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Sample records for samarium 130

  1. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  2. Particle-Size-Induced Valence Changes in Samarium Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, M. G.; Lee, S. -T.; Apai, G.; Davis, R. F.; Shirley, D. A.; Franciosi, A.; Weaver, J. H.

    1981-09-01

    Samarium clusters exhibit mixed-valence behavior which is sensitive to particle size. XPS and UPS data show samarium to be primarily divalent (4f{sup 6} ) at small particle size. The trivalent state (4f{sup 5} ) becomes progressively more abundant with increasing s1ze, becoming the dominant state for the bulk metal. These results are interpreted using a model in which band narrowing, due to reduced surface coordination, is more dominant than surface tension effects in establishing the valence of small samarium clusters.

  3. Yellow-green electroluminescence of samarium complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behzad, Sara Karimi; Najafi, Ezzatollah [Department of Chemistry Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Mostafa M., E-mail: m-pouramini@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Janghouri, Mohammad; Mohajerani, Ezeddin [Laser Research Institute Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ng, Seik Weng [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-12-15

    Four novel samarium complexes were prepared by reacting samarium(III) nitrate with 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline, and 1,10-phenanthroline and utilized as emitting materials in the electroluminescence device. All complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, UV–vis and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopes and the molecular structure of a representative complex, [Sm{sub 2}(Me-HQ){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}] (1), was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Utilization of a π-conjugated (phenanthroline) ligand as a second ligand in the structure of the samarium complexes resulted in red shifts in both absorption and fluorescence spectra of complexes and moderately enhanced the photoluminescence intensity and the fluorescence quantum yield. The maximum emission peaks showed that a good correlation exists between the nature of the substituent group on the 8-hydroxyquinoline and the addition of the π-conjugated ligand in the structure of samarium complexes and emission wavelength. Devices with samarium(III) complexes with structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (90 nm)/PVK:PBD:Sm(III) complexes (75 nm)/Al (180 nm) were fabricated. In the electroluminescence (EL) spectra of the devices, a strong ligand-centered emission and narrow bands arising from the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}→{sup 6}H{sub J} transitions (J=7/2, 9/2, and 11/2) of the samarium ion were observed for the complexes. The electroluminescent spectra of the samarium complexes were red-shifted as compared with the PVK:PBD blend. We believe that the electroluminescence performance of OLED devices based on samarium complexes relies on overlaps between the absorption of the samarium compounds and the emission of PVK:PBD. This revealed that it is possible to evaluate the electroluminescence performance of the samarium compounds-doped OLED devices based on the emission of PVK:PBD and the absorption of the dopants. - Highlights: • Four novel photoluminescence samarium complexes have been synthesized.

  4. Biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in rats treated with docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarim Neto, Arthur; Acucena, Maria Kadja Meneses Torres; Pereira, Kercia Regina Santos Gomes; Rego, Amalia Cinthia Meneses [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Postgraduate Program in Health Sciences; Azevedo, Italo Medeiros; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [State University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Biophysics and Biometry

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Many patients with metastatic bone disease have to use radiopharmaceuticals associated with chemotherapy to relieve bone pain. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of docetaxel on the biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in bones and other organs of rats. Methods: Wistar male rats were randomly allocated into 2 groups of 6 rats each. The DS (docetaxel/samarium) group received docetaxel (15 mg/kg) intraperitoneally in two cycles 11 days apart. The S (samarium/control) group rats were not treated with docetaxel. Nine days after chemotherapy, all the rats were injected with 0.1 ml of samarium-153-EDTMP via orbital plexus (25 {mu} Ci. After 2 hours, the animals were killed and samples of the brain, thyroid, lung, heart, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and both femurs were removed. The percentage radioactivity of each sample (% ATI / g) was determined in an automatic gamma-counter (Wizard-1470, Perkin-Elmer, Finland). Results: On the ninth day after the administration of the second chemotherapy cycle, the rats had a significant weight loss (314.50 +- 22.09 g) compared (p<0.5) to pre-treatment weight (353.66 {+-} 22.8). The % ATI/g in the samples of rats treated with samarium-153-EDTMP had a significant reduction in the right femur, left femur, kidney, liver and lungs of animals treated with docetaxel, compared to the control rats. Conclusion: The combination of docetaxel and samarium-153-EDTMP was associated with a lower response rate in the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical to targeted tissues. Further investigation into the impact of docetaxel on biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP would complement the findings of this study. (author)

  5. The Basis for Developing Samarium AMS for Fuel Cycle Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A; Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Tumey, S J; Weaver, C J

    2008-10-13

    Modeling of nuclear reactor fuel burnup indicates that the production of samarium isotopes can vary significantly with reactor type and fuel cycle. The isotopic concentrations of {sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, and {sup 151}Sm are potential signatures of fuel reprocessing, if analytical techniques can overcome the inherent challenges of lanthanide chemistry, isobaric interferences, and mass/charge interferences. We review the current limitations in measurement of the target samarium isotopes and describe potential approaches for developing Sm-AMS. AMS sample form and preparation chemistry will be discussed as well as possible spectrometer operating conditions.

  6. Optical characteristics of transparent samarium oxide thin films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optical characteristics of transparent samarium oxide thin films deposited by the radio-frequency sputtering technique. A A ATTA M M EL-NAHASS KHALED M ELSABAWY M M ABD EL-RAHEEM A M HASSANIEN A ALHUTHALI ALI BADAWI AMAR MERAZGA. Regular Volume 87 Issue 5 November 2016 Article ID 72 ...

  7. Optical properties of zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium oxide having the chemical composition Sm2O3() ZnO(40-)V2O5(60) (where = 0.1–0.5 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching method. The density of these glasses was measured by Archimedes method; the corresponding molar volumes have also been calculated.

  8. Optical properties of samarium doped zinc–tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Optical properties of samarium doped zinc–tellurite glasses. B ERAIAH. Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003, India. Present address: Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 056, India. MS received 20 March 2006; revised 13 June 2006. Abstract. Glasses with the composition, ...

  9. Effect of second ligand on the luminescence of Samarium (III ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of second ligand on the luminescence of Samarium (III) dibenzoylmethane complexes: Syntheses, crystal structures, thermal analysis and luminescence study. MUHAMMAD IDIRIS SALEH, MIN YEE CHOO, TAI WEI CHAN and MOHD R RAZALI. ∗. School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, ...

  10. Effect of second ligand on the luminescence of Samarium (III ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 12. Effect of second ligand on the luminescence of Samarium (III) dibenzoylmethane complexes: ... Muhammad Idiris Saleh1 Min Yee Choo1 Tai Wei Chan1 Mohd R Razali1. School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia ...

  11. Dependence of samarium-soil interaction on samarium concentration: Implications for environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Guinart, Oriol; Salaberria, Aitor; Vidal, Miquel; Rigol, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The sorption and desorption behaviour of samarium (Sm), an emerging contaminant, was examined in soil samples at varying Sm concentrations. The obtained sorption and desorption parameters revealed that soil possessed a high Sm retention capacity (sorption was higher than 99% and desorption lower than 2%) at low Sm concentrations, whereas at high Sm concentrations, the sorption-desorption behaviour varied among the soil samples tested. The fractionation of the Sm sorbed in soils, obtained by sequential extractions, allowed to suggest the soil properties (pH and organic matter solubility) and phases (organic matter, carbonates and clay minerals) governing the Sm-soil interaction. The sorption models constructed in the present work along with the sorption behaviour of Sm explained in terms of soil main characteristics will allow properly assessing the Sm-soil interaction depending on the contamination scenario under study. Moreover, the sorption and desorption K d values of radiosamarium in soils were strongly correlated with those of stable Sm at low concentrations (r = 0.98); indicating that the mobility of Sm radioisotopes and, thus, the risk of radioactive Sm contamination can be predicted using data from low concentrations of stable Sm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanism of the electrochemical deposition of samarium-based coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Edgar J. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Ortega-Borges, Raul [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Godinez, Luis A. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Chapman, Thomas W. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Meas-Vong, Yunny [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: yunnymeas@cideteq.mx

    2006-11-12

    Samarium-based films have been shown to form from aqueous solutions on the surfaces of metallic substrates such as steel or aluminum, and their presence has been reported to decrease substantially the corresponding corrosion rate of the underlying metallic substrate. Based on previous reports on the deposition of oxides or hydroxides of the closely related element cerium, this work demonstrates that samarium films are formed following a similar mechanism, which involves as the fundamental step an increase in interfacial pH resulting from cathodic oxygen-reduction or hydrogen-evolution reactions. With cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical quartz-crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurements, rotating-disk electrode (RDE) tests, and surface characterization techniques, namely, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray surface microanalysis (EDX), the postulated mechanism was verified, and the surface morphology of the resulting films was correlated with the nature of the reduction reaction that triggers film formation.

  13. Samarium Monosulfide (SmS): Reviewing Properties and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sousanis, Andreas; Smet, Philippe; Poelman, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we give an overview of the properties and applications of samarium monosulfide, SmS, which has gained considerable interest as a switchable material. It shows a pressure-induced phase transition from the semiconducting to the metallic state by polishing, and it switches back to the semiconducting state by heating. The material also shows a magnetic transition, from the paramagnetic state to an antiferromagnetically ordered state. The switching behavior between the semiconducti...

  14. Optical properties of zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium oxide having the chemical composition Sm2O3(x). ZnO(40−x)V2O5(60)(where x = 0·1–0·5 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching method. The density of these glasses was measured by Archimedes method; the corresponding molar volumes have also been ...

  15. Synthesis of nano-pore samarium (III)-imprinted polymer for preconcentrative separation of samarium ions from other lanthanide ions via solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani-Arani, Simindokht [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tehran, P.O.Box:14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jaber Ibne Hayan Research Laboratories, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Seyed Javad [Jaber Ibne Hayan Research Laboratories, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sjahmadi@aeoi.org.ir; Bahrami-Samani, Ali [Nuclear Engineering and Physics Department, Amir Kabir University, P.O.Box: 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jaber Ibne Hayan Research Laboratories, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad [Jaber Ibne Hayan Research Laboratories, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-08-08

    A batch process was developed to separate samarium ions from some lanthanide ions by a novel solid phase which was prepared via the ion-imprinting technique. The samarium (III) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) particles were synthesized by preparing the ternary complex of samarium ions with 5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol (DCQ) and 4-vinylpyridine (VP). Then, thermally copolymerization with styrene (functional monomer, STY) and divinylbenzene (cross-linking monomer, DVB) followed in the presence of 2-methoxy ethanol (porogen) and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator, AIBN). The imprinted ion was removed by stirring the above particles with 50% (v/v) HCl to obtain the leached IIP particles. Moreover, control polymer (CP) particles were similarly prepared without the samarium ions. The unleached and leached IIP particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infra-red spectroscopy (IR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, preconcentration and selectivity studies for samarium and the other lanthanide ions were carried out. The preconcentration of the samarium (III) traces was studied during rebinding with the leached IIP particles as a function of pH, the weight of the polymer material, the preconcentration and the elution times, the eluent volume and the aqueous phase volume. These studies indicated that the samarium (III) amount as low as 1 {mu}g, present in 200 mL, could be preconcentrated into 25 mL of 1.0 M HCl.

  16. Ionization of Samarium by Chemical Releases in the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Holmes, J. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Caton, R.; Miller, D.; Groves, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The release of Samarium vapor into the upper atmosphere was studied using during the Air Force Research Laboratory sponsored Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) rocket launches in May 2009. The Naval Research Laboratory supported these experiments with 3-D photochemical modeling of the artificial plasma cloud including (1) reactions with atomic oxygen, (2) photo excitation, (3) photoionization, (4) dissociative recombination, and (5) ion and neutral diffusion. NRL provided the experimental diagnostic instrument on the rocket which was a dual frequency radio beacon on the rocket to measure changes in total electron content. The AFRL provided ground based diagnostics of incoherent scatter radar and optical spectroscopy and imagery. The NRL Chemical Release Model (CRM) has over 600 excited states of atomic Samarium neutrals, atomic ions, along with Samarium Oxide Ions and electrons. Diffusive transport of neutrals in cylindrical geometry and ions along magnetic field lines is computed along with the reactive flow to predict the concentrations of Sm, Sm-Ion, Sm0, and SmO Ion. Comparison of the CRM with observations demonstrates that Sm release into the upper atmosphere initially produces enhanced electron densities and SmO-Ions. The diatomic ions recombine with electrons to yield neutral Sm and O. Only the photo ionization of Sm yields a stable atomic ion that does not substantially recombine. The MOSC releases in sunlight yielded long duration ion clouds that can be replicated with the CRM. The CRM predicts that Sm releases in darkness would not produce long duration plasma clouds because of the lack of photo excitation and photoionization.

  17. Reactive Materials for Evaporating Samarium (Pre-Print)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    SUBJECT TERMS energetic materials, heat sources, pyrotechnic charges, easily ionized metals 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...experiments.    Keywords:  energetic  materials, heat sources, pyrotechnic charges, easily ionized metals  1. Introduction Ejection of clouds of...results  were  negatively  affected  by  reduced  efficiency   of  release  and  ionization of samarium [8]. It is possible that not the entire charge of

  18. Implementation of an analytical technique for Samarium; Implementacion de una tecnica analitica para Samario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Since the Samarium presents the same chemical properties that the plutonium, it has been used as homologous in studies that allow us to know the behavior that the plutonium presents in solution, with the advantage of working with an inactive and not very dangerous element. At the moment studies of sorption of plutonium or samarium are made on some mineral matrices that present certain surface properties. Due to the low concentrations that are used in the studies of sorption of samarium on those reagent substrates, their detection becomes very difficult for the conventional analysis media. The luminescence is a technique that can detect lower concentrations, smaller at 1 X 10{sup -} {sup 2} M, but when fluorofors are used this limit of detection increases in several orders of magnitude. In this work it has been used the arsenazo-III as fluorofor agent since it reacts in a specific way with the samarium, forming a complex that presents a proportional luminescence to the concentration of the present samarium. The advantage of making the quantification of samarium by luminescence is that it can use the same instrumental equipment to determine the speciation of the samarium sipped in the zircon. (Author)

  19. Synthesis of samarium binding bleomycin - a possible NCT radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, B.M., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mendes, T.M.; Campos, T.P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a drug that has attractive features for the development of a new radiopharmaceutical, particularly with regard to neutron capture therapy (NCT) sensitized by Sm-149. It has the ability to chelate many metal ions. In vitro studies have shown that up to 78% of BLM present in a cell is accumulated inside the nucleus or in the nuclear membrane. In addition, this drug has higher affinity for tumor tissues than for normal tissues. Radioactive isotopes carried by this antibiotic would be taken preferentially to one important cellular targets DNA. Besides, BLM displays intrinsic anti-tumor activity - it is a chemotherapic antibiotic clinically used against some cancers. This study aimed to obtain bleomycin molecules bound to samarium (BLM-Sm) for NCT studies in vitro and in vivo. The binding technique employed in this work has great simplicity and low cost. Thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, fast protein liquid chromatography and analysis by ICP-AES were applied to verify the binding molecule. ICP-AES results showed the presence of samarium in the sample peaks related to BLM-Sm. However, efficiency and stability of this bond needs to be investigated. (author)

  20. Luminescent solutions and powders of new samarium complexes with N,N',O,O'-chelating ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Nikolskiy, Kirill S.; Borisova, Nataliya E.; Ivanov, Alexey V.; Reshetova, Marina D.; Yuzhakov, Viktor I.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques in biology and medicine are crucial tools to obtain information on structural and functional properties of living cells and organisms. To fulfill the requirements associated with application of these techniques it appears necessary to design markers with specific characteristics. Luminescent complexes of trivalent lanthanide ions with chelating ligands are of increasing importance in biomedical applications because of their millisecond luminescence lifetime, narrow emission band, high signal-to-noise ratio and minimal photodamage to biological samples. In order to extend the available emission wavelength range the luminescent samarium chelates are highly desirable. In this study the ligands with diamides of 2,2'-bipyridin-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid were used to improve photophysical characteristics of samarium complexes. We report the luminescence characteristics of samarium complexes with novel ligands. All complexes exhibited the characteristic emission of Sm (III) ion with the lines at 565, 597, 605, 645 and 654 nm, the intensity strongly depended on the ligand. Absorption and luminescence excitation spectra of Sm (III) complexes showed main peaks in the UV range demonstrating lanthanide coordination to the ligand. The absolute lumenescence quantum yield was measured for solutions in acetonitrile with excitation at 350 nm. The largest luminescence quantum yield was found for the samarium complex Bipy 6MePy Sm (3%) being much higher that for samarium complexes reported in the literature earlier. These results prove as well that samarium chelates are potential markers for multiparametric imaging techniques.

  1. Australian manufacture of Quadramet{sup TM} (Samarium-153 EDTMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, N.R.; Whitwell, J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Australian Radioisotopes

    1997-10-01

    Quadramet{sup T} (Samarium-153 EDTMP) has been shown overseas to be potentially useful in the palliation of painful osteoblastic skeletal metastases and has been approved this year for general marketing in the USA. Australian Radioisotopes (ARI) has licensed this product from the Australian patent holders, Dow Chemical. Within the facilities of ARI, a hot cell has been dedicated to this product and fitted out to manufacture it weekly on a cycle related to the operating cycle of the Australian reactor HIFAR. Due to neutron flux limitations of HIFAR, the local formulation has an elemental Samarium content up to 200{mu}g/mL whereas the overseas formulation has a level of 20-46{mu}g/mL. All other specifications of the two products are essentially the same. In 1995 and 1996 a small clinical trial with 19 patients was held which demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic behaviour was also essentially the same by measuring blood clearance rates and skeletal uptake dynamics. Soft tissue uptake was also qualitatively determined. The ARI version is now the subject of an application for general marketing within Australia. Some useful characteristics of this agent are: almost complete excretion or fixation in the skeleton within 6 hours, rapid onset of clinical effect, applicability in most cases where an abnormal diagnostic bone scan correlates with painful sites, dosage can be tailored to individual patient uptake due to easy dose measurement and retreatment is quite possible. The use of this class of agents in pain palliation continues to increase. Australian manufacture of Quadramet{sup TM} provides a further option in the management of these difficult cases

  2. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillejo, Y., E-mail: ycastril@qa.uva.es [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Fernandez, P. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Medina, J. [Dept Fisica Materia Condensada Cristalografia y Mineralogia, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C.P. 42076 Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Barrado, E. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) {r_reversible} Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al{sub 3}Sm and Al{sub 2}Sm.

  3. Optical analysis of samarium doped sodium bismuth silicate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V; Sofin, R G S; Allen, M; Thomas, H; Biju, P R; Jose, G; Unnikrishnan, N V

    2017-01-15

    Samarium doped sodium bismuth silicate glass was synthesized using the melt quenching method. Detailed optical spectroscopic studies of the glassy material were carried out in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral range. Using the optical absorption spectra Judd-Ofelt (JO) parameters are derived. The calculated values of the JO parameters are utilized in evaluating the various radiative parameters such as electric dipole line strengths (Sed), radiative transition probabilities (Arad), radiative lifetimes (τrad), fluorescence branching ratios (β) and the integrated absorption cross- sections (σa) for stimulated emission from various excited states of Sm3+‡ ion. The principal fluorescence transitions are identified by recording the fluorescence spectrum. Our analysis revealed that the novel glassy system has the optimum values for the key parameters viz. spectroscopic quality factor, optical gain, stimulated emission cross section and quantum efficiency, which are required for a high performance optical amplifier. Calculated chromaticity co-ordinates (0.61, 0.38) also confirm its application potential in display devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Samarium Monosulfide (SmS): Reviewing Properties and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousanis, Andreas; Smet, Philippe F; Poelman, Dirk

    2017-08-16

    In this review, we give an overview of the properties and applications of samarium monosulfide, SmS, which has gained considerable interest as a switchable material. It shows a pressure-induced phase transition from the semiconducting to the metallic state by polishing, and it switches back to the semiconducting state by heating. The material also shows a magnetic transition, from the paramagnetic state to an antiferromagnetically ordered state. The switching behavior between the semiconducting and metallic states could be exploited in several applications, such as high density optical storage and memory materials, thermovoltaic devices, infrared sensors and more. We discuss the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of SmS, its switching behavior, as well as the thin film deposition techniques which have been used, such as e-beam evaporation and sputtering. Moreover, applications and possible ideas for future work on this material are presented. Our scope is to present the properties of SmS, which were mainly measured in bulk crystals, while at the same time we describe the possible deposition methods that will push the study of SmS to nanoscale dimensions, opening an intriguing range of applications for low-dimensional, pressure-induced semiconductor-metal transition compounds.

  5. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Singh, Gurinder Pal [Department of Physics, Khalsa College, Amritsar 143002 (India); Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Singh, D.P., E-mail: dpsinghdr@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV‐Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λ{sub exc}.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO{sub 4} units thus supporting the density results. The UV‐ Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  6. Effect of samarium doping on the dielectric behavior of barium zircomium titanate ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badapanda, T., E-mail: badapanda.tanmaya@gmail.com [Department of Physics, C.V. Raman College of Engineering, Bhubaneswar, Odisha-752054 (India); Sarangi, S.; Behera, B. [School of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar Sambalpur, Odisha-768019 (India); Anwar, S. [Colloids and Materials Chemistry, Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar, Odisha-751013 (India); Sinha, T. P. [Department of Physics, Bose Institute, Kolkata-700009 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Samarium doped Barium Zirconium Titanate ceramic with general formula Ba{sub 1−x}Sm{sub 2x/3}Zr{sub 0.05}Ti{sub 0.95}O{sub 3} [x=0.0,0.01,0.02,0.03,0.04] has been prepared by high energy ball milling. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed that these ceramics have a single phase with perovskite-type upto x≤0.03 and a small secondary phase exist at x=0.04. The temperature dependent dielectric study shows a ferroelectric phase transition and transition temperature decreases with an increase in the Samarium content.

  7. Lithium Bromide/Water as Additives in Dearomatizing Samarium-Ketyl (Hetero)Arene Cyclizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chintada Nageswara; Bentz, Christoph; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-11-02

    New conditions for dearomatizing samarium-ketyl (hetero)arene cyclizations are reported. In many examples of these samarium diiodide-mediated reactions, lithium bromide and water can be used as additives instead of the carcinogenic and mutagenic hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA). The best results were obtained for the cyclizations of N-acylated indole derivatives delivering the expected indolines in good yields and excellent diastereoselectivities. A new type of cyclization delivering indolyl-substituted allene derivatives is also described. The scope and limitations of the lithium bromide/water system are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. One-step synthesis of samarium-doped ceria and its CO catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The samarium-doped ceria (SDC) nanospheres were prepared by the one-step hydrothermal method and characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometer and Raman spectra. According to the ...

  9. A spectroscopic comparison of samarium-doped LiYF4 and KY3F10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J. P. R.; Sugiyama, A.; Han, T. P. J.; Gallagher, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    Laser selective excitation and fluorescence has been performed on LiYF4 and KY3F10 doped with samarium ions. In LiYF4, a single, tetragonal symmetry center associated with isovalent substitution of Sm3+ with lattice yttrium ions is present. By contrast, three Sm2+ centres and a single, tetragonal

  10. The Use of a Flexible Calix[4]arene Template to Stabilize a Cyclooctatetraindiyl Samarium-Potassium Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffroy Guillemot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sandwich compound of cyclooctatetraendiyl (COT2− samarium-potassium was synthesized and analyzed using a flexible calix[4]arene dianion. This compound, [p-tBu-calix[4]-(OMe2(O2]arenediyl-samarium-(η8-cyclooctatetraendiyl-potassium (tetrahydrofurane3, is constructed as a linear sequence L-Sm--K-, where L, , and are specific ligands with L = O,O-dimethyl-calix[4]arene2−, = cyclo-octatetraendiyl, and = tetrahydrofurane templates.

  11. Glycoprotein 130 polymorphism predicts soluble glycoprotein 130 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonnerth, Anna; Katsaros, Katharina M; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Speidl, Walter S; Kaun, Christoph; Thaler, Kylie; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann; Maurer, Gerald; Seljeflot, Ingebjorg; Arnesen, Harald; Weiss, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key cytokine in inflammatory diseases. It exerts its biological function via binding to a homodimer of its signal transducer glycoprotein 130 (gp130). Soluble gp130 (sgp130) is the natural inhibitor of IL-6 trans-signalling. The aim of this study was to test a possible influence of the gp130 genotype on sgp130 serum levels. In two separate populations, subjects were genotyped for the gp130 polymorphism G148C. Sgp130, IL-6 and soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) levels were measured. The OSLO population consisted of 546 male subjects at high risk for CAD. The VIENNA population consisted of 299 male subjects with angiographically proven CAD. In the OSLO population, 124 (22.7%) subjects were hetero- or homozygote for the rare C allele. Individuals carrying the polymorphism had significantly higher levels of sgp130. In a multivariate linear regression model this association remained significant (adjusted p=0.001). In the VIENNA population, 48 (16.1%) subjects were hetero- or homozygote for the rare C allele. Consistent with the former study, sgp130 levels were significantly higher in carriers of the polymorphism compared to wildtype carriers (adjusted p=0.038). In the VIENNA population, sgp130 levels were significantly higher in diabetic patients. In the OSLO population, sgp130 was higher in patients with increased body mass index and in smokers (p<0.05). Sgp130 serum levels are significantly higher in subjects carrying the gp130 polymorphism G148C compared to wildtype carriers. This finding proposes a possible genetical influence on sgp130 levels which may alter individual coping mechanisms in inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solar nebula heterogeneity in p-process samarium and neodymium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Rasmus; Sharma, Mukul

    2006-11-03

    Bulk carbonaceous chondrites display a deficit of approximately 100 parts per million (ppm) in 144Sm with respect to other meteorites and terrestrial standards, leading to a decrease in their 142Nd/144Nd ratios by approximately 11 ppm. The data require that samarium and neodymium isotopes produced by the p process associated with photodisintegration reactions in supernovae were heterogeneously distributed in the solar nebula. Other samarium and neodymium isotopes produced by rapid neutron capture (r process) in supernovae and by slow neutron capture (s process) in red giants were homogeneously distributed. The supernovae sources supplying the p- and r-process nuclides to the solar nebula were thus disconnected or only weakly connected.

  13. RX130 Robot Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugal, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In order to create precision magnets for an experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a new reverse engineering method has been proposed that uses the magnetic scalar potential to solve for the currents necessary to produce the desired field. To make the magnet it is proposed to use a copper coated G10 form, upon which a drill, mounted on a robotic arm, will carve wires. The accuracy required in the manufacturing of the wires exceeds nominal robot capabilities. However, due to the rigidity as well as the precision servo motor and harmonic gear drivers, there are robots capable of meeting this requirement with proper calibration. Improving the accuracy of an RX130 to be within 35 microns (the accuracy necessary of the wires) is the goal of this project. Using feedback from a displacement sensor, or camera and inverse kinematics it is possible to achieve this accuracy.

  14. Samarium(II) iodide-mediated reductive annulations of ketones bearing a distal vinyl epoxide moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molander, G.A.; Shakya, S.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-08-23

    It was found that samarium (II) iodide promotes the intramolecular coupling of ketones with distal epoxy olefins while in the presence of hexamethylphosphoramide (HPMA). A number of epoxide compounds (1 a-k) fragment to form carbocycles with allylic alcohol side chains with high diastereoselectivity (2 a-k). Substituting tetramethylguanidine for HPMA reduces the diastereoselectivity. Adding Pd(0) as a catalyst reverses the diastereoselective sense. 40 refs., 1 tab.

  15. A temporal three-dimensional simulation of samarium release in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Sheng; Feng, Jie; Xu, Zheng-Wen; Wu, Jian; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Xu, Bin; Xue, Kun; Xu, Tong; Hu, Yan-Li

    2016-10-01

    For understanding plasma processes of the ionosphere and magnetosphere, the alkali and alkaline-earth metals are usually released in space for artificially increasing the electron density. However, it is a limitation that these releases must be in sunlight where the photoionization can take place. In recent years, the lanthanide metals, such as samarium, have been released to produce electrons in reaction with atomic oxygen in the upper space. The reaction could proceed without sunlight so that the restriction on experimental periods is broken. Unfortunately, any sophisticated models even preliminary ones are unavailable yet in the literature. A temporal three-dimensional model is presented for the samarium release in detail with respect to various altitudes and mass. Especially, the plasma diffusion equation is remarkably extended from 2-D to 3-D by importing the influence of geomagnetic declination, which could be also useful for other chemical releases. The field-aligned terms are brought so as to the presented model can describe the diffusion along the geomagnetic field subtly. On the basis of the presented model, behaviors of radio waves propagating through the release area are simulated by using ray tracing. This model could be as the theoretical support for samarium releases, and it also helpful for the research on the generation and evolution of the ionosphere irregularities.

  16. Liquid–liquid anion exchange extraction studies of samarium(III from salicylate media using high molecular weight amine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha M. Mandhare

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Liquid–liquid extraction and separation of samarium(III were carried out by using 0.025 mol dm−3 2-octylaminopyridine(2-OAP in xylene at 298 K. The extraction behavior of samarium was studied as a function of pH, weak acid concentration, extractant concentration, diluent, and equilibration time. Samarium was quantitatively extracted at pH 7.5 to 10.0 from 0.01 mol dm−3 sodium salicylate solution with 0.025 mol dm−3 2-OAP. The possible composition of the extracted species in organic phase has been determined by using model of slope analysis method and extraction mechanism was found to proceed via an anion exchange mechanism. The stripping efficiency was found to be quantitative in HNO3, HCl and CH3COOH. The robustness of the procedure was demonstrated by the average recoveries obtained (>99.6% for samarium(III extraction in the presence of several cations and anions which are commonly associated with it. The proposed method facilitates the separation and determination of samarium(III from binary and synthetic mixtures. The various thermodynamic functions like free energy (ΔG, enthalpy (ΔH and entropy (ΔS of extraction mechanism were discussed.

  17. Samarium(II) iodide-mediated intramolecular conjugate additions of alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molander, Gary A; St Jean, David J

    2002-05-31

    Samarium(II) iodide, in the presence of catalytic amounts of nickel(II) iodide, has been used to promote intramolecular conjugate additions of alkyl halides onto alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones. This process has been shown to be applicable to a number of alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones, including tetrasubstituted olefins, and has been demonstrated to be quite general for the formation of saturated bicyclic and tricyclic lactones. The method presented herein provides a mild, efficient process to form structurally complex lactones from simple precursors.

  18. Ekstraksi Pemisahan Neodimium dari Samarium, Itrium dan Praseodimium Memakai Tri Butil Fosfat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Veronica Purwani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of Nd(OH3 (neodymium hydroxide concentrate containing Y (yttrium, Sm (samarium and Pr (praseodymium as product of monazite processed has been done. The purpose of this study is to determine the separation of Nd from Y, Pr and Nd Sm in Nd concentrate. The aqueous phase was concentrated Nd (OH3 in HNO3 and extractant while organic phase was Tri Butyl Phosphate (TBP in kerosene. Parameters studied were pH and concentration feed, concentration of TBP in kerosene, extraction time and stirring speed. The result showed that the optimization of separation extraction neodymium from samarium, yttrium and praseodymium in Nd(OH3 concentrated with TBP, obtained the optimum condition of pH = 0.2, concentration of feed 100 g /L, concentration of TBP in kerosene 5%, extraction time 15 minutes and stirring speed 150 rpm. With the conditions, Separation Factor (SF obtained for Nd-Y, Nd-Pr, Nd-Sm are 2.242, 4.811, 4.002 respectively, while D and extraction efficiency of Nd are 0.236 and 19.07%.

  19. X-Band Microwave Reflection Properties of Samarium/Bismuth-Substituted Barium Lanthanum Titanate Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahel, Shalini; Pubby, Kunal; Narang, Sukhleen Bindra

    2017-03-01

    Samarium/bismuth-substituted barium lanthanum titanate ceramics with chemical composition Ba4 (La_{1 - y - z} Smy Biz )_{9.33} Ti_{18} O_{54} ( y = 0.5, 0.7; z = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15), intended as microwave reflecting materials, have been investigated in microwave X-band (8.2 GHz to 12.4 GHz) and the effect of substitution on their dielectric properties, i.e., dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent, has been studied by vector network analyzer. Dielectric analysis showed that the dielectric constant increased with increasing samarium as well as bismuth content. Dielectric relaxation was observed for all samples in the scanned frequency range. Microwave reflection and transmission analysis of ceramic pellets of thickness 4 mm was carried out using two methods, i.e., open- and short-circuit approach, both indicating very high values of reflected power and very low values of transmitted power for all the doped materials in comparison with the base composition. The doped compositions are therefore potential microwave shielding materials for use in anechoic chambers, microwave laboratories, and radar equipment. Double-layer reflectors are also proposed, having better reflection properties (˜99% reflection) compared with single-layer reflectors.

  20. Microstructure and hysteresis curves of samarium-holmium-iron garnet synthesized by coprecipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caffarena Valeska da Rocha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was made into the synthesis and magnetic properties of Sm(3-xHo xFe5O12 (samarium-holmium-iron garnet ferrite, as yet absent from the literature. The material in question was synthesized by co-precipitation, starting from hydrated chlorides of rare-earth elements and ferrous sulfate, and the mixed hydroxide co-precipitate was calcined at 1000 °C. Using PVA as a binder, rectangular cross section-shaped compacts were produced by means of steel-die pressing, drying and sintering from 1200 to 1450 °C. The main conclusions of this study were that the coercive force decreases as the sintering temperature increases, and that the effect of substituting holmium for samarium in SmIG is entirely different from that provided by replacing yttrium by gadolinium in YIG, which is the most important result of this work. An in-depth investigation will be necessary to determine the correlation between microstructure/magnetic properties and ceramic processing variables.

  1. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals as targeted agents of osteosarcoma: samarium-153-EDTMP and radium-223.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter M; Subbiah, Vivek; Rohren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a cancer characterized by formation of bone by malignant cells. Routine bone scan imaging with Tc-99m-MDP is done at diagnosis to evaluate primary tumor uptake and check for bone metastases. At time of relapse the Tc-99m-MDP bone scan also provides a specific means to assess formation of bone by malignant osteosarcoma cells and the potential for bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals to deliver radioactivity directly into osteoblastic osteosarcoma lesions. This chapter will review and compare a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical that emits beta-particles, samarium-153-EDTMP, with an alpha-particle emitter, radium-223. The charged alpha particles from radium-223 have far more mass and energy than beta particles (electrons) from Sm-153-EDTMP. Because radium-223 has less marrow toxicity and more radiobiological effectiveness, especially if inside the bone forming cancer cell than samarium-153-EDTMP, radium-223 may have greater potential to become widely used against osteosarcoma as a targeted therapy. Radium-223 also has more potential to be used with chemotherapy against osteosarcoma and bone metastases. Because osteosarcoma makes bone and radium-223 acts like calcium, this radiopharmaceutical could possibly become a new targeted means to achieve safe and effective reduction of tumor burden as well as facilitate better surgery and/or radiotherapy for difficult to resect large, or metastatic tumors.

  2. Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts: fabrication, characterization, and application in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Yunjiao; Wang, Xue; Yang, Chao; Yi, Yanfeng

    2012-11-01

    Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts were synthesized by the in situ chemical oxidative surface polymerization technique based on the self-assembly of pyrrole on the surface of the amine-functionalized Sm2O3 nanobelts. The morphologies of the polypyrrole/samarium oxide (PPy/Sm2O3) nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscope. The UV-vis absorbance of these samples was also investigated, and the remarkable enhancement was clearly observed. The electrochemical behaviors of the PPy/Sm2O3 composites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The results indicated that the PPy/Sm2O3 composite electrode was fully reversible and achieved a very fast Faradaic reaction. After being corrected into the weight percentage of the PPy/Sm2O3 composite at a current density of 20 mA cm-2 in a 1.0 M NaNO3 electrolyte solution, a maximum discharge capacity of 771 F g-1 was achieved in a half-cell setup configuration for the PPy/Sm2O3 composites electrode with the potential application to electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors.

  3. Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts: fabrication, characterization, and application in supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Peng, E-mail: pliu@lzu.edu.cn; Wang Yunjiao; Wang Xue; Yang Chao; Yi Yanfeng [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province and State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry (China)

    2012-11-15

    Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts were synthesized by the in situ chemical oxidative surface polymerization technique based on the self-assembly of pyrrole on the surface of the amine-functionalized Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobelts. The morphologies of the polypyrrole/samarium oxide (PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscope. The UV-vis absorbance of these samples was also investigated, and the remarkable enhancement was clearly observed. The electrochemical behaviors of the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The results indicated that the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite electrode was fully reversible and achieved a very fast Faradaic reaction. After being corrected into the weight percentage of the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite at a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2} in a 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} electrolyte solution, a maximum discharge capacity of 771 F g{sup -1} was achieved in a half-cell setup configuration for the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites electrode with the potential application to electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors.

  4. Behavior of Samarium III during the sorption process; Comportamiento del Samario-III durante el proceso de sorcion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Garcia G, N.; Garcia R, G. [ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: edo@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work the results of the behavior of samarium in solution are presented, in front of a fine powder of zirconium silicate (zircon). For that which is necessary to characterize the zircon, studying the crystallinity, the morphology, the surface area and the isoelectric point. The behavior of samarium in solution is studied by means of the elaboration of isotherm of sorption, using the technique by lots. One observes that to pH values of nearer to the isoelectric point (pH = 7.23) the process of sorption of the samarium begins, reaching a maximum to near pH at 9. The technique of luminescence is used to determine the concentration of the sipped samarium (phosphorescence) and also to make the speciation of the species formed in the surface of the zircon (phosphorescence). The results can be extrapolated with the plutonium when making the modeling of the migration of alpha emitting coming from the repositories of radioactive waste since both they have similar chemical properties (they are homologous). (Author)

  5. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Samarium, Europium, and Gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of samarium, europium and gadolinium (62 {le} Z {le} 64, 82 {le} N {le} 96).

  6. Pemisahan Unsur Samarium dan Yttrium dari Mineral Tanah Jarang dengan Teknik Membran Cair Berpendukung (Supported Liquid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amri Amin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available he increasing use of rare earth elements in high technology industries needs to be supported by developmental work for the separation of elements. The research objective is fiercely attracting and challenging considering the similarity of bath physical and chemical properties among these elements. The rate separation of samarium and yttrium elements using supported liquid membrane has been studied. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE with pore size of 0.45 µm has been used as the membrane and di(2-ethylhexyl phosphate (D2EHP in hexane has been used as a carrier and nitric acid solution has been used as receiving phase. Result of experiments showed that the best separation rate of samarium and yttrium elements could be obtained at feeding phase of pH 3.0, di(2-ethylhexyl phosphate (D2EHP concentration of 0.3 M, agitation rate of 700 rpm, agitation time of 2 hours, and nitric acid and its solution concentrations of 1.0 M and 0.1 M, respectively. At this condition, separation rates of samarium and yttrium were 64.4 and 67.6%, respectively.   Keywords: liquid membrane, rare earth elements, samarium, yttrium

  7. Effects of the atomic environment on the electron binding energies in samarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoyatov, A.Kh., E-mail: inoyatov@jinr.ru [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics, National University, Tashkent, Republic of Uzbekistan (Uzbekistan); Kovalík, A. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, CZ-25068 Řež near Prague (Czech Republic); Filosofov, D.V. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ryšavý, M.; Vénos, D. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, CZ-25068 Řež near Prague (Czech Republic); Yushkevich, Yu.V.; Perevoshchikov, L.L. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Zhdanov, V.S. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Eight different matrices (evaporated and implanted at 30 keV) used. • The greatest average difference in the binding energies amounted to 3.1 ± 0.1 eV. • The presence of trivalent and divalent Sm ions found in some implanted samples. • No significant differences in Sm natural atomic level widths were observed. - Abstract: Effects of the atomic environment on the L{sub 1}, L{sub 2}, L{sub 3}, M{sub 1}, M{sub 2}, M{sub 3}, and N{sub 1} electron binding energies in samarium generated in the electron capture decay of radioactive {sup 149}Eu were investigated by means of the internal conversion electron spectroscopy using the conversion electron spectrum of the 22.5 keV M1 + E2 nuclear transition in the daughter {sup 149}Sm. In this investigation, four pairs of {sup 149}Eu sources prepared by vacuum evaporation deposition and by ion implantation at 30 keV with the use of four different source backing materials, namely polycrystalline carbon, aluminium, gadolinium and platinum foils, were employed. The greatest average difference of (3.1 ± 0.1) eV in the L{sub 1}, L{sub 2}, L{sub 3}, and M{sub 1} subshell electron binding energies was observed between the {sup 149}Eu sources prepared by ion implantation into the aluminium and platinum substrates. On the other hand, minimal differences in the electron binding energies were generally found between samarium generated in the evaporated layer and in the bulk for the individual investigated source backings with the exception of the gadolinium foil. A doublet structure of all investigated conversion electron lines with the average values of 8.1 ± 0.2 eV and 1.5 ± 0.1 for the separation energy and the intensity ratio of the low-energy to high-energy components, respectively, was observed for the {sup 149}Eu sources prepared by ion implantation into the aluminium and carbon foils. This structure was presumably caused by the presence of both the trivalent and divalent Sm ions in the sources. No

  8. Multiphoton laser wave-mixing absorption spectroscopy for samarium using a graphite furnace atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniaci, Michael J.; Tong, William G. E-mail: william.tong@sdsu.edu

    2004-07-30

    Nonlinear laser wave-mixing optical technique is presented as a sensitive atomic spectroscopic method for the analysis of rare earth elements using an unmodified commercially available graphite furnace (GF) atomizer. A simple nonplanar backward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing optical arrangement offers sub-picogram detection sensitivity with sub-Doppler Lorentzian-broadened resolution. Nonlinear wave mixing is an unusually sensitive absorption-based optical method that offers both excellent detection sensitivity and sub-Doppler spectral resolution. A mass detection limit of 0.7 pg and a concentration detection limit of 70 pg/ml are determined for a rare earth element, samarium, using the 429.7-nm excitation line.

  9. Samarium Doped Cerium Oxide Clusters: a Study on the Modulation of Electronic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Josey E.; Kafader, Jared O.; Marrero-Colon, Vicmarie; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Cerium oxide is known for its use in solid oxide fuel cells due to its high ionic conductivity. The doping of trivalent samarium atoms into cerium oxide is known to enhance the ionic conductivity through the generation of additional oxygen vacancies. This study probes the electronic structure of Sm_{x}Ce_{y}O_{z} (x+y=3, z=2-4) anion and neutral clusters. Anion photoelectron spectra of these mixed metal clusters exhibit additional spectral features not present in the previously studied cerium oxide clusters. Density functional theory calculations have been used to aid interpretation of collected spectra. The results of this work can be used to inform the design of materials used for solid oxide fuel cells.

  10. Chelating Ligand-Mediated Hydrothermal Synthesis of Samarium Orthovanadate with Decavanadate as Vanadium Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanguo Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid- (EDTA- mediated hydrothermal route to prepare chrysanthemum-shaped samarium orthovanadate (SmVO4 nanocrystals with decavanadate (K6V10O28·9H2O as vanadium source has been developed. The present hydrothermal approach is simple and reproducible and employs a relatively mild reaction temperature. The EDTA, pH value, and temperature of the reaction systems play important roles in determining the morphologies and growth process of the SmVO4 products. The products have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, photoluminescence spectra (PL, and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  11. The Magnetocaloric Effect and Heat Capacity of Suspensions of High-Dispersity Samarium Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, V. V.; Aref'ev, I. M.; Ramazanova, A. G.

    2008-02-01

    The magnetocaloric effect and specific heat capacity of an aqueous suspension of samarium ferrite were determined calorimetrically over the temperature range 288-343 K in magnetic fields of 0-0.7 T. The data obtained were used to calculate changes in the magnetic component of the molar heat capacity and entropy of the magnetic phase and changes in the enthalpy of the process under an applied magnetic field. The magnetocaloric effect was found to increase nonlinearly as the magnetic field induction grew. The corresponding temperature dependences contained a maximum at 313 K related to the second-order magnetic phase transition at the Curie point. The field and temperature dependences of heat capacity contained a maximum in fields of 0.4 T and a minimum at the magnetic phase transition temperature.

  12. Preparation of hollow core/shell microspheres of hematite and its adsorption ability for samarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng-Hui; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2014-07-09

    Hollow core/shell hematite microspheres with diameter of ca. 1-2 μm have been successfully achieved by calcining the precursor composite microspheres of pyrite and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in air. The synthesized products were characterized by a wide range of techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) gas sorptometry. Temperature- and time-dependent experiments unveil that the precursor pyrite-PVP composite microspheres finally transform into hollow core/shell hematite microspheres in air through a multistep process including the oxidation and sulfation of pyrite, combustion of PVP occluded in the precursor, desulfation, aggregation, and fusion of nanosized hematite as well as mass transportation from the interior to the exterior of the microspheres. The formation of the hollow core/shell microspheres dominantly depends on the calcination temperature under current experimental conditions, and the aggregation of hematite nanocrystals and the core shrinking during the oxidation of pyrite are responsible for the formation of the hollow structures. Moreover, the adsorption ability of the hematite for Sm(III) was also tested. The results exhibit that the hematite microspheres have good adsorption activity for trivalent samarium, and that its adsorption capacity strongly depends on the pH of the solution, and the maximum adsorption capacity for Sm(III) is 14.48 mg/g at neutral pH. As samarium is a typical member of the lanthanide series, our results suggest that the hollow hematite microspheres have potential application in removal of rare earth elements (REEs) entering the water environment.

  13. The influence of the technological parameters on the ionic conductivity of samarium doped ceria thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantas Sriubas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sm0,20Ce0,80O2 powder was used for the formation of samarium doped cerium oxide (SDC thin films using e-beam. Surface area of powder was 34.9 m2/g and particle size – 0.3-0.5 μm. Thin films were deposited using physical vapor deposition system on SiO2 and Alloy 600 substrates. 2 Å/s – 16 Å/s growth rate and 20 °C – 600 °C substrate temperature were used during the deposition. Ionic conductivity investigation revealed that the maximum ionic conductivity (1.67 S/m has the thin film deposited on 300 °C temperature substrate using 4 Å/s growth rate. Minimum ionic conductivity (0.26 S/m has thin film which was deposited on 20 °C temperature substrate using 8 Å/s growth rate. Vacancy activation energies vary in 0.87 eV – 0.97 eV range. Furthermore the calculations of crystallite size revealed that crystallite size increases with increasing substrate temperature: from 7.50 nm to 46.23 nm on SiO2 substrate and from 9.30 nm to 44.62 nm on Alloy 600 substrate. Molar concentration of samarium in initial evaporated material is 19.38 mol% and varies from 11.37 mol% to 21 mol% in formed thin films depending on technological parameters.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5700

  14. Formation of Core-Shell Nanoparticles Composed of Magnetite and Samarium Oxide in Magnetospirillum magneticum Strain RSS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoshige, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Kobayashi, Hideki; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Shimamura, Shigeru; Mizuki, Toru; Inoue, Akira; Maekawa, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) synthesize magnetosomes composed of membrane-enveloped magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) particles in the cells. Recently, several studies have shown some possibilities of controlling the biomineralization process and altering the magnetic properties of magnetosomes by adding some transition metals to the culture media under various environmental conditions. Here, we successfully grow Magnetospirillum magneticum strain RSS-1, which are isolated from a freshwater environment, and find that synthesis of magnetosomes are encouraged in RSS-1 in the presence of samarium and that each core magnetic crystal composed of magnetite is covered with a thin layer of samarium oxide (Sm2O3). The present results show some possibilities of magnetic recovery of transition metals and synthesis of some novel structures composed of magnetic particles and transition metals utilizing MTB.

  15. Co-reduction of aluminium and lanthanide ions in molten fluorides: Application to cerium and samarium extraction from nuclear wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibilaro, M. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Massot, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr; Chamelot, P.; Taxil, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-09-01

    This work concerns the method of co-reduction process with aluminium ions in LiF-CaF{sub 2} medium (79-21 mol.%) on tungsten electrode for cerium and samarium extraction. Electrochemical techniques such as cyclic and square wave voltammetries, and potentiostatic electrolyses were used to study the co-reduction of CeF{sub 3} and SmF{sub 3} with AlF{sub 3}. For each of these elements, specific peaks of Al-Ce and Al-Sm alloys formation were observed by voltammetry as well as peaks of pure cerium and aluminium, and pure samarium and aluminium respectively. The difference of potential measured between the solvent reduction and the alloy formation suggests expecting an extraction efficiency of 99.99% of each lanthanide by the process. Different intermetallic compounds were obtained for different potentiostatic electrolysis and were characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy with EDS probe. The validity of the process was verified by carrying out cerium and samarium extractions in the form of Al-Ln alloy; the extraction efficiency was 99.5% for Ce(III) and 99.4% for Sm(III)

  16. 40 CFR 130.11 - Program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program management. 130.11 Section 130... PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.11 Program management. (a) State agencies may apply for grants under sections 106, 205(j) and 205(g) to carry out water quality planning and management activities. Interstate...

  17. 13 CFR 130.500 - Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding. 130.500 Section 130.500 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS § 130.500 Funding. The SBA funds Cooperative Agreements through its internal Letter of Credit Replacement System...

  18. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard, as...

  19. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse. ...

  20. 22 CFR 130.6 - Political contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Political contribution. 130.6 Section 130.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.6 Political contribution. Political contribution means any loan, gift...

  1. 7 CFR 65.130 - Consumer package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consumer package. 65.130 Section 65.130 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.130 Consumer package. Consumer package means any...

  2. 21 CFR 163.130 - Milk chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Milk chocolate. 163.130 Section 163.130 Food and... CONSUMPTION CACAO PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cacao Products § 163.130 Milk chocolate. (a) Description. (1) Milk chocolate is the solid or semiplastic food prepared by intimately mixing and grinding...

