructure and identification of α (bcc martensite) martensite in the alloy 1 as compared to alloy 2

  8. Phase Composition of Samarium Niobate and Tantalate Thin Films Prepared by Sol-Gel Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruncková, H.; Medvecký, Ľ.; Múdra, E.; Kovalčiková, A.; Ďurišin, J.; Šebek, M.; Girman, V.

    2017-12-01

    Samarium niobate SmNbO4 (SNO) and tantalate SmTaO4 (STO) thin films ( 100 nm) were prepared by sol-gel/spin-coating process on alumina substrates with PZT interlayer and annealing at 1000°C. The precursors of films were synthesized using Nb or Ta tartrate complexes. The improvement of the crystallinity of monoclinic M'-SmTaO4 phase via heating was observed through the coexistence of small amounts of tetragonal T-SmTa7O19 phase in STO precursor at 1000°C. The XRD results of SNO and STO films confirmed monoclinic M-SmNbO4 and M'-SmTaO4 phases, respectively, with traces of orthorhombic O-SmNbO4 (in SNO). In STO film, the single monoclinic M'-SmTaO4 phase was revealed. The surface morphology and topography of thin films were investigated by SEM and AFM analysis. STO film was smoother with roughness 3.2 nm in comparison with SNO (6.3 nm). In the microstructure of SNO film, small spherical ( 50 nm) and larger cuboidal particles ( 100 nm) of the SmNbO4 phase were observed. In STO, compact clusters composed of fine spherical SmTaO4 particles ( 20-50 nm) were found. Effect of samarium can contribute to the formation different polymorphs of these films for the application to environmental electrolytic thin film devices.

  9. Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts: fabrication, characterization, and application in supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Peng, E-mail: pliu@lzu.edu.cn; Wang Yunjiao; Wang Xue; Yang Chao; Yi Yanfeng [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province and State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry (China)

    2012-11-15

    Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts were synthesized by the in situ chemical oxidative surface polymerization technique based on the self-assembly of pyrrole on the surface of the amine-functionalized Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobelts. The morphologies of the polypyrrole/samarium oxide (PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscope. The UV-vis absorbance of these samples was also investigated, and the remarkable enhancement was clearly observed. The electrochemical behaviors of the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The results indicated that the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite electrode was fully reversible and achieved a very fast Faradaic reaction. After being corrected into the weight percentage of the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite at a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2} in a 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} electrolyte solution, a maximum discharge capacity of 771 F g{sup -1} was achieved in a half-cell setup configuration for the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites electrode with the potential application to electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors.

  10. 40 CFR 130.11 - Program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program management. 130.11 Section 130... PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.11 Program management. (a) State agencies may apply for grants under sections 106, 205(j) and 205(g) to carry out water quality planning and management activities. Interstate...

  11. 21 CFR 820.130 - Device packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device packaging. 820.130 Section 820.130 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.130 Device packaging. Each manufacturer shall ensure that device packaging and shipping containers are designed and constructed to protect the...

  12. 46 CFR 126.130 - Cranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cranes. 126.130 Section 126.130 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 126.130 Cranes. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, cranes, if installed, must... chapter. (b) The manufacturer of a crane may have tests and inspections conducted in compliance with § 107...

  13. 21 CFR 131.130 - Evaporated milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaporated milk. 131.130 Section 131.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.130 Evaporated milk. (a...

  14. 7 CFR 58.130 - Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health. 58.130 Section 58.130 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Personnel, Cleanliness and Health § 58.130 Health. No person afflicted with a communicable disease shall be permitted in any room or compartment...

  15. 24 CFR 891.130 - Prohibited relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibited relationships. 891.130 Section 891.130 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Requirements § 891.130 Prohibited relationships. This section shall apply to capital advances under the Section...

  16. 21 CFR 135.130 - Mellorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mellorine. 135.130 Section 135.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN DESSERTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Desserts § 135.130 Mellorine. (a...

  17. 46 CFR 130.440 - Communications system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Communications system. 130.440 Section 130.440 Shipping... MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.440 Communications system. (a) Each OSV must have a communications system to immediately summon a crew member to the machinery...

  18. 5 CFR 1207.130 - Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employment. 1207.130 Section 1207.130... BOARD § 1207.130 Employment. No qualified individual with a disability shall, on the basis of such disability, be subject to discrimination in employment under any program or activity conducted by the agency...

  19. 46 CFR 130.430 - Pilothouse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pilothouse control. 130.430 Section 130.430 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.430 Pilothouse control. Each...

  20. 46 CFR 130.120 - Propulsion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Propulsion control. 130.120 Section 130.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Vessel Control § 130.120 Propulsion control. (a) Each vessel must have— (1...

  1. 22 CFR 130.7 - Supplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplier. 130.7 Section 130.7 Foreign Relations... § 130.7 Supplier. Supplier means any person who enters into a contract with the Department of Defense for the sale of defense articles or defense services valued in an amount of $500,000 or more under...

  2. Pemisahan Unsur Samarium dan Yttrium dari Mineral Tanah Jarang dengan Teknik Membran Cair Berpendukung (Supported Liquid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amri Amin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available he increasing use of rare earth elements in high technology industries needs to be supported by developmental work for the separation of elements. The research objective is fiercely attracting and challenging considering the similarity of bath physical and chemical properties among these elements. The rate separation of samarium and yttrium elements using supported liquid membrane has been studied. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE with pore size of 0.45 µm has been used as the membrane and di(2-ethylhexyl phosphate (D2EHP in hexane has been used as a carrier and nitric acid solution has been used as receiving phase. Result of experiments showed that the best separation rate of samarium and yttrium elements could be obtained at feeding phase of pH 3.0, di(2-ethylhexyl phosphate (D2EHP concentration of 0.3 M, agitation rate of 700 rpm, agitation time of 2 hours, and nitric acid and its solution concentrations of 1.0 M and 0.1 M, respectively. At this condition, separation rates of samarium and yttrium were 64.4 and 67.6%, respectively.   Keywords: liquid membrane, rare earth elements, samarium, yttrium

  3. Behavior of Samarium III during the sorption process; Comportamiento del Samario-III durante el proceso de sorcion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Garcia G, N.; Garcia R, G. [ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: edo@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work the results of the behavior of samarium in solution are presented, in front of a fine powder of zirconium silicate (zircon). For that which is necessary to characterize the zircon, studying the crystallinity, the morphology, the surface area and the isoelectric point. The behavior of samarium in solution is studied by means of the elaboration of isotherm of sorption, using the technique by lots. One observes that to pH values of nearer to the isoelectric point (pH = 7.23) the process of sorption of the samarium begins, reaching a maximum to near pH at 9. The technique of luminescence is used to determine the concentration of the sipped samarium (phosphorescence) and also to make the speciation of the species formed in the surface of the zircon (phosphorescence). The results can be extrapolated with the plutonium when making the modeling of the migration of alpha emitting coming from the repositories of radioactive waste since both they have similar chemical properties (they are homologous). (Author)

  4. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinweber, G.; Burke, J.A.; Knox, H.D.; Drindak, N.J.; Mesh, D.W.; Haines, W.T.; Ballad, R.V.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Werner, C.J.; Trbovich, M.J.; Barry, D.P.; Sato, T.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to accurately measure the neutron cross sections of samarium. The most significant isotope is 149 Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a 235 U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25 meter flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-meter flight stations with 6 Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multi-level R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2. The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D 2 O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility. Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture resonance integral to include the strong 0.1 eV resonance in 149 Sm, present measurements agree within estimated uncertainties with En

  5. The systems cerium(3) (samarium) nitrate-quinoline nitrate-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khisaeva, D.A.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Semenova, Eh.B.

    1982-01-01

    Using the method of cross sections at 25 and 50 deg C the solubility in the systems cerium (3) nitrate-quinoline nitrate-water and samarium nitrate-quinoline nitrate-water has been studied. It is established that in the systems during chemical interaction of components congruently melting compounds of the composition: Ce(NO 3 ) 2 x2[C 9 H 7 NxHNO 3 ]x6H 2 O and Sm(NO 3 ) 3 x2[C 9 H 7 NxHNO 3 ]x2H 2 O are formed. New solid phases are separated preparatively and are subjected to chemical, differential thermal and IR spectroscopic analyses. The investigation results are compared with similar ones for nitrates of other representatives of lanthanide group

  6. The systems lanthanum (cerium, samarium) nitrate-tetramethyl-ammonium nitrate-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravlev, E.F.; Khisaeva, D.A.; Semenova, Eh.B.

    1984-01-01

    The method of cross sections at 25 and 50 deg C has been applied to study solubility in the systems lanthanum nitrate-tetramethyl ammonium nitrate-water (1), cesium (3) nitrate-tetramethyl ammonium nitrate-water (2) and samarium nitrate-tetramethyl ammonium nitrate-water (3). Crystallization fields of congruently dissolving compounds with 1:3 ratio of salt components (in system 1) and 1:2 ratio (in systems 2 and 3) are found in the systems. New solid phases are separated preparatively and subjected to chemical, differential thermal and IR spectroscopic analyses. Compositions of formed compounds are compared with the compositions known for nitrates of other representatives of light lanthanides

  7. Preparation and biological behaviour of samarium-153-hydroxyapatite particles for radiation synovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrueelles, M.G.; Luppi Berlanga, I.S.; Torres, E.A.; Rutty Sola, G.A.; Rimoldi, G.

    1998-01-01

    The preparation and labelling procedures of 153 Sm-hydroxyapatite ( 153 Sm-HA) are described in this paper. Hydroxyapatite (HA) was prepared and studied as a radiosynovectomy agent. HA particles were prepared from the reaction of calcium nitrate and ammonia phosphate at high pH Samarium-153 labelling was done in two steps with citric acid. A serie of experimental conditions, such as specific activity, citric acid mass, radioactive solution volume, in-vitro stability, have been carried out. Radiolabelling efficiency was greater than 95%. In vitro studies showed high stability (≥99%). Animal studies showed a good retention in the synovium, with a very low extra-articular leakage over 6 days after administration. (author)

  8. Efficacy and toxicity of Samarium-153-EDTMP locally produced in the treatment of painful skeletal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olea, E.; Quintana, J.C.; Nagel, J.; Arenas, L.; Tomicic, M.; Gil, M.C.; Araya, G.

    2001-01-01

    Samarium-153 emits medium-energy beta particles an a gamma photon with a physical half-life of 46,3 hours. When chelated to ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid (EDTMP), it is remarkably stable in vitro and in vivo. In this study we administered randomly 0,5 and 1,0 mCi/Kg body weight (two groups), to 30 patients with painful metastatic bone cancer. Slight and spontaneously reversible myelotoxicity was observed. A bigger leukocyte and platelet suppression was obtained with 1,0 mCi/kg than 0,5 mCi/Kg dose. Pain palliation was obtained in 66% of the treated patients. Our preliminary results indicate that 153 Sm-EDTMP is a promising radiotherapeutic agent for palliative treatment of metastatic bone cancer pain where a reactor is available and at a very affordable cost. (author)

  9. Studies on the structural, optical and dielectric properties of samarium coordinated with salicylic acid single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harjinder; Slathia, Goldy; Gupta, Rashmi; Bamzai, K. K.

    2018-04-01

    Samarium coordinated with salicylic acid was successfully grown as a single crystal by low temperature solution technique using mixed solvent of methanol and water in equal ratio. Structural characterization was carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and it crystallizes in centrosymmetric space group P121/c1. FTIR and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy confirmed the compound formation and help to determine the mode of binding of the ligand to the rare earth-metal ion. Dielectric constant and dielectric loss have been measured over the frequency range 100 Hz - 30MHz. The decrease in dielectric constant with increases in frequency is due to the transition from interfacial polarization to dipolar polarization. The small value of dielectric constant at higher frequency ensures that the crystal is good candidate for NLO devices. Dielectric loss represents the resistive nature of the material.

  10. Use of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for simultaneous preconcentration of samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallah, M.H.; Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran; Shemirani, F.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new preconcentration method of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for simultaneous preconcentration of samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium. DLLME technique was successfully used as a sample preparation method. In this preconcentration method, an appropriate mixture of extraction solvent, disperser solvent was injected rapidly into an aqueous solution containing Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy after complex formation using chelating reagent of the 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). After phase separation, 0.5 mL of the settled phase containing enriched analytes was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The main factors affected the preconcentration of Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy were extraction and dispersive solvent type and their volume, extraction time, volume of chelating agent (PAN), centrifuge speed and drying temperature of the samples. Under the best operating condition simultaneous preconcentration factors of 80, 100, 103 and 78 were obtained for Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy, respectively. (author)

  11. Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films grown by PLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christoulakis, S.; Suchea, M; Katsarakis, N.; Koudoumas, E

    2007-01-01

    Europium and samarium doped calcium sulfide thin films (CaS:Eu,Sm) with different thickness were prepared by the pulsed laser deposition technique using sintered targets. A typical homemade deposition chamber and XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) were employed and the films were deposited in helium atmosphere onto silicon and corning glass substrates. Structural investigations carried out by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy showed a strong influence of the deposition parameters on the film properties. The films grown had an amorphous or polycrystalline structure depending on growth temperature and the number of pulses used, the same parameters affecting the film roughness, the grain shape and dimensions, the film thickness and the optical transmittance. This work indicates that pulsed laser deposition can be a suitable technique for the preparation of CaS:Eu,Sm thin films, the film characteristics being controlled by the growth conditions

  12. Effect of samarium in corrosion and microstructure of Al-5Zn-0.5Cu as low driving voltage sacrificial anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesa, Yudha; Ferdian, Deni; Ramadhan, Fajar Yusya; Maulana, Bramuda

    2018-05-01

    Sacrificial Anode Low voltage is the latest generation of the sacrificial anode that can prevent the occurrence of Hydrogen Cracking (HIC) due to overprotection. The Al-5n-0.5Cu alloy showed the potential to be developed as the new sacrificial anode. However, the main problem is copper made Al2Cu intermetallic in grain boundary. Samarium is added to modify the shape of the intermetallic to make it finer and make the corrosion uniform. Several characterizations were conducted to analyze the effect of Samarium. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to analyzed the microstructure of the alloy. Metallography preparation was prepared for SEM analysis. Corrosion behavior was characterized by cyclic polarization in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results show samarium can change the shape of intermetallic and refine the grains. In addition, samarium makes better pitting resistance and exhibits a tendency for uniform corrosion. It is indicated by the loop reduction (ΔEpit-prot). Current density increased as an effect of samarium addition from 6x10-5 Ampere (Al-5Zn-0.5Cu) to 2.5x10-4 Ampere (Al-5Zn-0.5Cu-0.5Sm). Steel potential protection increased after addition of samarium which is an indication the possibility of Al-Zn-Cu-Sm to be used as low voltage sacrificial anode.

  13. Myelotoxicity of Samarium Sm153 lexidronam in patients with painful bony metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ghachem, T.; Mhiri, A.; Slim, I.; Bahloul, A.; Yeddes, I.; Elbez, I.; Meddeb, I.; Ben Slimene, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Introduction: the management of bone pain includes analgesia, radiation, hormones, radiofrequency (RF) ablation, chemotherapy, and surgery. Bone pain palliation therapy with radiopharmaceuticals is a cost-effective systemic therapy to relieve pain from skeletal metastases with a consequent decrease in morbidity and an improvement in quality of life. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of myelotoxicity of samarium lexidronam (Sm 153 ) in patients with painful bony metastasis. Methods: we reviewed 116 patients aged from 14 to 87 years old, 91 males (78%) and 25 females (22%), having received 1 to 4 treatments of Sm 153 (37 MBq/kg) for painful bony metastases from different primitive tumors: 67 cases of prostate cancer (57.7%), 22 cases of breast cancer (18.9%), 10 cases of pulmonary cancer (8.6%) and others in 14.6% of cases. Clinical follow-up was available for 159 treatments, consisting on blood count each week over at least two months, in order to evaluate myelotoxicity according to WHO classification. Results: no patients had grade 4 toxicity after its cures. A grade 2-3 myelotoxicity was observed after 52 treatments (34%) during the second week and after 50 treatments (32.6%) during the fourth week with a satisfactory reversibility. At 10 weeks of treatment, myelotoxicity was reclassified from 0 to 2 for 139 cures (90,8%). Moreover, we found that prior treatment with radiotherapy or chemotherapy did not affect the rates of myelotoxicity. Conclusion: multiple treatments with samarium Sm 153 lexidronam had no significant effect on myelotoxicity. Patients with bone predominant metastatic disease may survive for extended periods of time and may safely be treated with multiple modalities of therapy. (authors)

  14. Potentiometric study of samarium oxides formation from its chloride in a molten eutectic mixture of sodium and cesium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, V.V.; Bove, A.L.; Del'mukhamedov, R.D.; Borodina, N.P.; Gavrilov, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    Interaction of trivalent samarium cations with oxide-ions in NaCl-2CsCl melt at 973 K has been studied by potentiometric method using electrochemical cell with two platinum-oxygen electrodes with a solid electrolyte membrane. The mechanism of the interaction and composition of the reaction products, depending on the medium oxyacidity, have been considered. Certain thermodynamic characteristics of the process have been calculated

  15. 13 CFR 130.610 - General terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General terms. 130.610 Section 130.610 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS... responsibilities of the recipient organization and SBA, the scope of the project to be funded, and the budget of...

  16. 21 CFR 145.130 - Canned figs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., a mixture of brown sugar and honey, the statement “___ sirup of brown sugar and honey” the blank to... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned figs. 145.130 Section 145.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.130 - Engine exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine exhaust. 1065.130 Section 1065... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.130 Engine exhaust. (a) General. Use the exhaust system installed with the engine or one that represents a typical in-use configuration. This...

  18. 42 CFR 410.130 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 410.130 Section 410.130 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... condition of abnormal glucose metabolism diagnosed using the following criteria: A fasting blood sugar...

  19. 9 CFR 3.130 - Watering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Warmblooded Animals Other Than Dogs, Cats, Rabbits, Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Nonhuman Primates, and Marine... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Watering. 3.130 Section 3.130 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL...

  20. 40 CFR 164.130 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General. 164.130 Section 164.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE... on a pest for which registration has been finally cancelled or suspended by the Administrator...

  1. 13 CFR 130.460 - Budget justification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget justification. 130.460 Section 130.460 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT...) Cost principles. Principles for determining allowable costs are contained in OMB Circulars A-21 (cost...

  2. 33 CFR 118.130 - Fog signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fog signals. 118.130 Section 118... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.130 Fog signals. On waterways where visibility is frequently reduced due to fog or other causes, the District Commander may require or authorize the installation of one or...

  3. 13 CFR 130.480 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 130.480 Section... CENTERS § 130.480 Program income. (a) Program income for recipient organizations or SBDC service providers... A-110). Program income for recipient organizations or SBDC service providers based in State or local...

  4. (EC+β+) decay of 130Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shuwei; Zhang Tianmei; Xie Yuanxiang; Ma Ruichang; Ge Yuanxiu; Guo Yingxiang; Wang Chunfang; Li Zhankui; Guo Bing; Xing Jianping; Guo Tianrui; Zhu Shaofei; Xu Wang; Du Jinzhou

    1996-01-01

    The nuclide 130 Ce was produced by a ( 16 O, 4n) reaction on an enriched 118 Sn target. Reaction products were transported to a shielded location by using a helium-jet tape transport system. A 22.9 min activity in chemically separated cerium sample was identified as 130 Ce. The (EC+β + ) decay scheme of 130 Ce was proposed for the first time. This scheme includes 108 γ-lines, 107 γ-lines among them being new. More than 13 1 + low-lying states of 130 La are populated in the decay of 130 Ce. Two new isomers with half-life of 77±10 ns and 17±5 ns were observed by means of delayed γ-γ coincidence measurements. (orig.). With 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Structural and luminescence properties of samarium doped lead alumino borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaweta; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, D. P.; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-11-01

    The study reports the effect of samarium concentration on the physical, structural and spectroscopic characteristics of samarium doped lead alumino borate glasses having composition 20PbO-(10-x)Al2O3-70B2O3-xSm2O3; x = 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol %. The glasses were fabricated by conventional melt-quenching technique and then characterized by XRD, FTIR, optical absorption and fluorescence spectra. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the amorphous nature of the prepared glasses. FTIR spectra indicate the presence of BO3, BO4, AlO6 and a few other structural groups. Various physical properties such as density, molar volume, refractive index, rare earth ion concentration, boron-boron distance and polarizability etc. were determined using conventional methods and standard formulae. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied on the optical absorption spectra of the glasses to evaluate the three phenomenological intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6. The value of Ω2 was found to be highest for glass with 1 mol% Sm2O3 and attributed to the asymmetry of the ligand field at the rare earth ion site and the rare earth oxygen (Sm-O) covalency. The calculated intensity parameters and fluorescence spectra were further used to predict the radiative transition probability (A), radiative lifetime (τR), branching ratio (βR), peak wavelength (λp), effective line widths (Δλeff) and stimulated emission cross-section (σ) for the characteristic 4G5/2 → 6H5/2, 6H7/2 and 6H9/2 transitions of the Sm3+ ion. Concentration quenching was observed for 2 mol% concentration of Sm2O3 and ascribed to energy transfer through various cross-relaxation channels between Sm3+ ions. Reasonably high values of branching ratios and stimulated emission cross-section for the prepared glasses points towards their utility in the development of visible lasers emitting in the reddish-orange spectral region. However, the glass with 1 mol% Sm2O3 was found to show better radiative properties.

  6. Fluorometric determination of samarium and europium in rare earth minerals with. beta. -diketoneternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H; Hiraki, K; Nishikawa, Y [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1981-07-01

    This communication reported the optimum conditions for the fluorometric determination of these ions, and the method was adopted in the simultaneous determination of samarium and europium in xenotime and monazite minerals. From the experimental results on the effect of diverse ions and the extraction pH of the aqueous phase, it became clear that TTA-TOPO hexane method was the best system for the determination of samarium and europium because of the highest fluorescence sensitivity of the ternary complex, and also because the lower extraction pH eliminated the effect of diverse ions. Moreover, the very high detection limit (2 ppb) of Sm was achieved by the use of a red sensitive photomultiplier. Which was used at 644 nm, and that of Eu (0.02 ppb) at 614 nm. The procedure was established as follows: The rare earth minerals (xenotime, monazite) sample was treated with hot conc. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and twice precipitated with 0.5 mol dm/sup -3/ oxalic acid (pH was adjusted to 2.0 -- 2.2). Then the precipitate was filtered and ignited to give the rare earth oxide. Fifty milligrams of the oxide was dissolved in HCl and diluted with water in order to obtain the solution containing 5 ..mu..g cm/sup -3/ rare earth oxide. An aliquot of the solution ((1.0 -- 3.0) cm/sup 3/) was adjusted to pH 5.5 with sodium acetate and shaken with 1 x 10/sup -4/ mol dm/sup -3/ TTA- 2 x 10/sup -2/ mol dm/sup -3/ TOPO hexane solution. Then the fluorescence intensity of the organic layer was measured at 644 nm for Sm and 614 nm for Eu. In this procedure, the recovery of Sm and Eu was found to be about 96%. Xenotime contained 0.70% of Sm and 0.004% of Eu, and monazite contained 1.84% of Sm and 0.003% of Eu.

  7. 4 CFR 28.130 - General authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Corrective Action, Disciplinary and Stay Proceedings § 28.130 General authority. The procedures in this subpart relate to the Board's functions “to consider, decide and order corrective or disciplinary action...

  8. 21 CFR 163.130 - Milk chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CACAO PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cacao Products § 163.130 Milk chocolate. (a..., flavorings, or seasonings specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section are used in the breakfast cocoa, the...

  9. HC-130 Wing Life Raft Replacement Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scher, Bob

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) uses HC-130 aircraft for search and rescue (SAR) and other missions. The aircraft are presently equipped with two to four 20 person inflatable life rafts, stowed in cells in the wings...

  10. Cross sections for d-{sup 3}H neutron interactions with samarium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Junhua; He, Long [Hexi Univ., Zhangye (China). School of Physics and Electromechanical Engineering; Wu, Chunlei; Jiang, Li [Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China). Inst. of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry

    2016-11-01

    The cross sections for (n,x) reactions on samarium isotopes were measured at (d-T) neutron energies of 13.5 and 14.8 MeV with the activation technique. Samples were activated along with Nb and Al monitor foils to determine the incident neutron flux. Theoretical calculations of excitation functions were performed using the nuclear model codes TALYS-1.6 and EMPIRE-3.2 Malta with default parameters, at neutron energies varying from the reaction threshold to 20 MeV. The results were discussed and compared with experimental data found in the literature. At neutron energies 13.5 and 14.8 MeV, the cross sections of the {sup 149}Sm(n,p){sup 149}Pm reaction are reported for the first time. The cross sections of the {sup 150}Sm(n,p){sup 150}Pm, {sup 144}Sm(n,p){sup 144}Pm, {sup 152}Sm(n,α){sup 149}Nd and {sup 144}Sm(n,α){sup 141}Nd reactions at different neutron energies reported in the present work can be added as new data in the nuclear databases.

  11. Solar Hydrogen Production via a Samarium Oxide-Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic analysis of a samarium oxide-based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting cycle is reported. The analysis is performed using HSC chemistry software and databases. The first (solar-based step drives the thermal reduction of Sm2O3 into Sm and O2. The second (non-solar step corresponds to the production of H2 via a water splitting reaction and the oxidation of Sm to Sm2O3. The equilibrium thermodynamic compositions related to the thermal reduction and water splitting steps are determined. The effect of oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas on the thermal reduction temperature (TH is examined. An analysis based on the second law of thermodynamics is performed to determine the cycle efficiency (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion efficiency (ηsolar−to−fuel attainable with and without heat recuperation. The results indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar−to−fuel both increase with decreasing TH, due to the reduction in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas. Furthermore, the recuperation of heat for the operation of the cycle significantly improves the solar reactor efficiency. For instance, in the case where TH = 2280 K, ηcycle = 24.4% and ηsolar−to−fuel = 29.5% (without heat recuperation, while ηcycle = 31.3% and ηsolar−to−fuel = 37.8% (with 40% heat recuperation.

  12. Charge and transition densities of samarium isotopes in the interacting Boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinester, M.A.; Alster, J.; Dieperink, A.E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The interacting boson approximation (IBA) model has been used to interpret the ground-state charge distributions and lowest 2 + transition charge densities of the even samarium isotopes for A = 144-154. Phenomenological boson transition densities associated with the nucleons comprising the s-and d-bosons of the IBA were determined via a least squares fit analysis of charge and transition densities in the Sm isotopes. The application of these boson trasition densities to higher excited 0 + and 2 + states of Sm, and to 0 + and 2 + transitions in neighboring nuclei, such as Nd and Gd, is described. IBA predictions for the transition densities of the three lowest 2 + levels of 154 Gd are given and compared to theoretical transition densities based on Hartree-Fock calculations. The deduced quadrupole boson transition densities are in fair agreement with densities derived previously from 150 Nd data. It is also shown how certain moments of the best fit boson transition densities can simply and sucessfully describe rms radii, isomer shifts, B(E2) strengths, and transition radii for the Sm isotopes. (orig.)

  13. Development and evaluation of copper-67 and samarium-153 labeled conjugates for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Joshi, V.; Kolsky, K.; Sweet, M.; Steplewski, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The potential of utilizing receptor-specific agents such as monoclonal antibodies (MAb), and MAb-derived smaller molecules, as carriers of radionuclides for the selective destruction of tumors has stimulated much research activity. The success of such applications depends on many factors, especially the tumor binding properties of the antibody reagent, the efficiency of labeling and in-vivo stability of the radioconjugate and, on the careful choice of the radionuclide best suited to treat the tumor under consideration. The radiolabeled antibody technique for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), however, has experienced many limitations, and its success has not matched the expectations that were raised more than a decade ago. The problems that have been identified include: (i) degradation of antibody immunoreactivity resulting from chemical manipulations required for labeling; (ii) lack of suitable radioisotopes and methods for stable attachment of the radiolabel; (iii) in-vivo instability of the radioimmunoconjugates; (iv) excessive accumulation of activity in non-target locations; and (v) lack of radioimmunoconjugate accessibility to cells internal to a tumor mass. A careful choice of the radionuclide(s) best suited to treat the tumor under consideration is one of the most important requirements for successful radioimmunotherapy. This study evaluates copper 67 and samarium 153 for tumor radioimmunotherapy

  14. Enhancement of the fluorescence of the samarium (III) complex by gadolinium (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun-Xiang, C.; Zhang-Hua, L.

    1988-01-01

    The increase in sensitivity and selectivity of reactions in which colored species are formed by the addition of different metal ions is an area of research that has recently been developed. This phenomenon, which is sometimes called cocolaration effect, has been explained by the formation of mixed metal complex. The authors found an analogous phenomenon of reactions forming fluorescent complexes. The complexes of Sm(III)-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA)-phenanthroline (Phen)-Triton-X-100 (TX-100) and Gd(III) (or La(III), Lu(III) and Y(III))-TTA-Phen-TX-100 had practically no fluorescence separately. Instead, a fluorescence-enhancement phenomenon caused by adding Gd or La, Lu and Y ions to the system was observed for the first time. The intensity of the enhanced fluorescence of Sm(III) complex was increased in the following order: La< Y< Lu< Gd. By analogy with cocoloration effect, the authors call this new fluorescence-enhancement phenomenon the co-fluorescence effect. The object of this work was to study the enhancement effect of Gd(III) on the fluorescence of the Sm(III)-TTA-Phen-TX-100 system. The recommended fluorimetric method has been applied to the determination of trace amounts of samarium in ytterbium oxide with satisfactory results. A general reaction mechanism for the system studied was proposed

  15. Pharmacokinetics of labelled compounds with technetium-99m and samarium-153

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borda O, L.B.; Torres L, M.N.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish the different pharmacokinetics parameters of the main radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and samarium-153. These parameters could be subsequently used as reference to compare other products with the same use. Mathematical models and a computerized pharmacokinetic program were used to this purpose. A biodistribution study in quadruplicate and/or quintuplicate was conducted for each radiopharmaceutical, data was was obtained in injection dose percentages. The biodistribution study involved the injection of a predetermined dose of the radiopharmaceutical into animals (rats or mice), which were subsequently put away at different time intervals, removing the relevant organs. Activity in each organ was read by means of a well-type NaI scintillation counter, data obtained in activity counts was transformed into injection dose percentages. Based on these percentages, the mathematical model was constructed and the pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained using the computerized program Expo 2 v. 1, which is written in C language and works in windows. Analyzing the results obtained, we can conclude that the use of the Expo 2 v. 1 program for a bi compartmental analysis allowed us to obtain reliable pharmacokinetic parameters which describe what happens in the organism when the radiopharmaceutical passes from the central compartment to the peripheral one and vice versa

  16. Memory effect of calcined layered samarium hydroxy chlorides in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Il; Byeon, Song Ho

    2015-01-01

    The decomposition and recovery behavior of layered samarium hydroxychloride (Sm 2 (OH) 5 Cl·nH 2 O, LSmH) has been closely studied in various conditions. Although the heat treatment of LSmH at 700 °C completely collapsed typical layered structure, the calcined LSmH (c-LSmH) recovered its layered characteristics and consequently its ability to intercalate anions into the interlayer space when it was rehydroxylated and rehydrated in aqueous solutions containing organic and inorganic anions. This phenomenon is similar to the memory effect observed in classical layered double hydroxides (LDHs), where LDHs calcined to a mixture of metal oxides can recover their layered structures in aqueous solutions. In contrast, the recovery reaction of c-LSmH in water without any counter anions was unsuccessful and instead resulted in the formation of Sm(OH) 3 . Such a difference was interpreted on the basis of the salt effect on Sm 2 (OH) 5 Cl·nH 2 O–Sm(OH) 3 phase equilibria in water

  17. Characterization of luminescent samarium doped HfO2 coatings synthesized by spray pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon-Roa, C; Guzman-Mendoza, J; Aguilar-Frutis, M; Garcia-Hipolito, M; Alvarez-Fragoso, O; Falcony, C

    2008-01-01

    Trivalent samarium (Sm 3+ ) doped hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) films were deposited using the spray pyrolysis deposition technique. The films were deposited on Corning glass substrates at temperatures ranging from 300 to 550 deg. C using chlorides as raw materials. Films, mostly amorphous, were obtained when deposition temperatures were below 350 deg. C. However, for temperatures higher than 400 deg. C, the films became polycrystalline, presenting the HfO 2 monoclinic phase. Scanning electron microscopy of the films revealed a rough surface morphology with spherical particles. Also, electron energy dispersive analysis was performed on these films. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence characteristics of the HfO 2 : SmCl 3 films, measured at room temperature, exhibited four main bands centred at 570, 610, 652 and 716 nm, which are due to the well-known intra-4f transitions of the Sm 3+ ion. It was found that the overall emission intensity rose as the deposition temperature was increased. Furthermore, a concentration quenching of the luminescence intensity was also observed

  18. Effect of Zinc Oxide Doping on Electroluminescence and Electrical Behavior of Metalloporphyrins-Doped Samarium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghouri, Mohammad; Amini, Mostafa M.

    2018-02-01

    Samarium complex [(Sm(III)] as a new host material was used for preparation of red organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Devices with configurations of indium-doped tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):(poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS (50 nm)/polyvinyl carbazole (PVK):[zinc oxide (ZnO)] (50 nm)/[(Sm(III)]:[zinc(II) 2,3-tetrakis(dihydroxyphenyl)-porphyrin and Pt(II) 2,3-dimethoxyporphyrin] (60 nm)/2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) (15 nm)/Al (150 nm) have been fabricated and investigated. An electroplex occurring at the (PVK/Sm: Pt(II) 2,3-dimethoxyporphyrin) interface has been suggested when ZnO nanoparticles were doped in PVK. OLED studies have revealed that the photophysical characteristics and electrical behavior of devices with ZnO nanoparticles are much better than those of devices with pure PVK. The efficiency of devices based on [(Sm(III)] was superior than that of known aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) and also our earlier reports on red OLEDs under the same conditions.

  19. Pyroelectric properties and electrical conductivity in samarium doped BiFeO 3 ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Yingbang

    2012-06-01

    Samarium (Sm 3+) doped BiFeO 3 (BFO) ceramics were prepared by a modified solid-state-reaction method which adopted a rapid heating as well as cooling during the sintering process. The pyroelectric coefficient increased from 93 to 137 μC/m 2 K as the Sm 3+ doping level increased from 1 mol% to 8 mol%. Temperature dependence of the pyroelectric coefficient showed an abrupt decrease above 80 °C in all samples, which was associated with the increase of electrical conductivity with temperature. This electrical conduction was attributed to oxygen vacancy existing in the samples. An activation energy of ∼0.7 eV for the conduction process was found to be irrespective of the Sm 3+ doping level. On the other hand, the magnetic Néel temperature (T N) decreased with increasing Sm 3+ doping level. On the basis of our results, the effects of Sm doping level on the pyroelectric and electrical properties of the BFO were revealed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Detonation nanodiamond introduced into samarium doped ceria electrolyte improving performance of solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Kai; Li, Hongdong; Zou, Guangtian; Yu, Richeng; Zhao, Haofei; Shen, Xi; Wang, Liying; Song, Yanpeng; Qiu, Dongchao

    2017-02-01

    A novel electrolyte materials of introducing detonation nanodiamond (DNDs) into samarium doped ceria (SDC) is reported here. 1%wt. DNDs doping SDC (named SDC/ND) can enlarge the electrotyle grain size and change the valence of partial ceria. DNDs provide the widen channel to accelerate the mobility of oxygen ions in electrolyte. Larger grain size means that oxygen ions move easier in electrolyte, it can also reduce the alternating current (AC) impedance spectra of internal grains. The lower valence of partial Ce provides more oxygen vacancies to enhance mobility rate of oxygen ions. Hence all of them enhance the transportation of oxygen ions in SDC/ND electrolyte and the OCV. Ultimately the power density of SOFC can reach 762 mw cm-2 at 800 °C (twice higher than pure SDC, which is 319 mw cm-2 at 800 °C), and it remains high power density in the intermediate temperature (600-800 °C). It is relatively high for the electrolyte supported (300 μm) cells.

  1. Retention capacity of samarium (III) in zircon for it possible use in retaining walls for confinement of nuclear residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, N.

    2006-01-01

    Mexico, as country that produces part of its electric power by nuclear means, should put special emphasis in the development of technologies guided to the sure and long term confinement of the high level nuclear residuals. This work studies the capacity that has the natural zircon to retain to the samarium (III) in solution, by what due, firstly, to characterize the zircon for technical instrumental to determine the purity and characteristic of the mineral in study. The instrumental techniques that were used to carry out the physicochemical characterization were the neutron activation analysis (NAA), the infrared spectroscopy (IS), the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), semiquantitative analysis, dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and luminescence technique. The characterization of the surface properties carries out by means of the determination of the surface area using the BET multipoint technique, acidity constants, hydration time, the determination of the point of null charge (pH PCN ) and density of surface sites (D s ). The luminescence techniques were useful to determine the optimal point hydration of the zircon and for the quantification of the samarium, for that here intends the development of both analysis techniques. With the adjustment of the titration curves in the FITEQL 4 package the constants of surface acidity in the solid/liquid interface were determined. To the finish of this study it was corroborated that the zircon is a mineral that presents appropriate characteristics to be proposed as a contention barrier for the deep geologic confinement. With regard to the study of adsorption that one carries out the samarium retention it is superior to 90% under the described conditions. This investigation could also be applicable in the confinement of dangerous industrial residuals. (Author)

  2. Determination of the nuclear electric charge distribution of samarium isotopes 144, 148, 150, 152, 154 by the muonic atom method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreau, Pierre.

    1977-01-01

    The theory of the nucleus-negative muon system in the case of electrical interactions is discussed. The interactions of muons with the samarium isotopes 152, 154, 144, 148, 150 are investigated. After a description of the experimental device, from muon beam production to data acquisition (detection of the gamma spectra), the results are analyzed and the nuclear charge distribution parameters determined: for each isotope the absolute value of c (half-density radius) and t (skin thickness); for 152 Sm and 154 Sm the parameter β 2 (quadrupolar defomation). Nuclear polarization was accounted for throughout the analysis [fr

  3. High spin structure in 130Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Kaur, Navneet; Kumar, A.; Singh, Varinderjit; Sandal, Rohit; Kaur, Rajbir; Behera, B.R.; Singh, K.P.; Singh, G.; Shukla, Aaradhya; Sharma, H.P.; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar Raja, M.; Madhusudan Rao, P.V.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Kumar, Rakesh; Madhvan, M.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclei with mass A ∼130 has been of great interest to experimental studies on high spin states. This is particularly so for the nuclei in the A∼130 region which exhibit a softness to γ. Evidence for characteristics such as shape coexistence and γ-softness has been gathered during the last two decades for many nuclei from Xe to Nd. Another interesting feature of this mass region is the existence of a regular M1 band which has been considered to be a promising candidate for magnetic rotation. In several nuclei of the A ∼130 mass region M1 bands like those observed in the A < 200 mass region are known. One signature of magnetic rotation is the decrease of the B (M1) values with increasing spin. The aim of the work is to study the high spin states and lifetime measurements using the DSAM technique

  4. Fabrication and properties of samarium doped calcium sulphate thin films using spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reghima, Meriem [Université Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, LR99ES13 Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), 2092 Tunis, Tunisie (Tunisia); Institut d' Electronique et des systèmes, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i) – Université Montpellier, 860 rue de Saint Priest, Bâtiment 5, 34097 Montpellier (France); Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, Université de Carthage, Zarzouna 7021 (Tunisia); Guasch, Cathy [Institut d' Electronique et des systèmes, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i) – Université Montpellier, 860 rue de Saint Priest, Bâtiment 5, 34097 Montpellier (France); Azzaza, Sonia; Alleg, Safia [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Spectroscopie des Solides (LM2S), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Badji Mokhtar Annaba, B.P. 12, 23000 Annaba (Algeria); Kamoun-Turki, Najoua [Université Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, LR99ES13 Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), 2092 Tunis, Tunisie (Tunisia)

    2016-10-01

    Using low cost spray pyrolysis technique, polycrystalline CaSO{sub 4} thin films were successfully grown on a glass substrate with a thickness of about 1 μm. Samarium doping has been performed on CaSO{sub 4} thin films to explore luminescence properties. The characterizations of these films were carried out using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical measurements. The structural analyses reveal the existence of hexagonal CaSO{sub 4} phase with a (200) preferred orientation belonging to CaS compound for substrate temperatures below 350 °C. It is shown that the crystallinity of the sprayed thin films can be improved by increasing substrate temperature up to 250 °C. Warren-Averbach analysis has been applied on X-ray diffractogram to determine structural parameters involving the phase with its amount, the grain size and the lattice parameters using Maud software. The surface topography shows a rough surface covered by densely packed agglomerated clusters having faceted and hexagonal shapes. Energy dispersive microscopy measurements confirm the presence of calcium and sulfur in equal proportions as well as high percentage of oxygen. Photoluminescence at room temperature revealed that luminescence peaks are attributed to the intrinsic emission of pure CaSO{sub 4} phase. - Highlights: • Warren Averbach analysis reveal the presence of hcp structure of CaSO{sub 4} phase. • A mixture of CaSO{sub 4} and CaHO{sub 4.5}S phases has been detected for lower T{sub s}. • For increasing T{sub s}, the CaHO{sub 4.5}S phase has been disappeared. • The origin of PL peaks has been identified.