  3. 7 CFR 58.130 - Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health. 58.130 Section 58.130 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Personnel, Cleanliness and Health § 58.130 Health. No person afflicted with a communicable disease shall be permitted in any room or compartment...

  4. 21 CFR 225.130 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 225.130 Section 225.130 Food and Drugs... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Facilities and Equipment § 225.130 Equipment. Equipment shall be capable of producing a medicated feed of intended potency and purity, and shall be...

  5. 42 CFR 130.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... perinatal transmission at or before 15 months of age: identification of the presence of HIV by a positive... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 130.2 Section 130.2 Public Health... with HIV means the individual described in § 130.10(c). (e) Former lawful spouse means a person to whom...

  6. 46 CFR 130.120 - Propulsion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Propulsion control. 130.120 Section 130.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Vessel Control § 130.120 Propulsion control. (a) Each vessel must have— (1...

  7. 46 CFR 130.430 - Pilothouse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pilothouse control. 130.430 Section 130.430 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.430 Pilothouse control. Each...

  8. 46 CFR 126.130 - Cranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cranes. 126.130 Section 126.130 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 126.130 Cranes. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, cranes, if installed, must... chapter. (b) The manufacturer of a crane may have tests and inspections conducted in compliance with § 107...

  9. 5 CFR 1207.130 - Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employment. 1207.130 Section 1207.130... BOARD § 1207.130 Employment. No qualified individual with a disability shall, on the basis of such disability, be subject to discrimination in employment under any program or activity conducted by the agency...

  10. Structural and luminescence properties of samarium doped lead alumino borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaweta; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, D. P.; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-11-01

    The study reports the effect of samarium concentration on the physical, structural and spectroscopic characteristics of samarium doped lead alumino borate glasses having composition 20PbO-(10-x)Al2O3-70B2O3-xSm2O3; x = 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol %. The glasses were fabricated by conventional melt-quenching technique and then characterized by XRD, FTIR, optical absorption and fluorescence spectra. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the amorphous nature of the prepared glasses. FTIR spectra indicate the presence of BO3, BO4, AlO6 and a few other structural groups. Various physical properties such as density, molar volume, refractive index, rare earth ion concentration, boron-boron distance and polarizability etc. were determined using conventional methods and standard formulae. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied on the optical absorption spectra of the glasses to evaluate the three phenomenological intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6. The value of Ω2 was found to be highest for glass with 1 mol% Sm2O3 and attributed to the asymmetry of the ligand field at the rare earth ion site and the rare earth oxygen (Sm-O) covalency. The calculated intensity parameters and fluorescence spectra were further used to predict the radiative transition probability (A), radiative lifetime (τR), branching ratio (βR), peak wavelength (λp), effective line widths (Δλeff) and stimulated emission cross-section (σ) for the characteristic 4G5/2 → 6H5/2, 6H7/2 and 6H9/2 transitions of the Sm3+ ion. Concentration quenching was observed for 2 mol% concentration of Sm2O3 and ascribed to energy transfer through various cross-relaxation channels between Sm3+ ions. Reasonably high values of branching ratios and stimulated emission cross-section for the prepared glasses points towards their utility in the development of visible lasers emitting in the reddish-orange spectral region. However, the glass with 1 mol% Sm2O3 was found to show better radiative properties.

  11. X-ray Induced Luminescence Spectroscopy of Samarium Doped Barium Sulfate Prepared by Sintering Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumeda, T.; Maeda, K.; Shirano, Y.; Fujiwara, K.; Sakai, K.; Ikari, T.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray induced luminescence (XL) properties of phosphor materials made of samarium doped barium sulfate have been investigated. The samples were prepared by sintering method heated at 900-1250 °C for 3 hours in air from the mixture of BaSO4 and Sm2O3. The concentration of Sm were prepared from 0.01-6 at.%. In as-prepared sample, the Sm3+ was detected by photoluminescence (PL). The PL intensity is maximum about 2 at.% with Sm, and then starts decreasing. The PL intensity showed concentration quenching. The XL observed Sm2+ and Sm3+ ions. The XL was shown from the sample sintered up to 1200 °C. The XL intensity increased with Sm concentration up to 1 at.%. The intensity was almost constant larger than 1 at.% Sm. These concentration dependences is different since the X-ray energy absorbed to the host material at once, and the energy transferred to both Sm3+ and Sm2+ ions. Sm doped BaSO4 is found a host for XL phosphor materials.

  12. High-κ Samarium-Based Metal-Organic Framework for Gate Dielectric Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Abhishek; Chiou, Guan Ru; Gade, Narsinga Rao; Usman, Muhammad; Mendiratta, Shruti; Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair; Tseng, Tien Wen; Chen, Jenq-Wei; Chen, Fu-Rong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2017-07-05

    The self-assembly of a samarium-based metal-organic framework [Sm2(bhc)(H2O)6]n (1) in good yield was achieved by reacting Sm(NO3)3·6H2O with benzenehexacarboxylic acid (bhc) in a mixture of H2O-EtOH under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 crystallized in a space group of Pnmn and adopted a 3D structure with (4,8) connected nets. Temperature dependent dielectric measurements showed that compound 1 behaves as a high dielectric material with a high dielectric constant (κ = 45.1) at 5 kHz and 310 K, which is comparable to the values for some of the most commonly available dielectric inorganic metal oxides such as Sm2O3, Ta2O5, HfO2, and ZrO2. In addition, electrical measurements of 1 revealed an electrical conductivity of about 2.15 × 10-7 S/cm at a frequency of 5 kHz with a low leakage current (Ileakage = 8.13 × 10-12 Amm-2). Dielectric investigations of the Sm-based MOF provide an effective path for the development of high dielectric materials in the future.

  13. Pyroelectric properties and electrical conductivity in samarium doped BiFeO 3 ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Yingbang

    2012-06-01

    Samarium (Sm 3+) doped BiFeO 3 (BFO) ceramics were prepared by a modified solid-state-reaction method which adopted a rapid heating as well as cooling during the sintering process. The pyroelectric coefficient increased from 93 to 137 μC/m 2 K as the Sm 3+ doping level increased from 1 mol% to 8 mol%. Temperature dependence of the pyroelectric coefficient showed an abrupt decrease above 80 °C in all samples, which was associated with the increase of electrical conductivity with temperature. This electrical conduction was attributed to oxygen vacancy existing in the samples. An activation energy of ∼0.7 eV for the conduction process was found to be irrespective of the Sm 3+ doping level. On the other hand, the magnetic Néel temperature (T N) decreased with increasing Sm 3+ doping level. On the basis of our results, the effects of Sm doping level on the pyroelectric and electrical properties of the BFO were revealed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of luminescent samarium doped HfO{sub 2} coatings synthesized by spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon-Roa, C [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, C.P. 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Guzman-Mendoza, J [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, C.P. 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Aguilar-Frutis, M [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, C.P. 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia-Hipolito, M [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360 Coyoacan 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Fragoso, O [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360 Coyoacan 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Falcony, C [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, A. P. 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-01-07

    Trivalent samarium (Sm{sup 3+}) doped hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) films were deposited using the spray pyrolysis deposition technique. The films were deposited on Corning glass substrates at temperatures ranging from 300 to 550 deg. C using chlorides as raw materials. Films, mostly amorphous, were obtained when deposition temperatures were below 350 deg. C. However, for temperatures higher than 400 deg. C, the films became polycrystalline, presenting the HfO{sub 2} monoclinic phase. Scanning electron microscopy of the films revealed a rough surface morphology with spherical particles. Also, electron energy dispersive analysis was performed on these films. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence characteristics of the HfO{sub 2} : SmCl{sub 3} films, measured at room temperature, exhibited four main bands centred at 570, 610, 652 and 716 nm, which are due to the well-known intra-4f transitions of the Sm{sup 3+} ion. It was found that the overall emission intensity rose as the deposition temperature was increased. Furthermore, a concentration quenching of the luminescence intensity was also observed.

  15. Samarium-153 EDTMP for metastatic bone pain palliation: the impact of europium impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalef-Ezra, J A; Valakis, S T; Pallada, S

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the impact on the radiation protection policies of the radiocontaminants in Samarium-153 ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonate ((153)Sm-EDTMP). The internal contamination of patients treated with (153)Sm-EDMTP for palliation of painful disseminated multiple bone metastases due to long-lived impurities was assessed by direct measurements. These measurements were coupled with dose-rate measurements close to their bodies and spectroscopic analysis of the residual activity in post-treatment radiopharmaceutical vials. Whole-body counting carried out in six patients showed a 30-81-kBq europium -152 plus europium-154 contamination. The 0.85 mean (152)Eu- to -(154)Eu activity ratio obtained by direct counting was similar to that assessed by analysis of post-treatment residual activities in twelve radiopharmaceutical vials following radiopharmaceutical injection. The long-lived radiocontaminants in the patient's bodies and the treatment wastes require modifications of the applicable radiation protection policies. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Luminescence of trivalent samarium ions in silver and tin co-doped aluminophosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, José A.; Lysenko, Sergiy; Liu, Huimin; Sendova, Mariana

    2011-06-01

    This work presents the spectroscopic properties of trivalent samarium ions in a melt-quenched aluminophosphate glass containing silver and tin. Addition of 4 mol% of each Ag 2O and SnO into the glass system with 2 mol% Sm 2O 3 results in Sm 3+ ions luminescence under non-resonant UV excitation owing to energy transfer from single silver ions and/or twofold-coordinated Sn centers. Assessment of luminescence spectra and decay dynamics suggest the energy transfer mechanism to be essentially of the resonant radiative type. Moreover, a connection between the luminescent and structural properties of the rare-earth doped glass system was demonstrated. Raman spectroscopy characterization revealed that no significant variation in the glass matrix is induced by Sm 3+ doping at the concentration employed. A comparison was made with a structural study performed on the Eu 3+ doped system (containing 2 mol% Eu 2O 3 along with 4 mol% of each Ag 2O and SnO) where the radiative energy transfer mechanism was previously established. The data appears consistent regarding the lack of variation in glass structure upon the Eu 3+ and Sm 3+ doping in connection with the dominance of the radiative transfer in the matrix. Thermal treatment of the material leads to precipitation of Ag nanoparticles of a broad size range inside the dielectric as observed by transmission electron microspcopy. Assessment of 4G 5/2 excited state decay in Sm 3+ ions shows no influence from the silver particles.

  17. Samarium (III) adsorption on bentonite modified with N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Chang, Xijun; Hu, Zheng; Wang, Qihui; Li, Ruijun; Chai, Xiaoli

    2011-02-15

    A new material has been synthesized using dry process to activate bentonite followed by N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine connecting chlorosilane coupling agent. The synthesized new material was characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and thermogravimetry which proved that bentonite was successfully modified. The most interesting trait of the new material was its selective adsorption for rare earth elements. A variety of conditions of the new material were investigated for adsorption. The optimal conditions were determined with respect to pH and shaking time. Samarium (Sm) was quantitatively adsorbed at pH 4 and shaking time of 2 min onto the new material. Under these conditions the maximum static adsorption capacity of Sm(III) was found to be 17.7 mg g(-1). The adsorbed Sm(III) ion were quantitatively eluted by 2.0 mL 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl and 5% CS (NH(2))(2) solution. According to IUPAC definition, the detection limit (3σ) of this method was 0.60 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) under optimum conditions was less than 3% (n=8). The new material also was applied for the preconcentration of trace Sm(III) in environmental samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandiwana, Vusani, E-mail: VMandiwana@csir.co.za; Kalombo, Lonji, E-mail: LKalombo@csir.co.za [Centre of Polymers and Composites, CSIR (South Africa); Venter, Kobus, E-mail: Kobus.Venter@mrc.ac.za [South African Medical Research Council (South Africa); Sathekge, Mike, E-mail: Mike.Sathekge@up.ac.za [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine (South Africa); Grobler, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Grobler@nwu.ac.za; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn, E-mail: zeevaart@necsa.co.za [North-West University, DST/NWU Preclinical Drug Development Platform (South Africa)

    2015-09-15

    Developing nanoparticulate delivery systems that will allow easy movement and localization of a drug to the target tissue and provide more controlled release of the drug in vivo is a challenge in nanomedicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing samarium-153 oxide ([{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in vivo to prove that orally administered nanoparticles alter the biodistribution of a drug. These were then activated in a nuclear reactor to produce radioactive {sup 153}Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, and morphology. The nanoparticles were orally and intravenously (IV) administered to rats in order to trace their uptake through imaging and biodistribution studies. The {sup 153}Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles had an average size of 281 ± 6.3 nm and a PDI average of 0.22. The zeta potential ranged between 5 and 20 mV. The [{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} loaded PLGA nanoparticles, orally administered were distributed to most organs at low levels, indicating that there was absorption of nanoparticles. While the IV injected [{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded PLGA nanoparticles exhibited the highest localization of nanoparticles in the spleen (8.63 %ID/g) and liver (3.07 %ID/g), confirming that nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood by the RES, leading to rapid uptake in the liver and spleen. From the biodistribution data obtained, it is clear that polymeric nanoscale delivery systems would be suitable for improving permeability and thus the bioavailability of therapeutic compounds.

  19. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandiwana, Vusani; Kalombo, Lonji; Venter, Kobus; Sathekge, Mike; Grobler, Anne; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn

    2015-09-01

    Developing nanoparticulate delivery systems that will allow easy movement and localization of a drug to the target tissue and provide more controlled release of the drug in vivo is a challenge in nanomedicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution of poly( d, l-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing samarium-153 oxide ([153Sm]Sm2O3) in vivo to prove that orally administered nanoparticles alter the biodistribution of a drug. These were then activated in a nuclear reactor to produce radioactive 153Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, and morphology. The nanoparticles were orally and intravenously (IV) administered to rats in order to trace their uptake through imaging and biodistribution studies. The 153Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles had an average size of 281 ± 6.3 nm and a PDI average of 0.22. The zeta potential ranged between 5 and 20 mV. The [153Sm]Sm2O3 loaded PLGA nanoparticles, orally administered were distributed to most organs at low levels, indicating that there was absorption of nanoparticles. While the IV injected [153Sm]Sm2O3-loaded PLGA nanoparticles exhibited the highest localization of nanoparticles in the spleen (8.63 %ID/g) and liver (3.07 %ID/g), confirming that nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood by the RES, leading to rapid uptake in the liver and spleen. From the biodistribution data obtained, it is clear that polymeric nanoscale delivery systems would be suitable for improving permeability and thus the bioavailability of therapeutic compounds.

  20. Fabrication and properties of samarium doped calcium sulphate thin films using spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reghima, Meriem [Université Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, LR99ES13 Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), 2092 Tunis, Tunisie (Tunisia); Institut d' Electronique et des systèmes, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i) – Université Montpellier, 860 rue de Saint Priest, Bâtiment 5, 34097 Montpellier (France); Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, Université de Carthage, Zarzouna 7021 (Tunisia); Guasch, Cathy [Institut d' Electronique et des systèmes, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i) – Université Montpellier, 860 rue de Saint Priest, Bâtiment 5, 34097 Montpellier (France); Azzaza, Sonia; Alleg, Safia [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Spectroscopie des Solides (LM2S), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Badji Mokhtar Annaba, B.P. 12, 23000 Annaba (Algeria); Kamoun-Turki, Najoua [Université Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, LR99ES13 Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), 2092 Tunis, Tunisie (Tunisia)

    2016-10-01

    Using low cost spray pyrolysis technique, polycrystalline CaSO{sub 4} thin films were successfully grown on a glass substrate with a thickness of about 1 μm. Samarium doping has been performed on CaSO{sub 4} thin films to explore luminescence properties. The characterizations of these films were carried out using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical measurements. The structural analyses reveal the existence of hexagonal CaSO{sub 4} phase with a (200) preferred orientation belonging to CaS compound for substrate temperatures below 350 °C. It is shown that the crystallinity of the sprayed thin films can be improved by increasing substrate temperature up to 250 °C. Warren-Averbach analysis has been applied on X-ray diffractogram to determine structural parameters involving the phase with its amount, the grain size and the lattice parameters using Maud software. The surface topography shows a rough surface covered by densely packed agglomerated clusters having faceted and hexagonal shapes. Energy dispersive microscopy measurements confirm the presence of calcium and sulfur in equal proportions as well as high percentage of oxygen. Photoluminescence at room temperature revealed that luminescence peaks are attributed to the intrinsic emission of pure CaSO{sub 4} phase. - Highlights: • Warren Averbach analysis reveal the presence of hcp structure of CaSO{sub 4} phase. • A mixture of CaSO{sub 4} and CaHO{sub 4.5}S phases has been detected for lower T{sub s}. • For increasing T{sub s}, the CaHO{sub 4.5}S phase has been disappeared. • The origin of PL peaks has been identified.

  1. 13 CFR 130.420 - Renewal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Renewal applications. 130.420 Section 130.420 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... Project Officer, with the concurrence of the Program Manager, may grant an extension. The recipient...

  2. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing services. 52.130... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing personnel...

  3. 13 CFR 130.200 - Eligible entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or university; (3) A college or school of business, engineering, commerce or agriculture; (4) A... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible entities. 130.200 Section 130.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT...

  4. 21 CFR 820.130 - Device packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device packaging. 820.130 Section 820.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... shall ensure that device packaging and shipping containers are designed and constructed to protect the...

  5. 24 CFR 990.130 - Ineligible units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ineligible units. 990.130 Section... Unit Months § 990.130 Ineligible units. (a) Vacant units that do not fall within the definition of § 990.145 or § 990.150 are not eligible for operating subsidy under this part. (b) Units that are...

  6. 24 CFR 700.130 - Service coordinator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Service coordinator. 700.130 Section 700.130 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...) Assist the grant recipient in building informal support networks with neighbors, friends and family; and...

  7. 13 CFR 130.430 - Application decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application decisions. 130.430 Section 130.430 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... ability to contribute Matching Funds; (2) For renewal Proposals, the quality of prior performance; (3) The...

  8. 13 CFR 130.480 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 130.480 Section 130.480 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... be used to expand the quantity or quality of services, resources or outreach provided by the SBDC...

  9. 13 CFR 130.330 - Operating requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operating requirements. 130.330 Section 130.330 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... assessment and evaluation, and internal quality control. (c) The Lead Center shall be open to the public...

  10. 9 CFR 130.1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of animals. Slaughter animal. Any animal moving directly to slaughter. Standard feed. Seed, or dry... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 130.1 Section 130.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE USER...

  11. 49 CFR 130.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... prevention, containment and response planning requirements of the Department of Transportation applicable to... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 130.1 Section 130.1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  12. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Lemon juice or concentrated lemon juice. (d) Butter or margarine in a quantity not less than 3 percent...

  13. 21 CFR 145.130 - Canned figs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned figs. 145.130 Section 145.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN..., to which lemon juice, concentrated lemon juice or organic acid(s) is added, when necessary to reduce...

  14. 7 CFR 57.130 - Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification. 57.130 Section 57.130 Agriculture... Identification. Each inspector shall have in their possession at all times, and present while on duty upon request, the means of identification furnished by the Department. [69 FR 57167, Sept. 24, 2004] ...

  15. Optical properties and electronic transitions of zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauly, N; Yubero, F; Espinós, J P

    2017-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic transitions of four oxides, namely zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide, are determined in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy using primary electron energies in the range 0.3-2.0 keV. This...

  16. Optical response and magnetic characteristic of samarium doped zinc phosphate glasses containing nickel nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azmi, Siti Amlah M.; Sahar, M.R., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    A magnetic glass of composition 40ZnO–(58−x) P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–1Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–xNiO, with x=0.0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mol% is prepared by melt-quenching technique. The glass is characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. The X-rays diffraction confirms the amorphous nature of the glass while the HRTEM analysis reveals the presence of nickel nanoparticles in the glass samples. High-resolution TEM reveals that the lattice spacing of nickel nanoparticles is 0.35 nm at (100) plane. Photoluminescence emission shows the existence of four peaks that correspond to the transition from the upper level of {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} to the lower level of {sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 7/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 9/2,} and {sup 6}H{sub 11/2.} It is observed that all peaks experience significant quenching effect with the increasing concentration of nickel nanoparticles, suggesting a strong energy transfer from excited samarium ions to the nickel ions. The glass magnetization and susceptibility at 12 kOe at room temperature are found to be in the range of (3.87±0.17×10{sup −2}–7.19±0.39×10{sup −2}) emu/g and (3.24±0.16×10{sup −6}–5.99±0.29×10{sup −6}) emu/Oe g respectively. The obtained hysteresis curve indicates that the glass samples are paramagnetic materials. The studied glass can be further used towards the development of magneto-optical functional glass. - Highlights: • Sm{sup 3+} doped zinc phosphate glass embedded with Ni NPs has been prepared. • The Laue pattern and lattice spacing of Ni NPs are confirmed by HRTEM image. • The magnetic response of glasses has been studied through VSM analysis. • Enhancement factor and decay half-lifetime are investigated.

  17. Treatment of bone pain secondary to metastases using samarium-153-EDTMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elba Cristina Sá de Camargo Etchebehere

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: More than 50% of patients with prostate, breast or lung cancer will develop painful bone metastases. The purpose of treating bone metastases is to relieve pain, reduce the use of steroids and to maintain motion. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of samarium-153-EDTMP (153Sm-EDTMP for the treatment of bone pain secondary to metastases that is refractory to clinical management. TYPE OF STUDY: Retrospective. SETTING: Division of Nuclear Medicine, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients were studied (34 males with mean age 62 years; 31 patients had prostate cancer, 20 had breast cancer, three had lung cancer, one had lung hemangioendothelioma, one had parathyroid adenocarcinoma, one had osteosarcoma and one had an unknown primary tumor. All patients had multiple bone metastases demonstrated by bone scintigraphy using 99mTc-MDP,and were treated with 153Sm-EDTMP. Response to treatment was graded as good (pain reduction of 50-100%, intermediate (25-49% and poor (0-24%. RESULTS: All patients showed good uptake of 153Sm-EDTMP by bone metastases. Among the patients with prostate cancer, intermediate or good response to therapy occurred in 80.6% (25 patients and poor response in 19.4% (6. Among the patients with breast cancer, 85% (17 showed intermediate or good response to therapy while 15% (3 showed poor response. All three patients with lung cancer showed poor response to treatment. The lung hemangioendothelioma and unknown primary lesion patients showed intermediate response to treatment; the osteosarcoma and parathyroid adenocarcinoma patients showed good response to treatment. No significant myelotoxicity occurred. DISCUSSION: Pain control is important for improving the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers. The mechanism by which pain is relieved with the use of radionuclides is still not yet completely understood, however, the treatment is simple and provides a low risk of mielotoxicity

  18. Anchoring samarium oxide nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide for high-performance supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: ganjali@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Hamid Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Samarium oxide nanoparticles have been anchored on the surface of reduced graphene oxide for the first time. • Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RGO nanocomposite show high capacitance, good rate and cycling performance. • Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RGO nanocomposite can serve as efficient electrode material for energy storage. • The best composite electrode exhibits specific capacitance of 321 F g{sup −1} in 2 mV s{sup −1}. - Abstract: We have synthesized Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (SmNs) and anchored them onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) through a self-assembly thereof by utilizing a facile sonochemical procedure. The nanomaterials were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As the next step, the supercapacitive behavior of the resulting nanocomposites were investigated when used as electrode material, through with cyclic voltammetric (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The SmNs decorated RGO (SmN-RGO) nanocomposites were found to possess a specific capacitance (SC) of 321 F g{sup −1} when used in a 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution as an electrolyte, in a scan rate of 2 mV s{sup −1}. The SC of the SmN-RGO based electrodes were also found to be 268 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 2 A g{sup −1} through galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The outstanding properties of the SmN-RGOs were attributed to synergy of the high charge mobility of SmNs and the flexibility of the sheets of RGOs. Additionally, the nano-composite revealed a unique cycling durability (maintaining 99% of its SC even after 4000 cycles).

  19. HC-130 Wing Life Raft Replacement Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scher, Bob

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) uses HC-130 aircraft for search and rescue (SAR) and other missions. The aircraft are presently equipped with two to four 20 person inflatable life rafts, stowed in cells in the wings...

  20. Effect of Current Density on Thermodynamic Properties of Nanocrystalline Palladium Capped Samarium Hydride Thin Film Switchable Mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55 nm samarium film capped with a 10 nm palladium overlayer switched from a metallic reflecting to a semiconducting, transparent in visible state during ex-situ hydrogen loading via electrochemical means in 1 M KOH electrolytic aqueous solution at room temperature. The switching between metal to semiconductor was accompanied by measurement of transmittance during hydrogen loading/unloading. The effect of current density on switching and thermodynamic properties was studied between dihydride state (FCC phase and trihydride state (hexagonal phase. From the plateau of partial pressure of hydrogen at x=2.6, enthalpy of formation was calculated at different current densities. The diffusion coefficients and switching kinetics are shown to depend on applied current density.

  1. Targeted bone marrow radioablation with 153Samarium-lexidronam promotes allogeneic hematopoietic chimerism and donor-specific immunologic hyporesponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverardi, Luca; Linetsky, Elina; Pileggi, Antonello; Molano, R Damaris; Serafini, Aldo; Paganelli, Giovanni; Ricordi, Camillo

    2004-03-15

    Transplantation tolerance, defined as acceptance of a graft by an otherwise fully immunocompetent host, has been an elusive goal. Although robust tolerance has been achieved by the induction of stable hematopoietic chimerism after bone marrow transplantation, lethal or sublethal radiation conditioning used to induce long-term chimerism precludes its clinical use. We studied whether targeted delivery of radiation to bone marrow could allow for bone marrow cell (BMC) engraftment, chimerism, and donor-specific tolerance in the absence of the side effects associated with external irradiation. We administered a radioactive bone-seeking compound (Samarium-Lexidronam, Quadramet, Berlex Laboratories, Wayne, NJ) together with transient T-cell costimulatory blockade to recipient mice. Allogeneic BMCs were given 7 or 14 days after preconditioning. Costimulatory blockade was obtained by the use of an anti-CD154 antibody for 4 weeks. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. Mice then received donor-specific and third-party skin grafts. Graft survival was analyzed with mechanisms of donor-specific hyporesponsiveness. High levels of stable chimerism across an allogeneic barrier were achieved in mice by a single administration of Samarium-Lexidronam, transient T-cell costimulatory blockade, and BMC transplantation. A large percentage of chimeric animals retained donor-derived skin grafts for more than 120 days without requiring additional immunosuppression, suggesting that harsh cytotoxic preconditioning is not necessary to achieve stable chimerism and donor specific hyporesponsiveness. Analysis of the T-cell repertoire in chimeras indicates T-cell deletional mechanisms. These data broaden the potential use of BMC transplantation for tolerance induction and argue for its potential in treating autoimmune diseases.

  2. Sorption of samarium in soils: influence of soil properties and Sm concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Guinart, Oriol; Salaberria, Aitor; Rigol, Anna; Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Due to the fact that barriers of Deep Geological Repositories (DGR) may lose efficiency before the radioisotopes present in the High Level Radioactive Waste (HLRW) completely decay, it is possible that, in the long-term, radioactive leachates may escape from the DGR and reach the soil and water compartments in the biosphere. Therefore, it is required to examine the interaction and mobility of radionuclides present in the HLRW, or their chemical analogues, to predict the impact of their eventual incorporation in the biosphere and to assess the derived risk. Although relevant data have been recently obtained for a few radionuclides in soils, there are still some important gaps for some radionuclides, such us for samarium (Sm). Sm is a lanthanide that, besides being considered as a natural analogue of actinides, may also be present in HLRW in the form of the radioactive isotope {sup 151}Sm. The main objective of this work was to obtain sorption data (K{sub d}) of {sup 151}Sm gathered from a set of soil samples physicochemical fully-characterized (pH, texture, cationic exchange capacity, soil solution cationic composition, organic matter, carbonate and metallic oxides content, etc.). Additionally, as an alternative for testing sorption capacity of radionuclides in soils is the use of the corresponding stable isotope or a chemical analogue, the influence of Sm concentration was also checked. To evaluate {sup 151}Sm sorption, batch assays were carried out for each soil sample, which consisted in a pre-equilibration step of 2 g of each soil with 50 ml of double deionised water, and a subsequent equilibration step with the same solution, but labelled with {sup 151}Sm. The activity of {sup 151}Sm in initial and final solutions was measured by liquid scintillation and K{sub d} ({sup 151}Sm) data were calculated. The reversibly sorbed fraction was estimated by the application of a single extraction test, with double deionised water, to soil residues coming from the previous

  3. Crystal growth of semiorganic complex- samarium chloride coordinated thiourea-L-tartaric acid and its studies on structure and optical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slathia, Goldy; Singh, Harjinder; Ramya, E.; Rao, D. Narayana; Bamzai, K. K.

    2017-05-01

    The semi-organic complex of samarium chloride coordinated thiourea-L-tartaric acid (SCTLT) has been grown as a single crystal by slow evaporation technique at room temperature. For structural studies, the grown crystal was subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. Low cut off wavelength and transparent characteristics were explored by UV-VIS optical characterization. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of grown crystal were investigated by Z-scan technique.

  4. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems; Sorcion de samario en fosfatos de hierro (II) y (III) en sistemas acuosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz F, J.C

    2006-07-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  5. Trace amounts of rare earth elements in high purity samarium oxide by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after separation by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira, W.R. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil) and Fundacao Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho (FUNDACENTRO), 05409-002 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: walter.pedreira@fundacentro.gov.br; Queiroz, C.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Abrao, A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rocha, S.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.E. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Boaventura, G.R. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Pimentel, M.M. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2006-07-20

    Today there is an increasing need for high purity rare earth compounds in various fields, the optical, the electronics, the ceramic, the nuclear and geochemistry. Samarium oxide has special uses in glass, phosphors, lasers and thermoelectric devices. Calcium chloride crystals treated with samarium have been employed in lasers, which produce light beams intense enough to burn metal. In general, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) presents some advantages for trace element analysis, due to high sensitivity and resolution, when compared with other analytical techniques such as ICP optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this work, sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used. Sixteen elements (Sc, Y and 14 lanthanides) were determined selectively with the ICP-MS system using a concentration gradient method. The detection limits with the ICP-MS system were about 0.2 (La) pg mL{sup -1} to 8 (Gd) pg mL{sup -1}. The %R.S.D. of the methods varying between 0.9 and 1.5% for a set of five (n = 5) replicates was found for the IPEN's material and for the certificate reference sample. Determination of trace REEs in two high pure samarium oxides samples (IPEN and JMC) was performed. IPEN's material is highly pure (>99.99%) and was successfully analyzed without spectral interference (MO{sup +} and MOH{sup +})

  6. 24 CFR 901.130 - Incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM § 901.130 Incentives. (a) A PHA that is designated high performer or... the right decision that impacts long-term overall management or the quality of a PHA's housing stock... of requirements for prior HUD approval for certain types of contracts for services, it must still...

  7. HC/MC-130 Recapitalization Aircraft (HC/MC-130 Recap)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Budget 13 Cost and Funding 15 Low Rate Initial Production 27 Foreign Military Sales 28 Nuclear Costs 28 Unit Cost 29 Cost Variance...Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-257 HC/MC-130 Recapitalization Aircraft (HC/MC-130 Recap) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget ...Baseline APPN - Appropriation APUC - Average Procurement Unit Cost $B - Billions of Dollars BA - Budget Authority/ Budget Activity Blk - Block BY - Base

  8. Structure of the thiolated Au130 cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlahuice-Flores, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Bahena, Daniel; Vinogradova, Ekaterina; Conroy, Cecil V; Ahuja, Tarushee; Bach, Stephan B H; Ponce, Arturo; Wang, Gangli; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Whetten, Robert L

    2013-10-10

    The structure of the recently discovered Au130-thiolate and -dithiolate clusters is explored in a combined experiment-theory approach. Rapid electron diffraction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) enables atomic-resolution imaging of the gold core and the comparison with density functional theory (DFT)-optimized realistic structure models. The results are consistent with a 105-atom truncated-decahedral core protected by 25 short staple motifs, incorporating disulfide bridges linking the dithiolate ligands. The optimized structure also accounts, via time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) simulation, for the distinctive optical absorption spectrum, and rationalizes the special stability underlying the selective formation of the Au130 cluster in high yield. The structure is distinct from, yet shares some features with, each of the known Au102 and Au144/Au146 systems.

  9. Effectiveness of radiation synovectomy with samarium-{sup 153} particulate hydroxyapatite in rheumatoid arthritis patients with knee synovitis: a controlled randomized double-blind trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marla Francisca dos; Furtado, Rita Nely Vilar; Konai, Monique Sayuri; Natour, Jamil, E-mail: jnatour@unifesp.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Reumatologia; Castiglioni, Mario Luiz Vieira; Marchetti, Renata Rosa [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Medicina Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    Objectives: the aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite radiation synovectomy in rheumatoid arthritis patients with chronic knee synovitis. Methods: fifty-eight rheumatoid arthritis patients (60 knees) with chronic knee synovitis participated in a controlled double-blinded trial. Patients were randomized to receive either an intra-articular injection with 40 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide alone (TH group) or 40 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide combined with 15 mCi Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite (Sm/TH group). Blinded examination at baseline (T0) and at 1 (T1), 4 (T4), 12 (T12), 32 (T32), and 48 (T48) weeks post-intervention were performed on all patients and included a visual analog scale for joint pain and swelling as well as data on morning stiffness, flexion, extension, knee circumference, Likert scale of improvement, percentage of improvement, SF-36 generic quality of life questionnaire, Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne index, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or oral corticosteroids, events and adverse effects, calls to the physician, and hospital visits. Results: the sample was homogeneous at baseline, and there were no withdrawals. Improvement was observed in both groups in relation to T0, but no statistically significant differences between groups were observed regarding all variables at the time points studied. The Sm/TH group exhibited more adverse effects at T1 (p<0.05), but these were mild and transitory. No severe adverse effects were reported during follow-up. Conclusion: intra-articular injection of Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite (15 mCi) with 40 mg of triamcinolone hexacetonide is not superior to triamcinolone hexacetonide alone for the treatment of knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis at 1 y of follow-up. (author)

  10. 13 CFR 107.130 - Requirement for qualified management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement for qualified management. 107.130 Section 107.130 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Organizing An Sbic § 107.130 Requirement for...

  11. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Real estate brokers. 1955.130 Section 1955.130... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.130 Real estate brokers. Contracting authority for the use of real... provide for any licensed real estate broker to provide sales services for any property listed under the...

  12. 7 CFR 1.130 - Meaning of words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meaning of words. 1.130 Section 1.130 Agriculture... Adjudicatory Proceedings Instituted by the Secretary Under Various Statutes § 1.130 Meaning of words. As used in this subpart, words in the singular form shall be deemed to import the plural, and vice versa, as...

  13. 46 CFR 130.320 - Electronic position-fixing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic position-fixing device. 130.320 Section 130... CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.320 Electronic position-fixing device. Each vessel must be equipped with an electronic position-fixing device satisfactory for...

  14. 21 CFR 211.130 - Packaging and labeling operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packaging and labeling operations. 211.130 Section 211.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Labeling Control § 211.130 Packaging and labeling operations. There shall be written procedures designed to...

  15. 10 CFR 455.130 - State evaluation of grant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State evaluation of grant applications. 455.130 Section 455.130 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS State Responsibilities § 455.130...

  16. 46 CFR 117.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 117.130 Section 117.130... AND ARRANGEMENTS Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment § 117.130 Stowage of survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be: (1) Secured to the vessel by a painter with a float-free link permanently...

  17. 46 CFR 133.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 133.130 Section 133.130... SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.130 Stowage of survival craft. (a) General. Each survival craft must be stowed as follows: (1) Each survival craft must be as close to the accommodation and service...

  18. 46 CFR 180.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 180.130 Section 180.130... TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment § 180.130 Stowage of survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be: (1) Secured to the vessel by a painter with a...

  19. 46 CFR 199.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 199.130 Section 199.130... LIFESAVING SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 199.130 Stowage of survival craft. (a) General. Each survival craft must be stowed— (1) As close to the accommodation and service...

  20. 50 CFR 600.130 - Protection of confidentiality of statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... statistics. 600.130 Section 600.130 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... Fishery Management Councils § 600.130 Protection of confidentiality of statistics. Each Council must establish appropriate procedures for ensuring the confidentiality of the statistics that may be submitted to...

  1. 22 CFR 130.5 - Fee or commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fee or commission. 130.5 Section 130.5 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.5 Fee or commission. (a) Fee or commission means, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any loan, gift,...

  2. 49 CFR 176.130 - Magazine stowage Type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magazine stowage Type A. 176.130 Section 176.130... Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Stowage § 176.130 Magazine stowage Type A. (a) In addition to protecting the Class 1 (explosive) materials and preventing unauthorized access, magazine stowage type A...

  3. The properties of samarium-doped zinc oxide/phthalocyanine structure for optoelectronics prepared by pulsed laser deposition and organic molecular evaporation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Marešová, Eva; Fitl, Přemysl; Vlček, Jan; Bergmann, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Yatskiv, Roman; Bulíř, Jiří; Hubík, Pavel; Hruška, Petr; Drahokoupil, Jan; Abdellaoui, N.; Vrňata, M.; Lančok, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 225. ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15050; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0958; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10279S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14FR010 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : samarium-doped zinc oxide zinc/phthalocyanine deposition * evaporation * pulsed laser deposition * thin films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.455, year: 2016

  4. Neutron Activated Samarium-153 Microparticles for Transarterial Radioembolization of Liver Tumour with Post-Procedure Imaging Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikin, Nurul Ab. Aziz; Yeong, Chai-Hong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Chung, Lip-Yong; Dahalan, Rehir; Perkins, Alan Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Samarium-153 (153Sm) styrene divinylbenzene microparticles were developed as a surrogate for Yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres in liver radioembolization therapy. Unlike the pure beta emitter 90Y, 153Sm possess both therapeutic beta and diagnostic gamma radiations, making it possible for post-procedure imaging following therapy. Methods The microparticles were prepared using commercially available cation exchange resin, Amberlite IR-120 H+ (620–830 μm), which were reduced to 20–40 μm via ball mill grinding and sieve separation. The microparticles were labelled with 152Sm via ion exchange process with 152SmCl3, prior to neutron activation to produce radioactive 153Sm through 152Sm(n,γ)153Sm reaction. Therapeutic activity of 3 GBq was referred based on the recommended activity used in 90Y-microspheres therapy. The samples were irradiated in 1.494 x 1012 n.cm-2.s-1 neutron flux for 6 h to achieve the nominal activity of 3.1 GBq.g-1. Physicochemical characterisation of the microparticles, gamma spectrometry, and in vitro radiolabelling studies were carried out to study the performance and stability of the microparticles. Results Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of the Amberlite IR-120 resins showed unaffected functional groups, following size reduction of the beads. However, as shown by the electron microscope, the microparticles were irregular in shape. The radioactivity achieved after 6 h neutron activation was 3.104 ± 0.029 GBq. The specific activity per microparticle was 53.855 ± 0.503 Bq. Gamma spectrometry and elemental analysis showed no radioactive impurities in the samples. Radiolabelling efficiencies of 153Sm-Amberlite in distilled water and blood plasma over 48 h were excellent and higher than 95%. Conclusion The laboratory work revealed that the 153Sm-Amberlite microparticles demonstrated superior characteristics for potential use in hepatic radioembolization. PMID:26382059

  5. Preparation and examination of properties of samarium-153-EDTMP complex; Otrzymywanie chelatu kwasu etylenodiaminotetrametylenofosfonowego (EDTMP) z samarem-153 i badanie jego wlasciwosci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, M. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Garnuszek, P.; Lukasiewicz, A.; Wozniak, I.; Zulczyk, W. [Osrodek Badawczo-Rozwojowy Izotopow, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Licinska, I. [Instytut Lekow, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Preparation and properties of ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid (EDTMP) as well as some properties of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate have been examined. The chelate formed by samarium-153 (46.3 h, {beta}{sup -}-decay) with EDTMP exhibits high bone uptake and can be used for treatment of disseminated, painful skeletal metastases. The purity and stability of solutions of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate were examined in a broad range of samarium concentration and {sup 153}Sm specific activity. The complex under study was examined by radio-TLC, -electrophoresis and radio-HPLC. The results obtained suggest the small size of molecules of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate as compared with molecules of ``free``EDTMP. The results of biodistribution of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP determined in rats indicate the quick blood clearance, high deposition of radioactivity in bone and quick excretion of radioactivity into urine. No specific uptake of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP in extra-skeletal organs was found. (author). 42 refs, 13 figs, 22 tabs.

  6. The Level of Europium-154 Contaminating Samarium-153-EDTMP Activates the Radiation Alarm System at the US Homeland Security Checkpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Najeeb Al Hallak

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available 153Sm-EDTMP is a radiopharmaceutical composed of EDTMP (ethylenediamine-tetramethylenephosphonate and Samarium-153 [1]. 153Sm-EDTMP has an affinity for skeletal tissue and concentrates in areas with increased bone turnover; thus, it is successfully used in relieving pain related to diffuse bone metastases [1]. The manufacturing process of 153Sm-EDTMP leads to contamination with 154Eu (Europium-154 [2]. A previous study only alluded to the retention of 154Eu in the bones after receiving treatment with 153Sm-EDTMP [2]. Activation of the alarm at security checkpoints after 153Sm-EDTMP therapy has not been previously reported. Two out of 15 patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center (Fargo, N. Dak., USA activated the radiation activity sensors while passing through checkpoints; one at a US airport and the other while crossing theAmerican-Canadian border. We assume that the 154Eu which remained in the patients’ bones activated the sensors. Methods: In order to investigate this hypothesis, we obtained the consent from 3 of our 15 patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP within the previous 4 months to 2 years, including the patient who had activated the radiation alarm at the airport. The patients were scanned with a handheld detector and a gamma camera for energies from 511 keV to 1.3 MeV. Results: All three patients exhibited identical spectral images, and further analysis showed that the observed spectra are the result of 154Eu emissions. Conclusion: Depending on the detection thresholds and windows used by local and federal authorities, the remaining activity of 154Eu retained in patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP could be sufficient enough to increase the count rates above background levels and activate the sensors. At Roger Maris Cancer Center, patients are now informed of the potential consequences of 153Sm-EDTMP therapy prior to initiating treatment. In addition, patients treated with 153Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center

  7. The Level of Europium-154 Contaminating Samarium-153-EDTMP Activates the Radiation Alarm System at the US Homeland Security Checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb Al Hallak, Mohammed; McCurdy, Matt; Zouain, Nicolas; Hayes, Justin

    2009-08-28

    (153)Sm-EDTMP is a radiopharmaceutical composed of EDTMP (ethylenediamine-tetramethylenephosphonate) and Samarium-153 [1]. (153)Sm-EDTMP has an affinity for skeletal tissue and concentrates in areas with increased bone turnover; thus, it is successfully used in relieving pain related to diffuse bone metastases [1]. The manufacturing process of (153)Sm-EDTMP leads to contamination with (154)Eu (Europium-154) [2]. A previous study only alluded to the retention of (154)Eu in the bones after receiving treatment with (153)Sm-EDTMP [2]. Activation of the alarm at security checkpoints after (153)Sm-EDTMP therapy has not been previously reported. Two out of 15 patients who received (153)Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center (Fargo, N. Dak., USA) activated the radiation activity sensors while passing through checkpoints; one at a US airport and the other while crossing the American-Canadian border. We assume that the (154)Eu which remained in the patients' bones activated the sensors. METHODS: In order to investigate this hypothesis, we obtained the consent from 3 of our 15 patients who received (153)Sm-EDTMP within the previous 4 months to 2 years, including the patient who had activated the radiation alarm at the airport. The patients were scanned with a handheld detector and a gamma camera for energies from 511 keV to 1.3 MeV. RESULTS: All three patients exhibited identical spectral images, and further analysis showed that the observed spectra are the result of (154)Eu emissions. CONCLUSION: Depending on the detection thresholds and windows used by local and federal authorities, the remaining activity of (154)Eu retained in patients who received (153)Sm-EDTMP could be sufficient enough to increase the count rates above background levels and activate the sensors. At Roger Maris Cancer Center, patients are now informed of the potential consequences of (153)Sm-EDTMP therapy prior to initiating treatment. In addition, patients treated with (153)Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer

  8. Radiological analysis of lymphangiography in 130 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, T. S.; Oh, K. K.; Yoo, H. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-06-15

    As bipedal lymphangiography is a good method of visualization of retroperitoneal lymphatics and lymph nodes, this procedure plays an important role in lymphedema and intrapelvic tumor, such as carcinoma and lymphoma. Although anatomical details of lymphatics are well demonstrated by lymphangiography below L-2 level, dynamics of lymphatics and deep lymphatics of thorax, head and neck are easily demonstrated without complications and severe suffering through lympposcintigram, so which is more emphasized in this time. At the Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University Hospital, 130 patients were examined with direct lymphangiography of Kinmonth's method from Oct. 1975 to Dec. 1980 and 14 patients were examined with lymphoscintigram in recent 1 year. The results are as follows; 1. The lymphatics and lymph nodes below L-2 level are enoughly demonstrated by bipedal lymphangiography for staging of carcinoma and lymphoma, and follow-up study in the patients who had been experienced in lymphangiography is enoughly obtained by plain film for 4-5 months without repeat study. 2. Findings of lymphoscintigram in thorax, head and neck which are the difficult areas of demonstrating with lymphangiogram, are sufficiently helpful. 3. It is possible that follow-up study can be easy with lesser complications and sufferings of patients through lymphoscintigram. 4. Area of radiation field is conveniently planned with using lymphangiography and lymphoscintigram.

  9. 130-nm tunable grating-mirror VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity configurat......We have reported that a combination of the high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirror as movable mirror and the extended cavity configuration with an antireflection layer can provide a tuning wavelength range of 100 nm for tunable VCSELs. Here, we report that using the air-coupled cavity...... configuration instead of the extended cavity configuration can bring 130-nm tuning range around 1330-nm wavelength. The air-coupled cavity is known to reduce the quantum confinement factor in VCSELs, increasing threshold. In our air-coupled cavity HCG VCSEL case, the very short power penetration length...... in the HCG minimizes this reduction of the quantum confinement factor, not as significant as in the air-coupled cavity DBR VCSEL....

  10. Melting of MORB up to 130 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, G. K.; Fiquet, G.; Siebert, J.; Auzende, A.; Antonangeli, D.

    2013-12-01

    Though today Earth's mantle material is predominantly solid, presence of regions of anomalously low seismic wave velocity deep within the mantle, known as ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs), may be indicative of a remnant magma ocean[Labrosse et al., Nature 450, 866, 2007] or an accumulation of subducted oceanic crust. A recent study on peridotite melting [Fiquet et al., Science 329, 1516, 2010] showed that it is possible to melt peridotites at the base of the mantle, thus making the hypothesis of a remnant magma ocean thermodynamically feasible. It is thus important to know about the possible melting of the oceanic lithosphere at the base of the mantle and whether the partial melting products can significantly contribute to ULVZs. Data on the melting curve (solidus) of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), here taken as a proxy of the oceanic crust, exist up to 64 GPa [Hirose et al.,Nature 397, 53, 1999]. Melting temperature at the core mantle boundary, however, is only estimated from extrapolations of low pressure data and composition of the liquids obtained from partial melting have been reported in multi-anvil experiments at pressures up to 27.5 GPa only [Hirose et al.,GCA 66, 2099, 2002]. We have therefore conducted a series of experiments using diamond-anvil cells and laser-heating and determined the melting curve for the MORB between 44 and 130 GPa. Thin (electron transparent) sections of recovered samples (quenched melt) were prepared by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and further investigated by analytical transmission electron microscopy to check melting/crystallization sequences as well as variations of phase composition as a function of temperature and pressure. Our results also yield strong constraints on the solidus curve of the lower mantle.

  11. 22 CFR 130.15 - Confidential business information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., confidential business information means commercial or financial information which by law is entitled to... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Confidential business information. 130.15... CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.15 Confidential business information. (a) Any person who is required...

  12. 40 CFR 130.5 - Continuing planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuing planning process. 130.5... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.5 Continuing planning process. (a) General. Each State shall establish and maintain a continuing planning process (CPP) as described under section 303(e)(3)(A)-(H) of...

  13. 40 CFR 130.3 - Water quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality standards. 130.3 Section... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.3 Water quality standards. A water quality standard (WQS) defines the water quality goals of a water body, or portion thereof, by designating the use or uses to be made...

  14. 40 CFR 130.8 - Water quality report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality report. 130.8 Section... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.8 Water quality report. (a) Each State shall prepare and submit biennially to the Regional Administrator a water quality report in accordance with section 305(b) of the Act...

  15. 40 CFR 130.6 - Water quality management plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality management plans. 130.6... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.6 Water quality management plans. (a) Water quality management (WQM... and certified and approved updates to those plans. Continuing water quality planning shall be based...

  16. 40 CFR 130.4 - Water quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water quality monitoring. 130.4... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.4 Water quality monitoring. (a) In accordance with section 106(e)(1.../quality control guidance. (b) The State's water monitoring program shall include collection and analysis...

  17. 9 CFR 590.130 - Basis of billing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis of billing plants. 590.130... of Service § 590.130 Basis of billing plants. Overtime and/or holiday services shall be billed to the official plant on the basis of each 15 minutes of overtime and/or holiday service performed by each...

  18. 21 CFR 136.130 - Milk bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Milk bread, rolls, and buns. 136.130 Section 136....130 Milk bread, rolls, and buns. (a) Each of the foods milk bread, milk rolls, and milk buns conforms... ingredients prescribed for bread, rolls or buns by § 136.110 except that: (1) The only moistening ingredient...