  5. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandiwana, Vusani, E-mail: VMandiwana@csir.co.za; Kalombo, Lonji, E-mail: LKalombo@csir.co.za [Centre of Polymers and Composites, CSIR (South Africa); Venter, Kobus, E-mail: Kobus.Venter@mrc.ac.za [South African Medical Research Council (South Africa); Sathekge, Mike, E-mail: Mike.Sathekge@up.ac.za [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine (South Africa); Grobler, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Grobler@nwu.ac.za; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn, E-mail: zeevaart@necsa.co.za [North-West University, DST/NWU Preclinical Drug Development Platform (South Africa)

    2015-09-15

    Developing nanoparticulate delivery systems that will allow easy movement and localization of a drug to the target tissue and provide more controlled release of the drug in vivo is a challenge in nanomedicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing samarium-153 oxide ([{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in vivo to prove that orally administered nanoparticles alter the biodistribution of a drug. These were then activated in a nuclear reactor to produce radioactive {sup 153}Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, and morphology. The nanoparticles were orally and intravenously (IV) administered to rats in order to trace their uptake through imaging and biodistribution studies. The {sup 153}Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles had an average size of 281 ± 6.3 nm and a PDI average of 0.22. The zeta potential ranged between 5 and 20 mV. The [{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} loaded PLGA nanoparticles, orally administered were distributed to most organs at low levels, indicating that there was absorption of nanoparticles. While the IV injected [{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded PLGA nanoparticles exhibited the highest localization of nanoparticles in the spleen (8.63 %ID/g) and liver (3.07 %ID/g), confirming that nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood by the RES, leading to rapid uptake in the liver and spleen. From the biodistribution data obtained, it is clear that polymeric nanoscale delivery systems would be suitable for improving permeability and thus the bioavailability of therapeutic compounds.

  6. Study of samarium modified lead zirconate titanate and nickel zinc ferrite composite system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Rekha [Department of Physics, SD PG College, Panipat 132103 (India); School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004 (India); Juneja, J.K., E-mail: jk_juneja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Hindu College, Sonepat 131001 (India); Singh, Sangeeta [Department of Physics, GVM Girls College, Sonepat 131001 (India); Raina, K.K. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004 (India); Prakash, Chandra [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Timarpur, Delhi 110054 (India)

    2015-03-15

    In the present work, composites of samarium substituted lead zirconate titanate and nickel zinc ferrite with compositional formula 0.95Pb{sub 1−3x/2} Sm{sub x}Zr{sub 0.65}Ti{sub 0.35}O{sub 3}–0.05Ni{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03) were prepared by the conventional solid state route. X-ray diffraction analysis was carried out to confirm the coexistence of individual phases. Microstructural study was done by using scanning electron microscope. Dielectric constant and loss were studied as a function of temperature and frequency. To study ferroelectric and magnetic properties of the composite samples, corresponding P–E and M–H hysteresis loops were recorded. Change in magnetic properties of electrically poled composite sample (x=0.02) was studied to confirm the magnetoelectric (ME) coupling. ME coefficient (dE/dH) of the samples (x=0 and 0.02) was measured as a function of DC magnetic field. - Highlights: • We are reporting the effect of Sm substitution on PZT–NiZn ferrite composites. • Observation of both P–E and M–H loops confirms ferroelectric and magnetic ordering. • With Sm substitution, significant improvement in properties was observed. • Increase in magnetization for electrically poled sample is evidence of ME coupling. • Electric polarization is generated by applying magnetic field.

  7. The effectiveness of samarium-153 (153Sm) lexidronam (EDTMP) in treatment of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yubo; Huang Gang; Liu Jianjun

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of samarium-153 (153Sm) lexidronam (EDTMP) in treatment of bone metastases. Methods: 380 patients with bone metastases were studied (221 men, 159 women; average age 65.3 y; ranged 27-91 y; average weight 59.3 kg, ranged 39-95 kg). The tumor types were prostate carcinoma (n=155), pulmonary carcinoma (n=92), breast cancer (n=57), gastric carcinoma (n=12), colorectal carcinoma (n=22), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (n=8), lymphoma (n=8), hepatic carcinoma (n=6), ovary carcinoma (n=4) and others (n=16). All patients were received 135Sm-EDTMP 0.8 or 1.0 mCi/kg during 1 to 7 course of treatment. Patients and physician evaluations were used to assess pain relief. Numbers of metastatic foci and activity of ROIs were used to observe post-therapy change in bone scanning. Results: In 380 patients, pain relief was observed in 257 patients (67.6%). Persistence of pain relief was seen through 2 to 24 weeks. The mean relief time is 5.8±3.4 weeks. KPS score was higher 10% than pre-therapy (71.2%±9.6% Vs 80.9%±10.3%, p<0.001). Numbers of metastatic foci (11.2+8.8 Vs 8.4±5.7, p<0.001) and activity of ROIs (3.28±2.04 Vs 2.15±0.94, p<0.01) were less than pre-therapy. Bone marrow suppression was mild and reversible (5.87±1.56 Vs 4.94±1.16 x 109/L). Conclusions: 153Sm-EDTMP provided relief of pain associated with bone metastases and inhibition of metastatic foci. As a relief drug of painful bone metastases, 153Sm-EDTMP is safe and effective. (authors)

  8. 21 CFR 161.130 - Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... water. Before packing into the containers for shipment or other delivery for consumption the oysters are... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND SHELLFISH Requirements for Specific Standardized Fish and Shellfish § 161.130 Oysters. (a...

  9. 40 CFR 130.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AND MANAGEMENT § 130.2 Definitions. (a) The Act. The Clean Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et... its existing or future point sources of pollution. WLAs constitute a type of water quality-based effluent limitation. (i) Total maximum daily load (TMDL). The sum of the individual WLAs for point sources...

  10. ECC2K-130 on NVIDIA GPUs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, D.J.; Chen, H.-C.; Cheng, C.M.; Lange, T.; Niederhagen, R.F.; Schwabe, P.; Yang, B.Y.

    2012-01-01

    [Updated version of paper at Indocrypt 2010] A major cryptanalytic computation is currently underway on multiple platforms, including standard CPUs, FPGAs, PlayStations and GPUs, to break the Certicom ECC2K-130 challenge. This challenge is to compute an elliptic-curve discrete logarithm on a Koblitz

  11. ECC2K-130 on NVIDIA GPUs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, D.J.; Chen, H.-C.; Cheng, C.M.; Lange, T.; Niederhagen, R.F.; Schwabe, P.; Yang, B.Y.; Gong, G.; Gupta, K.C.

    2010-01-01

    A major cryptanalytic computation is currently underway on multiple platforms, including standard CPUs, FPGAs, PlayStations and Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), to break the Certicom ECC2K-130 challenge. This challenge is to compute an elliptic-curve discrete logarithm on a Koblitz curve over $\\rm

  12. 34 CFR 668.130 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... assistance who must, under § 668.33(a)(2), produce evidence from the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) that they are permanent residents of the United States or in the United States for..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Immigration-Status Confirmation § 668.130...

  13. Double beta decay of tellurium-130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.F.; Manuel, O.K.; Sinha, B.; Thorpe, R.I.

    1986-01-01

    The isotopic composition of xenon is reported in four, neutron-irradiated tellurium minerals - tellurobismuthite from Boliden, Sweden, native tellurium from the Good Hope Mine of Gunnison County, Colorado, altaite from the Kirkland Lake area, Ontario, and altaite from the Mattagami Lake area, Quebec. From the amount of radiogenic 130 Xe and pile-produced 131 Xe in these samples, it is concluded that the half-life of 130 Te for ββ-decay is 21 y based on measured values of (1.0+-0.3) . 10 21 y and higher. Our results demonstrate that there has been no significant partial leakage of radiogenic 130 Xe from these minerals over geologic time. Larger values of Tsub(1/2), as indicated from some of the analysis reported here and in other studies, are attributed to recrystallization of the soft telluride minerals and complete resetting of the Te-Xe system after mineralization. The value obtained here for the half-life of 130 Te is substantiated by recent measurements on xenon in tellurides from Kalgoorlie, Western Australia. (orig.)

  14. 27 CFR 28.130 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Withdrawal of Wine Without Payment of Tax for Exportation, Use on Vessels and Aircraft, Transfer to a Foreign-Trade Zone or to a Customs Bonded Warehouse, or Transportation to a Manufacturing Bonded Warehouse Return of Wines to Bonded Wine Cellar § 28.130 General. On...

  15. 13 CFR 130.100 - Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....100 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS § 130.100 Introduction. (a) Objective. The SBDC Program creates a broad-based system of assistance for the small business community by linking the resources of Federal, State and local governments with the...

  16. 40 CFR 761.130 - Sampling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 761.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... sampling scheme is that it is designed to characterize the degree of contamination within the entire.... For this purpose, the numerical level of cleanup required for spills cleaned in accordance with § 761...

  17. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... on duty each day of operation of the adult day health care program. This nurse must be currently... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program... to meet the total nursing care needs, as determined by participant assessment and individualized...

  18. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a tantalum boat for the determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daidoji, Hidehiro; Tamura, Shohei

    1982-01-01

    The determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprodium by means of graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was studied by a tantalum boat inserted into a graphite tube atomizer. These elements could not be determined by the use of a commercial graphite tube, In the atomization from a tantalum boat, better analytical sensitivities and negligible memory effects for these rare earths are obtained. The analytical sensitivities of yttrium, samarium, and dysprodium with the tantalum boat were 0.60 ng, 0.86 ng, and 0.17 ng respectively. This method was applied for the determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal. The measurements were performed with slightly acidified solutions (0.01 mol dm 3 HCI or HNO 3 ). The sensitivities and the precisions for these elements decreased with increasing acid concentration. An enhancement in the sensitivities of yttrium and dysprosium upon the addition of a large excess of lanthanum, neodymium, and praseodymium salts were observed. The yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal were determined with both analytical curves of standard solutions containing an excess of lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium ions and of the standard addition. The precisions for this work were in the 3 - 9.3% range. (author)

  19. Optical properties and electronic transitions of zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauly, N; Yubero, F; Espinós, J P

    2017-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic transitions of four oxides, namely zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide, are determined in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy using primary electron energies in the range 0.3-2.0 ke...

  20. An estimation of influence of humic acid and organic matter originated from bentonite on samarium solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaji, Mariko; Sato, Haruo; Sasahira, Akira

    1999-10-01

    Organic acids in groundwater are considered to form complexes and increase the solubility of radionuclides released from vitrified waste in a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. To investigate whether the solubility of samarium (Sm) is influenced by organic substances, we measured Sm solubility in the presence of different organic substances and compared those values with results from thermodynamic predictions. Humic acid (Aldrich) is commercially available and soluble organic matter originated from bentonite were used as organic substances in this study. Consequently, the solubility of Sm showed a tendency to apparently increase with increasing the concentration of humic acid, but in the presence of carbonate, thermodynamic predictions suggested that the dominant species are carbonate complexes and that the effect of organic substances are less than that of carbonate. Based on total organic carbon (TOC), the increase of Sm solubility measured with humic acid (Aldrich) was more significant than that in the case with soluble organic matter originated from bentonite. Since bentonite is presumed to include also simple organic matters of which stability constant for forming complexes is low, the effect of soluble organic matter originated from bentonite on the solubility of Sm is considered to be less effective than that of humic acid (Aldrich). Experimental values were compared with model prediction, proposed by Kim, based on data measured in a low pH region. Tentatively we calculated the increase in Sm solubility assuming complexation with humic acid. Trial calculations were carried out on the premise that the complexation reaction of metal ion with humic acid is based on neutralization process by 1-1 complexation. In this process, it was assumed that one metal ion coordinates with one unit of complexation sites which number of proton exchange sites is equal to ionic charge. Consequently, Kim's model indicated that carbonate complexes should be dominant

  1. Anchoring samarium oxide nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide for high-performance supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: ganjali@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Hamid Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Samarium oxide nanoparticles have been anchored on the surface of reduced graphene oxide for the first time. • Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RGO nanocomposite show high capacitance, good rate and cycling performance. • Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RGO nanocomposite can serve as efficient electrode material for energy storage. • The best composite electrode exhibits specific capacitance of 321 F g{sup −1} in 2 mV s{sup −1}. - Abstract: We have synthesized Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (SmNs) and anchored them onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) through a self-assembly thereof by utilizing a facile sonochemical procedure. The nanomaterials were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As the next step, the supercapacitive behavior of the resulting nanocomposites were investigated when used as electrode material, through with cyclic voltammetric (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The SmNs decorated RGO (SmN-RGO) nanocomposites were found to possess a specific capacitance (SC) of 321 F g{sup −1} when used in a 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution as an electrolyte, in a scan rate of 2 mV s{sup −1}. The SC of the SmN-RGO based electrodes were also found to be 268 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 2 A g{sup −1} through galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The outstanding properties of the SmN-RGOs were attributed to synergy of the high charge mobility of SmNs and the flexibility of the sheets of RGOs. Additionally, the nano-composite revealed a unique cycling durability (maintaining 99% of its SC even after 4000 cycles).

  2. Fluorescence properties of europium and samarium. beta. -diketonates and their use in fluorometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H; Hiraki, K; Nishikawa, Y [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1981-01-01

    Several europium and samarium ..beta..-diketonates (tta, ntfa, bfa) complexed with 1, 10-phenanthroline, or with trioctylphosphine oxide (topo) were synthesized. The fluorescence properties of these compounds in benzene or hexane have been studied. Absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yield, fluorescence sensitivity index (F.S.I.), and fluorescence lifetime were measured. From the measurement of fluorescence lifetime of the ..beta..-diketonates, the velocity of radiative process (k sub(f)/phi sub(f)) has almost the same value for benzene and hexane solvent. The red fluorescence (Em. max. : 619 nm) of Eu(III) in these chelates is attributed to transitions from /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 2/ levels of this ion, and the three-band spectrum (Em. max. : 569 nm, 606 nm, 650 nm) indicates the transitions from the /sup 4/G sub(5/2) ..-->.. /sup 6/H sub(5/2), /sup 4/G sub(5/2) ..-->.. /sup 6/H sub(7/2), and /sup 4/G sub(5/2) ..-->.. /sup 6/H sub(9/2) levels of Sm(III), respectively. These spectra are not changed by any solvents and ligands. From the results, the fluorescence of the ..beta..-diketonates in organic solvent has been attributed to m* ..-->.. m luminescence transition. The complexes of Eu(III) and Sm(III) show radiative transition within orbitals, composed exclusively of 4f orbitals of rare earth ions (m* ..-->.. m radiative transition). Fluorinated ligands show better sensitivity than unfluorinated ligands, and the best sensitivity is obtained with TTA-phen system, and/or TTA-topo system for the spectrofluorometric determination of the two metals. In the case of Eu determination, 619 nm emission wavelength is used (the determinable range : 0.2 -- 10 ppb Eu), and in the case of Sm determination, 650 nm emission wavelength is adopted (the determinable range : 0.1 -- 1 ppm Sm), because of much higher sensitivity than the other two peaks (569, 606 nm) without interference from europium complex.

  3. 130-nm tunable grating-mirror VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    configuration instead of the extended cavity configuration can bring 130-nm tuning range around 1330-nm wavelength. The air-coupled cavity is known to reduce the quantum confinement factor in VCSELs, increasing threshold. In our air-coupled cavity HCG VCSEL case, the very short power penetration length...... in the HCG minimizes this reduction of the quantum confinement factor, not as significant as in the air-coupled cavity DBR VCSEL....

  4. The dynamics of the laser-induced metal-semiconductor phase transition of samarium sulfide (SmS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaempfer, Tino

    2009-01-01

    The present thesis is dedicated to the experimental study of the metal-semiconductor phase transition of samarium sulfide (SmS): Temperature- and time-resolved experiments on the characterization of the phase transition of mixed-valence SmS samples (M-SmS) are presented. The measurement of the dynamics of the laser-induced phase transition pursues via time-resolved ultrashort-time microscopy and by X-ray diffraction with sub-picosecond time resolution. The electronic and structural processes, which follow an excitation of M-SmS with infrared femtosecond laser pulses, are physically interpreted on the base of the results obtained in this thesis and model imaginations. [de

  5. Thermodynamics of coproportionation reactions of homogeneous samarium (3) and yttrium (3) nitrates solvates with neutral organic phosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyartman, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    Reaction heats of homogeneous samarium (3) and yttrium (3) nitrate solvates coproportionation with neutral organophosphoric compounds (tri-n.-butylphosphate, diisooctylmethylphosphonate, diisoamylmethylphosphonate) at T=298.15 K in hexane have been measured by thermochemical method. It has been ascertained that enthalpies of coproportionation reactions practically do not depend on the nature, concentration of rare earth metal (3) nitrate solvates in hexane, nature of neutral organophosphoric compound and constitute 1.1±-.2 kJ/mol. The Gibbs free energy of coproportionation reactions is -5.43 kJ/mol, while entropy of the reactions in 14.5±0.7 J/mol·K. 8 refs., 1 tab

  6. On the effects of pressure and irradiation on the transport properties of samarium compounds with unstable valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morillo, J.

    1983-06-01

    We present the first extensive study of electronic transport properties of ''quasi-stoichiometric'' SmS as a function of pressure P, temperature T, magnetic field B and defect concentration C. SmS which is a semiconductor, undergoes with increasing P a first order transition towards an homogeneous intermediate valence state. In the semiconducting phase (s.c.), the energie epsilon(f) necessary to delocalize a 4f electron increases greatly with T and is about 250meV at 300K. The phase diagram for the first order electronic transition Sm 2 + →Smsup(2+epsilon) with P has been determined for T 6 has been investigated by resistivity measurements under irradiation at 21K. The threshold energy Ed for displacement of Sm in SmS has been determined: Ed(Sm) = 20 +- 2 eV, and the observed effects of irradiation have been associated to samarium displacements (vacancies and interstitials) [fr

  7. Sorption of samarium in soils: influence of soil properties and Sm concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Guinart, Oriol; Salaberria, Aitor; Rigol, Anna; Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Due to the fact that barriers of Deep Geological Repositories (DGR) may lose efficiency before the radioisotopes present in the High Level Radioactive Waste (HLRW) completely decay, it is possible that, in the long-term, radioactive leachates may escape from the DGR and reach the soil and water compartments in the biosphere. Therefore, it is required to examine the interaction and mobility of radionuclides present in the HLRW, or their chemical analogues, to predict the impact of their eventual incorporation in the biosphere and to assess the derived risk. Although relevant data have been recently obtained for a few radionuclides in soils, there are still some important gaps for some radionuclides, such us for samarium (Sm). Sm is a lanthanide that, besides being considered as a natural analogue of actinides, may also be present in HLRW in the form of the radioactive isotope {sup 151}Sm. The main objective of this work was to obtain sorption data (K{sub d}) of {sup 151}Sm gathered from a set of soil samples physicochemical fully-characterized (pH, texture, cationic exchange capacity, soil solution cationic composition, organic matter, carbonate and metallic oxides content, etc.). Additionally, as an alternative for testing sorption capacity of radionuclides in soils is the use of the corresponding stable isotope or a chemical analogue, the influence of Sm concentration was also checked. To evaluate {sup 151}Sm sorption, batch assays were carried out for each soil sample, which consisted in a pre-equilibration step of 2 g of each soil with 50 ml of double deionised water, and a subsequent equilibration step with the same solution, but labelled with {sup 151}Sm. The activity of {sup 151}Sm in initial and final solutions was measured by liquid scintillation and K{sub d} ({sup 151}Sm) data were calculated. The reversibly sorbed fraction was estimated by the application of a single extraction test, with double deionised water, to soil residues coming from the previous

  8. FUN3D Manual: 13.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bill; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.0, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  9. 21 CFR 136.130 - Milk bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Milk bread, rolls, and buns. 136.130 Section 136.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....130 Milk bread, rolls, and buns. (a) Each of the foods milk bread, milk rolls, and milk buns conforms...

  10. 12 CFR 516.130 - Where are comments filed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Where are comments filed? 516.130 Section 516.130 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY APPLICATION PROCESSING PROCEDURES Comment Procedures § 516.130 Where are comments filed? A commenter must file with the appropriate...

  11. 44 CFR 19.130 - Effect of employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 19.130 Effect of employment opportunities... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of employment opportunities. 19.130 Section 19.130 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY...

  12. 41 CFR 101-4.130 - Effect of employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 101-4.130 Effect of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Effect of employment opportunities. 101-4.130 Section 101-4.130 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  13. 49 CFR 176.130 - Magazine stowage Type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magazine stowage Type A. 176.130 Section 176.130... Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Stowage § 176.130 Magazine stowage Type A. (a) In addition to protecting the Class 1 (explosive) materials and preventing unauthorized access, magazine stowage type A...

  14. 46 CFR 117.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 117.130 Section 117.130... AND ARRANGEMENTS Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment § 117.130 Stowage of survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be: (1) Secured to the vessel by a painter with a float-free link permanently...

  15. 46 CFR 133.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 133.130 Section 133.130... SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.130 Stowage of survival craft. (a) General. Each survival craft must be stowed as follows: (1) Each survival craft must be as close to the accommodation and service...

  16. 46 CFR 180.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 180.130 Section 180.130... TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment § 180.130 Stowage of survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be: (1) Secured to the vessel by a painter with a...

  17. 46 CFR 28.130 - Survival craft equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft equipment. 28.130 Section 28.130 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.130 Survival craft equipment. (a) General. Each item of survival craft equipment must be of good quality, effective for the purpose it is intended to serve, and...

  18. 13 CFR 130.310 - Area of service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Area of service. 130.310 Section 130.310 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS § 130.310 Area of service. The AA/SBDC shall designate in writing the Area of Service of each...

  19. 19 CFR 201.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....130 Section 201.130 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF... Conducted by the U.S. International Trade Commission § 201.130 General prohibitions against discrimination... in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or...

  20. 45 CFR 2490.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General prohibitions against discrimination. 2490.130 Section 2490.130 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION § 2490.130 General prohibitions...

  1. 7 CFR 1493.130 - Recovery of losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recovery of losses. 1493.130 Section 1493.130...) Operations § 1493.130 Recovery of losses. (a) Notification. Upon payment of loss to the exporter or the... by CCC's Payment Guarantee: $4,668.55 Computation of Pro Rata Sharing in Recovery of Losses In...

  2. Ion feedback afterpulses in FEU-130 and XP2020 photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudanin, V.B.; Morozov, V.A.; Morozova, N.V.

    2003-01-01

    Intensities and time distributions of ion feedback afterpulses are studied as a function of the difference of potentials between the photocathode and the first dynodes in FEU-130. The intensities and amplitudes of afterpulses in FEU-130 are found to be appreciably larger than in XP2020, which may limit the use of FEU-130 in some experiments with autocorrelation delayed-coincidence spectrometers

  3. 50 CFR 600.130 - Protection of confidentiality of statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... statistics. 600.130 Section 600.130 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... Fishery Management Councils § 600.130 Protection of confidentiality of statistics. Each Council must establish appropriate procedures for ensuring the confidentiality of the statistics that may be submitted to...

  4. 21 CFR 130.9 - Sulfites in standardized food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfites in standardized food. 130.9 Section 130.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD STANDARDS: GENERAL General Provisions § 130.9 Sulfites in standardized food...

  5. 41 CFR 51-10.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... against discrimination. 51-10.130 Section 51-10.130 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED... THE COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED § 51-10.130 General...

  6. 40 CFR 130.12 - Coordination with other programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination with other programs. 130.12 Section 130.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.12 Coordination with other programs. (a) Relationship...

  7. 7 CFR 1.130 - Meaning of words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meaning of words. 1.130 Section 1.130 Agriculture... Adjudicatory Proceedings Instituted by the Secretary Under Various Statutes § 1.130 Meaning of words. As used in this subpart, words in the singular form shall be deemed to import the plural, and vice versa, as...

  8. Ferrites Ni0,5Zn0,5Fe2O4 doped with samarium: structural analysis, morphological and electromagnetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.C.F.M.; Diniz, A.P.; Viana, K.M.S.; Cornejo, D.R.; Kiminami, R.H.G.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes to investigate the sintering at 1200 deg C/2h of Ni 0.5 Zn 0.5 Fe 2-x Sm x O 4 ferrite doped with 0.05; 0.075 e 0.1 mol of Sm synthesized by combustion reaction to evaluate the performance materials as absorbers of electromagnetic radiation. The influence of the concentration of samarium on the structure, morphology and electromagnetic properties of ferrites was studied. The resulting samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic measurements and reflectivity measurements in the frequency range between 8-12 GHz. The results showed that increasing the concentration of samarium caused a decrease in particle size of the samples, encouraging, therefore, to obtain materials with better values of magnetization and reflectivity, allowing for use as absorbers in narrow-band frequency between 9-10 GHz. (author)

  9. JAEA thermodynamic database for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level and TRU wastes. Refinement of thermodynamic data for trivalent actinoids and samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Fujiwara, Kenso; Yui, Mikazu

    2010-01-01

    Within the scope of the JAEA thermodynamic database project for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive and TRU wastes, the refinement of the thermodynamic data for the inorganic compounds and complexes of trivalent actinoids (actinium(III), plutonium(III), americium(III) and curium(III)) and samarium(III) was carried out. Refinement of thermodynamic data for these elements was based on the thermodynamic database for americium published by the Nuclear Energy Agency in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). Based on the similarity of chemical properties among trivalent actinoids and samarium, complementary thermodynamic data for their species expected under the geological disposal conditions were selected to complete the thermodynamic data set for the performance assessment of geological disposal of radioactive wastes. (author)

  10. Effective visible light-active nitrogen and samarium co-doped BiVO{sub 4} for the degradation of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Min; Niu, Chao [College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shenyang Ligong University, Shenyang 110165 (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: minwang62@msn.com [Shenyang Military General Hospital, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Qianwu; Yang, Changxiu; Zheng, Haoyan [College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shenyang Ligong University, Shenyang 110165 (China)

    2015-11-05

    Nitrogen and samarium co-doped BiVO{sub 4} (N–xSm–BiVO{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized using a sol–gel method with a corn stem template. The physicochemical properties of the resultant N–xSm–BiVO{sub 4} particles were characterized using various methods: XPS, XRD, SEM, BET, and UV–Vis DRS analyses. The visible-light photocatalytic activity was successfully demonstrated by degrading a model dye, namely, methyl orange. The dopant content was optimized, and the nitrogen and samarium co-doped BiVO{sub 4} extended the light absorption spectrum toward the visible region, significantly enhancing the photodegradation of the model dye. The Sm and N co-doped BiVO{sub 4} exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity compared to materials with a single dopant or no dopant. The significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity of the N–Sm co-doped BiVO{sub 4} under visible-light irradiation can be attributed to the synergistic effects of the nitrogen and samarium. - Highlights: • The N–Sm codoped BiVO{sub 4} were synthesized using a sol–gel method with a corn stem template. • The N and Sm codoped BiVO{sub 4} has excellent photocatalytic activity of methyl orange degradation. • The maximum activity was observed when the molar ratio of Sm/Bi was 1.0. • The high photocatalytic activity was caused by the synergistic effects between N doping and Sm doping.

  11. Effective visible light-active nitrogen and samarium co-doped BiVO4 for the degradation of organic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Min; Niu, Chao; Liu, Jun; Wang, Qianwu; Yang, Changxiu; Zheng, Haoyan

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen and samarium co-doped BiVO 4 (N–xSm–BiVO 4 ) nanoparticles were synthesized using a sol–gel method with a corn stem template. The physicochemical properties of the resultant N–xSm–BiVO 4 particles were characterized using various methods: XPS, XRD, SEM, BET, and UV–Vis DRS analyses. The visible-light photocatalytic activity was successfully demonstrated by degrading a model dye, namely, methyl orange. The dopant content was optimized, and the nitrogen and samarium co-doped BiVO 4 extended the light absorption spectrum toward the visible region, significantly enhancing the photodegradation of the model dye. The Sm and N co-doped BiVO 4 exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity compared to materials with a single dopant or no dopant. The significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity of the N–Sm co-doped BiVO 4 under visible-light irradiation can be attributed to the synergistic effects of the nitrogen and samarium. - Highlights: • The N–Sm codoped BiVO 4 were synthesized using a sol–gel method with a corn stem template. • The N and Sm codoped BiVO 4 has excellent photocatalytic activity of methyl orange degradation. • The maximum activity was observed when the molar ratio of Sm/Bi was 1.0. • The high photocatalytic activity was caused by the synergistic effects between N doping and Sm doping

  12. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems; Sorcion de samario en fosfatos de hierro (II) y (III) en sistemas acuosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz F, J C

    2006-07-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  13. Results after therapy of pain from bone metastases with Samarium-153 in our centers in Lima, Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, N.; Eskenazi, S.; Valle, M.P.; Montoya, J.; Castro, M.; Montiel, L.; Velarde, V.; Jauregui, I.; Cueto, C.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: 105 patients with bone metastases from prostate and breast cancer; between 42 and 78 years age (median 61 years) were evaluated. Patients had intense pain that could not be managed with combinations of analgesic and anti tumoral drugs. All patients received 1.2 mCi/kg of Samarium-153 intravenously as treatment for pain due to bony metastases. The isotope obtained from atomic reactor placed in Lima - Peru, was provided by Peruvian Nuclear Energy Institute (IPEN). One week before therapy, all the patients had a bone scan study with Tc99m-MDP that showed the presence of multiple bone metastases with high blastic activity. Haematology and biochemical parameter checked were: Creatinine ( 150,000 mm3), Leukocytes (> 5,000 mm3), Red cells (>3,500,000 mm3). No problems were encountered during intravenous administration of the radioisotope. The side effects after treatment were: Primary effects: 16 cases of nausea, 2 of vomiting, 3 of headache, 28 had increment of pain, 6 had flushing. 50 patients did not have the primary symptoms. Secondary effects: 3 Patients showed drop in leukocyte count between 2nd and 3rd week of therapy. Red cells showed 10-15% decrease between 6th to 8th week. Platelets showed a decrease of about 15% with one peak between 1st and 2nd week post Samarium therapy. Data was analysed using an analogue visual scale of the pain with values from 0 - 10 (0-no pain; 10-maximum pain) and in the same way using the E.C.O.G. scale (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) in relationship with the Karnofsky index in order to establish functional recovery for each patient. The decrease of pain was seen between 4th-7th days (average 8 days). A second dose was given after 60 days in 12 patients and a third dose in 3 cases.11 patients died due to different causes between 30 - 60 days post treatment. The analgesic dose came down significantly in 80% of patients. We conclude that palliative therapy of metastatic bone pain in Peru is possible with radionuclides. It

  14. Samarium-modified vanadium phosphate catalyst for the selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hua-Yi; Wang, Hai-Bo; Liu, Xin-Hua; Li, Jian-Hui; Yang, Mei-Hua; Huang, Chuan-Jing; Weng, Wei-Zheng; Wan, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The addition of a small amount of Sm into VPO catalyst brought about great changes in its physicochemical properties such as surface area, surface morphology, phase composition and redox property, thus leading to a higher catalytic performance in the selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride, as compared to the undoped VPO catalyst. - Highlights: • The addition of Sm leads to great changes in the structure of VPO catalyst. • Sm improves performance of VPO for oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride. • Catalytic performance is closely related to structure of VPO catalyst. - Abstract: A series of samarium-modified vanadium phosphate catalysts were prepared and studied in selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride. The catalytic evaluation showed that Sm modification significantly increased the overall n-butane conversion and intrinsic activity. N 2 -adsorption, XRD, SEM, Raman, XPS, EPR and H 2 -TPR techniques were used to investigate the intrinsic difference among these catalysts. The results revealed that the addition of Sm to VPO catalyst can increase the surface area of the catalyst, lead to a significant change in catalyst morphology from plate-like structure into rosette-shape clusters, and largely promote the formation of (VO) 2 P 2 O 7 . All of these were related to the different catalytic performance of Sm-doped and undoped VPO catalysts. The roles of the different VOPO 4 phases and the influence of Sm were also described and discussed

  15. Study of unstable valences of cadmium and samarium by pulse radiolysis. Influence of complexation by some synthetical ionophores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerat-Parizot, O.

    1992-01-01

    Instable valences of cations in solution are evidenced by pulse radiolysis, in spite of a lifetime often lower than a milli-second they participate to electron transfer reactions, owing to their redox potential. In this work are studied Cd + and Sm 2+ obtained respectively by reduction of Cd 2+ and Sm 3+ by a solvated electron. The reactivity of Cd + in a cryptand and in a coronand is studied; it is a powerful reducing agent (redox potential -2V) going back to the stable valence by electron transfer to an acceptor. Transfer kinetics is studied by reduction of organic molecules, effect of solvents and ligands is also examined. For samarium the reduction kinetics by hydrated electrons is increased when the ion is in a cryptand in agreement with electrochemical observations, showing that the valence 2+ is stabilized in respect to the valence 3+ for lanthanides. The difference of behaviour between Cd + and Sm 2+ is probably due to the fact that for Cd the transferred electron comes from the external layer and for Sm it is a f electron protected by the 5s and 5p orbitals

  16. Fabrication of samarium strontium aluminate ceramic and deposition of thermal barrier coatings by air plasma spray process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskaran T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC with the metallic NiCrAlY bond coat are often used in many aircraft engines to protect superalloy components from high-temperature corrosion thereby to improve the life of gas turbine components. The search for new TBC material has been intensified in recent years due to lack of thermo-physical properties of conventionally used Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ TBCs. Recently, the rare earth containing Samarium Strontium Aluminate (SSA based ceramic was proposed as a new TBC material due to its matching thermo-physical properties with the substrate. The present work focused on the synthesis of SSA ceramics for TBCs application and its coatings development on Ni-based superalloy Inconel 718 substrate by air plasma spray process. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS result confirmed the formation of single phase SSA ceramic after synthesis. The surface morphology of SSA TBCs is mainly composed of melted splats, semi and un-melted particles. The cross-sectional SEM micrographs did not show any spallation at the interface which indicated good mechanical interlocking between the bond coat and ceramic top coat. The Young’s modulus and hardness of SSA TBCs were found to be 80 and 6.1 GPa, respectively. The load-depth curve of SSA TBC showed good elastic recovery about 47 %.

  17. Observation of near infrared and enhanced visible emissions from electroluminescent devices with organo samarium(III) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, B [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dong NanHu Road, Economic Development Area, Changchun, 130033 (China); Li, W L [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dong NanHu Road, Economic Development Area, Changchun, 130033 (China); Hong, Z R [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dong NanHu Road, Economic Development Area, Changchun, 130033 (China); Zang, F X [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dong NanHu Road, Economic Development Area, Changchun, 130033 (China); Wei, H Z [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dong NanHu Road, Economic Development Area, Changchun, 130033 (China); Wang, D Y [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dong NanHu Road, Economic Development Area, Changchun, 130033 (China); Li, M T [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16-Dong NanHu Road, Economic Development Area, Changchun, 130033 (China); Lee, C S [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lee, S T [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-11-07

    Samarium (dibenzoylmethanato){sub 3} bathophenanthroline (Sm(DBM){sub 3} bath) was employed as an emitting and electron transport layer in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and narrow electroluminescent (EL) emissions of a Sm{sup 3+} ion were observed in the visible and near infrared (NIR) region, differing from those of the same devices with Eu{sup 3+}- or Tb{sup 3+}-complex EL devices with the same structure. The EL emissions of the Sm{sup 3+}-devices originate from transitions from {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} to the lower respective levels of Sm{sup 3+} ions. A maximum luminance of 490 cd m{sup -2} at 15 V and an EL efficiency of 0.6% at 0.17 mA cm{sup -2} were obtained in the visible region, and the improved efficiency should be attributed to introducing a transitional layer between the N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (TPD) film and the Sm(DBM){sub 3} bath film and the avoidance of interfacial exciplex emission in devices. Sharp emissions of Sm{sup 3+} ions in the NIR region were also observed under a lower threshold value less than 4.5 V.

  18. Effects of increasing doses of samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate on axial and appendicular skeletal growth in juvenile rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essman, Stephanie C.; Lewis, Michael R.; Fox, Derek B.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Targeted radiotherapy using samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate ( 153 Sm-EDTMP) is currently under investigation for treatment of osteosarcoma. Osteosarcoma often occurs in children, and previous studies on a juvenile rabbit model demonstrated that clinically significant damage to developing physeal cartilage may occur as a result of systemic 153 Sm-EDTMP therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the late effects of 153 Sm-EDTMP on skeletal structures during growth to maturity and to determine if there is a dose response of 153 Sm-EDTMP on growth of long bones. Methods: Female 8-week-old New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three treatment groups plus controls. Each rabbit was intravenously administered a predetermined dose of 153 Sm-EDTMP. Multiple bones of each rabbit were radiographed every 2 months until physeal closure, with subsequent measurements made to assess for abbreviated bone growth. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the differences in bone length between groups, with significance set at P 153 Sm-EDTMP. Further investigation regarding the effects of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals on bone growth and physeal cartilage is warranted

  19. Synthesis and characterization of samarium-doped ZnS nanoparticles: A novel visible light responsive photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanifehpour, Younes, E-mail: y_hanifehpour@yu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Soltani, Behzad; Amani-Ghadim, Ali Reza; Hedayati, Behnam [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khomami, Bamin [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Joo, Sang Woo, E-mail: swjoo1@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Sm-doped ZnS Nanomaterials were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The as-prepared compounds were characterized by XRD, TEM, XPS, SEM and UV techniques. • The photocatalytic effect of compounds was determined by Reactive Red 43 degradation. • The degradation of RRed 43 followed the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model. - Abstract: We prepared pure and samarium-doped ZnS (Sm{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}S{sub 1+0.5x}) nanoparticles via hydrothermal process at 160 °C for 24 h. XRD analysis shows that the particles were well crystallized and corresponds to a cubic sphalerite phase. SEM and TEM images indicate that the sizes of the particles were in the range of 20–60 nm. The photocatalytic activity of Sm-doped ZnS nanoparticles was evaluated by monitoring the decolorization of Reactive Red 43 in aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. The color removal efficiency of Sm{sub 0.04}Zn{sub 0.96}S and pure ZnS was 95.1% and 28.7% after 120 min of treatment, respectively. Among the different amounts of dopant agent used, 4% Sm-doped ZnS nanoparticles indicated the highest decolorization. We found that the presence of inorganic ions such as Cl{sup −}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and other radical scavengers such as buthanol and isopropyl alcohol reduced the decolorization efficiency.

  20. Determination of the speciation and bioavailability of samarium to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in the presence of natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Justine-Anne; Fillion, Marc-Alexandre; Smith, Scott; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2018-06-01

    As technological interest and environmental emissions of the rare earth elements increase, it is becoming more important to assess their potential environmental impact. Samarium (Sm) is a lanthanide of intermediate molar mass that is used in numerous high-technology applications including wind turbines, solar panels, and electric vehicles. The present study relates the speciation of Sm determined in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) to its bioavailability to the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The free ion concentration was determined using a cation exchange resin (ion exchange technique) in dynamic mode and compared with thermodynamic modeling. Short-term biouptake experiments were performed in the presence of 4 types of NOM: Suwannee River fulvic acids, Pahokee Peat fulvic acids, Suwannee River humic acids, and a Luther Marsh dissolved organic matter isolate (90-95% humic acids). It was clearly shown that even a small amount of NOM (0.5 mg C L -1 ) resulted in a significant decrease (10 times) in the Sm internalization fluxes. Furthermore, complexation with humic acids (and the corresponding reduction in Sm bioavailability) was stronger than that with fulvic acids. The results showed that the experimentally measured (free) Sm was a better predictor of Sm internalization than either the total concentrations or the free ion concentrations obtained using thermodynamic modeling. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:1623-1631. © 2018 SETAC. © 2018 SETAC.

  1. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible exposure level. 62.130 Section 62... REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.130 Permissible exposure level. (a) The mine operator must assure that no miner is exposed during any work shift to noise that exceeds the permissible exposure level. If...

  2. 22 CFR 130.15 - Confidential business information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., confidential business information means commercial or financial information which by law is entitled to... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Confidential business information. 130.15... CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.15 Confidential business information. (a) Any person who is required...

  3. 40 CFR 130.5 - Continuing planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.5 Continuing planning process. (a) General. Each State shall establish and maintain a continuing planning process (CPP) as described under section 303(e)(3)(A)-(H) of... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuing planning process. 130.5...

  4. 9 CFR 590.130 - Basis of billing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis of billing plants. 590.130... of Service § 590.130 Basis of billing plants. Overtime and/or holiday services shall be billed to the official plant on the basis of each 15 minutes of overtime and/or holiday service performed by each...

  5. 46 CFR 130.330 - Charts and nautical publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Charts and nautical publications. 130.330 Section 130... publications. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) or (c) of this section, as appropriate for the intended... navigation possible; (2) U.S. Coast Pilot or similar publication; (3) Coast Guard Light List; (4) Tide Tables...

  6. 21 CFR 211.130 - Packaging and labeling operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification of the drug product with a lot or control number that permits determination of the history of the... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packaging and labeling operations. 211.130 Section 211.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  7. 40 CFR 130.6 - Water quality management plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality management plans. 130.6... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.6 Water quality management plans. (a) Water quality management (WQM... and certified and approved updates to those plans. Continuing water quality planning shall be based...

  8. 40 CFR 130.4 - Water quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.4 Water quality monitoring. (a) In accordance with section 106(e)(1...; developing and reviewing water quality standards, total maximum daily loads, wasteload allocations and load... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality monitoring. 130.4...

  9. 40 CFR 130.8 - Water quality report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality report. 130.8 Section... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.8 Water quality report. (a) Each State shall prepare and submit biennially to the Regional Administrator a water quality report in accordance with section 305(b) of the Act...

  10. 40 CFR 130.3 - Water quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality standards. 130.3 Section... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.3 Water quality standards. A water quality standard (WQS) defines the water quality goals of a water body, or portion thereof, by designating the use or uses to be made...

  11. 46 CFR 199.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 199.130 Section 199.130... craft. (a) General. Each survival craft must be stowed— (1) As close to the accommodation and service spaces as possible; (2) So that neither the survival craft nor its stowage arrangements will interfere...

  12. 49 CFR 28.130 - General prohibition against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General prohibition against discrimination. 28.130....130 General prohibition against discrimination. (a) No qualified individual with handicaps shall, on... subjected to discrimination under any program or activity conducted by the Department. (b)(1) The Department...

  13. 20 CFR 402.130 - How to request a record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How to request a record. 402.130 Section 402.130 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE... telephone, fax, Internet, and e-mail. Any request should reasonably describe the record you want. If you...

  14. 20 CFR 655.130 - Application filing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application filing requirements. 655.130 Section 655.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY... Certification must be mailed, and will also post these addresses on the OFLC Internet Web site at http://www...

  15. 12 CFR 410.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General prohibitions against discrimination. 410.130 Section 410.130 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED...

  16. Fabrication of a PVC membrane samarium(III) sensor based on N,N Prime ,N Double-Prime -tris(4-pyridyl)trimesic amide as a selectophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, Hassan Ali, E-mail: haszamani@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naghavi-Reyabbi, Fatemeh [Resident of General Surgery, Endoscopic and Minimaly Invasive Surgery Research Center, Ghaem Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadhosseini, Majid [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Shahrood Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Rad, Maryam [Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    A new ion-selective electrode for Sm{sup 3+} ion is described based on the incorporation of N,N Prime ,N Double-Prime -tris(4-pyridyl)trimesic amide (TPTA) in a poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) matrix. The membrane sensor comprises nitrobenzene (NB) as a plasticizer, and oleic acid (OA) as an anionic additive. The sensor with the optimized composition shows a Nernstian potential response of 19.8 {+-} 0.5 mV decade{sup -1} over a wide concentration range of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, with a lower detection limit of 4.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} and satisfactor applicable pH range of 3.6-9.2. Having a short response time of less than 10 s and a very good selectivity towards the Sm{sup 3+} over a wide variety of interfering cations (e.g. alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions) the sensor seemed to be a promising analytical tool for determination of the Sm{sup 3+}. Hence, it was used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of samarium ion with EDTA. It was also applied to the direct samarium recovery in binary mixtures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new Sm{sup 3+}-PVC membrane sensor is introduced for determination of Sm{sup 3+} ions in the solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N,N Prime ,N Double-Prime -tris(4-pyridyl)trimesic amide was used as a suitable selectophore for samarium sensor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection limit of the sensor is 4.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} with a short response time of less than 10 s.

  17. Fabrication of a PVC membrane samarium(III) sensor based on N,N′,N″-tris(4-pyridyl)trimesic amide as a selectophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamani, Hassan Ali; Naghavi-Reyabbi, Fatemeh; Faridbod, Farnoush; Mohammadhosseini, Majid; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Rad, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    A new ion-selective electrode for Sm 3+ ion is described based on the incorporation of N,N′,N″-tris(4-pyridyl)trimesic amide (TPTA) in a poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) matrix. The membrane sensor comprises nitrobenzene (NB) as a plasticizer, and oleic acid (OA) as an anionic additive. The sensor with the optimized composition shows a Nernstian potential response of 19.8 ± 0.5 mV decade −1 over a wide concentration range of 1.0 × 10 −2 and 1 × 10 −6 mol L −1 , with a lower detection limit of 4.7 × 10 −7 mol L −1 and satisfactor applicable pH range of 3.6–9.2. Having a short response time of less than 10 s and a very good selectivity towards the Sm 3+ over a wide variety of interfering cations (e.g. alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions) the sensor seemed to be a promising analytical tool for determination of the Sm 3+ . Hence, it was used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of samarium ion with EDTA. It was also applied to the direct samarium recovery in binary mixtures. - Highlights: ► A new Sm 3+ -PVC membrane sensor is introduced for determination of Sm 3+ ions in the solutions. ► N,N′,N″-tris(4-pyridyl)trimesic amide was used as a suitable selectophore for samarium sensor. ► Detection limit of the sensor is 4.7 × 10 −7 mol L −1 with a short response time of less than 10 s.

  18. The theoretical basis and clinical methodology for stereotactic interstitial brain tumor irradiation using iododeoxyuridine as a radiation sensitizer and samarium-145 as a brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Kanellitsas, C.; Clendenon, N.R.; Laster, B.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    High grade astrocytomas have proven resistant to all conventional therapy. A technique to produce radiation enhancement during interstitial brain tumor irradiation by using a radiation sensitizer (IdUrd) and by stimulation of Auger electron cascades through absorption of low energy photons in iodine (Photon activation) is described. Clinical studies using IdUrd, 192 Ir as a brachytherapy source, and external radiation have produced promising results. Substituting samarium-145 for 192 Ir in this protocol is expected to produce enhanced results. 15 refs

  19. The properties of samarium-doped zinc oxide/phthalocyanine structure for optoelectronics prepared by pulsed laser deposition and organic molecular evaporation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Marešová, Eva; Fitl, Přemysl; Vlček, Jan; Bergmann, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Yatskiv, Roman; Bulíř, Jiří; Hubík, Pavel; Hruška, Petr; Drahokoupil, Jan; Abdellaoui, N.; Vrňata, M.; Lančok, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 225. ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15050; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0958; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10279S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14FR010 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : samarium-doped zinc oxide zinc/phthalocyanine deposition * evaporation * pulsed laser deposition * thin films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.455, year: 2016

  20. Effects of increasing doses of samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate on axial and appendicular skeletal growth in juvenile rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essman, Stephanie C. [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)], E-mail: essmans@missouri.edu; Lewis, Michael R. [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Service, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Fox, Derek B. [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: Targeted radiotherapy using samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate ({sup 153}Sm-EDTMP) is currently under investigation for treatment of osteosarcoma. Osteosarcoma often occurs in children, and previous studies on a juvenile rabbit model demonstrated that clinically significant damage to developing physeal cartilage may occur as a result of systemic {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the late effects of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP on skeletal structures during growth to maturity and to determine if there is a dose response of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP on growth of long bones. Methods: Female 8-week-old New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three treatment groups plus controls. Each rabbit was intravenously administered a predetermined dose of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP. Multiple bones of each rabbit were radiographed every 2 months until physeal closure, with subsequent measurements made to assess for abbreviated bone growth. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the differences in bone length between groups, with significance set at P<.05. Results: Significant differences in lengths of multiple bones were detected between the high-dose group and other treatment groups and controls at each time interval. A significant difference in lengths of the tibias was also noted in the medium-treatment group, compared to controls. Mean reduction of bone length was first detected at 4 months and did not increase significantly over time. Conclusions: These data suggest that clinically significant bone shortening may occur as a result of high-dosage administration of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP. Further investigation regarding the effects of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals on bone growth and physeal cartilage is warranted.

  1. Effect of samarium (Sm) addition on the microstructures and mechanical properties of Al–7Si–0.7Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Hongxu; Yan, Hong; Hu, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Sm affected the secondary dendrite arm spacing of Al–7Si–0.7Mg alloy. •The coarse plate-like eutectic silicon was fully modified into a fine branched and particle structure when 0.6 wt.% Sm added. •The tensile properties were enhanced by the addition of Sm. •Sm has marked effects on eutectic temperature and the latent heat ΔH R on remelting behavior. •The morphology and chemical composition of Sm-rich intermetallics were studied. -- Abstract: The effects of samarium (Sm) additions (0–0.9 wt.%) on the microstructures and mechanical properties of Al–7Si–0.7Mg alloys have been studied in this article. The microstructures of the as-cast samples were examined by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The experimental results indicated that the rare earth Sm affected the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) of Al–7Si–0.7Mg alloy. And it was found that Sm had great modification effects on the microstructures of eutectic silicon. When 0.6 wt.% Sm was added to the alloy, the coarse plate-like eutectic silicon was fully modified into a fine fibrous structure; the dendrites of Al–7Si–0.7Mg alloy was best refined. The mechanical properties were investigated by tensile test. The findings indicate that the tensile properties and elongation were improved by the addition of Sm. And a good combination of ultimate tensile strength (215 MPa) and elongation (3.3%) was obtained when the Sm addition was up to 0.6 wt.%. Furthermore the results of thermal analysis reveal that Sm addition had marked effects on eutectic temperature and the latent heat ΔH R on remelting behavior

  2. Usefulness of CA 130 kit based on IRMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Takashi; Kimura, Yoshiko; Ata, Mariko; Miyagawa, Naoko; Iio, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Immunoradiometric assay for CA 130 was fundamentally and clinically evaluated using a commercially available D-7111 kit. Incubation time was 4 hr with the present CA 133 kit as compared with 16 - 24 hr with conventional CA 125 kit. Laboratory performance of CA 130 kit was satisfactory for standard curve, reproducibility, and recovery test. There was well correlation between the present CA 130 kit and CA 125 kit (r = 0.931). The concentration of CA 130 in the serum was significantly higher in healthy women than men (17.3 +- 10.5 U/ml vs 9.6 +- 5.1 U/ml). Serum CA 130 levels tended to decrease with aging, regardless of sex. These levels were changeable with menstrual cycle ; i.e., these were significantly higher during menstrual phase (24.2 +- 9.0 U/ml) and significantly lower during ovulatory phase (10.9 +- 2.4 U/ml) and during menopause (12.1 +- 3.4 U/ml). Cut off serum CA 130 levels were defined as 20 U/ml for men and 38 U/ml for women. Positive rate for CA 130 was the highest in cases of ovarian cancer (80 %), followed by endometrial cancer (50 %), pancreatic cancer (47 %), benign ovarian tumor (44 %), and lung cancer (39 %). (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Is hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: It is heavily debated whether or not treatment with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 contributes to the development of acute kidney failure in patients with severe sepsis. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Muller and colleagues report no association between initial resuscitation...... with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 and renal impairment in a cohort of septic patients. Can we then consider hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 a safe intervention? The answer is no - observational data should be interpreted with caution and should mainly be used to identify risks, while safety must be assessed...

  4. Nuclear spectroscopy of doubly-even130,132Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Gupta, Surbhi; Singh, Suram; Bharti, Arun

    2018-05-01

    A comparative study of some high-spin characteristic nuclear structure properties of doubly-even 130,132Ba nuclei has been made using two microscopic frameworks - CHFB and PSM. The yrast spectra, intrinsic quadrupole moment and deformation systematics of these nuclei have been successfully calculated. Further, the calculated data from both the frameworks is also compared with the available experimental data and a good agreement has been obtained. The present CHFB calculations describes very well the low spin structure of even-even 130,132Ba nuclei whereas PSM calculations provide a qualitative description of the high-spin band structure of doubly-even 130,132Ba nuclei.

  5. Determination of trace amounts of rare earth elements in samarium, terbium and disprosium oxides by graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, E.S.K.

    1990-01-01

    A graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry method for the determination of neodymium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium at trace level in samarium oxide; of samarium, europium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium and yttrium in terbium oxide and of europium, terbium, holmium, erbium and yttrium in dysprosium oxide was established. The best pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were determined for each lanthanide considered. Calibration curves were obtained for the pure elements, for binary mixtures formed by the matrix and each of the lanthanides studied and, finally, for the complex mixtures constituted by the matrix and all the other lanthanide of the group under scrutiny. This study has been carried out to examine the interference of the presence of one lanthanide on the behaviour of the other, since a lack of linearity on the calibration curves has been observed in some cases. Detection and determination limits have been determined as well. The detection limits encountered were within the range 0.002 to 0.3% for different elements. The precision of the method expressed as the relative standard deviation was calculated for each element present in each of the matrices studied. The conclusion arrived at is that the method can be applied for determining the above mentioned lanthanides present in the matrices studied with purity up to 99.50%. (author)

  6. Preparation and examination of properties of samarium-153-EDTMP complex; Otrzymywanie chelatu kwasu etylenodiaminotetrametylenofosfonowego (EDTMP) z samarem-153 i badanie jego wlasciwosci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, M. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Garnuszek, P.; Lukasiewicz, A.; Wozniak, I.; Zulczyk, W. [Osrodek Badawczo-Rozwojowy Izotopow, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Licinska, I. [Instytut Lekow, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Preparation and properties of ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid (EDTMP) as well as some properties of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate have been examined. The chelate formed by samarium-153 (46.3 h, {beta}{sup -}-decay) with EDTMP exhibits high bone uptake and can be used for treatment of disseminated, painful skeletal metastases. The purity and stability of solutions of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate were examined in a broad range of samarium concentration and {sup 153}Sm specific activity. The complex under study was examined by radio-TLC, -electrophoresis and radio-HPLC. The results obtained suggest the small size of molecules of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate as compared with molecules of ``free``EDTMP. The results of biodistribution of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP determined in rats indicate the quick blood clearance, high deposition of radioactivity in bone and quick excretion of radioactivity into urine. No specific uptake of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP in extra-skeletal organs was found. (author). 42 refs, 13 figs, 22 tabs.

  7. Risk Management of an Aging KC-130 Fleet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    .... For the aging USMC KC-130 F/R fleet, a damage-tolerant approach ensured that safety would be maintained but it presented a problem in forecasting readiness, aircraft remaining in the inventory...

  8. Organizational structures and communications on the SH 130 project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    This product summarizes the findings from research analyzing SH 130 organizational structures and communication flows. A set of guidelines pertaining to team organization and communication improvement and the design-build environment is also included...

  9. High spin structure in 130,131Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Navneet; Kumar, A.; Singh, Amandeep; Kumar, S.; Kaur, Rajbir; Singh, Varinderjit; Behera, B.R.; Singh, K.P.; Singh, G.; Mukherjee, G.; Sharma, H.P.; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar Raju, M.; Madhusudhan Rao, P.V.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Kumar, Rakesh; Madhvan, N.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    High spin states of 130,131 Ba have been investigated via fusion evaporation reactions 122 Sn( 13 C,4n) 131 Ba and 122 Sn( 13 C, 5n) 130 Ba at E beam =65 MeV. The level schemes of 130,131 Ba have been extended by placing several new γ transitions. A few interband transitions connecting two negative-parity bands, which are the experimental fingerprints of signature partners, have been established in 130 Ba. Spin and parity of a side band have been assigned in 131 Ba and this dipole band is proposed to have a three-quasiparticle configuration, νh 11/2 x πh 11/2 x πg 7/2 . The observed band structures and nuclear shape evolution as a function of the angular momentum have been discussed in the light of Total-Routhian-Surface calculations. (orig.)

  10. 13 CFR 108.130 - Identified Low Income Geographic Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Organizing A Nmvc Company § 108.130... intends to make Developmental Venture Capital investments and provide Operational Assistance under the...

  11. 40 CFR 5.130 - Effect of employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Introduction § 5.130 Effect of employment opportunities. The obligation to comply with these Title IX...

  12. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as follows...

  13. Deletion of Pr130 Interrupts Cardiac Development in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B, alpha (PPP2R3A, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is a major serine/threonine phosphatase that regulates crucial function in development and growth. Previous research has implied that PPP2R3A was involved in heart failure, and PR130, the largest transcription of PPP2R3A, functioning in the calcium release of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR, plays an important role in the excitation-contraction (EC coupling. To obtain a better understanding of PR130 functions in myocardium and cardiac development, two pr130-deletion zebrafish lines were generated using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas system. Pr130-knockout zebrafish exhibited cardiac looping defects and decreased cardiac function (decreased fractional area and fractional shortening. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining demonstrated reduced cardiomyocytes. Subsequent transmission electron microscopy revealed that the bright and dark bands were narrowed and blurred, the Z- and M-lines were fogged, and the gaps between longitudinal myocardial fibers were increased. Additionally, increased apoptosis was observed in cardiomyocyte in pr130-knockout zebrafish compared to wild-type (WT. Taken together, our results suggest that pr130 is required for normal myocardium formation and efficient cardiac contractile function.

  14. The effect of samarium doping on structure and enhanced thermionic emission properties of lanthanum hexaboride fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shenlin; Hu, Qianglin [College of Mathematics and Physics, Jinggangshan University, Jian (China); Zhang, Jiuxing; Liu, Danmin [Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing (China); Huang, Qingzhen [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, MD (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Single-phase polycrystalline solid solutions (La{sub 1-x}Sm{sub x})B{sub 6} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1) are fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). This study demonstrates a systematic investigation of structure-property relationships in Sm-doped LaB{sub 6} ternary rare-earth hexaborides. The microstructure, crystallographic orientation, electrical resistivity, and thermionic emission performance of these compounds are investigated. Analysis of the results indicates that samarium (Sm) doping has a noticeable effect on the structure and performance of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}). The analytical investigation of the electron backscatter diffraction confirms that (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} exhibits a clear (001) texture that results in a low work function. Work functions are determined by pulsed thermionic diode measurements at 1500-1873 K. The (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} possesses improved thermionic emission properties compared to LaB{sub 6}. The current density of (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} is 42.4 A cm{sup -2} at 1873 K, which is 17.5% larger than that of LaB{sub 6}. The values of Φ{sub R} for (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} and LaB{sub 6} are 1.98 ± 0.03 and 1.67 ± 0.03 eV, respectively. Furthermore, the Sm substitution of lanthanum (La) effectively increases the electrical resistivity. These results reveal that Sm doping lead to significantly enhanced thermionic emission properties of LaB{sub 6}. The compound (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} appears most promising as a future emitter material. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. The Level of Europium-154 Contaminating Samarium-153-EDTMP Activates the Radiation Alarm System at the US Homeland Security Checkpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Najeeb Al Hallak

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available 153Sm-EDTMP is a radiopharmaceutical composed of EDTMP (ethylenediamine-tetramethylenephosphonate and Samarium-153 [1]. 153Sm-EDTMP has an affinity for skeletal tissue and concentrates in areas with increased bone turnover; thus, it is successfully used in relieving pain related to diffuse bone metastases [1]. The manufacturing process of 153Sm-EDTMP leads to contamination with 154Eu (Europium-154 [2]. A previous study only alluded to the retention of 154Eu in the bones after receiving treatment with 153Sm-EDTMP [2]. Activation of the alarm at security checkpoints after 153Sm-EDTMP therapy has not been previously reported. Two out of 15 patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center (Fargo, N. Dak., USA activated the radiation activity sensors while passing through checkpoints; one at a US airport and the other while crossing theAmerican-Canadian border. We assume that the 154Eu which remained in the patients’ bones activated the sensors. Methods: In order to investigate this hypothesis, we obtained the consent from 3 of our 15 patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP within the previous 4 months to 2 years, including the patient who had activated the radiation alarm at the airport. The patients were scanned with a handheld detector and a gamma camera for energies from 511 keV to 1.3 MeV. Results: All three patients exhibited identical spectral images, and further analysis showed that the observed spectra are the result of 154Eu emissions. Conclusion: Depending on the detection thresholds and windows used by local and federal authorities, the remaining activity of 154Eu retained in patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP could be sufficient enough to increase the count rates above background levels and activate the sensors. At Roger Maris Cancer Center, patients are now informed of the potential consequences of 153Sm-EDTMP therapy prior to initiating treatment. In addition, patients treated with 153Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center

  16. Decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 130Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, J.; Beller, J.; Fiori, E.; Krtička, M.; Löher, B.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Scheck, M.; Silva, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Tonchev, A.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H.; Zweidinger, M.

    2014-03-01

    The electric dipole strength distribution in 130Te has been investigated using the method of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. The experiments were performed at the Darmstadt High Intensity Photon Setup using bremsstrahlung as photon source and at the High Intensity overrightarrow γ -Ray Source, where quasi-monochromatic and polarized photon beams are provided. Average decay properties of 130Te below the neutron separation energy are determined. Comparing the experimental data to the predictions of the statistical model indicate, that nuclear structure effects play an important role even at sufficiently high excitation energies. Preliminary results will be presented.

  17. Decay pattern of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 130Te

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaak J.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The electric dipole strength distribution in 130Te has been investigated using the method of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. The experiments were performed at the Darmstadt High Intensity Photon Setup using bremsstrahlung as photon source and at the High Intensity γ→$\\overrightarrow \\gamma $-Ray Source, where quasi-monochromatic and polarized photon beams are provided. Average decay properties of 130Te below the neutron separation energy are determined. Comparing the experimental data to the predictions of the statistical model indicate, that nuclear structure effects play an important role even at sufficiently high excitation energies. Preliminary results will be presented.

  18. Study for the determination of samarium, europium,terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in gadolinium oxide matrix by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caires, A.C.F.

    1985-01-01

    A study for determination of samarium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in a gadolinium oxide matrix by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace is presented. The best charrring and atomization conditions were estabilished for each element, the most convenient ressonance lines being selected as well. The study was carried out for the mentioned lanthanides both when pure and when in binary mixtures with gadolinium, besides those where all for them were together with gadolinium. The determination limits for pure lanthanides were found to be between 1.3 and 9.6 ng assuming a 20% relative standard deviation as acceptable. The detection limits were in the range 0.51 and 7.5 ng, assuming as positive any answer higher than twofold the standard deviation. (author) [pt

  19. Biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in rats treated with docetaxel Biodistribuição de EDTMP-153-samário em ratos tratados com docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Villarim Neto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Many patients with metastatic bone disease have to use radiopharmaceuticals associated with chemotherapy to relieve bone pain. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of docetaxel on the biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in bones and other organs of rats. METHODS: Wistar male rats were randomly allocated into 2 groups of 6 rats each. The DS (docetaxel/samarium group received docetaxel (15 mg/kg intraperitoneally in two cycles 11 days apart. The S (samarium/control group rats were not treated with docetaxel. Nine days after chemotherapy, all the rats were injected with 0.1ml of samarium-153-EDTMP via orbital plexus (25µCi. After 2 hours, the animals were killed and samples of the brain, thyroid, lung, heart, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and both femurs were removed. The percentage radioactivity of each sample (% ATI/g was determined in an automatic gamma-counter (Wizard-1470, Perkin-Elmer, Finland. RESULTS: On the 9th day after the administration of the 2nd chemotherapy cycle, the rats had a significant weight loss (314.50±22.09g compared (pOBJETIVO: Muitos pacientes com metástases ósseas são tratados com radiofármacos associados com quimioterapia para alívio da dor óssea. O objetivo do trabalho foi estudar a influência do docetaxel na biodistribuição do EDTMP-153-samário nos ossos e outros órgãos de ratos. MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar foram aleatoriamente alocados em 2 grupos de 6 animais cada. O grupo DS (docetaxel/samário recebeu docetaxel (15 mg/kg intraperitoneal em dois ciclos com 11 dias de intervalo. Os ratos do grupo S (samário/controle não foram tratados com docetaxel. Nove dias após a quimioterapia, todos os animais receberam 0,1ml de EDTMP-153-samário via plexo orbital (25µCi. Após 2 horas, os animais foram mortos e feitas biópsias de cérebro, tireóide, pulmão, coração, estômago, cólon, fígado, rim e fêmures. O percentual de radioatividade por grama (%ATI/g de tecido de cada bi

  20. Optimal Timing of Bisphosphonate Administration in Combination with Samarium-153 Oxabifore in the Treatment of Painful Metastatic Bone Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasulova, Nigora; Lyubshin, Vladimir; Arybzhanov, Dauranbek; Sagdullaev, Sh.; Krylov, Valery; Khodjibekov, Marat

    2013-01-01

    While bisphosphonates are indicated for prevention of skeletal-related events, radionuclide therapy is widely used for treatment of painful bone metastases. Combined radionuclide therapy with bisphosphonates has demonstrated improved effectiveness in achieving bone pain palliation in comparison to mono therapy with radionuclides or bisphosphonates alone. However, there are conflicting reports as to whether bisphosphonates adversely influence skeletal uptake of the bone-seeking radiotracers used for therapy. Recent studies analyzing influence of Zoledronic acid on total bone uptake of Samarium-153 EDTMP (Sm-153 EDTMP) by measuring cumulative urinary activity of Sm-153 on baseline study, as well as in combination with bisphosphonates (administrated 48 hours prior to Sm-153) did not provide any statistically significant difference in urinary excretion of Sm-153 between the two groups. It may be noted that the exact temporal sequence of bisphosphonate administration vis a vis radionuclide therapy has not yet been studied. One of the side effects of bisphosphonates is transient flare effect on bone pain. Radionuclide therapy may also have similar side effect. Keeping in view the above the current study was designed with the main objective of determining the exact timing of bisphosphonate administration in patients receiving combined therapy so as to achieve optimal efficacy of bone pain palliation. Ninety-three patients suffering from metastatic bone pain who received combination therapy with Sm-153 oxabifore (an analog of Sm-153 EDTMP) and Zoledronic acid were divided into three groups according to the timing of Zoledronic acid administration: Group I: 39 patients who received Zoledronic acid 7 or more days prior to Sm-153 oxabifore treatment; Group II: 32 patients who received Zoledronic acid 48-72 hours prior to Sm-153 oxabifore treatment and Group III: 22 patients who received Zoledronic acid 7 days after Sm-153 oxabifore treatment. Sm-153 oxabifore was administered

  1. 45 CFR 1153.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General prohibitions against discrimination. 1153... §§ 1153.130 General prohibitions against discrimination. (a) No qualified handicapped person shall, on the... subjected to discrimination under any program or activity conducted by the agency. (b)(1) The agency, in...

  2. L130-million cut to grants hits UK physical scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Cressey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    "UK physicists, still reeling from massive funding cuts announced earlier this year, have learnt of worse to come. Roughly L130 million (US$260 million)is being slashed from research grants awarded by the Engineering and Physical Scienes Research Council (EPSRC), it announced on 17 March." (2 pages)

  3. 13 CFR 130.630 - Dispute resolution procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... organization has supplied the Committee with all requested documentation. (b) Programmatic (non-financial... DEVELOPMENT CENTERS § 130.630 Dispute resolution procedures. (a) Financial Disputes. (1) A recipient organization wishing to resolve a financial Dispute formally must submit a written statement describing the...

  4. 28 CFR 35.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES General Requirements § 35.130 General... disabilities. (5) A public entity, in the selection of procurement contractors, may not use criteria that... cover the costs of measures, such as the provision of auxiliary aids or program accessibility, that are...

  5. 16 CFR 1500.130 - Self-pressurized containers: labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Self-pressurized containers: labeling. 1500... § 1500.130 Self-pressurized containers: labeling. (a) Self-pressurized containers that fail to bear a...: warning—contents under pressure Do not puncture or incinerate container. Do not expose to heat or store at...

  6. 40 CFR 130.10 - State submittals to EPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.10 State submittals to EPA. (a) The following must be submitted...)(1). (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2040-0071) (3) Total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) (303(d)); and (4) Water quality management (WQM) plan and certified and...

  7. 32 CFR 1699.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General prohibitions against discrimination... CONDUCTED BY SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM § 1699.130 General prohibitions against discrimination. (a) No... the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity conducted...

  8. 42 CFR 483.130 - PASARR determination criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....130 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... or community mental retardation or developmental disability providers. (d) Examples of categories... are available to the individual consistent with these determinations; and (4) The rights of the...

  9. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide is...

  10. The 130Te (p,p') reaction on analog resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Ruiz, M. del C.H.; Cescato, M.L.; Foster Junior, J.L.; Krmpotic, F.

    1983-07-01

    Angular distributions for elastic and inelastic scattering have been measured on six analog resonances in the 130 Te + p system and at two off resonance energies. Partial widths are deduced from the angular distributions. Formulae for the spectroscopic amplitudes within the framework of quasiparticle random phase approximation are presented. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions. (Author) [pt

  11. 14 CFR 21.130 - Statement of conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Statement of conformity. 21.130 Section 21... conformity. Each holder or licensee of a type certificate only, for a product manufactured in the United... Administrator a statement of conformity (FAA Form 317). This statement must be signed by an authorized person...

  12. Synthesis of samarium complexes with the derivative binder of Schiff Quinolinic base. Characterization and photophysical study; Sintesis de complejos de samario con el ligante derivado de base de Schiff Quinolinica. Caracterizacion y estudio fotofisico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas H, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we determined the metal: binder stoichiometry of the species formed during the UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration of the derivative binder of Schiff quinolinic base, L1 with the samarium nitrate pentahydrate in methanol. Statistical analysis of the data allowed proposing the metal: binder stoichiometry for the synthesis of the complexes which was one mole of samarium salt by 2.5 moles of binder and thus favor the formation of complexes with 1M: 1L and 1M: 2L stoichiometries. They were synthesized in aqueous-organic medium (water-ethanol), isolated and purified two complexes with stoichiometry 1 Sm: 1 L1, complex 1 and 1 Sm: 2 L1, complex 2. The overall yield of the reaction was 76%. The characterization of the formed complexes was performed by visible ultraviolet spectrometry (UV/Vis), nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), thermal gravimetric analysis with differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC), and radial distribution function. These complexes were studied by fluorescence and emission phosphorescence at variable temperature. Spectroscopic techniques used in both solution and solid demonstrated the formation and stability of these complexes. In addition XP S indicated that in both complexes the samarium retains its oxidation state 3+. Luminescence studies indicated that there is intra-binding charge transfer which decreases the transfer of light energy from the binder to the samarium. Based on the experimental results, L1 binder molecules and complexes 1 and 2 were modeled that demonstrated the proposed Nc for each complex, as well as allowed to visualize the structural arrangement of the molecules, complexes and binder. (Author)

  13. BOREAS RSS-20 POLDER C-130 Measurements of Surface BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Marc; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-20 data set contains measurements of surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) made by the polarization and Directionality of Earth reflectances (POLDER) instrument over several surface types (pine, spruce, fen) of the BOREAS southern study area (SSA) during the 1994 intensive field campaigns (IFCs). Single-point BRDF values were acquired either from the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) C-130 aircraft or from a NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) helicopter. A related data set collected from the helicopter platform is available as is POLDER imagery acquired from the C-130. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. Investigation of the Photon Strength Function in 130 Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, J.; Beller, J.; Fiori, E.; Glorius, J.; Krtička, M.; Löher, B.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Scheck, M.; Silva, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Zweidinger, M.

    2016-01-01

    The dipole strength distribution of 130Te was investigated with the method of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence using continuous-energy bremsstrahlung at the Darmstadt High Intensity Photon Setup and quasi-monoenergetic photons at the High Intensity γ-Ray Source. The average decay properties were determined between 5.50 and 8.15 MeV and compared to simulations within the statistical model.

  15. Photoluminescence and spectroscopic dependence of fluorophosphate glasses on samarium ions concentration and the induced defects by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, M.A., E-mail: marzouk_nrc@yahoo.com [Glass Research Department, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth Street (former EL Tahrir), P.O. 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Hamdy, Y.M. [Spectroscopy Department, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth Street (former EL Tahrir), P.O. 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); ElBatal, H.A. [Glass Research Department, National Research Centre, 33 El Bohouth Street (former EL Tahrir), P.O. 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Ezz ElDin, F.M. [National Institute for Radiation Research & Technology, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    /2} and {sup 6}H{sub 11/2}, respectively. The intensity of the emission spectra is observed to increase with the increase of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. The optical spectra within the visible–near IR region and photoluminescence spectra of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped glasses are found to be stable and show almost no variations after gamma irradiation especially when rare-earth ions are present in noticeable contents (1–3%). FTIR spectra of all the studied glasses reveal repetitive and characteristic vibrational bands mainly due to phosphate groups with abundant of Q{sup 2} and Q{sup 3} groups due to the high content of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (70 mol%). The introduction of 10% NaF and 20% AlF{sub 3} is observed to cause formation of mixed fluorophosphate groups (PO{sub 3}F){sup 2−}. The formation of (AlPO){sub 4} and/or (AlPO{sub 6}) groups needs further justification by combined techniques. The increase of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} content to 3% causes obvious increase of the IR absorption bands within the wavenumbers range of about 850–1400 cm{sup −1} due to suggested depolymerization effect. Gamma irradiation causes no distinct variations in the FTIR spectra due to suggested compactness through the formation of additional structural groups from AlF{sub 4} or AlF{sub 6}. - Highlights: • Samarium ions doped in host fluorophosphate glasses were prepared. • Optical and FT infrared absorption techniques were applied to study the spectral properties of the glasses. • Photoluminescence properties were measured. • Collective spectroscopic variations generated by gamma irradiation were investigated.

  16. MicroRNA-130a and -130b enhance activation of hepatic stellate cells by suppressing PPARγ expression: A rat fibrosis model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Le; Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Hongwei [Department of General Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, No.157, West 5th Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710004 (China); Zhang, Guoyu [West Hospital Ward 1, Shaanxi Provincial People' s Hospital, No.256, Youyi Road(west), Xi' an, Shaanxi 710068 (China); Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiazhong; Zhang, Yafei; Shang, Hao; Ji, Hong; Chen, Xi; Duan, Yanxia [Department of General Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, No.157, West 5th Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710004 (China); Li, Yiming, E-mail: yiminngli@163.com [Department of General Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, No.157, West 5th Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710004 (China)

    2015-09-25

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary sources of extracellular matrix (ECM) in normal and fibrotic liver. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) maintains HSCs in a quiescent state, and its downregulation induces HSC activation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can induce PPARγ mRNA degradation, but the mechanism by which miRNAs regulate PPARγ in rat HSCs is unclear. This study aimed to investigate some miRNAs which putatively bind to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of PPARγ mRNA, and increase expression of ECM genes in rat HSCs. In carbon tetrachloride injection (CCl{sub 4}) and common bile duct ligation (CBDL) liver fibrosis models, miRNAs miR-130a, miR-130b, miR-301a, miR-27b and miR-340 levels were found to be increased and PPARγ expression decreased. Overexpression of miR-130a and miR-130b enhanced cell proliferation by involving Runx3. MiR-130a and miR-130b decreased PPARγ expression by targeting the 3′-UTR of PPARγ mRNA in rat HSC-T6 cells. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) may mediate miR-130a and miR-130b overexpression, PPARγ downregulation, and ECM genes overexpression in cell culture. These findings suggest that miR-130a and miR-130b are involved in downregulation of PPARγ in liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • MiR-130a and miR-130b are increased and PPARγ is decreased in liver fibrosis models. • MiR-130a and miR-130b decreased PPARγ by targeting the 3′-UTR of PPARγ mRNA. • MiR-130a and miR-130b enhanced HSC cell proliferation by involving Runx3. • TGF-β1 may mediate miR-130a and miR-130b overexpression.

  17. Lightning Tests on the WC-130 Research Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    in the WC-136 tests at various times.) E- Feild Fiber Optic Test Article Sensor Transmitter (Typ)WiePr Indtuced Voltag Sensor"" *Fiber I"=Current optic...well-characterized. 5.1 Skin Current Measurements Skin current vectors were measured at five fuselage locations on the left side of the WC-130 at a...MGL-S7) which were mounted so that they sampled two orthogonal components of the skin current vector . The measured responses were then inte- grated

  18. Structural and superconducting properties of (Y,Gd)Ba2Cu3O7-δ grown by MOCVD on samarium zirconate buffered IBAD-MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan, L; Holesinger, T G; Maiorov, B; Feldmann, D M; Usov, I O; DePaula, R F; Civale, L; Foltyn, S R; Jia, Q X; Chen, Y; Selvamanickam, V

    2008-01-01

    Textured samarium zirconate (SZO) films have been grown by reactive cosputtering directly on an ion beam assisted deposited (IBAD) MgO template, without an intermediate homoepitaxial MgO layer. The subsequent growth of 0.9 μm thick (Y,Gd)Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ ((Y, Gd)BCO) films by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) yielded well textured films with a full width at half maximum of 1.9 0 and 3.4 0 for the out-of-plane and in-plane texture, respectively. Microstructural characterizations of the SZO buffered samples revealed clean interfaces. This indicates that the SZO not only provides a diffusion barrier, but also functions as a buffer for (Y, Gd)BCO grown by MOCVD. The achievement of self-field critical current densities (J c ) of over 2 MA cm -2 at 75.5 K is another proof of the effectiveness of SZO as a buffer on the IBAD-MgO template. The in-field measurements revealed an asymmetric angular dependence of J c and a shift of the ab-plane maxima due to the tilted nature of the template and (Y,Gd) 2 O 3 particles existing in the (Y, Gd)BCO matrix. The present results are especially important because they demonstrate that high temperature superconducting coated conductors with simpler architecture can be fabricated using commercially viable processes

  19. Pharmacokinetics of labelled compounds with technetium-99m and samarium-153; Farmacocinetica de compuestos marcados con tecnecio-99m y samario-153

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borda O, L B; Torres L, M N

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish the different pharmacokinetics parameters of the main radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and samarium-153. These parameters could be subsequently used as reference to compare other products with the same use. Mathematical models and a computerized pharmacokinetic program were used to this purpose. A biodistribution study in quadruplicate and/or quintuplicate was conducted for each radiopharmaceutical, data was was obtained in injection dose percentages. The biodistribution study involved the injection of a predetermined dose of the radiopharmaceutical into animals (rats or mice), which were subsequently put away at different time intervals, removing the relevant organs. Activity in each organ was read by means of a well-type NaI scintillation counter, data obtained in activity counts was transformed into injection dose percentages. Based on these percentages, the mathematical model was constructed and the pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained using the computerized program Expo 2 v. 1, which is written in C language and works in windows. Analyzing the results obtained, we can conclude that the use of the Expo 2 v. 1 program for a bi compartmental analysis allowed us to obtain reliable pharmacokinetic parameters which describe what happens in the organism when the radiopharmaceutical passes from the central compartment to the peripheral one and vice versa.

  20. 130 kV 130 A High voltage switching mode power supply for neutral beam plasma heating: design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganuza, D.; Del Rio, J.M.; Garcia, I.; Garcia, F.; Garcia de Madinabeitia, P.; Perez, A.; Zabaleta, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The company JEMA has designed and manufactured two High Voltage Switching Mode Power Supplies (HVSMPS), rated at 130 kV dc and 130 A, each of which will feed the accelerator grids of two Positive Ion Neutral Injector (PINI) loads, to be installed at the Joint European Torus (EFDA-JET facility located at Culham, UK). The solution designed by JEMA includes two matching transformers which adapt the 36 kV of the JET AC power distribution network to the required 670 V at the secondary side. Additionally, such transformers provide a 30 deg.phase shift which is required by a 30000 A 12 pulse thyristor rectifier. The obtained and stabilised 650 V feed 120 IGBT invertors, which operate at 2778 Hz with modulated square waveform. Each invertor feeds a High Insulation High Frequency Transformer. The 120 transformers corresponding to one power supply are arranged in three oil filled tanks and provide the main insulation from the low voltage to the high voltage side. The square waveform obtained at the secondary of each transformer is rectified by means of a diode bridge. The connection in series of the 120 diode bridges provides the required 130 kV d.c. at the output. In order to protect the load, a redundant solid state crowbar has been designed. Such short circuiting device is composed of 26 Light Triggered Thyristors (LTTs), connected in series. Electrical simulations have been carried out in order to ensure that the system complies with the requirements of high accuracy and adequate protection of the load. The critical design of the High Voltage-High Frequency Transformers has also required electrostatic simulations of the electric field distribution

  1. 41 CFR 105-53.130-4 - Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Disadvantaged Business Utilization. 105-53.130-4 Section 105-53.130-4 Public Contracts and Property Management... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.130-4 Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization. (a) Creation and authority. Public Law 95-507, October 14, 1978, an amendment to the Small...