  19. 45 CFR 147.130 - Coverage of preventive health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage of preventive health services. 147.130... § 147.130 Coverage of preventive health services. (a) Services—(1) In general. Beginning at the time... rating of A or B in the current recommendations of the United States Preventive Services Task Force with...

  20. 45 CFR 205.130 - State financial participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION-PUBLIC ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 205.130 State financial participation. State plan requirements: (a) A State plan for financial assistance under title I, IV-A, X, XIV, or XVI (AABD) of the Social Security... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State financial participation. 205.130 Section 205...

  1. 24 CFR 3.130 - Effect of employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of employment opportunities. 3.130 Section 3.130 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING...

  2. 13 CFR 130.820 - Reports and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports and recordkeeping. 130.820 Section 130.820 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT... evaluations and performance and financial reports for SBA review to determine the quality of services provided...

  3. 22 CFR 1600.130 - General prohibitions against discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 1600.130 Section 1600.130 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP..., on the basis of handicap, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise...

  4. 44 CFR 19.130 - Effect of employment opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of employment opportunities. 19.130 Section 19.130 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... employment opportunities in any occupation or profession are or may be more limited for members of one sex...

  5. 21 CFR 173.130 - Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae. 173.130... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.130 Carbohydrase derived from Rhizopus oryzae. Carbohydrase from Rhizopus oryzae may be safely used in the production of dextrose from starch in...

  6. 13 CFR 130.630 - Dispute resolution procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... copies to the Grants Management Specialist and the Project Officer. (9) Expedited Dispute appeal process... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dispute resolution procedures. 130.630 Section 130.630 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS...

  7. Formation of a new adduct based on fullerene tris-malonate samarium salt C60-[C60(=C(COO)2)3]Sm2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A. A.; Keskinov, V. A.; Semenov, K. N.; Charykov, N. A.; Letenko, D. G.; Nikitin, V. A.

    2017-03-01

    Gram quantities of a new adduct based on light fullerene tris-malonate samarium salt C60 [C60(=C(COO)2)3]Sm2 are obtained via the reaction of ion exchange. The obtained adduct is studied by means of electron and infrared spectroscopy, X-ray and elemental analysis, electron microscopy, and thermogravimetry. The polythermal solubility of [C60(=C(COO)2)3]Sm2 in water is determined in ampoules via saturation within 20-70°C. The composition of crystalline hydrate [C60(=C(COO)2)3]Sm2 · 36H2O, which exists in equilibrium with the saturated solution, is estimated.

  8. Biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in rats treated with docetaxel Biodistribuição de EDTMP-153-samário em ratos tratados com docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Villarim Neto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Many patients with metastatic bone disease have to use radiopharmaceuticals associated with chemotherapy to relieve bone pain. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of docetaxel on the biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in bones and other organs of rats. METHODS: Wistar male rats were randomly allocated into 2 groups of 6 rats each. The DS (docetaxel/samarium group received docetaxel (15 mg/kg intraperitoneally in two cycles 11 days apart. The S (samarium/control group rats were not treated with docetaxel. Nine days after chemotherapy, all the rats were injected with 0.1ml of samarium-153-EDTMP via orbital plexus (25µCi. After 2 hours, the animals were killed and samples of the brain, thyroid, lung, heart, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and both femurs were removed. The percentage radioactivity of each sample (% ATI/g was determined in an automatic gamma-counter (Wizard-1470, Perkin-Elmer, Finland. RESULTS: On the 9th day after the administration of the 2nd chemotherapy cycle, the rats had a significant weight loss (314.50±22.09g compared (pOBJETIVO: Muitos pacientes com metástases ósseas são tratados com radiofármacos associados com quimioterapia para alívio da dor óssea. O objetivo do trabalho foi estudar a influência do docetaxel na biodistribuição do EDTMP-153-samário nos ossos e outros órgãos de ratos. MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar foram aleatoriamente alocados em 2 grupos de 6 animais cada. O grupo DS (docetaxel/samário recebeu docetaxel (15 mg/kg intraperitoneal em dois ciclos com 11 dias de intervalo. Os ratos do grupo S (samário/controle não foram tratados com docetaxel. Nove dias após a quimioterapia, todos os animais receberam 0,1ml de EDTMP-153-samário via plexo orbital (25µCi. Após 2 horas, os animais foram mortos e feitas biópsias de cérebro, tireóide, pulmão, coração, estômago, cólon, fígado, rim e fêmures. O percentual de radioatividade por grama (%ATI/g de tecido de cada bi

  9. Marrow irradiation with high-dose 153Samarium-EDTMP followed by chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell infusion for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Anderson, Peter M; Litzow, Mark R; Erlandson, Linda; Trotz, Barbara A; Arndt, Carola A S; Khan, Shakila P; Wiseman, Gregory A

    2006-08-01

    In four patients, aged 15 - 20 years, with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), high-dose samarium 153-labelled ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP) was used for targeted marrow irradiation before preparative chemotherapy conditioning regimens and allogeneic (three patients) or autologous (one patient) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The dose of 153Sm-EDTMP was 703 MBq/kg (n = 1) or 1110 MBq/kg (n = 3). No side-effects occurred during the 30-min infusion of 153Sm-EDTMP. Samarium - melphalan regimens were given to three patients; one had 153Sm-EDTMP - busulfan + cyclophosphamide. Total body radioactivity was below the 133 MBq safe limit before infusion of stem cells (day 14 after 153Sm-EDTMP). No hemorrhagic cystitis, nephrotoxicity or serious infections occurred. Leukocyte engraftment (white blood cell count >0.5 x 10(9)/l) occurred between 12 and 23 days after stem cell infusion (mean of 17 days). Complete cytogenetic and morphologic remission of AML was evident on follow-up marrow aspirate and biopsy specimens from all patients. In two of the four study patients, the disease remains in complete remission and the patients have an excellent quality of life (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0; no medications) and no organ toxicity more than 2 years and more than 4 years, respectively, after their blood and bone marrow transplantations. Thus, in adolescents and adults, 153Sm-EDTMP may provide a relatively simple and effective means for using irradiation to eliminate AML within the marrow.

  10. r-process abundances near the mass 130 peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Laeter, J.R.; Rosman, K.J.R.

    1983-07-15

    A recent article by Kaeppeler et al. has reevaluated r-process abundances in the light of new neutron-capture cross section and elemental abundance data. The height of the r-process peak near mass 130 is largely determined by the r-only process nuclides /sup 128/Te and /sup 130/Te. Recent work by Smith, De Laeter and Rosman has not been given due consideration is assessing the solar system abundance of tellurium. These data indicate a 25% reduction in the height of the mass 130 peak, in agreement with predictions from s-process systematics.

  11. Is hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: It is heavily debated whether or not treatment with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 contributes to the development of acute kidney failure in patients with severe sepsis. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Muller and colleagues report no association between initial resuscitation...... with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 and renal impairment in a cohort of septic patients. Can we then consider hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 a safe intervention? The answer is no - observational data should be interpreted with caution and should mainly be used to identify risks, while safety must be assessed...

  12. Synthesis of samarium complexes with the derivative binder of Schiff Quinolinic base. Characterization and photophysical study; Sintesis de complejos de samario con el ligante derivado de base de Schiff Quinolinica. Caracterizacion y estudio fotofisico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas H, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we determined the metal: binder stoichiometry of the species formed during the UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration of the derivative binder of Schiff quinolinic base, L1 with the samarium nitrate pentahydrate in methanol. Statistical analysis of the data allowed proposing the metal: binder stoichiometry for the synthesis of the complexes which was one mole of samarium salt by 2.5 moles of binder and thus favor the formation of complexes with 1M: 1L and 1M: 2L stoichiometries. They were synthesized in aqueous-organic medium (water-ethanol), isolated and purified two complexes with stoichiometry 1 Sm: 1 L1, complex 1 and 1 Sm: 2 L1, complex 2. The overall yield of the reaction was 76%. The characterization of the formed complexes was performed by visible ultraviolet spectrometry (UV/Vis), nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), thermal gravimetric analysis with differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC), and radial distribution function. These complexes were studied by fluorescence and emission phosphorescence at variable temperature. Spectroscopic techniques used in both solution and solid demonstrated the formation and stability of these complexes. In addition XP S indicated that in both complexes the samarium retains its oxidation state 3+. Luminescence studies indicated that there is intra-binding charge transfer which decreases the transfer of light energy from the binder to the samarium. Based on the experimental results, L1 binder molecules and complexes 1 and 2 were modeled that demonstrated the proposed Nc for each complex, as well as allowed to visualize the structural arrangement of the molecules, complexes and binder. (Author)

  13. Organizational structures and communications on the SH 130 project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    This product summarizes the findings from research analyzing SH 130 organizational structures and communication flows. A set of guidelines pertaining to team organization and communication improvement and the design-build environment is also included...

  14. The polarity protein Angiomotin p130 controls dendritic spine maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigerius, Michael; Quinn, Dylan; Diab, Antonios; Clattenburg, Leanne; Kolar, Annette; Qi, Jiansong; Krueger, Stefan R; Fawcett, James P

    2018-01-09

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for the structural changes in dendritic spines that lead to the formation of new synapses. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying spine formation are well characterized, the events that drive spine maturation during development are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that Angiomotin (AMOT-130) is necessary for spine stabilization. AMOT-130 is enriched in mature dendritic spines and functions to stabilize the actin cytoskeleton by coupling F-actin to postsynaptic protein scaffolds. These functions of AMOT are transiently restricted during postnatal development by phosphorylation imposed by the kinase Lats1. Our study proposes that AMOT-130 is essential for normal spine morphogenesis and identifies Lats1 as an upstream regulator in this process. Moreover, our findings may link AMOT-130 loss and the related spine defects to neurological disorders. © 2018 Wigerius et al.

  15. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as follows...

  16. Deletion of Pr130 Interrupts Cardiac Development in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B, alpha (PPP2R3A, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is a major serine/threonine phosphatase that regulates crucial function in development and growth. Previous research has implied that PPP2R3A was involved in heart failure, and PR130, the largest transcription of PPP2R3A, functioning in the calcium release of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR, plays an important role in the excitation-contraction (EC coupling. To obtain a better understanding of PR130 functions in myocardium and cardiac development, two pr130-deletion zebrafish lines were generated using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas system. Pr130-knockout zebrafish exhibited cardiac looping defects and decreased cardiac function (decreased fractional area and fractional shortening. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining demonstrated reduced cardiomyocytes. Subsequent transmission electron microscopy revealed that the bright and dark bands were narrowed and blurred, the Z- and M-lines were fogged, and the gaps between longitudinal myocardial fibers were increased. Additionally, increased apoptosis was observed in cardiomyocyte in pr130-knockout zebrafish compared to wild-type (WT. Taken together, our results suggest that pr130 is required for normal myocardium formation and efficient cardiac contractile function.

  17. A calorimetric search on double beta decay of 130Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Capelli, S.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Pobes, C.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.; Vanzini, M.

    2003-04-01

    We report on the final results of a series of experiments on double beta decay of 130Te carried out with an array of twenty cryogenic detectors. The set-up is made with crystals of TeO2 with a total mass of 6.8 kg, the largest operating one for a cryogenic experiment. Four crystals are made with isotopically enriched materials: two in 128Te and two others in 130Te. The remaining ones are made with natural tellurium, which contains 31.7% and 33.8% 128Te and 130Te, respectively. The array was run under a heavy shield in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory at a depth of about 3500 m.w.e. By recording the pulses of each detector in anticoincidence with the others a lower limit of 2.1×1023 years has been obtained at the 90% C.L. on the lifetime for neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te. In terms of effective neutrino mass this leads to the most restrictive limit in direct experiments, after those obtained with Ge diodes. Limits on other lepton violating decays of 130Te and on the neutrinoless double beta decay of 128Te to the ground state of 128Xe are also reported and discussed. An indication is presented for the two neutrino double beta decay of 130Te. Some consequences of the present results in the interpretation of geochemical experiments are discussed.

  18. Pyrolysis result of polyethylene waste as fuel for solid oxide fuel cell with samarium doped-ceria (SDC)-carbonate as electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahputra, R. J. E.; Rahmawati, F.; Prameswari, A. P.; Saktian, R.

    2017-02-01

    In this research, the result of pyrolysis on polyethylene was used as fuel for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The pyrolysis result is a liquid which consists of hydrocarbon chains. According to GC-MS analysis, the hydrocarbons mainly consist of C7 to C20 hydrocarbon chain. Then, the liquid was applied to a single cell of NSDC-L | NSDC | NSDC-L. NSDC is a composite SDC (samarium doped-ceria) with sodium carbonate. Meanwhile, NSDC-L is a composite of NSDC with LiNiCuO (LNC). NSDC and LNC were analyzed by X-ray diffraction to understand their crystal structure. The result shows that presence of carbonate did not change the crystal structure of SDC. SEM EDX analysis for fuel cell before and after being loaded with polyethylene oil to get information of element diffusion to the electrolyte. Meanwhile, the conductivity properties were investigated through impedance measurement. The presence of carbonate even increases the electrical conductivity. The single cell test with the pyrolysis result of polyethylene at 300 - 600 °C, found that the highest power density is at 600 °C with the maximum power density of 0.14 mW/cm2 and open circuit voltage of 0.4 Volt. Elemental analysis at three point spots of single cell NDSC-L |NSDC|NSDC-L found that a migration of ions was occurred during fuel operation at 300 - 600 °C.

  19. Effects of some rare earth and carbonate-based co-dopants on structural and electrical properties of samarium doped ceria (SDC) electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mustafa; Khan, Zuhair S.; Mustafa, Kamal; Rana, Akmal

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, samarium doped ceria (SDC) and SDC-based composite with the addition of K2CO3 were prepared by co-precipitation route and effects of pH of the solution and calcination temperature on microstructure of SDC and SDC-K2CO3, respectively, were investigated. Furthermore, experimentation was performed to investigate into the ionic conductivity of pure SDC by co-doping with yttrium i.e., YSDC, XRD and SEM studies show that the crystallite size and particle size of SDC increases with the increase in pH. The SEM images of all the samples of SDC synthesized at different pH values showed the irregular shaped and dispersed particles. SDC-K2CO3 was calcined at 600∘C, 700∘C and 800∘C for 4 h and XRD results showed that crystallite size increases while lattice strain, decreases with the increase in calcination temperature and no peaks were detected for K2CO3 as it is present in an amorphous form. The ionic conductivity of the electrolytes increases with the increase in temperature and SDC-K2CO3 shows the highest value of ionic conductivity as compared to SDC and YSDC. Chemical compatibility tests were performed between the co-doped electrolyte and lithiated NiO cathode at high temperature. It revealed that the couple could be used up to the temperature of 700∘C.

  20. Calculation of the Dose of Samarium-153-Ethylene Diamine Tetramethylene Phosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP as a Radiopharmaceutical for Pain Relief of bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Razghandi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the important applications of nuclear physics in medicine is the use of radioactive elements as radiopharmaceuticals. Metastatic bone disease is the most common form of malignant bone tumors. Samarium-153-ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP as a radiopharmaceutical is used for pain palliation. This radiopharmaceutical usually emits beta particles, which have a high uptake in bone tissues. The purpose of this study was to calculate the radiation dose distribution of 153Sm-EDTMP in bone and other tissues, using MCNPX Monte Carlo code in the particle transport model. Materials and Methods Dose delivery to the bone was simulated by seeking radiopharmaceuticals on the bone surface. The phantom model had a simple cylindrical geometry and included bone, bone marrow, and soft tissue. Results The simulation results showed that a significant amount of radiation dose was delivered to the bone by the use of this radiopharmaceutical. Conclusion Thebone acted as a fine protective shield against rays for the bone marrow. Therefore, the trivial absorbed dose by the bone marrow caused less damage to bone-making cells. Also, the high absorbed dose of the bone could destroy cancer cells and relieve the pain in the bone.

  1. Synthesis, quality control and biological evaluation of tris[(1,10-phenanthroline)[{sup 153}Sm]samarium(III)]trithiocyanate complex as a therapeutic agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naseri, Z.; Kharat, A. Nemati [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Inorganic Chemistry Dept.; Hakimi, A. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch; Jalilian, A.R.; Shirvani-Arani, S.; Bahrami-Samani, A.; Ghannadi-Maragheh, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (IR). Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab (RRDL)

    2012-07-01

    Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are designed to deliver high doses of radiation to selected target organs or tissues with an aim of minimizing unwanted radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. In this work, [tris(1,10-phenanthroline)[{sup 153}Sm]samarium(III)]trithiocyanate ({sup 153}Sm-TPTTC) was developed for possible therapeutic properties. The cold compound, i.e. {sup nat}Sm-TPTTC was prepared and characterized by IR, UV, mass and {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy. {sup 153}Sm-TPTTC was prepared in two steps using [{sup 153}Sm]SmCl{sub 3}, obtained by neutron activation of an enriched {sup 152}Sm sample. Stability tests, partition coefficient determination, toxicity tests and biodistribution studies of the complex in wild-type and fibrosarcoma-bearing mice were determined. The radiolabeled complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (> 99% precipitation method) and specific activity of 278 GBq/mmol and demonstrated significant stability at 4, 25 and 37 C (in presence of human serum). Initial complex biodistribution data showed significant liver accumulation in wild-type mice and significant tumor accumulation in fibrosarcoma-bearing mice with tumor:blood and tumor:muscle ratios of 3.55 (2 h) and 38.26 (96 h) respectively. {sup 153}Sm-TPTTC properties suggest an efficient tumor targeting agent with high tumor-avidity. Further investigation on the therapeutic properties must be conducted. (orig.)

  2. Phenotype abnormality: 130 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 130 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u636i decreased efficiency... during process named growth in period of F mature embryo stage ... F mature embryo stage ... decreased efficiency ... growth ...

  3. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.130 Permissible exposure level. (a) The mine operator must assure that no miner is exposed during any work shift to noise that exceeds the permissible exposure level. If during any work shift a miner's noise exposure exceeds the permissible exposure level, the mine operator...

  4. 50 CFR 300.130 - Vessel and gear restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel and gear restrictions. 300.130... gear restrictions. (a) Factory vessels. Factory vessels are prohibited from operating in treaty waters... top of the trap that, when removed, will leave an opening no smaller than the throat or entrance of...

  5. 16 CFR 1500.130 - Self-pressurized containers: labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Self-pressurized containers: labeling. 1500... § 1500.130 Self-pressurized containers: labeling. (a) Self-pressurized containers that fail to bear a...: warning—contents under pressure Do not puncture or incinerate container. Do not expose to heat or store at...

  6. New nematotoxic indoloditerpenoid produced by Gymnoascus reessii za-130

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical investigation of the fungal strain Gymnoascus reessii za-130, which was previously isolated from the rhizosphere of tomato plants infected by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita, led to the isolation and identification of a new indoloditerpenoid metabolite designated gymnoascole ac...

  7. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide is...

  8. 14 CFR 21.130 - Statement of conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Statement of conformity. 21.130 Section 21... conformity. Each holder or licensee of a type certificate only, for a product manufactured in the United... Administrator a statement of conformity (FAA Form 317). This statement must be signed by an authorized person...

  9. L130-million cut to grants hits UK physical scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Cressey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    "UK physicists, still reeling from massive funding cuts announced earlier this year, have learnt of worse to come. Roughly L130 million (US$260 million)is being slashed from research grants awarded by the Engineering and Physical Scienes Research Council (EPSRC), it announced on 17 March." (2 pages)

  10. Gas Pobre: Factibilidad de su uso en los motores ZIL – 130; Poor Gas: Feasibility of use other ZIL - 130

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Néstor - Proenza Pérez

    2011-01-01

    ... Combustión Interna, las cuales son, bajaconcentración de alquitrán en el gas pobre (temperatura del gas producto a la salida delgasificador, el motor seleccionado es el ZIL-130, por ser de amplio uso en nuestro...

  11. Retention capacity of samarium (III) in zircon for it possible use in retaining walls for confinement of nuclear residues; Capacidad de retencion de samario (III) en circon para su posible uso en barreras de contencion para confinamiento de residuos nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N

    2006-07-01

    Mexico, as country that produces part of its electric power by nuclear means, should put special emphasis in the development of technologies guided to the sure and long term confinement of the high level nuclear residuals. This work studies the capacity that has the natural zircon to retain to the samarium (III) in solution, by what due, firstly, to characterize the zircon for technical instrumental to determine the purity and characteristic of the mineral in study. The instrumental techniques that were used to carry out the physicochemical characterization were the neutron activation analysis (NAA), the infrared spectroscopy (IS), the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), semiquantitative analysis, dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and luminescence technique. The characterization of the surface properties carries out by means of the determination of the surface area using the BET multipoint technique, acidity constants, hydration time, the determination of the point of null charge (pH{sub PCN}) and density of surface sites (D{sub s}). The luminescence techniques were useful to determine the optimal point hydration of the zircon and for the quantification of the samarium, for that here intends the development of both analysis techniques. With the adjustment of the titration curves in the FITEQL 4 package the constants of surface acidity in the solid/liquid interface were determined. To the finish of this study it was corroborated that the zircon is a mineral that presents appropriate characteristics to be proposed as a contention barrier for the deep geologic confinement. With regard to the study of adsorption that one carries out the samarium retention it is superior to 90% under the described conditions. This investigation could also be applicable in the confinement of dangerous industrial residuals. (Author)

  12. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sen, A [University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Parach, A [Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalantari, F [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  13. Fabrication of catalytically active nanocrystalline samarium (Sm)-doped cerium oxide (CeO2) thin films using electron beam evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Subrata; Sutradhar, Narottam; Thangamuthu, R.; Subramanian, B.; Panda, Asit Baran; Jayachandran, M.

    2012-08-01

    Samarium (Sm)-doped cerium oxide (CeO2) thin films were fabricated using electron beam evaporation technique. The synthesized films were deposited either on glass or ITO substrates and studied their nature by annealing at different temperatures. The optical properties and other morphological studies were done by UV-Vis, XRD, XPS, SEM, EDS, and FT-IR analysis. XRD and XPS analysis clearly confirm the presence of Sm in the ceria site. From the SEM study, it was found that after annealing at high temperature ( 300 or 500 °C), the particles size was reduced due to breakdown of large aggregates of particles which is also confirmed from UV-Vis, XPS, and XRD analyses. The FT-IR study proves the presence of -COO-, -OH, or ammonium group on the particles surface. The deposition of Sm-doped CeO2 nanomaterials was found more feasible on ITO substrate compared to that of glass substrate in terms of stability and depth of film thickness. The Sm-doped CeO2 nanomaterial acts as a re-usable catalyst for the reduction of organic dye molecules in the presence of NaBH4. The catalysis rate was compared by considering the electron transfer process during the reduction. The synthesized Sm-doped CeO2 thin films might find wide variety of applications in various emerging fields like solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), oxygen sensor or as catalyst in different types of organic and inorganic catalytic reactions. The fabrication process is very simple, straightforward, less time consuming, and cost effective.

  14. Fabrication of catalytically active nanocrystalline samarium (Sm)-doped cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) thin films using electron beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Subrata, E-mail: skundu@cecri.res.in [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Electrochemical Materials Science (ECMS) Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute - CECRI (India); Sutradhar, Narottam [G. B. Marg, Central Salt and Marine Chemical Research Institute - CSIR (India); Thangamuthu, R.; Subramanian, B. [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Electrochemical Materials Science (ECMS) Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute - CECRI (India); Panda, Asit Baran [G. B. Marg, Central Salt and Marine Chemical Research Institute (CSIR) (India); Jayachandran, M., E-mail: mjayam54@yahoo.com [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Electrochemical Materials Science (ECMS) Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute - CECRI (India)

    2012-08-15

    Samarium (Sm)-doped cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) thin films were fabricated using electron beam evaporation technique. The synthesized films were deposited either on glass or ITO substrates and studied their nature by annealing at different temperatures. The optical properties and other morphological studies were done by UV-Vis, XRD, XPS, SEM, EDS, and FT-IR analysis. XRD and XPS analysis clearly confirm the presence of Sm in the ceria site. From the SEM study, it was found that after annealing at high temperature ({approx}300 or 500 Degree-Sign C), the particles size was reduced due to breakdown of large aggregates of particles which is also confirmed from UV-Vis, XPS, and XRD analyses. The FT-IR study proves the presence of -COO-, -OH, or ammonium group on the particles surface. The deposition of Sm-doped CeO{sub 2} nanomaterials was found more feasible on ITO substrate compared to that of glass substrate in terms of stability and depth of film thickness. The Sm-doped CeO{sub 2} nanomaterial acts as a re-usable catalyst for the reduction of organic dye molecules in the presence of NaBH{sub 4}. The catalysis rate was compared by considering the electron transfer process during the reduction. The synthesized Sm-doped CeO{sub 2} thin films might find wide variety of applications in various emerging fields like solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), oxygen sensor or as catalyst in different types of organic and inorganic catalytic reactions. The fabrication process is very simple, straightforward, less time consuming, and cost effective.Graphical Abstract.

  15. BOREAS RSS-20 POLDER C-130 Measurements of Surface BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Marc; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-20 data set contains measurements of surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) made by the polarization and Directionality of Earth reflectances (POLDER) instrument over several surface types (pine, spruce, fen) of the BOREAS southern study area (SSA) during the 1994 intensive field campaigns (IFCs). Single-point BRDF values were acquired either from the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) C-130 aircraft or from a NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) helicopter. A related data set collected from the helicopter platform is available as is POLDER imagery acquired from the C-130. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  16. Structure of A∼130 nuclei in La–Ce region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of a pair of h11/2 proton particles has been conjectured at hω ∼ 0.3 MeV, from the single- ... triaxial shapes. Experimental data on the odd–odd and odd-A nuclei of this mass region have also displayed a varied amount of signature splitting in the yrast se- ... A systematic analysis of the MR bands in A ∼ 130 region has been.

  17. Phenotype-gene: 130 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 130 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u3ria224u1128i decreased height...etadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17627280i decreased height in organ named whole plant http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u675i AT1G73177

  18. Crystal structure of monoclinic samarium and cubic europium sesquioxides and bound coherent neutron scattering lengths of the isotopes {sup 154}Sm and {sup 153}Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlmann, Holger [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Hein, Christina; Kautenburger, Ralf [Saarland Univ., Saarbruecken (Germany). Inorganic Solid State Chemistry; Hansen, Thomas C.; Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Doyle, Stephen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation (ISS)

    2016-11-01

    The crystal structures of monoclinic samarium and cubic europium sesquioxide, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were reinvestigated by powder diffraction methods (laboratory X-ray, synchrotron, neutron). Rietveld analysis yields more precise structural parameters than previously known, especially for oxygen atoms. Interatomic distances d(Sm-O) in Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} range from 226.3(4) to 275.9(2) pm [average 241.6(3) pm] for the monoclinic B type Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} [space group C2/m, a = 1418.04(3) pm, b = 362.660(7) pm, c = 885.48(2) pm, β = 100.028(1) ], d(Eu-O) in Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} from 229.9(2) to 238.8(2) pm for the cubic bixbyite (C) type [space group Ia anti 3, a = 1086.87(1) pm]. Neutron diffraction at 50 K and 2 K did not show any sign for magnetic ordering in Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Isotopically enriched {sup 154}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {sup 153}Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for the neutron diffraction work because of the enormous absorption cross section of the natural isotopic mixtures for thermal neutrons. The isotopic purity was determined by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry to be 98.9% for {sup 154}Sm and 99.8% for {sup 153}Eu. Advanced analysis of the neutron diffraction data suggest that the bound coherent scattering lengths of {sup 154}Sm and {sup 153}Eu need to be revised. We tentatively propose b{sub c}({sup 154}Sm) = 8.97(6) fm and b{sub c}({sup 153}Eu) = 8.85(3) fm for a neutron wavelength of 186.6 pm to be better values for these isotopes, showing up to 8% deviation from accepted literature values. It is shown that inaccurate scattering lengths may result in severe problems in crystal structure refinements causing erroneous structural details such as occupation parameters, which might be critically linked to physical properties like superconductivity in multinary oxides.

  19. 41 CFR 105-53.130-4 - Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Disadvantaged Business Utilization. 105-53.130-4 Section 105-53.130-4 Public Contracts and Property Management... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.130-4 Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization. (a) Creation and authority. Public Law 95-507, October 14, 1978, an amendment to the Small...

  20. 40 CFR 1033.130 - Instructions for engine remanufacturing or engine installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Instructions for engine remanufacturing or engine installation. 1033.130 Section 1033.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... and Related Requirements § 1033.130 Instructions for engine remanufacturing or engine installation. (a...

  1. 41 CFR 102-85.130 - How are exemptions from Rent granted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rent granted? 102-85.130 Section 102-85.130 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Rent Charges § 102-85.130 How are exemptions from Rent granted? Exemptions from Rent are rare. However, the Administrator of General Services may exempt any GSA customer from Rent after a...

  2. 41 CFR 102-192.130 - What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as an agency mail manager? 102-192.130 Section 102-192.130 Public Contracts and Property... ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.130 What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager? In addition to carrying out the responsibilities in Subparts B, C, D...

  3. 42 CFR 137.130 - What is covered by this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is covered by this subpart? 137.130 Section 137.130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Final Offer § 137.130 What is...

  4. Impact of microRNA-130a on the neutrophil proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C. C.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Østergaard, O.

    2015-01-01

    derepressed proteins (NFYC, ISOC1, and CAT) are putative miR-130a targets with good RAIN scores. We also created a network including inferred, putative neutrophil miR-130a targets and identified the transcription factors Myb and CBF-beta as putative miR-130a targets, which may regulate the primary granule...

  5. 38 CFR 59.130 - General requirements for all State home facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements for all State home facilities. 59.130 Section 59.130 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.130...

  6. 20 CFR 641.130 - What is the scope of this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the scope of this part? 641.130 Section 641.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM Purpose and Definitions § 641.130 What is the...

  7. New experimental results on double beta decay of 130Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Vanzini, M.; Zanotti, L.; Bucci, C.; Pobes, C.

    2000-07-01

    New results are presented of a search for double beta decay of Te isotopes carried out, using the bolometric technique, with an array of 20 natural tellurite crystals with a total cryogenic mass of /~6.8 kilograms. The array has been run at a temperature around 10 mK in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory. No evidence has been found for neutrinoless double beta decay of 128Te and 130Te and upper limits of 8.6 /× 1022 and 1.44 /× 1023 years, respectively, have been achieved at the 90% confidence level. From the latter we obtain limits on the lepton non-conserving parameters which are the most restrictive ones in direct experiments after those on 76Ge according to theoretical calculations. Results on two neutrino and majoron mediated decays are also presented and discussed with respect to those obtained for the same nuclei in geochemical experiments.

  8. Shape transition in odd-odd A [approx] 130 nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzutto, M.A. (Lab. Pelletron, Dept. de Fisica Nuclear, Inst. de Fisica, Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paolo, SP (Brazil)); Cybulska, E.W. (Lab. Pelletron, Dept. de Fisica Nuclear, Inst. de Fisica, Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paolo, SP (Brazil)); Emediato, L.G.R. (Lab. Pelletron, Dept. de Fisica Nuclear, Inst. de Fisica, Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paolo, SP (Brazil)); Medina, N.H. (Lab. Pelletron, Dept. de Fisica Nuclear, Inst. de Fisica, Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paolo, SP (Brazil)); Ribas, R.V. (Lab. Pelletron, Dept. de Fisica Nuclear, Inst. de Fisica, Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paolo, SP (Brazil)); Hara, K. (Lab. Pelletron, Dept. de Fisica Nuclear, Inst. de Fisica, Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paolo, SP (Brazil)); Lima, C.L. (Nuclear Theory and Elementary Particle Phenomenology Group, Inst. de Fisica, Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil))

    1994-03-14

    A systematic analysis of rotational bands in doubly odd nuclei in the mass region A = 130-140 is carried out using a shell model configuration mixing approach. The shell model (many-body) basis is constructed by projecting out deformed quasiparticle (Nilsson + BCS) states onto good angular momenta. The hamiltonian is assumed to be a sum of (spherical) single-particle hamiltonian and a schematic two-body interaction, which consists of Q.Q + (monopole) pairing + quadrupole-pairing forces. The analysis indicates a shape transition from prolate (N = 73) to oblate (N = 79) shape as a function of neutron number. Agreement between theoretical results and experimental data is quite satisfactory except for [gamma]-deformed nuclei (N = 75 and 77). (orig.)

  9. Tracking word frequency effects through 130 years of sound change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer B; Pierrehumbert, Janet B; Walker, Abby J; LaShell, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary New Zealand English has distinctive pronunciations of three characteristic vowels. Did the evolution of these distinctive pronunciations occur in all words at the same time or were different words affected differently? We analyze the changing pronunciation of New Zealand English in a large set of recordings of speakers born over a 130 year period. We show that low frequency words were at the forefront of these changes and higher frequency words lagged behind. A long-standing debate exists between authors claiming that high frequency words lead regular sound change and others claiming that there are no frequency effects. The leading role of low frequency words is surprising in this context. It can be elucidated in models of lexical processing that include detailed word-specific memories. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Calibration and Data Analysis of the MC-130 Air Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Dennis; Ulbrich, N.

    2012-01-01

    Design, calibration, calibration analysis, and intended use of the MC-130 air balance are discussed. The MC-130 balance is an 8.0 inch diameter force balance that has two separate internal air flow systems and one external bellows system. The manual calibration of the balance consisted of a total of 1854 data points with both unpressurized and pressurized air flowing through the balance. A subset of 1160 data points was chosen for the calibration data analysis. The regression analysis of the subset was performed using two fundamentally different analysis approaches. First, the data analysis was performed using a recently developed extension of the Iterative Method. This approach fits gage outputs as a function of both applied balance loads and bellows pressures while still allowing the application of the iteration scheme that is used with the Iterative Method. Then, for comparison, the axial force was also analyzed using the Non-Iterative Method. This alternate approach directly fits loads as a function of measured gage outputs and bellows pressures and does not require a load iteration. The regression models used by both the extended Iterative and Non-Iterative Method were constructed such that they met a set of widely accepted statistical quality requirements. These requirements lead to reliable regression models and prevent overfitting of data because they ensure that no hidden near-linear dependencies between regression model terms exist and that only statistically significant terms are included. Finally, a comparison of the axial force residuals was performed. Overall, axial force estimates obtained from both methods show excellent agreement as the differences of the standard deviation of the axial force residuals are on the order of 0.001 % of the axial force capacity.

  11. Highly CO2-Tolerant Cathode for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Samarium-Doped Ceria-Protected SrCo0.85Ta0.15O3-δ Hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengran; Zhou, Wei; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-25

    Susceptibility to CO2 is one of the major challenges for the long-term stability of the alkaline-earth-containing cathodes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells. To alleviate the adverse effects from CO2, we incorporated samarium-stabilized ceria (SDC) into a SrCo0.85Ta0.15O3-δ (SCT15) cathode by either mechanical mixing or a wet impregnation method and evaluated their cathode performance stability in the presence of a gas mixture of 10% CO2, 21% O2, and 69% N2. We observed that the CO2 tolerance of the hybrid cathode outperforms the pure SCT15 cathode by over 5 times at 550 °C. This significant enhancement is likely attributable to the low CO2 adsorption and reactivity of the SDC protective layer, which are demonstrated through thermogravimetric analysis, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity study.

  12. The role of glycoprotein 130 family of cytokines in fetal rat lung development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nogueira-Silva

    Full Text Available The glycoprotein 130 (gp130 dependent family of cytokines comprises interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-11, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1 and oncostatin M (OSM. These cytokines share the membrane gp130 as a common signal transducer. Recently, it was demonstrated that IL-6 promotes, whereas LIF inhibits fetal lung branching. Thus, in this study, the effects on fetal lung morphogenesis of the other classical members of the gp130-type cytokines (IL-11, CLC, CNTF, CT-1 and OSM were investigated. We also provide the first description of these cytokines and their common gp130 receptor protein expression patterns during rat lung development. Fetal rat lung explants were cultured in vitro with increasing concentrations of IL-11, CLC, CNTF, CT-1 and OSM. Treated lung explants were morphometrically analyzed and assessed for MAPK, PI3K/AKT and STAT3 signaling modifications. IL-11, which similarly to IL-6 acts through a gp130 homodimer receptor, significantly stimulated lung growth via p38 phosphorylation. On the other hand, CLC, CNTF, CT-1 and OSM, whose receptors are gp130 heterodimers, inhibited lung growth acting in different signal-transducing pathways. Thus, the present study demonstrated that although cytokines of the gp130 family share a common signal transducer, there are specific biological activities for each cytokine on lung development. Indeed, cytokine signaling through gp130 homodimers stimulate, whereas cytokine signaling through gp130 heterodimers inhibit lung branching.

  13. In vitro phosphorylation and acetylation of the murine pocket protein Rb2/p130.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saeed

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma protein (pRb and the related proteins Rb2/p130 and 107 represent the "pocket protein" family of cell cycle regulators. A key function of these proteins is the cell cycle dependent modulation of E2F-regulated genes. The biological activity of these proteins is controlled by acetylation and phosphorylation in a cell cycle dependent manner. In this study we attempted to investigate the interdependence of acetylation and phosphorylation of Rb2/p130 in vitro. After having identified the acetyltransferase p300 among several acetyltransferases to be associated with Rb2/p130 during S-phase in NIH3T3 cells in vivo, we used this enzyme and the CDK4 protein kinase for in vitro modification of a variety of full length Rb2/p130 and truncated versions with mutations in the acetylatable lysine residues 1079, 128 and 130. Mutation of these residues results in the complete loss of Rb2/p130 acetylation. Replacement of lysines by arginines strongly inhibits phosphorylation of Rb2/p130 by CDK4; the inhibitory effect of replacement by glutamines is less pronounced. Preacetylation of Rb2/p130 strongly enhances CDK4-catalyzed phosphorylation, whereas deacetylation completely abolishes in vitro phosphorylation. In contrast, phosphorylation completely inhibits acetylation of Rb2/p130 by p300. These results suggest a mutual interdependence of modifications in a way that acetylation primes Rb2/p130 for phosphorylation and only dephosphorylated Rb2/p130 can be subject to acetylation. Human papillomavirus 16-E7 protein, which increases acetylation of Rb2/p130 by p300 strongly reduces phosphorylation of this protein by CDK4. This suggests that the balance between phosphorylation and acetylation of Rb2/p130 is essential for its biological function in cell cycle control.

  14. Effect of Ayurvedic management in 130 patients of diabetic nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kalapi; Gupta, S. N.; Shah, Namrata

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a specific form of renal disease. It is a major cause of renal insufficiency and ultimately of death. The present study has been carried out to prove the efficacy of Ayurvedic drugs in the management of diabetic nephropathy, which can be helpful in reducing the need of dialysis and avoiding or delaying renal transplantation. A total of 130 patients of this disease were treated in IPD (Group A) and OPD (Group B). Ayurvedic formulations including Gokshuradi Guggulu, Bhumyamalaki, Vasa and Shilajatvadi Vati were given to all the patients for 2 months. Group A patients were given special planned food. Results were analyzed statistically using “t” test. In group A patients, highly significant reduction was found in the values of serum creatinine, blood urea and urinary excretion of albumin. Marked improvement was found in the patients’ general physical well-being, together with reduction in symptoms, in group A patients. This shows the importance of Pathyapathya in Ayurvedic management of the disease. This management may bring some new hope to the patients of diabetic nephropathy, which usually terminates to chronic renal failure and ultimately to death. Further studies are being carried out in this regard. PMID:22131758

  15. Les cellulites cervico-faciales à propos de 130 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouadi, Sami; Ouaissi, Laila; El Khiati, Rhizlane; Abada, Redallah; Mahtar, Mohamed; Roubal, Mohamed; Janah, Abdellah; Essaadi, Mustapha; Kadiri, Fatmi

    2013-01-01

    Le but de cette étude était d’étudier le profil épidémioclinique et paraclinique de nos patients, d’évaluer leur prise en charge thérapeutique et leur évolution. Nous avons inclus 130 patients pris en charge entre janvier 2007 et novembre 2009. Nous avons relevé de manière rétrospective les données épidémiologiques, les données cliniques, la prise en charge thérapeutique médico-chirurgicale et l’évolution. Notre série retrouve une prédominance masculine avec un âge moyen de 31 ans. L’origine dentaire est l’étiologie la plus fréquente. La tomodensitométrie avec injection de produit de contraste est l’examen clé du bilan initial. L’antibiothérapie et la chirurgie ont permis une bonne évolution dans 74% des cas. Le taux de mortalité est de 0%. Les cellulites cervico-faciales sont des pathologies potentiellement graves touchant souvent des adultes jeunes dont la mortalité hospitalière doit être réduite à la condition d’un diagnostic précoce et une prise en charge médico-chirurgicale immédiate. PMID:23646224

  16. A retrospective survey of ocular abnormalities in pugs: 130 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecny, M; Tichy, A; Rushton, J; Nell, B

    2015-02-01

    To determine the types and frequency of ophthalmic findings in pugs. Retrospective analysis of case records of pugs presented to an ophthalmology unit between 2001 and 2012. Ophthalmological findings were correlated with age, gender, presenting signs and time of onset of disease. In total, 130 pugs (258 eyes) with a mean (±sd) age of 2 · 8 (±2 · 87) years were examined. Ocular abnormalities identified included keratoconjunctivitis sicca (n = 39 eyes), macroblepharon (n = 258 eyes), entropion (n = 258 eyes), distichiasis (n = 56 eyes), ectopic cilia (n = 8 eyes), conjunctivitis (n = 88 eyes), corneal pigmentation (n = 101 eyes), opacity (n = 63 eyes), ulceration (n = 46 eyes), vascularisation (n = 35 eyes), iris-to-iris persistent pupillary membranes (n = 21 eyes) and cataract (n = 18). Keratoconjunctivitis sicca was significantly associated with the presence of corneal pigmentation (P = 0 · 007 for left eyes; P = 0 · 043 for right eyes). However corneal pigmentation was also identified in pugs (n = 61) without keratoconjunctivitis sicca. There was a significant influence of ectopic cilia on corneal ulceration (P pugs. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  17. Gas Pobre: Factibilidad de su uso en los motores ZIL – 130; Poor Gas: Feasibility of use other ZIL - 130

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor - Proenza Pérez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se hace un estudio de los diferentes tipos de gasificadores existentes, así como el estado actual de latecnología de gasificación, realizando la selección del gasificador Downdraft Imbert Modificado, desarrollado porinvestigaciones del grupo de Conversión Térmica de la Biomasa de la Universidad de Camagüey, por las ventajasque el mismo presenta para el accionamiento directo de un Motor de Combustión Interna, las cuales son, bajaconcentración de alquitrán en el gas pobre (<10mg/Nm3 y baja temperatura del gas producto a la salida delgasificador, el motor seleccionado es el ZIL-130, por ser de amplio uso en nuestro país y estar perfectamenteadaptado al entorno cubano, se les realizaron diferentes cálculos teóricos con el objetivo de visualizar sucomportamiento al sustituirle su combustible original por gas pobre así como una valoración económica de dichasustitución, también se logro dimensionar el gasificador que alimentará dichos motores.In this work a study of the different types of existent gasifiers is made, as well as the current state of the gasificationtechnology, carrying out the selection of the gasifier Downdraft Modified Imbert, developed by investigations of thegroup of Thermal Conversion of the Biomass, for the advantages that the same one presents for the direct working ofa MCI, which are, low concentration of tar in the poor gas (<10mg/Nm3 and low temperature of the gas product to,the selected motor is the ZIL-130, to be of wide use in our country and to be perfectly adapted to the Cubanenvironment, they were carried out different theoretical calculations with the objective of visualizing its behavior whensubstituting him its original fuel for poor gas as well as an economic valuation of this substitution, you also achievesdimensionar the gasifier that will feed this motors.

  18. Ferrites Ni{sub 0,5}Zn{sub 0,5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} doped with samarium: structural analysis, morphological and electromagnetic; Ferritas Ni{sub 0,5}Zn{sub 0,5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} dopada com samario: analise estrutural, morfologica e eletromagnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A.C.F.M.; Diniz, A.P., E-mail: anacristina@dema.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academinca de Engenharia de Materiais; Viana, K.M.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, PE (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Cornejo, D.R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Kiminami, R.H.G.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes to investigate the sintering at 1200 deg C/2h of Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2-x}Sm{sub x}O{sub 4} ferrite doped with 0.05; 0.075 e 0.1 mol of Sm synthesized by combustion reaction to evaluate the performance materials as absorbers of electromagnetic radiation. The influence of the concentration of samarium on the structure, morphology and electromagnetic properties of ferrites was studied. The resulting samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic measurements and reflectivity measurements in the frequency range between 8-12 GHz. The results showed that increasing the concentration of samarium caused a decrease in particle size of the samples, encouraging, therefore, to obtain materials with better values of magnetization and reflectivity, allowing for use as absorbers in narrow-band frequency between 9-10 GHz. (author)

  19. 29 CFR 4.130 - Types of covered service contracts illustrated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Types of covered service contracts illustrated. 4.130 Section 4.130 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor LABOR STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS...) Aerial reconnaissance for fire detection. (3) Ambulance service. (4) Barber and beauty shop services. (5...

  20. 9 CFR 130.51 - Penalties for nonpayment or late payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Penalties for nonpayment or late payment. 130.51 Section 130.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... penalty or interest on any delinquent APHIS user fee; or (iv) Payment has been dishonored. (2) Resolution...

  1. 13 CFR 130.620 - Revisions and amendments to cooperative agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Revisions and amendments to cooperative agreement. 130.620 Section 130.620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Officer concurrence, review by the Program Manager and the Grants Management Specialist, approval of the...

  2. 7 CFR 1703.130 - Use of combination loan and grant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of combination loan and grant. 1703.130 Section 1703.130 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Combination Loan and Grant...

  3. Identification of a gp130 cytokine receptor critical site involved in oncostatin M response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, C; Auguste, P; Chabbert, M; Lelièvre, E; Chevalier, S; Gascan, H

    2000-02-25

    Gp130 cytokine receptor is involved in the formation of multimeric functional receptors for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-11, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM), ciliary neurotrophic factor, and cardiotrophin-1. Cloning of the epitope recognized by an OSM-neutralizing anti-gp130 monoclonal antibody identified a portion of gp130 receptor localized in the EF loop of the cytokine binding domain. Site-directed mutagenesis of the corresponding region was carried out by alanine substitution of residues 186-198. To generate type 1 or type 2 OSM receptors, gp130 mutants were expressed together with either LIF receptor beta or OSM receptor beta. When positions Val-189/Tyr-190 and Phe-191/Val-192 were alanine-substituted, Scatchard analyses indicated a complete abrogation of OSM binding to both type receptors. Interestingly, binding of LIF to type 1 receptor was not affected, corroborating the notion that in this case gp130 mostly behaves as a converter protein rather than a binding receptor. The present study demonstrates that positions 189-192 of gp130 cytokine binding domain are essential for OSM binding to both gp130/LIF receptor beta and gp130/OSM receptor beta heterocomplexes.

  4. 31 CFR 103.130 - Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. 103.130 Section 103.130 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering...

  5. 13 CFR 130.700 - Suspension, termination and non-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... applicable general procedures for suspension and termination are contained in 13 CFR 143.43 and 143.44, and... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension, termination and non-renewal. 130.700 Section 130.700 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  6. 13 CFR 130.340 - SBDC services and restrictions on service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... access to capital, such as business plan development, financial statement preparation and analysis, and... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false SBDC services and restrictions on service. 130.340 Section 130.340 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  7. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 130 - Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist C Appendix C to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... C to Part 130—Petition Form, Petition Instructions, and Documentation Checklist ER31MY00.004...

  8. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001 ...

  9. 24 CFR 1720.130 - Restrictions on appearances as to former officers and employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restrictions on appearances as to former officers and employees. 1720.130 Section 1720.130 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...

  10. IL-13 R130Q single nucleotide polymorphism in asthmatic Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IL-13 R130Q single nucleotide polymorphism in asthmatic Egyptian children. ... Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The) ... Objective: We sought to study the association of IL-13 genetic variant R130Q with bronchial asthma in Egyptian children and its relation to various clinical and laboratory phenotypes ...

  11. 37 CFR 2.130 - New matter suggested by the trademark examining attorney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New matter suggested by the trademark examining attorney. 2.130 Section 2.130 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Procedure in Inter...

  12. 42 CFR 413.130 - Introduction to capital-related costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Introduction to capital-related costs. 413.130... Costs § 413.130 Introduction to capital-related costs. (a) General rule. Capital-related costs and an... equity capital, as determined under § 413.157. (9) The capital-related costs of related organizations (as...

  13. 41 CFR 102-38.130 - Must we publicly advertise sales of Federal personal property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must we publicly advertise sales of Federal personal property? 102-38.130 Section 102-38.130 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL...

  14. Distinct phosphorylation events regulate p130- and p107-mediated repression of E2F-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, Thomas; Hansen, Klaus; Holm, Karin

    2002-01-01

    The "pocket proteins" pRb (retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein), p107, and p130 regulate cell proliferation via phosphorylation-sensitive interactions with E2F transcription factors and other proteins. We previously identified 22 in vivo phosphorylation sites in human p130, including three...

  15. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  16. 21 CFR 130.8 - Conformity to definitions and standards of identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conformity to definitions and standards of identity. 130.8 Section 130.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Conformity to definitions and standards of identity. In the following conditions, among others, a food does...

  17. Structure of a positive-parity band in {sup 130}Pr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, K.Y. [Jilin University, College of Physics, Changchun (China); Jilin University, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Changchun (China); Lu, J.B.; Xu, X.; Liu, Y.M.; Zhang, Z.; Li, X.Y.; Yang, D.; Liu, Y.Z. [Jilin University, College of Physics, Changchun (China); Wu, X.G.; He, C.Y.; Zheng, Y.; Li, C.B. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2017-01-15

    High-spin states of {sup 130}Pr have been populated using the {sup 99}Ru({sup 35}Cl, 2n2p){sup 130}Pr reaction at a beam energy of 151 MeV. A new positive-parity side band has been identified and possible interpretations on the origin of the side band have been discussed. (orig.)