  2. 31 CFR 1.30 - Application to system of records maintained by Government contractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application to system of records maintained by Government contractors. 1.30 Section 1.30 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act § 1.30 Application to system of records maintained...

  3. 33 CFR 162.130 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules. 162.130 Section 162.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.130 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; general rules. (a) Purpose. The...

  4. 40 CFR 1033.130 - Instructions for engine remanufacturing or engine installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Instructions for engine remanufacturing or engine installation. 1033.130 Section 1033.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... and Related Requirements § 1033.130 Instructions for engine remanufacturing or engine installation. (a...

  5. 41 CFR 102-38.130 - Must we publicly advertise sales of Federal personal property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must we publicly advertise sales of Federal personal property? 102-38.130 Section 102-38.130 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 38-SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Sales Process Advertising § 102-38.130 Must we publicly advertise...

  6. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? 102-33.130 Section 102-33.130 Public Contracts and Property... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are...

  7. 42 CFR 440.130 - Diagnostic, screening, preventive, and rehabilitative services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diagnostic, screening, preventive, and rehabilitative services. 440.130 Section 440.130 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Definitions § 440.130 Diagnostic, screening, preventive, and rehabilitative services. (a) “Diagnostic services...

  8. 40 CFR 436.130 - Applicability; description of the borax subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... borax subcategory. 436.130 Section 436.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Borax Subcategory § 436.130 Applicability; description of the borax subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  9. 41 CFR 102-192.130 - What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as an agency mail manager? 102-192.130 Section 102-192.130 Public Contracts and Property... ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.130 What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager? In addition to carrying out the responsibilities in Subparts B, C, D...

  10. Scattering of 130 MeV helions on 58Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaloeis, A.; Alderliesten, C.; Bojowald, J.; Oelert, W.; Turek, P.

    1982-01-01

    Angular distributions for the tau + 58 Ni scattering to the (g.s., 0 + ) (1.45 MeV, 2 + ) and giant resonance (Esub(x) approximately 63Asup(-1/3) MeV) states in 58 Ni have been measured at Esub(tau) = 130 MeV in an angular range thetasub(c.m.) = 6 0 -83 0 . Optical model and DWBA analyses have been performed. The use of helion optical potentials with either a volume (Woods-Saxon) or a surface (Woods-Saxon derivative) absorption results in good fits to the g.s. and 1.45 MeV data. However, the volume absorption gives consistently a better fit quality. The discrete ambiguity of the helion optical potential has been resolved in favour of the shallow potential family. The giant resonance is found to have a dominant quadrupole (L=2) character with about 6% (EWSR) L=4 admixture. (Auth.)

  11. Wide modulation bandwidth terahertz detection in 130 nm CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Shamsun; Shafee, Marwah; Blin, Stéphane; Pénarier, Annick; Nouvel, Philippe; Coquillat, Dominique; Safwa, Amr M. E.; Knap, Wojciech; Hella, Mona M.

    2016-11-01

    Design, manufacturing and measurements results for silicon plasma wave transistors based wireless communication wideband receivers operating at 300 GHz carrier frequency are presented. We show the possibility of Si-CMOS based integrated circuits, in which by: (i) specific physics based plasma wave transistor design allowing impedance matching to the antenna and the amplifier, (ii) engineering the shape of the patch antenna through a stacked resonator approach and (iii) applying bandwidth enhancement strategies to the design of integrated broadband amplifier, we achieve an integrated circuit of the 300 GHz carrier frequency receiver for wireless wideband operation up to/over 10 GHz. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of low cost 130 nm Si-CMOS technology, plasma wave transistors based fast/wideband integrated receiver operating at 300 GHz atmospheric window. These results pave the way towards future large scale (cost effective) silicon technology based terahertz wireless communication receivers.

  12. Calibration and Data Analysis of the MC-130 Air Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Dennis; Ulbrich, N.

    2012-01-01

    Design, calibration, calibration analysis, and intended use of the MC-130 air balance are discussed. The MC-130 balance is an 8.0 inch diameter force balance that has two separate internal air flow systems and one external bellows system. The manual calibration of the balance consisted of a total of 1854 data points with both unpressurized and pressurized air flowing through the balance. A subset of 1160 data points was chosen for the calibration data analysis. The regression analysis of the subset was performed using two fundamentally different analysis approaches. First, the data analysis was performed using a recently developed extension of the Iterative Method. This approach fits gage outputs as a function of both applied balance loads and bellows pressures while still allowing the application of the iteration scheme that is used with the Iterative Method. Then, for comparison, the axial force was also analyzed using the Non-Iterative Method. This alternate approach directly fits loads as a function of measured gage outputs and bellows pressures and does not require a load iteration. The regression models used by both the extended Iterative and Non-Iterative Method were constructed such that they met a set of widely accepted statistical quality requirements. These requirements lead to reliable regression models and prevent overfitting of data because they ensure that no hidden near-linear dependencies between regression model terms exist and that only statistically significant terms are included. Finally, a comparison of the axial force residuals was performed. Overall, axial force estimates obtained from both methods show excellent agreement as the differences of the standard deviation of the axial force residuals are on the order of 0.001 % of the axial force capacity.

  13. Retention capacity of samarium (III) in zircon for it possible use in retaining walls for confinement of nuclear residues; Capacidad de retencion de samario (III) en circon para su posible uso en barreras de contencion para confinamiento de residuos nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N

    2006-07-01

    Mexico, as country that produces part of its electric power by nuclear means, should put special emphasis in the development of technologies guided to the sure and long term confinement of the high level nuclear residuals. This work studies the capacity that has the natural zircon to retain to the samarium (III) in solution, by what due, firstly, to characterize the zircon for technical instrumental to determine the purity and characteristic of the mineral in study. The instrumental techniques that were used to carry out the physicochemical characterization were the neutron activation analysis (NAA), the infrared spectroscopy (IS), the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), semiquantitative analysis, dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and luminescence technique. The characterization of the surface properties carries out by means of the determination of the surface area using the BET multipoint technique, acidity constants, hydration time, the determination of the point of null charge (pH{sub PCN}) and density of surface sites (D{sub s}). The luminescence techniques were useful to determine the optimal point hydration of the zircon and for the quantification of the samarium, for that here intends the development of both analysis techniques. With the adjustment of the titration curves in the FITEQL 4 package the constants of surface acidity in the solid/liquid interface were determined. To the finish of this study it was corroborated that the zircon is a mineral that presents appropriate characteristics to be proposed as a contention barrier for the deep geologic confinement. With regard to the study of adsorption that one carries out the samarium retention it is superior to 90% under the described conditions. This investigation could also be applicable in the confinement of dangerous industrial residuals. (Author)

  14. A 130 ka reconstruction of rainfall on the Bolivian Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placzek, C. J.; Quade, J.; Patchett, P. J.

    2013-02-01

    New efforts to link climate reconstructions from shoreline deposits and sediment cores yield an improved and more detailed lake history from the Bolivian Altiplano. On the Southern Altiplano, 10 lake oscillations have been identified from this new unified chronology, each coincident with North Atlantic cold events such as Heinrich Events H5, H2, H1, and the Younger Dryas. By coupling this new lake history to a hydrologic budget model we are able to evaluate precipitation variability on the Southern Bolivian Altiplano over the last 130 ka. These modeling efforts underscore the relative aridity of the Altiplano during the rare and small lake cycles occurring between 80 and 20 ka, when colder temperatures combined with little or no change in rainfall produced smaller paleolakes. Relative aridity between 80 and 20 ka contrasts with the immense Tauca lake cycle (18.1-14.1 ka), which was six times larger than modern Lake Titicaca and coincided with Heinrich Event 1. This improved paleolake record from the Southern Altiplano reveals a strong link between central Andean climate and Atlantic sea-surface temperature gradients during the late Pleistocene, even though today rainfall variability is driven mostly by Pacific sea-surface temperature anomalies associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. However, not all Heinrich Events appear to result in lake expansions, most conspicuously during the global cold interval between 80 and 20 ka when the Altiplano and Amazon Basin were relatively arid.

  15. 46 CFR 148.04-17 - Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above. 148.04-17...-17 Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above. (a) The requirements of this part do not apply to bulk shipments of petroleum coke, calcined, on any vessel when the material is less than 130 °F. (b...

  16. Gas Pobre: Factibilidad de su uso en los motores ZIL – 130; Poor Gas: Feasibility of use other ZIL - 130

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor - Proenza Pérez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se hace un estudio de los diferentes tipos de gasificadores existentes, así como el estado actual de latecnología de gasificación, realizando la selección del gasificador Downdraft Imbert Modificado, desarrollado porinvestigaciones del grupo de Conversión Térmica de la Biomasa de la Universidad de Camagüey, por las ventajasque el mismo presenta para el accionamiento directo de un Motor de Combustión Interna, las cuales son, bajaconcentración de alquitrán en el gas pobre (<10mg/Nm3 y baja temperatura del gas producto a la salida delgasificador, el motor seleccionado es el ZIL-130, por ser de amplio uso en nuestro país y estar perfectamenteadaptado al entorno cubano, se les realizaron diferentes cálculos teóricos con el objetivo de visualizar sucomportamiento al sustituirle su combustible original por gas pobre así como una valoración económica de dichasustitución, también se logro dimensionar el gasificador que alimentará dichos motores.In this work a study of the different types of existent gasifiers is made, as well as the current state of the gasificationtechnology, carrying out the selection of the gasifier Downdraft Modified Imbert, developed by investigations of thegroup of Thermal Conversion of the Biomass, for the advantages that the same one presents for the direct working ofa MCI, which are, low concentration of tar in the poor gas (<10mg/Nm3 and low temperature of the gas product to,the selected motor is the ZIL-130, to be of wide use in our country and to be perfectly adapted to the Cubanenvironment, they were carried out different theoretical calculations with the objective of visualizing its behavior whensubstituting him its original fuel for poor gas as well as an economic valuation of this substitution, you also achievesdimensionar the gasifier that will feed this motors.

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of 120-130Te nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoy, J.R.; Champine, B.R.; Coleman, R.T.; Crandell, K.A.; Tanyi, J.A.; Hicks, S.F.; Alexander, G.K.; Burkett, P.G.; Burns, M.C.; Collard, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Structure of the even 120-130 Te nuclei have been investigated with prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy following the 122-126,nat Te(n,n'γ) reactions and the (α,2nγ) 120,124,126 Te reactions. Gamma-ray excitation functions, angular distributions, γγ-coincidences, and Doppler shifts have been measured. Level schemes have been constructed to approximately 3.3 MeV excitation energy, and spectroscopic information including level spins and parities, branching and multipole-mixing ratios, and lifetimes have been extracted. Three different types of structure are thought to play an important role in these low-lying excitations. These are: collective, two-particle, and 4p-2h intruder excitations. Because there are seven stable even-even Te nuclei, the evolution of these excitation modes over this wide range in neutron number is investigated. Level sequences and transition rates obtained from these measurements are compared to IBM-2 model calculations both with and without intruder-state mixing by Rikovska et al. (1), and to particle-vibrational coupling model calculations by Lopac (2). The IBM-2 model calculations with intruder mixing well reproduce the level energies in the low-mass Te; however, examination of the electromagnetic transition rates reveals that there is no clear improvement in the description of these nuclei by adding the intruder configurations. Additionally, no evidence of the 2 + mixed-symmetry strength is observed in the 2 3 + and 2 4 + levels in these nuclei. The particle-vibration model calculations appear to do a good job describing both the level scheme and the transition rates in the heavier nuclei investigated. (author)

  18. Bunker door interlock limit issues of K-130 cyclotron, VECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srihari, K.; Ravishankar, R.; Mitra, M.S.; Mishra, S.K.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    The K-130 cyclotron is in operation at VECC, Kolkata. Recently modernization of the cyclotron has taken place. Central region modification has increased reasonable internal beam current. During the tuning of the projectiles, loss of beam is unavoidable and projectiles hitting different parts of the machine inside the vacuum chamber . These interactions produce prompt radiation comprising neutron and gamma. However machine bunker is not accessible during the operation of the machine. The induced activity produced because of interactions of the primary and secondary radiation a radiation hazardous environment during the shut down for the related maintenance work. Area radiation monitors placed at machine bunker room have the interlock with massive shield door of the bunker. Area radiation monitors are set to specified limiting value, lower than that will allow to open the shield door in normal condition. As, the internal beam current being increased and the probability of beam spread being more. Consequently generation of induced activity is also high leading to delay in machine bunker door opening because of the interlock settings. Radiation dose mapping after a long operation of the machine was done for the different strategic points (The locations mainly people access immediate after shut down). Different consequences and remedial measures being presented in paper to raise the dose rate limit level for the interlocks between the area radiation monitors with machine bunker door, keeping in mind of the regulatory requirements. Raising the limit of dose rate limiting value will minimize the waiting time to access the machine bunker which will increase the duty factor of the machine. (author)

  19. Multicentre trial on the efficacy and toxicity of single-dose samarium-153-ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate as a palliative treatment for painful skeletal metastases in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jia-he; Zhang Jin-ming; He Yi-jie; Hou Qing-tian; Oyang Qiao-hong; Wang Jian-min; Chuan Ling

    1999-01-01

    A multicentre trial was organized in China as part of an international coordinated research project to study the efficacy and toxicity of single-dose samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) as a palliative treatment for painful skeletal metastases. One hundred and five patients with painful bone metastases from various primaries were treated with 153 Sm-EDTMP at a dose of 37 MBq/kg(group I) or 18.5 MBq/kg (group II). The effects were evaluated according to change in daily analgesic consumption, pain score, sum of effect product (SEP), Physician's Global Assessment (PGA), blood counts, and organ function tests conducted regularly for 16 weeks. Fifty-eight of 70 patients in group I and 30 of 35 in group II had a positive response, with SEPs of 22.29±14.47 and 20.13±13.90 respectively. Of 72 patients who had been receiving analgesics, 63 reduced their consumption. PGA showed that the Karnofsky score (KS) increased from 58.54±25.90 to 71.67±26.53, indicating improved general condition, but the difference was not significant. Among subgroups of patients, only those with breast cancer showed a significant change in the Karnofsky score after treatment. Inter-group differences were found for net change in KS between patients with lung and patients with breast cancer, and between patients with lung and patients with oesophageal cancer. Seventeen patients showed no response. No serious side-effects were noted, except for falls in the white blood cell (nadir 1.5 x 10 9 /l) and platelet (nadir 6.0 x 10 10 /l) counts in 44/105 and 34/105 cases, respectively. Ten patients had an abnormal liver function test. Response and side-effects were both independent of dose. In conclusion, 153 Sm-EDTMP provided effective palliation in 83.8% of patients with painful bone metastases; the major toxicity was temporary myelosuppression. Further studies are needed to identify better ways of determining the appropriate dose in the individual case and the efficacy of

  20. Converting a C-130 Hercules into a Compound Helicopter: A Conceptual Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottapalli, Anjaney P.; Harris, Franklin D.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the performance and weight changes for a Compound C-130 as compared to the Baseline C-130H Hercules, using NDARC as the primary analysis tool. First, the C-130H was modeled within NDARC, from which performance at various conditions and a parametric weight statement were generated. Then, the C-130H NDARC file was modified to represent the Compound C-130, which was then put through the same performance analysis as the C-130H. A parametric weight statement was also calculated for the Compound C-130, which allowed for comparison to the C-130H. As part of the modeling of the Compound C-130, a Rotor Design Spreadsheet was created that would allow the direct calculation of the weight of the main rotors being added. Using composite materials led to considerable weight savings for both the rotor system and the hub weights. These weight savings are reflected in the NDARC Technology Factors which were determined to be 0.71 and 0.5 for the rotor blades and the hub/hinge system, respectively. Such Technology Factors suggest that using composites for other components could drastically lighten the Operating Empty Weight of the aircraft. The weight statements show the weights for each of the components on each aircraft. It is quite evident that the Compound C-130 has a higher Operating Empty Weight due to the addition of the two main rotors and a drive system to connect each engine group on the wing tips. Upon further analysis, the main weight driver is the drive system. While the main rotor/hub/hinge weight increase is to be expected, the weight increase due to the transmission drive and gear boxes are cause for concern. Unless a method can be found of reducing the weight of the drive system, the weight penalty makes the Compound a C-130 an inefficient aircraft in terms of payload/fuel capacity. Possible solutions are either off-loading some of the power requirements through the drive system or using composite materials in the construction of the drive system

  1. Ruschita Romanian marble - 130 years of official exploitation and 130 m depth of architectural beauty around the word

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetean, Valentina

    2013-04-01

    Developed in a large metamorphic area, the marble deposit from Ruschita perimeter is the most important Romanian source for ornamental stone, the old quarry being operative since 1883. The closest locality offer the commercial name also, identical with the geological one as is defined in the technical referentials and in the denomination European standard. Ruschita is also an active quarry, developed by step-by-step expansion in depth (the initial extraction reached 130 m depth), but also in the adjacent areas. The important height of the open deposit offered the possibility to the owner, MARMOSIM SA, to apply an experimental extraction method, by underground mining. It is the only Romanian place, and few in the world, where this spectacular mining element can be found for dimension stone. The extraction gallery was built starting from the lower level of the old quarry and allowed obtaining nicer and bigger blocks. The Ruschita marble is a metamorphic stone with high crystallinity and medium size of crystals (until 0.2-0.5 mm). Has the basic colour from white and grey to pink, with many intermediary nuances generally given by grey veins and less by impurities from internal structure. The stone present irregular break, sometimes following the very narrow internal discontinuities, invisible at macroscopic analyse. The main physical - mechanical characteristics are presented below: Characteristic M.U. Value Apparent density Kg/m3 2680 - 2720 Water absorption % 0.12 - 0.21 Capillarity g/m2.s0,5 0.130-0.218 Porosity % 0.30 - 0.74 Compression strength N/mm2 85 - 120 Flexural strength MPa 15-18 Rupture energy J 5 Coefficient of frost cleftness % 10 -14 Abrasion resistance - Bohme cm3/50cm2 17-18 Salt crystallization % 0.1 Nowadays, the extraction in the Ruschita area is achieved by equipments from Dazzini, Fantini, Pellegrini, Korfamann, Caterpillar, Volvo and Komatsu. The average volume of blocks is bigger than 10-12 m2. The Ruschita marble can be easily cut at size and

  2. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001 ...

  3. 32 CFR 552.130 - Disposition of confiscated/seized weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .../unattended on the installation, will be immediately turned over to the military police, U.S. Army Criminal... military police, USACIDC, or other law enforcement or judicial agencies, the items will be disposed of....130 Section 552.130 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY...

  4. IL-13 R130Q single nucleotide polymorphism in asthmatic Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma and its associated phenotypes are under a substantial degree of genetic control. The common variant IL-13 gene polymorphism R130Q is reported to be associated with the risk of development of asthma in some populations. Objective: We sought to study the association of IL-13 genetic variant R130Q ...

  5. 38 CFR 21.130 - Educational and vocational courses outside the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... vocational courses outside a State if the case manager determines that such training is in the best interest... vocational courses outside the United States. 21.130 Section 21.130 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation...

  6. Distinct phosphorylation events regulate p130- and p107-mediated repression of E2F-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, Thomas; Hansen, Klaus; Holm, Karin

    2002-01-01

    The "pocket proteins" pRb (retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein), p107, and p130 regulate cell proliferation via phosphorylation-sensitive interactions with E2F transcription factors and other proteins. We previously identified 22 in vivo phosphorylation sites in human p130, including three...

  7. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 130 - Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist C Appendix C to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... C to Part 130—Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist ER31MY00.004...

  8. 21 CFR 130.8 - Conformity to definitions and standards of identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... identity. 130.8 Section 130.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Conformity to definitions and standards of identity. In the following conditions, among others, a food does not conform to the definition and standard of identity therefor: (a) If it contains an ingredient for...

  9. 13 CFR 130.340 - SBDC services and restrictions on service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Training and Specialized Services, concerning the formation, financing, management and operation of small... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false SBDC services and restrictions on service. 130.340 Section 130.340 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  10. 20 CFR 220.130 - Work experience as a vocational factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Work experience as a vocational factor. 220.130 Section 220.130 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD... amount of walking, standing, sitting, lifting and carrying the claimant did during the work day, as well...

  11. 130 años, Presencia de la Academia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraím Otero Ruiz

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available

    El mes de agosto conmemora la Academia Nacional de Medicina, en ceremonia especial, sus 130 años de fundada. Efectivamente, el 3 de enero de 1873 se reunieron en Bogotá, en casa del Dr. Abraham Aparicio los fundadores, doctores Manuel Plata Azuero, Nicolás Osorio, Liborio Zerda, Leoncio Barreto, Evaristo García y el dueño de casa para crear una sociedad “para el estudio y adelanto de las ciencias médicas y naturales”, teniendo como objetivo adicional “el de solidarizar al cuerpo médico y darle unidad al ejercicio profesional, en Bogotá y después en el resto del país”.

    Como Presidente y Secretario se eligieron al Dr. Plata Azuero y al Dr. Aparicio, encargando al Dr. Zerda la elaboración del proyecto de reglamento. En la segunda reunión, que declaró formalmente establecida la Sociedad de Medicina y Ciencias Naturales, concurrieron además los doctores Julio A. Corredor, Samuel Fajardo, Proto Gómez, Andrés María Pardo, Bernardino Medina, Policarpo Pizarro, Pío Rengifo, Rafael Rocha Castilla, Federico Rivas, Joaquín Sarmiento y Antonio Ospina como médicos, asistiendo como naturalista el Sr. Francisco Montoya.

    Adoptaron el reglamento elaborado por el Dr. Zerda y continuaron reuniéndose mensualmente; en julio 2 de 1873 apareció el primer número de la Revista Médica (hoy “Medicina” que, con algunas interrupciones, continuaría publicándose hasta nuestros días.

    Diecisiete años después, en noviembre de 1890, el presidente Carlos Holguín sancionó la Ley 71 de 1890 en que se creaba, con base en la antigua Sociedad, la Academia Nacional de Medicina, cuyo primer Presidente fue el Dr. José María Buendía.

    La Academia fue formalmente instalada por el Presidente Holguín en Abril de 1891 y desde entonces ha venido sesionando en forma ininterrumpida por más de un siglo, cumpliendo la función asesora en materias de salud que le fuera otorgada desde su creación y le fuera ratificada por la

  12. 130 LPW 1000 Lm Warm White LED for Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soer, Wouter [Philips Lumileds Lighting Company LLC, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-12-21

    An illumination-grade warm-white LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2700 and 3500 K and capable of producing 1000 lm output at over 130 lm/W at room temperature, has been developed in this program. The high-power warm-white LED is an ideal source for use in indoor and outdoor lighting applications. Over the two year period, we have made the following accomplishments: • Developed a low-cost high-power white LED package and commercialized a series of products with CCT ranging from 2700 to 5700 K under the product name LUXEON M; • Demonstrated a record efficacy of 124.8 lm/W at a flux of 1023 lm, CCT of 3435 K and color rendering index (CRI) over 80 at room temperature in the productized package; • Demonstrated a record efficacy of 133.1 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lm, CCT of 3475 K and CRI over 80 at room temperature in an R&D package. The new high-power LED package is a die-on-ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 2 mm2 InGaN pump dice, flip-chip attached to a ceramic submount in a 2x2 array configuration. The submount design utilizes a design approach that combines a high-thermal- conductivity ceramic core for die attach and a low-cost and low-thermal-conductivity ceramic frame for mechanical support and as optical lens carrier. The LED package has a thermal resistance of less than 1.25 K/W. The white LED fabrication also adopts a new batch level (instead of die-by-die) phosphor deposition process with precision layer thickness and composition control, which provides not only tight color control, but also low cost. The efficacy performance goal was achieved through the progress in following key areas: (1) high-efficiency royal blue pump LED development through active region design and epitaxial growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs); (2) improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN-die-level and package-level optical extraction efficiency; and (3) improvement in phosphor

  13. Low- and high-risk human papillomavirus E7 proteins regulate p130 differently

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow-Laing, Lisa; Chen Wei; Roman, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The E7 protein of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR HPVs) targets pRb family members (pRb, p107 and p130) for degradation; low-risk (LR) HPV E7 only targets p130 for degradation. The effect of HR HPV 16 E7 and LR HPV 6 E7 on p130 intracellular localization and half-life was examined. Nuclear/cytoplasmic fractionation and immunofluorescence showed that, in contrast to control and HPV 6 E7-expressing cells, a greater amount of p130 was present in the cytoplasm in the presence of HPV 16 E7. The half-life of p130, relative to control cells, was decreased in the cytoplasm in the presence of HPV 6 E7 or HPV 16 E7, but only decreased by HPV 6 E7 in the nucleus. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation extended the half-life of p130, regardless of intracellular localization. These results suggest that there may be divergent mechanisms by which LR and HR HPV E7 target p130 for degradation.

  14. Vp130, a chloroviral surface protein that interacts with the host Chlorella cell wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimatsu, Hideki; Sugimoto, Ichiro; Fujie, Makoto; Usami, Shoji; Yamada, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    A protein, Vp130, that interacts with the host cell wall was isolated from Chlorovirus CVK2. From its peptide sequence, the gene for Vp130 was identified on the PBCV-1 genomic sequence as an ORF combining A140R and A145R. In Vp130, the N-terminus was somehow modified and the C-terminus was occupied by 23-26 tandem repeats of a PAPK motif. In the internal region, Vp130 contained seven repeats of 70-73 amino acids, each copy of which was separated by PAPK sequences. This protein was well conserved among NC64A viruses. A recombinant rVp130N protein formed in Escherichia coli was shown not only to bind directly to the host cell wall in vitro but also to specifically bind to the host cells, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. Because externally added rVp130N competed with CVK2 to bind to host cells, Vp130 is most likely to be a host-recognizing protein on the virion

  15. Change of nuclear configurations in the neutrinoless double-β decay of 130Te →130Be and 136Xe136Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwisle, J. P.; Kay, B. P.; Tamii, A.; Adachi, S.; Aoi, N.; Clark, J. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Furuno, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Hoffman, C. R.; Ideguchi, E.; Ito, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Kawabata, T.; Liu, B.; Miura, M.; Ong, H. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Sharp, D. K.; Süsoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Szwec, S. V.; Takaki, M.; Tsumura, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-06-01

    The change in the configuration of valence protons between the initial and final states in the neutrinoless double-β decay of 130Te → 130Be and of 136Xe136Ba has been determined by measuring the cross sections of the (d ,3He) reaction with 101-MeV deuterons. Together with our recent determination of the relevant neutron configurations involved in the process, a quantitative comparison with the latest shell-model and interacting-boson-model calculations reveals significant discrepancies. These are the same calculations used to determine the nuclear matrix elements governing the rate of neutrinoless double-β decay in these systems.

  16. Studies on the rare earth complexes with pyridine derivatives and their N-oxide(II) - Synthesis and properties of fluorescent solid complexes of samarium, europium, gadolium and terbium chlorides with 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minyu, T.; Ning, T.; Yingli, Z.; Jiyuan, B.

    1985-01-01

    The solid complexes of rare earth nitrates perchlorates and thiocyanates with 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide (bipyO/sub 2/) have been reported. However, the corresponding complexes of other rear earth chlorides have not been investigated except lanthanum, cerium and yttrium. As an extension of our previous work on the synthesis of complexes of praseodymium and neodymium chlorides wiht bipoyO/sub 2/, the authors have now prepared fluorescent solid complexes of samarium, europium, gadolium and terbium chlorides with biphyO/sub 2/, using methanol as a reaction medium. The new synthesized compounds have been identified by means of elemental analysis, infrared spectrometry, conductometry, differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG) and X-ray powder diffraction

  17. Measurement and analysis of excitation functions in (α,np) reactions on 128,130Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.P.; Sankaracharyulu, M.G.V.; Ansari, M.A.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H.D.

    1992-02-01

    Excitation functions for the reactions 128 Te(α,np) 130 I, 130 Te(α,np) 132 I and 130 Te(α,np) 132m I have been measured using stacked foil technique and have also been calculated using statistical model with and without the inclusion of pre-equilibrium emission. As expected, inclusion of pre-equilibrium emission in compound nucleus calculations agree well with the experimental excitation functions. The pre-equilibrium fraction has been found to be energy and target mass number dependent. (author). 37 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  18. An Iraq C-130 Aviation Advisor Mission and Lessons for the Future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bauer, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    .... A review of lessons learned from the initial Iraq C-130 advisor mission provided insights into challenges stemming from differences in United States advisors and Iraqi airmen in language, culture...

  19. miRNA-130a regulates C/EBP-ε expression during granulopoiesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Maria T; Häger, Mattias; Glenthøj, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    cells. In contrast, C/EBP-ε protein is virtually detectable only in the MC/MM population, indicating that expression in more immature cells could be inhibited by microRNAs (miRNAs). We found that miRNA-130a (miR-130a) regulates C/EBP-ε protein expression in both murine and human granulocytic precursors...... target site for miR-130a restored both C/EBP-ε production, expression of Camp and Lcn2, and resulted in the cells having a more mature phenotype. We conclude that miR-130a is important for the regulation of the timed expression of C/EBP-ε during granulopoiesis.......CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-ε (C/EBP-ε) is considered a master transcription factor regulating terminal neutrophil maturation. It is essential for expression of secondary granule proteins, but it also regulates proliferation, cell cycle, and maturation during granulopoiesis. Cebpe(-/-) mice have...

  20. Perioperative volume replacement in children undergoing cardiac surgery: albumin versus hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanart, Christophe; Khalife, Maher; de Villé, Andrée; Otte, Florence; de Hert, Stefan; van der Linden, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare 4% albumin with 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 in terms of perioperative blood loss and intraoperative fluid requirements in children undergoing cardiac surgery. DESIGN: Prospective randomized study. SETTING: Single University Hospital. PATIENTS: Pediatric patients

  1. OW Smith and Sandwell v8.2 - 1/30 Degree Bathymetry & Topography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Global bathymetry and topography information at 1/30 degree resolution. Data collected by means of in-situ and satellite measurements.

  2. SAFARI 2000 C-130 Aerosol and Meteorological Data, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Met Office C-130 research aircraft was based at Windhoek, Namibia, between September 5-16, 2000, where it conducted a series of flights over Namibia as part of...

  3. SAFARI 2000 C-130 Aerosol and Meteorological Data, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Met Office C-130 research aircraft was based at Windhoek, Namibia, between September 5-16, 2000, where it conducted a series of flights over Namibia as...

  4. Qualification and Flight Test of Non-Chrome Primers for C-130 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    system  Significant hexavalent chrome reduction in finish system  Potential exposure level of spray applied chromated conversion coating not as...Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Qualification and Flight Test of Non- Chrome Primers for C-130 Aircraft Scott Jones Lockheed Martin...00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Qualification and Flight Test of Non- Chrome Primers for C-130 Aircraft 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  5. Oncostatin M induces heat hypersensitivity by gp130-dependent sensitization of TRPV1 in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langeslag Michiel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oncostatin M (OSM is a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family and regulates eg. gene activation, cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. OSM binds to a receptor complex consisting of the ubiquitously expressed signal transducer gp130 and the ligand binding OSM receptor subunit, which is expressed on a specific subset of primary afferent neurons. In the present study, the effect of OSM on heat nociception was investigated in nociceptor-specific gp130 knock-out (SNS-gp130-/- and gp130 floxed (gp130fl/fl mice. Subcutaneous injection of pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of OSM into the hind-paw of C57BL6J wild type mice significantly reduced paw withdrawal latencies to heat stimulation. In contrast to gp130fl/fl mice, OSM did not induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo in SNS-gp130-/- mice. OSM applied at the receptive fields of sensory neurons in in vitro skin-nerve preparations showed that OSM significantly increased the discharge rate during a standard ramp-shaped heat stimulus. The capsaicin- and heat-sensitive ion channel TRPV1, expressed on a subpopulation of nociceptive neurons, has been shown to play an important role in inflammation-induced heat hypersensitivity. Stimulation of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons with OSM resulted in potentiation of capsaicin induced ionic currents. In line with these recordings, mice with a null mutation of the TRPV1 gene did not show any signs of OSM-induced heat hypersensitivity in vivo. The present data suggest that OSM induces thermal hypersensitivity by directly sensitizing nociceptors via OSMR-gp130 receptor mediated potentiation of TRPV1.

  6. Myxoma virus M130R is a novel virulence factor required for lethal myxomatosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John W; Werden, Steven J; Wang, Fuan; McKillop, William M; Jimenez, June; Villeneuve, Danielle; McFadden, Grant; Dekaban, Gregory A

    2009-09-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a highly lethal, rabbit-specific poxvirus that induces a disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits. In an effort to understand the function of predicted immunomodulatory genes we have deleted various viral genes from MV and tested the ability of these knockout viruses to induce lethal myxomatosis. MV encodes a unique 15 kD cytoplasmic protein (M130R) that is expressed late (12h post infection) during infection. M130R is a non-essential gene for MV replication in rabbit, monkey or human cell lines. Construction of a targeted gene knockout virus (vMyx130KO) and infection of susceptible rabbits demonstrate that the M130R knockout virus is attenuated and that loss of M130R expression allows the rabbit host immune system to effectively respond to and control the lethal effects of MV. M130R expression is a bona fide poxviral virulence factor necessary for full and lethal development of myxomatosis.

  7. Impact of microRNA-130a on the neutrophil proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Corinna Cavan; Refsgaard, Jan Christian; Østergaard, Ole

    2015-01-01

    by in silico prediction algorithms one at a time. However, one miRNA can have many different targets, which may vary depending on the context. Here, we investigated the effect of miR-130a on the proteome of a murine and a human myeloid cell line. RESULTS: Using pulsed stable isotope labelling of amino acids...... with the impact on protein levels. We used RAIN, a novel database for miRNA-protein and protein-protein interactions, to identify putative miR-130a targets. In the 32Dcl3 clone, putative targets were more up-regulated than the remaining quantified proteins following miR-130a inhibition, and three significantly...... derepressed proteins (NFYC, ISOC1, and CAT) are putative miR-130a targets with good RAIN scores. We also created a network including inferred, putative neutrophil miR-130a targets and identified the transcription factors Myb and CBF-β as putative miR-130a targets, which may regulate the primary granule...

  8. 45 CFR 2544.130 - How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... solicit or accept a donation? 2544.130 Section 2544.130 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... DONATIONS § 2544.130 How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation? (a) The Corporation will solicit and accept a donation only for the purpose of furthering the mission and goals of the...

  9. 17 CFR 274.130 - Form N-Q, quarterly schedule of portfolio holdings of registered management investment company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of portfolio holdings of registered management investment company. 274.130 Section 274.130 Commodity... INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 Forms for Reports § 274.130 Form N-Q, quarterly schedule of portfolio holdings of registered management investment company. This form shall be used by registered management...

  10. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total...

  11. 9 CFR 130.18 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site (excluding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site (excluding FADDL). 130.18 Section 130.18 Animals and... § 130.18 User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site...

  12. 9 CFR 130.16 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. 130.16 Section 130.16 Animals... USER FEES § 130.16 User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding...

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.130 - Must my agency use a GBL for express, courier, or small package shipments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... package express delivery, the terms and conditions of that contract are binding. ... for express, courier, or small package shipments? 102-118.130 Section 102-118.130 Public Contracts and... Transportation Services § 102-118.130 Must my agency use a GBL for express, courier, or small package shipments...

  14. Ferrites Ni{sub 0,5}Zn{sub 0,5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} doped with samarium: structural analysis, morphological and electromagnetic; Ferritas Ni{sub 0,5}Zn{sub 0,5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} dopada com samario: analise estrutural, morfologica e eletromagnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A.C.F.M.; Diniz, A.P., E-mail: anacristina@dema.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academinca de Engenharia de Materiais; Viana, K.M.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, PE (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Cornejo, D.R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Kiminami, R.H.G.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes to investigate the sintering at 1200 deg C/2h of Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2-x}Sm{sub x}O{sub 4} ferrite doped with 0.05; 0.075 e 0.1 mol of Sm synthesized by combustion reaction to evaluate the performance materials as absorbers of electromagnetic radiation. The influence of the concentration of samarium on the structure, morphology and electromagnetic properties of ferrites was studied. The resulting samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic measurements and reflectivity measurements in the frequency range between 8-12 GHz. The results showed that increasing the concentration of samarium caused a decrease in particle size of the samples, encouraging, therefore, to obtain materials with better values of magnetization and reflectivity, allowing for use as absorbers in narrow-band frequency between 9-10 GHz. (author)

  15. 24 CFR 1000.130 - May a recipient charge a non low-income family rents or homebuyer payments which are more than 30...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...? 1000.130 Section 1000.130 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES Affordable Housing Activities § 1000.130 May a...

  16. Mek1Y130C mice recapitulate aspects of human cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoidi, Rifdat; Houde, Nicolas; Landry-Truchon, Kim; Holter, Michael; Jacquet, Kevin; Charron, Louis; Yu, Benjamin D.; Rauen, Katherine A.; Bisson, Nicolas; Newbern, Jason

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RAS/MAPK signaling pathway is one of the most investigated pathways, owing to its established role in numerous cellular processes and implication in cancer. Germline mutations in genes encoding members of the RAS/MAPK pathway also cause severe developmental syndromes collectively known as RASopathies. These syndromes share overlapping characteristics, including craniofacial dysmorphology, cardiac malformations, cutaneous abnormalities and developmental delay. Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC) is a rare RASopathy associated with mutations in BRAF, KRAS, MEK1 (MAP2K1) and MEK2 (MAP2K2). MEK1 and MEK2 mutations are found in ∼25% of the CFC patients and the MEK1Y130C substitution is the most common one. However, little is known about the origins and mechanisms responsible for the development of CFC. To our knowledge, no mouse model carrying RASopathy-linked Mek1 or Mek2 gene mutations has been reported. To investigate the molecular and developmental consequences of the Mek1Y130C mutation, we generated a mouse line carrying this mutation. Analysis of mice from a Mek1 allelic series revealed that the Mek1Y130C allele expresses both wild-type and Y130C mutant forms of MEK1. However, despite reduced levels of MEK1 protein and the lower abundance of MEK1 Y130C protein than wild type, Mek1Y130C mutants showed increased ERK (MAPK) protein activation in response to growth factors, supporting a role for MEK1 Y130C in hyperactivation of the RAS/MAPK pathway, leading to CFC. Mek1Y130C mutant mice exhibited pulmonary artery stenosis, cranial dysmorphia and neurological anomalies, including increased numbers of GFAP+ astrocytes and Olig2+ oligodendrocytes in regions of the cerebral cortex. These data indicate that the Mek1Y130C mutation recapitulates major aspects of CFC, providing a new animal model to investigate the physiopathology of this RASopathy. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29590634

  17. Interaction between focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated tyrosine kinase substrate p130Cas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polte, T R; Hanks, S K

    1995-11-07

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been implicated in integrin-mediated signaling events and in the mechanism of cell transformation by the v-Src and v-Crk oncoproteins. To gain further insight into FAK signaling pathways, we used a two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact with mouse FAK. The screen identified two proteins that interact with FAK via their Src homology 3 (SH3) domains: a v-Crk-associated tyrosine kinase substrate (Cas), p130Cas, and a still uncharacterized protein, FIPSH3-2, which contains an SH3 domain closely related to that of p130Cas. These SH3 domains bind to the same proline-rich region of FAK (APPKPSR) encompassing residues 711-717. The mouse p130Cas amino acid sequence was deduced from cDNA clones, revealing an overall high degree of similarity to the recently reported rat sequence. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that p130Cas and FAK are associated in mouse fibroblasts. The stable interaction between p130Cas and FAK emerges as a likely key element in integrin-mediated signal transduction and further represents a direct molecular link between the v-Src and v-Crk oncoproteins. The Src family kinase Fyn, whose Src homology 2 (SH2) domain binds to the major FAK autophosphorylation site (tyrosine 397), was also identified in the two-hybrid screen.

  18. Commissioning and operation of 130 kV/130 A switched-mode HV power supplies with the upgraded JET neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.C.; Bigi, M.; Brown, D.P.D.; Ganuza, D.; Garcia, F.; Hudson, Z.; Jones, T.T.C.; Perez, A.