  18. 40 CFR 417.130 - Applicability; description of the chlorosulfonic acid sulfation subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the chlorosulfonic acid sulfation subcategory. 417.130 Section 417.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE...

  19. 46 CFR 130.220 - Design of equipment for cooking and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of equipment for cooking and heating. 130.220 Section 130.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS... Design of equipment for cooking and heating. (a) Doors on each cooking appliance must be provided with...

  20. Ruschita Romanian marble - 130 years of official exploitation and 130 m depth of architectural beauty around the word

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetean, Valentina

    2013-04-01

    Developed in a large metamorphic area, the marble deposit from Ruschita perimeter is the most important Romanian source for ornamental stone, the old quarry being operative since 1883. The closest locality offer the commercial name also, identical with the geological one as is defined in the technical referentials and in the denomination European standard. Ruschita is also an active quarry, developed by step-by-step expansion in depth (the initial extraction reached 130 m depth), but also in the adjacent areas. The important height of the open deposit offered the possibility to the owner, MARMOSIM SA, to apply an experimental extraction method, by underground mining. It is the only Romanian place, and few in the world, where this spectacular mining element can be found for dimension stone. The extraction gallery was built starting from the lower level of the old quarry and allowed obtaining nicer and bigger blocks. The Ruschita marble is a metamorphic stone with high crystallinity and medium size of crystals (until 0.2-0.5 mm). Has the basic colour from white and grey to pink, with many intermediary nuances generally given by grey veins and less by impurities from internal structure. The stone present irregular break, sometimes following the very narrow internal discontinuities, invisible at macroscopic analyse. The main physical - mechanical characteristics are presented below: Characteristic M.U. Value Apparent density Kg/m3 2680 - 2720 Water absorption % 0.12 - 0.21 Capillarity g/m2.s0,5 0.130-0.218 Porosity % 0.30 - 0.74 Compression strength N/mm2 85 - 120 Flexural strength MPa 15-18 Rupture energy J 5 Coefficient of frost cleftness % 10 -14 Abrasion resistance - Bohme cm3/50cm2 17-18 Salt crystallization % 0.1 Nowadays, the extraction in the Ruschita area is achieved by equipments from Dazzini, Fantini, Pellegrini, Korfamann, Caterpillar, Volvo and Komatsu. The average volume of blocks is bigger than 10-12 m2. The Ruschita marble can be easily cut at size and

  1. 130 años, Presencia de la Academia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraím Otero Ruiz

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available

    El mes de agosto conmemora la Academia Nacional de Medicina, en ceremonia especial, sus 130 años de fundada. Efectivamente, el 3 de enero de 1873 se reunieron en Bogotá, en casa del Dr. Abraham Aparicio los fundadores, doctores Manuel Plata Azuero, Nicolás Osorio, Liborio Zerda, Leoncio Barreto, Evaristo García y el dueño de casa para crear una sociedad “para el estudio y adelanto de las ciencias médicas y naturales”, teniendo como objetivo adicional “el de solidarizar al cuerpo médico y darle unidad al ejercicio profesional, en Bogotá y después en el resto del país”.

    Como Presidente y Secretario se eligieron al Dr. Plata Azuero y al Dr. Aparicio, encargando al Dr. Zerda la elaboración del proyecto de reglamento. En la segunda reunión, que declaró formalmente establecida la Sociedad de Medicina y Ciencias Naturales, concurrieron además los doctores Julio A. Corredor, Samuel Fajardo, Proto Gómez, Andrés María Pardo, Bernardino Medina, Policarpo Pizarro, Pío Rengifo, Rafael Rocha Castilla, Federico Rivas, Joaquín Sarmiento y Antonio Ospina como médicos, asistiendo como naturalista el Sr. Francisco Montoya.

    Adoptaron el reglamento elaborado por el Dr. Zerda y continuaron reuniéndose mensualmente; en julio 2 de 1873 apareció el primer número de la Revista Médica (hoy “Medicina” que, con algunas interrupciones, continuaría publicándose hasta nuestros días.

    Diecisiete años después, en noviembre de 1890, el presidente Carlos Holguín sancionó la Ley 71 de 1890 en que se creaba, con base en la antigua Sociedad, la Academia Nacional de Medicina, cuyo primer Presidente fue el Dr. José María Buendía.

    La Academia fue formalmente instalada por el Presidente Holguín en Abril de 1891 y desde entonces ha venido sesionando en forma ininterrumpida por más de un siglo, cumpliendo la función asesora en materias de salud que le fuera otorgada desde su creación y le fuera ratificada por la

  2. 130 LPW 1000 Lm Warm White LED for Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soer, Wouter [Philips Lumileds Lighting Company LLC, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-12-21

    An illumination-grade warm-white LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2700 and 3500 K and capable of producing 1000 lm output at over 130 lm/W at room temperature, has been developed in this program. The high-power warm-white LED is an ideal source for use in indoor and outdoor lighting applications. Over the two year period, we have made the following accomplishments: • Developed a low-cost high-power white LED package and commercialized a series of products with CCT ranging from 2700 to 5700 K under the product name LUXEON M; • Demonstrated a record efficacy of 124.8 lm/W at a flux of 1023 lm, CCT of 3435 K and color rendering index (CRI) over 80 at room temperature in the productized package; • Demonstrated a record efficacy of 133.1 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lm, CCT of 3475 K and CRI over 80 at room temperature in an R&D package. The new high-power LED package is a die-on-ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 2 mm2 InGaN pump dice, flip-chip attached to a ceramic submount in a 2x2 array configuration. The submount design utilizes a design approach that combines a high-thermal- conductivity ceramic core for die attach and a low-cost and low-thermal-conductivity ceramic frame for mechanical support and as optical lens carrier. The LED package has a thermal resistance of less than 1.25 K/W. The white LED fabrication also adopts a new batch level (instead of die-by-die) phosphor deposition process with precision layer thickness and composition control, which provides not only tight color control, but also low cost. The efficacy performance goal was achieved through the progress in following key areas: (1) high-efficiency royal blue pump LED development through active region design and epitaxial growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs); (2) improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN-die-level and package-level optical extraction efficiency; and (3) improvement in phosphor

  3. XB130 translocation to microfilamentous structures mediates NNK-induced migration of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qifei; Nadesalingam, Jeya; Moodley, Serisha; Bai, Xiaohui; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-07-20

    Cigarette smoking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone (NNK) is the most potent carcinogen among cigarette smoking components, and is known to enhance migration of cancer cells. However, the effect of NNK on normal human bronchial epithelial cells is not well studied. XB130 is a member of actin filament associated protein family and is involved in cell morphology changes, cytoskeletal rearrangement and outgrowth formation, as well as cell migration. We hypothesized that XB130 mediates NNK-induced migration of normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results showed that, after NNK stimulation, XB130 was translocated to the cell periphery and enriched in cell motility-associated structures, such as lamellipodia, in normal human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells. Moreover, overexpression of XB130 significantly enhanced NNK-induced migration, which requires both the N- and C-termini of XB130. Overexpression of XB130 enhanced NNK-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation and promoted matrix metalloproteinase-14 translocation to cell motility-associated cellular structures after NNK stimulation. XB130-mediated NNK-induced cell migration may contribute to airway epithelial repair; however, it may also be involved in cigarette smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

  4. Imbalanced gp130 signalling in ApoE-deficient mice protects against atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth W; McLeod, Louise; Kennedy, Catherine L; Bozinovski, Steven; Najdovska, Meri; Jenkins, Brendan J

    2015-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is a key modulator of the acute phase response (APR), and while both are implicated in atherosclerosis, the pathological role of specific IL-6 signalling cascades is ill-defined. Since IL-6 employs the cytokine receptor gp130 to primarily activate the STAT3 pathway, here we evaluate whether gp130-dependent STAT3 activation modulates atherosclerosis. High-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis was established in ApoE(-/-) mice crossed with gp130(F/F) knock-in mice displaying elevated gp130-dependent STAT3 activation and production of the APR protein, serum amyloid A (SAA). Also generated were gp130(F/F):Stat3(-/+):ApoE(-/-) mice displaying genetically-normalised STAT3 activation and SAA levels, and bone marrow chimeras involving ApoE(-/-) and gp130(F/F):ApoE(-/-) mice. At 10 weeks post high-fat diet, aortic atherosclerotic lesions, including the presence of CD68(+) macrophages, and plasma lipid and SAA profiles, were assessed. Aortic plaque development and plasma triglyceride levels in gp130(F/F):ApoE(-/-) mice were significantly reduced (3-fold, P atherosclerosis without impacting on the development of aortic plaques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Retrospective evaluation of bone pain palliation after samarium-153-EDTMP therapy Avaliação retrospectiva do tratamento da dor óssea metastática com Samário-153-EDTMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Tatit Sapienza

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of metastatic bone pain palliation and medullar toxicity associated with samarium-153-EDTMP treatment. METHODS: Seventy-three patients with metastatic bone pain having previously undergone therapy with samarium-153-EDTMP (1 mCi/kg were retrospectively evaluated. Routine follow-up included pain evaluation and blood counts for 2 months after treatment. Pain was evaluated using a subjective scale (from 0 to 10 before and for 8 weeks after the treatment. Blood counts were obtained before treatment and once a week for 2 months during follow-up. Dosimetry, based upon the urinary excretion of the isotope, was estimated in 41 individuals, and the resulting radiation absorbed doses were correlated with hematological data. RESULTS: Reduction in pain scores of 75% to 100% was obtained in 36 patients (49%, with a decrease of 50% to 75%, 25% to 50%, and 0% to 25% in, respectively, 20 (27%, 10 (14%, and 7 (10% patients. There was no significant relationship between the pain response and location of the primary tumor (breast or prostate cancer. Mild to moderate myelosuppression was noted in 75.3% of patients, usually with hematological recovery at 8 weeks. The mean bone marrow dose was 347 ± 65 cGy, and only a weak correlation was found between absorbed dose and myelosuppression (Pearson coefficient = .4. CONCLUSIONS: Samarium-153-EDTMP is a valuable method for metastatic bone pain palliation. A mild to moderate and transitory myelosuppression is the main toxicity observed after samarium therapy, showing a weak correlation with dosimetric measures.OBJETIVO: O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito paliativo da dor e a toxicidade medular associados ao tratamento com Samário-153-EDTMP em pacientes com metástases ósseas. MÉTODOS: O estudo foi realizado de forma retrospectiva, a partir do levantamento de prontuário de 178 pacientes submetidos a tratamento com 1mCi/kg de 153Sm

  6. The dynamics of the laser-induced metal-semiconductor phase transition of samarium sulfide (SmS); Die Dynamik des laserinduzierten Metall-Halbleiter-Phasenuebergangs von Samariumsulfid (SmS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaempfer, Tino

    2009-12-15

    The present thesis is dedicated to the experimental study of the metal-semiconductor phase transition of samarium sulfide (SmS): Temperature- and time-resolved experiments on the characterization of the phase transition of mixed-valence SmS samples (M-SmS) are presented. The measurement of the dynamics of the laser-induced phase transition pursues via time-resolved ultrashort-time microscopy and by X-ray diffraction with sub-picosecond time resolution. The electronic and structural processes, which follow an excitation of M-SmS with infrared femtosecond laser pulses, are physically interpreted on the base of the results obtained in this thesis and model imaginations. [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit ist der experimentellen Untersuchung des Metall-Halbleiter-Phasenuebergangs von Samariumsulfid (SmS) gewidmet. Es werden temperatur- und zeitaufgeloeste Experimente zur Charakterisierung des Phasenuebergangs gemischt-valenter SmS Proben (M-SmS) vorgestellt. Die Messung der Dynamik des laserinduzierten Phasenuebergangs erfolgt ueber zeitaufgeloeste Ultrakurzzeit-Mikroskopie und durch Roentgenbeugung mit subpikosekunden Zeitaufloesung. Die elektronischen und strukturellen Prozesse, welche einer Anregung von M-SmS mit infraroten Femtosekunden-Laserpulsen folgen, werden auf der Basis der in dieser Arbeit gewonnenen Ergebnisse und Modellvorstellungen physikalisch interpretiert. (orig.)

  7. SAFARI 2000 C-130 Aerosol and Meteorological Data, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Met Office C-130 research aircraft was based at Windhoek, Namibia, between September 5-16, 2000, where it conducted a series of flights over Namibia as...

  8. SAFARI 2000 C-130 Aerosol and Meteorological Data, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Met Office C-130 research aircraft was based at Windhoek, Namibia, between September 5-16, 2000, where it conducted a series of flights over Namibia as part of...

  9. Perioperative volume replacement in children undergoing cardiac surgery: albumin versus hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanart, Christophe; Khalife, Maher; de Villé, Andrée; Otte, Florence; de Hert, Stefan; van der Linden, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare 4% albumin with 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 in terms of perioperative blood loss and intraoperative fluid requirements in children undergoing cardiac surgery. DESIGN: Prospective randomized study. SETTING: Single University Hospital. PATIENTS: Pediatric patients

  10. 77 FR 30883 - Amendment of Area Navigation (RNAV) Route Q-130; UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... Q-130, during radio communications with air traffic control. To eliminate future misunderstandings... reasons to avoid confusion in radio communications, notice and public procedures under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) are...

  11. BOREAS RSS-20 POLDER Radiance Images from the NASA C-130

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A subset of images collected by the POLDER instrument mounted on the NASA/Ames C-130 aircraft over tower sites in the BOREAS study areas during the IFCs in 1994.

  12. Iatrogenic mandibular fractures following removal of impacted third molars: an analysis of 130 cases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ethunandan, M; Shanahan, D; Patel, M

    2012-01-01

    .... We analysed 130 cases of mandibular fractures following removal of impacted third molars reported in the literature, including four managed in the maxillofacial unit and identified potential risk factors...

  13. OW Smith and Sandwell v8.2 - 1/30 Degree Bathymetry & Topography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Global bathymetry and topography information at 1/30 degree resolution. Data collected by means of in-situ and satellite measurements.

  14. 21 CFR 1311.130 - Requirements for establishing logical access control-Institutional practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.130 Requirements for establishing logical access control—Institutional... practitioner's electronic prescription application to indicate that controlled substances prescriptions are...

  15. MiR-221 and miR-130a regulate lung airway and vascular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Mujahid

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions play a crucial role in branching morphogenesis, but very little is known about how endothelial cells contribute to this process. Here, we examined how anti-angiogenic miR-221 and pro-angiogenic miR-130a affect airway and vascular development in the fetal lungs. Lung-specific effects of miR-130a and miR-221 were studied in mouse E14 whole lungs cultured for 48 hours with anti-miRs or mimics to miR-130a and miR-221. Anti-miR 221 treated lungs had more distal branch generations with increased Hoxb5 and VEGFR2 around airways. Conversely, mimic 221 treated lungs had reduced airway branching, dilated airway tips and decreased Hoxb5 and VEGFR2 in mesenchyme. Anti-miR 130a treatment led to reduced airway branching with increased Hoxa5 and decreased VEGFR2 in the mesenchyme. Conversely, mimic 130a treated lungs had numerous finely arborized branches extending into central lung regions with diffusely localized Hoxa5 and increased VEGFR2 in the mesenchyme. Vascular morphology was analyzed by GSL-B4 (endothelial cell-specific lectin immunofluorescence. Observed changes in airway morphology following miR-221 inhibition and miR-130a enhancement were mirrored by changes in vascular plexus formation around the terminal airways. Mouse fetal lung endothelial cells (MFLM-91U were used to study microvascular cell behavior. Mimic 221 treatment resulted in reduced tube formation and cell migration, where as the reverse was observed with mimic 130a treatment. From these data, we conclude that miR-221 and miR-130a have opposing effects on airway and vascular morphogenesis of the developing lung.

  16. Due to interleukin-6 type cytokine redundancy only glycoprotein 130 receptor blockade efficiently inhibits myeloma growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Renate; Günther, Andreas; Klausz, Katja; Staudinger, Matthias; Peipp, Matthias; Penas, Eva Maria Murga; Rose-John, Stefan; Wijdenes, John; Gramatzki, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-6 has an important role in the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma where it supports the growth and survival of the malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. It belongs to a family of cytokines which use the glycoprotein 130 chain for signal transduction, such as oncostatin M or leukemia inhibitory factor. Targeting interleukin-6 in plasma cell diseases is currently evaluated in clinical trials with monoclonal antibodies. Here, efforts were made to elucidate the contribution of interleukin-6 and glycoprotein 130 signaling in malignant plasma cell growth in vivo. In the xenograft severe combined immune deficiency model employing our interleukin-6-dependent plasma cell line INA-6, the lack of human interleukin-6 induced autocrine interleukin-6 production and a proliferative response to other cytokines of the glycoprotein 130 family. Herein, mice were treated with monoclonal antibodies against human interleukin-6 (elsilimomab/B-E8), the interleukin-6 receptor (B-R6), and with an antibody blocking glycoprotein 130 (B-R3). While treatment of mice with interleukin-6 and interleukin-6 receptor antibodies resulted in a modest delay in tumor growth, the development of plasmacytomas was completely prevented with the anti-glycoprotein 130 antibody. Importantly, complete inhibition was also achieved using F(ab’)2-fragments of monoclonal antibody B-R3. Tumors harbor activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and in vitro, the antibody inhibited leukemia inhibitory factor stimulated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and cell growth, while being less effective against interleukin-6. In conclusion, the growth of INA-6 plasmacytomas in vivo under interleukin-6 withdrawal remains strictly dependent on glycoprotein 130, and other glycoprotein 130 cytokines may substitute for interleukin-6. Antibodies against glycoprotein 130 are able to overcome this redundancy and should be explored for a possible therapeutic window

  17. Oncostatin M induces heat hypersensitivity by gp130-dependent sensitization of TRPV1 in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langeslag Michiel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oncostatin M (OSM is a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family and regulates eg. gene activation, cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. OSM binds to a receptor complex consisting of the ubiquitously expressed signal transducer gp130 and the ligand binding OSM receptor subunit, which is expressed on a specific subset of primary afferent neurons. In the present study, the effect of OSM on heat nociception was investigated in nociceptor-specific gp130 knock-out (SNS-gp130-/- and gp130 floxed (gp130fl/fl mice. Subcutaneous injection of pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of OSM into the hind-paw of C57BL6J wild type mice significantly reduced paw withdrawal latencies to heat stimulation. In contrast to gp130fl/fl mice, OSM did not induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo in SNS-gp130-/- mice. OSM applied at the receptive fields of sensory neurons in in vitro skin-nerve preparations showed that OSM significantly increased the discharge rate during a standard ramp-shaped heat stimulus. The capsaicin- and heat-sensitive ion channel TRPV1, expressed on a subpopulation of nociceptive neurons, has been shown to play an important role in inflammation-induced heat hypersensitivity. Stimulation of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons with OSM resulted in potentiation of capsaicin induced ionic currents. In line with these recordings, mice with a null mutation of the TRPV1 gene did not show any signs of OSM-induced heat hypersensitivity in vivo. The present data suggest that OSM induces thermal hypersensitivity by directly sensitizing nociceptors via OSMR-gp130 receptor mediated potentiation of TRPV1.

  18. AIR NATIONAL GUARD C-130H AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE OFFICER MANNING: IS THERE A BETTER OPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    130H aircraft maintenance officers adequately allow units to fill UTCs for deployment. Although ANG C-130H maintenance group UTCs work well in the...at NGB/A1MR, stated the additional aircraft maintenance officer was placed in the AMXS in order to continue operations at home station when the...placement on the UMD affects day to day operations at home station. Aircraft maintenance officer span of control imbalance is at its peak during unit

  19. 40 CFR 35.1605-9 - Indian Tribe set forth at 40 CFR 130.6(d).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Indian Tribe set forth at 40 CFR 130.6... Publicly Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-9 Indian Tribe set forth at 40 CFR 130.6(d). A Tribe meeting the requirements set forth at 40 CFR 130.6(d). ...

  20. 41 CFR 102-36.130 - What are our responsibilities in processing transfer orders of excess personal property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities in processing transfer orders of excess personal property? 102-36.130 Section 102-36.130 Public... Property For Our Agency Processing Transfers § 102-36.130 What are our responsibilities in processing transfer orders of excess personal property? Whether the excess is for your use or for use by a non-federal...

  1. 9 CFR 130.18 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site (excluding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site (excluding FADDL). 130.18 Section 130.18 Animals and... § 130.18 User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site...

  2. 9 CFR 130.16 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. 130.16 Section 130.16 Animals... USER FEES § 130.16 User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding...

  3. 75 FR 48615 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (ECF) Model AS350B3 and EC130 B4 Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... Directives; Eurocopter France (ECF) Model AS350B3 and EC130 B4 Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation... 073254 and modification of the Model EC130 B4 by MOD 073773. Failure of a contactor can prevent switching... No. 05A009, for the Model EC130 B4 helicopters. Both ASB's are dated November 16, 2009. Both ASBs...

  4. 75 FR 63052 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France (ECF) Model AS350B3 and EC130 B4 Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... (ECF) Model AS350B3 and EC130 B4 Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... Model AS350B3 and EC130 B4 helicopters. This amendment is prompted by a mandatory continuing... amend 14 CFR part 39 to include an AD that would apply to ECF Model AS350B3 and EC130 B4 helicopters on...

  5. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total...

  6. 22 CFR 130.10 - Information to be furnished by applicant or supplier to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Its employer and title; and (v) Its relationship, if any, to applicant, supplier, or vendor, and to... supplier to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. 130.10 Section 130.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT... § 130.10 Information to be furnished by applicant or supplier to the Directorate of Defense Trade...

  7. Structural Organization of a Full-Length Gp130/LIF-R Cytokine Receptor Transmembrane Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiniotis, G.; Lupardus, P.J.; Martick, M.; Walz, T.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-26

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-R{alpha}). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6R{alpha} hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-R{alpha} heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-R{alpha}/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the 'tall' class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others.

  8. Impact of microRNA-130a on the neutrophil proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Corinna Cavan; Refsgaard, Jan Christian; Østergaard, Ole

    2015-01-01

    by in silico prediction algorithms one at a time. However, one miRNA can have many different targets, which may vary depending on the context. Here, we investigated the effect of miR-130a on the proteome of a murine and a human myeloid cell line. RESULTS: Using pulsed stable isotope labelling of amino acids...... with the impact on protein levels. We used RAIN, a novel database for miRNA-protein and protein-protein interactions, to identify putative miR-130a targets. In the 32Dcl3 clone, putative targets were more up-regulated than the remaining quantified proteins following miR-130a inhibition, and three significantly...... derepressed proteins (NFYC, ISOC1, and CAT) are putative miR-130a targets with good RAIN scores. We also created a network including inferred, putative neutrophil miR-130a targets and identified the transcription factors Myb and CBF-β as putative miR-130a targets, which may regulate the primary granule...

  9. Myxoma virus M130R is a novel virulence factor required for lethal myxomatosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John W; Werden, Steven J; Wang, Fuan; McKillop, William M; Jimenez, June; Villeneuve, Danielle; McFadden, Grant; Dekaban, Gregory A

    2009-09-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a highly lethal, rabbit-specific poxvirus that induces a disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits. In an effort to understand the function of predicted immunomodulatory genes we have deleted various viral genes from MV and tested the ability of these knockout viruses to induce lethal myxomatosis. MV encodes a unique 15 kD cytoplasmic protein (M130R) that is expressed late (12h post infection) during infection. M130R is a non-essential gene for MV replication in rabbit, monkey or human cell lines. Construction of a targeted gene knockout virus (vMyx130KO) and infection of susceptible rabbits demonstrate that the M130R knockout virus is attenuated and that loss of M130R expression allows the rabbit host immune system to effectively respond to and control the lethal effects of MV. M130R expression is a bona fide poxviral virulence factor necessary for full and lethal development of myxomatosis.

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 130: Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 130: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 130 are located within Areas 1, 7, 10, 20, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Unit 130 is comprised of the following CASs: • 01-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 07-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks • 10-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 20-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 20-99-05, Tar Residue • 22-02-02, Buried UST Piping • 23-02-07, Underground Storage Tank This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective action investigations and provides data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 130 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implemented any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation-derived wastes. From August 4 through September 30, 2008, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 130, Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, confirm that no residual contamination is present, and properly dispose of wastes. Constituents detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to identify

  11. Phosphorylation of p130Cas initiates Rac activation and membrane ruffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Alok

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NTKs regulate physiological processes such as cell migration, differentiation, proliferation, and survival by interacting with and phosphorylating a large number of substrates simultaneously. This makes it difficult to attribute a particular biological effect to the phosphorylation of a particular substrate. We developed the Functional Interaction Trap (FIT method to phosphorylate specifically a single substrate of choice in living cells, thereby allowing the biological effect(s of that phosphorylation to be assessed. In this study we have used FIT to investigate the effects of specific phosphorylation of p130Cas, a protein implicated in cell migration. We have also used this approach to address a controversy regarding whether it is Src family kinases or focal adhesion kinase (FAK that phosphorylates p130Cas in the trimolecular Src-FAK-p130Cas complex. Results We show here that SYF cells (mouse fibroblasts lacking the NTKs Src, Yes and Fyn exhibit a low level of basal tyrosine phosphorylation at focal adhesions. FIT-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of NTK substrates p130Cas, paxillin and FAK and cortactin was observed at focal adhesions, while FIT-mediated phosphorylation of cortactin was also seen at the cell periphery. Phosphorylation of p130Cas in SYF cells led to activation of Rac1 and increased membrane ruffling and lamellipodium formation, events associated with cell migration. We also found that the kinase activity of Src and not FAK is essential for phosphorylation of p130Cas when the three proteins exist as a complex in focal adhesions. Conclusion These results demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas is sufficient for its localization to focal adhesions and for activation of downstream signaling events associated with cell migration. FIT provides a valuable tool to evaluate the contribution of individual components of the response to signals with multiple outputs, such as

  12. Glycoprotein 130 receptor signaling mediates α-cell dysfunction in a rodent model of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chow, Samuel Z; Speck, Madeleine; Yoganathan, Piriya

    2014-01-01

    the effects of α-cell gp130 receptor signaling on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. IL-6 family cytokines were elevated in islets in rodent models of this disease. gp130 receptor activation increased STAT3 phosphorylation in primary α-cells and stimulated glucagon secretion. Pancreatic α-cell gp130......Dysregulated glucagon secretion accompanies islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes. We recently discovered that interleukin (IL)-6 stimulates glucagon secretion from human and rodent islets. IL-6 family cytokines require the glycoprotein 130 (gp130) receptor to signal. In this study, we elucidated...... knockout (αgp130KO) mice showed no differences in glycemic control, α-cell function, or α-cell mass. However, when subjected to streptozotocin plus high-fat diet to induce islet inflammation and pathophysiology modeling type 2 diabetes, αgp130KO mice had reduced fasting glycemia, improved glucose tolerance...

  13. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-10-13

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

  14. Loss of the retinoblastoma protein-related p130 protein in small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Holm, K; Niebuhr, A

    1997-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene family consists of the tumor suppressor protein pRB and its two relatives p107 and p130. These proteins have been implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, in part, through inactivation of members of the E2F transcription factor family. Overexpression of pRB, p...... been described in a variety of human tumors, including retinoblastomas, osteosarcomas, and small cell lung carcinomas. Despite the structural and functional similarity between pRB, p107, and p130, alterations in the latter two proteins have not been identified in human tumors. We have screened a panel...... a splice acceptor sequence in the GLC2 genomic DNA. This mutation eliminates exon 2, leading to an in-frame stop codon, and no detectable protein is produced. These data are, to our knowledge, the first to describe the loss of p130 as a consequence of a genetic alteration, suggesting that not only pRB...

  15. A calorimetric search on double beta decay of {sup 130}Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Capelli, S.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Pobes, C.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.; Vanzini, M

    2003-04-03

    We report on the final results of a series of experiments on double beta decay of {sup 130}Te carried out with an array of twenty cryogenic detectors. The set-up is made with crystals of TeO{sub 2} with a total mass of 6.8 kg, the largest operating one for a cryogenic experiment. Four crystals are made with isotopically enriched materials: two in {sup 128}Te and two others in {sup 130}Te. The remaining ones are made with natural tellurium, which contains 31.7% and 33.8% {sup 128}Te and {sup 130}Te, respectively. The array was run under a heavy shield in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory at a depth of about 3500 m.w.e. By recording the pulses of each detector in anticoincidence with the others a lower limit of 2.1x10{sup 23} years has been obtained at the 90% C.L. on the lifetime for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te. In terms of effective neutrino mass this leads to the most restrictive limit in direct experiments, after those obtained with Ge diodes. Limits on other lepton violating decays of {sup 130}Te and on the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 128}Te to the ground state of {sup 128}Xe are also reported and discussed. An indication is presented for the two neutrino double beta decay of {sup 130}Te. Some consequences of the present results in the interpretation of geochemical experiments are discussed.

  16. ATLAS ITk Short-Strip Stave prototypes with 130nm chipset

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Peter William; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS ITk is working to deliver a new Inner Tracking detector for use at HL-LHC. The strip tracker community has recently constructed partially loaded, double sided demonstrator staves using the HCC / ABC130 chipset in 130nm CMOS technology. Mindful of the need to maximise power efficiency whilst minimising the cost and material of associated cable plant, the system design includes the integration of a low-mass DC-DC converter and sensor bias (HV) switch within each module. This paper documents the first results from the demonstrator staves. The system concept and the roadmap toward a full system test are also outlined.

  17. ATLAS ITk Short-Strip Stave Prototypes with 130 nm chipset

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Peter William; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS ITk Collaboration is working to deliver a new Inner Tracking detector for use at HL-LHC. The strip tracker community has recently constructed a partially loaded, double-sided demonstrator stave using the HCC / ABC130 chipset in 130 nm CMOS technology. Mindful of the need to maximise power efficiency whilst minimising the cost and material of associated cable plant, the system design includes the integration of a low-mass DC-DC converter and sensor bias (HV) switch within each module. This paper documents the first results from the demonstrator stave. The system concept is also outlined.

  18. MicroRNA-130b is involved in bovine granulosa and cumulus cells function, oocyte maturation and blastocyst formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Pritam Bala; Tesfaye, Dawit; Rings, Franca; Hossien, Munir; Hoelker, Michael; Held, Eva; Neuhoff, Christaine; Tholen, Ernst; Schellander, Karl; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie

    2017-06-19

    Oocyte maturation and preimplantation embryo development are controlled by array of genes that are post-transcriptionally regulated by microRNAs. With respect to this, previously, we identified altered expression of microRNA-130b (miR-130b) during oocyte maturation. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of miR-130b in bovine granulosa and cumulus cell function, oocyte maturation and preimplantation embryo development using gain- and loss-of- function approach. For this study, the granulosa cells, cumulus cells and the oocytes were collected from ovaries obtained from slaughterhouse. The genes targeted by miR-130b were identified using dual-luciferase reporter assay. The role of miR-130b in granulosa and cumulus cell function was investigated by increasing and inhibiting its expression in in vitro cultured cells using miR-130b precursor and inhibitor, respectively while the role of miR-130b on oocyte development, immature oocytes were microinjected with miR-130b precursor and inhibitor and the polar body extrusion, the proportion of oocytes reaching to metaphase II stage and the mitochondrial were determined in each oocyte group 22 h after microinjection. Moreover, to investigate the role of miR-130b during preimplantation embryo development, zygote stage embryos were microinjected with miR-130b precursor or inhibitor and the cleavage rate, morula and blastocyst formation was analyzed in embryos derived from each zygote group after in vitro culture. The luciferase assay showed that SMAD5 and MSK1 genes were identified as the direct targets of miR-130b. Overexpression of miR-130b increased the granulosa and cumulus cell proliferation, while inhibition showed the opposite phenotype. Apart from these, modulation of miR-130b altered the lactate production and cholesterol biosynthesis in cumulus cells. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-130b expression during oocyte in vitro maturation reduced the first polar body extrusion, the proportion of oocytes reaching to metaphase

  19. Microstructure characterization in the weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-11-27

    Nov 27, 2002 ... Abstract. Microstructural characterization of the weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 high strength steels, welded under 80% Ar + 20% CO2 gas shielded metal arc welding and different weld heat inputs, was carried out by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy ...

  20. Microstructure characterization in the weld metals of HQ130+ QJ63 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microstructural characterization of the weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 high strength steels, welded under 80% Ar + 20% CO2 gas shielded metal arc welding and different weld heat inputs, was carried out by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The relative contents of ...

  1. 75 FR 47201 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Model EC 130 B4 Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ...-63-AD; Amendment 39-16369; AD 2010-15-03] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... Eurocopter France helicopters. This action requires inspecting certain electrical harnesses for damage and if... Eurocopter France Model EC 130 B4 helicopters that have been modified in accordance with MOD 073774, and have...

  2. Air Launch Characteristics of the MQM-74C Target Drone from DC-130A Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-09

    are defined in reference (b). ENGINE CHARACTERISTICS The WR24-7 is a target drone turbojet engine. It is housed in the aft fusel - age with the air...installed position on the pylon (-3 ’egrees with respect to the aircraft fusel - age reference line). The installed coefficients vary as the DC-130A

  3. 21 CFR 111.130 - What quality control operations are required for returned dietary supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for... and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.130 What quality control operations are required for returned dietary supplements? Quality control operations for returned dietary...

  4. 21 CFR 130.11 - Label designations of ingredients for standardized foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Label designations of ingredients for standardized... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD STANDARDS: GENERAL General Provisions § 130.11 Label... the label wherever the name of the standardized food appears on the label so conspicuously as to be...

  5. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer in ...

  6. Improving the Cost Efficiency and Readiness of MC-130 Aircrew Training: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Air Force VBA Visual Basic for Applications 1 AFSOC/A3T, "MC-130 Aircrew Training," Air Force...GRASP), integer programing, the use of Excel VBA tools, and Tabu searches. The literature review provided me with a good working knowledge of this

  7. 40 CFR 1045.130 - What installation instructions must I give to vessel manufacturers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What installation instructions must I... MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1045.130 What installation... include specified limits for catalyst systems, such as exhaust backpressure, catalyst location, and...

  8. 40 CFR 1054.130 - What installation instructions must I give to equipment manufacturers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What installation instructions must I...-IGNITION ENGINES AND EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1054.130 What installation..., this may include specified limits for catalyst systems, such as exhaust backpressure, catalyst location...

  9. A Policy Analysis of the Refugee Act 130 of 1998 | Kleinsmidt | Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article provides a policy analysis of the Refugee Act 130 of 1998, focusing specifi cally on formulation and implementation. The South African legislation on refugees is located within the context of the principles of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the African Union (AU), the New Economic ...

  10. 12 CFR 550.130 - How may I conduct multi-state operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a fiduciary for relationships that include property located in other States, and may act as a... FIDUCIARY POWERS OF SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS Exercising Fiduciary Powers § 550.130 How may I conduct multi-state operations? (a) Conducting fiduciary activities in more than one State. You may conduct fiduciary activities...

  11. IL-13 R130Q single nucleotide polymorphism in asthmatic Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    the wild type in inducing allergic inflammation as reflected by the higher serum total IgE and AEC. Hence, IL-13R130Q may be .... DNA extraction from mononuclear cells using. (Purescript total DNA Isolation kit, Gentra, Cat. .... atopic dermatitis, most strongly in white children. Chen and associates21 indicated that SNP in IL-.

  12. 42 CFR 401.130 - Materials available at social security district offices and branch offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials available at social security district... Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.130 Materials available at social security district offices and branch... inspection at the social security district offices and branch offices: (1) Compilation of the Social Security...

  13. Identified hadron production in $\\sqrt {s}= 130$ GeV Au–Au ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 60; Issue 5. Identified hadron production in s = 130 GeV Au–Au collisions at relativistic heavy-ion collider. Julia Velkovska. Volume 60 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 1011-1015 ... Author Affiliations. Julia Velkovska1. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 510C, Upton, NY 11973, USA ...

  14. 25 CFR 39.130 - Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs... INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Language Development Programs § 39.130 Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs? Yes, schools can use ISEF funds to...

  15. Gas Pobre: Factibilidad de su uso en los motores ZIL – 130

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nestor Proenza Pérez

    2011-01-01

    ... Combustión Interna, las cuales son, baja concentración de alquitrán en el gas pobre (temperatura del gas producto a la salida del gasificador, el motor seleccionado es el ZIL-130, por ser de amplio uso en nuestro...

  16. 42 CFR 415.130 - Conditions for payment: Physician pathology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... Physician Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.130 Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... of physician pathology services to fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who were hospital...

  17. Mir-130a-Mediated Downregulation of SMAD4 Contributes to Reduced Sensitivity to TGE beta Stimulation in Promyelocytic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hager, Mattias; Pedersen, Corinna Cavan; Larsen, Maria Torp

    2011-01-01

    R-130a expression is significant lower. In acute myeloid leukemia the granulocyte precursors have lost the ability to undergo terminal maturation, leading to accumulation of non-functional, immature granulocytes (myeloblasts). We hypothesize that a sustained high expression of miR-130a during...... of Smad4 was found in primary cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and in a cell line (Kasumi-1) with the t(8:21)(q22;q22) chromosomal translocation. The level of Smad4 increased in Kasumi-1 cells when the endogenous level of miR-130a was inhibited by anti-miR-130a LNA. Our data indicate...

  18. Association of IL6ST (gp130) Polymorphism with Functional Outcome Following Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Husseini, Nada; Hoffman, Benjamin M; Bennett, Ellen R; Li, Yen-Wei; Williamson Taylor, Rachel A; Hailey, Claire E; Richardson, Kara; Li, Yi-Ju; Laskowitz, Daniel T; James, Michael L

    2018-01-01

    Genes associated with the inflammatory response and cytostructural integrity may influence recovery following a brain injury. To examine this in the setting of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed for associations with patient outcome. A cohort of 54 patients with supratentorial ICH were enrolled. Based on known involvement with neuroinflammation and cytostructural integrity, 10 preselected SNPs from 6 candidate genes were tested for associations with 6-month functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] ≥ 3), mortality, and in-hospital deterioration (Glasgow Coma Scale decrease by >2 within 7 days of admission) following ICH. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression with adjustment for race and ICH score were performed. SNP rs10940495 (gp130 G/A) within the gp130 gene was the only SNP significantly associated with lower odds of an unfavorable 6-month functional outcome (odds ratio = .16 for mRS ≥ 3; 95% confidence interval, .03-.87, P = .03). Compared with major allele (A) homozygotes, minor allele (G) carriers in the IL6 signal transducer gene (gp130) locus were 84% less likely to have a poor outcome (mRS ≥ 3) at 6 months following spontaneous ICH. The SNP rs10940495 (gp130 G/A) and SNP rs3219119 (PARP-1 A/T) were associated with 6-month mortality (P = .02 and .04, respectively) only on univariate analysis. None of the SNPs examined were associated with in-hospital deterioration. In this exploratory study, SNP rs10940495 in the gp130 locus was associated with functional outcome at 6 months following spontaneous ICH. These findings, which should be validated through a larger study, suggest that inflammation plays an important role in mediating outcomes after ICH. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Glycoprotein 130 Inhibitor Ameliorates Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiwei; Liu, Zhihong; Luo, Qin; Zhao, Zhihui; Zhao, Qing; Zheng, Yaguo; Xi, Qunying; Tang, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vasoconstriction, vascular remodelling, and microthrombotic events. Inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL-6) may be a key factor in the development of PAH, and glycoprotein 130 (Gp130) is an important signal-transducing subunit of IL-6. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Gp130 inhibitor in reducing inflammation and ameliorating PAH-related vascular remodelling in monocrotaline (MCT)-exposed rats. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 96; weight, 240-250 g) were randomly divided into 3 groups: control, MCT-exposed (MCT), and MCT-exposed plus Gp130 inhibitor (MCT-Gp) administered daily (5 mg/kg) from days 14-28. Eight rats were killed in each group at weeks 1 through 4, with the following measured variables compared across groups on day 28: hemodynamics, right ventricular hypertrophy, morphometric measurements, immunohistochemical results, levels of IL-6, phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2 (BMPR2), proangiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), proproliferative kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax. Compared with the MCT group, Gp130 inhibitor, after MCT exposure, improved hemodynamics and significantly reduced the severity of inflammation, as estimated by levels of IL-6 (P pulmonary arterial remodelling, as assessed by medial wall thickness (P pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, and ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodelling in MCT-induced PH in rats. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 21 CFR 130.20 - Food additives proposed for use in foods for which definitions and standards of identity are...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amendment of a regulation establishing a definition and standard of identity for a food under section 401 of... and standard of identity contains a proposal for a food additive regulation, and the petitioner fails... definitions and standards of identity are established. 130.20 Section 130.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  1. 37 CFR 1.130 - Affidavit or declaration to disqualify commonly owned patent or published application as prior art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disqualify commonly owned patent or published application as prior art. 1.130 Section 1.130 Patents... or declaration to disqualify commonly owned patent or published application as prior art. (a) When.... patent or U.S. patent application publication which is not prior art under 35 U.S.C. 102(b), and the...

  2. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development staff...

  3. 20 CFR 667.130 - How are WIA title I formula funds allocated to local workforce investment areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are WIA title I formula funds allocated to local workforce investment areas? 667.130 Section 667.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... must assist Governors in the development of any discretionary within-State allocation formulas. (WIA...

  4. 9 CFR 130.15 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or other authorized site. 130.15... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.15 User fees for veterinary diagnostic isolation and identification...

  5. A North Atlantic tephrostratigraphical framework for 130-60 ka b2k

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwan M., Davis; Peter M., Abbott; Rhian H., Meara

    2014-01-01

    . Major, minor and trace element results are presented for the new NGRIP horizons together with age estimates based on their position within the ice-core record. Basaltic tephras of Icelandic origin dominate the framework with only eight tephras of rhyolitic composition found. New results from marine core......Building chronological frameworks for proxy sequences spanning 130e60 ka b2k is plagued by difficulties and uncertainties. Recent developments in the North Atlantic region, however, affirm the potential offered by tephrochronology and specifically the search for cryptotephra. Here we review...... the potential offered by tephrostratigraphy for sequences spanning 130e60 ka b2k. We combine newly identified cryptotephra deposits from the NGRIP ice-core and a marine core from the Iceland Basin with previously published data from the ice and marine realms to construct the first tephrostratigraphical...

  6. miRNA-130a regulates C/EBP-ε expression during granulopoiesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Maria T; Häger, Mattias; Glenthøj, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-ε (C/EBP-ε) is considered a master transcription factor regulating terminal neutrophil maturation. It is essential for expression of secondary granule proteins, but it also regulates proliferation, cell cycle, and maturation during granulopoiesis. Cebpe(-/-) mice have...... incomplete granulocytic differentiation and increased sensitivity toward bacterial infections. The amount of C/EBP-ε messenger RNA (mRNA) increases with maturation from myeloblasts with peak level in myelocytes (MC)/metamyelocytes (MM), when the cells stop proliferating followed by a decline in more mature...... cells. In contrast, C/EBP-ε protein is virtually detectable only in the MC/MM population, indicating that expression in more immature cells could be inhibited by microRNAs (miRNAs). We found that miRNA-130a (miR-130a) regulates C/EBP-ε protein expression in both murine and human granulocytic precursors...

  7. Shock initiation of the TATB-based explosive PBX 9502 heated to 130 degrees C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Bartram, B. D.; Gibson, L. L.; Pacheco, A. H.; Jones, J. D.; Goodbody, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present gas-gun driven plate-impact shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX 9502 (95 weight % triaminotrinitrobenzene, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder) heated to 130 + / - 2 degrees C. PBX 9502 samples were heated using resistive elements, temperatures were monitored using embedded and surface mounted type-E thermocouples, and the shock to detonation transition was measured using embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. Results indicate that shock sensitivity increases regularly as the temperature increases. For a fixed initial pressure, the time and distance to onset of detonation are shorter for the heated explosive than for the explosive initially at 23 degrees C. For PBX 9502 heated to 130 degrees C, the ``Pop-plot'' or distance to detonation, xD, vs. impact pressure, P, is log10(xD) = 2.82 - 2.19log10(P) .

  8. MiR-130b functions as a tumor promoter in glioma via regulation of ERK/MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Liu, Y-H; Sun, A-G; Huan, L-C; Li, H-D; Liu, D-M

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the miR-130b expression in patients with glioma and to analyze its role and underlying molecular mechanism on the carcinogenesis. The expression levels of miR-130b were detected with quantitative Real-time PCR. The relationship between miR-130b expression and clinicopathologic characteristics were analyzed. MiR-130b inhibitor was transfected into glioma cell lines to investigate its role in HCC. MTT assays were conducted to explore the impact of miR-130b down-expression on the proliferation of human glioma cells. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis assays were performed using flow cytometry. Levels of ERK/MAPK pathway related proteins were evaluated by Western blotting. Data were analyzed using the 2-ΔΔCT method through student's t-test via the GraphPad Prism software (La Jolla, CA, USA). The expression of miR-130b was markedly upregulated in glioma cell lines and tissues, and high miR-130b expression was significantly associated with advanced WHO grade (p = 0.022) and low Karnofsky performance score (p = 0.001). In addition, downregulation of miR-130b inhibited the proliferation of glioma cells and induced cell-cycle arrest and cells apoptosis in vivo. Importantly, ERK/MAPK pathway was found to be inactivated in the glioma cell lines after miR-130b knockout experiment. The current data indicated that miR-130b may play a critical role in the progression of glioma via ERK/MAPK signaling cascades, suggesting that it may be a useful therapeutic agent in glioma patients.

  9. Ride-along data LOS 130, 170 & LO330 shots z3139, 3140 and 3141

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loisel, Guillaume Pascal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Each instrument records the x-ray emission from the Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum (ZPDH); LOS 130 TIXTLs instruments record the absorption of the pinch backlighter through an expanding NaF/Mg foil; LOS 170 MLM instruments record monochromatic images at 276 and 528 eV energies near and before ZPDH stagnation time; LOS 330 TREX 6A & B: recoded time resolved absorption spectra from a radiatively heated Ne gas.

  10. Closure of the Car Pool in building 130 until 6 November

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The Car Pool, Building 130, will be closed from Friday, 9 October until Friday, 6 November for renovation.   All activities, such as SIXT rental cars and maintenance of the CERN car fleet, will be temporarily transferred to the Car Pool at Building 124. Mobile phone: 161113 (+41 75 411 1113). Thank you in advance for your understanding. GS-IS Group

  11. Human Factors of CC-130 Operations. Volume 5: Human Factors in Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    ATG study team describes the development of a proposed new training programme devoted to Human Factors in Decision Making ( HFDM ). It is envisaged that...the HFDM training syllabus would replace existing Aircrew Co- ordination Training (ACT) within the CC-130 community. The proposed training can be...processing. The differences lie less in the content than in the way the material is organised and shaped by theory. The proposed HFDM training is based

  12. Gender Discrimination in Hiring: Evidence from 19,130 Resumes in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiangyi; Zhang, Jie; Song, Xuetao

    2013-01-01

    We study gender discrimination in hiring markets by sending 19,130 fictitious matched resumes in response to professional employment advertisements posted on major Internet employment boards in China for positions such as engineers, accountants, secretaries, and marketing professionals in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Wuhan, and Chengdu. Our results show that, in general, state-owned firms tend to prefer male applicants. Foreign and private firms tend to prefer female applicants. On...

  13. Training for Three Wars Ago: Antiquated C-130H Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    GlobalSecurity.org, “Overview of the Stryker Brigade Combat Team,” http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/army/fm/3-21-31/c01.htm 28 Alan Vick ...Modernization, Issues for Congress, R43618 (Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, June 2014), 11. 48 Alan Vick , et al, The Stryker Brigade...www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104517/c-130- hercules.aspx Vick , Alan, David Orletsky, Bruce Pirnie, Seth Jones. The

  14. Loss of the golgin GM130 causes Golgi disruption, Purkinje neuron loss, and ataxia in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chunyi; Mei, Mei; Li, Qiuling; Roboti, Peristera; Pang, Qianqian; Ying, Zhengzhou; Gao, Fei; Lowe, Martin; Bao, Shilai

    2017-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus lies at the heart of the secretory pathway where it is required for secretory trafficking and cargo modification. Disruption of Golgi architecture and function has been widely observed in neurodegenerative disease, but whether Golgi dysfunction is causal with regard to the neurodegenerative process, or is simply a manifestation of neuronal death, remains unclear. Here we report that targeted loss of the golgin GM130 leads to a profound neurological phenotype in mice. Globa...

  15. Searching for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of 130Te with CUORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Artusa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ decay is a hypothesized lepton-number-violating process that offers the only known means of asserting the possible Majorana nature of neutrino mass. The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE is an upcoming experiment designed to search for 0νββ decay of 130Te using an array of 988 TeO2 crystal bolometers operated at 10 mK. The detector will contain 206 kg of 130Te and have an average energy resolution of 5 keV; the projected 0νββ decay half-life sensitivity after five years of livetime is 1.6 × 1026 y at 1σ (9.5 × 1025 y at the 90% confidence level, which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana mass in the range 40–100 meV (50–130 meV. In this paper, we review the experimental techniques used in CUORE as well as its current status and anticipated physics reach.

  16. “No-spin” states and low-lying structures in 130Xe and 136Xe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inelastic neutron scattering on solid 130XeF2 and 136XeF2 targets was utilized to populate excited levels in 130Xe and 136Xe. When calculating nuclear matrix elements vital to the understanding of double-beta decay, it is important to have a clear understanding of the low-lying level structure of both the parent and daughter nucleus. Of particular relevance to double-beta decay searches are the assignments of 0+ states. We show here that in the case of 130Xe there are several discrepancies in the adopted level structure. We found that one previous 0+ candidate level (1590 keV can be ruled out and assigned two additional candidates (2223 and 2242 keV. In 136Xe we question the previous assignment of a 0+ level at 2582 keV. Excitation function and angular distribution measurements were utilized to make spin and parity assignments of levels and place new transitions.