    2005-01-01

    The design features, on-site testing, commissioning and operation are described of two new 130 kV/130 A HV power supply units serving four upgraded 130 kV/60 A positive ion neutral injectors (PINIs) on JET. Both units were factory tested at full power and pulse length into dummy resistive load. Following on-site installation, the factory tests were repeated. The transition from dummy-load testing to PINI operation required full integration of the HVPS within the overall JET control system, and rigorous testing of the co-ordinated actions and protections of all PINI power supplies (filament and arc for plasma source and negative suppression grid). The implementation of these functions is described. Extensive use was made of parasitic integrated test pulses, where the other PINIs could be operated normally, with the HVPS energised under full remote control together with the corresponding PINI plasma sources, but with the HVPS connected to dummy load. The amount of NB operation time dedicated to commissioning was thereby minimised, yet gave a high degree of confidence of readiness for HV energisation of the PINI, and first beam operation followed less than 24 h from HV connection to the PINI. The routine operating experience and performance, including load protection characteristics of the new HVPS units are also described

  19. Analyses of test beam data for the ATLAS upgrade readout chip (ABC130)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peschke, Richard [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    As part of the ATLAS phase II upgrade it is planned to replace the current tracker with an all silicon tracker. The outer part of the new tracker will consist of silicon strip detectors. For the readout of the strip detector a new Analog to Binary Converter chip (ABC130) was designed. The chip is processed in the 130 nm technology. In laboratory measurements the preamplifier of the new ABC130 showed a significant lower gain than expected. From the measurements in the laboratory it was not possible to distinguish if the malfunction is in the preamplifier or in the test circuit. Therefore an unbiased test was mandatory. Among other measurements, one was a test beam campaign at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Collider (SLAC). The result of measurement is shown in the presentation.

  20. Effect of temperatures up to 130 deg C on the responses of TLD 700

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, J A; Binns, P J [UKAEA Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell. Environmental and Medical Sciences Div.

    1984-01-01

    The need to measure doses at temperatures up to 130 deg C led to an investigation into the effect of exposure and storage at these temperatures on the response of TLD 700 before and after UV phototransfer. As a preliminary, the delays required during the UV re-estimation process were optimised. The effects of storage and exposure were compared. This was followed by a detailed examination of the effects of storage at temperatures up to 130 deg C. Glow curves were analysed to investigate the rates of growth and decay of the different peaks. The findings for peaks 6 and 7 are compatible with previously reported effects at lower temperatures on peaks 3, 4 and 5. Storage at temperatures of 130 deg C or below for periods up to 28 days does not affect the UV photo-transfer response.

  1. ATLAS ITk Short-Strip Stave prototypes with 130nm chipset

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Peter William; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS ITk is working to deliver a new Inner Tracking detector for use at HL-LHC. The strip tracker community has recently constructed partially loaded, double sided demonstrator staves using the HCC / ABC130 chipset in 130nm CMOS technology. Mindful of the need to maximise power efficiency whilst minimising the cost and material of associated cable plant, the system design includes the integration of a low-mass DC-DC converter and sensor bias (HV) switch within each module. This paper documents the first results from the demonstrator staves. The system concept and the roadmap toward a full system test are also outlined.

  2. ATLAS ITk short-strip stave prototypes with 130 nm chipset

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00116199; The ATLAS collaboration; Dopke, Jens; Sawyer, Craig

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS ITk Collaboration is working to deliver a new Inner Tracking detector for use at HL-LHC. The strip tracker community has recently constructed a partially loaded, double-sided demonstrator stave using the HCC / ABC130 chipset in 130 nm CMOS technology. Mindful of the need to maximise power efficiency whilst minimising the cost and material of associated cable plant, the system design includes the integration of a low-mass DC-DC converter and sensor bias (HV) switch within each module. This paper documents the first results from the demonstrator stave. The system concept is also outlined.

  3. Loss of the retinoblastoma protein-related p130 protein in small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Holm, K; Niebuhr, A

    1997-01-01

    107, or p130 leads to growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and this arrest is abolished by complex formation with the adenovirus E1A, human papilloma virus E7, or simian virus 40 T oncoproteins. Inactivation of pRB by gross structural alterations or point mutations in the RB-1 gene has...... been described in a variety of human tumors, including retinoblastomas, osteosarcomas, and small cell lung carcinomas. Despite the structural and functional similarity between pRB, p107, and p130, alterations in the latter two proteins have not been identified in human tumors. We have screened a panel...

  4. Charged particle multiplicity in e+e- interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Charpentier, Ph; Gavillet, Ph; Jarlskog, Ch; Khohklov, Yu; Papadopoulou, Th D

    1996-01-01

    From the data collected by DELPHI at LEP in autumn 1995, the multiplicity of charged particles at a hadronic energy of 130 GeV has been measured to be = 23.84 \\pm 0.51 (stat) \\pm 0.52 (syst). When compared to lower energy data, the value measured is consistent with the evolution predicted by QCD with corrections at next-to-leading order, for a value \\alpha_s(130 {\\mathrm{GeV}}) = 0.105 \\pm 0.003 (stat) \\pm 0.008 (syst).

  5. The Search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with 130Te with CUORE-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouellet, Jonathan Loren

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the design, operation and results of an experimental search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of 130 Te using the CUORE-0 detector. The discovery of 0νββ would have profound implications for particle physics and our understanding of the Universe. Its discovery would demonstrate the violation of lepton number and imply that neutrinos are Majorana fermions and therefore their own anti-particles. Combined with other experimental results, the discovery of 0νββ could also have implications for understanding the absolute neutrino mass scale as well as the presently unknown neutrino mass hierarchy. The CUORE experiment is a ton-scale search for 0νββ in 130 Te expected to begin operation in late 2015. The first stage of this experiment is a smaller 39-kg active-mass detector called CUORE-0. This detector contains 11 kg of 130 Te and operates in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso lab in Italy from 2013-2015. The results presented here are based on a nat TeO 2 exposure of 35.2 kg·yr, or 9.8 kg·yr exposure of 130 Te collected between 2013-2015. We see no evidence of 0νββ and place an upper limit on the 0νββ decay rate of Γ 0νββ <0.25x10 24 yr 1 (90 % C.L.), corresponding to a lower limit on the half-life of T 1/2 0ν >2.8x10 24 yr (90 % C.L.). We combine the present result with the results of previous searches in 130 Te. Combining it with the 1.2 kg·Te exposure from the Three Towers Test run we place a half-life limit of T 1/2 03 ν>3.3x10 24 yr (90 % C.L.). And combining these results with the 19.75 kg·yr 130 Te exposure from Cuoricino, we place the strongest limit on the 0νββ half-life of 130 Te to date, at T 1/2 0ν >4.5x10 24 yr (90 % C.L.). Using the present nuclear matrix element calculations for 130 Te, this result corresponds to a 90 % upper limit range on the effective Majorana mass of m ββ <250-710 meV.

  6. Fine structure in the inter-critical heat-affected zone of HQ130 super ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    †Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, ... The microstructure in the inter-critical heat-affected zone (ICHAZ) of HQ130 steel, has been .... Ac3. The microhardness was measured by using the.

  7. 130 miljonit krooni paremad viinerid tulevad Rakverest / Kadrin Karner, Anne Oja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karner, Kadrin

    2008-01-01

    Rakvere Lihakombinaat ostis 130 miljonit krooni maksva uue viineritootmise liini, septembris käivitus ka Valio Eesti Laeva Meierei 50 miljonit krooni maksnud piimaliin ning Saaremaa Piimatööstus kavatseb investeerida ligi 30 miljonit krooni juustutootmise ja juustu pakkimise liini

  8. 31 CFR 103.130 - Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anti-money laundering programs for... Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering Programs Anti-Money Laundering Programs § 103.130 Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. (a) For...

  9. 25 CFR 37.130 - Who establishes boundaries for Off-Reservation Boarding Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who establishes boundaries for Off-Reservation Boarding... GEOGRAPHIC BOUNDARIES Off-Reservation Boarding Schools § 37.130 Who establishes boundaries for Off-Reservation Boarding Schools? The Secretary or the Secretary's designee, in consultation with the affected...

  10. 21 CFR 111.130 - What quality control operations are required for returned dietary supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.130 What quality control operations are required for returned dietary supplements? Quality control operations for returned dietary...

  11. 40 CFR 1039.130 - What installation instructions must I give to equipment manufacturers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1039.130 What installation instructions must I give to equipment manufacturers? (a) If you sell an engine for someone else to install in a... manufacturers not to install the engines in variable-speed applications. (6) Describe any other instructions to...

  12. 46 CFR 130.220 - Design of equipment for cooking and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of equipment for cooking and heating. 130.220... Design of equipment for cooking and heating. (a) Doors on each cooking appliance must be provided with heavy-duty hinges and locking-devices to prevent accidental opening in heavy weather. (b) Each cooking...

  13. The (γ, p) reaction in 30Si, 68Zn and 130Te at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulow, B.; Johnsson, B.; Nilsson, M.

    1977-01-01

    The yields of (γ, p) reactions on 30 Si, 68 Zn and 130 Te have been measured as a function of the bremsstrahlung end-point energy, Esub(γ, max), in the energy range 75-800 MeV, using the activation method. Cross sections have been deduced and are compared to results obtained using a semiempirical model. (Auth.)

  14. A Policy Analysis of the Refugee Act 130 of 1998 | Kleinsmidt | Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article provides a policy analysis of the Refugee Act 130 of 1998, focusing specifi cally on formulation and implementation. The South African legislation on refugees is located within the context of the principles of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the African Union (AU), the New Economic ...

  15. 25 CFR 39.130 - Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Language Development Programs § 39.130 Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs? Yes, schools can use ISEF funds to... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs...

  16. Comparative study of new 130mm diameter fast photomultipliers for neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moszynski, M.; Costa, G.J.; Guillaume, G.; Heusch, B.; Huck, A.; Mouatassim, S.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper is a summary of the test measurements carried out using new 130 mm diameter fast photomultiplier tubes manufactured by Philips (France), EMI (England) and Hamamatsu (Japan), along with a comparison to the results obtained with the well known XP 2041 Philips model. These tubes will be used in large size neutron detectors

  17. Acute kidney injury with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 in severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Rasmus Gamborg; Haase, Nicolai; Lange, T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to detail the effects of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) vs. Ringer's on kidney function including the interaction with mortality in post-hoc analyses as resuscitation with HES 130/0.42 increased mortality in the Scandinavian Starch for Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock (6S) trial. METHODS...

  18. 42 CFR 433.130 - Waiver of conditions of initial operation and approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.130 Waiver of conditions of initial operation... system will not significantly improve the efficiency of the administration of the State plan. (c) If CMS... waiver, that a system would significantly improve the administration of the State Medicaid program, CMS...

  19. 42 CFR 415.130 - Conditions for payment: Physician pathology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... Physician Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.130 Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... of physician pathology services to fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who were hospital...

  20. Retrospective evaluation of bone pain palliation after samarium-153-EDTMP therapy Avaliação retrospectiva do tratamento da dor óssea metastática com Samário-153-EDTMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Tatit Sapienza

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of metastatic bone pain palliation and medullar toxicity associated with samarium-153-EDTMP treatment. METHODS: Seventy-three patients with metastatic bone pain having previously undergone therapy with samarium-153-EDTMP (1 mCi/kg were retrospectively evaluated. Routine follow-up included pain evaluation and blood counts for 2 months after treatment. Pain was evaluated using a subjective scale (from 0 to 10 before and for 8 weeks after the treatment. Blood counts were obtained before treatment and once a week for 2 months during follow-up. Dosimetry, based upon the urinary excretion of the isotope, was estimated in 41 individuals, and the resulting radiation absorbed doses were correlated with hematological data. RESULTS: Reduction in pain scores of 75% to 100% was obtained in 36 patients (49%, with a decrease of 50% to 75%, 25% to 50%, and 0% to 25% in, respectively, 20 (27%, 10 (14%, and 7 (10% patients. There was no significant relationship between the pain response and location of the primary tumor (breast or prostate cancer. Mild to moderate myelosuppression was noted in 75.3% of patients, usually with hematological recovery at 8 weeks. The mean bone marrow dose was 347 ± 65 cGy, and only a weak correlation was found between absorbed dose and myelosuppression (Pearson coefficient = .4. CONCLUSIONS: Samarium-153-EDTMP is a valuable method for metastatic bone pain palliation. A mild to moderate and transitory myelosuppression is the main toxicity observed after samarium therapy, showing a weak correlation with dosimetric measures.OBJETIVO: O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito paliativo da dor e a toxicidade medular associados ao tratamento com Samário-153-EDTMP em pacientes com metástases ósseas. MÉTODOS: O estudo foi realizado de forma retrospectiva, a partir do levantamento de prontuário de 178 pacientes submetidos a tratamento com 1mCi/kg de 153Sm

  1. Effects of samarium (Sm) additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast and hot-extruded Mg-5 wt%Al-3 wt%Ca-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Hyeon-Taek; Lee, Jae-Seol; Kim, Dae-Guen; Yoshimi, Kyosuke; Maruyama, Kouichi

    2009-01-01

    Samarium (Sm) additions to as-cast Mg-5Al-3Ca-based alloys result in changes, such as equiaxed grains and a refined grain size. The microstructure of as-cast Mg-5Al-3Ca-xSm alloys consists of an α-Mg matrix, a (Mg, Al) 2 Ca eutectic phase, and an Al 2 Sm intermetallic compound. In as-cast alloys, the (Mg, Al) 2 Ca eutectic phase was located at grain boundaries with a chain structure, and the Al 2 Sm intermetallic compounds were homogeneously distributed at the α-Mg matrix and grain boundaries. The eutectic phase of the extruded alloys was elongated in the extrusion direction and crushed into fine particles because of severe deformation during hot extrusion, and the grain size was refined with an increased amount of Sm addition. The maximum values of the yield strength and tensile strength were 313 MPa and 330 MPa at 2 wt%Sm alloy content, respectively

  2. 32 CFR 37.130 - Which other parts of the DoD Grant and Agreement Regulations apply to TIAs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations apply to TIAs? 37.130 Section 37.130 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Which other parts of the DoD Grant and Agreement Regulations apply to TIAs? (a) TIAs are explicitly... information about assistance awards. (b) Two additional parts of the DoDGARs apply to TIAs, although they do...

  3. 37 CFR 1.130 - Affidavit or declaration to disqualify commonly owned patent or published application as prior art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disqualify commonly owned patent or published application as prior art. 1.130 Section 1.130 Patents... or declaration to disqualify commonly owned patent or published application as prior art. (a) When.... patent or U.S. patent application publication which is not prior art under 35 U.S.C. 102(b), and the...

  4. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development staff...

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent and -independent functions of p130 cooperate to evoke a sustained G1 block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Farkas, T; Lukas, J

    2001-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (pRb)-related p130 pocket protein is a regulator of cell growth and differentiation, and a candidate tumour suppressor. Both pRb and p130 operate through interactions with cellular proteins, including the E2F transcription factors. While such interactions are controlled...

  6. 9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized site. 130.15... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.15 User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification...

  7. Glycoprotein 130 receptor signaling mediates α-cell dysfunction in a rodent model of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chow, Samuel Z; Speck, Madeleine; Yoganathan, Piriya

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated glucagon secretion accompanies islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes. We recently discovered that interleukin (IL)-6 stimulates glucagon secretion from human and rodent islets. IL-6 family cytokines require the glycoprotein 130 (gp130) receptor to signal. In this study, we elucidated...

  8. A 130 point Nd:YAG Thomson scattering diagnostic on MAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scannell, R.; Walsh, M. J.; Dunstan, M. R.; Figueiredo, J.; Naylor, G.; O' Gorman, T.; Shibaev, S. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gibson, K. J.; Wilson, H. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    A Thomson scattering diagnostic designed to measure both edge and core physics has been implemented on MAST. The system uses eight Nd:YAG lasers, each with a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The relative and absolute timing of the lasers may be set arbitrarily to produce fast bursts of measurements to suit the time evolution of the physics being studied. The scattered light is collected at F/6 by a 100 kg six element lens system with an aperture stop of 290 mm. The collected light is then transferred to 130 polychromators by 130 independent fiber bundles. The data acquisition and processing are based on a distributed computer system of dual core processors embedded in 26 chassis. Each chassis is standalone and performs data acquisition and processing for five polychromators. This system allows data to be available quickly after the MAST shot and has potential for real-time operations.

  9. Improving the Cost Efficiency and Readiness of MC-130 Aircrew Training: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Air Force VBA Visual Basic for Applications 1 AFSOC/A3T, "MC-130 Aircrew Training," Air Force...aircrew members have access to a co- located flight simulator, the proportion of training that is accomplished at a temporary duty...coordinate to have access to the aerial refueling track which is basically the airspace used to conduct aerial refueling. Crewmembers must also be

  10. Closure of the Car Pool in building 130 until 6 November

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Car Pool, Building 130, will be closed from Friday, 9 October until Friday, 6 November for renovation.   All activities, such as SIXT rental cars and maintenance of the CERN car fleet, will be temporarily transferred to the Car Pool at Building 124. Mobile phone: 161113 (+41 75 411 1113). Thank you in advance for your understanding. GS-IS Group

  11. Measurement of multilayer reflectivities from 8 keV to 130 keV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeghoej, P.; Joensen, K. D.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of specular and non-specular reflectivities of a W/Si multilayer with period d=135.1 A. Angular dispersive measurements were performed at 8.05 keY and 59.3 keY, while energy dispersive measurements were made in the range of 17 keV to 130 keY. At an incidence angle...

  12. Design and component test performance of an efficient 4 W, 130 K sorption refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.; Ryba, E.; Sywulka, P.; Wade, L.

    1990-01-01

    A recent advance in sorption cooler technology has resulted in cryocooler designs offering high performance and the promise of long-life operation. A 4-W, 130 K sorption refrigeration stage which incorporates the advanced concept design is presently being constructed. Powdered charcoal is used as the sorbent, and methane is used as the refrigerant. Expansion is accomplished using a passive Joule-Thomson expansion valve. The design details of this cooler and the component performance test results are discussed. 5 refs

  13. 9 CFR 130.14 - User fees for FADDL veterinary diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for FADDL veterinary..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.14 User fees for FADDL veterinary diagnostics. (a... 167.00 Rabbit antiserum, any agent 1 mL 179.00 185.00 190.00 196.00 (b) Veterinary diagnostics tests...

  14. Ride-along data LOS 130, 170 & LO330 shots z3139, 3140 and 3141

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loisel, Guillaume Pascal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Each instrument records the x-ray emission from the Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum (ZPDH); LOS 130 TIXTLs instruments record the absorption of the pinch backlighter through an expanding NaF/Mg foil; LOS 170 MLM instruments record monochromatic images at 276 and 528 eV energies near and before ZPDH stagnation time; LOS 330 TREX 6A & B: recoded time resolved absorption spectra from a radiatively heated Ne gas.

  15. 130 kV 130 A high voltage switching mode power supply for neutral beam injectors-Control issues and algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganuza, D.; Garcia, F.; Zulaika, M.; Perez, A.; Jones, T.T.C.

    2005-01-01

    The company JEMA has delivered to the Joint European Torus (JET facility in Culham) two high voltage switching mode power supplies (HVSMPS) each rated 130 kVdc and 130 A. One HVSMPS feeds the grids of two PINI loads. This paper describes the main control issues and the algorithms developed for the project. The most demanding requirements from the control point of view is an absolute accuracy of ±1300 V and the possibility of performing up to 255 re-applications of the high voltage during a 20 s pulse. Keeping the output voltage ripple to the specified tolerance has been a major achievement of the control system. Since the output stage is formed of several modules (120) connected in series, their stray capacitance to ground significantly influences the individual contribution of each single module to the global output voltage. Two complementary techniques have been used to balance the effects of the stray capacities. The fast re-applications requirement has a significant impact on the intermediate dc link. This section is composed of a capacity of 0.83 F, which feeds the 120 invertor modules. The dc link is fed by a 12 pulse SCR rectifier, whose matching transformers are connected to the 36 kV grid. Every re-application and every voltage shutdown supposes a quasi-instantaneous power step of 17 MW. Fast open loop algorithms have been implemented in order to keep the dc link voltage within acceptable margins. Moreover, the HVSMPS output characteristics have to be maintained during the rapid and important voltage fluctuations of the 36 kV mains (28-37 kV). The general control system is based on a Simatic S7 PLC, and a SCADA user interface. Up to 1000 signals are acquired. The control system has shown to be also a useful tool to allow for a rapid and accurate identification of faults and their origin

  16. Optimization of scintillator loading with the tellurium-130 isotope for long-term stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Lauren; Song, Xiaoya; Goutnik, Michael; Kaptanoglu, Tanner; Klein, Joshua; SNO+ Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Tellurium-130 was selected as the isotope for the SNO + neutrinoless double beta decay search, as 130Te decays to 130Xe via double beta decay. Linear alkyl benzene(LAB) is the liquid scintillator for the SNO + experiment. To load tellurium into scintillator, it is combined with 1,2-butanediol to form an organometallic complex, commonly called tellurium butanediol (TeBD). This study focuses on maximizing the percentage of tellurium loaded into scintillator and evaluates the complex's long-term stability. Studies on the effect of nucleation due to imperfections in the detector's surface and external particulates were employed by filtration and induced nucleation. The impact of water on the stability of TeBD complex was evaluated by liquid-nitrogen sparging, variability in pH and induced humidity. Alternative loading methods were evaluated, including the addition of stability-inducing organic compounds. Samples of tellurium-loaded scintillator were synthesized, treated, and consistently monitored in a controlled environment. It was found that the hydronium ions cause precipitation in the loaded scintillator, demonstrating that water has a detrimental effect on long-term stability. Optimization of loaded scintillator stability can contribute to the SNO + double beta decay search.

  17. Searching for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of 130Te with CUORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Artusa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ decay is a hypothesized lepton-number-violating process that offers the only known means of asserting the possible Majorana nature of neutrino mass. The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE is an upcoming experiment designed to search for 0νββ decay of 130Te using an array of 988 TeO2 crystal bolometers operated at 10 mK. The detector will contain 206 kg of 130Te and have an average energy resolution of 5 keV; the projected 0νββ decay half-life sensitivity after five years of livetime is 1.6 × 1026 y at 1σ (9.5 × 1025 y at the 90% confidence level, which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana mass in the range 40–100 meV (50–130 meV. In this paper, we review the experimental techniques used in CUORE as well as its current status and anticipated physics reach.

  18. Densities inferred from ESA's Venus Express aerobraking campaign at 130 km altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Sean; Marty, Jean-Charles; Svedhem, Håkan; Williams, Adam; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    In June-July 2014, ESA performed a planned aerobraking campaign with Venus Express to measure neutral densities above 130 km in Venus' atmosphere by means of the engineering accelerometers. To that purpose, the orbit perigee was lowered to approximately 130 km in order to enhance the atmospheric drag effect to the highest tolerable levels for the spacecraft; the accelerometer resolution and precision were not sufficient at higher altitudes. This campaign was requested as part of the Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VExADE). A total of 18 orbits (i.e. days) were processed using the attitude quaternions to correctly orient the spacecraft bus and solar arrays in inertial space, which is necessary to accurately compute the exposed surface in the ram direction. The accelerometer data provide good measurements approximately from 130-140 km altitude; the length of the profiles is about 85 seconds, and they are on the early morning side (LST=4.5) at high northern latitude (70°N-82°N). The densities are a factor 2-3 larger than Hedin's VTS-3 thermosphere model, which is consistent with earlier results obtained via classical precise orbit determination at higher altitudes. Wavelike structures with amplitudes of 20% and more are detected, with wavelengths of about 100-500 km. We cannot entirely rule out that these waves are caused by the spacecraft or due to some unknown instrumental effect, but we estimate this probability to be very low.

  19. MicroRNA-130a is highly expressed in the esophageal mucosa of achalasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hiroyuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Yoshida, Akira; Ikeda, Haruo; Minami, Hitomi; Kanda, Tsutomu; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2017-08-01

    Esophageal achalasia is considered as a risk factor of esophageal cancer. The etiologies of esophageal achalasia remain unknown. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has recently been established as a minimally invasive method with high curability. The aims of the present study were to identify the microRNAs (miRs) specific to esophageal achalasia, to determine their potential target genes and to assess their alteration following POEM. RNA was extracted from biopsy samples from middle esophageal mucosa and analyzed using a microarray. Differentially expressed miRs in achalasia patients compared with control samples were identified and analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Correlations between specific miR expression levels and the patients' clinical background were also investigated. In addition, alterations of selected miR expression levels before and after POEM were analyzed. The results of RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated that the miR-130a expression levels were significantly higher in patients with achalasia (Pachalasia. However, no significant change in miR-130a expression was observed between before and after POEM. In conclusion, miR-130a is highly expressed in the esophageal mucosa of patients with achalasia and may be a biomarker of esophageal achalasia.

  20. Structural and superconducting properties of (Y,Gd)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} grown by MOCVD on samarium zirconate buffered IBAD-MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stan, L; Holesinger, T G; Maiorov, B; Feldmann, D M; Usov, I O; DePaula, R F; Civale, L; Foltyn, S R; Jia, Q X [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chen, Y; Selvamanickam, V [SuperPower, Incorporated, 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Textured samarium zirconate (SZO) films have been grown by reactive cosputtering directly on an ion beam assisted deposited (IBAD) MgO template, without an intermediate homoepitaxial MgO layer. The subsequent growth of 0.9 {mu}m thick (Y,Gd)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} ((Y, Gd)BCO) films by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) yielded well textured films with a full width at half maximum of 1.9{sup 0} and 3.4{sup 0} for the out-of-plane and in-plane texture, respectively. Microstructural characterizations of the SZO buffered samples revealed clean interfaces. This indicates that the SZO not only provides a diffusion barrier, but also functions as a buffer for (Y, Gd)BCO grown by MOCVD. The achievement of self-field critical current densities (J{sub c}) of over 2 MA cm{sup -2} at 75.5 K is another proof of the effectiveness of SZO as a buffer on the IBAD-MgO template. The in-field measurements revealed an asymmetric angular dependence of J{sub c} and a shift of the ab-plane maxima due to the tilted nature of the template and (Y,Gd){sub 2}O{sub 3} particles existing in the (Y, Gd)BCO matrix. The present results are especially important because they demonstrate that high temperature superconducting coated conductors with simpler architecture can be fabricated using commercially viable processes.

  1. MicroRNA-130b targets Fmr1 and regulates embryonic neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Xi; Zhang, Kunshan; Wang, Yanlu; Wang, Junbang; Cui, Yaru; Li, Siguang; Luo, Yuping

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We found that the 3′ UTR of the Fmr1 mRNA is a target of miR-130b. •MiR-130b suppresses the expression of Fmr1 in mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters the proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters fate specification of mouse embryonic stem cell. -- Abstract: Fragile X syndrome, one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat in the 5′-untranslated region of the X-linked Fmr1 gene, which results in transcriptional silencing and loss of expression of its encoded protein FMRP. The loss of FMRP increases proliferation and alters fate specification in adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs). However, little is known about Fmr1 mRNA regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In the present study, we report that miR-130b regulated Fmr1 expression by directly targeting its 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR). Up-regulation of miR-130b in mouse embryonic neural progenitor cells (eNPCs) decreased Fmr1 expression, markedly increased eNPC proliferation and altered the differentiation tendency of eNPCs, suggesting that antagonizing miR-130b may be a new therapeutic entry point for treating Fragile X syndrome

  2. MicroRNA-130b targets Fmr1 and regulates embryonic neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Zhang, Kunshan [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Yanlu; Wang, Junbang; Cui, Yaru [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Li, Siguang, E-mail: siguangli@163.com [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Luo, Yuping, E-mail: luoyuping@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We found that the 3′ UTR of the Fmr1 mRNA is a target of miR-130b. •MiR-130b suppresses the expression of Fmr1 in mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters the proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters fate specification of mouse embryonic stem cell. -- Abstract: Fragile X syndrome, one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat in the 5′-untranslated region of the X-linked Fmr1 gene, which results in transcriptional silencing and loss of expression of its encoded protein FMRP. The loss of FMRP increases proliferation and alters fate specification in adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs). However, little is known about Fmr1 mRNA regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In the present study, we report that miR-130b regulated Fmr1 expression by directly targeting its 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR). Up-regulation of miR-130b in mouse embryonic neural progenitor cells (eNPCs) decreased Fmr1 expression, markedly increased eNPC proliferation and altered the differentiation tendency of eNPCs, suggesting that antagonizing miR-130b may be a new therapeutic entry point for treating Fragile X syndrome.

  3. Balanced Hydroxyethylstarch (HES 130/0.4 Impairs Kidney Function In-Vivo without Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Alexander Schick

    Full Text Available Volume therapy is a standard procedure in daily perioperative care, and there is an ongoing discussion about the benefits of colloid resuscitation with hydroxyethylstarch (HES. In sepsis HES should be avoided due to a higher risk for acute kidney injury (AKI. Results of the usage of HES in patients without sepsis are controversial. Therefore we conducted an animal study to evaluate the impact of 6% HES 130/0.4 on kidney integrity with sepsis or under healthy conditions Sepsis was induced by standardized Colon Ascendens Stent Peritonitis (sCASP. sCASP-group as well as control group (C remained untreated for 24 h. After 18 h sCASP+HES group (sCASP+VOL and control+HES (C+VOL received 50 ml/KG balanced 6% HES (VOL 130/0.4 over 6 h. After 24 h kidney function was measured via Inulin- and PAH-Clearance in re-anesthetized rats, and serum urea, creatinine (crea, cystatin C and Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL as well as histopathology were analysed. In vitro human proximal tubule cells (PTC were cultured +/- lipopolysaccharid (LPS and with 0.1-4.0% VOL. Cell viability was measured with XTT-, cell toxicity with LDH-test. sCASP induced severe septic AKI demonstrated divergent results regarding renal function by clearance or creatinine measure focusing on VOL. Soleley HES (C+VOL deteriorated renal function without sCASP. Histopathology revealed significantly derangements in all HES groups compared to control. In vitro LPS did not worsen the HES induced reduction of cell viability in PTC cells. For the first time, we demonstrated, that application of 50 ml/KG 6% HES 130/0.4 over 6 hours induced AKI without inflammation in vivo. Severity of sCASP induced septic AKI might be no longer susceptible to the way of volume expansion.

  4. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu [Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Pathology and Molecular Medicine, and Queen' s University Cancer Institute, Queen' s University, Botterell Hall, Rm. 713, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Feracci, Helene [Universite Bordeaux 1, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS UPR 8641, 33600 Pessac (France); Raptis, Leda, E-mail: raptisl@queensu.ca [Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Pathology and Molecular Medicine, and Queen' s University Cancer Institute, Queen' s University, Botterell Hall, Rm. 713, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  5. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu; Feracci, Helene; Raptis, Leda

    2010-01-01

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac V12 ), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac V12 with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac V12 -expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac V12 is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac V12 expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac V12 . The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac V12 , as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  6. Improvements in 130Te double beta decay search with cryogenic TeO2 array detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Caspani, P.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Zanotti, L.

    1996-01-01

    Single crystal TeO 2 bolometers have been used since 5 years ago to search for neutrinoless DBD of 130 Te. During the last year, our group has been studying and preparing the first array of 4 crystals, 340 g each, opening this technique to new frontiers in rare events' physics. The results and perspectives of this second generation cryogenic detectors are here reported and discussed, with particular emphasis on the peculiarities which make them feasible for a consistent upgrading of our previous result in DBD search. (orig.)

  7. Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, K. H.; Adams, N.; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Allgower, C.; Amsbaugh, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderssen, E.; Arnesen, H.; Arnold, L.; Averichev, G. S.; Baldwin, A.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Beddo, M.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Berger, J.; Betts, W.; Bichsel, H.; Bieser, F.; Bland, L. C.; Bloomer, M.; Blyth, C. O.; Boehm, J.; Bonner, B. E.; Bonnet, D.; Bossingham, R.; Botlo, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouillo, N.; Bouvier, S.; Bradley, K.; Brady, F. P.; Braithwaite, E. S.; Braithwaite, W.; Brandin, A.; Brown, R. L.; Brugalette, G.; Byrd, C.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carr, L.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Caylor, B.; Cebra, D.; Chatopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Chrin, J.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Conin, L.; Consiglio, C.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Danilov, V. I.; Dayton, D.; Demello, M.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, H.; Deyoung, P. A.; Didenko, L.; Dimassimo, D.; Dioguardi, J.; Dominik, W.; Drancourt, C.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Eggert, T.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Etkin, A.; Fachini, P.; Feliciano, C.; Ferenc, D.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fessler, H.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Flores, I.; Foley, K. J.; Fritz, D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gojak, C.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grau, M.; Greiner, D.; Greiner, L.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gross, J.; Guilloux, G.; Gushin, E.; Hall, J.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harper, G.; Harris, J. W.; He, P.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hill, D.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Howe, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Hunt, W.; Hunter, J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jacobson, S.; Jared, R.; Jensen, P.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kenney, V. P.; Khodinov, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Koehler, G.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kormilitsyne, V.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotov, I.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krupien, T.; Kuczewski, P.; Kuhn, C.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Lamont, M. A.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lecompte, T.; Leonhardt, W. J.; Leontiev, V. M.; Leszczynski, P.; Levine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Z.; Liaw, C.-J.; Lin, J.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Locurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Lopiano, D.; Love, W. A.; Lutz, J. R.; Lynn, D.; Madansky, L.; Maier, R.; Majka, R.; Maliszewski, A.; Margetis, S.; Marks, K.; Marstaller, R.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; Matyushevski, E. A.; McParland, C.; McShane, T. S.; Meier, J.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Middlekamp, P.; Mikhalin, N.; Miller, B.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Minor, B.; Mitchell, J.; Mogavero, E.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moltz, D.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; Morse, R.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mutchler, G. S.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Ngo, T.; Nguyen, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Noggle, T.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Nussbaum, T.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Olchanski, K.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Ososkov, G. A.; Ott, G.; Padrazo, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Pentia, M.; Perevotchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pinganaud, W.; Pirogov, S.; Platner, E.; Pluta, J.; Polk, I.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Puskar-Pasewicz, J.; Rai, G.; Rasson, J.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J.; Renfordt, R. E.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Riso, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Roehrich, D.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Russ, D.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sanchez, R.; Sandler, Z.; Sandweiss, J.; Sappenfield, P.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Scheblien, J.; Scheetz, R.; Schlueter, R.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schulz, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Sedlmeir, J.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, J.; Seyboth, P.; Seymour, R.; Shakaliev, E. I.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shi, Y.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shuman, D.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L. P.; Snellings, R.; Solberg, K.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Stone, N.; Stone, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Stroebele, H.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Symons, T. J.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarchini, A.; Tarzian, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Tikhomirov, V.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tonse, S.; Trainor, T.; Trentalange, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Vakula, I.; van Buren, G.; Vandermolen, A. M.; Vanyashin, A.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Visser, G.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vu, C.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Weerasundara, D.; Weidenbach, R.; Wells, R.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitfield, J. P.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wilson, K.; Wirth, J.; Wisdom, J.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wolf, J.; Wood, L.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yokosawa, A.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhu, J.; Zimmerman, D.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  8. Development of front-end electronics for LumiCal detector in CMOS 130 nm technology

    CERN Document Server

    Firlej, M; Idzik, M; Moron, J; Swientek, K; Terlecki, P

    2015-01-01

    front-end electronics for luminosity detector at future Linear Collider are presented. The 8-channel prototype was designed and fabricated in a 130 nm CMOS technology. Each channel comprises a charge sensitive preamplifier with pole-zero cancellation circuit and a CR-RC shaper with 50 ns peaking time. The measurements results confirm full functionality of the prototype and compliance with the requirements imposed by the detector specification. The power consumption of the front-end is in the range 0.6–1.5 mW per channel and the noise ENC around 900 e− at 10 pF input capacitance.

  9. Fissility of actinide nuclei induced by 60-130 MeV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcelle, Viviane; Tavares, Odilon A.P.

    2004-06-01

    Nuclear fissilities obtained from recent photofission reaction cross section measurements carried out at Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory (Saskatoon, Canada) in the energy range 60-130 MeV for 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np nuclei have been analysed in a systematic way. To this aim, a semiempirical approach has been developed based on the quasi-deuteron nuclear photoabsorption model followed by the process of competition between neutron evaporation and fission for the excited nucleus. The study reproduces satisfactorily well the increasing trend of nuclear fissility with parameter Z 2 =A. (author)

  10. Neutrinoless double beta decay search for 130Te: cuoricino status and cuore prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangiorgio, S.; Artusa, D.R.; And others

    2006-01-01

    CUORE is a ∼ I-ton experiment to search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of 130 Te using 988 TeO 2 bolometers. It aims at reaching a sensitivity of the order of few tens of MeV on the effective neutrino mass. CUORICINO, a single CUORE tower running since 2003 in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS), plays an important role as a standing alone experiment and for developing the future CUORE setup. Present results already achieved and studies that are underway are presented and discussed

  11. Non-adiabatic description of proton emission from the odd-odd nucleus 130Eu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patial Monika

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the non-adiabatic quasiparticle approach for calculating the rotational spectra and decay width of odd-odd proton emitters. The Coriolis effects are incorporated in both the parent and daughter wave functions. Results for the two probable ground states (1+ and 2+ of the proton emitter 130Eu are discussed. With our calculations, we confirm the proton emitting state to be the Iπ = 1+ state, irrespective of the strength of the Coriolis interaction. This study provides us with an opportunity to look into the details of wave functions of deformed odd-odd nuclei to which the proton emission halflives are quite sensitive.

  12. A CMOS 130nm Evaluation digitzer chip for silicon strips readout

    CERN Document Server

    Da Silva, W; Dhellot, M; Fougeron, D; Genat, J F; Hermel, R; Huppert, J f; Kapusta, F; Lebbolo, H; Pham, T H; Rossel, F; Savoy-navarro, A; Sefri, R; Vilalte

    2007-01-01

    A CMOS 130nm evaluation chip intended to read Silicon strip detectors at the ILC has been designed and successfully tested. Optimized for a detector capacitance of 10 pF, it includes four channels of charge integration, pulse shaping, a 16-deep analogue sampler triggered on input analogue sums, and parallel analogue to digital conversion. Tests results of the full chain are reported, demonstrating the behaviour and performance of the full sampling process and analogue to digital conversion. Each channel dissipates less than one milli-Watt static power.

  13. Measurements of neutron-deuteron breakup cross sections at 13.0 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setze, H.R.; Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W.

    1993-01-01

    The discrepancy between low-energy nucleon-deuteron breakup cross-section data and calculations, which do not include three-nucleon forces, has been cited as a possible signature of the influence of three-nucleon forces section. The comparison between data and calculations is difficult to interpret because there are significant disagreements between the data. To help clarify the situation we have made kinematically complete cross-section measurements for n-d breakup at an incident neutron energy of 13.0 MeV. The experimental techniques and data analysis method will be described. Preliminary results will be presented in comparison to calculations and previous data

  14. Constraining the electric dipole photon strength function in {sup 130}Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaak, J.; Loeher, B.; Savran, D.; Silva, J. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS, Frankfurt (Germany); Ahmed, M.W.; Kelley, J.H.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University, TUNL (United States); Beller, J.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Zweidinger, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Glorius, J.; Sonnabend, K. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Krticka, M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Rusev, G. [Chemistry Division, LANL (United States); Scheck, M. [School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland (United Kingdom); Tonchev, A.P. [Physics Division, LLNL (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The decay properties of photo-excited states in {sup 130}Te have been investigated by means of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence experiments at the Darmstadt High Intensity Photon Setup (DHIPS) and the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS). The combination of continuous-energy bremsstrahlung on the one hand and the quasi-monoenergetic and linearly polarized photon beam on the other enables a detailed insight into the photoabsorption cross section and the decay behavior of spin-1 states. Comparing these results to simulations within the statistical model allow for constraining the electric dipole photon strength function (E1-PSF). Results are presented and discussed.

  15. SOX9/miR-130a/CTR1 axis modulates DDP-resistance of cervical cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chenzhe; Ma, Fang; Hu, Chunhong; Ma, Jin-An; Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Fang; Hou, Tao; Jiang, Shun; Wang, Yapeng; Feng, Yeqian

    2018-01-01

    Cisplatin (DDP) -based chemotherapy is a standard strategy for cervical cancer, while chemoresistance remains a huge challenge. Copper transporter protein 1 (CTR1), a copper influx transporter required for high affinity copper (probably reduced Cu I) transport into the cell, reportedly promotes a significant fraction of DDP internalization in tumor cells. In the present study, we evaluated the function of CTR1 in the cell proliferation of cervical cancer upon DDP treatment. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been regarded as essential regulators of cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, as well as chemoresistance. By using online tools, we screened for candidate miRNAs potentially regulate CTR1, among which miR-130a has been proved to promote cervical cancer cell proliferation through targeting PTEN in our previous study. In the present study, we investigated the role of miR-130a in cervical cancer chemoresistance to DDP, and confirmed the binding of miR-130a to CTR1. SOX9 also reportedly act on cancer chemoresistance. In the present study, we revealed that SOX9 inversely regulated miR-130a through direct targeting the promoter of miR-130a. Consistent with previous studies, SOX9 could affect cervical cancer chemoresistance to DDP. Taken together, we demonstrated a SOX9/miR-130a/CTR1 axis which modulated the chemoresistance of cervical cancer cell to DDP, and provided promising targets for dealing with the chemoresistance of cervical cancer.

  16. MiR130b-Regulation of PPARγ Coactivator- 1α Suppresses Fat Metabolism in Goat Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Chen

    Full Text Available Fat metabolism is a complicated process regulated by a series of factors. microRNAs (miRNAs are a class of negative regulator of proteins and play crucial roles in many biological processes; including fat metabolism. Although there have been some researches indicating that miRNAs could influence the milk fat metabolism through targeting some factors, little is known about the effect of miRNAs on goat milk fat metabolism. Here we utilized an improved miRNA detection assay, S-Poly-(T, to profile the expression of miRNAs in the goat mammary gland in different periods, and found that miR-130b was abundantly and differentially expressed in goat mammary gland. Additionally, overexpressing miR-130b impaired adipogenesis while inhibiting miR-130b enhanced adipogenesis in goat mammary epithelial cells. Utilizing 3'-UTR assay and Western Blot analusis, the protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1α (PGC1α, a major regulator of fat metabolism, was demonstrated to be a potential target of miR-130b. Interestingly, miR-130b potently repressed PGC1α expression by targeting both the PGC1α mRNA coding and 3' untranslated regions. These findings have some insight of miR-130b in mediating adipocyte differentiation by repressing PGC1α expression and this contributes to further understanding about the functional significance of miRNAs in milk fat synthesis.

  17. GOLGA2/GM130, cis-Golgi matrix protein, is a novel target of anticancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seung-Hee; Hong, Seong-Ho; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ji-Young; Kang, Bitna; Park, Sungjin; Han, Kiwon; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-11-01

    Achievement of long-term survival of patients with lung cancer treated with conventional chemotherapy is still difficult for treatment of metastatic and advanced tumors. Despite recent progress in investigational therapies, survival rates are still disappointingly low and novel adjuvant and systemic therapies are urgently needed. A recently elucidated secretory pathway is attracting considerable interest as a promising anticancer target. The cis-Golgi matrix protein, GOLGA2/GM130, plays an important role in glycosylation and transport of protein in the secretory pathway. In this study, the effects of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs targeting GOLGA2/GM130 (shGOLGA2) on autophagy and lung cancer growth were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of GOLGA2/GM130 led to induction of autophagy and inhibition of glycosylation in A549 cells and in the lungs of K-ras(LA1) mice. Furthermore, downregulation of GOLGA2/GM130 decreased angiogenesis and cancer cell invasion in vitro and suppressed tumorigenesis in lung cancer mice model. The tumor specificity of sequence targeting GOLGA2/GM130 was also demonstrated. Taken together, these results suggest that induction of autophagy by shGOLGA2 may induce cell death rather than cell survival. Therefore, downregulation of GOLGA2/GM130 may be a potential therapeutic option for lung cancer.

  18. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjia Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development.

  19. Mir-130a-Mediated Downregulation of SMAD4 Contributes to Reduced Sensitivity to TGE beta Stimulation in Promyelocytic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hager, Mattias; Pedersen, Corinna Cavan; Larsen, Maria Torp

    2011-01-01

    mature, the expression of miR-130a decreases dramatically whereas the level of Smad4 protein expression increases demonstrating inverse correlation between miR-130a and Smad4 protein. The level of Stnad4 mRNA is comparable at all stages of granulopoiesis. High miR-130a levels and low or no expression...... by point mutations in the miRNA-binding site. In agreement, we observed that stable overexpression of miR-130a in a granulocytic cell line reduces the level of Smad4 protein, and render the cells less sensitive to TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition. This was also confirmed with cell cycles analysis...... of Smad4 was found in primary cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and in a cell line (Kasumi-1) with the t(8:21)(q22;q22) chromosomal translocation. The level of Smad4 increased in Kasumi-1 cells when the endogenous level of miR-130a was inhibited by anti-miR-130a LNA. Our data indicate...

  20. 130 MeV Au ion irradiation induced dewetting on In2Te3 thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheswaran, P.; Abhirami, K.M.; Gokul, B.; Sathyamoorthy, R.; Prakash, Jai; Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► In 2 Te 3 phase formed from In/Te bilayer by 130 MeV Au ion irradiation. ► Lower fluence results mixed phases with initial state of dewetting. ► At higher fluence, In 2 Te 3 phase with complete dewetting pattern is formed. ► Thermal spike model is used to explain the inter face mixing phenomena. ► SHI irradiation may be used to functionalize the structural and surface properties of thin films. - Abstract: In/Te bilayer thin films were prepared by sequential thermal evaporation and subsequently irradiated by 130 MeV Au ions. The pristine and irradiated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques. RBS spectra reveal the sputtering of Te film and interface mixing, with increasing fluence. The surface morphology showed the beginning of dewetting of Te thin film and formation of the partially connected with the mixed zones at the fluence of 1 × 10 13 ions/cm 2 . At the higher fluence of 3 × 10 13 ions/cm 2 , dewetted structures were isolated at the surface. Above results are explained based on the formation of craters, sputtering and dewetting followed by inter-diffusion at the interface of molten zones due to thermal spike induced by Au ions.

  1. Organization of functional domains in the docking protein p130Cas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Garcia-Guzman, Miguel; Briknarova, Klara; Larsen, Elise; Havert, Marnie L.; Vuori, Kristiina; Ely, Kathryn R.

    2004-01-01

    The docking protein p130Cas becomes phosphorylated upon cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins, and is thought to play an essential role in cell transformation. Cas transmits signals through interactions with the Src-homology 3 (SH3) and Src-homology 2 domains of FAK or v-Crk signaling molecules, or with 14-3-3 protein, as well as phosphatases PTP1B and PTP-PEST. The large (130 kDa), multi-domain Cas molecule contains an SH3 domain, a Src-binding domain, a serine-rich protein interaction region, and a C-terminal region that participates in protein interactions implicated in antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer. In this study, as part of a long-term goal to examine the protein interactions of Cas by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, molecular constructs were designed to express two adjacent domains, the serine-rich domain and the Src-binding domain, that each participate in intermolecular contacts dependent on protein phosphorylation. The protein products are soluble, homogeneous, monodisperse, and highly suitable for structural studies to define the role of Cas in integrin-mediated cell signaling

  2. Data Analysis Of A Coastal Zone Remote Sensing Campaign By The Nasa C130 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippi, I.; Radicati, B.

    1988-01-01

    The principal goal of most of our remote sensing campaigns has been the choice of the best airborne sensors and the selection of the most efficient visible and infrared wavelengths for the remote sensing of the Italian coastal zone. The "1986 C130 European Program" was performed by NASA C130 airplane last summer. In this contest on 30th July a flight over the Tuscan islands and coast was performed. The airplane was equipped with the following main sensors: a Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS), a Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) and an Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS). The images acquired, were firstly corrected for the several types of instrumental noise and errors and after that were correlated with the flight parameters and geometrically corrected. Finally the data were reduced to physical units taking into account the sensors calibration. Particular attention was also paid to the atmospheric effects taken into account by the use of the spectral results of the computer program LOWTRAN-6. First results on sea temperature detection, especially near river or channel estuaries, were reported. At the same time comparison between the thermal infrared channel of the TMS and those of THIS was performed. In addition studies are being made on the relationships among chlorophyll, plankton, yellow substance, oil at sea, total suspended matter, fluorescence and sea color. On that basis, combining the bands of the TMS, tentative image processing is being performed to determinate alga and dissolved organic materials covering.

  3. Projected Shell Model Description of Positive Parity Band of 130Pr Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suram; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Dhanvir; Sharma, Chetan; Bharti, Arun; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical investigation of positive parity yrast band of odd-odd 130Pr nucleus is performed by applying the projected shell model. The present study is undertaken to investigate and verify the very recently observed side band in 130Pr theoretically in terms of quasi-particle (qp) configuration. From the analysis of band diagram, the yrast as well as side band are found to arise from two-qp configuration πh 11/2 ⊗ νh 11/2. The present calculations are viewed to have qualitatively reproduced the known experimental data for yrast states, transition energies, and B( M1) / B( E2) ratios of this nucleus. The recently observed positive parity side band is also reproduced by the present calculations. The energy states of the side band are predicted up to spin 25+, which is far above the known experimental spin of 18+ and this could serve as a motivational factor for future experiments. In addition, the reduced transition probability B( E2) for interband transitions has also been calculated for the first time in projected shell model, which would serve as an encouragement for other research groups in the future.

  4. Search for excited leptons at 130-140 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jacobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    A search for the radiative decay of excited charged leptons, ℓ ∗, and for radiative and weak decays of excited electron neutrinos, ν e∗, is performed, using the 5.8 pb -1 of data collected by ALEPH at 130-140 GeV. No evidence for a signal is found in single or pair production. Excluded mass limits from pair production are close to 65 GeV/ c2 for all excited lepton species. Limits on the couplings, {λ}/{m ℓ ∗}, of excited leptons are derived from single production. For an excited lepton mass of 130 GeV/ c2, these limits are 0.04 GeV -1 for μ ∗ and τ ∗, and 0.0007 GeV -1 for e ∗. For ν e∗, the limit is at the level of 0.03 GeV -1 for a mass of 120 GeV/ c2, independent of the decay branching ratios.

  5. Search for excited leptons in $e^{+} e^{-}$ annihilation at $\\sqrt {s}$ = 130 - 140 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bencze, G L; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Brambilla, Elena; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buijs, A; Bujak, A T; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Burgos, C; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Castello, R; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coan, T E; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Dénes, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabbretti, R; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Fernández, G; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Gailloud, M; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; González, E; Gougas, Andreas; Goujon, D; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gustafson, H R; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; He, J T; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Ilyas, M M; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Koffeman, E; Köngeter, A; Koutsenko, V F; Koulbardis, A; Krämer, R W; Kramer, T; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Lenti, M; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lindemann, B; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Ludovici, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Macchiolo, A; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Maolinbay, M; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Möller, M; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Raghavan, R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Redaelli, M; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Ricker, A; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Röhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Salicio, J M; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schulte, R; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Seiler, P G; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Sticozzi, F; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Toker, O; Tonisch, F; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tsaregorodtsev, A Yu; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Urbàn, L; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vuilleumier, L; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weill, R; Willmott, C; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zaccardelli, C; Zalite, A; Zemp, P; Zeng, J Y; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, G J; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Van der Zwaan, B C C

    1996-01-01

    We report on a search for the excited leptons e^*,mu^*,tau^* and nu^* in e+e- collisions at sqrt{s} = 130 - 140 GeV using the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence has been found for their existence. From an analysis of the expected pair produced l^*l^* in the channels e.e.gamma.gamma, mu.mu.gamma.gamma, tau.tau.gamma.gamma, eeWW, and nu.nu.gamma.gamma, we determine the lower mass limits at 95% C.L. of 64.7 GeV for e^*, 64.9 GeV for mu^*, 64.2 GeV for tau*, 57.3 GeV ( eW decay mode) and 61.4 GeV ( nu.gamma decay mode) for nu^*. From an analysis of the expected singly produced l.l^* in the channels e.e.gamma, mu.mu.gamma, tau.tau.gamma, nu.eW and nu.nu.gamma, we determine upper limits on the couplings lambda/m_{l^*} up to m_{l^*} = 130 GeV.

  6. Total Ionizing Dose effects in 130-nm commercial CMOS technologies for HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gonella, L; Silvestri, M; Gerardin, S; Pantano, D; Re, V; Manghisoni, M; Ratti, L; Ranieri, A

    2007-01-01

    The impact of foundry-to-foundry variability and bias conditions during irradiation on the Total Ionizing Dose (TID) response of commercial 130-nm CMOS technologies have been investigated for applications in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. n- and p-channel MOSFETs from three different manufacturers have been irradiated with X-rays up to more than 100 Mrad (SiO2). Even though the effects of TID are qualitatively similar, the amount of degradation is shown to vary considerably from foundry to foundry, probably depending on the processing of the STI oxide and/or doping profile in the substrate. The bias during irradiation showed to have a strong impact as well on the TID response, proving that exposure at worst case bias conditions largely overestimates the degradation a device may experience during its lifetime. Overall, our results increase the confidence that 130-nm CMOS technologies can be used in future HEP experiments even without Hardness-By-Design solutions, provided that constant monitoring of th...

  7. 25 CFR 900.130 - What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Construction § 900.130 What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a self-determination construction contract? 900.130 Section 900.130...

  8. Lifetime and g-factor of a new isomer in 130 La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.; Brandolini, F.; Pavan, P.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; De Poli, M.; Medina, N.H.; Rao, M.N.

    1999-01-01

    Pulsed-beam measurements have been recently performed at the XTU-tandem of the National Laboratory of Legnaro with the aim to investigate short-lived isomeric states in neutron-deficient nuclei of the A∼130 region. Isotopically enriched tin targets were irradiated with a 70 MeV 16 O beam (pulse width of 3 ns at a repetition rate of 800 ns) and the γ-ray angular distributions perturbed in magnetic or electric interaction were observed time-differentially. Static electromagnetic moments were thus determined for several known short-lived isomers in 129,130,131 Ce and 129 Ba. In these experiments a new isomeric decay has been also identified and its properties are reported in the present work. The isomer has been observed on a target containing 116 Sn (87%), 117 Sn (8%) and 118 Sn (5%). The tin target of 0.6 mg/cm 2 thickness evaporated on a Pb foil was placed in an external magnetic field of 32 kG whose orientation was periodically reversed. Two planar HPGe detectors positioned at ±135 deg. with respect to the beam direction were used for the γ-ray detection. In the delayed spectra a γ-ray of 105.2 keV has been observed and a half-life of 32(5)ns has been determined for it. The experimental and calculated R(t) modulation ratios of the 105.2 keV γ-ray in the external magnetic field are given. From the derived Larmor frequency a value g = + 0.48(3) has been determined for the isomeric state g-factor. A dipole character has been established for the delayed 105.2 keV γ-transition based on the determined negative A 2 coefficient. The new isomer was tentatively assigned to the odd-odd 130 La populated in the 116,117,118 Sn ( 16 O,pxn) reaction. In this nucleus a state at (150.3 + x) keV de-excited by a 105.2 keV transition is known and it was identified with the isomer. Further experiments are in progress for the definite assignment and the elucidation of the isomer configuration. (authors)

  9. Analysis of p130 protein and mRNA expression in ten patients with uterine papillary serous carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-ting XU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To examine p130 protein and mRNA expression in uterine papillary serous carcinoma(UPSC and their clinical and pathologic significance.Methods A total of 10 UPSC patients(Stage I were included,with 10 cases of high-level endometrial carcinoma of the same stage taken as the control group and 10 cases of normal proliferative stage endometrium(EM taken as the disease control group.The level of p130 protein expression was determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining,microscopic observation,and immunohistochemistry,whereas the p130 mRNA levels were examined through real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.The clinicopathologic analysis was carried out in combination with clinical data.Results The p130 protein and p130 mRNA expression levels in the UPSC group(0.46±0.01 and 0.56±0.06,respectively were apparently less than that of the normal proliferative stage endometrium group(0.91±0.04 and 2.81±0.40,respectively;P < 0.01 and also less than those in high-level endometrial carcinoma(P < 0.05.Clinicopathologic analysis shows that all patients are post-menopausal women with symptoms of irregular vaginal bleeding and the average tumor size was 7.5cm(range: 1.2-14.8cm.The pathologic features are same as that of high-level ovarian papillary serous carcinoma.Conclusion Reduced p130 protein and p130 mRNA expression in UPSC might correlate with poor prognosis in UPSC patients.

  10. miR-130b-3p Modulates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Crosstalk in Lung Fibrosis by Targeting IGF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuhong; Geng, Jing; Xu, Xuefeng; Huang, Xiaoxi; Leng, Dong; Jiang, Dingyuan; Liang, Jiurong; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Dianhua; Dai, Huaping

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive and usually lethal fibrotic lung disease with largely unknown etiology and pathogenesis. Evidence suggests microRNAs (miRNA) contribute to pathogenesis of IPF. In this study, we sought to identify miRNA expression signatures and determine the role of miR-130b-3p in lung fibrosis. The miRNA expression profile of the lungs from patients with IPF and normal donors was determined by Affymetrix microarray, and transcriptome with Affymetrix array. The functions and signal pathways as well as miRNA-mRNA networks were established by bioinformatics analysis. Luciferase assays and ELISA were used to confirm the miRNA target gene. The effect of miRNA-transfected epithelium on fibroblast activities was assessed using a co-culture system. The fibroblast activities were determined by qRT-PCR, western blotting, Transwell and BrdU assays. Seven miRNAs were significantly decreased in IPF lungs, with miR-130b-3p being the highest in the miRNA-mRNA network. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) was a target gene of miR-130b-3p in the epithelium. miR-130b-3p inhibition in the epithelium induced collagen I expression and enhanced the proliferation and migration ability of fibroblast in co-culture systems, which mimicked the functions of exogenous IGF-1 on fibroblasts. Neutralizing IGF-1 with an antibody significantly reduced the modulatory effects of miR-130b-3p inhibitor-transfected epithelium on the activation of fibroblasts. Our results show that miR-130b-3p was downregulated in IPF lungs. miR-130b-3p downregulation contributed to the activation of fibroblasts and the dysregulated epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk by promoting IGF-1 secretion from lung epithelium, suggesting a key regulatory role for this miRNA in preventing lung fibrosis.

  11. A 130 GHz Electro-Optic Ring Modulator with Double-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The optical absorption coefficient of graphene will change after injecting carriers. Based on this principle, a high-speed double-layer graphene electro-optic modulator with a ring resonator structure was designed in this paper. From the numerical simulations, we designed a modulator. Its optical bandwidth is larger than 130 GHz, the switching energy is 0.358 fJ per bit, and the driven voltage is less than 1.2 V. At the same time, the footprint of the proposed modulator is less than 10 microns squared, which makes the process compatible with the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS process. This will provide the possibility for the on-chip integration of the photoelectric device.

  12. C-130: Results of center wing residual strength and crack propagation test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.; Snider, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings which had experienced from approximately 4,000 to 13,000 hours of flight service and its associated fatigue damage were tested to destruction, seven in upbending and seven in downbending. Six wings were tested directly for static residual strength in the fatigue-damaged condition as received from field service. The other eight wings were tested in crack propagation cyclic testing at a prescribed stress level for a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Then the stress level was reduced and testing was continued up to a maximum of 20,000 total cycles. Cyclic testing was performed with constant-amplitude stresses at a stress ratio of +0.1. Maximum cyclic skin stresses were approximately 18,000 psi. At the conclusion of cyclic testing, a static test to destruction was conducted to determine the residual strength of each fatigue-damaged specimen.

  13. Development of scalable frequency and power Phase-Locked Loop in 130nm CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Firlej, M; Idzik, M; Moron, J; Swientek, K

    2014-01-01

    The design and measurements results of a prototype very low power Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) ASIC for applications in readout systems of particle physics detectors are presented. The PLL was fabricated in 130 nm CMOS technology. It was designed and simulated for frequency range 10 MHz–3.5 GHz. Four division factors i.e. 6, 8, 10 and 16 were implemented in the PLL feedback loop. The main PLL block-voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) should work in 16 frequency ranges/modes, switched either manually or automatically. Preliminary measurements done in frequency range 20 MHz–1.6 GHz showed that the ASIC is functional and generates proper clock signal. The automatic VCO mode switching, one of the main design goals, was positively verified. Power consumption of around 0.6mW was measured at 1 GHz for a division factor equal to 10.

  14. Development of scalable frequency and power Phase-Locked Loop in 130 nm CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firlej, M; Fiutowski, T; Idzik, M; Moroń, J; Świentek, K

    2014-01-01

    The design and measurements results of a prototype very low power Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) ASIC for applications in readout systems of particle physics detectors are presented. The PLL was fabricated in 130 nm CMOS technology. It was designed and simulated for frequency range 10 MHz–3.5 GHz. Four division factors i.e. 6, 8, 10 and 16 were implemented in the PLL feedback loop. The main PLL block-voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) should work in 16 frequency ranges/modes, switched either manually or automatically. Preliminary measurements done in frequency range 20 MHz–1.6 GHz showed that the ASIC is functional and generates proper clock signal. The automatic VCO mode switching, one of the main design goals, was positively verified. Power consumption of around 0.6 mW was measured at 1 GHz for a division factor equal to 10

  15. Energy spectra and E2 transition rates of 124—130Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, H.; Seidi, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we have studied the energy spectra and B(E2) values of 124—130Ba isotopes in the shape phase transition region between the spherical and gamma unstable deformed shapes. We have used a transitional interacting Boson model (IBM), Hamiltonian which is based on affine SU(1,1) Lie algebra in the both IBM-1 and 2 versions and also the Catastrophe theory in combination with a coherent state formalism to generate energy surfaces and determine the exact values of control parameters. Our results for control parameters suggest a combination of U(5) and SO(6) dynamical symmetries in this isotopic chain. Also, the theoretical predictions can be rather well reproduce the experimental counterparts, when the control parameter is approached to the SO(6) limit.

  16. Cross-section measurements of neutron-deuteron breakup at 13.0 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setze, H.R.; Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W.; Braun, R.T.; Gonzalez Trotter, D.E.; Hussein, A.H.; Pedroni, R.S.; Roper, C.D.; Salinas, F.; Slaus, I.; Vlahovic, B.; Walter, R.L.; Mertens, G.; Lambert, J.M.; Witala, H.; Gloeckle, W.

    2005-01-01

    Cross-section measurements of seven exit-channel configurations in the neutron-deuteron breakup at 13.0 MeV are reported and compared to rigorous calculations. Our data are consistent with those of previous measurements in four of six configurations. The present data for five configurations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The cross-section data for the space-star and another out-of-plane configuration are larger than the theoretical predictions by more than three standard deviations. The previously observed 20% discrepancy between theory and data for the space-star configuration is confirmed in the present work. The inclusion of the Tucson-Melbourne 2π-exchange three-nucleon force changes the predicted cross section by only 2% and in the wrong direction needed to bring theory into agreement with data

  17. Partial purification and characterization of a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium 130 isolated from mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luiz Tulini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are important in foods as potential probiotics and also due to the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds that can contribute for biopreservation. In this work, the bacteriocin produced by the food isolate Enterococcus faecium 130 was partially purified and characterized. The compound was active against Gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes. It was produced after 4 days of storage at a broad temperature range (4 to 37 °C; it was stable at pH ranging from 2 to 10 with no loss of activity after heating at 100 °C for 15 minutes. Bacteriocin was partially purified by the adsorption-desorption technique, and the analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed a molecular mass of 3.5 to 6.5 kDa. These data encourage studies on application of this bacteriocin in food systems as an additional hurdle to microbial growth.

  18. Single Event Gate Rupture in 130-nm CMOS Transistor Arrays Subjected to X-Ray Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestri, M; Gerardin, Simone; Faccio, Federico; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    We present new experimental results on heavy ion-induced gate rupture on deep submicron CMOS transistor arrays. Through the use of dedicated test structures, composed by a large number of 130-nm MOSFETs connected in parallel, we show the response to heavy ion irradiation under high stress voltages of devices previously irradiated with X-rays. We found only a slight impact on gate rupture critical voltage at a LET of 32 MeV cm(2) mg(-1) for devices previously irradiated up to 3 Mrad(SiO2), and practically no change for 100 Mrad(SiO2) irradiation, dose of interest for the future super large hadron collider (SLHC).

  19. NMR structure of the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide fragment, GIP(1-30)amide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alana, Inigo; Hewage, Chandralal M.; G. Malthouse, J. Paul; Parker, Jeremy C.; Gault, Victor A.; O'Harte, Finbarr P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide is an incretin hormone that stimulates insulin secretion and reduces postprandial glycaemic excursions. The glucose-dependent action of GIP on pancreatic β-cells has attracted attention towards its exploitation as a potential drug for type 2 diabetes. Use of NMR or X-ray crystallography is vital to determine the three-dimensional structure of the peptide. Therefore, to understand the basic structural requirements for the biological activity of GIP, the solution structure of the major biologically active fragment, GIP(1-30)amide, was investigated by proton NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The structure is characterised by a full length α-helical conformation between residues F 6 and A 28 . This structural information could play an important role in the design of therapeutic agents based upon GIP receptor agonists

  20. Biophysical properties of intrinsically disordered p130Cas substrate domain--implication in mechanosensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinya Hotta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical stretch-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the proline-rich 306-residue substrate domain (CasSD of p130Cas (or BCAR1 has eluded an experimentally validated structural understanding. Cellular p130Cas tyrosine phosphorylation is shown to function in areas without internal actomyosin contractility, sensing force at the leading edge of cell migration. Circular dichroism shows CasSD is intrinsically disordered with dominant polyproline type II conformations. Strongly conserved in placental mammals, the proline-rich sequence exhibits a pseudo-repeat unit with variation hotspots 2-9 residues before substrate tyrosine residues. Atomic-force microscopy pulling experiments show CasSD requires minimal extension force and exhibits infrequent, random regions of weak stability. Proteolysis, light scattering and ultracentrifugation results show that a monomeric intrinsically disordered form persists for CasSD in solution with an expanded hydrodynamic radius. All-atom 3D conformer sampling with the TraDES package yields ensembles in agreement with experiment when coil-biased sampling is used, matching the experimental radius of gyration. Increasing β-sampling propensities increases the number of prolate conformers. Combining the results, we conclude that CasSD has no stable compact structure and is unlikely to efficiently autoinhibit phosphorylation. Taking into consideration the structural propensity of CasSD and the fact that it is known to bind to LIM domains, we propose a model of how CasSD and LIM domain family of transcription factor proteins may function together to regulate phosphorylation of CasSD and effect machanosensing.

  1. NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF 130,000 QUASARS: AN SDSS-UKIDSS-MATCHED CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peth, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a catalog of over 130,000 quasar candidates with near-infrared (NIR) photometric properties, with an areal coverage of approximately 1200 deg 2 . This is achieved by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in the optical ugriz bands to the UKIRT Infrared Digital Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) in the NIR YJHK bands. We match the ∼1 million SDSS DR6 Photometric Quasar catalog to Data Release 3 of the UKIDSS LAS (ULAS) and produce a catalog with 130,827 objects with detections in one or more NIR bands, of which 74,351 objects have optical and K-band detections and 42,133 objects have the full nine-band photometry. The majority (∼85%) of the SDSS objects were not matched simply because these were not covered by the ULAS. The positional standard deviation of the SDSS Quasar to ULAS matches is δ R.A. = 0.''1370 and δ decl. = 0.''1314. We find an absolute systematic astrometric offset between the SDSS Quasar catalog and the UKIDSS LAS, of |R.A. offset | = 0.''025 and |decl. offset | = 0.''040; we suggest the nature of this offset to be due to the matching of catalog, rather than image, level data. Our matched catalog has a surface density of ∼53 deg -2 for K ≤ 18.27 objects; tests using our matched catalog, along with data from the UKIDSS Deep Extragalactic Survey, imply that our limiting magnitude is i ∼ 20.6. Color-redshift diagrams, for the optical and NIR, show a close agreement between our matched catalog and recent quasar color models at redshift z ∼ 4.6, and very high, z > 5.7, redshift previously discovered quasars.

  2. Total Ionizing Dose Testing of the ABC130 ASIC for the ATLAS Phase-II Semiconductor Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Morningstar, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) current inner detector was not built to withstand the radiation damage from the 3000 $\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity that is planned for the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). Therefore, the ATLAS inner detector (ID) must be completely upgraded. As a part of this upgrade, the semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) will be replaced with new silicon microstrip sensors {[}1{]}. These silicon strips will be read out by the ABC130 chip and thus the ABC130 must be able to withstand an expected 30 Mrad of radiation over 10 years. The ABC130 chip was irradiated with 70 Mrad of x-ray radiation over the course of 2 days and the results are discussed in this report.

  3. miR-130a activates apoptotic signaling through activation of caspase-8 in taxane-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yasunori; Kojima, Toshio; Kawakami, Kyojiro; Mizutani, Kosuke; Kato, Taku; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-10-01

    The acquisition of drug resistance is one of the most malignant phenotypes of cancer and identification of its therapeutic target is a prerequisite for the development of novel therapy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in various types of cancer and proposed as potential therapeutic targets for patients. In the present study, we aimed to identify miRNA that could serve as a therapeutic target for taxane-resistant prostate cancer. In order to identify miRNAs related to taxane-resistance, miRNA profiling was performed using prostate cancer PC-3 cells and paclitaxel-resistant PC-3 cell lines established from PC-3 cells. Microarray analysis of mRNA expression was also conducted to search for potential target genes of miRNA. Luciferase reporter assay was performed to examine miRNA binding to the 3'-UTR of target genes. The effects of ectopic expression of miRNA on cell growth, tubulin polymerization, drug sensitivity, and apoptotic signaling pathway were investigated in a paclitaxel-resistant PC-3 cell line. The expression of miR-130a was down-regulated in all paclitaxel-resistant cell lines compared with parental PC-3 cells. Based on mRNA microarray analysis and luciferase reporter assay, we identified SLAIN1 as a direct target gene for miR-130a. Transfection of a miR-130a precursor into a paclitaxel-resistant cell line suppressed cell growth and increased the sensitivity to paclitaxel. Lastly, ectopic expression of miR-130a did not affect the polymerized tubulin level, but activated apoptotic signaling through activation of caspase-8. Our results suggested that reduced expression of miR-130a may be involved in the paclitaxel-resistance and that miR-130a could be a therapeutic target for taxane-resistant prostate cancer patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. JTT-130, a Novel Intestine-Specific Inhibitor of Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein, Improves Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia Independent of Suppression of Food Intake in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Sakata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of JTT-130 on glucose and lipid metabolism independent of the suppression of feeding by comparing with pair-fed animals. Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats were divided into control, JTT-130 treatment, and pair-fed groups. The rats were fed with a regular powdered diet with or without JTT-130 as a food admixture for 6 weeks. We compared the effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in JTT-130 treatment group with those in pair-fed group. Results. Hyperglycemia in ZDF rats was prevented in both JTT-130 treatment and pair-fed groups, but the prevention in pair-fed group became poor with time. Moreover, reduction in plasma cholesterol levels was observed only in JTT-130 treatment group. JTT-130 treatment group showed improved glucose tolerance at 5 weeks after treatment and significant elevation of portal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 levels. The hepatic lipid content in JTT-130 treatment group was decreased as compared with pair-fed group. Furthermore, pancreatic protection effects, such as an increase in pancreatic weight and an elevation of insulin-positive area in islets, were observed after JTT-130 treatment. Conclusions. JTT-130 improves hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia via a mechanism independent of suppression of food intake, which is ascribed to an enhancement of GLP-1 secretion and a reduction of lipotoxicity.

  5. Parton interactions and two particle transverse momentum correlations in Au + Au collisions at √SNN=130 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingjun; Guo Liqun; Piao Xingliang

    2006-01-01

    Partonic effects on two-particle transverse momentum correlations are studied for Au + Au collisions at √S NN =130 GeV in the Monte Carlo model, AMPT. This study demonstrates that in these collisions partonic interactions contribute significantly to the correlations. Additionally, model calculations are compared with data of the two-particle transverse momentum correlations measured by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and it is found that AMPT with string melting can well reproduce the measured centrality dependence of the two-particle transverse momentum correlations in Au + Au collisions at √S NN =130 GeV. (authors)

  6. Reliability analysis of C-130 turboprop engine components using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qattan, Nizar A.

    In this study, we predict the failure rate of Lockheed C-130 Engine Turbine. More than thirty years of local operational field data were used for failure rate prediction and validation. The Weibull regression model and the Artificial Neural Network model including (feed-forward back-propagation, radial basis neural network, and multilayer perceptron neural network model); will be utilized to perform this study. For this purpose, the thesis will be divided into five major parts. First part deals with Weibull regression model to predict the turbine general failure rate, and the rate of failures that require overhaul maintenance. The second part will cover the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model utilizing the feed-forward back-propagation algorithm as a learning rule. The MATLAB package will be used in order to build and design a code to simulate the given data, the inputs to the neural network are the independent variables, the output is the general failure rate of the turbine, and the failures which required overhaul maintenance. In the third part we predict the general failure rate of the turbine and the failures which require overhaul maintenance, using radial basis neural network model on MATLAB tool box. In the fourth part we compare the predictions of the feed-forward back-propagation model, with that of Weibull regression model, and radial basis neural network model. The results show that the failure rate predicted by the feed-forward back-propagation artificial neural network model is closer in agreement with radial basis neural network model compared with the actual field-data, than the failure rate predicted by the Weibull model. By the end of the study, we forecast the general failure rate of the Lockheed C-130 Engine Turbine, the failures which required overhaul maintenance and six categorical failures using multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP) model on DTREG commercial software. The results also give an insight into the reliability of the engine

  7. Vitamin D Potentiates the Inhibitory Effect of MicroRNA-130a in Hepatitis C Virus Replication Independent of Type I Interferon Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiong Duan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcitriol, the bioactive metabolite of vitamin D, was reported to inhibit HCV production in a synergistic fashion with interferon, a treatment in vitro. Our previous study established that miR-130a inhibits HCV replication by restoring the host innate immune response. We aimed to determine whether there is additive inhibitory effect of calcitriol and miR-130a on HCV replication. Here we showed that calcitriol potentiates the anti-HCV effect of miR-130a in both Con1b replicon and J6/JFH1 culture systems. Intriguingly, this potentiating effect of calcitriol on miR-130a was not through upregulating the expression of cellular miR-130a or through increasing the miR-130a-mediated IFNα/β production. All these findings may contribute to the development of novel anti-HCV therapeutic strategies although the antiviral mechanism needs to be further investigated.

  8. Basic and clinical evaluation of CA 130 RIA kit (D-7111) using two newly developed monoclonal antibodies. Comparison with CA 125 kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saga, Tsuneo; Endo, Keigo; Nakajima, Tetsuo and others

    1988-10-01

    The CA 130 RIA kit was developed with the use of two monoclonal antibodies, 130 - 22 and 145 - 9. Laboratory performance was satisfactory for precision, reproducibility, recovery, and dilution. Measurement values with CA 130 kit were almost consistent with those with CA 125 kit. Favorable standard curves were attained with smaller concentrations and shorter incubation time of CA 130 kit than those with CA 125 kit. There was less prozone phenomenon. When defining a cut-off serum level of CA 130 as 35 U/ml, false-positive rate was 0 % for healthy men and 4 % for healthy women, suggesting the involvement of menstrual cycle. Positive rate for CA 130 was 65 % for malignant ovarian tumor, 48 % for lung cancer, and 47 % for endometriosis. (Namekawa, K.).

  9. Development of Radiation-hard Bandgap Reference and Temperature Sensor in CMOS 130 nm Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kuczynska, Marika; Bugiel, Szymon; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Idzik, Marek; Michelis, Stefano; Moron, Jakub; Przyborowski, Dominik; Swientek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    A stable reference voltage (or current) source is a standard component of today's microelectronics systems. In particle physics experiments such reference is needed in spite of harsh ionizing radiation conditions, i.e. doses exceeding 100 Mrads and fluences above 1e15 n/cm2. After such radiation load a bandgap reference using standard p-n junction of bipolar transistor does not work properly. Instead of using standard p-n junctions, two enclosed layout transistor (ELTMOS) structures are used to create radiation-hard diodes: the ELT bulk diode and the diode obtained using the ELTMOS as dynamic threshold transistor (DTMOS). In this paper we have described several sub-1V references based on ELTMOS bulk diode and DTMOS based diode, using CMOS 130 nm process. Voltage references the structures with additional PTAT (Proportional To Absolute Temperature) output for temperature measurements were also designed. We present and compare post-layout simulations of the developed bandgap references and temperature sensors, w...

  10. Recombination in deuterium plasma at cryogenic temperatures (down to 130 K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, O.; Glosik, J.; Pysanenko, A.; Zakouril, P.; Plasil, R.; Tichy, M. [Prague Charles Univ., Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The ions H{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 3}{sup +} play an important role in the kinetics of media of astrophysical interest but also in laboratory produced plasmas (discharges, fusion plasmas). In the presented study variable temperature flowing afterglow with Langmuir probe (VT-FALP) was used to study plasma decay in D{sub 2}/He mixture at temperatures down to 130 K and total pressure up to 10 Torr. Large extend of partial number densities of D{sub 2} (10{sup 12} - 3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) were used in the experiments. Langmuir probes and mass spectrometers were applied to monitor decay of the plasma during the afterglow. The study is a continuation of our previous measurements of recombination rate coefficients of D{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 5}{sup +} ions. In these studies we observed dependence of the recombination rate coefficient on partial pressure of deuterium indicating that third-body assisted recombination is efficient and significantly contributes to recombination in decaying deuterium-containing plasma. (authors)

  11. Investigating Degradation Mechanisms in 130 nm and 90 nm Commercial CMOS Technologies Under Extreme Radiation Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, Lodovico; Gaioni, Luigi; Manghisoni, Massimo; Traversi, Gianluca; Pantano, Devis

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the mechanisms underlying performance degradation in 130 nm and 90 nm commercial CMOS technologies exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation. The investigation has been mainly focused on their noise properties in view of applications to the design of low-noise, low-power analog circuits to be operated in harsh environment. Experimental data support the hypothesis that charge trapping in shallow trench isolation (STI), besides degrading the static characteristics of interdigitated NMOS transistors, also affects their noise performances in a substantial fashion. The model discussed in this paper, presented in a previous work focused on CMOS devices irradiated with a 10 Mrad(SiO2) gamma -ray dose, has been applied here also to transistors exposed to much higher (up to 100 Mrad(SiO2 )) doses of X-rays. Such a model is able to account for the extent of the observed noise degradation as a function of the device polarity, dimensions and operating point.

  12. A 130 nm ASIC prototype for the NA62 Gigatracker readout

    CERN Document Server

    Dellacasa, G; Wheadon, R; Mazza, G; Rivetti, A; Marchetto, F; Garbolino, S

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging detectors of the NA62 experiment is the silicon tracker, called Gigatracker. It consists of three hybrid silicon pixel stations, each one covering an area of 27 mm x 60 mm. While the maximum pixel size is fairly large, 300 mu m x 300 mu m the system has to sustain a very high particle rate, 1.5 MHz/mm(2), which corresponds to 800 MHz for each station. To obtain an efficient tracking with such a high rate the required track timing resolution is 150 ps (rms). Therefore the front-end ASIC should provide for each pixel a 200 Ps time measurement capability, thus leading to the requirement of time walk compensation and very compact TDCs. Moreover, Single Event Upset protection has to be implemented in order to protect the digital circuitry. An ASIC prototype has been realized in CMOS 130 nm technology, containing three pixel columns. The chip performs the time walk compensation by a Constant Fraction Discriminator circuit, while the time measurement is performed by a Time to Amplitude Co...

  13. A 130 nm ASIC prototype for the NA62 Gigatracker readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellacasa, G., E-mail: gdellaca@to.infn.it [I.N.F.N. sez. Torino, via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Garbolino, S. [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dip. Fisica Sperimentale, via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Marchetto, F. [I.N.F.N. sez. Torino, via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Martoiu, S. [I.N.F.N. sez. Torino, via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); CERN CH-1211, Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Mazza, G.; Rivetti, A.; Wheadon, R. [I.N.F.N. sez. Torino, via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2011-09-11

    One of the most challenging detectors of the NA62 experiment is the silicon tracker, called Gigatracker. It consists of three hybrid silicon pixel stations, each one covering an area of 27 mmx60 mm. While the maximum pixel size is fairly large, 300{mu}mx300{mu}m the system has to sustain a very high particle rate, 1.5 MHz/mm{sup 2}, which corresponds to 800 MHz for each station. To obtain an efficient tracking with such a high rate the required track timing resolution is 150 ps (rms). Therefore the front-end ASIC should provide for each pixel a 200 ps time measurement capability, thus leading to the requirement of time walk compensation and very compact TDCs. Moreover, Single Event Upset protection has to be implemented in order to protect the digital circuitry. An ASIC prototype has been realized in CMOS 130 nm technology, containing three pixel columns. The chip performs the time walk compensation by a Constant Fraction Discriminator circuit, while the time measurement is performed by a Time to Amplitude Converter based TDC, both of them implemented on each pixel cell. The End of Column circuit containing only digital logic is responsible for the data readout from the pixel cell. The whole chip works with a system clock of 160 MHz and the digital logic is SEU protected by the use of Hamming codes. The detailed architecture of the ASIC prototype and test results are presented.