  17. Loss of the golgin GM130 causes Golgi disruption, Purkinje neuron loss, and ataxia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyi; Mei, Mei; Li, Qiuling; Roboti, Peristera; Pang, Qianqian; Ying, Zhengzhou; Gao, Fei; Lowe, Martin; Bao, Shilai

    2017-01-10

    The Golgi apparatus lies at the heart of the secretory pathway where it is required for secretory trafficking and cargo modification. Disruption of Golgi architecture and function has been widely observed in neurodegenerative disease, but whether Golgi dysfunction is causal with regard to the neurodegenerative process, or is simply a manifestation of neuronal death, remains unclear. Here we report that targeted loss of the golgin GM130 leads to a profound neurological phenotype in mice. Global KO of mouse GM130 results in developmental delay, severe ataxia, and postnatal death. We further show that selective deletion of GM130 in neurons causes fragmentation and defective positioning of the Golgi apparatus, impaired secretory trafficking, and dendritic atrophy in Purkinje cells. These cellular defects manifest as reduced cerebellar size and Purkinje cell number, leading to ataxia. Purkinje cell loss and ataxia first appear during postnatal development but progressively worsen with age. Our data therefore indicate that targeted disruption of the mammalian Golgi apparatus and secretory traffic results in neuronal degeneration in vivo, supporting the view that Golgi dysfunction can play a causative role in neurodegeneration.

  18. Wind tunnel test of 1/30 scale heliostat field array model. Test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G. L.

    1978-02-22

    From 9 January through 20 January 1978, Honeywell conducted a wind tunnel test on a 1/30 scale partial heliostat field. The heliostats were per Honeywell's design developed under the 10 megawatt central receiver pilot electrical power plant subsystem research experiment contract. Likewise, the scaled section of the field geometry duplicated the proposed circular layout. Testing was conducted at the Georgia Institute of Technology's 9 foot subsonic tunnel. The objective of the test was to ascertain from a qualitative standpoint the field effects upon wind loading within a heliostat field. To accomplish this, numerous pressure tap measurements at different heights and at different field positions were taken with varying wind speeds, fence designs, and heliostat gimbal orientations. The Department of Energy specified boundary layer profile was also scaled by 1/30 in order to simulate the total wind effects as accurately as possible taking into account the potentially severe scaling or Reynolds number effects at a 1/30 scale. After initial model set-up within the tunnel and scaled boundary layer generated, 91 separate runs were accomplished. The results do demonstrate the high sensitivity of wind loading upon the collector field due to the actual heliostat orientation and fence geometry. Vertical pressure gradients within the model field and flow reentry angles provide a good qualitative feel as to the full scale environment that might be expected and point to the need for specific additional testing to further explore potentially dangerous conditions.

  19. [Superficial Esophageal Carcinoma and Esophageal Intraepithelial Neoplasia: a Pathological Study of 130 Cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Du; Wu, Xia; Jiang, Dan; Yao, Wen-qing; Liu, Qing-lin; Wang, Yi-ying; Zhu-Lin-lin; Qin, Lin-yu; Zhang, Wen-yan

    2015-11-01

    To identify the pathological features of superficial esophageal carcinoma and esophageal intraepithelial neoplasia resected through endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The clinical and pathologic profiles of 130 cases were reviewed, including gross type, histology type, infiltration depth, infiltrative growth pattern, presence of tumor budding, lymphatic and vascular invasion, and margin status. The patients had a median age of 62 years old. The predominant gross type was mixed type (78/130, 60.0%), followed by Type 0-II (49/130, 37.7%). The longest diameter of lesionshad a median of 13.8 mm. Morphologically, there were 3 cases (2.3%) of undetermined dysplasia, 25 cases (19.2%) of low grade intraepithelial neoplasia, 56 cases (43.1%) of high grade of intraepithelial neoplasia, and 46 cases (35.4%) of invasive carcinoma. No correlation was found between histological type and gross type. Intramucosal and submucosal invasive carcinoma accounted for 87.0% (40/46) and 13.0% (6/46) of the cases, respectively; sm1 and sm2 accounted for 4.3% (2/46) and 8.7% (4/46) of the cases, respectively. Infiltrative growth pattern was identified as infiltrative growth pattern (INF) a (23/46, 50.0%), INFbeta (17/46, 37.0%) and INFc (6/46, 13.0%). Tumor budding was found in 3 cases and lymphatic and vascular invasion was found in 2 cases. Margin was positive in 30 cases (23.1%). Invasive carcinomahad a higher margin positive rate (24/46, 52.1%) than low grade intraepithelial neoplasia (1/25, 4.0%) and high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (5/56, 89%) (Pneoplasia (8.0%, 2/25) and high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (8.9%, 5/56) (Pneoplasia resected by ESD are predominantly mixed type under endoscope, with histological features of high grade intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Invasive carcinomas are more likely to recur and present with a positive margin.

  20. MicroRNA-130b targets Fmr1 and regulates embryonic neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Zhang, Kunshan [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Yanlu; Wang, Junbang; Cui, Yaru [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Li, Siguang, E-mail: siguangli@163.com [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Luo, Yuping, E-mail: luoyuping@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We found that the 3′ UTR of the Fmr1 mRNA is a target of miR-130b. •MiR-130b suppresses the expression of Fmr1 in mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters the proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters fate specification of mouse embryonic stem cell. -- Abstract: Fragile X syndrome, one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat in the 5′-untranslated region of the X-linked Fmr1 gene, which results in transcriptional silencing and loss of expression of its encoded protein FMRP. The loss of FMRP increases proliferation and alters fate specification in adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs). However, little is known about Fmr1 mRNA regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In the present study, we report that miR-130b regulated Fmr1 expression by directly targeting its 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR). Up-regulation of miR-130b in mouse embryonic neural progenitor cells (eNPCs) decreased Fmr1 expression, markedly increased eNPC proliferation and altered the differentiation tendency of eNPCs, suggesting that antagonizing miR-130b may be a new therapeutic entry point for treating Fragile X syndrome.

  1. Nuclear deformation and the two-neutrino double- {beta} decay in {sup 124,126}Xe, {sup 128,130}Te, {sup 130,132}Ba and {sup 150}Nd isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Chandra, R.; Rath, P.K. [University of Lucknow, Department of Physics, Lucknow (India); Raina, P.K. [IIT, Department of Physics and Meteorology, Kharagpur (India); Hirsch, J.G. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, A.P. 70-543, Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-09-15

    The two-neutrino double-beta decay of {sup 124,126}Xe, {sup 128,} {sup 130}Te,{sup 130,132}Ba and {sup 150}Nd isotopes is studied in the Projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (PHFB) model. Theoretical 2 {nu} {beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -} half-lives of {sup 128,130}Te, and {sup 150}Nd isotopes, and 2{nu}{beta}{sup +}{beta}{sup +}, 2 {nu} {beta}{sup +}EC and 2{nu}ECEC for {sup 124,126}Xe and {sup 130,132}Ba nuclei are presented. Calculated quadrupolar transition probabilities B(E2:0{sup +}{yields}2{sup +}), static quadrupole moments and g-factors in the parent and daughter nuclei reproduce the experimental information, validating the reliability of the model wave functions. The anticorrelation between nuclear deformation and the nuclear transition matrix element M{sub 2{nu}} is confirmed. (orig.)

  2. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu [Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Pathology and Molecular Medicine, and Queen' s University Cancer Institute, Queen' s University, Botterell Hall, Rm. 713, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Feracci, Helene [Universite Bordeaux 1, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS UPR 8641, 33600 Pessac (France); Raptis, Leda, E-mail: raptisl@queensu.ca [Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and Pathology and Molecular Medicine, and Queen' s University Cancer Institute, Queen' s University, Botterell Hall, Rm. 713, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  3. Balanced Hydroxyethylstarch (HES 130/0.4 Impairs Kidney Function In-Vivo without Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Alexander Schick

    Full Text Available Volume therapy is a standard procedure in daily perioperative care, and there is an ongoing discussion about the benefits of colloid resuscitation with hydroxyethylstarch (HES. In sepsis HES should be avoided due to a higher risk for acute kidney injury (AKI. Results of the usage of HES in patients without sepsis are controversial. Therefore we conducted an animal study to evaluate the impact of 6% HES 130/0.4 on kidney integrity with sepsis or under healthy conditions Sepsis was induced by standardized Colon Ascendens Stent Peritonitis (sCASP. sCASP-group as well as control group (C remained untreated for 24 h. After 18 h sCASP+HES group (sCASP+VOL and control+HES (C+VOL received 50 ml/KG balanced 6% HES (VOL 130/0.4 over 6 h. After 24 h kidney function was measured via Inulin- and PAH-Clearance in re-anesthetized rats, and serum urea, creatinine (crea, cystatin C and Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL as well as histopathology were analysed. In vitro human proximal tubule cells (PTC were cultured +/- lipopolysaccharid (LPS and with 0.1-4.0% VOL. Cell viability was measured with XTT-, cell toxicity with LDH-test. sCASP induced severe septic AKI demonstrated divergent results regarding renal function by clearance or creatinine measure focusing on VOL. Soleley HES (C+VOL deteriorated renal function without sCASP. Histopathology revealed significantly derangements in all HES groups compared to control. In vitro LPS did not worsen the HES induced reduction of cell viability in PTC cells. For the first time, we demonstrated, that application of 50 ml/KG 6% HES 130/0.4 over 6 hours induced AKI without inflammation in vivo. Severity of sCASP induced septic AKI might be no longer susceptible to the way of volume expansion.

  4. Human microdosing and mice xenograft data of AGM-130 applied to estimate efficacious doses in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wan-Su; Park, Gab-Jin; Han, Seunghoon; Ban, Sooho; Park, Moon-Young; Kim, San-Ho; Kim, Seon-Myung; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung Sik; Shin, Young G; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-08-01

    AGM-130 is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that exhibits dose-dependent efficacy in xenograft mouse models. During preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) studies, mice and rats showed comparable PK parameters while dogs showed unusually high clearance (CL), which has made human PK prediction challenging. To address this discrepancy, we performed a human microdosing PK and developed a mouse PK/PD model in order to guide the first-in-human studies. A microdose of AGM-130 was given via intravenous injection to healthy subjects. Efficacy data obtained using MCF-7 breast cancer cells implanted in mice was analyzed using pre-existing tumor growth inhibition models. We simulated a human PK/PD profile with the PK parameters obtained from the microdose study and the PD parameters estimated from the xenograft PK/PD model. The human CL of AGM-130 was 3.08 L/h/kg, which was comparable to CL in mice and rats. The time-courses of tumor growth in xenograft model was well described by a preexisting model. Our simulation indicated that the human doses needed for 50 and 90% inhibition of tumor growth were about 100 and 400 mg, respectively. This is the first report of using microdose PK and xenograft PK/PD model to predict efficacious doses before the first-in-human trial in cancer patients. In addition, this work highlights the importance of integration of all of information in PK/PD analysis and illustrates how modeling and simulation can be used to add value in the early stages of drug development.

  5. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}$=130 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, K H; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A R; Balewski, J T; Barannikova, O Yu; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M E; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M A; Blyth, C O; Böhm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A B; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chathopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; De Mello, M; Deng, W S; Derevshchikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Díaz, H; De Young, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, Wojciech; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelyanov, V I; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, Kenneth J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N D; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F J M; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O A; Grau, M; Greiner, D E; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D P; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E M; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J L; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I V; Kovalenko, A D; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krüger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kühn, C E; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T J; Leonhardt, W; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; Le Vine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lo Curto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, Jean Robert; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R S; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; Matyushevsky, E A; McParland, C P; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D M; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevozchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E D; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N T; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E V; Prindle, D J; Pruneau, C A; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J E; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Röhrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V L; Sakrejda, I; Sánchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlüter, R; Schmitz, N; Schröder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J E; Seliverstov, D M; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimansky, S S; Shuman, D B; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G P; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, Reinhard; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Ströbele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Symons, T J M; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tonse, S R; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V N; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T S; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; Van der Molen, A; Vanyashin, A V; Vasilevskii, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T J; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-01

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=130 GeV using the STAR TPC at RHIC. The elliptic flow signal, v_2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  6. Measurement of Radiation Damage to 130nm Hybrid Pixel Detector Readout Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Plackett, R; Ballabriga, R; Campbell, M; Tlustos, L; Wong, W

    2009-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the performance of the Medipix3 hybrid pixel readout chip after exposure to significant x-ray flux. Specifically the changes in performance of the mixed mode pixel architecture, the digital periphery, digital to analogue converters and the e-fuse technology were characterised. A high intensity, calibrated x- ray source was used to incrementally irradiate the separate regions of the detector whilst it was powered. This is the first total ionizing dose study of a large area pixel detector fabricated using the 130nm CMOS technology.

  7. Band structure in doubly-odd nuclei with mass around 130

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashiyama, K [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yoshinaga, N [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama City 338-8570 (Japan)

    2006-10-10

    Nuclear structure of the doublet bands in the doubly-odd nuclei with mass A {approx} 130 is studied in terms of a pair-truncated shell model. The model reproduces quite well the energy levels of the doublet bands and the electromagnetic transitions. The doublet bands turn out to be realized by the chopsticks-like motion of two angular momenta of the unpaired neutron and the unpaired proton, weakly coupled with the quadrupole collective excitations of the even-even part of the nucleus.

  8. Microscopic description of systematic doublet bands in the A {approx} 130 region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama City 338-8570 (Japan); Higashiyama, Koji [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    The properties of the yrast and yrare states with the {nu}h{sub 11/2} x {pi}h{sub 11/2} configuration in the mass A {approx} 130 region are studied by a full microscopic theoretical framework of the pair-truncated shell model. This approach for energy levels and electromagnetic transition rates in {sup 134}La gives good agreement with experiment. The analysis of the wavefunctions reveals new band structure, which results from chopsticks configurations of two angular momenta of the unpaired neutron and the unpaired proton, weakly coupled with the quadrupole collective excitations of the even-even core.

  9. 130,000-yr continuous pollen record from Clear Lake, Lake County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, David P.; Sims, John D.; Throckmorton, Constance K.

    1981-08-01

    Pollen analysis of a 115-m sediment core from Clear Lake, Lake County, California, provides a climatic record that is continuous for the past 130,000 yr. The pollen record reflects migrations of the tree species of the California Coast Ranges in response to the climatic changes of the last glacial cycle. During interglacials, the Clear Lake pollen rain was dominated by Quercus (oak) pollen. During cooler periods, oak pollen was replaced by pollen of coniferous species. The curve for Quercus pollen strongly resembles and is used to correlate with both deep-sea oxygen-isotope curves and the climatic record from certain European pollen studies.

  10. (Vapour + liquid) equilibria of (fluoromethane + tetrafluoromethane) at the temperature 130.46 K

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, I. M. A.; Sardinha, G. G.; Lobo, Lélio Q.

    1998-01-01

    The total vapour pressure of binary liquid mixtures of (fluoromethane+tetrafluoromethane) has been measured at the temperature 130.46 K. Two partially miscible liquid phases were found. The excess molar Gibbs energy was calculated in the region where the two liquids are mutually soluble. For the hypothetical equimolar mixture,GEm01 (x=0.5)=846 Jmol-1. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WHM-45J58FM-1B/1/78724d9c4f932fc881a978011fc1d879

  11. microRNA-130a is an oncomir suppressing the expression of CRMP4 in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Y

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yiran Zhou,1,2,* Ruhong Li,2,* Haidong Yu,2 Ruotian Wang,2 Zhiqiang Shen1 1Department of Pharmacy, Kunming Medical University, 2Yan’an Hospital Affiliated to Kunming Medical University, Kunming, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of death worldwide, although its incidence has steadily declined in recent years. There is strong evidence that aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs are involved in gastric cancer tumorigenesis. Furthermore, CRMP4 is closely associated with the occurrence and development of gastric cancer, and our predictions suggest that miR-130a, which can promote gastric cancer tumorigenesis, is a potential CRMP4 regulator. In this study, we investigated the expression of CRMP4 and miR-130a in human gastric cancer cell lines by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and Western blot (WB examination and direct interactions between miR-130a and CRMP4 by dual-luciferase reporter assay. We also evaluated the biological roles of miR-130a and CRMP4 in gastric cancer cells by flow cytometry, MTT assay, soft agar colony formation assay, and Transwell tests and confirmed CRMP4 function in vivo, using a tumor xenograft model. Our results demonstrated that CRMP4 expression was significantly decreased at both the gene and protein levels, while miR-130a expression was notably increased, in five human gastric cancer cell lines compared with human gastric epithelial cells. Dual-luciferase reporter assays indicated that CRMP4 was the direct target of miR-130a. Moreover, an inverse regulatory relationship between miR-130a and CRMP4 was verified by qRT-PCR and WB, and overexpression of miR-130a in BGC823 cells enhanced apoptosis and cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1, and facilitated cell colony formation, invasion, migration, and adhesion, while upregulation of CRMP4 had opposite effects. Finally

  12. A NOVEL SAMARIUM COMPLEX WITH INTERESTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Fluorescent materials, particularly blue fluorescent materials have gained strong interest because ... emitting complexes in different technical applications, such as emitting materials for organic light emitting ..... properties of three novel two-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with mixed aromatic ...

  13. Pyroelectric Ferroelectric and Resistivity Studies on Samarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Barium Strontium Sodium Niobate (Ba1-xSrx)2NaNb5O15 (BSNN) belongs to tungsten bronze ferroelectric morphotrophic phase boundary (MPB) system at x = 0.6, having large spontaneous polarisation, pyroelectric coefficient and low dielectic constant and is expected to be applicable for piezoceramic filter and ...

  14. A NOVEL SAMARIUM COMPLEX WITH INTERESTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emitting complexes in different technical applications, such as emitting materials for organic light emitting diodes, sensitizers in solar energy conversion, chemical sensors and so forth [6-9]. The ability of bipy to act as a rigid ..... properties of three-dimensional organic-inorganic hybrids based on α-metatungstate. Inorg. Chim.

  15. Improvements Needed in the Defense Logistics Agencys Evaluation of Fair and Reasonable Prices for C130 Aircraft Spare Parts (Redacted)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    applied outdated average industry rates. As a result, DLA Aviation paid increased prices for 18 C-130 spare parts, totaling $2.5 million, without...C-130H model was first delivered in 1974, and is no longer produced. However, it remains in operation with an average fleet age of more than 25...3,538,639 1 (FOUO) DLA Aviation contract demand amount for each NSN was calculated by multiplying the average unit price by the estimated demand

  16. 25 CFR 900.130 - What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Construction § 900.130 What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a self-determination construction contract? 900.130 Section 900.130...

  17. 22 CFR 130.13 - Information to be furnished to applicant, supplier or vendor by a recipient of a fee or commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information to be furnished to applicant, supplier or vendor by a recipient of a fee or commission. 130.13 Section 130.13 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.13 Information to be furnished to applican...

  18. Blocking gp130 signaling suppresses autotaxin expression in adipocytes and improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuhong; Wang, Ran; Song, Jianwen; Guan, Ming; Li, Na; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhao, Zhenwen; Zhang, Junjie

    2017-11-01

    Autotaxin (ATX), which is highly expressed and secreted by adipocytes, functions as the key enzyme to generate lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) from lysophosphatidylcholine. Adipose tissue is the main source of circulating ATX that modulates plasma LPA levels. Upregulation of ATX expression in obese patients and mice is closely related with insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. However, the mechanism of ATX expression in adipocytes remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that glycoprotein 130 (gp130)-mediated Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation was required for abundant ATX expression in adipocytes. Through gp130, the interleukin 6 (IL-6) family cytokines, such as IL-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, cardiotrophin-1, and ciliary neurotrophic factor, upregulated ATX expression in adipocytes. ATX contributes to the induction of insulin resistance and lipolysis in IL-6-stimulated adipocytes. Oral administration of gp130 inhibitor SC144 suppressed ATX expression in adipose tissue, decreased plasma ATX, LPA, and FFA levels, and significantly improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in high-fat diet-fed obese mice. In summary, our results indicate that the activation of gp130-JAK-STAT3 pathway by IL-6 family cytokines has an important role in regulating ATX expression in adipocytes and that gp130 is a promising target in the management of obesity-associated glucose metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjia Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development.

  20. Phosphorylation-dependent and -independent functions of p130 cooperate to evoke a sustained G1 block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Farkas, T; Lukas, J

    2001-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (pRb)-related p130 pocket protein is a regulator of cell growth and differentiation, and a candidate tumour suppressor. Both pRb and p130 operate through interactions with cellular proteins, including the E2F transcription factors. While such interactions are controlled...... by phosphorylation of multiple sites of pRb, regulation of p130 remains poorly understood. We now identify 22 in vivo phosphorylation sites of p130, targeted by diverse kinases, and present evidence for three cyclin-dependent kinase 4(6) [Cdk4(6)] specific phosphorylations, which appear critical for controlling...... the growth-restraining activity of p130. When expressed in U2OS cells, the phosphorylation-deficient mutant p130(Delta)(CDK4), in which the Cdk4 specific sites were mutated to alanine residues, imposed a more sustained G1 arrest than a constitutively active pRb(Delta)(CDK), known to repress all cellular E2F...

  1. Succinic acid production from cheese whey using Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Xiu, Shuangning

    2008-03-01

    Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z was used to produce succinic acid from cheese whey in this study. At the presence of external CO(2) supply, the effects of initial cheese whey concentration, pH, and inoculum size on the succinic acid production were studied. The by-product formation during the fermentation process was also analyzed. The highest succinic acid yield of 0.57 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, while the highest succinic acid productivity of 0.58 g h(-1) L(-1) was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 100 g/L. Increase in pH and inoculum size caused higher succinic acid yield and productivity. At the preferred fermentation condition of pH 6.8, inoculum size of 5% and initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, succinic acid yield of 0.57, and productivity of 0.44 g h(-1) L(-1) were obtained. Acetic acid and formic acid were the main by-products throughout the fermentation run of 48 h. It is feasible to produce succinic acid using lactose from cheese whey as carbon resource by A. succinogenes 130 Z.

  2. Quest for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of 130Te with the CUORE Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Thomas; Cuore Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The CUORE experiment, in the advanced stages of construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), aims to search for 0 νββ decay of 130Te with unprecedented sensitivity: T1/ 2 0 ν = 9 . 5 ×1025 yr at 90 % C.L. The detector will consist of 19 towers, each comprising 13 planes of four, 125 cm3, cubic TeO2 crystals. This amounts to a total mass of 206 kg of 130Te. When cooled to an operating temperature of ~ 10 mK such crystals function as highly sensitive bolometers with energy resolution better than 5 keV demonstrated near the 0 νββ decay Q-value (2527.518 +/- 0.013 keV). In this talk I will describe the expected reach of CUORE considering the rigorous cleaning, materials handling, and ultra-pure assembly techniques developed by the collaboration. I will also report on the status of CUORE-0, a single CUORE-like tower where many of these background mitigation techniques were deployed during assembly. CUORE-0 represents a new 0 νββ experiment which is already operating at LNGS and will surpass the sensitivity of the previous generation experiment (Cuoricino) before CUORE begins operating.

  3. Nonadiabatic quasiparticle approach for deformed odd-odd nuclei and the proton emitter 130Eu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patial, Monika; Arumugam, P.; Jain, A. K.; Maglione, E.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2013-11-01

    Proton emission from deformed nuclei near the drip line is regarded as a versatile tool in nuclear structure physics and such a study in odd-odd nuclei provides us with an excellent opportunity to understand several interesting features including the interaction between the valence proton and the valence neutron. We present a detailed formalism for a full microscopic calculation of such proton emitters, where the nuclear structure and decay aspects are taken into account exactly. This formalism is based on the nonadiabatic approach for the two quasiparticle plus rotor model, where the residual neutron-proton interactions are considered in the mean field represented by a deformed Woods-Saxon potential. We demonstrate a systematic way of unambiguously identifying several parameters involved in the calculations with the aid of the experimental data. The quality of results in the case of 180Ta justifies the approach which is further extended to discuss in detail the proton emission from 130Eu. Iπ=1+ state in 130Eu still remains to be the proton emitting state irrespective of the choice of several parameters. We also note that the decay widths could be quite sensitive to the residual np interaction in case of proton emission from isomeric states.

  4. Addictions biology: haplotype-based analysis for 130 candidate genes on a single array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Colin A; Yuan, Qiaoping; Xu, Ke; Shen, Pei-Hong; Heinz, Elizabeth; Lobos, Elizabeth A; Binder, Elizabeth B; Cubells, Joe; Ehlers, Cindy L; Gelernter, Joel; Mann, John; Riley, Brien; Roy, Alec; Tabakoff, Boris; Todd, Richard D; Zhou, Zhifeng; Goldman, David

    2008-01-01

    To develop a panel of markers able to extract full haplotype information for candidate genes in alcoholism, other addictions and disorders of mood and anxiety. A total of 130 genes were haplotype tagged and genotyped in 7 case/control populations and 51 reference populations using Illumina GoldenGate SNP genotyping technology, determining haplotype coverage. We also constructed and determined the efficacy of a panel of 186 ancestry informative markers. An average of 1465 loci were genotyped at an average completion rate of 91.3%, with an average call rate of 98.3% and replication rate of 99.7%. Completion and call rates were lowered by the performance of two datasets, highlighting the importance of the DNA quality in high throughput assays. A comparison of haplotypes captured by the Addictions Array tagging SNPs and commercially available whole-genome arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix shows comparable performance of the tag SNPs to the best whole-genome array in all populations for which data are available. Arrays of haplotype-tagged candidate genes, such as this addictions-focused array, represent a cost-effective approach to generate high-quality SNP genotyping data useful for the haplotype-based analysis of panels of genes such as these 130 genes of interest to alcohol and addictions researchers. The inclusion of the 186 ancestry informative markers allows for the detection and correction for admixture and further enhances the utility of the array.

  5. Elements of an advanced pattern generator for 130- to 100-nm maskmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakarian, Varoujan; Sauer, Charles A.; Shamoun, Bassam; Chilese, Frank; Trost, David; Zywno, Marek; Hofmann, Ulrich; Teitzel, Robin; Prior, Richard; Raymond, Frederick, III; Ghanbari, Abe; Abboud, Frank E.

    2000-07-01

    In response to next-generation mask requirements, Etec Systems, Inc has developed a complete raster-based patterning solution to meet the production needs of the 130 nm IC device generation as well as those for early 100 nm production. In developing this new MEBES system, we have aimed at versatility, extendability, and compatibility with conventional high-contrast resists and redesigned it form the ground up. This MEBES system incorporates many technological innovations, such as anew 50 kV electron-beam (e-beam) column, a new raster graybeam writing strategy, a new stage, an integrated automated material handling system, on-board diagnostics, and environmental/thermal control. A discussion of architectural details of the new MEBES system designed to meet the tight requirements of 130-100 nm technology nodes is presented. This comprehensive patterning solution offers the best combination of benefits to the user in terms of versatility, overall system throughput, and extendability. Initial throughput and lithographic performance benchmarks are also presented and are very promising in predicting the ability to meet critical dimension uniformity requirements of 10nm or better, as predicted by the ITRS requirements.

  6. Evaluation of a high-dose extended multipass gray writing system for 130-nm pattern generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabala, Jan M.; Weaver, Suzanne; Alexander, David W.; Pearce-Percy, Henry T.; Lu, Maiying; Cole, Damon M.; Abboud, Frank E.

    2000-07-01

    Recent developments in electron-beam (e-beam) systems and mask-writing strategies facilitate pattern generation for the 130-nm IC generation. The MEBESR 5500 pattern generation system incorporates a high-dose electron optical system and a high-throughput writing strategy, Multipass Gray-II (MPG-II). We evaluate the effectiveness of these innovations by three criteria: improved resolution, improved critical dimension (CD) control, and increased throughput. The conclusions of this paper are based on results from extensive modeling, test masks, and factory acceptance masks. Mask resist choice and processing have been optimized for the MEBES 5500 system. A consequence of these improvements is greater productivity for 150 nm devices and early development of 130 nm devices. The MEBES 5500 system uses a high-dose gun and electron optical system. The maximum current density that can be delivered to the mask is 800 A/cm2, twice the value of previous MEBES systems. Without loss of throughput, it is possible to increase the dose deposited in the resist, while using smaller e-beam sizes. These capabilities are exploited to improve printing of submicrometer features, including 200 nm-scale optical proximity correction (OPC) patterns. At small data addresses (MEBES 4500 system. The fundamentals of the MPG-II strategy are described, as well as throughput and lithographic results.

  7. Co-pumped 130 W monolithic single frequency fiber amplifier with an optically induced thermal gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeringue, Clint; Vergien, Chris; Dajani, Iyad

    2011-06-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results of a 130 W continuous-wave (CW), single-frequency, 7 m, polarizationmaintaining (PM) Yb:doped fiber (25/400) μm amplifier simultaneously seeded with a combination of broadband and narrow-line signals. Experiments were performed for two thermal configurations and the SBS threshold of the doubly seeded amplifier is compared to the singly seeded case. In the first configuration, the fiber was wrapped around a cold spool held at 12° C to diminish thermally induced shifts in the acoustic resonance of the fiber, which is known to suppress stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). In this case, over 80 W of single-frequency output was obtained demonstrating an enhancement of 3 dB in the SBS threshold compared to the single-tone case whereby the SBS threshold was 40 W. In the second thermal configuration, 6 m of the fiber is wrapped around the same cold spool, but approximately 1 m of the fiber is left to cool in ambient conditions. In this case, an optically induced thermal gradient was formed due to the quantum defect heating associated with power transfer from the pump and broadband seed signals into the single-frequency signal at the output end of the fiber. Over 130 W of single-frequency output was demonstrated yielding an effective increase of ~5 dB in the SBS threshold when compared to the single-tone case.

  8. Total Ionizing Dose effects in 130-nm commercial CMOS technologies for HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gonella, L; Silvestri, M; Gerardin, S; Pantano, D; Re, V; Manghisoni, M; Ratti, L; Ranieri, A

    2007-01-01

    The impact of foundry-to-foundry variability and bias conditions during irradiation on the Total Ionizing Dose (TID) response of commercial 130-nm CMOS technologies have been investigated for applications in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. n- and p-channel MOSFETs from three different manufacturers have been irradiated with X-rays up to more than 100 Mrad (SiO2). Even though the effects of TID are qualitatively similar, the amount of degradation is shown to vary considerably from foundry to foundry, probably depending on the processing of the STI oxide and/or doping profile in the substrate. The bias during irradiation showed to have a strong impact as well on the TID response, proving that exposure at worst case bias conditions largely overestimates the degradation a device may experience during its lifetime. Overall, our results increase the confidence that 130-nm CMOS technologies can be used in future HEP experiments even without Hardness-By-Design solutions, provided that constant monitoring of th...

  9. Search for excited leptons at 130-140 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jacobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    A search for the radiative decay of excited charged leptons, ℓ ∗, and for radiative and weak decays of excited electron neutrinos, ν e∗, is performed, using the 5.8 pb -1 of data collected by ALEPH at 130-140 GeV. No evidence for a signal is found in single or pair production. Excluded mass limits from pair production are close to 65 GeV/ c2 for all excited lepton species. Limits on the couplings, {λ}/{m ℓ ∗}, of excited leptons are derived from single production. For an excited lepton mass of 130 GeV/ c2, these limits are 0.04 GeV -1 for μ ∗ and τ ∗, and 0.0007 GeV -1 for e ∗. For ν e∗, the limit is at the level of 0.03 GeV -1 for a mass of 120 GeV/ c2, independent of the decay branching ratios.

  10. Succinic Acid Production from Cheese Whey using Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Xiu, Shuangning

    Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z was used to produce succinic acid from cheese whey in this study. At the presence of external CO2 supply, the effects of initial cheese whey concentration, pH, and inoculum size on the succinic acid production were studied. The by-product formation during the fermentation process was also analyzed. The highest succinic acid yield of 0.57 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, while the highest succinic acid productivity of 0.58 g h-1 L-1 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 100 g/L. Increase in pH and inoculum size caused higher succinic acid yield and productivity. At the preferred fermentation condition of pH 6.8, inoculum size of 5% and initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, succinic acid yield of 0.57, and productivity of 0.44 g h-1 L-1 were obtained. Acetic acid and formic acid were the main by-products throughout the fermentation run of 48 h. It is feasible to produce succinic acid using lactose from cheese whey as carbon resource by A. succinogenes 130 Z.

  11. Projected Shell Model Description of Positive Parity Band of 130Pr Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suram; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Dhanvir; Sharma, Chetan; Bharti, Arun; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical investigation of positive parity yrast band of odd-odd 130Pr nucleus is performed by applying the projected shell model. The present study is undertaken to investigate and verify the very recently observed side band in 130Pr theoretically in terms of quasi-particle (qp) configuration. From the analysis of band diagram, the yrast as well as side band are found to arise from two-qp configuration πh 11/2 ⊗ νh 11/2. The present calculations are viewed to have qualitatively reproduced the known experimental data for yrast states, transition energies, and B( M1) / B( E2) ratios of this nucleus. The recently observed positive parity side band is also reproduced by the present calculations. The energy states of the side band are predicted up to spin 25+, which is far above the known experimental spin of 18+ and this could serve as a motivational factor for future experiments. In addition, the reduced transition probability B( E2) for interband transitions has also been calculated for the first time in projected shell model, which would serve as an encouragement for other research groups in the future.

  12. A critical role for p130Cas in the progression of pulmonary hypertension in humans and rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ly; De Man, Frances; Girerd, Barbara; Huertas, Alice; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Lecerf, Florence; François, Charlène; Perros, Frédéric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Fadel, Elie; Montani, David; Eddahibi, Saadia; Humbert, Marc; Guignabert, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive and fatal disease characterized by pulmonary arterial muscularization due to excessive pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and migration, a phenotype dependent upon growth factors and activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). p130Cas is an adaptor protein involved in several cellular signaling pathways that control cell migration, proliferation and survival. Objectives We hypothesized that in experimental and human PAH p130Cas signaling is over-activated, thereby facilitating the intracellular transmission of signal induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Measurements and Main Results In PAH patients, levels of p130Cas protein and/or activity are higher in the serum, in walls of distal pulmonary arteries, in cultured smooth muscle (PA-SMCs) and pulmonary endothelial cells (P-ECs) than controls. These abnormalities in the p130Cas signaling were also found to be in the chronically hypoxic mice and monocrotaline-injected rats as models of human PAH. We next obtained evidence for convergence and amplification of the growth-stimulating effect of EGF, FGF2 and PDGF signaling pathways via p130Cas signaling pathway. Finally, we found that daily treatment with each of the EGF-R inhibitor gefitinib, the FGF-R inhibitor dovitinib and the PDGF-R inhibitor imatinib started 2 weeks after a subcutaneous monocrotaline injection substantially attenuate the abnormal increase in p130cas and ERK1/2 activation and regress established PH. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that p130Cas signaling plays a critical role in experimental and iPAH by modulating pulmonary vascular cell migration, proliferation and by acting as an amplifier of RTKs downstream signals. PMID:22798315

  13. Analysis of p130 protein and mRNA expression in ten patients with uterine papillary serous carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-ting XU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To examine p130 protein and mRNA expression in uterine papillary serous carcinoma(UPSC and their clinical and pathologic significance.Methods A total of 10 UPSC patients(Stage I were included,with 10 cases of high-level endometrial carcinoma of the same stage taken as the control group and 10 cases of normal proliferative stage endometrium(EM taken as the disease control group.The level of p130 protein expression was determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining,microscopic observation,and immunohistochemistry,whereas the p130 mRNA levels were examined through real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.The clinicopathologic analysis was carried out in combination with clinical data.Results The p130 protein and p130 mRNA expression levels in the UPSC group(0.46±0.01 and 0.56±0.06,respectively were apparently less than that of the normal proliferative stage endometrium group(0.91±0.04 and 2.81±0.40,respectively;P < 0.01 and also less than those in high-level endometrial carcinoma(P < 0.05.Clinicopathologic analysis shows that all patients are post-menopausal women with symptoms of irregular vaginal bleeding and the average tumor size was 7.5cm(range: 1.2-14.8cm.The pathologic features are same as that of high-level ovarian papillary serous carcinoma.Conclusion Reduced p130 protein and p130 mRNA expression in UPSC might correlate with poor prognosis in UPSC patients.

  14. Psychosexual adjustment and age factors in 130 men undergone hypospadias surgery in a Chinese hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W-W; Deng, C-H; Chen, L-W; Zhao, L-Y; Mo, J-C; Tu, X-A

    2010-12-01

    The study investigated the psychosexual status and sexual function in adults who had hypospadias surgery at different ages. A detailed questionnaire was mailed to 130 patients who underwent hypospadias surgery between January 1988 and December 2007, and 50 healthy males who served as the control group. The patients were divided into three groups based on their age at which surgery was completed: group A (n=32; 18 years). The Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and The Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale were used to assess psychosexual status; a designed questionnaire and the International Index of Erectile Function-5 were used to assess sexual function. The incidence of anxiety and depression was significantly higher in patients than that in controls (P 0.05). In conclusion, difference existed in certain aspects of psychosexual and penile development between patients and controls. Hypospadias surgery should be performed early. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Evaluation of T91 after 130,000 hours in service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Sikka, V.K.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Canonico, D.A. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Two superheater tubes fabricated from T91 were removed for evaluation after 130,000 hours service. Regions of interest included a hot section that replaced type 321 stainless steel, dissimilar welds to type 321 stainless steel safe ends, and cold bends. The evaluation consisted of metallography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and precipitate analysis, hardness, tensile properties, creep, and stress rupture. Observed microstructure and properties of the tubing were compared with results on unexposed and thermally aged materials. Overall, the properties were similar to expectations. Substructural coarsening occurred which produced reductions in the short-time tensile and creep strength. However, ductility remained high. Corrosion was minimal, although somewhat greater on the fire side of the cold bend. Short oxide wedge cracks were observed at the dissimilar metal welds, and type 4 cracking was observed in an untempered region of a stainless steel attachment weld.

  16. Stacked depth graded multilayer for hard X-rays, measured up to 130 keV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Romaine, S.

    2007-01-01

    edges in this energy range, for example Ni0.93V0.07, but are not used because of high interface roughness. By using a WC/SiC multilayer for the bottom and a Ni0.93V0.07/SiC multilayer for the thicker top layers of a depth graded multilayer we have made a reflector that doesn't have a clear absorption...... edge. This reflector has been measured at energies between 8 keV and 130 keV. At a graze angle of 0.11 degree there is still nearly the same reflectivity below the W absorption edge as for a traditional W based coating, and above the W absorption edge there is still 48% reflection at 80 keV....

  17. Prevalence of adverse food reactions in 130 dogs in Italy with dermatological signs: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, D; Perego, R; Spada, E; Ferro, E

    2010-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of adverse food reactions (AFRs) in dogs with dermatological signs presented to the referral dermatological clinic of the University of Milan. The medical records of dogs with dermatological signs were reviewed. Prevalence of AFRs was calculated. Owner and clinician pruritus scores were compared. Breed, sex and age predisposition were statistically tested, as was the association between AFR and selected clinical features. The prevalence of AFRs in dogs with dermatological signs was 12% (16 of 130). AFR was diagnosed in 26% of dogs with allergic disease and 48% of those subjected to a dietary trial. There was a significant association between AFRs and early onset of clinical signs (dogs with perianal fistulas were German shepherd dogs. The prevalence of AFRs in the study population was higher than most reported values. Further studies are warranted to investigate the true prevalence of AFR and its possible association with perianal fistula and other potential markers.

  18. Celebrating 130 Years of the Alvan Clark Telescope at Albion College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Nicolle; Smeltekop, N. Garrett

    2014-01-01

    This year, 2013-2014, marks the 130th anniversary of the 8” Alvan Clark refracting telescope and observatory building at Albion College, an undergraduate college in Albion, MI. Completed in 1884, the observatory is an excellent example of a nineteenth century astronomical building; its telescope is still useable and other instruments (Fauth and Company sidereal clock, transit telescope, and chronograph) are in very good condition. The building has a long history, serving once as a barracks for World War I soldiers, and the telescope has helped to train the next generation of scientists, from Forest Ray Moulton (Class of 1894) to present-day students. Several times each year, the telescope is open to the public and to the campus community for public observing events, and during the anniversary year, several other activities are planned. I will describe the history of our observatory and its people and give an overview of the events planned for this year.

  19. Design and performance of a THz block camera with a 130nm CMOS focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, E. F.; Romero, H.; Schlupf, J.; Boudreau, A.; Kim, D. Y.; O, Kenneth

    2017-05-01

    Recent advances in 130 nm CMOS based Schottky barrier diode THz power detectors enable relatively simple, highperformance focal plane arrays. We present a low size, weight and power block camera which uses polymer refractive optics and a 6x6 focal plane array to image the return from an active source operating at 218 GHz. The operating frequency is chosen for multiple reasons: to coincide with atmospheric transmission windows, to image through degraded visual environments, and to leverage recently developed high power sources available at the Naval Research Laboratory. The sensor achieves better than 30 pW/√Hz NEP at video frame rates while lock-in detecting a modulated source. The three and a half pound camera houses a COTs aspheric polymer optic, detector array, signal amplification and lock-in detection, and outputs data over an Ethernet connection. We will present the camera design, performance metrics, and sample imagery

  20. Single Event Gate Rupture in 130-nm CMOS Transistor Arrays Subjected to X-Ray Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestri, M; Gerardin, Simone; Faccio, Federico; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    We present new experimental results on heavy ion-induced gate rupture on deep submicron CMOS transistor arrays. Through the use of dedicated test structures, composed by a large number of 130-nm MOSFETs connected in parallel, we show the response to heavy ion irradiation under high stress voltages of devices previously irradiated with X-rays. We found only a slight impact on gate rupture critical voltage at a LET of 32 MeV cm(2) mg(-1) for devices previously irradiated up to 3 Mrad(SiO2), and practically no change for 100 Mrad(SiO2) irradiation, dose of interest for the future super large hadron collider (SLHC).

  1. A 130 GHz Electro-Optic Ring Modulator with Double-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The optical absorption coefficient of graphene will change after injecting carriers. Based on this principle, a high-speed double-layer graphene electro-optic modulator with a ring resonator structure was designed in this paper. From the numerical simulations, we designed a modulator. Its optical bandwidth is larger than 130 GHz, the switching energy is 0.358 fJ per bit, and the driven voltage is less than 1.2 V. At the same time, the footprint of the proposed modulator is less than 10 microns squared, which makes the process compatible with the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS process. This will provide the possibility for the on-chip integration of the photoelectric device.

  2. BOREAS RSS-20 POLDER Radiance Images From the NASA C-130

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, M.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    These Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-20 data are a subset of images collected by the Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectance (POLDER) instrument over tower sites in the BOREAS study areas during the intensive field campaigns (IFCs) in 1994. The POLDER images presented here from the NASA ARC C-130 aircraft are made available for illustration purposes only. The data are stored in binary image-format files. The POLDER radiance images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. Partial purification and characterization of a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium 130 isolated from mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luiz Tulini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are important in foods as potential probiotics and also due to the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds that can contribute for biopreservation. In this work, the bacteriocin produced by the food isolate Enterococcus faecium 130 was partially purified and characterized. The compound was active against Gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes. It was produced after 4 days of storage at a broad temperature range (4 to 37 °C; it was stable at pH ranging from 2 to 10 with no loss of activity after heating at 100 °C for 15 minutes. Bacteriocin was partially purified by the adsorption-desorption technique, and the analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed a molecular mass of 3.5 to 6.5 kDa. These data encourage studies on application of this bacteriocin in food systems as an additional hurdle to microbial growth.

  4. The amino acid exchange R28E in ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) abrogates interleukin-6 receptor-dependent but retains CNTF receptor-dependent signaling via glycoprotein 130 (gp130)/leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Eva-Maria; Aurich, Matthias; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Floss, Doreen M; Garbers, Christoph; Breusing, Kati; Rabe, Björn; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2014-06-27

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a neurotrophic factor with therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, therapeutic application of CNTF reduced body weight in mice and humans. CNTF binds to high or low affinity receptor complexes consisting of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR or IL-6R·gp130·LIFR, respectively. Clinical studies of the CNTF derivative Axokine revealed intolerance at higher concentrations, which may rely on the low-affinity binding of CNTF to the IL-6R. Here, we aimed to generate a CNTFR-selective CNTF variant (CV). CV-1 contained the single amino acid exchange R28E. Arg(28) is in close proximity to the CNTFR binding site. Using molecular modeling, we hypothesized that Arg(28) might contribute to IL-6R/CNTFR plasticity of CNTF. CV-2 to CV-5 were generated by transferring parts of the CNTFR-binding site from cardiotrophin-like cytokine to CNTF. Cardiotrophin-like cytokine selectively signals via the CNTFR·gp130·LIFR complex, albeit with a much lower affinity compared with CNTF. As shown by immunoprecipitation, all CNTF variants retained the ability to bind to CNTFR. CV-1, CV-2, and CV-5, however, lost the ability to bind to IL-6R. Although all variants induced cytokine-dependent cellular proliferation and STAT3 phosphorylation via CNTFR·gp130·LIFR, only CV-3 induced STAT3 phosphorylation via IL-6R·gp130·LIFR. Quantification of CNTF-dependent proliferation of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR expressing cells indicated that only CV-1 was as biologically active as CNTF. Thus, the CNTFR-selective CV-1 will allow discriminating between CNTFR- and IL-6R-mediated effects in vivo. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. The Amino Acid Exchange R28E in Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) Abrogates Interleukin-6 Receptor-dependent but Retains CNTF Receptor-dependent Signaling via Glycoprotein 130 (gp130)/Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIFR)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Eva-Maria; Aurich, Matthias; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Floss, Doreen M.; Garbers, Christoph; Breusing, Kati; Rabe, Björn; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a neurotrophic factor with therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, therapeutic application of CNTF reduced body weight in mice and humans. CNTF binds to high or low affinity receptor complexes consisting of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR or IL-6R·gp130·LIFR, respectively. Clinical studies of the CNTF derivative Axokine revealed intolerance at higher concentrations, which may rely on the low-affinity binding of CNTF to the IL-6R. Here, we aimed to generate a CNTFR-selective CNTF variant (CV). CV-1 contained the single amino acid exchange R28E. Arg28 is in close proximity to the CNTFR binding site. Using molecular modeling, we hypothesized that Arg28 might contribute to IL-6R/CNTFR plasticity of CNTF. CV-2 to CV-5 were generated by transferring parts of the CNTFR-binding site from cardiotrophin-like cytokine to CNTF. Cardiotrophin-like cytokine selectively signals via the CNTFR·gp130·LIFR complex, albeit with a much lower affinity compared with CNTF. As shown by immunoprecipitation, all CNTF variants retained the ability to bind to CNTFR. CV-1, CV-2, and CV-5, however, lost the ability to bind to IL-6R. Although all variants induced cytokine-dependent cellular proliferation and STAT3 phosphorylation via CNTFR·gp130·LIFR, only CV-3 induced STAT3 phosphorylation via IL-6R·gp130·LIFR. Quantification of CNTF-dependent proliferation of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR expressing cells indicated that only CV-1 was as biologically active as CNTF. Thus, the CNTFR-selective CV-1 will allow discriminating between CNTFR- and IL-6R-mediated effects in vivo. PMID:24802752

  6. Total Ionizing Dose Testing of the ABC130 ASIC for the ATLAS Phase-II Semiconductor Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Morningstar, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) current inner detector was not built to withstand the radiation damage from the 3000 $\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity that is planned for the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). Therefore, the ATLAS inner detector (ID) must be completely upgraded. As a part of this upgrade, the semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) will be replaced with new silicon microstrip sensors {[}1{]}. These silicon strips will be read out by the ABC130 chip and thus the ABC130 must be able to withstand an expected 30 Mrad of radiation over 10 years. The ABC130 chip was irradiated with 70 Mrad of x-ray radiation over the course of 2 days and the results are discussed in this report.

  7. JTT-130, a novel intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, improves hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia independent of suppression of food intake in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shohei; Ito, Makoto; Mera, Yasuko; Sasase, Tomohiko; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Kakutani, Makoto; Ohta, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of JTT-130 on glucose and lipid metabolism independent of the suppression of feeding by comparing with pair-fed animals. Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were divided into control, JTT-130 treatment, and pair-fed groups. The rats were fed with a regular powdered diet with or without JTT-130 as a food admixture for 6 weeks. We compared the effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in JTT-130 treatment group with those in pair-fed group. RESULTS. Hyperglycemia in ZDF rats was prevented in both JTT-130 treatment and pair-fed groups, but the prevention in pair-fed group became poor with time. Moreover, reduction in plasma cholesterol levels was observed only in JTT-130 treatment group. JTT-130 treatment group showed improved glucose tolerance at 5 weeks after treatment and significant elevation of portal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. The hepatic lipid content in JTT-130 treatment group was decreased as compared with pair-fed group. Furthermore, pancreatic protection effects, such as an increase in pancreatic weight and an elevation of insulin-positive area in islets, were observed after JTT-130 treatment. CONCLUSIONS. JTT-130 improves hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia via a mechanism independent of suppression of food intake, which is ascribed to an enhancement of GLP-1 secretion and a reduction of lipotoxicity.

  8. JTT-130, a Novel Intestine-Specific Inhibitor of Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein, Improves Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia Independent of Suppression of Food Intake in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Sakata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of JTT-130 on glucose and lipid metabolism independent of the suppression of feeding by comparing with pair-fed animals. Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats were divided into control, JTT-130 treatment, and pair-fed groups. The rats were fed with a regular powdered diet with or without JTT-130 as a food admixture for 6 weeks. We compared the effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in JTT-130 treatment group with those in pair-fed group. Results. Hyperglycemia in ZDF rats was prevented in both JTT-130 treatment and pair-fed groups, but the prevention in pair-fed group became poor with time. Moreover, reduction in plasma cholesterol levels was observed only in JTT-130 treatment group. JTT-130 treatment group showed improved glucose tolerance at 5 weeks after treatment and significant elevation of portal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 levels. The hepatic lipid content in JTT-130 treatment group was decreased as compared with pair-fed group. Furthermore, pancreatic protection effects, such as an increase in pancreatic weight and an elevation of insulin-positive area in islets, were observed after JTT-130 treatment. Conclusions. JTT-130 improves hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia via a mechanism independent of suppression of food intake, which is ascribed to an enhancement of GLP-1 secretion and a reduction of lipotoxicity.

  9. The Role of Interleukin-6/GP130 Signaling in Prostate Cancer Progression and its Contribution to Bone Metastasis Morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Those that can initiate signaling via gp130 include IL-6, IL-11, LIF, CT-1, CNTF and OSM (Heinrich et al., 1998). Notably, BM18 tumors of all...gp130 and STAT3, e.g. IL-11, LIF, CT-1, CNTF or OSM. 2c) Measure apoptosis and cellular proliferation in formalin fixed paraffin embedded BM18 xenograft...Pellegrini, S., et al. (1994). Association and activation of Jak-Tyk kinases by CNTF -LIF-OSM-IL-6 beta receptor components. Science (New York, NY 263

  10. PEM steam electrolysis at 130 °C using a phosphoric acid doped short side chain PFSA membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Kalmar; Aili, David; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Steam electrolysis test with a phosphoric acid doped Aquivion™ membrane was successfully conducted and current densities up to 775 mA cm-2 at 1.8 V was reached at 130 ºC and ambient pressure. A new composite membrane system using a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (Aquivion™) as matrix and phospho......Steam electrolysis test with a phosphoric acid doped Aquivion™ membrane was successfully conducted and current densities up to 775 mA cm-2 at 1.8 V was reached at 130 ºC and ambient pressure. A new composite membrane system using a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (Aquivion™) as matrix...

  11. Boson-model M1 form factors for inelastic electron scattering on sup 130,132,134 Ba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipas, P.O.; Koskinen, M. (Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics); Harter, H.; Nojarov, R.; Faessler, Amand (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1991-06-01

    The proton-neutron interacting-boson model (IBA-2) is used to predict the (e,e') form factor for collective 1{sup +} excitation in {sup 130,132,134}Ba. A simple estimate of the {sup 130}Ba transition current density, and thence of the form factor, is obtained from the known form factor of {sup 164}Dy by a scaling method built on PWBA and Fourier-Bessel analysis. A weightier prediction is obtained from microscopic boson structure and DWBA. The 1{sup +} excitation should be observable in the bariums. Boson g factors are calculated. (author).

  12. An alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Lane, Robert W.; Cortez, Maximo G.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal vacuum testing often requires temperature control of chamber shrouds and heat exchangers within the -130 C to 75 C range. There are two conventional methods which are normally employed to achieve control through this intermediate temperature range: (1) single-pass flow where control is achieved by alternately pulsing hot gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and cold LN2 into the feed line to yield the setpoint temperature; and (2) closed-loop circulation where control is achieved by either electrically heating or LN2 cooling the circulating GN2 to yield the setpoint temperature. A third method, using a mass flow ratio controller along with modulating control valves on GN2 and LN2 lines, provides excellent control but equipment for this method is expensive and cost-prohibitive for all but long-term continuous processes. The single-pass method provides marginal control and can result in unexpected overcooling of the test article from even a short pulse of LN2. The closed-loop circulation method provides excellent control but requires an expensive blower capable of operating at elevated pressures and cryogenic temperatures. Where precise control is needed (plus or minus 2 C), single-pass flow systems typically have not provided the precision required, primarily because of overcooling temperature excursions. Where several individual circuits are to be controlled at different temperatures, the use of expensive cryogenic blowers for each circuit is also cost-prohibitive, especially for short duration of one-of-a-kind tests. At JPL, a variant of the single-pass method was developed that was shown to provide precise temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range while exhibiting minimal setpoint overshoot during temperature transitions. This alternate method uses a commercially available temperature controller along with a GN2/LN2 mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by LN2 pulsing. The design of the GN2/LN2 mixer, the overall control system

  13. Gas Pobre: Factibilidad de su uso en los motores ZIL – 130;

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Proenza Pérez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se hace un estudio de los diferentes tipos de gasificadores existentes, así como el estado actual de la tecnología de gasificación, realizando la selección del gasificador Downdraft Imbert Modificado, desarrollado por investigaciones del grupo de Conversión Térmica de la Biomasa de la Universidad de Camagüey, por las ventajasque el mismo presenta para el accionamiento directo de un Motor de Combustión Interna, las cuales son, baja concentración de alquitrán en el gas pobre (<10mg/Nm3 y baja temperatura del gas producto a la salida del gasificador, el motor seleccionado es el ZIL-130, por ser de amplio uso en nuestro país y estar perfectamente adaptado al entorno cubano, se les realizaron diferentes cálculos teóricos con el objetivo de visualizar sucomportamiento al sustituirle su combustible original por gas pobre así como una valoración económica de dicha sustitución, también se logro dimensionar el gasificador que alimentará dichos motores. In this work a study of the different types of existent gasifiers is made, as well as the current state of the gasification technology, carrying out the selection of the gasifier Downdraft Modified Imbert, developed by investigations of the group of Thermal Conversion of the Biomass, for the advantages that the same one presents for the direct working ofa MCI, which are, low concentration of tar in the poor gas (<10mg/Nm3 and low temperature of the gas product to, the selected motor is the ZIL-130, to be of wide use in our country and to be perfectly adapted to the Cuban environment, they were carried out different theoretical calculations with the objective of visualizing its behavior whensubstituting him its original fuel for poor gas as well as an economic valuation of this substitution, you also achieves dimensionar the gasifier that will feed this motors.   

  14. Reliability analysis of C-130 turboprop engine components using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qattan, Nizar A.

    In this study, we predict the failure rate of Lockheed C-130 Engine Turbine. More than thirty years of local operational field data were used for failure rate prediction and validation. The Weibull regression model and the Artificial Neural Network model including (feed-forward back-propagation, radial basis neural network, and multilayer perceptron neural network model); will be utilized to perform this study. For this purpose, the thesis will be divided into five major parts. First part deals with Weibull regression model to predict the turbine general failure rate, and the rate of failures that require overhaul maintenance. The second part will cover the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model utilizing the feed-forward back-propagation algorithm as a learning rule. The MATLAB package will be used in order to build and design a code to simulate the given data, the inputs to the neural network are the independent variables, the output is the general failure rate of the turbine, and the failures which required overhaul maintenance. In the third part we predict the general failure rate of the turbine and the failures which require overhaul maintenance, using radial basis neural network model on MATLAB tool box. In the fourth part we compare the predictions of the feed-forward back-propagation model, with that of Weibull regression model, and radial basis neural network model. The results show that the failure rate predicted by the feed-forward back-propagation artificial neural network model is closer in agreement with radial basis neural network model compared with the actual field-data, than the failure rate predicted by the Weibull model. By the end of the study, we forecast the general failure rate of the Lockheed C-130 Engine Turbine, the failures which required overhaul maintenance and six categorical failures using multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP) model on DTREG commercial software. The results also give an insight into the reliability of the engine

  15. Final report of CCQM-K130 nitrogen mass fraction measurements in glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedevskikh, Maria; Krasheninina, Maria; do Rego, Eliane C. P.; Wollinger, Wagner; Monteiro, Tânia M.; de Carvalho, Lucas J.; Acco Garcia, Steve Ali; Haraldsson, Conny; Rodriguez, M. Alejandra; Rodriguez, Gabriela; Salvo, Karino; Gavrilkin, Vladimir; Kulyk, Sergij; Samuel, Laly

    2017-01-01

    CCQM key comparison K-130 in the field of nitrogen mass fracton has been performed by the Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM). The aim of this key comparison CCQM-K130 is to support National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes (DIs) to demonstrate the validity of the procedures the employed for determination of nitrogen mass fraction in glycine. Mass fraction of nitrogen is very important pointer because the results of these measurements are often used for determination of protein mass fraction that is an important indicator of the quality of the vast majority of food products and raw materials, in particular dry milk powder. Proteins-enzymes catalyze chemical reactions, protein along with fats and carbohydrates is one of the indicators characterizing the energy value of food, so its definition is mandatory for all food products. The study material for this key comparison has been selected to be representative as one of the aminoacid - the simplest part of the protein. Glycine is an amino acid, single acid that does not have any isomers (melting point -290 °C specific heat of evaporation - 528,6 J/kg; specific melting heat - 981,1 J/kg; pKa - 2, 34, molar mass - 75,07 g/mol, density - 1,607 g/cm3). Ural Scientific Research Institute for Metrology (UNIIM) acted as the coordinating laboratory of this comparison. Nine NMIs participated in this key comparison and one NMI participated in Pilot study that was condacted in parallel. Report A contains the results of key comparison and pilot study. The results of Pilot study were excluded from the Report B Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM

  16. An alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Lane, Robert W.; Cortez, Maximo G.

    1992-11-01

    Thermal vacuum testing often requires temperature control of chamber shrouds and heat exchangers within the -130 C to 75 C range. There are two conventional methods which are normally employed to achieve control through this intermediate temperature range: (1) single-pass flow where control is achieved by alternately pulsing hot gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and cold LN2 into the feed line to yield the setpoint temperature; and (2) closed-loop circulation where control is achieved by either electrically heating or LN2 cooling the circulating GN2 to yield the setpoint temperature. A third method, using a mass flow ratio controller along with modulating control valves on GN2 and LN2 lines, provides excellent control but equipment for this method is expensive and cost-prohibitive for all but long-term continuous processes. The single-pass method provides marginal control and can result in unexpected overcooling of the test article from even a short pulse of LN2. The closed-loop circulation method provides excellent control but requires an expensive blower capable of operating at elevated pressures and cryogenic temperatures. Where precise control is needed (plus or minus 2 C), single-pass flow systems typically have not provided the precision required, primarily because of overcooling temperature excursions. Where several individual circuits are to be controlled at different temperatures, the use of expensive cryogenic blowers for each circuit is also cost-prohibitive, especially for short duration of one-of-a-kind tests. At JPL, a variant of the single-pass method was developed that was shown to provide precise temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range while exhibiting minimal setpoint overshoot during temperature transitions. This alternate method uses a commercially available temperature controller along with a GN2/LN2 mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by LN2 pulsing. The design of the GN2/LN2 mixer, the overall control system

  17. Peripheral nerve regeneration and NGF-dependent neurite outgrowth of adult sensory neurons converge on STAT3 phosphorylation downstream of neuropoietic cytokine receptor gp130.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Serena; Baeumer, Bastian E; Scherbakov, Nadja; Andratsch, Manfred; Rose-John, Stefan; Dechant, Georg; Bandtlow, Christine E; Kress, Michaela

    2014-09-24

    After nerve injury, adult sensory neurons can regenerate peripheral axons and reconnect with their target tissue. Initiation of outgrowth, as well as elongation of neurites over long distances, depends on the signaling of receptors for neurotrophic growth factors. Here, we investigated the importance of gp130, the signaling subunit of neuropoietic cytokine receptors in peripheral nerve regeneration. After sciatic nerve crush, functional recovery in vivo was retarded in SNS-gp130(-/-) mice, which specifically lack gp130 in sensory neurons. Correspondingly, a significantly reduced number of free nerve endings was detected in glabrous skin from SNS-gp130(-/-) compared with control mice after nerve crush. Neurite outgrowth and STAT3 activation in vitro were severely reduced in cultures in gp130-deficient cultured neurons. Surprisingly, in neurons obtained from SNS-gp130(-/-) mice the increase in neurite length was reduced not only in response to neuropoietic cytokine ligands of gp130 but also to nerve growth factor (NGF), which does not bind to gp130-containing receptors. Neurite outgrowth in the absence of neurotrophic factors was partially rescued in gp130-deficient neurons by leptin, which activates STAT3 downstream of leptic receptor and independent of gp130. The neurite outgrowth response of gp130-deficient neurons to NGF was fully restored in the presence of leptin. Based on these findings, gp130 signaling via STAT3 activation is suggested not only to be an important regulator of peripheral nerve regeneration in vitro and in vivo, but as determining factor for the growth promoting action of NGF in adult sensory neurons. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413222-12$15.00/0.

  18. 76 FR 28637 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Model AS350B, B1, B2, B3, BA, and EC130 B4 Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... Model AS350B, B1, B2, B3, BA, and EC130 B4 Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA..., 2009, for the Model EC130 B4 helicopters. The Model AS350 BB helicopter is not type certificated in the...) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to Model AS350B, B1, B2, B3, BA, and EC130 B4 helicopters with...

  19. 75 FR 79988 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Model AS350B, B1, B2, B3, BA, and EC130 B4 Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... France Model AS350B, B1, B2, B3, BA, and EC130 B4 Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration..., Revision 1, dated February 6, 2009, for the Model EC130 B4 helicopter (80A003). The Model AS350 BB... Model AS350B, B1, B2, B3, BA, and EC130 B4 helicopters with ARRIEL engines with Aircraft Parts...

  20. A follow-up of 130 patients with acromegaly in a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanowski, Marek; Zatonska, Katarzyna; Kaluzny, Marcin; Zielinski, Grzegorz; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grazyna; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna; Daroszewski, Jacek; Szymczak, Jadwiga; Podgorski, Jan Krzysztof

    2006-12-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease with increased mortality rate. The aim was to present our centre experience in the diagnosis and treatment of a series of patients suffering from acromegaly. 130 patients (55 men, 75 women) aged 19-84 years presenting with clinical and hormonal features of acromegaly, attending Department of Endocrinology and Out-patient Clinic between 1990 and 2004 were studied. They were analyzed their GH and IGF-1 levels, CT and MRI scans, and they were administered medical therapy, neurosurgery and radiotherapy. We have observed 106 macro-, 16 microadenomas and 1 case of ectopic GHRH. 115 patients were operated, as cured were recognized 74 of them. Pituitary irradiation was applied to 11 patients, in 4 of them it did not cure the disease. Medical therapy was efficacious in 12% patients treated with bromocriptine, 73% with long-acting lanreotide and 58% with long-acting octreotide. In 7 patients other malignant neoplasm were detected. 11 patients died during the follow-up. There is possible underdiagnosis of acromegaly in our region, especially in males. We have observed better diagnostic opportunities in recent years when MRI was available. It was accompanied by better outcome of surgical and pharmacological treatment and better control of the complications of the disease.

  1. [Hypertensive crisis. Clinical and therapeutic study of 130 cases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, M D; Alcázar, J M; Pérez Díaz, V; Gutiérrez Millet, V; Morales, J M; Barrientos, A; Rodicio, J L; Ruilope, L M

    1981-05-10

    The clinical aspects and response to therapy of 130 hypertensive emergencies are reviewed in this report. According to the main features of the clinical picture, the patients were divided into neurologic, cardiac or mixed emergencies. The patients were evaluated with clinical examination, fundoscopy, routine biochemistry, ECG, and chest radiograms. According to the response of the blood pressure to the administration of hypotensive drugs, the patients were divided into two groups: group I, with good response to a single drug associated to frusemide, and group II, with good response to two or more drugs associated to frusemide. Neurologic emergencies appeared in 55 patients (42% of total), and cardiac emergencies in 45 (34%), the initial blood pressure beeing higher in the first group (p less than 0.005). The fundus showed hypertensive retinopathy degrees III-IV in 55% of the patients. Patients in group I had less elevation of the initial blood pressure, showed a better response to therapy, and had only mild side effects from the administered drugs. Group II had a mortality of 11% and, as expected, showed more complications due to side effects. The frequency of appearance of toxic side effects from the drugs given is reviewed, and a therapeutic schedule is proposed.

  2. An Algorithmic Approach for the Reconstruction of Nasal Skin Defects: Retrospective Analysis of 130 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrak Akşam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most of the malignant cutaneous carcinomas are seen in the nasal region. Reconstruction of nasal defects is challenging because of the unique anatomic properties and complex structure of this region. In this study, we present our algorithm for the nasal skin defects that occurred after malignant skin tumor excisions. Material and Methods: Patients whose nasal skin was reconstructed after malignant skin tumor excision were included in the study. These patients were evaluated by their age, gender, comorbities, tumor location, tumor size, reconstruction type, histopathological diagnosis, and tumor recurrence. Results: A total of 130 patients (70 female, 60 male were evaluated. The average age of the patients was 67.8 years. Tumors were located mostly at the dorsum, alar region, and tip of the nose. When reconstruction methods were evaluated, primary closure was preferred in 14.6% patients, full thickness skin grafts were used in 25.3% patients, and reconstruction with flaps were the choice in 60% patients. Different flaps were used according to the subunits. Mostly, dorsal nasal flaps, bilobed flaps, nasolabial flaps, and forehead flaps were used. Conclusion: The defect-only reconstruction principle was accepted in this study. Previously described subunits, such as the dorsum, tip, alar region, lateral wall, columella, and soft triangles, of the nose were further divided into subregions by their anatomical relations. An algorithm was planned with these sub regions. In nasal skin reconstruction, this algorithm helps in selection the methods for the best results and minimize the complications.

  3. Heavy ion-induced SEEs on 130 nm CMOS technology for LHC application - status and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielli, A., E-mail: alessandro.gabrielli@bo.infn.it [INFN and Physics Department of University of Bologna (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    This work summarizes the status of the art of electronic designs, using CMOS technologies, to stand LHC and S-LHC radiation-hard environments. Radiation effects can be divided into Single Event Effects and Total Ionizing Dose effects, which are consequences of different interaction effects within the silicon and the electronics. These types of effects are commonly investigated and faced separately. The commercial 130 nm CMOS technology, today primarily proposed for SLHC electronic upgrades, only implements redundancies against the Single Event Effects'. On the contrary, the 250 nm technology node used in the past years for LHC experiments, was also hardened against the Total Ionizing Dose. Hence, the choice of the technology to be used for high-energy experiments is very crucial as it implies huge efforts in the designs of the components. In addition, an unavoidable technology scaling keeps moving toward ever-smaller sizes and this affects the availability of the silicon process for medium and long-term experiments.

  4. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-07-22

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode's current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm(2) of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA.

  5. Development of Radiation-hard Bandgap Reference and Temperature Sensor in CMOS 130 nm Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kuczynska, Marika; Bugiel, Szymon; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Idzik, Marek; Michelis, Stefano; Moron, Jakub; Przyborowski, Dominik; Swientek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    A stable reference voltage (or current) source is a standard component of today's microelectronics systems. In particle physics experiments such reference is needed in spite of harsh ionizing radiation conditions, i.e. doses exceeding 100 Mrads and fluences above 1e15 n/cm2. After such radiation load a bandgap reference using standard p-n junction of bipolar transistor does not work properly. Instead of using standard p-n junctions, two enclosed layout transistor (ELTMOS) structures are used to create radiation-hard diodes: the ELT bulk diode and the diode obtained using the ELTMOS as dynamic threshold transistor (DTMOS). In this paper we have described several sub-1V references based on ELTMOS bulk diode and DTMOS based diode, using CMOS 130 nm process. Voltage references the structures with additional PTAT (Proportional To Absolute Temperature) output for temperature measurements were also designed. We present and compare post-layout simulations of the developed bandgap references and temperature sensors, w...

  6. Shape-phase transitions in odd-mass γ -soft nuclei with mass A ≈130

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, K.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum phase transitions between competing equilibrium shapes of nuclei with an odd number of nucleons are explored using a microscopic framework of nuclear energy density functionals and a fermion-boson coupling model. The boson Hamiltonian for the even-even core nucleus, as well as the spherical single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of unpaired nucleons, are completely determined by a constrained self-consistent mean-field calculation for a specific choice of the energy density functional and pairing interaction. Only the strength parameters of the particle-core coupling have to be adjusted to reproduce a few empirical low-energy spectroscopic properties of the corresponding odd-mass system. The model is applied to the odd-A Ba, Xe, La, and Cs isotopes with mass A ≈130 , for which the corresponding even-even Ba and Xe nuclei present a typical case of γ -soft nuclear potential. The theoretical results reproduce the experimental low-energy excitation spectra and electromagnetic properties, and confirm that a phase transition between nearly spherical and γ -soft nuclear shapes occurs also in the odd-A systems.

  7. Investigation of the disappearance of collective motion in nuclei of mass A~120-130

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiolino C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A study of hot Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR in nuclei of mass A=120~130 in an excitation energy range from 150 to 330 MeV, where the GDR quenching is expected to arise, has been undertaken using the MEDEA multi-detector system. Hot nuclei were populated using complete and incomplete fusion reactions. The characterization of hot system was performed through the study of residue time of flight combined with the analysis of light charged energy spectra detected in coincidence. Gamma-ray energy spectra show an evolution of the GDR main features both in terms of width and multiplicity. Evidences of a saturation of gamma multiplicity appear at high excitation energy at variance with predictions of statistical model calculations. Gamma-ray energy spectra can been reproduced in a phenomenological way introducing in the statistical model a sharp suppression of the gamma-ray emission above E* = 240 MeV. A comparison of experimental data to models describing the GDR disappearance will be presented.

  8. K-shell emission trends from 60 to 130 cm/μs stainless steel implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Jones, B.; Hansen, S. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, M. C.; Flanagan, T. M.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Lopez, M. R.; Apruzese, J. P.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Maron, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Recent experiments at the 20 MA Z Accelerator have demonstrated, for the first time, implosion velocities up to 110-130 cm/μs in imploding stainless steel wire arrays. These velocities, the largest inferred in a magnetically driven implosion, lead to ion densities of 2 × 1020 cm-3 with electron temperatures of ˜5 keV. These plasma conditions have resulted in significant increases in the K-shell radiated output of 5-10 keV photons, radiating powers of >30 TW and yields >80 kJ, making it the brightest laboratory x-ray source in this spectral region. These values represent a doubling of the peak power and a 30% increase in the yield relative to previous studies. The experiments also included wire arrays with slower implosions, which were observed to have lower temperatures and reduced K-shell output. These colder pinches, however, radiated 260 TW in the soft x-ray region, making them one of the brightest soft x-ray sources available.

  9. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Strle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode’s current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm2 of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC. The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA.

  10. A 130 nm ASIC prototype for the NA62 Gigatracker readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Marchetto, F.; Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G.; Rivetti, A.; Wheadon, R.

    2011-09-01

    One of the most challenging detectors of the NA62 experiment is the silicon tracker, called Gigatracker. It consists of three hybrid silicon pixel stations, each one covering an area of 27 mm×60 mm. While the maximum pixel size is fairly large, 300 μm×300 μm the system has to sustain a very high particle rate, 1.5 MHz/mm 2, which corresponds to 800 MHz for each station. To obtain an efficient tracking with such a high rate the required track timing resolution is 150 ps (rms). Therefore the front-end ASIC should provide for each pixel a 200 ps time measurement capability, thus leading to the requirement of time walk compensation and very compact TDCs. Moreover, Single Event Upset protection has to be implemented in order to protect the digital circuitry. An ASIC prototype has been realized in CMOS 130 nm technology, containing three pixel columns. The chip performs the time walk compensation by a Constant Fraction Discriminator circuit, while the time measurement is performed by a Time to Amplitude Converter based TDC, both of them implemented on each pixel cell. The End of Column circuit containing only digital logic is responsible for the data readout from the pixel cell. The whole chip works with a system clock of 160 MHz and the digital logic is SEU protected by the use of Hamming codes. The detailed architecture of the ASIC prototype and test results are presented.

  11. A 130 nm ASIC prototype for the NA62 Gigatracker readout

    CERN Document Server

    Dellacasa, G; Wheadon, R; Mazza, G; Rivetti, A; Marchetto, F; Garbolino, S

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging detectors of the NA62 experiment is the silicon tracker, called Gigatracker. It consists of three hybrid silicon pixel stations, each one covering an area of 27 mm x 60 mm. While the maximum pixel size is fairly large, 300 mu m x 300 mu m the system has to sustain a very high particle rate, 1.5 MHz/mm(2), which corresponds to 800 MHz for each station. To obtain an efficient tracking with such a high rate the required track timing resolution is 150 ps (rms). Therefore the front-end ASIC should provide for each pixel a 200 Ps time measurement capability, thus leading to the requirement of time walk compensation and very compact TDCs. Moreover, Single Event Upset protection has to be implemented in order to protect the digital circuitry. An ASIC prototype has been realized in CMOS 130 nm technology, containing three pixel columns. The chip performs the time walk compensation by a Constant Fraction Discriminator circuit, while the time measurement is performed by a Time to Amplitude Co...

  12. Search for charged Higgs bosons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    A search is described to detect charged Higgs bosons via the process e^+e^- -> H^+H^-, using data collected by the OPAL detector at center-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 25 pb^-1. The decay channels are assumed to be H^+ -> qq'(bar) and H^+ -> \\tau^+ \

  13. Influence of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 on hemostasis as measured by viscoelastic device analysis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Christiane S; Reuter, Dorit; Loesche, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Michael; Reinhart, Konrad

    2011-11-01

    Hydroxyethyl starch solutions (HES) are plasma volume expanders which affect hemostasis. Newer HES 130/0.4 is said to be safer. Reevaluation of published evidence is necessary after the recent retraction of studies. Systematic review of studies assessing HES 130/0.4 effects on hemostasis by thrombelastography (TEG, ROTEM) or Sonoclot (SCR) in comparison with crystalloid or albumin control fluids was performed. Only studies which provided statistical comparisons between study fluids were analyzed. Studies were divided into in vitro or in vivo hemodilution studies. We assessed study quality, HES effects which differed significantly from controls, values outside normal range, degree of hemodilution, and cumulative HES dose. Seventeen in vitro and seven in vivo hemodilution studies were analyzed. Four studies reported quality control measures. Nineteen studies (all 15 ROTEM studies, 3 of 5 in vitro TEG, and 1 of 2 SCR studies) showed a significant hypocoagulatory effect of HES 130/0.4 on clot formation, while clotting time was not uniformly affected. Three in vivo TEG studies with low HES doses or cancer patients found mixed or nonsignificant results. In studies which provided normal ranges (n = 9), more values were outside normal ranges in the HES than in the control groups (87/122 vs. 58/122, p 40 ml/kg. HES 130/0.4 administration results in a weaker and smaller clot. Until results from well-designed clinical trials are available, safer fluids should be chosen for patients with impaired coagulation.

  14. Matrix Remodeling Promotes Pulmonary Hypertension through Feedback Mechanoactivation of the YAP/TAZ-miR-130/301 Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bertero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a deadly vascular disease with enigmatic molecular origins. We found that vascular extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling and stiffening are early and pervasive processes that promote PH. In multiple pulmonary vascular cell types, such ECM stiffening induced the microRNA-130/301 family via activation of the co-transcription factors YAP and TAZ. MicroRNA-130/301 controlled a PPARγ-APOE-LRP8 axis, promoting collagen deposition and LOX-dependent remodeling and further upregulating YAP/TAZ via a mechanoactive feedback loop. In turn, ECM remodeling controlled pulmonary vascular cell crosstalk via such mechanotransduction, modulation of secreted vasoactive effectors, and regulation of associated microRNA pathways. In vivo, pharmacologic inhibition of microRNA-130/301, APOE, or LOX activity ameliorated ECM remodeling and PH. Thus, ECM remodeling, as controlled by the YAP/TAZ-miR-130/301 feedback circuit, is an early PH trigger and offers combinatorial therapeutic targets for this devastating disease.

  15. Curcumin Suppresses the Colon Cancer Proliferation by Inhibiting Wnt/β-Catenin Pathways via miR-130a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqiang Dou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin exhibits anti-tumor effects in several cancers, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC, but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. Here we studied the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells. SW480 cells were injected into mice to establish the xenograft tumor model, followed by evaluation of survival rate with the treatment of curcumin. The expression levels of β-catenin, Axin and TCF4 were measured in the SW480 cells in the absence or presence of curcumin. Moreover, miRNAs related to the curcumin treatment were also detected in vitro. Curcumin could suppress the growth of colon cancer cells in the mouse model. This anti-tumor activity of curcumin was exerted by inhibiting cell proliferation rather than promoting cell apoptosis. Further study suggested that curcumin inhibited cell proliferation by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. MiR-130a was down-regulated by curcumin treatment, and overexpressing miR-130a could abolish the anti-tumor activity of curcumin. Our study confirms that curcumin is able to inhibit colon cancer by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathways via miR-130a. MiR-130a may serve as a new target of curcumin for CRC treatment.

  16. 42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Documentation... individual described in § 130.10(a) has (or had) a blood-clotting disorder, such as hemophilia; (2) That the... child with HIV acquired an HIV infection through perinatal transmission from a parent who is: (i) The...

  17. 42 CFR 130.10 - Who is eligible for payment under the Act-living persons with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES COMPASSIONATE PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Criteria for Eligibility... hemophilia, who was treated with antihemophilic factor at any place defined in § 130.2(o), or at any... who acquired the HIV infection through perinatal transmission from a parent who is the individual with...

  18. Characterization of the tank 51 alternate reductant sludge batch 9 slurry sample (HTF-51-15-130)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-01

    Tank 51 slurry sample HTF-51-15-130 was collected following sludge washing at the Tank Farm. The sample was received at SRNL and then characterized in preparation for qualification of the alternate reductant Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) flowsheet. In this characterization, densities, solids distribution, elemental constituents, anionic constituents, carbon content, and select radioisotopes were quantified.

  19. 9 CFR 130.17 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for other veterinary... FEES USER FEES § 130.17 User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. (a) User fees for veterinary diagnostics tests performed at the...

  20. Forest structure and tree recruitment changes on a permanent historical Cinder Hills plot over a 130-Year Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob H. Dyer; Andrew J. Sanchez Meador; Margaret M. Moore; Jonathan D. Bakker

    2008-01-01

    We examined forest structure, tree recruitment, and spatial pattern over a 130-year period on cinder soils in northern Arizona. Data were collected from a 3.24 ha permanent, stem-mapped plot established in 1909. This site is unique in that it represents ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws. var. scopulorum Engelm.) growing on black cinder soils, which are of limited...

  1. Forest structure and tree recruitment changes on a permanent historical Cinder Hills plot over a 130-year period (P-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob H. Dyer; Andrew J. Sánchez Meador; Margaret M. Moore; Jonathan D. Bakker

    2008-01-01

    We examined forest structure, tree recruitment, and spatial pattern over a 130-year period on cinder soils in northern Arizona. Data were collected from a 3.24 ha permanent, stem-mapped plot established in 1909. This site is unique in that it represents ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws. var. scopulorum Engelm.) growing on black cinder soils, which are of limited...

  2. The functional Thr130Ile and Val255Met polymorphisms of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF4A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Jakob; Rose, Christian Schack; Jensen, Dorit Packert

    2005-01-01

    HNF4A encodes an orphan nuclear receptor that plays crucial roles in regulating hepatic gluconeogenesis and insulin secretion. The aim of the present study was to examine two rare missense polymorphisms of HNF4A, Thr130Ile and Val255Met, for altered function and for association with type 2 diabetes...

  3. Ouabain affects cell migration via Na,K-ATPase-p130cas and via nucleus-centrosome association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ou

    Full Text Available Na,K-ATPase is a membrane protein that catalyzes ATP to maintain transmembrane sodium and potassium gradients. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also acts as a signal-transducing receptor for cardiotonic steroids such as ouabain and activates a number of signalling pathways. Several studies report that ouabain affects cell migration. Here we used ouabain at concentrations far below those required to block Na,K-ATPase pump activity and show that it significantly reduced RPE cell migration through two mechanisms. It causes dephosphorylation of a 130 kD protein, which we identify as p130cas. Src is involved, because Src inhibitors, but not inhibitors of other kinases tested, caused a similar reduction in p130cas phosphorylation and ouabain increased the association of Na,K-ATPase and Src. Knockdown of p130cas by siRNA reduced cell migration. Unexpectedly, ouabain induced separation of nucleus and centrosome, also leading to a block in cell migration. Inhibitor and siRNA experiments show that this effect is mediated by ERK1,2. This is the first report showing that ouabain can regulate cell migration by affecting nucleus-centrosome association.

  4. The p130 Isoform of Angiomotin Is Required for Yap-Mediated Hepatic Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chunling; Shen, Zhewei; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Dawany, Noor; Troutman, Scott; Showe, Louise C.; Liu, Qin; Shimono, Akihiko; Sudol, Marius; Holmgren, Lars; Stanger, Ben Z.; Kissil, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo-Yap signaling pathway regulates a number of developmental and adult cellular processes, including cell fate determination, tissue growth, and tumorigenesis. Members of the scaffold protein angiomotin (Amot) family interact with several Hippo pathway components, including Yap (Yes-associated protein), and either stimulate or inhibit Yap activity. We used a combination of genetic, biochemical, and transcriptional approaches to assess the functional consequences of the Amot-Yap interaction in mice and in human cells. Mice with a liver-specific Amot knockout exhibited reduced hepatic “oval cell” proliferation and tumorigenesis in response to toxin-induced injury or when crossed with mice lacking the tumor suppressor Nf2. Biochemical examination of the Amot-Yap interaction revealed that the p130 splicing isoform of Amot (Amot-p130) and Yap interacted in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, which involved binding of PPxY and LPxY motifs in Amot-p130 to WW domains of Yap. In the cytoplasm, Amot-p130 prevented the phosphorylation of Yap by blocking access of the WW domains to the kinase Lats1. Within the nucleus, Amot-p130 was associated with the transcriptional complex containing Yap and Teads (TEA domain family members) and contributed to the regulation of a subset of Yap target genes, many of which are associated with tumorigenesis. These findings indicated that Amot acts as a Yap cofactor, preventing Yap phosphorylation and augmenting its activity toward a specific set of genes that facilitate tumorigenesis. PMID:24003254

  5. Determination of specific radioactivity of samarium-153 product. 1. Quantitative determination of samarium by spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumo, Mishiroku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nemoto, Masahiro [Tokyo Nuclear Service Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    On the specific radioactivity of Sm-153 for the radiotherapy of cancers, a simple method for determination of the amount of Sm was described. The method used Arsenazo III as a colorimetric reagent. The sample irradiated in the reactor was dissolved in 1M HCl solution. A small part of it was taken and mixed with Arsenazo III at pH 3.2, and the amount of Sm was determined by the spectrophotometric method at a wavelength of 652 nm. The molar absorptivity of Sm at 652 nm was 6.6x10{sup 3} m{sup -1}{center_dot}mm{sup -1}. The error of measurement in the partial different conditions was about 2% of the value determined. The effects of impurities, Fe, Zn and Cu mixing in the Sm during operation, were clarified. (author)

  6. miR-130b targets NKD2 and regulates the Wnt signaling to promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhi [Department of Human Anatomy and Histoembryology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University (China); Li, Youjun, E-mail: liyoujunn@126.com [Department of Human Anatomy and Histoembryology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University (China); Wang, Nan; Yang, Lifeng; Zhao, Wei; Zeng, Xiandong [Central Hospital Affiliated to Shenyang Medical College (China)

    2016-03-18

    miR-130b was significantly up-regulated in osteosarcoma (OS) cells. Naked cuticle homolog 2 (NKD2) inhibited tumor growth and metastasis in OS by suppressing Wnt signaling. We used three miRNA target analysis tools to identify potential targets of miR-130b, and found that NKD2 is a potential target of miR-130b. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that miR-130b might target NKD2 and regulate the Wnt signaling to promote OS growth. We detected the expression of miR-130b and NKD2 mRNA and protein by quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot assays, respectively, and found up-regulation of miR-130b and down-regulation of NKD2 mRNA and protein exist in OS cell lines. MTT and flow cytometry assays showed that miR-130b inhibitors inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in OS cells. Furthermore, we showed that NKD2 is a direct target of miR-130b, and miR-130b regulated proliferation and apoptosis of OS cells by targeting NKD2. We further investigated whether miR-130b and NKD2 regulate OS cell proliferation and apoptosis by inhibiting Wnt signaling, and the results confirmed our speculation that miR-130b targets NKD2 and regulates the Wnt signaling to promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of OS cells. These findings will offer new clues for OS development and progression, and novel potential therapeutic targets for OS. - Highlights: • miR-130b is up-regulated and NKD2 is down-regulated in osteosarcoma cell lines. • Down-regulation of miR-130b inhibits proliferation of osteosarcoma cells. • Down-regulation of miR-130b promotes apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells. • miR-130b directly targets NKD2. • NKD2 regulates OS cell proliferation and apoptosis by inhibiting the Wnt signaling.

  7. Clinical Characteristics of 130 Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma Followed at a Tertiary Hospital From Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andreza Correa; Mente, Enio David; Cantao, Cassio Alfred Brattig; Sankarankutty, Ajith Kumar; Souza, Fernanda Fernandes; Motta, Tatiane Cardoso; Monsignore, Lucas; Junior, Jorge Elias; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Abud, Daniel Giansante; Peria, Fernanda Maris; Silva, Orlando Castro; de Lourdes Candolo Martinelli, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignant tumor of the liver that represents a serious public health problem all over the world, corresponding to the third cause of cancer death worldwide. The object was to present the clinical characteristics and follow-up of patients with HCC attended at the University Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto-USP (HCFMRP-USP), Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Methods Epidemiological and clinical data were revised from medical records. Results A total of 130 patients participated in the study, 81.5% of them being males. Mean (± SD) age at the time of HCC diagnosis was 55.6 ± 11.2 years. Cirrhosis was present in 89.2% of cases, with 53.4% of the patients being Child-Pugh A; chronic hepatitis B or C without cirrhosis was detected in 3.2%, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in 3.8%, and a normal liver in 3.8%. Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in 26.2% of the subjects, 16.9% of the patients were submitted to surgical resection, and 6.2% to percutaneous ethanol infusion (PEI). Transarterial embolization and transarterial chemoembolization were performed in 9.2% of the patients. Systemic chemotherapy was applied to 4.6% of cases and 24.6% of the patients received symptomatic treatment. Conclusion Thus, in the present series cirrhosis was the main risk factor for HCC, with 53.4% of the patients being Child-Pugh A. Liver transplantation or surgical resection of the tumor, potentially curative techniques, were possible in only 43.1% of cases. PMID:29147300

  8. Biopsy in a series of 130 pediatric diffuse intrinsic Pontine gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puget, Stephanie; Beccaria, Kevin; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Roujeau, Thomas; James, Syril; Grill, Jacques; Zerah, Michel; Varlet, Pascale; Sainte-Rose, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is the most severe pediatric solid tumor, with no significant improvement in the past 50 years. Possible reasons for failure to make therapeutic progress include poor understanding of the underlying molecular biology due to lack of tumor material. We performed a prospective analysis of children with typical appearance of DIPG who had a stereotactic biopsy in our unit since 2002. Technical approach, complications, histopathological results, and samples processing are exposed. The literature on this subject is discussed. Reviewing our own 130 cases of DIPG biopsies and previous published data, these procedures appear to have a diagnostic yield and morbidity rates similar to those reported for other brain locations (3.9 % of transient morbidity in our series). In addition, the quality and the quantity of the material obtained allow to (1) confirm the diagnosis, (2) reveal that WHO grading was useless to predict outcome, and (3) perform an extended molecular screen, including biomarkers study and the development of preclinical models. Recent studies reveal that DIPG may comprise more than one biological entity and a unique oncogenesis involving mutations never described in other types of cancers, i.e., histones H3 K27M and activin receptor ACVR1. Stereotactic biopsies of DIPG can be considered as a safe procedure in well-trained neurosurgical teams and could be incorporated in protocols. It is a unique opportunity to integrate DIPG biopsies in clinical practice and use the biology at diagnosis to drive the introduction of innovative targeted therapies, in combination with radiotherapy.

  9. A 130,000-year-old archaeological site in southern California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holen, Steven R; Deméré, Thomas A; Fisher, Daniel C; Fullagar, Richard; Paces, James B; Jefferson, George T; Beeton, Jared M; Cerutti, Richard A; Rountrey, Adam N; Vescera, Lawrence; Holen, Kathleen A

    2017-04-26

    The earliest dispersal of humans into North America is a contentious subject, and proposed early sites are required to meet the following criteria for acceptance: (1) archaeological evidence is found in a clearly defined and undisturbed geologic context; (2) age is determined by reliable radiometric dating; (3) multiple lines of evidence from interdisciplinary studies provide consistent results; and (4) unquestionable artefacts are found in primary context. Here we describe the Cerutti Mastodon (CM) site, an archaeological site from the early late Pleistocene epoch, where in situ hammerstones and stone anvils occur in spatio-temporal association with fragmentary remains of a single mastodon (Mammut americanum). The CM site contains spiral-fractured bone and molar fragments, indicating that breakage occured while fresh. Several of these fragments also preserve evidence of percussion. The occurrence and distribution of bone, molar and stone refits suggest that breakage occurred at the site of burial. Five large cobbles (hammerstones and anvils) in the CM bone bed display use-wear and impact marks, and are hydraulically anomalous relative to the low-energy context of the enclosing sandy silt stratum. (230)Th/U radiometric analysis of multiple bone specimens using diffusion-adsorption-decay dating models indicates a burial date of 130.7 ± 9.4 thousand years ago. These findings confirm the presence of an unidentified species of Homo at the CM site during the last interglacial period (MIS 5e; early late Pleistocene), indicating that humans with manual dexterity and the experiential knowledge to use hammerstones and anvils processed mastodon limb bones for marrow extraction and/or raw material for tool production. Systematic proboscidean bone reduction, evident at the CM site, fits within a broader pattern of Palaeolithic bone percussion technology in Africa, Eurasia and North America. The CM site is, to our knowledge, the oldest in situ, well

  10. SHAKESPEARE IN THREE LANGUAGES READING AND ANALYZING SONNET 130 AND ITS TRANSLATIONS IN LIGHT OF SEMIOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sündüz ÖZTÜRK KASAR

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the literary genres, poetry is the one that resists translation the most. Creating a new and innovative language that breaks the usual rules of the standard language with brand-new uses and meanings is probably one of the most important goals of the poet. Poetry challenges the translator to capture not only original images, exceptional symbolism, and subjective connotations but also its musicality, rhythm, and measure. Faced with this revolutionary use of language, the translator needs a guide so as to not get lost in the labyrinths of the poetic universe. The universe of sound and meaning unique to each language and the incompatibility of these languages with each other makes the duty of the translator seem impossible. At this point, semiotics may function as a guide, opening up the mysteries of the universe built by the poet and giving clues as to how it can be conveyed in the target language. This allows us to suggest the cooperation of semiotics and translation. From this perspective, we aim to present a case study that exemplifies this cooperation. Our corpus comprises Shakespeare’s sonnet 130 and its Turkish and French translations. The study treats the translator as the receiver of the source text and the producer of the target text in the light of the Theory of Instances of Enunciation propounded by Jean-Claude Coquet. Further, through the Systematics of Designificative Tendencies propounded by Sündüz Öztürk Kasar, the study compares the translators’ creations to the original sonnet to see the extent to which the balance of the original text’s meaning and form is preserved in the translations and how skillfully and competently the signs that constitute the universe of meaning are transmitted in the target languages.

  11. An overview of reactive chlorine measurements during the WINTER C-130 aircraft campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J. A.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Jaegle, L.; Haskins, J.; Shah, V.; Brown, S. S.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Veres, P. R.; Dibb, J. E.; Sparks, T.; Ebben, C. J.; Cohen, R. C.; Sullivan, A.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Schroder, J. C.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, T. L.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Wintertime Investigation of Transport, Emissions, and Reactivity (WINTER) campaign, the University of Washington Iodide-adduct high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) was deployed aboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. Calibrated measurements of ClNO2, Cl2, HCl, N2O5, HNO3, HONO, among several other compounds, were made at 2Hz on all 13 research flights. ClNO2 and HCl were often the dominant forms of reactive gas-phase chlorine compounds, with ClNO2 routinely reaching >1.5 ppb in the polluted outflow of the eastern U.S. urban corridor. ClNO2 often becomes a substantial fraction (~30%) of NOz (NOz = NOy - NOx) in these plumes at night. Preliminary analyses suggests that ClNO2 production is most efficient in the polluted marine boundary layer, with yields approaching unity and the evolution of nighttime ClNO2 highly correlated with that of HNO3 and particulate nitrate. However, ClNO2 production was observed throughout the region and a significant source of reactive chlorine from coal-fired power plants was directly confirmed with measurements of HCl strongly correlated with SO2. In addition, there is some evidence that biomass or biofuel combustion is a source of reactive chlorine that can lead to ClNO2 production. Examples of the nocturnal and diel evolution of reactive chlorine species are given, and we show to our knowledge the first measurements of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) in the polluted mid-latitude marine boundary layer.

  12. JTT-130, a novel intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, ameliorates lipid metabolism and attenuates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Mera

    2015-11-01

    From these results, JTT-130 ameliorates lipid metabolism accompanied with the enhancement of the anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL, and attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic animals. These findings indicate that intestinal MTP inhibition may be atherogenic in vivo and that JTT-130 may be a useful compound for the treatment of dyslipidemia and a potential anti-atherogenic drug.

  13. 41 CFR 102-83.130 - When must agencies consider the impact of location decisions on low- and moderate-income employees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... consider the impact of location decisions on low- and moderate-income employees? 102-83.130 Section 102-83... Socioeconomic Considerations § 102-83.130 When must agencies consider the impact of location decisions on low... lease actions involving the relocation of a major work force must consider the impact on employees with...

  14. Low-noise design issues for analog front-end electronics in 130 nm and 90 nm CMOS technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Manghisoni, M; Re, V; Speziali, V; Traversi, G

    2007-01-01

    Deep sub-micron CMOS technologies provide wellestablished solutions to the implementation of low-noise front-end electronics in various detector applications. The IC designers’ effort is presently shifting to 130 nm CMOS technologies, or even to the next technology node, to implement readout integrated circuits for silicon strip and pixel detectors, in view of future HEP applications. In this work the results of noise measurements carried out on CMOS devices in 130 nm and 90 nm commercial processes are presented. The behavior of the 1/f and white noise terms is studied as a function of the device polarity and of the gate length and width. The study is focused on low current density applications where devices are biased in weak or moderate inversion. Data obtained from the measurements provide a powerful tool to establish design criteria in nanoscale CMOS processes for detector front-ends in LHC upgrades.

  15. A 130,000-year-old archaeological site in southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holen, Steven R.; Deméré, Thomas A.; Fisher, Daniel C.; Fullagar, Richard; Paces, James B.; Jefferson, George T.; Beeton, Jared M.; Cerutti, Richard A.; Rountrey, Adam N.; Vescera, Lawrence; Holen, Kathleen A.

    2017-01-01

    The earliest dispersal of humans into North America is a contentious subject, and proposed early sites are required to meet the following criteria for acceptance: (1) archaeological evidence is found in a clearly defined and undisturbed geologic context; (2) age is determined by reliable radiometric dating; (3) multiple lines of evidence from interdisciplinary studies provide consistent results; and (4) unquestionable artefacts are found in primary context1,2. Here we describe the Cerutti Mastodon (CM) site, an archaeological site from the early late Pleistocene epoch, where in situ hammerstones and stone anvils occur in spatio-temporal association with fragmentary remains of a single mastodon (Mammut americanum). The CM site contains spiral-fractured bone and molar fragments, indicating that breakage occured while fresh. Several of these fragments also preserve evidence of percussion. The occurrence and distribution of bone, molar and stone refits suggest that breakage occurred at the site of burial. Five large cobbles (hammerstones and anvils) in the CM bone bed display use-wear and impact marks, and are hydraulically anomalous relative to the low-energy context of the enclosing sandy silt stratum. 230Th/U radiometric analysis of multiple bone specimens using diffusion–adsorption–decay dating models indicates a burial date of 130.7 ± 9.4 thousand years ago. These findings confirm the presence of an unidentified species of Homo at the CM site during the last interglacial period (MIS 5e; early late Pleistocene), indicating that humans with manual dexterity and the experiential knowledge to use hammerstones and anvils processed mastodon limb bones for marrow extraction and/or raw material for tool production. Systematic proboscidean bone reduction, evident at the CM site, fits within a broader pattern of Palaeolithic bone percussion technology in Africa3,4,5,6, Eurasia7,8,9 and North America10,11,12. The CM site is, to our knowledge, the oldest in situ

  16. Structural and functional insights into the interaction between the Cas family scaffolding protein p130Cas and the focal adhesion-associated protein paxillin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Miller, Darcie J.; Guibao, Cristina D.; Donato, Dominique M.; Hanks, Steven K.; Zheng, Jie J.

    2017-08-31

    The Cas family scaffolding protein p130Cas is a Src substrate localized in focal adhesions (FAs) and functions in integrin signaling to promote cell motility, invasion, proliferation, and survival. p130Cas targeting to FAs is essential for its tyrosine phosphorylation and downstream signaling. Although the N-terminal SH3 domain is important for p130Cas localization, it has also been reported that the C-terminal region is involved in p130Cas FA targeting. The C-terminal region of p130Cas or Cas family homology domain (CCHD) has been reported to adopt a structure similar to that of the focal adhesion kinase C-terminal focal adhesion-targeting domain. The mechanism by which the CCHD promotes FA targeting of p130Cas, however, remains unclear. In this study, using a calorimetry approach, we identified the first LD motif (LD1) of the FA-associated protein paxillin as the binding partner of the p130Cas CCHD (in a 1:1 stoichiometry with a Kd ~4.2 μM) and elucidated the structure of the p130Cas CCHD in complex with the paxillin LD1 motif by X-ray crystallography. Of note, a comparison of the CCHD/LD1 complex with a previously solved structure of CCHD in complex with the SH2-containing protein NSP3 revealed that LD1 had almost identical positioning of key hydrophobic and acidic residues relative to NSP3. Because paxillin is one of the key scaffold molecules in FAs, we propose that the interaction between the p130Cas CCHD and the LD1 motif of paxillin plays an important role in p130Cas FA targeting.