  14. The spleen can influence the metastasis of AH130 hepatoma cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyonaga, M; Hiraoka, T; Tanaka, H; Miyauchi, Y

    1993-06-01

    The effect of pathophysiological conditions due to disturbance of the spleen is still unclear. We studied the effects of splenectomy in normal and methylcellulose-induced hypersplenic rats on the development of pulmonary metastases created by intravenous injection of ascites containing AH130 hepatoma cells from male Hos-Donryu rats. Growth of metastatic lesions in the lung was not affected by splenectomy in normal rats, but was increased by splenectomy in hypersplenic rats. Overall, there were fewer pulmonary metastases in rats with hypersplenism, but after splenectomy rats with hypersplenism had a significantly greater number of metastases than did normal rats. The metastases rate correlated somewhat with changes in the blood coagulation and T lymphocyte profile. There is a relationship between the spleen and formation of metastases in cancer. Formation of metastases in the lung was affected most by splenectomy in hypersplenism. To elucidate the mechanism by which metastases are formed in the lung under these pathologic conditions, further studies on the exact role of the spleen are required.

  15. An Algorithmic Approach for the Reconstruction of Nasal Skin Defects: Retrospective Analysis of 130 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrak Akşam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most of the malignant cutaneous carcinomas are seen in the nasal region. Reconstruction of nasal defects is challenging because of the unique anatomic properties and complex structure of this region. In this study, we present our algorithm for the nasal skin defects that occurred after malignant skin tumor excisions. Material and Methods: Patients whose nasal skin was reconstructed after malignant skin tumor excision were included in the study. These patients were evaluated by their age, gender, comorbities, tumor location, tumor size, reconstruction type, histopathological diagnosis, and tumor recurrence. Results: A total of 130 patients (70 female, 60 male were evaluated. The average age of the patients was 67.8 years. Tumors were located mostly at the dorsum, alar region, and tip of the nose. When reconstruction methods were evaluated, primary closure was preferred in 14.6% patients, full thickness skin grafts were used in 25.3% patients, and reconstruction with flaps were the choice in 60% patients. Different flaps were used according to the subunits. Mostly, dorsal nasal flaps, bilobed flaps, nasolabial flaps, and forehead flaps were used. Conclusion: The defect-only reconstruction principle was accepted in this study. Previously described subunits, such as the dorsum, tip, alar region, lateral wall, columella, and soft triangles, of the nose were further divided into subregions by their anatomical relations. An algorithm was planned with these sub regions. In nasal skin reconstruction, this algorithm helps in selection the methods for the best results and minimize the complications.

  16. Western Tropical Atlantic Hydrologic change during the last 130,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, S. M.; Lavoie, N.; Oppo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Abrupt climate changes in the North Atlantic during the last 130,000 years are associated with hydrologic changes in the western tropical Atlantic Ocean. Previous studies on marine sediment cores from between 4°S and the equator have documented pulses of terrigenous sediment recording increased precipitation and weathering on the Brazilian Nordeste associated with Heinrich events. We worked on cores KNR197-3-11CDH (7°40'N, 53°49'W, water depth 550 m) and KNR 197-3-46CDH (7°50.1621'N, 53°39.8051'W, 947m water depth) located farther north along the South American continental slope, where sediment derives from the Amazon river basin and is transported by the North Brazilian Current. Preliminary stratigraphy based on magnetic susceptibility shows a possible correlation with the Greenland ice core δ18O stratigraphy. We use sediment elemental composition, determined by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to evaluate variations in terrigenous sediment runoff and δ18O of the planktonic foraminifers Globierinoides ruber to evaluate variations in western tropical North Atlantic surface hydrography across North Atlantic abrupt climate events. Similarities and differences among our records and the records from the more southerly cores will help understand the mechanisms of hydrologic changes in the regions on abrupt climate time scales.

  17. Radiological re-survey results at 130 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ029)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from 1916 to 1959. During the early years of operation, MCW stored wastes and residues in low-lying areas west of the processing facilities and consequently some of the residuals containing radioactive materials migrated offsite to the surrounding area. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designated for remedial action the old MCW property and several vicinity properties. Additionally, in 1984, the property at 130 West Central Ave., Maywood, New Jersey and properties in its vicinity were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In 1987 and 1988, at the request of DOE, ORNL conducted a radiological survey on this property. A second radiological survey by ORNL was conducted on this property in May, 1993 at the request of DOE after an ad hoc radiological survey, requested by a new property owner and conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), identified some contamination not previously found by ORNL. The purpose of the survey was to determine if residuals from the old MCW were present on the property, and if so, if any radiological elements present were above guidelines. A certified civil survey was requisitioned by ORNL to determine actual property boundaries before beginning the radiological survey. The radiological re-survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of a large number of soil samples for radionuclide analyses

  18. Results of the radiological survey at 130 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ029)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclides analyses. The survey of this site, 130 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ029), was conducted during 1987 and 1988. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action program criteria. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Strle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode’s current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm2 of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC. The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA.

  20. Advanced control system for the scattering chamber of K-130 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaumik, Tapas Kumar; Saha, Amiya Kumar; Mandal, Bidhan Chandra; Adak, Debabrata; Purkait, Monirul; Bhattacharya, Sailajananda

    2013-01-01

    The old relay based position control system of the Scattering Chamber of K-130 Cyclotron was more than 30 years old, developed multiple problems over the years, and the components of the control system like relays, potentiometers, limit switches, radiation resistant cables were not functioning as per specifications. It has been replaced recently by a new PLC based embedded control system. This has been developed using Advantech ADAM-5510EKW 16 bit CPU together with required I/O modules. MULTIPROG Basic V.4.6 has been used as programming software and Ladder Diagram has been used to realize control scheme of the PLC. A resistive type touch screen based operator panel, WebOP-2104VN4AE has been mounted on the control rack for local control. iFIX SCADA, 75 tags Runtime Version 5.1 has been used to operate from remote PC connected to the PLC by 70m CAT6 cable. The PLC communicates with the touch panel and remote PC through 100 Mbps Ethernet switch. The Graphical User Interfaces of the local control panel and the remote panel have been developed as per the requirement from the users. All the old sensors, limit switches, relays and cables have been replaced by new items. This paper reports about the development and commissioning of basic hardware, software and operation of the control system for last six months. (author)

  1. Differentiation between benign and malignant palatal tumors using conventional MRI: a retrospective analysis of 130 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yingyan; Xiao, Zebin; Zhang, Hua; She, Dejun; Lin, Xuehua; Lin, Yu; Cao, Dairong

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the discriminative value of conventional magnetic resonance imaging between benign and malignant palatal tumors. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging features of 130 patients with palatal tumors confirmed by histopathologic examination were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical data and imaging findings were assessed between benign and malignant tumors and between benign and low-grade malignant salivary gland tumors. The variables that were significant in differentiating benign from malignant lesions were further identified using logistic regression analysis. Moreover, imaging features of each common palatal histologic entity were statistically analyzed with the rest of the tumors to define their typical imaging features. Older age, partially defined and ill-defined margins, and absence of a capsule were highly suggestive of malignant palatal tumors, especially ill-defined margins (β = 6.400). The precision in determining malignant palatal tumors achieved a sensitivity of 92.8% and a specificity of 85.6%. In addition, irregular shape, ill-defined margins, lack of a capsule, perineural spread, and invasion of surrounding structures were more often associated with low-grade malignant salivary gland tumors. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging is useful for differentiating benign from malignant palatal tumors as well as benign salivary gland tumors from low-grade salivary gland malignancies. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic and mechanical design of a 130 mm aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felice, H.; Vedrine, P. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SACM/LEAS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Mailfert, A. [LEM, F-54500 Vandoeuvre Les Nancy, (France)

    2007-07-01

    For the next generation of dipoles for accelerators, two main challenges come into play. In one hand, high dipolar fields in the range of 13 to 15 T are targeted. In the other hand, large apertures (above 80 mm) are required in the interaction regions. These two requirements lead to two issues. First, a new superconductor has to replace the NbTi as its limits have been reached around 10 T with the LHC. The superconducting material liable to be its successor is the Nb{sub 3}Sn. However, it is a very mechanical stress sensitive material. Up to now, a mechanical stress of 150 MPa is supposed to degrade its critical properties. Second, large aperture dipole can not be considered with the well-known cosine theta design. Indeed, above 88 mm, azimuthal Lorentz forces in this magnetic configuration produces mechanical stresses on the coil midplane higher than the acceptable limit. In this paper, an alternative coil arrangement based on intersecting ellipses and limiting the mechanical stresses is proposed for a 130 mm aperture dipole. The first part of this paper is dedicated to the magnetic study of this magnet. We can underline the fact that the field quality required in particle accelerators can be reached with a bore field of about 13 T. The second part deals with the mechanical structure of the magnet which is necessary to withstand the Lorentz forces involved and to apply pre-stress. (authors)

  3. Converting a C-130 Hercules into a Compound Helicopter: A Conceptual Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottapalli, Anjaney P.; Harris, Franklin D.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the US Military and NASA are investigating the feasibility of a Vertical/Short Take Off and Landing (VSTOL) aircraft that can provide invaluable aid in the combat theater and significantly improve the civil transportation system. The nominal military mission requirement calls for a 28-ton payload heavy lift capability while the civilian requirements calls for a 90-passenger, 1000-nm range, airliner, as noted in Reference 1. To aid in these aircraft requirements, the present study examined the conversion of a Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules into a compound aircraft, which would demonstrate the technology required by a much larger version. The present study examined various configurations and rotor blade designs in order to fulfill the nominal mission described previously. It was shown that the initial design of a 180 ft diameter rotor to lift 155,000 lb was not feasible due to material constraints. A revised design, in which the rotor radius was reduced to 55 ft, met the given constraints but required too much power. The decision was made to move to a twin rotor compound to take advantage of the increased disc area and drop the need for anti torque devices. Following this design shift, a new design point was found where all five constraints were met and the power requirements were deemed reasonable. This twin-rotor design was used in NDARC to provide a complete sizing analysis of the chosen design point.

  4. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-07-22

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode's current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm(2) of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA.

  5. RBL2/p130 is a direct AKT target and is required to induce apoptosis upon AKT inhibition in lung cancer and mesothelioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimalli, Francesca; Forte, Iris M; Esposito, Luca; Indovina, Paola; Iannuzzi, Carmelina A; Alfano, Luigi; Costa, Caterina; Barone, Daniela; Rocco, Gaetano; Giordano, Antonio

    2018-04-02

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein family includes RB1/p105, RBL1/p107, and RBL2/p130, which are key factors in cell-cycle regulation and stand at the crossroads of multiple pathways dictating cell fate decisions. The role of RB proteins in apoptosis is controversial because they can inhibit or promote apoptosis depending on the context, on the apoptotic stimuli and on their intrinsic status, impacting on the response to antitumoral treatments. Here we identified RBL2/p130 as a direct substrate of the AKT kinase, a key antiapoptotic factor hyperactive in multiple cancer types. We showed that RBL2/p130 and AKT1 physically interact and AKT phosphorylates RBL2/p130 Ser941, located in the pocket domain, but not when this residue is mutated into Ala. We found that pharmacological inhibition of AKT, through the highly selective AKT inhibitor VIII (AKTiVIII), impairs RBL2/p130 Ser941 phosphorylation and increases RBL2/p130 stability, mRNA expression and nuclear levels in both lung cancer and mesothelioma cell lines, mirroring the more extensively studied effects on the p27 cell-cycle inhibitor. Consistently, AKT inhibition reduced cell viability, induced cell accumulation in G0/G1, and triggered apoptosis, which proved to be largely dependent on RBL2/p130 itself, as shown upon RBL2/p130 silencing. AKT inhibition induced RBL2/p130-dependent apoptosis also in HEK-293 cells, in which re-expression of a short hairpin-resistant RBL2/p130 was able to rescue AKTiVIII-induced apoptosis upon RBL2/p130 silencing. Our data also showed that the combination of AKT and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) inhibitors, which converge on the re-activation of RBL2/p130 antitumoral potential, could be a promising anticancer strategy.

  6. Half-life of samarium-147

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, N; Nakanishi, T

    2003-01-01

    The alpha-decay half-life of sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Sm has been reevaluated. Known amounts of natural Sm and an alpha-emitter standard ( sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, or sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am) were mixed well to prepare thin sources for the simultaneous counting of sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Sm and the alpha-emitter standard by means of an alpha-spectrometer using a silicon surface barrier detector. The alpha-disintegration rate of known amounts of sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Sm was determined by reference to the alpha activity of the standard. The source preparation and counting were repeated to establish the reproducibility of the present half-life determination, and supplementary alpha spectrometry was carried out by a liquid-scintillation spectrometer. The arithmetic mean of the experimental half-life values was obtained to be (1.17 +- 0.02) x 10 sup 1 sup 1 y. This value is about 10% longer than the currently adopted value, (1.06 +- 0.02) x 10 sup 1 sup 1 y, and the possible factors for this difference are discussed...

  7. Vaporization of Samarium trichloride studied by thermogravimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, Marcelo R.; Pasquevich, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work, the vaporization reaction of SmCl 3 (l) obtained from the 'in situ' reaction of Sm 2 O 3 (s) and Cl 2 (g)-C(s) was studied by thermogravimetry under controlled atmosphere. The effects of both the temperature between 825 C degrees and 950 C degrees and the total flow gas on the vaporization rate of the following reaction: SmCl 3 (l) = SmCl 3 (g) were analyzed. The vaporization rate of the process was found to be independent of then total gas flow rate and highly dependent on the temperature. E ap calculation led to a value of 240 ± 10 kJ.mol -1 . A comparison between this value and that of the molar enthalpy of vaporization allow to the conclusion that the reaction occur in conditions near to equilibrium. The SmCl 3 identity was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). (author)

  8. A NOVEL SAMARIUM COMPLEX WITH INTERESTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017 Chemical Society of Ethiopia and The Authors ... 1Institute of Applied Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jinggangshan ... 3State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research ... INTRODUCTION ..... Fenamate cocrystals with 4,4'-bipyridine: structural and thermodynamic ...

  9. 12 CFR 1.130 - Type II securities; guidelines for obligations issued for university and housing purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INVESTMENT SECURITIES Interpretations § 1.130 Type II securities... financing the construction or improvement of facilities at or used by a university or a degree-granting... construction or improvement of facilities used by a hospital may be eligible as a Type II security, if the...

  10. 21 CFR 130.20 - Food additives proposed for use in foods for which definitions and standards of identity are...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food additives proposed for use in foods for which...: GENERAL Food Additives in Standardized Foods § 130.20 Food additives proposed for use in foods for which... the act, which proposes the inclusion of a food additive in such definition and standard of identity...

  11. Characterization of the tank 51 alternate reductant sludge batch 9 slurry sample (HTF-51-15-130)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-01

    Tank 51 slurry sample HTF-51-15-130 was collected following sludge washing at the Tank Farm. The sample was received at SRNL and then characterized in preparation for qualification of the alternate reductant Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) flowsheet. In this characterization, densities, solids distribution, elemental constituents, anionic constituents, carbon content, and select radioisotopes were quantified.

  12. 9 CFR 130.11 - User fees for inspecting and approving import/export facilities and establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... hourly user fee rate in § 130.30(2) applies to biosecurity level two laboratories. (b) [Reserved] [65 FR... approval) Per year $537.00 $553.00 $570.00 $587.00 $604.00 Inspection for approval of biosecurity level three labs (all inspections related to approving the laboratory for handling one defined set of...

  13. Search for charged Higgs bosons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    A search is described to detect charged Higgs bosons via the process e^+e^- -> H^+H^-, using data collected by the OPAL detector at center-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 25 pb^-1. The decay channels are assumed to be H^+ -> qq'(bar) and H^+ -> \\tau^+ \

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.130 - If hazardous substance activity took place on the property, what specific information must an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If hazardous substance... Utilization of Excess Real Property Title Report § 102-75.130 If hazardous substance activity took place on... quantity of such hazardous substance and the time at which such storage, release, or disposal took place...

  15. Ouabain affects cell migration via Na,K-ATPase-p130cas and via nucleus-centrosome association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ou

    Full Text Available Na,K-ATPase is a membrane protein that catalyzes ATP to maintain transmembrane sodium and potassium gradients. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also acts as a signal-transducing receptor for cardiotonic steroids such as ouabain and activates a number of signalling pathways. Several studies report that ouabain affects cell migration. Here we used ouabain at concentrations far below those required to block Na,K-ATPase pump activity and show that it significantly reduced RPE cell migration through two mechanisms. It causes dephosphorylation of a 130 kD protein, which we identify as p130cas. Src is involved, because Src inhibitors, but not inhibitors of other kinases tested, caused a similar reduction in p130cas phosphorylation and ouabain increased the association of Na,K-ATPase and Src. Knockdown of p130cas by siRNA reduced cell migration. Unexpectedly, ouabain induced separation of nucleus and centrosome, also leading to a block in cell migration. Inhibitor and siRNA experiments show that this effect is mediated by ERK1,2. This is the first report showing that ouabain can regulate cell migration by affecting nucleus-centrosome association.

  16. Silencing of RB1 and RB2/P130 during adipogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells results in dysregulated differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Stefania; Alessio, Nicola; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Cipollaro, Marilena; Melone, Mariarosa Ab; Peluso, Gianfranco; Giordano, Antonio; Galderisi, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is different from fat found elsewhere in the body, and only recently have some of its functions been investigated. BMAT may regulate bone marrow stem cell niche and plays a role in energy storage and thermogenesis. BMAT may be involved also in obesity and osteoporosis onset. Given the paramount functions of BMAT, we decided to better clarify the human bone marrow adipogenesis by analyzing the role of the retinoblastoma gene family, which are key players in cell cycle regulation. Our data provide evidence that the inactivation of RB1 or RB2/P130 in uncommitted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) facilitates the first steps of adipogenesis. In cultures with silenced RB1 or RB2/P130, we observed an increase of clones with adipogenic potential and a higher percentage of cells accumulating lipid droplets. Nevertheless, the absence of RB1 or RB2/P130 impaired the terminal adipocyte differentiation and gave rise to dysregulated adipose cells, with alteration in lipid uptake and release. For the first time, we evidenced that RB2/P130 plays a role in bone marrow adipogenesis. Our data suggest that while the inactivation of retinoblastoma proteins may delay the onset of last cell division and allow more BMSC to be committed to adipocyte, it did not allow a permanent cell cycle exit, which is a prerequisite for adipocyte terminal maturation.

  17. 9 CFR 130.17 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for other veterinary... FEES USER FEES § 130.17 User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. (a) User fees for veterinary diagnostics tests performed at the...

  18. Forest structure and tree recruitment changes on a permanent historical Cinder Hills plot over a 130-Year Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob H. Dyer; Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Margaret M. Moore; Jonathan D. Bakker

    2008-01-01

    We examined forest structure, tree recruitment, and spatial pattern over a 130-year period on cinder soils in northern Arizona. Data were collected from a 3.24 ha permanent, stem-mapped plot established in 1909. This site is unique in that it represents ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws. var. scopulorum Engelm.) growing on black cinder soils, which are of limited...

  19. Search for anomalous production of single photons at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leser, G; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Wiele

    1996-01-01

    This letter reports the results of the measurement of single photon production in the reaction $e^+e^- \\rightarrow \\gamma +$ invisible particles at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=$~130 and 136 GeV and an integrated luminosity of 5.83~pb$

  20. Is the 130 GeV line real? A search for systematics in the Fermi-LAT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Su, Meng [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Weniger, Christoph, E-mail: dfinkbeiner@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mengsu@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: weniger@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany)

    2013-01-01

    Our recent claims of a Galactic center feature in Fermi-LAT data at approximately 130 GeV have motivated a large number of papers proposing explanations ranging from dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic pulsar winds. Because of the importance of such interpretations for physics and astrophysics, a discovery will require not only additional data, but a thorough investigation of possible LAT systematics. While we do not have access to the details of each event reconstruction, we do have information about each event from the public event lists and spacecraft parameter files. These data allow us to search for suspicious trends that could indicate a spurious signal. We consider several hypotheses that might make an instrumental artifact more apparent at the Galactic center, and find them implausible. We also search for an instrumental signature in the Earth limb photons, which provide a smooth reference spectrum for null tests. We find no significant 130 GeV feature in the Earth limb sample. However, we do find a marginally significant 130 GeV feature in Earth limb photons with a limited range of detector incidence angles. This raises concerns about the 130 GeV Galactic center feature, even though we can think of no plausible model of instrumental behavior that connects the two. A modest amount of additional limb data would tell us if the limb feature is a statistical fluke. If the limb feature persists, it would raise doubts about the Pass 7 processing of E > 100 GeV events. At present we find no instrumental systematics that could plausibly explain the excess Galactic center emission at 130 GeV.

  1. Lower limb entheseal morphology in the Neandertal Krapina population (Croatia, 130,000 BP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Valentina; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna

    2011-06-01

    Although the Neandertal locomotor system has been shown to differ from Homo sapiens, characteristics of Neandertal entheses, the skeletal attachments for muscles, tendons, ligaments and joint capsules, have never been specifically investigated. Here, we analyse lower limb entheses of the Krapina Neandertal bones (Croatia, 130,000 BP) with the aim of determining how they compare with modern humans, using a standard developed by our research group for describing modern human entheseal variability. The entheses examined are those of the gluteus maximus, iliopsoas and vastus medialis on the femur, the quadriceps tendon on the patella, and soleus on the tibia. For the entheses showing a different morphological pattern from H. sapiens, we discuss the possibility of recognising genetic versus environmental causes. Our results indicate that only the gluteus maximus enthesis (the gluteal tuberosity), falls out of the modern human range of variation. It displays morphological features that could imply histological differences from modern humans, in particular the presence of fibrocartilage. In both H. sapiens and the Krapina Neandertals, the morphological pattern of this enthesis is the same in adult and immature femurs. These results can be interpreted in light of genetic differences between the two hominins. The possibility of functional adaptations to higher levels of mechanical load during life in the Neandertals seems less likely. The particular morphology and large dimensions of the Krapina enthesis, and perhaps its fibrocartilaginous nature, could have been selected for in association with other pelvic and lower limb characteristics, even if genetic drift cannot be ruled out. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SSR and morphological trait based population structure analysis of 130 diverse flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shashi Bhushan; Sharma, Hariom Kumar; Kumar, Arroju Anil; Maruthi, Rangappa Thimmaiah; Mitra, Jiban; Chowdhury, Isholeena; Singh, Binay Kumar; Karmakar, Pran Gobinda

    2017-02-01

    A total of 130 flax accessions of diverse morphotypes and worldwide origin were assessed for genetic diversity and population structure using 11 morphological traits and microsatellite markers (15 gSSRs and 7 EST-SSRs). Analysis performed after classifying these accessions on the basis of plant height, branching pattern, seed size, Indian/foreign origin into six categories called sub-populations viz. fibre type exotic, fibre type indigenous, intermediate type exotic, intermediate type indigenous, linseed type exotic and linseed type indigenous. The study assessed different diversity indices, AMOVA, population structure and included a principal coordinate analysis based on different marker systems. The highest diversity was exhibited by gSSR markers (SI=0.46; He=0.31; P=85.11). AMOVA based on all markers explained significant difference among fibre type, intermediate type and linseed type populations of flax. In terms of variation explained by different markers, EST-SSR markers (12%) better differentiated flax populations compared to morphological (9%) and gSSR (6%) markers at P=0.01. The maximum Nei's unbiased genetic distance (D=0.11) was observed between fibre type and linseed type exotic sub-populations based on EST-SSR markers. The combined structure analysis by using all markers grouped Indian fibre type accessions (63.4%) in a separate cluster along with the Indian intermediate type (48.7%), whereas Indian accessions (82.16%) of linseed type constituted an independent cluster. These findings were supported by the results of the principal coordinate analysis. Morphological markers employed in the study found complementary with microsatellite based markers in deciphering genetic diversity and population structure of the flax germplasm. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Nuclear structure studies in A∼100 and A∼130 mass regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihotra, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the nuclear structure studies in the mass A∼ 100 and A∼130 regions. The investigations were performed in 98,99 Rh, 99 Pd, 96 Tc, 106,107 In, and 129,131 Cs nuclei near the proton (Z = 50) and neutron (N = 50, 64) shell closures with a view to understand the structural features that result from interplay between single particle and collective degrees of freedom. The nuclei in these regions are characterized by a small quadrupole deformation and soft to gamma deformation at low spins. In order to compare experimental results directly with the theoretical calculations, the experimental spins and level energies have been transformed into the rotating (intrinsic) frame of nucleus. The level schemes have been interpreted in the framework of theoretical model calculations. Configurations assigned to various bands are discussed in the framework of Principal/Tilted Axis Cranking (PAC/TAC) model and the deformed Hartree-Fock and angular momentum projection (PHF) calculations. Level energies and B(M1)/B(E2) ratios have, on the whole, been reproduced for the assigned configurations. Triaxial deformation in these mass regions has been inferred from the observed rotational-alignment frequencies, staggering behavior, M1 reduced transition probabilities and chiral-twin bands. Another important feature observed in these isotopes is the magnetic dipole bands generated through the shears mechanism. Observation of new E1 transitions linking the opposite-parity bands based on the proton/neutron h 11/2 and d 5/2 orbitals (Δl = 3, Δj = 1, Δπ = -1) in 131 Cs and 99 Pd provide fingerprints of possible octupole correlations in these mass-regions. (author)

  4. SHAKESPEARE IN THREE LANGUAGES READING AND ANALYZING SONNET 130 AND ITS TRANSLATIONS IN LIGHT OF SEMIOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sündüz ÖZTÜRK KASAR

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the literary genres, poetry is the one that resists translation the most. Creating a new and innovative language that breaks the usual rules of the standard language with brand-new uses and meanings is probably one of the most important goals of the poet. Poetry challenges the translator to capture not only original images, exceptional symbolism, and subjective connotations but also its musicality, rhythm, and measure. Faced with this revolutionary use of language, the translator needs a guide so as to not get lost in the labyrinths of the poetic universe. The universe of sound and meaning unique to each language and the incompatibility of these languages with each other makes the duty of the translator seem impossible. At this point, semiotics may function as a guide, opening up the mysteries of the universe built by the poet and giving clues as to how it can be conveyed in the target language. This allows us to suggest the cooperation of semiotics and translation. From this perspective, we aim to present a case study that exemplifies this cooperation. Our corpus comprises Shakespeare’s sonnet 130 and its Turkish and French translations. The study treats the translator as the receiver of the source text and the producer of the target text in the light of the Theory of Instances of Enunciation propounded by Jean-Claude Coquet. Further, through the Systematics of Designificative Tendencies propounded by Sündüz Öztürk Kasar, the study compares the translators’ creations to the original sonnet to see the extent to which the balance of the original text’s meaning and form is preserved in the translations and how skillfully and competently the signs that constitute the universe of meaning are transmitted in the target languages.

  5. Status and perspectives of deep N-well 130 nm CMOS MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Re, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Deep N-Well (DNW) MAPS were developed in two different flavors to approach the specifications of vertex detectors in dissimilar experimental environments such as the Super B-Factory and the ILC. The first generation of MAPS with on-pixel data sparsification and time stamping capabilities is now available and was tested in a beam for the first time in September 2008. These devices are fabricated in a commercial 130 nm CMOS process, and the triple well structure available in such an ultra-deep submicron technology is exploited by using the deep N-well as the charge-collecting electrode. Because of the high integration density of such a technology, complex digital functions can be included in each pixel, implementing a sparsified readout architecture of the pixel matrix with time stamping. This paper reviews the features of the ''ILC class'' and ''SuperB class'' MAPS devices, discussing their different design in terms of pixel pitch, analog signal processing, and digital readout architecture. For SuperB, a data-driven, continuously operating readout scheme was adopted along with a macropixel matrix arrangement, whereas for the ILC the matrix is read out in the long intertrain period. In both versions, the address of hit pixels is transmitted off-chip along with the time stamp. The experimental performance of the chips provides an assessment of the Deep N-Well MAPS potential in view of future applications. The paper also discusses the way forward in the development of these devices, outlining the issues that have to be tackled to design full size Deep N-Well MAPS for actual experiments. These sensors could take advantage from technological advances in microelectronic industry, such as vertical integration. The impact of these new technologies on the design and performance of DNW pixel sensors could be large, with potential benefit for various device features, from the charge collection properties to the digital readout architecture.

  6. A p130Cas tyrosine phosphorylated substrate domain decoy disrupts v-Crk signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafusa Hidesaburo

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adaptor protein p130Cas (Cas has been shown to be involved in different cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration and transformation. This protein has a substrate domain with up to 15 tyrosines that are potential kinase substrates, able to serve as docking sites for proteins with SH2 or PTB domains. Cas interacts with focal adhesion plaques and is phosphorylated by the tyrosine kinases FAK and Src. A number of effector molecules have been shown to interact with Cas and play a role in its function, including c-crk and v-crk, two adaptor proteins involved in intracellular signaling. Cas function is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation of its substrate domain, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas in part regulates its control of adhesion and migration. To determine whether the substrate domain alone when tyrosine phosphorylated could signal, we have constructed a chimeric Cas molecule that is phosphorylated independently of upstream signals. Results We found that a tyrosine phosphorylated Cas substrate domain acts as a dominant negative mutant by blocking Cas-mediated signaling events, including JNK activation by the oncogene v-crk in transient and stable lines and v-crk transformation. This block was the result of competition for binding partners as the chimera competed for binding to endogenous c-crk and exogenously expressed v-crk. Conclusion Our approach suggests a novel method to study adaptor proteins that require phosphorylation, and indicates that mere tyrosine phosphorylation of the substrate domain of Cas is not sufficient for its function.

  7. miR-130b targets NKD2 and regulates the Wnt signaling to promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhi [Department of Human Anatomy and Histoembryology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University (China); Li, Youjun, E-mail: liyoujunn@126.com [Department of Human Anatomy and Histoembryology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University (China); Wang, Nan; Yang, Lifeng; Zhao, Wei; Zeng, Xiandong [Central Hospital Affiliated to Shenyang Medical College (China)

    2016-03-18

    miR-130b was significantly up-regulated in osteosarcoma (OS) cells. Naked cuticle homolog 2 (NKD2) inhibited tumor growth and metastasis in OS by suppressing Wnt signaling. We used three miRNA target analysis tools to identify potential targets of miR-130b, and found that NKD2 is a potential target of miR-130b. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that miR-130b might target NKD2 and regulate the Wnt signaling to promote OS growth. We detected the expression of miR-130b and NKD2 mRNA and protein by quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot assays, respectively, and found up-regulation of miR-130b and down-regulation of NKD2 mRNA and protein exist in OS cell lines. MTT and flow cytometry assays showed that miR-130b inhibitors inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in OS cells. Furthermore, we showed that NKD2 is a direct target of miR-130b, and miR-130b regulated proliferation and apoptosis of OS cells by targeting NKD2. We further investigated whether miR-130b and NKD2 regulate OS cell proliferation and apoptosis by inhibiting Wnt signaling, and the results confirmed our speculation that miR-130b targets NKD2 and regulates the Wnt signaling to promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of OS cells. These findings will offer new clues for OS development and progression, and novel potential therapeutic targets for OS. - Highlights: • miR-130b is up-regulated and NKD2 is down-regulated in osteosarcoma cell lines. • Down-regulation of miR-130b inhibits proliferation of osteosarcoma cells. • Down-regulation of miR-130b promotes apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells. • miR-130b directly targets NKD2. • NKD2 regulates OS cell proliferation and apoptosis by inhibiting the Wnt signaling.

  8. miR-130b targets NKD2 and regulates the Wnt signaling to promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhi; Li, Youjun; Wang, Nan; Yang, Lifeng; Zhao, Wei; Zeng, Xiandong

    2016-01-01

    miR-130b was significantly up-regulated in osteosarcoma (OS) cells. Naked cuticle homolog 2 (NKD2) inhibited tumor growth and metastasis in OS by suppressing Wnt signaling. We used three miRNA target analysis tools to identify potential targets of miR-130b, and found that NKD2 is a potential target of miR-130b. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that miR-130b might target NKD2 and regulate the Wnt signaling to promote OS growth. We detected the expression of miR-130b and NKD2 mRNA and protein by quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot assays, respectively, and found up-regulation of miR-130b and down-regulation of NKD2 mRNA and protein exist in OS cell lines. MTT and flow cytometry assays showed that miR-130b inhibitors inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in OS cells. Furthermore, we showed that NKD2 is a direct target of miR-130b, and miR-130b regulated proliferation and apoptosis of OS cells by targeting NKD2. We further investigated whether miR-130b and NKD2 regulate OS cell proliferation and apoptosis by inhibiting Wnt signaling, and the results confirmed our speculation that miR-130b targets NKD2 and regulates the Wnt signaling to promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of OS cells. These findings will offer new clues for OS development and progression, and novel potential therapeutic targets for OS. - Highlights: • miR-130b is up-regulated and NKD2 is down-regulated in osteosarcoma cell lines. • Down-regulation of miR-130b inhibits proliferation of osteosarcoma cells. • Down-regulation of miR-130b promotes apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells. • miR-130b directly targets NKD2. • NKD2 regulates OS cell proliferation and apoptosis by inhibiting the Wnt signaling.

  9. 29 CFR 794.130 - Not more than 25 percent of sales may be to customers engaged in bulk distribution of petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... engaged in bulk distribution of petroleum products for resale. 794.130 Section 794.130 Labor Regulations... PETROLEUM DISTRIBUTORS UNDER SECTION 7(b)(3) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Exemption From Overtime Pay... percent of sales may be to customers engaged in bulk distribution of petroleum products for resale. As a...

  10. Onychomycosis: Clinico-mycologic study of 130 patients from Himachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Mudita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Onychomycosis is a common nail infection caused by dermatophytes, yeast or other nondermatophyte molds and has diverse clinical presentations. Although common in this part of the country, no significant clinico-mycologic data is available. Objectives: This study was carried out to document the clinico-mycologic pattern of onychomycosis in Himachal Pradesh (India. Methods: All consecutive patients of onychomycosis diagnosed clinically during March 2005 to February 2006 were studied for clinical forms, number of nails involved and severity of infection. The clippings from the most severely affected nails were subjected to potassium hydroxide (KOH mounts for direct microscopy and fungal culture on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar. Results: These 130 patients (M:F 98:32 were between 8-76 years of age (mean 41.35 ± 14.98 years. The prevalence of onychomycosis was higher among farmers and office workers (20% each. Finger or toe nails were exclusively involved in 56.9 and 32.3% patients respectively while these were involved concurrently in the rest of the 10.8% patients. Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis seen in 73.1% of the specimens was the most common clinical type. KOH- and culture-positivity were recorded in 59.2 and 37.6% cases respectively. Dermatophytes and yeast (Candida albicans were isolated in 40.8% each of the cultured nail specimens while nondermatophytic molds (NDM were cultured in 18.6% of the samples. Various dermatophytes cultured were Trichophyton rubrum (32.6%, T. mentagrophytes (6.1% and T. verrucosum (2.1% respectively. Aspergillus spp. (6.1% was the most commonly isolated NDM while other detected molds were Acremonium spp., Fusarium spp,, Scopulariopsis spp., Curvularia spp. and Penicillium marneffei. Peripheral vascular disorders (7.69%, occupational trauma (13.8%, close association with animals (60.78% and a family history of onychomycosis (26.15% were a few of the predisposing factors identified. Conclusion

  11. Myocardial Infarction Causes Transient Cholinergic Transdifferentiation of Cardiac Sympathetic Nerves via gp130.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivas, Antoinette; Gardner, Ryan T; Wang, Lianguo; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Woodward, William R; Habecker, Beth A

    2016-01-13

    Sympathetic and parasympathetic control of the heart is a classic example of norepinephrine (NE) and acetylcholine (ACh) triggering opposing actions. Sympathetic NE increases heart rate and contractility through activation of β receptors, whereas parasympathetic ACh slows the heart through muscarinic receptors. Sympathetic neurons can undergo a developmental transition from production of NE to ACh and we provide evidence that mouse cardiac sympathetic nerves transiently produce ACh after myocardial infarction (MI). ACh levels increased in viable heart tissue 10-14 d after MI, returning to control levels at 21 d, whereas NE levels were stable. At the same time, the genes required for ACh synthesis increased in stellate ganglia, which contain most of the sympathetic neurons projecting to the heart. Immunohistochemistry 14 d after MI revealed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in stellate sympathetic neurons and vesicular ACh transporter immunoreactivity in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cardiac sympathetic fibers. Finally, selective deletion of the ChAT gene from adult sympathetic neurons prevented the infarction-induced increase in cardiac ACh. Deletion of the gp130 cytokine receptor from sympathetic neurons prevented the induction of cholinergic genes after MI, suggesting that inflammatory cytokines induce the transient acquisition of a cholinergic phenotype in cardiac sympathetic neurons. Ex vivo experiments examining the effect of NE and ACh on rabbit cardiac action potential duration revealed that ACh blunted both the NE-stimulated decrease in cardiac action potential duration and increase in myocyte calcium transients. This raises the possibility that sympathetic co-release of ACh and NE may impair adaptation to high heart rates and increase arrhythmia susceptibility. Sympathetic neurons normally make norepinephrine (NE), which increases heart rate and the contractility of cardiac myocytes. We found that, after myocardial infarction, the sympathetic neurons

  12. GABARAP activates ULK1 and traffics from the centrosome dependent on Golgi partners WAC and GOLGA2/GM130.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Justin; Tooze, Sharon A

    2016-05-03

    WAC and GOLGA2/GM130 are 2 Golgi proteins that affect autophagy; however, their mechanism of action was unknown. We have shown that WAC binding to GOLGA2 at the Golgi displaces GABARAP from GOLGA2 to allow the maintenance of a nonlipidated centrosomal GABARAP pool. Centrosomal GABARAP can traffic to autophagic structures during starvation. In addition GABARAP specifically promotes ULK1 activation and this is independent of GABARAP lipidation but likely requires a LIR-mediated GABARAP-ULK1 interaction.

  13. GOLGA2/GM130, cis-Golgi Matrix Protein, is a Novel Target of Anticancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Seung-Hee; Hong, Seong-Ho; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ji-Young; Kang, Bitna; Park, Sungjin; Han, Kiwon; Chae, Chanhee; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-01-01

    Achievement of long-term survival of patients with lung cancer treated with conventional chemotherapy is still difficult for treatment of metastatic and advanced tumors. Despite recent progress in investigational therapies, survival rates are still disappointingly low and novel adjuvant and systemic therapies are urgently needed. A recently elucidated secretory pathway is attracting considerable interest as a promising anticancer target. The cis-Golgi matrix protein, GOLGA2/GM130, plays an im...

  14. GABARAP activates ULK1 and traffics from the centrosome dependent on Golgi partners WAC and GOLGA2/GM130

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim, Justin; Tooze, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT WAC and GOLGA2/GM130 are 2 Golgi proteins that affect autophagy; however, their mechanism of action was unknown. We have shown that WAC binding to GOLGA2 at the Golgi displaces GABARAP from GOLGA2 to allow the maintenance of a nonlipidated centrosomal GABARAP pool. Centrosomal GABARAP can traffic to autophagic structures during starvation. In addition GABARAP specifically promotes ULK1 activation and this is independent of GABARAP lipidation but likely requires a LIR-mediated GABARAP...

  15. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogler, Laura K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-11-30

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2vββ). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO2 crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with 130Te and 2 with 128Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2vββ rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of 350 g 130Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2vββ half-life was measured to be T2v1/2 = [9.81± 0.96(stat)± 0.49(syst)] x1020 y.