  17. High incidence of allelic loss at 16q12.2 region spanning RBL2/p130 gene in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Kadam; Jada, Srinivasa Rao; Quah, Boon Long; Quah, Thuan Chong; Lai, Poh San

    2009-04-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is the most common intra-ocular tumor that manifests in early childhood. It is initiated by the inactivation of RB1/p105 gene, a prototype tumor suppressor gene. However, observed recurrent chromosomal aberrations accompanying RB1/p105 mutations suggest the involvement of additional mutational events. Chromosome 16q is one of the loci with recurrent losses which are likely to contain tumor suppressor genes. In this study, allelic loss was demonstrated at a second locus for retinoblastoma, RBL2/p130 on 16q12.2. Using intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1074182 and rs10748) and flanking extragenic microsatellite markers (D16S411 and D16S408), 40 retinoblastoma tumor samples were analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of these markers was found in 11 (57.9%) out of 19 informative tumors at the RBL2/p130 gene locus and while a total of 15 (78.9%) tumors showed LOH in at least one marker. Deletions extending more than 13 cM across the pericentromeric region of 16q12.1-q13 were inferred from four tumors. Microsatellite instability was observed in two other tumors at the flanking markers. No mutations were found in RBL2/p130 exons 19-22 coding for the protein domain critical for biological activity. This is the first evidence of LOH within RBL2/p130 gene in retinoblastoma. The high frequency of allelic loss provides further evidence on the implication of this gene in retinoblastoma development and/or progression.

  18. Ultrabroadband 50-130 THz pulses generated via phase-matcheddifference frequency mixing in LiIO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentgraf, Thomas; Huber, Rupert; Nielsen, Nils C.; Chemla, DanielS.; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2006-10-10

    We report the generation of ultrabroadband pulses spanningthe 50-130 THz frequency range via phase-matched difference frequencymixing within the broad spectrum of sub-10 fs pulses in LiIO_3. Modelcalculations reproduce the octave-spanning spectra and predict few-cycleTHz pulse durations less than 20~;fs. The applicability of this scheme isdemonstrated with 9-fs pulses from a Ti:sapphire oscillator and with 7-fsamplified pulses from a hollow fiber compressor as pumpsources.

  19. Deep inelastic reactions of /sup 32/S on /sup 27/Al at 130 MeV bombarding energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manduchi, C.; Russo-Manduchi, M.T.; Segato, G.F.; Andolfato, F.

    1985-10-01

    Deep inelastic reactions induced by /sup 32/S bombardment on /sup 27/Al were studied at 130 MeV incident energy. The experiment employed a coincidence spectrometer consisting of two ion chambers which measured the energy, position and nuclear charge of the heavy reaction products. Inclusive fragment measurements and fragment-fragment coincidences have been used to determine the production of fragments of different Z, and related Q-value distributions. (orig.).

  20. Development of X-Ray Laser Media: Measurement of gain and Development of Cavity Resonators for Wavelengths Near 130 Angstroms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    for Wavelengt 130 Angstroms *j - ------------ Lobororory for Lowe ErgefaL Colk-ge of FEngimv and AW d Scince J UnhewWyof Rds :250 Emt W od Rochew...which inverted populations on soft x-ray transitions could be produced in laser heated plasmas. Direct easurements with grating spectrographs were...One of our first accomplishments under this grant was to model the directional characteristics of amplified spontaneous emission and to verify the

  1. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogler, Laura K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-11-30

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2vββ). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO2 crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with 130Te and 2 with 128Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2vββ rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of 350 g 130Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2vββ half-life was measured to be T2v1/2 = [9.81± 0.96(stat)± 0.49(syst)] x1020 y.

  2. Time-course of changes in indirect markers of muscle damage responses following a 130-km cycling race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Rodrigues

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2016v18n3p322   The purpose of the present investigation was to identify the effects of a 130-km cycling race on indices of biochemical indirect markers of muscle damage and muscle soreness responses during a 72-hour recovery period. Fifteen endurance-trained male cyclists which were competing for more than 2 years and were involved in systematic training at least of 3 days/wk underwent a collection of indirect biochemical markers of muscle damage (CK, LDH, Myo and delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS, at five different moments of data collection: before (PRE and immediately after (POST a 130-km cycling race, and 24, 48, 72 hours following the cycling race. CK and LDH plasma concentrations significantly increased POST-race (p 0.05. A 130-km cycling race has a noteworty effect on indices of biochemical indirect markers of muscle damage and muscle soreness responses, indicating that 72 hour recovery period do not seems to be enough for long-distance cyclist, and reinforce the propositions of scientific literature about the need of a sufficient recovery period for cycling endurance athletes.

  3. Total Ionizing Dose Influence on the Single-Event Upset Sensitivity of 130-nm PD SOI SRAMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiwen; Cui, Jiangwei; Liu, Mengxin; Zhou, Hang; Liu, Mohan; Wei, Ying; Su, Dandan; Ma, Teng; Lu, Wu; Yu, Xuefeng; Guo, Qi; He, Chengfa

    2017-07-01

    Effect of total ionizing dose (TID) on single-event upset (SEU) hardness of 130 nm partially depleted (PD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) static random access memories (SRAMs) is investigated in this paper. The measurable synergistic effect of TID on SEU sensitivity of 130-nm PD SOI SRAM was observed in our experiment, even though that is far less than micrometer and submicrometer devices. Moreover, SEU cross section after TID irradiation has no dependence on the data pattern that was applied during TID exposure: SEU cross sections are characterized by TID data pattern and its complement data pattern are decreased consistently rather than a preferred state and a nonpreferred state as micrometer and sub-micrometer SRAMs. The memory cell test structure allowing direct measurement of static noise margin (SNM) under standby operation was designed using identical memory cell layout of SRAM. Direct measurement of the memory cell SNM shows that both data sides' SNM is decreased by TID, indicating that SEU cross section of 130-nm PD SOI SRAM will be increased by TID. And, the decreased SNM is caused by threshold shift in memory cell transistors induced by “radiation-induced narrow channel effect”.

  4. Transcytosis of IL-11 and Apical Redirection of gp130 Is Mediated by IL-11α Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar Monhasery

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-11 signaling is involved in various processes, including epithelial intestinal cell regeneration and embryo implantation. IL-11 signaling is initiated upon binding of IL-11 to IL-11R1 or IL-11R2, two IL-11α-receptor splice variants, and gp130. Here, we show that IL-11 signaling via IL-11R1/2:gp130 complexes occurs on both the apical and basolateral sides of polarized cells, whereas IL-6 signaling via IL-6R:gp130 complexes is restricted to the basolateral side. We show that basolaterally supplied IL-11 is transported and released to the apical extracellular space via transcytosis in an IL-11R1-dependent manner. By contrast, IL-6R and IL-11R2 do not promote transcytosis. In addition, we show that transcytosis of IL-11 is dependent on the intracellular domain of IL-11R1 and that synthetic transfer of the intracellular domain of IL-11R1 to IL-6R promotes transcytosis of IL-6. Our data define IL-11R as a cytokine receptor with transcytotic activity by which IL-11 and IL-6:soluble IL-6R complexes are transported across cellular barriers.

  5. miR-130A as a diagnostic marker to differentiate malignant mesothelioma from lung adenocarcinoma in pleural effusion cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellesso, Rocco; Galasso, Marco; Nicolè, Lorenzo; Dabrilli, Paolo; Volinia, Stefano; Fassina, Ambrogio

    2017-08-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare tumor with a dismal prognosis, usually presenting with recurrent effusions. However, the majority of malignant pleural effusions are due to lung adenocarcinoma (AdC). The distinction between these tumors has considerable therapeutic and medicolegal implications and can be very challenging both histologically and cytologically. Appropriate immunohistochemistry (IHC) is required to support the diagnosis. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression analysis could be a viable diagnostic tool for distinguishing between these tumors. The purpose of the current study was to assess the reliability of miRNAs as diagnostic markers to differentiate epithelioid malignant mesothelioma (MM) from lung AdC. Bioinformatic analysis of publicly searchable data sets regarding miRNA expression profiling was performed to select the most significant differentially expressed miRNAs. These were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction on histologic (41 MM cases and 40 lung AdC cases) and cytological (26 MM cases and 27 lung AdC cases) specimens and the diagnostic performances were assessed. miR-130a, miR-193a, miR-675, miR-141, miR-205, and miR-375 were found to be the best distinguishing markers. Of these, only miR-130a was significantly overexpressed in MM compared with lung AdC (P =.029 in histologic and P =.014 in cytological samples). miR-130a demonstrated a sensitivity of 77%, a specificity of 67%, a positive predictive value of 69%, a negative predictive value of 75%, and an accuracy of 72% in identifying MM. The diagnostic performances of miR-130a expression analysis and IHC appear to be similar. miR-130a quantification could be used reliably as second-level diagnostic tool to differentiate MM from lung AdC in pleural effusion cytology, mainly in those cases with ambiguous or negative IHC. Further validation is needed. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:635-43. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. NMR solution structure of the peptide fragment 1-30, derived from unprocessed mouse Doppel protein, in DHPC micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Oglecka, Kamila; Mäler, Lena; Jarvet, Jüri; Wright, Peter E; Dyson, H Jane; Gräslund, Astrid

    2006-01-10

    The downstream prion-like Doppel (Dpl) protein is a homologue related to the prion protein (PrP). Dpl is expressed in the brains of mice that do not express PrP, and Dpl is known to be toxic to neurons. One mode of toxicity has been suggested to involve direct membrane interactions. PrP under certain conditions of cell trafficking retains an uncleaved signal peptide, which may also hold for the much less studied Dpl. For a peptide with a sequence derived from the N-terminal part (1-30) of mouse Dpl (mDpl(1-30)) CD spectroscopy shows about 40% alpha-helical structure in DHPC and SDS micelles. In aqueous solution it is mostly a random coil. The three-dimensional solution structure was determined by NMR for mDpl(1-30) associated with DHPC micelles. 2D 1H NMR spectra of the peptide in q = 0.25 DMPC/DHPC bicelles only showed signals from the unstructured termini, indicating that the structured part of the peptide resides within the lipid bilayer. Together with 2H2O exchange data in the DHPC micelle solvent, these results show an alpha-helix protected from solvent exchange between residues 7 and 19, and suggest that the alpha-helical segment can adopt a transmembrane localization also in a membrane. Leakage studies with entrapped calcein in large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles showed that the peptide is almost as membrane perturbing as melittin, known to form pores in membranes. The results suggest a possible channel formation mechanism for the unprocessed Dpl protein, which may be related to toxicity through direct cell membrane interaction and damage.

  7. Intercomparison of aircraft instruments on board the C-130 and Falcon 20 over southern Germany during EXPORT 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Brough

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the summer 2000 EXPORT aircraft campaign (European eXport of Precursors and Ozone by long-Range Transport, two comprehensively instrumented research aircraft measuring a variety of chemical species flew wing tip to wing tip for a period of one and a quarter hours. During this interval a comparison was undertaken of the measurements of nitrogen oxide (NO, odd nitrogen species (NOy, carbon monoxide (CO and ozone (O3. The comparison was performed at two different flight levels, which provided a 10-fold variation in the concentrations of both NO (10 to 1000 parts per trillion by volume (pptv and NOy (200 to over 2500 pptv. Large peaks of NO and NOy observed from the Falcon 20, which were at first thought to be from the exhaust of the C-130, were also detected on the 4 channel NOxy instrument aboard the C-130. These peaks were a good indication that both aircraft were in the same air mass and that the Falcon 20 was not in the exhaust plume of the C-130. Correlations and statistical analysis are presented between the instruments used on the two separate aircraft platforms. These were found to be in good agreement giving a high degree of correlation for the ambient air studied. Any deviations from the correlations are accounted for in the estimated inaccuracies of the instruments. These results help to establish that the instruments aboard the separate aircraft are reliably able to measure the corresponding chemical species in the range of conditions sampled and that data collected by both aircraft can be co-ordinated for purposes of interpretation.

  8. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Suarez

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720 which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  9. $\\beta$-delayed neutron spectroscopy of $^{130-132}$ Cd isotopes with the ISOLDE decay station and the VANDLE array

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to use the new ISOLDE decay station and the neutron detector VANDLE to measure the $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission of N=82-84 $^{130-132}$Cd isotopes. The large delayed neutron emission probability observed in a previous ISOLDE measurement is indicative of the Gamow-Teller transitions due to the decay of deep core neutrons. Core Gamow-Teller decay has been experimentally proven in the $^{78}$Ni region for the N>50 nuclei using the VANDLE array. The spectroscopic measurement of delayed neutron emission along the cadmium isotopic chain will allow us to track the evolution of the single particle states and the shell gap.

  10. Ultrabroadband 50-130 THz pulses generated via phase-matched difference frequency mixing in LiIO3

    OpenAIRE

    Zentgraf, Thomas; Huber, Rupert; Nielsen, Nils C.; Chemla, Daniel S.; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    We report the generation of ultrabroadband pulses spanning the 50-130 THz frequency range via phase-matched difference frequency mixing within the broad spectrum of sub-10 fs pulses in LiIO_3. Model calculations reproduce the octave-spanning spectra and predict few-cycle THz pulse durations less than 20~;fs. The applicability of this scheme is demonstrated with 9-fs pulses from a Ti:sapphire oscillator and with 7-fs amplified pulses from a hollow fiber compressor as pump sources.

  11. Search for charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palla, Fabrizio; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Searches for charginos and neutralinos produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In the 5.7 pb-1 data sample collected by ALEPH, no candidate events were found. As a result, chargino and neutralino masses and couplings are constrained and the domains previously excluded at LEP1 are extended.

  12. Four fermion production in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jacobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Four-fermion events have been selected in a data sample of 5.8 pb**-1 collected with the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. The final states l^+l^- qqbar, l^+l^-l^+l^-, nunubar qqbar, and nunubar l^+l^- have been examined. Five events are observed in the data, in agreement with the Standard Model predictions of 6.67 +/- 0.38 events from four-fermion processes and 0.14+0.19-0.05 from background processes.

  13. Search for charginos and neutralinos with R-parity violation at √s = 130 and 136 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lunch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Searches for charginos and neutralinos produced in e +e - collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed under the assumptions that R-parity is not conserved, that the dominant R-parity violating coupling involves only leptonic fields, and that the lifetime of the lightest supersymmetric particle can be neglected. In the 5.7 pb -1 data sample collected by ALEPH, no candidate events were found. As a result, chargino and neutralino masses and couplings are constrained and the domains previously excluded at LEP1 are extended.

  14. Pion Interferometry of square root of (s(NN)) =130 GeV Au + Au collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Bossingham, R; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón De La Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Greiner, D; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schweda, K; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; Szanto De Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-08-20

    Two-pion correlation functions in Au+Au collisions at square root of [s(NN)] = 130 GeV have been measured by the STAR (solenoidal tracker at RHIC) detector. The source size extracted by fitting the correlations grows with event multiplicity and decreases with transverse momentum. Anomalously large sizes or emission durations, which have been suggested as signals of quark-gluon plasma formation and rehadronization, are not observed. The Hanbury Brown-Twiss parameters display a weak energy dependence over a broad range in square root of [s(NN)].

  15. Immunolocalization of Upstream binding factor and pocket protein p130 during final stages of bovine oocyte growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baran, Vladimír; Pavlok, Antonín; Bjerregaard, B.; Wrenzycki, C.; Hermann, D.; Philimonenko, V. V.; Lapathitis, Georgios; Hozák, Pavel; Niemann, H.; Motlík, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 4 (2004), s. 877-886 ISSN 0006-3363 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 573; GA MŠk LN00A065; GA AV ČR IPP1050128 Grant - others:Slovenská Akademie věd(SK) Vega 2/3065/23; Evropská unie(XE) QLK3-CT1999-00104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : pocket protein p130 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.550, year: 2004

  16. Performance Characteristics of Automotive Engines in the United States : Third Series - Report No. 1 - 1977 Volvo 130 CID (2.1 Liters), F.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    Experimental data were obtained in dynamometer tests of a 1977 Volvo 130 CID engine to determine fuel consumption and emissions (hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen) at steady-state engine-operating modes. The objective of the program is...

  17. Program for establishing long-time flight service performance of composite materials in the center wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 5: Flight service and inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizer, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Inspections of the C-130 composite-reinforced center wings were conducted over the flight service monitoring period of more than six years. Twelve inspections were conducted on each of the two C-130H airplanes having composite reinforced center wing boxes. Each inspection consisted of visual and ultrasonic inspection of the selective boron-epoxy reinforced center wings which included the inspection of the boron-epoxy laminates and the boron-epoxy reinforcement/aluminum structure adhesive bondlines. During the flight service monitoring period, the two C-130H aircraft accumulated more than 10,000 flight hours and no defects were detected in the inspections over this period. The successful performance of the C-130H aircraft with composite-reinforced center wings allowed the transfer of the responsibilities of inspecting and maintaining these two aircraft to the U. S. Air Force.

  18. Studies of QCD in $e^{+}e^{-}\\to$ hadrons at E$_{cm}$ = 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    Studies of QCD in $\\mbox{e}^+\\mbox{e}^- \\rightarrow$ Hadrons at $E_{cm} = $} 130 and 136 GeV The ALEPH Collaboration An analysis of the properties of hadronic final states produced in electron-positron annihilation at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV is presented. The measurements are based on a data sample of 5.7 $\\mbox{pb}^{-1}$ collected in November 1995 with the \\Aleph detector at LEP. Inclusive charged particle distributions, jet rates and event-shape distributions are measured and the results are compared with the predictions of QCD-based models. From the measured distributions quantities are determined for which the dependence on the centre-of-mass energy can be predicted by QCD, including the mean multiplicity of charged particles, the peak position of the inclusive distribution of $\\xi = -\\ln x_p$ ($x_p = p / p_{beam}$), and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$. The QCD predictions are tested by comparing with corresponding measurements at $E_{cm} = 91.2$ GeV and at lower energies.

  19. Cryogenic Lifetime Studies of 130 nm and 65 nm CMOS Technologies for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, James R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Deptuch, G. W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wu, Guoying [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Gui, Ping [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-04

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility intends to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. Research is under way to place the electronics inside the cryostat. For reasons of efficiency and economics, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This, then, requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130 nm and 65 nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. Our results show that both technologies achieve the lifetimes required by the experiment. Minimal design changes are necessary in the case of the 130 nm process and no changes whatsoever are necessary for the 65 nm process.

  20. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 130: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-07-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 130, Storage Tanks, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 130 consists of the seven following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 7, 10, 20, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site: • 01-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 07-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks • 10-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 20-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 20-99-05, Tar Residue • 22-02-02, Buried UST Piping • 23-02-07, Underground Storage Tank This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 130 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) finalized on April 3, 2008, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 130. The DQO process developed for this CAU

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation reveals insights into the mechanism of unfolding by the A130T/V mutations within the MID1 zinc-binding Bbox1 domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjie Zhao

    Full Text Available The zinc-binding Bbox1 domain in protein MID1, a member of the TRIM family of proteins, facilitates the ubiquitination of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A and alpha4, a protein regulator of PP2A. The natural mutation of residue A130 to a valine or threonine disrupts substrate recognition and catalysis. While NMR data revealed the A130T mutant Bbox1 domain failed to coordinate both structurally essential zinc ions and resulted in an unfolded structure, the unfolding mechanism is unknown. Principle component analysis revealed that residue A130 served as a hinge point between the structured β-strand-turn-β-strand (β-turn-β and the lasso-like loop sub-structures that constitute loop1 of the ββα-RING fold that the Bbox1 domain adopts. Backbone RMSD data indicate significant flexibility and departure from the native structure within the first 5 ns of the molecular dynamics (MD simulation for the A130V mutant (>6 Å and after 30 ns for A130T mutant (>6 Å. Overall RMSF values were higher for the mutant structures and showed increased flexibility around residues 125 and 155, regions with zinc-coordinating residues. Simulated pKa values of the sulfhydryl group of C142 located near A130 suggested an increased in value to ~9.0, paralleling the increase in the apparent dielectric constants for the small cavity near residue A130. Protonation of the sulfhydryl group would disrupt zinc-coordination, directly contributing to unfolding of the Bbox1. Together, the increased motion of residues of loop 1, which contains four of the six zinc-binding cysteine residues, and the increased pKa of C142 could destabilize the structure of the zinc-coordinating residues and contribute to the unfolding.

  2. Low angiomotin-p130 with concomitant high Yes-associated protein 1 expression is associated with adverse prognosis of advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soon Auck; Son, Myoung Won; Cho, Junhun; Jang, Si-Hyong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Hyun Deuk; Oh, Mee-Hye; Lee, Moon Soo

    2017-11-01

    Angiomotin (AMOT) promotes angiogenesis and plays a role in neovascularization during tumorigenesis. Recently, the AMOT isoform, AMOT-p130, was shown to exert a regulatory effect on Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), a major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway. The specific roles of AMOT-p130 and YAP1 in advanced gastric cancer (AGC) are yet to be established. In this study, a total of 166 patients with AGC were enrolled, and AMOT-p130 and YAP1 levels were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Low AMOT-p130 together with high YAP1 expression (n = 30, 18.1%) was associated with high T stage (p = 0.042), high TNM stage (p = 0.025), and venous invasion (p = 0.048). A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank test revealed a significant correlation with decreased AMOT-p130 coupled with high nuclear YAP1 expression with shorter overall survival (p = 0.0045) and disease-free survival (p = 0.0028). Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that the low AMOT-p130/high YAP1 expression profile was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (p = 0.008, HR = 1.874, CI, 1.177-2.986) and overall survival (p = 0.012, HR = 1.903, CI, 1.152-3.143). Our findings collectively demonstrate that low AMOT-p130 combined with high YAP1 expression is correlated with an unfavorable AGC prognosis. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Sequence-specific inhibition of microRNA-130a gene by CRISPR/Cas9 system in breast cancer cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainina Abdollah, Nur; Das Kumitaa, Theva; Yusof Narazah, Mohd; Razak, Siti Razila Abdul

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short stranded noncoding RNA that play important roles in apoptosis, cell survival, development and cell proliferation. However, gene expression control via small regulatory RNA, particularly miRNA in breast cancer is still less explored. Therefore, this project aims to develop an approach to target microRNA-130a using the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 system in MCF7, breast cancer cell line. The 20 bp sequences target at stem loop, 3ʹ and 5ʹ end of miR130a were cloned into pSpCas9(BB)-2A-GFP (PX458) plasmid, and the positive clones were confirmed by sequencing. A total of 5 μg of PX458-miR130a was transfected to MCF7 using Lipofectamine® 3000 according to manufacturer’s protocol. The transfected cells were maintained in the incubator at 37 °C under humidified 5% CO2. After 48 hours, cells were harvested and total RNA was extracted using miRNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen). cDNAs were synthesised specific to miR-130a using TaqMan MicroRNA Reverse Transcription Kit (Applied Biosystems). Then, qRT-PCR was carried out using TaqMan Universal Master Mix (Applied Biosystems) to quantify the knockdown level of mature miRNAs in the cells. Result showed that miR-130a-5p was significantly downregulated in MCF7 cell line. However, no significant changes were observed for sequences targeting miR-130a-3p and stem loop. Thus, this study showed that the expression of miR-130a-5p was successfully down-regulated using CRISPR silencing system. This technique may be useful to manipulate the level of miRNA in various cell types to answer clinical questions at the molecular level.

  4. Radiolesão vascular como efeito deletério da braquiterapia intra-arterial com dose elevada de Samário-153 em coelhos hipercolesterolêmicos Vascular radiolesion as a deleterious effect of high-dose-rate intraarterial brachytherapy with Samarium-153 in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton Bertolim Précoma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo tem por objetivo avaliar as alterações vasculares morfológicas e morfométricas induzidas pela braquiterapia com Samário-153 (153 Sm em coelhos hipercolesterolêmicos, com doses elevadas. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados 43 coelhos hipercolesterolêmicos, brancos, da raça New Zealand, e o total de 86 artérias ilíacas submetidas a lesão por balão de angioplastia. Divididos em três grupos: dois (GI irradiados com as doses de 15Gy (n=14 e 60Gy (n=36 e um grupo controle (n=36. Foram realizadas avaliação histológica morfométrica e análise histológica qualitativa para análise tecidual. RESULTADOS: Foram observadas uma redução significativa da neoproliferação intimal (NPI no GI 15 Gy (pOBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate vascular morphological and morphometric changes induced by brachytherapy with samarium-153 (Sm-153 at high doses in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. METHODS: Forty-three New Zealand White hypercholesterolemic rabbits were analyzed, and the total of 86 iliac arteries underwent balloon angioplasty injury. The rabbits were divided into three different groups: two irradiation groups (IG assigned to 15 Gy (n=14 and 60 Gy (n=36 irradiation doses, respectively, and a control group (n = 36. Histomorphometric and qualitative histological analyses were performed for tissue evaluation. RESULTS: Significant reductions were found in neointimal proliferation (NIP (p< 0.0001, media area (MA (p<0.0001 and percent stenosis (p<0.0001 in the 15-Gy IG, compared to the other groups. The 60-Gy IG had the higher rate of NIP, increase in media and vessel areas (VA and percent stenosis. The 60-Gy IG also showed the greatest number of xanthomatous cells (60-Gy IG: 86.11% and 15-Gy IG: 14.29%, p<0.0001 and the highest amount of hyaline amorphous tissue (60-Gy IG:58.33% and 15-Gy IG:0%, p=0.0001 and vascular proliferation (60-Gy IG:30.56% and 15-Gy IG:0%, p=0.0221. No statistically significant differences were found

  5. Multi-photon final states in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    The process e^+e^- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 25.38 pb^{-1} taken at centre-of-mass energies of 130-172 GeV. The measured cross-sections agree well with the expectation from QED. In a combined fit using data from all centre-of-mass energies, the angular distribution is used to obtain improved limits on the cut-off parameters: Lambda_+ > 195 GeV and Lambda_- > 210 GeV (95% CL). In addition, limits on non-standard e^+e^-gamma couplings and contact interactions, as well as a 95% CL mass limit for an excited electron, M_{e^*} > 194 GeV for an e^+e^-gamma coupling kappa = 1, are determined.

  6. Radiation-Induced Short Channel (RISCE) and Narrow Channel (RINCE) Effects in 65 and 130 nm MOSFETs

    CERN Document Server

    Faccio, F; Cornale, D; Paccagnella, A; Gerardin, S

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of transistors in commercial-grade complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technologies in the 65 and 130 nm nodes has been explored up to a total ionizing dose of 1 Grad. The large dose tolerance of the thin gate oxide is confirmed, but defects in the spacer and STI oxides have a strong effect on the performance of the transistors. A radiation-induced short channel effect is traced to charge trapping in the spacers used for drain engineering, while a radiation-induced narrow channel effect is due to defect generation in the lateral isolation oxide (STI). These strongly degrade the electrical characteristics of short and narrow channel transistors at high doses, and their magnitude depends on the applied bias and temperature during irradiation in a complex way.

  7. Study of Fermion Pair Production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at 130-183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Riu, I.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Loomis, C.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Raine, C.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Ward, J.J.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E.B.; Nash, J.; Nowell, J.; Sciaba, A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Williams, M.I.; van Gemmeren, P.; Giehl, I.; Holldorfer, F.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Krocker, M.; Nurnberger, H.A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kado, M.; Lefrancois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; de Viviede Regie, J.B.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faif, G.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-01-01

    The cross sections and forward-backward asymmetries of hadronic and leptonic events produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130-183 GeV are presented. Results for ee, mumu, tautau, qq, bb and cc production show no significant deviation from the Standard Model predictions. This enable constraints to be set upon physics beyond the Standard Model such as four-fermion contact interactions, leptoquarks, Z' bosons and R-parity violating squarks and sneutrinos. Limits on the energy scale Lambda of eeff contact interactions are typically in the range from 2-10 TeV. Limits on R-parity violating sneutrinos reach masses of a few hundred GeV for large values of their Yukawa couplings.

  8. Large-scale Two-particle Correlation Structures In Gold- Gold Collisions At Center Of Mass Energy = 130 Gev

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, A

    2004-01-01

    The first measurement of surviving correlation structure in the final-state charged hadron distribution produced in the collisions of gold nuclei at sNN = 130 GeV is presented. We observe an abundance of correlation structures reflecting dynamics of relativistic heavy ion collisions over a large momentum acceptance, transverse momentum range 0.15 ≤ p t ≤ 2.0 GeV/c, pseudorapidity range −1.3 ≤ η ≤ 1.3 and full azimuth angle −π ≤ &phis; ≤ π among primary hadrons measured by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Correlation structures are measured by means of two-particle number-density ratios in transverse and axial momentum spaces. Isoscalar and isovector correlations are studied separately by examining pair- charge dependent (CD) and independent (CI) correlation components. Observed correlation structures are consistent with the picture that particle production from color-string fragmentation ...

  9. The N-terminal extension of the P. falciparum GBP130 signal peptide is irrelevant for signal sequence function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Corinna; Barniol, Luis; Hiss, Jan A; Przyborski, Jude M

    2017-07-17

    The malaria parasite P. falciparum exports a large number of proteins to its host cell, the mature human erythrocyte. Although the function of the majority of these proteins is not well understood, many exported proteins appear to play a role in modification of the erythrocyte following invasion. Protein export to the erythrocyte is a secretory process that begins with entry to the endoplasmic reticulum. For most exported proteins, this step is mediated by hydrophobic signal peptides found towards the N-terminal end of proteins. The signal peptides present on P. falciparum exported proteins often differ in length from those found in other systems, and generally contain a highly extended N-terminal region. Here we have investigated the function of these extended N-terminal regions, using the exported parasite protein GBP130 as a model. Surprisingly, several deletions of the extended N-terminal regions of the GBP130 signal peptide have no effect on the ability of the signal peptide to direct a fluorescent reporter to the secretory pathway. Addition of the same N-terminal extension to a canonical signal peptide does not affect transport of either soluble or membrane proteins to their correct respective subcellular localisations. Finally, we show that extended signal peptides are able to complement canonical signal peptides in driving protein traffic to the apicoplast of the parasite, and are also functional in a mammalian cell system. Our study is the first detailed analysis of an extended P. falciparum signal peptide and suggests that N-terminal extensions of exported Plasmodium falciparum proteins are not required for entry to the secretory system, and are likely to be involved in other, so far unknown, processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  10. NMR solution structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biverståhl, Henrik; Andersson, August; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena

    2004-11-30

    The structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein (bPrPp) has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy in phospholipid membrane mimetic systems. CD spectroscopy revealed that the peptide adopts a largely alpha-helical structure in zwitterionic bicelles as well as in DHPC micelles but has a less degree of alpha-helix structure in partly charged bicelles. The solution structure of bPrPp was determined in DHPC micelles, and an alpha-helix was found between residues Ser8 and Ile21. The residues within the helical region show slow amide hydrogen exchange. Translational diffusion measurements in zwitterionic q = 0.5 bicelles show that the peptide does not induce aggregation of the bicelles. Increased quadrupolar splittings were observed in the outer part of the (2)H spectrum of DMPC in q = 3.5 bicelles, indicating that the peptide induces a certain degree of order in the bilayer. The amide hydrogen exchange and the (2)H NMR results are consistent with a slight positive hydrophobic mismatch and that bPrPp forms a stable helix that inserts in a transmembrane location in the bilayer. The structure of bPrPp and its position in the membrane may be relevant for the understanding of how the N-terminal (1-30) part of the bovine PrP functions as a cell-penetrating peptide. These findings may lead to a better understanding of how the prion protein accumulates at the membrane surface and also how the conversion into the scrapie form is carried out.

  11. Syp associates with gp130 and Janus kinase 2 in response to interleukin-11 in 3T3-L1 mouse preadipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, D K; Feng, G S; Yang, Y C

    1995-10-20

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation and thus dephosphorylation are part of the interleukin (IL)-11 response in mouse 3T3-L1 cells. We report here for the first time the involvement and interactions of the SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase Syp in the IL-11 signal transduction pathway. Addition of IL-11 to 3T3-L1 cells resulted in an increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of Syp. When cell lysates were precipitated with glutathione S-transferase fusion products of Syp, the C-terminal SH2 domain of Syp was shown to precipitate several proteins of 70, 130, 150, and 200 kDa that were tyrosine phosphorylated in response to IL-11. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation experiments showed that Syp was inducibly associated with both gp130 and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). A phosphopeptide containing the sequence for a potential Syp binding site (YXXV) was used to compete with the associations of Syp with gp130 and JAK2. The phosphopeptide reduced the Syp association with both gp130 and JAK2. To summarize, Syp has multiple interactions in IL-11 signal transduction. In addition to the IL-11-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Syp, Syp coprecipitated with gp130, JAK2, and other tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in response to IL-11. These findings may have extensive significance to IL-11 and related cytokine signal transduction, suggesting new pathways and mechanisms.

  12. Insight into the effect of inhibitor resistant S130G mutant on physico-chemical properties of SHV type beta-lactamase: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hassan Baig

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is a serious threat to human health. The production of β-lactamase, which inactivates β-lactams is most common cause of resistance to the β-lactam antibiotics. The Class A enzymes are most frequently encountered among the four β-lactamases in the clinic isolates. Mutations in class A β-lactamases play a crucial role in substrate and inhibitor specificity. SHV and TEM type are known to be most common class A β-lactamases. In the present study, we have analyzed the effect of inhibitor resistant S130G point mutation of SHV type Class-A β-lactamase using molecular dynamics and other in silico approaches. Our study involved the use of different in silico methods to investigate the affect of S130G point mutation on the major physico-chemical properties of SHV type class A β-lactamase. We have used molecular dynamics approach to compare the dynamic behaviour of native and S130G mutant form of SHV β-lactamase by analyzing different properties like root mean square deviation (RMSD, H-bond, Radius of gyration (Rg and RMS fluctuation of mutation. The results clearly suggest notable loss in the stability of S130G mutant that may further lead to decrease in substrate specificity of SHV. Molecular docking further indicates that S130G mutation decreases the binding affinity of all the three inhibitors in clinical practice.

  13. Interactions of the integrin subunit beta1A with protein kinase B/Akt, p130Cas and paxillin contribute to regulation of radiation survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidler, Julia; Durzok, Rita; Brakebusch, Cord

    2005-01-01

    in presence or absence of growth factors or inhibitors for phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), i.e. Ly294002 and wortmannin. In addition to colony formation, protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt) kinase activity, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p130Cas, paxillin and c-Jun N2-terminal kinase (JNK) expression...... substrates. PI3K inhibition moderately or strongly radiosensitized GD25beta1A or GD25beta1B cells, respectively. The pro-survival effects detected in serum starved GD25beta1A cells were due to direct, PI3K-mediated stimulation of PKB/Akt activity by beta1-integrins and induced p130Cas and paxillin...... phosphorylation. Phosphorylated p130Cas and paxillin subsequently prevented activation of cell death-regulating JNK. CONCLUSIONS: The data show that beta1-integrin-mediated signaling through the cytoplasmic integrin domains is critical for efficient pro-survival regulation after irradiation. Profound knowledge...

  14. Four-jet final state production in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Ward, J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The four jet topology is analysed in the ALEPH data taken between November 1995 and November 1997, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 to 184 GeV. While an unexpected accumulation of events with a dijet mas sum around 105 GeV/c**2 had been observed during the first run in 1995 at 130/136 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 pb-1, no significant differences between data and standard model prediction is noticed, either in the high energy runs (81.1 pb-1 taken at centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV) or in the 7.1 pb-1 recorded during a new short run at 130/136 GeV in 1997. We have found no other explanation for the earlier reported ``four jet anomaly'' than a statistical fluctuation.

  15. Detection of mecC-positive Staphylococcus aureus (CC130-MRSA-XI in diseased European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Monecke

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel mec gene conferring beta-lactam resistance in Staphylococcus aureus has been discovered. This gene, mecC, is situated on a SCCmec XI element that has to date been identified in clonal complexes 49, 130, 425, 599 and 1943. Some of the currently known isolates have been identified from animals. This, and observations of mecA alleles that do not confer beta-lactam resistance, indicate that mec genes might have a reservoir in Staphylococcus species from animals. Thus it is important also to screen wildlife isolates for mec genes. Here, we describe mecC-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ST130-MRSA-XI and the lesions related to the infection in two diseased free-ranging European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus. One was found dead in 2003 in central Sweden, and suffered from S. aureus septicaemia. The other one, found on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea in 2011, showed a severe dermatitis and was euthanised. ST130-MRSA-XI isolates were isolated from lesions from both hedgehogs and were essentially identical to previously described isolates from humans. Both isolates carried the complete SCCmec XI element. They lacked the lukF-PV/lukS-PV and lukM/lukF-P83 genes, but harboured a gene for an exfoliative toxin homologue previously described from Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and other S. aureus of the CC130 lineage. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of CC130-MRSA-XI in hedgehogs. Given that one of the samples was taken as early as 2003, this was the earliest detection of this strain and of mecC in Sweden. This and several other recent observations suggest that CC130 might be a zoonotic lineage of S. aureus and that SCCmec XI/mecC may have originated from animal pathogens.

  16. Detection of mecC-Positive Staphylococcus aureus (CC130-MRSA-XI) in Diseased European Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widen, Dolores; Mattsson, Roland; Rangstrup-Christensen, Lena; Lazaris, Alexandros; Coleman, David C.; Shore, Anna C.; Ehricht, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a novel mec gene conferring beta-lactam resistance in Staphylococcus aureus has been discovered. This gene, mecC, is situated on a SCCmec XI element that has to date been identified in clonal complexes 49, 130, 425, 599 and 1943. Some of the currently known isolates have been identified from animals. This, and observations of mecA alleles that do not confer beta-lactam resistance, indicate that mec genes might have a reservoir in Staphylococcus species from animals. Thus it is important also to screen wildlife isolates for mec genes. Here, we describe mecC-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ST130-MRSA-XI) and the lesions related to the infection in two diseased free-ranging European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus). One was found dead in 2003 in central Sweden, and suffered from S. aureus septicaemia. The other one, found on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea in 2011, showed a severe dermatitis and was euthanised. ST130-MRSA-XI isolates were isolated from lesions from both hedgehogs and were essentially identical to previously described isolates from humans. Both isolates carried the complete SCCmec XI element. They lacked the lukF-PV/lukS-PV and lukM/lukF-P83 genes, but harboured a gene for an exfoliative toxin homologue previously described from Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and other S. aureus of the CC130 lineage. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of CC130-MRSA-XI in hedgehogs. Given that one of the samples was taken as early as 2003, this was the earliest detection of this strain and of mecC in Sweden. This and several other recent observations suggest that CC130 might be a zoonotic lineage of S. aureus and that SCCmec XI/mecC may have originated from animal pathogens. PMID:23776626

  17. Up-regulation of Serum MiR-130b-3p Level is Associated with Renal Damage in Early Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanpeng; Mou, Shan; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Minfang; Shao, Xinghua; Fang, Wei; Lu, Renhua; Qi, Chaojun; Fan, Zhuping; Cao, Qin; Wang, Qin; Fang, Yan; Ni, Zhaohui

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a common but severe autoimmune systemic inflammatory disease. Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious complication of SLE,affecting up to 70% of SLE patients. Circulating microRNAs (miRNA) are emerging as biomarkers for pathological conditions and play significant roles in intercellular communication. In present research, serum samples from healthy control, early and late stage LN patients were used to analyze the expression profile of miRNAs by microarray. Subsequent study demonstrated that miR-130b-3p in serum of patients with early stage LN were significantly up-regulated when compared with healthy controls. In addition,we have also observed that the expression of a large amount of circulating microRNAs significantly decreased in patients with late stage LN. The further analysis found that the expression of serum miR-130b-3p was positively correlated with 24-hour proteinuria and renal chronicity index in patients with early stage LN.Transfection of renal tubular cellline(HK-2)with miR-130b-3p mimics can promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The opposite effects were observed when transfected with miR-130b-3p inhibitors. MiR-130b-3p negatively regulated ERBB2IP expression by directly targeting the 3‧-UTR of ERBB2IP The circulating miR-130b-3p might serve as a biomarker and play an important role in renal damage in early stage LN patients.

  18. The viscous behaviour of HES 130/0.4 (Voluven®) and HES 260/0.45 (Pentaspan®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrew M; Lee, Kogan; Dobson, Gary M; Johnston, Clifton R

    2012-03-01

    Several fluids are available for volume therapy to address hypovolemia. We focus on two hydroxyethyl starches (HES) available for volume expansion in Canada, HES 130/0.4 (Voluven®) and HES 260/0.45 (Pentaspan®). Although information is available regarding their pharmacokinetic and risk/benefit profiles, this paper examines their viscous properties. Dynamic viscosities of HES 130/0.4 and HES 260/0.45 were measured through capillary viscometry at 21°C and 37°C. The viscosities of the solutions were then measured through a closed flow loop at room temperature across physiologically relevant flow rates that maintained a laminar flow regime. Measured dynamic viscosity through capillary viscometry for HES 130/0.4 and HES 260/0.45 was 2.76 centipoises (cP) and 7.62 cP, respectively, at 21°C decreasing to 1.74 cP and 4.25 cP, respectively, at 37°C. Pipe flow analysis found that HES 130/0.4 (expiry 02/13) and HES 260/0.45 (expiry 10/10) displayed marginal variation in viscosity suggesting Newtonian behaviour. However, a sample of HES 130/0.4 (expiry 10/10) displayed an appreciable increase in viscosity (13%) at higher flow rates suggesting shear thickening behaviour. This study represents an innovative characterization of not only the viscosity of two commonly utilized HES solutions but also their viscous behaviour across physiologically relevant flow rates. The shear thickening behaviour of a sample of HES 130/0.40 (expiry 10/10) at high flow rates was not expected, and the effect this result may have on endothelial cell function is unknown.

  19. Six percent hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 impacts differently on blood glucose than 4% gelatine in a swine model of mixed acidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Martin; Koch, Vera; Keckel, Tobias; Boemke, Willehad; Hiebl, Bernhard; Unger, Juliane K

    2009-12-01

    Tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane can be used as a buffer in case of restricted ventilation, but hypoglycaemia is one adverse effect. The influence of a starch-based colloid [6% hydroxyethyl starch 130 kDa/0.4 (HES130)] vs. a gelatine-based colloid (4% polysuccinated gelatine) on blood glucose was investigated in a swine model of mixed acidaemia. Continuous colloid infusion was done in anaesthetized pigs with exogenously induced mixed acidaemia, which was maintained for 3 h. Pigs (approximately 40 kg, n = 6 in each group) were randomized to HES130 or 4% gelatine infusion (4 ml kg h(-1)). Infusion of an acid solution and low tidal volume ventilation induced mixed acidaemia. Treatment of mixed acidaemia with tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane buffer, which is known to induce hypoglycaemia, prolonged anaesthesia, and volume support challenged the control of blood glucose. Hypoglycaemia was treated by individually dosed infusion of 5% glucose in sterile water. Bolus infusion of HES130 led to a moderate peak in blood glucose in four pigs. Four pigs in the 4% gelatine group and three in the HES130 group needed glucose infusion to prevent a drop in blood glucose levels below the set threshold (4 mmol l(-1)). The total amount of the glucose infusion was significantly lower in the HES130 group compared with the 4% gelatine group (100 vs. 295 ml per pig, median, P gelatine pig to prevent a drop of blood glucose below 4 mmol l(-1). Volume support impacted specifically on blood glucose in this porcine model. Thus, an additional control of blood glucose seems recommendable whenever a change in the volume support occurs.

  20. Effects of Viscum album extract therapy in patients with cancer: relation with interleukin-6, soluble interleukin-6 receptor, and soluble gp130.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Eva

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the effects of Viscum album (VA) extract therapy on interleukin (IL)-12, IL-16, IL-6, soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R), and soluble gp130 (sgp130) in patients with cancer. VA extract as immunomodulator is used as treatment either following or in combination with chemo/radiotherapy. Previously we showed that serum levels of IL-12 and IL-16 were significantly elevated during tumor progression in 72 patients. The serum values of IL-6 were not significantly altered, however sIL-6R and sgp130 also increased significantly. In this study the serum levels of the five parameters were measured during VA extract therapy in 46 of these 72 tumor patients and compared to the values before VA extract treatment. The levels of the serum parameters IL-12, IL-16, IL-6, sIL-6R, sgp130 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Private cancer hospital in Arlesheim, Switzerland. Eighty percent (80%) of the tumor patients survived longer than 1 year (11 patients in stage I + II without, 8 patients after chemotherapy/radiotherapy, 10 patients in stage III + IV without, 8 patients after chemotherapy). Clinically and with laboratory investigations there was no progression in these patients. VA extract therapy did not affect serum values of IL-12 or IL-16. However both the number of patients with increased levels of IL-6, sIL-6R, and sgp130 and also the serum values decreased significantly during the treatment, (between p cancer with rapid progression who died within 3 months, the serum values of IL-6 increased significantly (p < 0.05), whereas the other investigated parameters did not change. The results show that measurements of IL-6, sIL-6R, and sgp130 could be important for establishing the clinical condition and evaluating treatment in tumor patients.

  1. Measurement of the two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of ^{130}Te with the CUORE-0 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduino, C.; Alfonso, K.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Cappelli, L.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Carniti, P.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dafinei, I.; Davis, C. J.; Dell'Oro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Drobizhev, A.; Fang, D. Q.; Faverzani, M.; Feintzeig, J.; Fernandes, G.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Hansen, E.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hickerson, K. P.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Leder, A.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Liu, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Maino, M.; Marini, L.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P. J.; Napolitano, T.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; O'Donnell, T.; Orio, F.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sangiorgio, S.; Santone, D.; Scielzo, N. D.; Singh, V.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Vignati, M.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zhu, B. X.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of ^{130}Te with the CUORE-0 detector. From an exposure of 33.4 kg year of TeO_2, the half-life is determined to be T_{1/2}^{2ν } = [8.2 ± 0.2 (stat.) ± 0.6 (syst.)] × 10^{20} year. This result is obtained after a detailed reconstruction of the sources responsible for the CUORE-0 counting rate, with a specific study of those contributing to the ^{130}Te neutrinoless double-beta decay region of interest.

  2. Charged particle multiplicity near mid-rapidity in central Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 56 and 130 AGeV

    CERN Document Server

    Back, B B; Barton, D S; Basilev, S N; Baum, R; Betts, R R; Bialas, A; Bindel, R; Bogucki, W; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A S; Ceglia, M; Chang, Y H; Chen, A E; Coghen, T; Conner, C L; Czyz, W; Dabrowski, B; Decowski, M P; Despet, M; Fita, P; Fitch, J; Friedl, M; Galuszka, K; Ganz, R E; García-Solis, E; George, N; Godlewski, J; Gomes, C; Griesmayer, E; Gulbrandsen, K H; Gushue, S; Halik, J; Halliwell, C; Haridas, P; Hayes, A; Heintzelman, G A; Henderson, C; Hollis, R; Holynski, R; Holzman, B; Johnson, E; Kane, J; Katzy, J M; Kita, W; Kotula, J; Kraner, H W; Kucewicz, W; Kulinich, P A; Law, C; Lemler, M A; Ligocki, T J; Lin, W T; Manly, S L; McLeod, D; Michalowski, J; Mignerey, A C; Mülmenstädt, J; Neal, M; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Patel, M; Pernegger, H; Plesko, M; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Reuter, M; Roland, C; Roland, G; Ross, D; Rosenberg, L J; Ryan, J; Sanzgiri, A; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Scaduto, J; Shea, J; Sinacore, J; Skulski, W; Steadman, S G; Stephans, G S F; Steinberg, P; Straczek, A; Stodulski, M; Strek, M; Stopa, Z; Sukhanov, A; Surowiecka, K; Tang, J L; Teng, R; Trzupek, A; Vale, C J; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Verdier, R; Wadsworth, B; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wyslouch, B; Zalewski, Kasper

    2000-01-01

    We present the first measurement of pseudorapidity densities of primary charged particles near mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 56 and 130 AGeV. For the most central collisions, we find the charged particle pseudorapidity density to be $dN/d\\eta |_{|\\eta|<1} = 408 \\pm 12 {(stat)} \\pm 30 {(syst)}$ at 56 AGeV and $555 \\pm 12 {(stat)} \\pm 35 {(syst)}$ at 130 AGeV, values that are higher than any previously observed in nuclear collisions. Compared to proton-antiproton collisions, our data show an increase in the pseudorapidity density per participant by more than 40% at the higher energy.

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE 130

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Antibiotics have proven to be a dynamic category of drugs in the fight against infectious bacteria. However, antibiotic resistance is one of the greatest current challenges to the effective treatment of infections and there is every indication that antibiotic resistance will become an even greater challenge in the future.

  4. FCJ-130 Embedding response:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Bech, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing positions a world where computation is embedded into our surrounding environment. Rather than retrieving information and communication from distinct devices (PCs) removed from contexts and activities, ubiquitous computing proposes that the mediated can become an integral part...

  5. 130 ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    were observed in the prevalence of MRSA among gender, duration of wounds, wound dressing interval and source of wound. There was an association between age, prolonged hospital admission MRSA infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates showed high resistance to ampicillin 90.5% followed by ...

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE 130

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    1*Département de Microbiologie Médicale, Ecole de Médicine, Faculté de Science Médicale, Université de Bénin, P.M.B. 1152, ville de Bénin, Nigéria; 2Département ... national de surveillance pour suivre les tendances microbiennes et les situations de résistance aux antimicrobiens au. Nigeria. Mots clés: multi-résistance ...