  16. Thermal comfort and safety of cotton blankets warmed at 130°F and 200°F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia A; Cooper, Susan K; Krogh, Mary L; Morse, Elizabeth C; Crandall, Craig G; Winslow, Elizabeth H; Balluck, Julie P

    2013-12-01

    In 2009, the ECRI Institute recommended warming cotton blankets in cabinets set at 130°F or less. However, there is limited research to support the use of this cabinet temperature. To measure skin temperatures and thermal comfort in healthy volunteers before and after application of blankets warmed in cabinets set at 130 and 200°F, respectively, and to determine the time-dependent cooling of cotton blankets after removal from warming cabinets set at the two temperatures. Prospective, comparative, descriptive. Participants (n = 20) received one or two blankets warmed in 130 or 200°F cabinets. First, skin temperatures were measured, and thermal comfort reports were obtained at fixed timed intervals. Second, blanket temperatures (n = 10) were measured at fixed intervals after removal from the cabinets. No skin temperatures approached levels reported in the literature that cause epidermal damage. Thermal comfort reports supported using blankets from the 200°F cabinet, and blankets lost heat quickly over time. We recommend warming cotton blankets in cabinets set at 200°F or less to improve thermal comfort without compromising patient safety. Copyright © 2013 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. First Results from CUORE: A Search for Lepton Number Violation via 0 ν β β Decay of Te 130

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduino, C.; Alessandria, F.; Alfonso, K.; Andreotti, E.; Arnaboldi, C.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Bandac, I.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Barucci, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Benato, G.; Bersani, A.; Biare, D.; Biassoni, M.; Bragazzi, F.; Branca, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bryant, A.; Buccheri, A.; Bucci, C.; Bulfon, C.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Capodiferro, M.; Cappelli, L.; Cardani, L.; Cariello, M.; Carniti, P.; Carrettoni, M.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Cereseto, R.; Ceruti, G.; Chiarini, A.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Conventi, D.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Crescentini, C.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; D'Addabbo, A.; D'Aguanno, D.; Dafinei, I.; Datskov, V.; Davis, C. J.; Del Corso, F.; Dell'Oro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; di Domizio, S.; di Vacri, M. L.; di Paolo, L.; Drobizhev, A.; Ejzak, L.; Faccini, R.; Fang, D. Q.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gaigher, R.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gladstone, L.; Goett, J.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Guandalini, C.; Guerzoni, M.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Hansen, E. V.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hickerson, K. P.; Huang, H. Z.; Iannone, M.; Ioannucci, L.; Kadel, R.; Keppel, G.; Kogler, L.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Leder, A.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Liu, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Marini, L.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Amaya, C.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P. J.; Nagorny, S. S.; Napolitano, T.; Nastasi, M.; Nisi, S.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Novati, V.; Nucciotti, A.; Nutini, I.; O'Donnell, T.; Olcese, M.; Olivieri, E.; Orio, F.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pedrotta, R.; Pelosi, A.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Reindl, F.; Rimondi, F.; Risegari, L.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rossi, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sakai, M.; Sala, E.; Salvioni, C.; Sangiorgio, S.; Santone, D.; Schaeffer, D.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Singh, V.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Stivanello, F.; Taffarello, L.; Tatananni, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tessaro, M.; Tomei, C.; Ventura, G.; Vignati, M.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Wallig, J.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J.; Wilson, K.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Zanotti, L.; Zarra, C.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zhu, B. X.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.; Cuore Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    The CUORE experiment, a ton-scale cryogenic bolometer array, recently began operation at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. The array represents a significant advancement in this technology, and in this work we apply it for the first time to a high-sensitivity search for a lepton-number-violating process: Te 130 neutrinoless double-beta decay. Examining a total TeO2 exposure of 86.3 kg yr, characterized by an effective energy resolution of (7.7 ±0.5 ) keV FWHM and a background in the region of interest of (0.014 ±0.002 ) counts /(keV kg yr ) , we find no evidence for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Including systematic uncertainties, we place a lower limit on the decay half-life of T1/2 0 ν(Te 130 )>1.3 ×1025 yr (90% C.L.); the median statistical sensitivity of this search is 7.0 ×1024 yr . Combining this result with those of two earlier experiments, Cuoricino and CUORE-0, we find T1/2 0 ν(Te 130 )>1.5 ×1025 yr (90% C.L.), which is the most stringent limit to date on this decay. Interpreting this result as a limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass, we find mβ β<(110 -520 ) meV , where the range reflects the nuclear matrix element estimates employed.

  18. The emerin-binding transcription factor Lmo7 is regulated by association with p130Cas at focal adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A. Wozniak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations in the nuclear inner membrane protein, emerin, cause X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (X-EDMD. X-EDMD is characterized by contractures of major tendons, skeletal muscle weakening and wasting, and cardiac conduction system defects. The transcription factor Lmo7 regulates muscle- and heart-relevant genes and is inhibited by binding to emerin, suggesting Lmo7 misregulation contributes to EDMD disease. Lmo7 associates with cell adhesions and shuttles between the plasma membrane and nucleus, but the regulation and biological consequences of this dual localization were unknown. We report endogenous Lmo7 also associates with focal adhesions in cells, and both co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with p130Cas, a key signaling component of focal adhesions. Lmo7 nuclear localization and transcriptional activity increased significantly in p130Cas-null MEFs, suggesting Lmo7 is negatively regulated by p130Cas-dependent association with focal adhesions. These results support EDMD models in which Lmo7 is a downstream mediator of integrin-dependent signaling that allows tendon cells and muscles to adapt to and withstand mechanical stress.

  19. A panel of 130 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms for ancestry assignment in five Asian populations and in Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Lin, Chih-Peng; Huang, Tsun-Ying; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Hsieh, Wei-Hsin; Lin, Chun-Yen; Yin, Hsiang-I; Tseng, Li-Hui; Lee, James Chun-I

    2017-06-01

    Ancestry informative single-nucleotide polymorphism (AISNP) panels for differentiating between East and Southeast Asian populations are scarce. This study aimed to identify AISNPs for ancestry assignment of five East and Southeast Asian populations, and Caucasians. We analyzed 145 autosomal SNPs of the 627 DNA samples from individuals of six populations (234 Taiwanese Han, 91 Filipinos, 79 Indonesians, 60 Thais, 71 Vietnamese, and 92 Caucasians) using arrays. The multiple logistic regression model and a multi-tier approach were used for ancestry classification. We observed that 130 AISNPs were effective for classifying the ethnic origins with fair accuracy. Among the 130 AISNPs, 122 were useful for stratification between these five Asian populations and 64 were effective for differentiating between Caucasians and these Asian populations. For differentiation between Caucasians and Asians, an accuracy rate of 100% was achieved in these 627 subjects with 50 optimal AISNPs among the 64 effective SNPs. For classification of the five Asian populations, the accuracy rates of ancestry inference using 20 to 57 SNPs for each of the two Asian populations ranged from 74.1% to 100%. Another 14 degraded DNA samples with incomplete profiling were analyzed, and the ancestry of 12 (85.7%) of those subjects was accurately assigned. We developed a 130-AISNP panel for ethnic origin differentiation between the five East and Southeast Asian populations and Caucasians. This AISNP set may be helpful for individual ancestral assignment of these populations in forensic casework.

  20. Downregulation of microRNA-130a contributes to endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in diabetic patients via its target Runx3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Meng

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs contributes to diabetic vascular disease. MicroRNAs (miRs have emerged as key regulators of diverse cellular processes including angiogenesis. We recently reported that miR-126, miR-130a, miR-21, miR-27a, and miR-27b were downregulated in EPCs from type II diabetes mellitus (DM patients, and downregulation of miR-126 impairs EPC function. The present study further explored whether dysregulated miR-130a were also related to EPC dysfunction. EPCs were cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of diabetic patients and healthy controls. Assays on EPC function (proliferation, migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and colony and tubule formation were performed. Bioinformatics analyses were used to identify the potential targets of miR-130a in EPCs. Gene expression of miR-103a and Runx3 was measured by real-time PCR, and protein expression of Runx3, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Akt was measured by Western blotting. Runx3 promoter activity was measured by luciferase reporter assay. A miR-130a inhibitor or mimic and lentiviral vectors expressing miR-130a, or Runx3, or a short hairpin RNA targeting Runx3 were transfected into EPCs to manipulate miR-130a and Runx3 levels. MiR-130a was decreased in EPCs from DM patients. Anti-miR-130a inhibited whereas miR-130a overexpression promoted EPC function. miR-130a negatively regulated Runx3 (mRNA, protein and promoter activity in EPCs. Knockdown of Runx3 expression enhanced EPC function. MiR-130a also upregulated protein expression of ERK/VEGF and Akt in EPCs. In conclusion, miR-130a plays an important role in maintaining normal EPC function, and decreased miR-130a in EPCs from DM contributes to impaired EPC function, likely via its target Runx3 and through ERK/VEGF and Akt pathways.

  1. New drive axles for hybrid applications in low-floor city busses. The electric axle AVE 130; Neue Antriebsachse fuer Hybridapplikationen in Niederflur-Stadtbussen. Die Elektroachse AVE 130

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solka, Ulrich [ZF Passau GmbH (Germany); Mueller, Axel M. [ZF Friedrichshafen AG (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The contribution under consideration reports on the mechanically constructional structure of the electrically driven low-floor axle AVE 130 of ZF Friedrichshafen AG (Friedrichshafen, Federal Republic of Germany). The characteristics of the electric drive are presented with the particularities of the implemented asynchronous machine and the road performances which can be developed by a city bus using this axle. Also the system characteristics of a hybrid bus with serial hybrid drive system concerning to aggregate arrangement, mass balances and the interaction of the aggregates in the drive briefly are discussed. The results of numerical simulation regarding fuel saving potential in these systems round the remarks off.

  2. 柴达木盆地大浪滩130ka BP以来的孢粉组合与古气候%Sporo-pollen assemblage and palaeoenvironment since 130 ka BP in Dalangtan Lake of Qaidarn Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯献华; 郑绵平; 杨振京; 杨庆华; 毕志伟

    2011-01-01

    This paper obtained the data of the cores based on U-series age from ZK02 borehole at ridge of Dalangtan in the western Qaidam basin, where 34 samples from the sludge containing gypsum silt were selected of select for 130 ka BP (90.5 m and above) and the pollen analysis was done. Based on the pollen characteristics, the assemblage of the pollen from the bottom upwards can be divided into six zones to analyze the ancient vegetation succession in the last interglacial (130 ka BP) state in this area. The results showed as follows: in the period of 130 ka BP (the last interglacial period), the vegetation in the western Qaidam basin obviously changed compared with the very significant environment. Overall, the spruce, fir and pine trees consisted of some cold temperate coniferous forest had expanded for five times to the surrounded Zhongshan area, and even extends towards the basin. But thegrass of Gramineae, Compositae, Artemisia as the main component occupied the basin, which showed the climate that was mild climate controlled by the summer monsoon flow from the East Asia to the West, while vegetation flourished, the enhanced soil expanded, water being desalinized, the lake larger in the interstadial period, particularly that in the first pollen assemblage I ( 130 -92 ka BP) and the pollen assemblage IV (56.2 -49 ka BP) in the duration of sedimentation when the plant diversity increased. In addition to the grassland vegetation in the basin, on the wetlands around the lake the plant was growing quite flonrishing, which demonstrated that the two periods were the most enhanced summer monsoon circulation with more adequate rainfall and the forest expanding fast in the mountains. The river flow was incresing and salt lake became desaltinized. The emergent grasses were growing at the edge of the marsh in the lake area. In particular in 49 ka BP ago or so, coniferous forest was growing associated with mountain cedar. Thus it suggested that the place was affected by the

  3. $\\beta$-delayed neutron spectroscopy of $^{130-132}$ Cd isotopes with the ISOLDE decay station and the VANDLE array

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to use the new ISOLDE decay station and the neutron detector VANDLE to measure the $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission of N=82-84 $^{130-132}$Cd isotopes. The large delayed neutron emission probability observed in a previous ISOLDE measurement is indicative of the Gamow-Teller transitions due to the decay of deep core neutrons. Core Gamow-Teller decay has been experimentally proven in the $^{78}$Ni region for the N>50 nuclei using the VANDLE array. The spectroscopic measurement of delayed neutron emission along the cadmium isotopic chain will allow us to track the evolution of the single particle states and the shell gap.

  4. PEM steam electrolysis at 130 °C using a phosphoric acid doped short side chain PFSA membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Kalmar; Aili, David; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Steam electrolysis test with a phosphoric acid doped Aquivion™ membrane was successfully conducted and current densities up to 775 mA cm-2 at 1.8 V was reached at 130 ºC and ambient pressure. A new composite membrane system using a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (Aquivion™) as matrix and phospho...... implied that a new and highly corrosion resistant construction material was needed. Tantalum coated stainless steel felt was tested and found suitable as the anode gas diffusion layer. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. SCANDAL -- A facility for elastic neutron scattering studies in the 50--130 MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, J.; Blomgren, J.; Atac, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Dangtip, S.; Elmgren, K.; Johansson, C.; Olsson, N.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Rahm, J.; Oberstedt, A.; Tovesson, F.; Eudes, Ph.; Haddad, F.; Kerveno, M.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.; Stuttge, L.; Slypen, I.; Michel, R.; Neumann, S.; Herpers, U.

    2001-01-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50--130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has recently been installed at the 20--180 MeV neutron beam facility of the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. It is primarily intended for studies of elastic neutron scattering, but can be used for the (n,p) and (n,d) reaction experiments as well. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated in measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on 1 H and 12 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail

  6. Four fermion production in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jacobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Four-fermion events have been selected in a data sample of 5.8 pb**-1 collected with the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. The final states l^+l^- qqbar, l^+l^-l^+l^-, nunubar qqbar, and nunubar l^+l^- have been examined. Five events are observed in the data, in agreement with the Standard Model predictions of 6.67 +/- 0.38 events from four-fermion processes and 0.14+0.19-0.05 from background processes.

  7. Search for charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palla, Fabrizio; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Searches for charginos and neutralinos produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In the 5.7 pb-1 data sample collected by ALEPH, no candidate events were found. As a result, chargino and neutralino masses and couplings are constrained and the domains previously excluded at LEP1 are extended.

  8. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, K H; Adams, N; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M; Blyth, C O; Boehm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chatopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Diaz, H; DeYoung, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, W; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, K J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grau, M; Greiner, D; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G J; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kuhn, C; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Leonhardt, W J; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, J R; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; Matyushevski, E A; McParland, C; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevotchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Roehrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sanchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlueter, R; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimanskii, S S; Shuman, D; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Symons, T J; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto De Toledo, A; Tonse, S; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-15

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  9. Pion-Kaon correlations in central Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN] = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-12-31

    Pion-kaon correlation functions are constructed from central Au+Au STAR data taken at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results suggest that pions and kaons are not emitted at the same average space-time point. Space-momentum correlations, i.e., transverse flow, lead to a space-time emission asymmetry of pions and kaons that is consistent with the data. This result provides new independent evidence that the system created at RHIC undergoes a collective transverse expansion.

  10. Search for charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violation at √s = 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lunch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Searches for charginos and neutralinos produced in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In the 5.7 pb -1 data sample collected by ALEPH, no candidate events were found. As a result, chargino and neutralino masses and couplings are constrained and the domains previously excluded at LEP1 are extended.

  11. SCANDAL--a facility for elastic neutron scattering studies in the 50-130 MeV range

    CERN Document Server

    Klug, J; Atac, A; Bergenwall, B; Dangtip, S; Elmgren, K; Johansson, C; Olsson, N; Pomp, S; Prokofiev, A V; Rahm, J; Tippawan, U; Jonsson, O; Nilsson, L; Renberg, P U; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ringbom, A; Oberstedt, A; Tovesson, F; Blideanu, V; Le Brun, C; Lecolley, J F; Lecolley, F R; Louvel, M; Marie, N; Schweitzer, C; Varignon, C; Eudes, P; Haddad, F; Kerveno, M; Kirchner, T; Lebrun, C; Stuttgé, L; Slypen, I; Smirnov, A N; Michel, R; Neumann, S; Herpers, U

    2002-01-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy (SCANDAL), has recently been installed at the 20-180 MeV neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. It is primarily intended for studies of elastic neutron scattering, but can be used for (n,p) and (n,d) reaction experiments as well. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated in measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on sup 1 H and sup 1 sup 2 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail.

  12. DC-Motor Drive Encompassing SiGe Asynchronous Control Electronics for Ultra-Wide (-230 °C to +130 °C) Environments, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I, the research team formed by APEI, Inc. and University of Arkansas proved the feasibility of developing ultra-wide temperature (-230oC to +130 oC) motor...

  13. A Life Cycle Cost Analysis of the Proposed Replacement of Pope Air Force Base's C-130E Fleet Using a Fleet Replacement Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    French, Lance

    2002-01-01

    .... However, after conducting sensitivity analyses on the input parameters, the research shows the replace now option becomes the least cost solution when any one of the following occur: the C-130J...

  14. MicroRNA-130a-mediated down-regulation of Smad4 contributes to reduced sensitivity to TGF-β1 stimulation in granulocytic precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häger, Mattias; Pedersen, Corinna Cavan; Larsen, Maria Torp

    2011-01-01

    Smad4 is important in the TGF-ß pathway and required for transcriptional activation and inhibition of cell growth after TGF-ß1 stimulation. We demonstrate that miR-130a is differentially expressed during granulopoiesis and targets Smad4 mRNA. The transcript for Smad4 is present throughout...... neutrophil maturation, but Smad4 protein is undetectable in the most immature cells, where miR-130a is highly expressed. Two miR-130a binding sites were identified in the 3'-untranslated region of the Smad4 mRNA. Overexpression of miR-130a in HEK293, A549, and 32Dcl3 cells repressed synthesis of Smad4...... protein without affecting Smad4 mRNA level. Repression of Smad4 synthesis in a granulocytic cell line by miR-130a reduced its sensitivity to TGF-ß1-induced growth inhibition. This effect was reversed by inhibiting the activity of miR-130a with an antisense probe or by expressing a Smad4 mRNA lacking mi...

  15. MicroRNA-130a–mediated down-regulation of Smad4 contributes to reduced sensitivity to TGF-β1 stimulation in granulocytic precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häger, Mattias; Pedersen, Corinna Cavan; Larsen, Maria Torp

    2011-01-01

    Smad4 is important in the TGF-β pathway and required for transcriptional activation and inhibition of cell growth after TGF-β1 stimulation. We demonstrate that miR-130a is differentially expressed during granulopoiesis and targets Smad4 mRNA. The transcript for Smad4 is present throughout...... neutrophil maturation, but Smad4 protein is undetectable in the most immature cells, where miR-130a is highly expressed. Two miR-130a binding sites were identified in the 3'-untranslated region of the Smad4 mRNA. Overexpression of miR-130a in HEK293, A549, and 32Dcl3 cells repressed synthesis of Smad4...... protein without affecting Smad4 mRNA level. Repression of Smad4 synthesis in a granulocytic cell line by miR-130a reduced its sensitivity to TGF-β1–induced growth inhibition. This effect was reversed by inhibiting the activity of miR-130a with an antisense probe or by expressing a Smad4 mRNA lacking mi...

  16. On the way to 130 g CO2/km-Estimating the future characteristics of the average European passenger car

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaras, Georgios; Samaras, Zissis

    2010-01-01

    A new average CO 2 emissions limit for passenger cars was introduced in EU in 2009 imposing gradual average CO 2 emissions reduction to 130 g/km until 2015. This paper attempts to study possible changes in vehicle characteristics for meeting this limit taking into account the average European passenger car of 2007-2008. For this purpose first the most important factors affecting vehicle fuel consumption over the reference cycle (NEDC) are identified. At a second step, the CO 2 benefit from the optimisation of these factors is quantified, through simulations of 6 different passenger cars commonly found in the European fleet. For the simulations Advisor 2002 was employed and validated against published type approval data. The analysis indicated that substantial reductions in vehicle weight, tyre rolling resistance and engine efficiency are necessary to reach even the 2008 target. A 10% reduction in average vehicle weight combined with 10% better aerodynamic characteristics, 20% reduced tyre rolling resistance and a 7.5% increase in average powertrain efficiency can lead to CO 2 reductions of approximately 13% (about 138 g/km based on 2007-2008 fleet-wide performance). Complying with the 130 g/km within the next six-year timeframe will be a rather difficult task and additional technical measures appear to be necessary.

  17. Studies of QCD in $e^{+}e^{-}\\to$ hadrons at E$_{cm}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    Studies of QCD in $\\mbox{e}^+\\mbox{e}^- \\rightarrow$ Hadrons at $E_{cm} = $} 130 and 136 GeV The ALEPH Collaboration An analysis of the properties of hadronic final states produced in electron-positron annihilation at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV is presented. The measurements are based on a data sample of 5.7 $\\mbox{pb}^{-1}$ collected in November 1995 with the \\Aleph detector at LEP. Inclusive charged particle distributions, jet rates and event-shape distributions are measured and the results are compared with the predictions of QCD-based models. From the measured distributions quantities are determined for which the dependence on the centre-of-mass energy can be predicted by QCD, including the mean multiplicity of charged particles, the peak position of the inclusive distribution of $\\xi = -\\ln x_p$ ($x_p = p / p_{beam}$), and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$. The QCD predictions are tested by comparing with corresponding measurements at $E_{cm} = 91.2$ GeV and at lower energies.

  18. Cryogenic Lifetime Studies of 130 nm and 65 nm CMOS Technologies for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, James R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Deptuch, G. W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wu, Guoying [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Gui, Ping [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-04

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility intends to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. Research is under way to place the electronics inside the cryostat. For reasons of efficiency and economics, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This, then, requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130 nm and 65 nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. Our results show that both technologies achieve the lifetimes required by the experiment. Minimal design changes are necessary in the case of the 130 nm process and no changes whatsoever are necessary for the 65 nm process.

  19. Integrin αβ1, αvβ, α6β effectors p130Cas, Src and talin regulate carcinoma invasion and chemoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansing, Hope A.; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Berrier, Allison L.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Proteomics of clustered integrin αβ1, α v β, α 6 β receptors in oral carcinoma. → p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin regulate oral carcinoma invasion. → p130Cas, talin, Src and zyxin regulate oral carcinoma resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Ligand engagement by integrins induces receptor clustering and formation of complexes at the integrin cytoplasmic face that controls cell signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics critical for adhesion-dependent processes. This study searches for a subset of integrin effectors that coordinates both tumor cell invasion and resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in oral carcinomas. Candidate integrin effectors were identified in a proteomics screen of proteins recruited to clustered integrin αβ1, α v β or α 6 β receptors in oral carcinomas. Proteins with diverse functions including microtubule and actin binding proteins, and factors involved in trafficking, transcription and translation were identified in oral carcinoma integrin complexes. Knockdown of effectors in the oral carcinoma HN12 cells revealed that p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin were required for invasion through Matrigel. Disruption of talin or p130Cas by RNA interference increased resistance to cisplatin, whereas targeting Dek, Src or zyxin reduced HN12 resistance to cisplatin. Analysis of the spreading of HN12 cells on collagen I and laminin I revealed that a decrease in p130Cas or talin expression inhibited spreading on both matrices. Interestingly, a reduction in zyxin expression enhanced spreading on laminin I and inhibited spreading on collagen I. Reduction of Dek, Src, talin or zyxin expression reduced HN12 proliferation by 30%. Proliferation was not affected by a reduction in p130Cas expression. We conclude that p130Cas, Src and talin function in both oral carcinoma invasion and resistance to cisplatin.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation reveals insights into the mechanism of unfolding by the A130T/V mutations within the MID1 zinc-binding Bbox1 domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjie Zhao

    Full Text Available The zinc-binding Bbox1 domain in protein MID1, a member of the TRIM family of proteins, facilitates the ubiquitination of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A and alpha4, a protein regulator of PP2A. The natural mutation of residue A130 to a valine or threonine disrupts substrate recognition and catalysis. While NMR data revealed the A130T mutant Bbox1 domain failed to coordinate both structurally essential zinc ions and resulted in an unfolded structure, the unfolding mechanism is unknown. Principle component analysis revealed that residue A130 served as a hinge point between the structured β-strand-turn-β-strand (β-turn-β and the lasso-like loop sub-structures that constitute loop1 of the ββα-RING fold that the Bbox1 domain adopts. Backbone RMSD data indicate significant flexibility and departure from the native structure within the first 5 ns of the molecular dynamics (MD simulation for the A130V mutant (>6 Å and after 30 ns for A130T mutant (>6 Å. Overall RMSF values were higher for the mutant structures and showed increased flexibility around residues 125 and 155, regions with zinc-coordinating residues. Simulated pKa values of the sulfhydryl group of C142 located near A130 suggested an increased in value to ~9.0, paralleling the increase in the apparent dielectric constants for the small cavity near residue A130. Protonation of the sulfhydryl group would disrupt zinc-coordination, directly contributing to unfolding of the Bbox1. Together, the increased motion of residues of loop 1, which contains four of the six zinc-binding cysteine residues, and the increased pKa of C142 could destabilize the structure of the zinc-coordinating residues and contribute to the unfolding.

  1. Integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} effectors p130Cas, Src and talin regulate carcinoma invasion and chemoresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansing, Hope A. [Department of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA (United States); Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R. [Department of Chemical Physiology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J. Silvio [Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Berrier, Allison L., E-mail: allison.berrier@gmail.com [Department of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, School of Dentistry, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomics of clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}, {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinoma. {yields} p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin regulate oral carcinoma invasion. {yields} p130Cas, talin, Src and zyxin regulate oral carcinoma resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Ligand engagement by integrins induces receptor clustering and formation of complexes at the integrin cytoplasmic face that controls cell signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics critical for adhesion-dependent processes. This study searches for a subset of integrin effectors that coordinates both tumor cell invasion and resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin in oral carcinomas. Candidate integrin effectors were identified in a proteomics screen of proteins recruited to clustered integrin {alpha}{beta}1, {alpha}{sub v}{beta} or {alpha}{sub 6}{beta} receptors in oral carcinomas. Proteins with diverse functions including microtubule and actin binding proteins, and factors involved in trafficking, transcription and translation were identified in oral carcinoma integrin complexes. Knockdown of effectors in the oral carcinoma HN12 cells revealed that p130Cas, Dek, Src and talin were required for invasion through Matrigel. Disruption of talin or p130Cas by RNA interference increased resistance to cisplatin, whereas targeting Dek, Src or zyxin reduced HN12 resistance to cisplatin. Analysis of the spreading of HN12 cells on collagen I and laminin I revealed that a decrease in p130Cas or talin expression inhibited spreading on both matrices. Interestingly, a reduction in zyxin expression enhanced spreading on laminin I and inhibited spreading on collagen I. Reduction of Dek, Src, talin or zyxin expression reduced HN12 proliferation by 30%. Proliferation was not affected by a reduction in p130Cas expression. We conclude that p130Cas, Src and talin function in both oral carcinoma invasion and resistance to cisplatin.

  2. Sequence-specific inhibition of microRNA-130a gene by CRISPR/Cas9 system in breast cancer cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainina Abdollah, Nur; Das Kumitaa, Theva; Yusof Narazah, Mohd; Razak, Siti Razila Abdul

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short stranded noncoding RNA that play important roles in apoptosis, cell survival, development and cell proliferation. However, gene expression control via small regulatory RNA, particularly miRNA in breast cancer is still less explored. Therefore, this project aims to develop an approach to target microRNA-130a using the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 system in MCF7, breast cancer cell line. The 20 bp sequences target at stem loop, 3ʹ and 5ʹ end of miR130a were cloned into pSpCas9(BB)-2A-GFP (PX458) plasmid, and the positive clones were confirmed by sequencing. A total of 5 μg of PX458-miR130a was transfected to MCF7 using Lipofectamine® 3000 according to manufacturer’s protocol. The transfected cells were maintained in the incubator at 37 °C under humidified 5% CO2. After 48 hours, cells were harvested and total RNA was extracted using miRNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen). cDNAs were synthesised specific to miR-130a using TaqMan MicroRNA Reverse Transcription Kit (Applied Biosystems). Then, qRT-PCR was carried out using TaqMan Universal Master Mix (Applied Biosystems) to quantify the knockdown level of mature miRNAs in the cells. Result showed that miR-130a-5p was significantly downregulated in MCF7 cell line. However, no significant changes were observed for sequences targeting miR-130a-3p and stem loop. Thus, this study showed that the expression of miR-130a-5p was successfully down-regulated using CRISPR silencing system. This technique may be useful to manipulate the level of miRNA in various cell types to answer clinical questions at the molecular level.

  3. The SCANDAL facility - How to measure elastic neutron scattering in the 50-130 MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, Joakim

    2001-01-01

    The interest in neutrons of energies above 20 MeV is growing rapidly, since new applications are being developed or have been identified. Transmutation of nuclear waste and cancer therapy with neutron beams are two research fields that would benefit from new neutron scattering data at these energies. A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has been developed and installed at the neutron beam facility of the The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. It can be used to study the (n,n), (n,p) and (n,d) reactions. This thesis describes the layout of the setup, the experimental procedure, and data analysis principles. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated with measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on 1 H and 12 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail

  4. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  5. High $P\\perp$ spectra from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 130 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dunlop, J C

    2002-01-01

    We report on hadron production at high transverse momentum from Au+Au collisions at _/sNN = 130GeV, measured with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Preliminary negative hadron spectra up to p| relative to a reference from p + p collisions. Preliminary azimuthal anisotropies have been measured up to p| = 4.5 GeV/c, which are described well by a hydrodynamical calculation below 1.5 GeV/c, but show a significant deviation at higher p|. A preliminary ratio p/p has been measured by the STAR-RICH detector in the range p| = 2-2.5 GeV/c.

  6. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 130: Essential service water system failures at multi-unit sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, V.; Basdekas, D.; Mazetis, G.

    1991-06-01

    The essential service water system (ESWS) is required to provide cooling in nuclear power plants during normal operation and accident conditions. The ESWS typically supports component cooling water heat exchangers, containment spray heat exchangers, high-pressure injection pump oil coolers, emergency diesel generators, and auxiliary building ventilation coolers. Failure of the ESWS function could lead to severe consequences. This report presents the regulatory analysis for GI-130, ''Essential Service Water System Failures at Multi-Unit Sites.'' The risk reduction estimates, cost/benefit analyses, and other insights gained during this effort have shown that implementation of the recommendations will significantly reduce risk and that these improvements are warranted in accordance with the backfit rule, 10 CFR 50.109(a)(3). 19 refs., 16 tabs

  7. A 200 mV low leakage current subthreshold SRAM bitcell in a 130 nm CMOS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Na; Lü Baitao

    2012-01-01

    A low leakage current subthreshold SRAM in 130 nm CMOS technology is proposed for ultra low voltage (200 mV) applications. Almost all of the previous subthreshold works ignore the leakage current in both active and standby modes. To minimize leakage, a self-adaptive leakage cut off scheme is adopted in the proposed design without any extra dynamic energy dissipation or performance penalty. Combined with buffering circuit and reconfigurable operation, the proposed design ensures both read and standby stability without deteriorating writability in the subthreshold region. Compared to the referenced subthreshold SRAM bitcell, the proposed bitcell shows: (1) a better critical state noise margin, and (2) smaller leakage current in both active and standby modes. Measurement results show that the proposed SRAM functions well at a 200 mV supply voltage with 0.13 μW power consumption at 138 kHz frequency. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  8. Challenges in designing a very compact 130 MeV Moeller polarimeter for the S-DALINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahlo, Thore; Enders, Joachim; Kuerzeder, Thorsten; Pietralla, Norbert; Wissmann, Jan [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Superconducting Darmstadt Linear Accelerator is capable of accelerating polarized electron beams produced by the S-DALINAC Polarized Injector (SPIN). For electron energies of up to 14 MeV it is possible to measure the absolute polarization of the electrons with two Mott polarimeters that are already mounted in the injector beamline. Until now it is not possible to measure the absolute electron beam polarization after the passage of the main accelerator. Therefore a Moeller polarimeter for energies between 50 MeV and 130 MeV is currently being developed. The rather low incident beam energy, the variability of the incident beam energy, and spatial restrictions necessitate a compact set-up with large acceptance. The very restrictive boundary conditions introduce technical and geometrical challenges. We will present the design of the target chamber, of the separation dipole magnet as well as the beam dump.

  9. Multi-photon final states in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    The process e^+e^- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 25.38 pb^{-1} taken at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The measured cross-sections agree well with the expectation from QED. In a combined fit using data from all centre-of-mass energies, the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits on the cut-off parameters: Lambda_+ > 195 GeV and Lambda_- > 210 GeV (95% CL). In addition, limits on non-standard e^+e^-gamma couplings and contact interactions, as well as a 95% CL mass limit for an excited electron, M_{e^*} > 194 GeV for an e^+e^-gamma coupling kappa = 1, are determined.

  10. Study of Fermion Pair Production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at 130-183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Riu, I.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Loomis, C.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Raine, C.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Ward, J.J.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Nowell, J.; Sciaba, A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Williams, M.I.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Holldorfer, F.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Viviede Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-01-01

    The cross sections and forward-backward asymmetries of hadronic and leptonic events produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130-183 GeV are presented. Results for ee, mumu, tautau, qq, bb and cc production show no significant deviation from the Standard Model predictions. This enable constraints to be set upon physics beyond the Standard Model such as four-fermion contact interactions, leptoquarks, Z' bosons and R-parity violating squarks and sneutrinos. Limits on the energy scale Lambda of eeff contact interactions are typically in the range from 2-10 TeV. Limits on R-parity violating sneutrinos reach masses of a few hundred GeV for large values of their Yukawa couplings.

  11. Effect of Water Cut on Pressure Drop of Oil (D130) -Water Flow in 4″Horizontal Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Mehaboob; Shaahid, S. M.; Al-Hems, Luai M.

    2018-03-01

    The oil-water flow in pipes is a challenging subject that is rich in physics and practical applications. It is often encountered in many oil and chemical industries. The pressure gradient of two phase flow is still subject of immense research. The present study reports pressure measurements of oil (D130)-water flow in a horizontal 4″ diameter stainless steel pipe at different flow conditions. Experiments were carried out for different water cuts (WC); 0-100%. Inlet oil-water flow rates were varied from 4000 to 8000 barrels-per-day in steps of 2000. It has been found that the frictional pressure drop decreases for WC = 0 - 40 %. With further increase in WC, friction pressure drop increases, this could be due to phase inversion.

  12. Radiation-Induced Short Channel (RISCE) and Narrow Channel (RINCE) Effects in 65 and 130 nm MOSFETs

    CERN Document Server

    Faccio, F; Cornale, D; Paccagnella, A; Gerardin, S

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of transistors in commercial-grade complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technologies in the 65 and 130 nm nodes has been explored up to a total ionizing dose of 1 Grad. The large dose tolerance of the thin gate oxide is confirmed, but defects in the spacer and STI oxides have a strong effect on the performance of the transistors. A radiation-induced short channel effect is traced to charge trapping in the spacers used for drain engineering, while a radiation-induced narrow channel effect is due to defect generation in the lateral isolation oxide (STI). These strongly degrade the electrical characteristics of short and narrow channel transistors at high doses, and their magnitude depends on the applied bias and temperature during irradiation in a complex way.

  13. 130 MeV Au ion irradiation induced dewetting on In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matheswaran, P.; Abhirami, K.M.; Gokul, B. [Department of Physics, Kongunadu Arts and Science College, Coimbatore 641029 (India); Sathyamoorthy, R., E-mail: rsathya1959@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Kongunadu Arts and Science College, Coimbatore 641029 (India); Prakash, Jai [Department of Chemistry, M.M.H. College, Ghaziabad 201001 (India); Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D. [Materials Science Division, Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2012-09-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase formed from In/Te bilayer by 130 MeV Au ion irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower fluence results mixed phases with initial state of dewetting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At higher fluence, In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase with complete dewetting pattern is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal spike model is used to explain the inter face mixing phenomena. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHI irradiation may be used to functionalize the structural and surface properties of thin films. - Abstract: In/Te bilayer thin films were prepared by sequential thermal evaporation and subsequently irradiated by 130 MeV Au ions. The pristine and irradiated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques. RBS spectra reveal the sputtering of Te film and interface mixing, with increasing fluence. The surface morphology showed the beginning of dewetting of Te thin film and formation of the partially connected with the mixed zones at the fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. At the higher fluence of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}, dewetted structures were isolated at the surface. Above results are explained based on the formation of craters, sputtering and dewetting followed by inter-diffusion at the interface of molten zones due to thermal spike induced by Au ions.

  14. 130 kDa phosphatase from the liver of labeo rohita: isolation: purification and some kinetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqua, A.; Sherazi, M.; Shah, A.H.; Khan, A.R.; Khan, H.U.

    2009-01-01

    An isoenzyme of high molecular weight acid phosphatase (HM-ACP) from the live of fish rohu (Labeo Rohita) was isolated and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had specific activity of 14.96 U/mg and a recovery of about 4%. The purification procedure included ammonium sulphate precipitation and series of chromatographic separations on SP-Sephadex C-50, CM-Cellulose and Sephacryl HR-200 columns. Nealry 500-folds purification was achieved. The molecular weight was estimated to be 120-130 kDa by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of native enzyme and 130 kDa by gel filtration on calibrated Sephadex G-100 column. sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under reduced and non-reduced condition showed a band corresponding to 66 kDa confirming the dimeric nature of enzyme. para nitrophenyl phosphate and flavin mononucleotide were hydrolyzed effectively by the enzyme and found to be good substrates. Optimum temperature for the enzyme was 50 degree C and temperature stability was 0 degree-50 degree C. Similarly optimum ph for the enzyme was 5.4 and ph stability was 4.8-6.0. The K/sub m/ for the p-nitrophenyl phosphate was estimated to be 0.15 mM. The enzyme was competitively inhibited by the phosphate, vanadate, molybdate, tartrate, fluoride and pyridoxal-5-PO/sub 4/ while pyridoxamine-5-PO/sub 4/ showed poor inhibition. Metal ions such as Ag/sup +/, Cu/sup ++/ Zn/sup ++/ showed strong inhibition on the enzyme activity while other divalent ions like Mg/sup ++/, Mn/sup ++/ and Co/sup ++/ were found to be poor inhibitors. Modifiers like EDTA, methanol, ethanol, acetone and glycerol had no effect on the enzyme's activity. (author)

  15. Insight into the effect of inhibitor resistant S130G mutant on physico-chemical properties of SHV type beta-lactamase: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hassan Baig

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is a serious threat to human health. The production of β-lactamase, which inactivates β-lactams is most common cause of resistance to the β-lactam antibiotics. The Class A enzymes are most frequently encountered among the four β-lactamases in the clinic isolates. Mutations in class A β-lactamases play a crucial role in substrate and inhibitor specificity. SHV and TEM type are known to be most common class A β-lactamases. In the present study, we have analyzed the effect of inhibitor resistant S130G point mutation of SHV type Class-A β-lactamase using molecular dynamics and other in silico approaches. Our study involved the use of different in silico methods to investigate the affect of S130G point mutation on the major physico-chemical properties of SHV type class A β-lactamase. We have used molecular dynamics approach to compare the dynamic behaviour of native and S130G mutant form of SHV β-lactamase by analyzing different properties like root mean square deviation (RMSD, H-bond, Radius of gyration (Rg and RMS fluctuation of mutation. The results clearly suggest notable loss in the stability of S130G mutant that may further lead to decrease in substrate specificity of SHV. Molecular docking further indicates that S130G mutation decreases the binding affinity of all the three inhibitors in clinical practice.

  16. Four-jet final state production in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Morawitz, P.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M. M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Coles, J.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    The four jet topology is analysed in the ALEPH data taken between November 1995 and October 1997, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV. While an unexpected accumulation of events with a dijet mass sum around 105 GeV/c2 had been observed during the first run in 1995 at 130/136 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 pb-1, no significant differences between data and standard model prediction is seen, either in the high energy runs (81.1 pb-1 taken at centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV) or in the 7.1 pb-1 recorded during a new short run at 130/136 GeV in 1997. We have found no other explanation for the earlier reported ``four jet anomaly'' than a statistical fluctuation.

  17. Four-jet final state production in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Ward, J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The four jet topology is analysed in the ALEPH data taken between November 1995 and November 1997, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV. While an unexpected accumulation of events with a dijet mas sum around 105 GeV/c**2 had been observed during the first run in 1995 at 130/136 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 pb-1, no significant differences between data and standard model prediction is noticed, either in the high energy runs (81.1 pb-1 taken at centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV) or in the 7.1 pb-1 recorded during a new short run at 130/136 GeV in 1997. We have found no other explanation for the earlier reported ``four jet anomaly'' than a statistical fluctuation.

  18. Characterization of a novel HLA-B*39:01:01-related allele, HLA-B*39:130, by cloning and phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L X; Tian, W; Zhu, F M; Wang, W Y; Cai, J H

    2017-12-01

    A novel HLA-B*39:01:01-related variant, HLA-B*39:130, has been identified in a normal individual of Han ethnicity in Hunan province, southern China. Following Sanger polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT), this new allele was further confirmed by cloning, phasing and sequencing. Aligned with HLA-B*39:01:01, HLA-B*39:130 has a nonsynonymous thymine substitution at nucleotide position 94 in exon 4, resulting in amino acid change from threonine to isoleucine at codon 214 (ACA→ATA) of the mature HLA-BmRNA molecule. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE 130

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    frequently display a multi-drug resistant phenotype. [7, 8, and 6]. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) and the presence of several virulence factors in the strains of many pathogens responsible for different diseases pose an increasing threat to the successful management of disease scourge [9]. However, strategies for addressing ...

  20. 130 ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    as hospital acquired (HA-MRSA) and community acquired ... conditions such as septicaemia, pneumonia, endocarditis ..... lead to prolonged hospitalization or poor prognosis. In a study at ..... (1987): The Braden Scale for predicting sore risk.