  7. 130 ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Département des sciences de laboratoire médicales, Faculté des Sciences de la santé et de Technologie, Collège de Médecine, l'Université du Nigeria, Campus ... nécessaire d'établir le système de surveillance de la sensibilité aux antimicrobiens et d'améliorer les programmes courants pour contrôler l'infection aux ...

  8. Lifetime studies of 130nm nMOS transistors intended for long-duration, cryogenic high-energy physics experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, J.R.; /Fermilab; Arora, R.; Cressler, J.D.; /Georgia Tech; Deptuch, G.W.; /Fermilab; Gui, P.; /Southern Methodist U.; Lourenco, N.E.; /Georgia Tech; Wu, G.; /Southern Methodist U.; Yarema, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    Future neutrino physics experiments intend to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. To increase performance, integrated readout electronics should work inside the cryostat. Due to the scale and cost associated with evacuating and filling the cryostat, the electronics will be unserviceable for the duration of the experiment. Therefore, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is via hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. The results show that the difference in lifetime for room temperature operation and cryogenic operation for this process are not great and the lifetimes at both 300K and at 77K can be projected to more than 20 years at the nominal voltage (1.5V) for this technology.

  9. Measurement and Interpretation of Fermion-Pair Production at LEP energies from 130 to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chalanda, N; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerdyukov, L N; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rakoczy, D; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Senko, V A; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vishnevski, N K; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    The data collected with the DELPHI detector at centre-of-mass energies between 130 and 172~$\\GeV$, during LEP operation in 1995 and 1996, have been used to determine the hadronic and leptonic cross-sections and leptonic forward--backward asymmetries. In addition the cross-section ratios and forward--backward asymmetries for flavour-tagged samples of light (uds), c and b quarks have been measured. The results are interpreted by performing S-matrix fits to these data and to the data collected previously at the energies near the $\\Zzero$ resonance peak (88-93~$\\GeV$). The results are also interpreted in terms of contact interactions, which parameterise physics beyond the Standard Model. Further interpretation of the data is made in terms of possible R-parity violating SUSY particles and of possible Z$^{'}$ bosons. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectations are found and limits are given for the various interpretations which are made of physics beyond the Standard Model.

  10. The palaeogeographic setting and the local environmental impact of the 130 ka Falconiera tuff-cone eruption (Ustica island, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vita, Sandro; Foresta Martin, Franco

    2017-04-01

    This research focuses on the effects of the last eruption at Ustica (Suthern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), which formed the Falconiera tuff-cone at around 130 ka BP in the north-eastern tip of the island. This eruption was mainly explosive and phreatomagmatic, and emplaced a series of pyroclastic surge beds that formed an asymmetric tuff cone. This is the most easily recognizable volcanic edifice on Ustica, although its north-eastern sector has been partially eroded. A section of the feeding conduit is exposed northward, and is composed of lavas that fed the last stages of the eruption characterized by an intracrateric lava lake and a Strombolian scoria-fallout deposit. The eruption occurred during Upper Pleistocene Marine Isotopic Substage 5.5, a warm period characterized by a high sea-level stand (6±3 m above the present sea level in stable areas) and the diffusion of subtropical flora and fauna across the Mediterranean sea. This eruption slightly modified the morphology of Ustica, but impacted both marine and terrestrial environments, burying beach deposits rich in mollusk shells (i.e. Strombus bubonius, Conus testudinarius, Brachidontes puniceus), colonies of corals (Cladocora caespitosa) and subaerial plants (Chamaerops humilis). These organisms, found in some cases in their life position, along with other lines of evidence, provide information on the palaeogeography of this sector of the island at the time of the eruption, and on the local impact of this event on the environment.

  11. Distinctive effect of 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (Voluven) infusion on pediatric patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J-Z; Liu, J-S; Zhang, S-H; Huang, S-Y; Zhang, J-J; Zhou, J; Zhou, J-H

    2017-03-01

    It has not been clear that Voluven (6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4) may be administered in pediatric patients safely. The purpose of this study was to determine if Voluven could be used for blood volume expansion and hypovolemia prevention in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. 50 pediatric patients with congenital heart disease were recruited in the study. Circulatory and respiratory parameters were determined to monitor the responses to intravenous infusion of Voluven in the patients. Intravenous infusion of Voluven significantly increased levels of colloid osmotic pressure and central venous pressure, but decreased levels of hemoglobin in the patients. Voluven infusion did not significantly affect colloid osmotic pressure, central venous pressure, hemoglobin and heart rate in the preschool children (heart rate in the young child patients. Also, there was the similar response, i.e. increased colloid osmotic pressure, to Voluven infusion in both female child patients and patients with atrial septal defect. Voluven may be used in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease, but not in the preschool child patients. Furthermore, special attention should be paid to the intravenous administration of Voluven for blood volume expansion and hypovolemia prevention in female pediatric patients and child patients with atrial septal defect.

  12. Study of solid and liquid behavior in large copper flotation cells (130 m2 using radioactive tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yianatos J.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of the solid and liquid phases, in large flotation cells, was characterized by means of the radioactive tracer technique. The use of radioactive tracers enabled the identification of the Residence Time Distribution, of floatable and non-floatable solid, from continuous (on-line measuring at the output streams of the flotation cells. For this study, the proper radioactive tracers were selected and applied in order to characterize the different phases; i.e. for liquid phase Br-82 as Ammonium Bromide, for floatable solid recovered in the concentrate Cu-64, and for non-floatable solid in three particle size classes (coarse: >150 μm, intermediate: 45 μm, and fine: <45 μm, Na-24. The experimental results confirmed the strong effect of particle size on the Residence Time Distribution, and mean residence time of solids in larger flotation cells, and consequently in flotation hydrodynamics. From a hydrodynamic point of view, the experimental data confirmed that a single mechanical flotation cells, of large size, can deviate significantly from perfect mixing. The experimental work was developed in a 130 m3 industrial flotation cell of the rougher circuit at El Teniente Division, Codelco-Chile.

  13. Central adiposity and the overweight risk paradox in aging: follow-up of 130,473 UK Biobank participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kirsty; Atkins, Janice L; Delgado, João; Kos, Katarina; Kuchel, George A; Ble, Alessandro; Ferrucci, Luigi; Melzer, David

    2017-07-01

    Background: For older groups, being overweight [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)): 25 to BMI: 18.5 to BMI failing to measure fat redistribution to a centralized position in later life.Objective: This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD).Design: This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 y (baseline 2006-2010) for ≤8.3 y (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Survival models were adjusted for age, sex, alcohol intake, smoking history, and educational attainment. Population and sex-specific lower and higher WHR tertiles were BMI plus WHR groups with respect to mortality.Conclusions: For healthier agers (i.e., nonsmokers without disease-associated weight loss), having central adiposity and a BMI corresponding to normal weight or overweight is associated with substantial excess mortality. The claimed BMI-defined overweight risk paradox may result in part from failing to account for central adiposity, rather than reflecting a protective physiologic effect of higher body-fat content in later life.

  14. Voyager 1/UVS Lyman α Measurements at the Distant Heliosphere (90-130 AU): Unknown Source of Additional Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Quémerais, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Lallement, R.; Sandel, B. R.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we present for the first time the Lyman α intensities measured by Voyager 1/UVS in 2003-2014 (at 90-130 AU from the Sun). During this period Voyager 1 measured the Lyman α emission in the outer heliosphere at an almost fixed direction close to the upwind (i.e." toward the interstellar flow). The data show an unexpected behavior in 2003-2009: the ratio of observed intensity to the solar Lyman α flux is almost constant. Numerical modeling of these data is performed in the frame of a state-of-the-art self-consistent kinetic-MHD model of the heliospheric interface. The model results, for various interstellar parameters, predict a monotonic decrease of intensity not seen in the data. We propose two possible scenarios that explain the data qualitatively. The first is the formation of a dense layer of hydrogen atoms near the heliopause. Such a layer would provide an additional backscattered Doppler-shifted Lyman α emission, which is not absorbed inside the heliosphere and may be observed by Voyager. About 35 R of intensity from the layer is needed. The second scenario is an external nonheliospheric Lyman α component, which could be galactic or extragalactic. Our parametric study shows that ˜25 R of additional emission leads to a good qualitative agreement between the Voyager 1 data and the model results.

  15. [Gasless laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Our experience with 130 cases compared with 450 cases treated with the CO2 technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuto, E; Bonatti, L; Schieroni, R; Villata, E; Bacino, A; Galliano, R; Lorenzini, L; Borello, G; Butera, F; Massaioli, N

    2000-04-01

    Alongside the technique based on the creation of an abdominal cavity for surgery following the introduction of gas (usually CO2) into the peritoneal cavity, a new method has been developed. This involves the use of an atraumatic mechanical lifting device connected to the same abdominal wall (gasless laparoscopy). The authors report a technique that uses an inflatable cushion inserted into the abdomen through a periumbilical incision. The cushion is connected to an external motorized hydraulic jack fixed to the operating table, fitted with an electric motor and friction gear. Between May 1991 and June 1998, 580 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Since December 1995 a total of 130 patients have undergone surgery using gasless laparoscopy. Shoulder pain and pain in the upper abdominal quadrant were no longer reported; pain was present in 70% of the patients operated using the CO2 technique. There was also a marked reduction in the anesthesiological risks, above all in elderly patients with cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Surgical manoeuvres are made easier owing to the possibility of using traditional surgical instruments. Washing and continuous aspiration allow a good control of intraoperative hemostasis, and reduce the phenomenon of lens misting without the risk of losing pneumoperitoneum. Less visibility of the surgical field was reported, particularly in obese patients, above all because of the reduced diaphragmatic distension and the lack of displacement of the intestinal loops. In the authors' opinion the gasless technique is suitable above all in patients affected by cardiopulmonary disorders in whom hypercapnia might represent a significant operating risk.

  16. A 130 nm CMOS mixed mode front end readout chip for silicon strip tracking at the future linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, T.H., E-mail: pham@lpnhe.in2p3.f [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Charpy, A.; Ciobanu, C. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Comerma, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dept E.C.M/Dept. Electronica/ICC-Diagonal 647, planta 6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); David, J.; Dhellot, M. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Dieguez, A.; Gascon, D. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dept E.C.M/Dept. Electronica/ICC-Diagonal 647, planta 6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Genat, J.F.; Savoy Navarro, A.; Sefri, R. [LPNHE-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie/IN2P3-CNRS-4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2010-11-01

    A 130 nm mixed (analog and digital) CMOS chip intended to read silicon strip detectors for future linear collider experiments was developed. Currently under testing, this chip has been optimized for a silicon micro-strip tracking device. It includes 88 channels of a full analog signal processing chain with the corresponding digital control and readout. Every analog channel includes (i) a low noise charge amplifier and integration with long pulse shaping, (ii) an eight by eight positions analog sampler for both storing successive events and reconstructing the full pulse shape, and (iii) a sparsifier performing analog sum of three adjacent inputs to decide whether there is signal or not. The whole system is controlled by the digital part, which allows configuring all the reference currents and voltages, drives the control signals to the analog memories, records the timing and channel information and subsequently performs the conversion to digital values of samples. The total surface of the circuit is 10x5 mm{sup 2}, with each analog channel occupying an area of 105x3500 {mu}m{sup 2}, and the remaining space of about 9000x700 {mu}m{sup 2} being filled by the analog channels on the silicon.

  17. Initial benchmarking of a new electron-beam raster pattern generator for 130-100 nm maskmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Charles A.; Abboud, Frank E.; Babin, Sergey V.; Chakarian, Varoujan; Ghanbari, Abe; Innes, Robert; Trost, David; Raymond, Frederick, III

    2000-07-01

    The decision by the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) to accelerate the continuing evolution to smaller linewidths is consistent with the commitment by Etec Systems, Inc. to rapidly develop new technologies for pattern generation systems with improved resolution, critical dimension (CD) uniformity, positional accuracy, and throughput. Current pattern generation designs are inadequate to meet the more advanced requirements for masks, particularly at or below the 100 nm node. Major changes to all pattern generation tools will be essential to meet future market requirements. An electron-beam (e-beam) system that is designed to meet the challenges for 130 - 100 nm device generation with extendibility to the 70-nm range will be discussed. This system has an architecture that includes a graybeam writing strategy, a new state system, and improved thermal management. Detailed changes include a pulse width modulated blanking system, per-pixel deflection, retrograde scanning multipass writing, and a column with a 50 kV accelerating voltage that supports a dose of up to 45 (mu) C/cm2 with minimal amounts of resist heating. This paper examines current issues, our approach to meeting International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) requirements, and some preliminary results from a new pattern generator.

  18. Investigating the degradation mechanisms caused by the TID effects in 130 nm PDSOI I/O NMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Chao, E-mail: pengchao@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, Guangzhou 510610 (China); Hu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zhengxuan [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, Guangzhou 510610 (China); Huang, Huixiang; Ning, Bingxu; Bi, Dawei [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-06-01

    This paper evaluates the radiation responses of 3.3 V I/O NMOSFETs from 130 nm partially-depleted silicon-on-insulator (PDSOI) technology. The data obtained from {sup 60}Co ionizing radiation experiments indicate that charge trapped in the shallow trench isolation, particularly at the bottom region of the trench oxide, should be the dominant contributor to the off-state drain-to-source leakage current under ON bias. The body doping profile and device dimension are two key factors affecting the performance degradation of the PDSOI transistors after radiation. Significant front gate threshold voltage shift is observed in the T-shape gate device, which is well known as the Radiation Induced Narrow Channel Effect (RINCE). The charge trapped in the buried oxide can induce large threshold voltage shift in the front gate transistor through coupling effect in the low body doping device. The coupling effect is evaluated through three-dimensional simulation. A degradation of the carrier mobility which relates to shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide trapped charge in the narrow channel device is also discussed. - Highlights: • STI and BOX have different contributions to the TID responses of PDSOI NMOSFETs. • Body doping profile and device dimensions are two key factors affecting TID effect. • Mobility degradation in narrow channel device relates to STI oxide trapped charge.

  19. A new member of the GM130 golgin subfamily is expressed in the optic lobe anlagen of the metamorphosing brain of Manduca sexta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Miin Wang

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available During metamorphosis of the insect brain, the optic lobe anlagen generate the proliferation centers for the visual cortices. We show here that, in the moth Manduca sexta, an 80 kDa Golgi complex protein (Ms-golgin80 is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells in the optic lobe anlagen and proliferation centers. The predicted amino acid sequence for Ms-golgin80 is similar to that of several members of the GM130 subfamily of Golgi-associated proteins, including rat GM130 and human golgin-95. Homologs of Ms-golgin80 from Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Brugia malayi were identified through homology sequence search. Sequence similarities are present in three regions: the N-terminus, an internal domain of 89 amino acids, and another domain of 89 amino acids near the C-terminus. Structural similarities further suggest that these molecules play the same cellular role as GM130. GM130 is involved in the docking and fusion of coatomer (COP I coated vesicles to the Golgi membranes; it also regulates the fragmentation and subsequent reassembly of the Golgi complex during mitosis. Abundant expression of Ms-golgin80 in neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells and its reduced expression in the neuronal progeny of these cells suggest that this protein may be involved in the maintenance of the proliferative state.

  20. Identification and expression analysis of miR-144-5p and miR-130b-5p in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs can coordinate the main pathways involved in innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating gene expression. To explore the resistance to mastitis in cows, miR-144-5p and miR-130b-5p were identified in bovine mammary gland tissue and 14 potential target genes belonging to the chemokine signaling pathway, the arginine and proline metabolism pathway and the mRNA surveillance pathway were predicted. Subsequently, we estimated the relative expression of miR-144-5p and miR-130b-5p in cow mammary tissues by using stem-loop quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the relative expression of miR-144-5p and miR-130b-5p in the mastitis-infected mammary tissues (n = 5 was significantly downregulated 0.14-fold (p < 0. 01 and upregulated 3.34-fold (p < 0. 01, respectively, compared to healthy tissues (n = 5. Our findings reveal that miR-144-5p and miR-130b-5p may have important roles in resistance to mastitis in dairy cattle.

  1. Program for establishing long time flight service performance of composite materials in the central wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 2: Detailed design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvill, W. E.; Duhig, J. J.; Spencer, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of boron-epoxy reinforced C-130 center wing boxes are discussed. Design drawings, static strength, fatigue endurance, flutter, and weight analyses required for the wing box fabrication are presented. Additional component testing to verify the design for panel buckling and to evaluate specific local design areas are reported.

  2. Characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O130:H11 and O178:H19 isolated from dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Daniel; Krüger, Alejandra; Polifroni, Rosana; Bustamante, Ana V.; Sanso, A. Mariel; Etcheverría, Analía I.; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.; Parma, Alberto E.; Padola, Nora L.

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) are isolated from human patients with bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis (HC), and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). In the last years, the infections with non-O157 serotypes are increasing their frequency of association with human disease. STEC produce Shiga toxin (Stx) and other virulence factors that could contribute to human pathogenesis. Cattle are the main reservoir and the transmission to humans is through the consumption of undercooked meat, non-pasteurized dairy products, and vegetables or water contaminated with feces. We have previously determined that O130:H11 and O178:H19 serotypes were the most prevalent in dairy cows from Argentina. In the present study, 37 and 25 STEC isolates from dairy cows belonging to O130:H11 and O178:H19 serotypes, respectively, were characterized regarding to their cytotoxicity on Vero cells, stx subtypes, presence of sab and typing by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). All strains demonstrated a cytotoxic effect, and in O130:H11 isolates, stx2EDL933 was the predominant subtype. In O178:H19 isolates the main stx2 subtype was stx2vha. The sab gene was detected in 65 and 24% of the isolates belonging to O130:H11 and O178:H19, respectively. Only one MLVA profile was identified among the O130:H11 isolates meanwhile 10 MLVA profiles were detected among the O178:H19 isolates which were grouped in two main clusters. In conclusion, our data show that O130:H11 and O178:H19 STEC isolates encode virulence factors associated with severe human disease and both serotypes should be considered for routinely testing. Our subtyping experiments showed that isolates could be distinguished based on the stx2 subtype and the presence/absence of sab gene, and for isolates belonging to O178:H19, also when the MLVA type was considered. However, MLVA subtyping of O130:H11 isolates will require the development of more specific markers. PMID:23483233

  3. p130Cas scaffolds the signalosome to direct adaptor-effector cross talk during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus trafficking in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy; Chandran, Bala

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules, without any intrinsic

  4. A crucial role for DOK1 in PDGF-BB-stimulated glioma cell invasion through p130Cas and Rap1 signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Angela; Evans, Ian M; Frolov, Antonina; Britton, Gary; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Yamaji, Maiko; Mehta, Vedanta; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Li, Ningning; Brandner, Sebastian; Zachary, Ian C; Frankel, Paul

    2014-06-15

    DOK1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-stimulated glioma cell motility. Mechanisms regulating tumour cell motility are essential for invasion and metastasis. We report here that PDGF-BB-mediated glioma cell invasion and migration are dependent on the adaptor protein downstream of kinase 1 (DOK1). DOK1 is expressed in several glioma cell lines and in tumour biopsies from high-grade gliomas. DOK1 becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon PDGF-BB stimulation of human glioma cells. Knockdown of DOK1 or expression of a DOK1 mutant (DOK1FF) containing Phe in place of Tyr at residues 362 and 398, resulted in inhibition of both the PDGF-BB-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas (also known as BCAR1) and the activation of Rap1. DOK1 colocalises with tyrosine phosphorylated p130Cas at the cell membrane of PDGF-BB-treated cells. Expression of a non-tyrosine-phosphorylatable substrate domain mutant of p130Cas (p130Cas15F) inhibited PDGF-BB-mediated Rap1 activation. Knockdown of DOK1 and Rap1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced chemotactic cell migration, and knockdown of DOK1 and Rap1 and expression of DOK1FF inhibited PDGF-mediated three-dimensional (3D) spheroid invasion. These data show a crucial role for DOK1 in the regulation of PDGF-BB-mediated tumour cell motility through a p130Cas-Rap1 signalling pathway. [Corrected] © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. In-situ Monitoring of Sub-cooled Nucleate Boiling on Fuel Cladding Surface in Water at 1 bar and 130 bars using Acoustic Emission Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Heon; Wu, Kaige; Shim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Crud deposition increases through a sufficient corrosion product supply around the steam-liquid interface of a boiling bubble. Therefore, the understanding of this SNB phenomenon is important for effective and safe operation of nuclear plants. The experimental SNB studies have been performed in visible conditions at a low pressure using a high speed video camera. Meanwhile, an acoustic emission (AE) method is an on-line non-destructive evaluation method to sense transient elastic wave resulting from a rapid release of energy within a dynamic process. Some researchers have investigated boiling phenomena using the AE method. However, their works were performed at atmospheric pressure conditions. Therefore, the objective of this work is for the first time to detect and monitor SNB on fuel cladding surface in simulated PWR primary water at 325 .deg. C and 130 bars using an AE technique. We successfully observed the boiling AE signals in primary water at 1 bar and 130 bars using AE technique. Visualization test was performed effectively to identify a correlation between water boiling phenomenon and AE signals in a transparent glass cell at 1 bar, and the boiling AE signals were in good agreement with the boiling behavior. Based on the obtained correlations at 1 bar, the AE signals obtained at 130 bars were analyzed. The boiling density and size of the AE signals at 130 bars were decreased by the flow parameters. However, overall AE signals showed characteristics and a trend similar to the AE signals at 1 bar. This indicates that boiling AE signals are detected successfully at 130 bars, and the AE technique can be effectively implemented in non-visualized condition at high pressures.

  6. Optical characteristics of transparent samarium oxide thin films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-07

    Oct 7, 2016 ... 1Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Taif University, Taif 888, Saudi Arabia. 2Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy 11757, Cairo, Egypt. 3Materials Science Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, 31725 Tanta, Egypt. 4Department of ...

  7. Optical properties of lead–tellurite glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The optical properties of a new family of Sm2O3–(40–)PbO–60TeO2 glasses are investigated. The optical absorption spectra were recorded at ... The refractive index, molar refraction and polarizability of oxide ions have been calculated by using Lorentz–Lorentz relations. The non-linear variations of the above optical ...

  8. Optical properties of lead–tellurite glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The optical properties of a new family of xSm2O3–(40–x)PbO–60TeO2 glasses are investigated. The optical absorption spectra were recorded at room temperature in the UV-visible region. From the absorption edge studies, the values of optical bandgap energies have been evaluated. The refractive index, molar ...

  9. Measurement of radiative lifetime in atomic samarium using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... In this paper, we report the investigations of lifetime measurement of odd-parity energy level 19009.52 cm. −1 .... introduced by an electronic delay generator between the two Q-switch pulses of Nd-YAG laser. The slope of the .... Our values of the lifetimes are free from the common systematic errors. Thus ...

  10. A novel samarium complex with interesting photoluminescence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 4,4'-Hbipy moieties, isolated nitrates and [Sm(H2O)4(NO3)3] species are held together via hydrogen bonds and p…p interactions to form a 3-D supramolecular framework. Luminescent investigation reveals a strong emission in blue region. Optical absorption spectrum of 1 reveals the presence of an optical gap of 3.60 ...

  11. Lithium samarium polyphosphate, LiSm(PO34

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The mixed-metal rare-earth polyphosphate LiSm(PO34 consists of a three-dimensional framework in which zigzag [(PO3n]n− chains with a periodicity of four PO4 tetrahedra are connected through Li+ and Sm3+ ions (both with 2. symmetry.

  12. Sodium samarium tetrakis(polyphosphate, NaSm(PO34

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available NaSm(PO34 has been prepared by solid state reactions. It belongs to type II of the structural family of MILnIII(PO34 compounds (MI = alkali metal and LnIII = rare earth metal and is composed of ∞(PO3n]n− polyphosphate chains with a repeating unit of four PO4 tetrahedra. The chains extend parallel to [100] and share O atoms with irregular SmO8 polyhedra, forming a three-dimensional framework which delimits tunnels occupied by Na+ cations in a distorted octahedral environment.

  13. Isotopic Ratios of Samarium by TIMS for Nuclear Forensic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis Jean, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Inglis, Jeremy David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    The isotopic ratio of Nd, Sm, and Gd can provide important information regarding fissile material (nuclear devices, reactors), neutron environment, and device yield. These studies require precise measurement of Sm isotope ratios, by either TIMS or MC-ICP-MS. There has been an increasing trend to measure smaller and smaller quantities of Sm bearing samples. In nuclear forensics 10-100 ng of Sm are needed for precise measurement. To measure sub-ng Sm samples using TIMS for nuclear forensic analysis.

  14. Synthesis of copper, silver, and samarium chalcogenides by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtani, T.; Maruyama, K.; Ohshima, K. [Okayama Univ. of Science (Japan). Lab. for Solid State Chemistry

    1997-03-01

    CuInX{sub 2} (X = S, Se, Te), Ag{sub 2}S, Ag{sub 2}Se, Ag{sub 3}Te{sub 2}, Ag{sub 1.9}Te, AgCuSe, Sm{sub 3}Se{sub 4}, Sm{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, and SmTe were synthesized by a mechanical alloying method, using a high-energy planetary ball mill. The compounds were obtained by milling mixtures of the elements with desired ratios in agate or Cu-Be vials for 60--180 min.

  15. Oriented growth of thin films of samarium oxide by MOCVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Thin films of Sm2O3 have been grown on Si(100) and fused quartz by low-pressure chemical va- pour deposition using an adducted β-diketonate precursor. The films on quartz are cubic, with no preferred orientation at lower growth temperatures (~ 550°C), while they grow with a strong (111) orientation as the.

  16. 150 KVA Samarium Cobalt VSCF Starter Generator Electrical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    considerable hand labor. Addition of a provision for suitable electrical connection by the SCR manufacturer wou;d be desirable for production runs. Predicted...licen- sing the holder or any other person or corporation, or conveying any rights or permission to manufacture , use, or sell any patented invent,’n...tesile strength to contain the magnets and pole pieces up through the overspeed rating of the rotor. The cho.;en process uses maraging steel as the

  17. Optical properties of samarium doped zinc–tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Glasses with the composition, (Sm2O3)(ZnO)(40–)(TeO2)(60), were prepared by conventional melt quenching method. The density, molar volume, and optical energy band gap of these glasses have been measured. The refractive index, molar refraction and polarizability of oxide ion have been calculated by using ...

  18. Pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands: retrospective multicentric study of 130 cases with emphasis on histopathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Maria Luiza Diniz de Sousa; Barroso, Keila Martha Amorim; Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Martins, Manoela Domingues; de Souza, Lélia Batista

    2017-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most frequent benign epithelial lesion of salivary gland origin, showing great histopathological diversity. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective analysis, with emphasis on histopathologic features of PA of salivary glands. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics of 130 cases of minor and major salivary glands PAs from three Brazilian reference centers were studied. Higher frequency of PAs was observed in female (55.4 %) subjects, with mean age of 49.7 years. The most common affected site was palate (64.5 %) for the PAs of minor salivary glands and parotid for cases affecting major glands (86.2 %). Microscopically, most cases were classified as classic PAs (50 %). Incomplete capsule was observed in 36.2 % of the cases, while 47.2 % showed capsular infiltration. Rounded (66.9 %), angular (49.2 %), oval (46.2 %) and plasmacytoid (39.2 %) cells were widely observed, as well as fibrous (73.8 %) and myxoid (69.2 %) stroma, squamous metaplasia (25.4 %) and cystic degeneration (43.1 %). Crystalloids (3.1 %), increased mitotic activity (5.4 %) and vascular invasion (2.3 %) were rarely observed. PAs arising in minor salivary glands were associated with incomplete capsules, spindle, oval, angular, plasmacytoid and pleomorphic cells, fibrous and hyaline stroma, cystic degeneration, squamous metaplasia and pleomorphism (p < 0.05). No association between capsular features and histological subtype was noted (p ≥ 0.05). These results confirm the findings of previous studies regarding major clinicopathological features of pleomorphic adenomas; and highlighted some important morphologic characteristics like the capsule, vascular invasion, pleomorphism and increased mitotic activity, which can reflect the biological behavior of these tumors.

  19. pRb2/p130 protein expression and RBL2 mutation analysis in Burkitt lymphoma from Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wabinga Henry

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The members of the retinoblastoma protein family, pRb, p107 and pRb2 (p130, are central players in controlling the cell cycle. Whereas disturbed function of pRb is commonly seen in human cancers, it is still an open question whether pRb2 is involved in tumorigenic processes. However, altered subcellular localization of pRb2 and mutations in the pRb2-encoding gene RBL2 have been described for some tumours, including Burkitt lymphomas (BL. Methods We retrieved 51 biopsy specimens of endemic BL cases from Uganda. The expression of pRb2 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Exons 19–22 of the RBL2 gene, the region known to contain a nuclear localization signal, were screened for mutations by PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing. Results Nearly all of our cases (84.0% were positive for pRb2 protein expression although this protein is a marker for growth arrest and Burkitt lymphoma is characterized by a high proliferation rate. Of the positive cases, 73.8% were scored as expressing the protein at a high level. Subcellular pRb2 localization was predominantly nuclear and no cases with expression restricted to the cytoplasm were observed. We did not detect any RBL2 mutations in the part of the gene that encodes the C-terminal end of the protein. Conclusion The majority of endemic BL cases from Uganda express pRb2, but somatic RBL2 mutations affecting the protein's nuclear localization signal appear to be rare.

  20. Proficiency test in clinical mammography. Results of a consecutive series of volunteer italian radiologists; Impiego di una casistica campione per la valutazione dell'accuratezza diagnostica nella mammografia classica: analisi dei risultati ottenuti da 130 radiologi italiani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciatto, S.; Andreoli, C. [Centro per lo Studio e la Prevenzione Oncologica, Florence (Italy); Di Maggio, C. [Padua Policlinico, Padua (Italy). Scuola Italiana di Senologia

    1999-10-01

    Purpose of this report is to evaluate the results obtained by 130 Italian radiologists undergoing a proficiency test of clinical mammography. [Italian] Sono stati analizzati i risultati ottenuti da 130 radiologi italiani che si sono volontariamente sottoposti alla valutazione dell'accuratezza diagnostica nella mammografia clinica su una casistica campione.

  1. Search for an excess in the production of four-jet events from $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-184 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Events with four distinct jets from e^+e^- collisions, collected by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies between 130 and 184 GeV, are analysed for a peak in the sum of dijet masses. This search is motivated by the ALEPH Collaboration's observation of a clear excess of events with dijet mass sums close to 105 GeV in data taken at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV in 1995. We have observed no significant excess of four-jet events compared to the Standard Model expectation for any dijet mass sum at any energy. Our observation is inconsistent with the excess observed by ALEPH in 1995. Upper limits are determined on the production cross-section as a function of the dijet mass sum.

  2. Measurement of the two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 130}Te with the CUORE-0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduino, C.; Avignone, F.T.; Chott, N.; Creswick, R.J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Alfonso, K.; Hickerson, K.P.; Huang, H.Z.; Liu, X.; Trentalange, S.; Zhu, B.X. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Artusa, D.R. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Azzolini, O.; Camacho, A.; Keppel, G.; Palmieri, V.; Pira, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Banks, T.I.; Drobizhev, A.; Freedman, S.J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; O' Donnell, T.; Wagaarachchi, S.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bari, G.; Deninno, M.M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Beeman, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Ferroni, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Bersani, A.; Caminata, A. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Carbone, L.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Rusconi, C. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Faverzani, M.; Fiorini, E.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pozzi, S.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.; Zanotti, L. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Bucci, C.; Cappelli, L.; D' Addabbo, A.; Di Vacri, M.L.; Gorla, P.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Canonica, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Cao, X.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Ma, Y.G.; Wang, H.W.; Zhang, G.Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Copello, S.; Di Domizio, S.; Fernandes, G.; Marini, L.; Pallavicini, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genova (Italy); Cushman, J.S.; Davis, C.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Lim, K.E.; Maruyama, R.H. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Dafinei, I.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P.J.; Orio, F.; Pettinacci, V.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dell' Oro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Feintzeig, J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Mei, Y.; Smith, A.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Franceschi, M.A.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T.; Piperno, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Giuliani, A.; Tenconi, M. [Universite Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Gladstone, L.; Leder, A.; Winslow, L.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Gutierrez, T.D. [California Polytechnic State University, Physics Department, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Han, K. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai (China); Hansen, E. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kadel, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kolomensky, Yu.G. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Martinez, M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Moggi, N. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Scienze per la Qualita della Vita, Bologna (Italy); Nones, C. [Service de Physique des Particules, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Norman, E.B.; Wang, B.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ouellet, J.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Pagliarone, C.E. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Meccanica, Cassino (Italy); Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Santone, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, L' Aquila (Italy); Singh, V. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (US); Taffarello, L. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padova (IT); Wise, T. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (US); University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (US); Woodcraft, A. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, Edinburgh (GB); Zimmermann, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Engineering Division, Berkeley, CA (US); Zucchelli, S. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (IT); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (IT)

    2017-01-15

    We report on the measurement of the two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 130}Te with the CUORE-0 detector. From an exposure of 33.4 kg year of TeO{sub 2}, the half-life is determined to be T{sub 1/2}{sup 2ν} = [8.2 ± 0.2 (stat.) ± 0.6 (syst.)] x 10{sup 20} year. This result is obtained after a detailed reconstruction of the sources responsible for the CUORE-0 counting rate, with a specific study of those contributing to the {sup 130}Te neutrinoless double-beta decay region of interest. (orig.)

  3. Search for supersymmetric particles in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palla, Fabrizio; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Aleppo, M; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Ragusa, F; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Search for supersymmetric particles in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV have been performed in a data sample of 5.7 pb-1 collected in the autumn of 1995 by the ALEPH detector at LEP. No candidate events were found, allowing limits to be set on the masses and production cross-sections of scalar leptons, scalar tops charginos and neutralinos. The domains previously excluded at LEP1 are substantially extended. For instance, masses of gaugino-like charginos smaller than 67.8 GeV/c2 are excluded at the 95% C.L. for scalar neutrino masses larger than 200 GeV/c2.

  4. Thresholds and Targets for Hypertension Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Remain at 130/80 mmHg: What's the Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Niharika; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2017-12-20

    Hypertension and diabetes are common comorbidities and are both modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease and death. Lowering blood pressure reduces target organ damage and prevents cardiovascular disease outcomes. The harmonized Canadian clinical practice guidelines for managing hypertension in people with diabetes provides health-behaviour advice and medical therapy recommendations for a threshold blood pressure of 130/80 mmHg and above and to target blood pressure to below 130/80 mmHg. We have reviewed the studies supporting these recommendations and others, and they appear to be at odds with the guidelines, including those for elderly people and patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Review of 130 years of research on cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems in Serbia presented in a Serbian Cyanobacterial Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Svirčev

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of toxic cyanobacteria in aquatic ecosystems in the territory of the Republic of Serbia was surveyed over a period of several decades. Increasing attention is being paid to some negative consequences that may be caused by these microorganisms. Information from available literary sources regarding the distribution and frequency of cyanobacteria and their toxins over a period of 130 years, together with the effects on humans and wildlife in aquatic ecosystems, were gathered and incorporated into a Serbian Cyanobacterial Database created for the CYANOCOST Action. This database encompasses information on 65 aquatic ecosystems, including rivers, lakes, ponds, canals, irrigation reservoirs, reservoirs used for drinking water supply and reservoirs used for other purposes. Cyanobacterial blooms were found in almost 80% of the investigated aquatic ecosystems. The analysis of the research showed the presence of more than 70 species, including blooms of 24 species from 13 genera. Five species of cyanobacteria: Microcystis aeruginosa, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Planktothrix agardhii, Microcystis flos-aquae and Planktothrix rubescens frequently formed blooms in the investigated waterbodies and cyanotoxins were also detected in some of them, which had certain negative effects. Here, we present an overview of data contained in the Serbian Cyanobacterial Database, concerning cyanobacterial distribution, cyanotoxin production and associated biological effects in different types of water bodies from the Republic of Serbia. Also, recent important and major cases of cyanobacterial blooming in reservoirs used for drinking water supply: at Vrutci and Ćelije, the Aleksandrovac irrigation reservoir, the Ponjavica River and Lake Palić, including systematic research on the Lake Ludoš and few fishponds are further described. It can be concluded that cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are omnipresent in different water bodies throughout the Republic of Serbia

  6. IcePod - A versatile Science Platform for the New York Air National Guard's LC-130 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frearson, N.; Bell, R. E.; Zappa, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The ICEPOD program is a five-year effort to develop an ice imaging system mounted on New York Air National Guard (NYANG) LC-130 aircraft to map the surface and sub-surface topography of ice sheets, ice streams and outlet glaciers for the NSF Major Research Instrumentation program. The project is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The fundamental goal of the ICEPOD program is to develop an instrumentation package that can capture the dynamics of the changing polar regions, focusing on ice and ocean systems. The vision is that this instrumentation will be operated both on routine flights of the NYANG in the polar regions, such as on missions between McMurdo and South Pole Station, and on targeted science missions, from mapping sea ice and outlet glaciers such as those surrounding Ross Island or Greenland to quantifying the drainage systems from large subglacial lakes in East Antarctica. It is a key aspect of the design that at the conclusion of this program, the Pod, Deployment Arm and Data Acquisition and Management system will become available for use by the science community at large to install their own instruments onto. The science requirements for the primary instruments in the Icepod program have been defined and can be viewed on-line at www.ldeo.columbia.edu/icepod. As a consequence, the instrumentation will consist of a scanning laser for precise measurements of the ice surface, stereo-photogrammetry from both visible and infrared imaging cameras to document the ice surface and temperature, a VHF coherent, pulsed radar to recover ice thickness and constrain the distribution of water at the ice sheet bed and an L-band radar to measure surface accumulation or sea-ice thickness. All instrument data sets will be time-tagged and geo-referenced by recording precision GPS satellite data integrated with inertial measurement technology integrated into the pod. There will also be two operational modes - a low altitude flight mode that will optimize

  7. A Study of $b\\overline{b}$ Production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-207 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P.P; Amaldi, U; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W-D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Asman, B; Augustin, J.E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G.J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K-H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Berat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besancon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P.S.L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T.J.V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Bruckman, P; Brunet, J.M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, Ph; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S.U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M.J; Crennell, D; Cuevas, J; D'Hondt, J; da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; De Boer, W; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; de Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelof, T; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito Santo, M.C; Fanourakis, G; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Foeth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; Garcia, C; Gavillet, Ph; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S-O; Holt, P.J; Houlden, M.A; Jackson, J.N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E.K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B.P; Kerzel, U; King, B.T; Kjaer, N.J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouznetsov, O; Krumstein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J.H; Lopez, J.M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Marechal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J-C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martinez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W; Mjoernmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Monig, Klaus; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Mueller, U; Muenich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nemecek, S; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Olshevski, A; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J.P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, Th.D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M.E; Polok, G; Pozdniakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Richard, F; Ridky, J; Rivero, M; Rodriguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovsky, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassov, T; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tome, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M-L; Tyapkin, I.A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A.J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2009-01-01

    Measurements are presented of R_b, the ratio of the b bbar cross-section to the q qbar cross-section in e+e- collisions, and the forward-backward asymmetry A^b_FB at twelve energy points in the range sqrt(s) = 130-207 GeV. These results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model expectations. The measurements are used to set limits on new physics scenarios involving contact interactions.

  8. Analog 65/130 nm CMOS 5 GHz Sub-Arrays with ROACH-2 FPGA Beamformers for Hybrid Aperture-Array Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    respectively. The cross-coupled pair (M2) at the top of the filter reduces the node resistance by generating negative resistance R1, which reduces the...accomplished by varying bias current with Vbias and the feedback resistance R2. A 4-element electronically steerable array of antennas was implemented in a 130...nm CMOS technology based on the proposed APF. The circuit included a low- noise amplifier (LNA) followed by a voltage-to-current stage and a cascade

  9. Measurement of hadron and lepton-pair production from e+e- annihilation at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Hadronic and leptonic cross-sections and forward-backward asymmetries are measured using 5.7~pb$^{-1}$ of data taken with the ALEPH detector at LEP at $\\cms$ energies of 130 and 136~GeV. The results agree with Standard Model expectations. The measurement of hadronic cross-sections far away from the Z resonance improves the determination of the interference between photon and Z exchange. Constraints on models with extra Z bosons are presented.

  10. [Prophylaxis for hypotension during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia: a randomized trial comparing hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 to ephedrine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseyran Samper, F; Errando, C L; Plaza Lloret, M; Díaz Cambronero, O; García Gregorio, N; de Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2011-01-01

    Spinal anesthesia is the technique of choice for scheduled or emergency cesarean section, but the prevalence of hypotension is high in this setting. Our aim was to compare the efficacy of a colloid (6% hydroxyethyl starch [HES] 130/0.4) to ephedrine for preventing hypotension. Patients undergoing elective or emergency cesarean section (in non-life-threatening situations) were enrolled. Patients were randomized to 3 groups for prophylaxis. The first ephedrine group received 5 mg of ephedrine intravenously (EPHE-5); the second ephedrine group received 10 mg of the drug intravenously (EPHE-10); and the HES group received 500 mL of HES 130/0.4 in rapid infusion n 15 minutes. We recorded systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate after 10 minutes in the operating room and 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes after injection of the anesthetic. We also assessed the sensory and motor blockades on both sides 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes after injection. Neonatal status was assessed by Apgar score and umbilical cord blood gas analysis. Ninety-six patients, 33 in each ephedrine group and 30 in the HES group, were enrolled. Blood pressure decreased similarly in all 3 groups (36% EPHE-5 group, 36% EPHE-10 group and 40% HES group); no significant between-group differences were observed. Nor were there significant differences in the percentages of patients requiring bolus doses of ephedrine to treat hypotension (23% in the HES group vs 33% in the EPHE-5 group and 27% in the EPHE-10 group) or in the cumulative doses of ephedrine. Neonatal status was also similarly satisfactory in all 3 groups. HES 130/0.4 is as useful for hypotension prophylaxis as 5-mg or 10-mg intravenous doses of ephedrine. HES 130/0.4 might be a substitute for sympathomimetic agents if adverse effects are predicted or contraindications to the use of such drugs are present.

  11. Comparison of 4% Succinylated Gelatin with 6% Hydroxyethyl Starch 130/0.4 for Preloading Prior to Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Deshmukh, Amit; Dave, Sona; Gujjar, Pinakin

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The present study was carried out with an objective to compare 4% succinylated gelatin with 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 for preloading prior to cardiopulmonary bypass in coronary artery bypass grafting patients with respect to haemodynamics status, blood loss, transfusion requirement, ICU stay and complication. Methods: The study enrolling 60 patients of either sex, aged between 30-70 years undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting. These patients were randoml...

  12. Rare occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC130 with a novel mecA homologue in humans in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Cuny

    Full Text Available MRSA CC130 containing the mecA homologue mecA(LGA251 were reported from the UK and from Denmark so far from cattle and humans. Here we report on 11 MRSA CC130 among a sample of 12691 isolates of human origin collected from January 2006 until June 2011. MRSA CC130 grew insufficiently on chromogernic agar plates for detection of MRSA; the agglutination test for presence of PBP2a was negative. We designed primers for specific detection of mecA(LGA251 as well as for concomitant detection of both, mec(LGA251 and mecA. As already described, the isolates exhibited spa-types t843, t1736, and t1773. The ccrA homologue indicated the presence SCCmec(XI. When subjected to further characterization by means of a commercially available microarray the isolates were negative for sak chp, and scn, and as expected positive for hla, untruncated hlb, and hld. They furthermore contained edinB, aur, slpA, slpB, slpE. From genes coding for surface and cell wall associated products the ica-operon, cap8, clfA, clfF, ebpS, fnbA, fnbB, sdrC were detected but not cna. The isolates were negative for enterotoxin genes and tst, as well as for eta, and etb; agr-type was III.

  13. Two apolipoprotein E mimetic peptides, ApoE(130-149) and ApoE(141-155)2, bind to LRP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Johnny E; Brandon, Theodore; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2004-06-15

    LRP1 is a cell surface receptor responsible for clearing some 30 known ligands. We have previously shown that each of the three complete LDL receptor-homology domains of the LRP1 extracellular domain (sLRPs) binds apoE-enriched beta-VLDL particles. Here we show that two peptides from the N-terminal receptor binding domain of apoE, which are known to elicit a number of different cellular responses, bind to LRP1. Solution binding assays show that the two peptides, apoE(130-149) and apoE(141-155)(2), interact with each of the sLRPs (2, 3, and 4). Each peptide was found to exhibit the same solution binding characteristics as apoE-enriched beta-VLDL particles. Surface plasmon resonance analyses of the sLRP-apoE peptide interaction show that both peptides bind the sLRPs with K(D) values in the 100 nM range, a value similar to the effective concentration required for observation of the cellular responses. Consistent with results from mutagenesis studies of binding of apoE to LDLR, apoE(130-149,Arg142Glu) bound with a K(D) similar to that of the wild-type sequence, while apoE(130-149,Lys143Glu) showed a 10-fold decrease in K(D). Each of the peptides bound heparin, and heparin competed for sLRP binding.

  14. Attenuation of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling of myocardial infarction by microRNA-130a are mediated by suppression of PTEN and activation of PI3K dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chen; Wang, Xiaohui; Ha, Tuanzhu; Hu, Yuanping; Liu, Li; Zhang, Xia; Yu, Honghui; Miao, Jonathan; Kao, Race; Kalbfleisch, John; Williams, David; Li, Chuanfu

    2015-12-01

    Activation of PI3K/Akt signaling protects the myocardium from ischemia/reperfusion injury. MicroRNAs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In this study, we examined whether miR-130a will attenuate cardiac dysfunction and remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) via PI3K/Akt dependent mechanism. To determine the role of miR-130a in the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, HUVECs were transfected with miR-130a mimics before the cells were subjected to scratch-induced wound injury. Transfection of miR-130a mimics stimulated the migration of endothelial cells into the wound area and increased phospho-Akt levels. To examine the effect of miR-130a on cardiac dysfunction and remodeling after MI, Lentivirus expressing miR-130a (LmiR-130a) was delivered into mouse hearts seven days before the mice were subjected to MI. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography before and for up to 21 days after MI. Ejection fraction (EF%) and fractional shortening (FS%) in the LmiR-130a transfected MI hearts were significantly greater than in LmiR-control and untransfected control MI groups. LmiR-130a transfection increased capillary number and VEGF expression, and decreased collagen deposition in the infarcted myocardium. Importantly, LmiR-130a transfection significantly suppressed PTEN expression and increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt in the myocardium. However, treatment of LmiR-130a-transfected mice with LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, completely abolished miR-130a-induced attenuation of cardiac dysfunction after MI. miR-130a plays a critical role in attenuation of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling after MI. The mechanisms involve activation of PI3K/Akt signaling via suppression of PTEN expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Attenuation of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling of myocardial infarction by microRNA-130a is mediated by suppression of PTEN and activation of PI3K dependent signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chen; Wang, Xiaohui; Ha, Tuanzhu; Hu, Yuanping; Liu, Li; Zhang, Xia; Yu, Honghui; Miao, Jonathan; Kao, Race; Kalbfleisch, John; Williams, David; Li, Chuanfu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Activation of PI3K/Akt signaling protects the myocardium from ischemia/reperfusion injury. MicroRNAs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In this study, we examined whether miR-130a will attenuate cardiac dysfunction and remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) via PI3K/Akt dependent mechanism. Approaches and Results To determine the role of miR-130a in the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, HUVECs were transfected with miR-130a mimics before the cells were subjected to scratch-induced wound injury. Transfection of miR-130a mimics stimulated the migration of endothelial cells into the wound area and increased phosphor-Akt levels. To examine the effect of miR-130a on cardiac dysfunction and remodeling after MI, Lentivirus expressing miR-130a (LmiR-130a) was delivered into mouse hearts seven days before the mice were subjected to MI. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography before and for up to 21 days after MI. Ejection fraction (EF%) and fractional shortening (FS%) in the LmiR-130a transfected MI hearts were significantly greater than in LmiR-control and untransfected control MI groups. LmiR-130a transfection increased capillary number and VEGF expression, and decreased collagen deposition in the infarcted myocardium. Importantly, LmiR-130a transfection significantly suppressed PTEN expression and increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt in the myocardium. However, treatment of LmiR-130a-transfected mice with LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, completely abolished miR-130a-induced attenuation of cardiac dysfunction after MI. Conclusions miR-130a plays a critical role in attenuation of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling after MI. The mechanisms involve activation of PI3K/Akt signaling via suppression of PTEN expression. PMID:26458524

  16. Use of RSM modeling for optimizing decolorization of simulated textile wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 capable of simultaneous removal of reactive dyes and hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Zahid; Hussain, Sabir; Ahmad, Tanvir; Nadeem, Habibullah; Imran, Muhammad; Khalid, Azeem; Abid, Muhammad; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    Remediation of colored wastewater loaded with dyes and metal ions is a matter of interest nowadays. In this study, 220 bacteria isolated from textile wastewater were tested for their potential to decolorize each of the four reactive dyes (reactive red-120, reactive black-5, reactive yellow-2, and reactive orange-16) in the presence of a mixture of four different heavy metals (Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd) commonly found in textile effluents. Among the tested bacteria, the isolate ZM130 was found to be the most efficient in decolorizing reactive dyes in the presence of the mixture of heavy metals and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 by 16S rRNA gene analysis. The strain ZM130 was highly effective in simultaneously removing hexavalent chromium (25 mg L(-1)) and the azo dyes (100 mg L(-1)) from the simulated wastewater even in the presence of other three heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd). Simultaneous removal of chromium and azo dyes ranged as 76.6-98.7 % and 51.9-91.1 %, respectively, after 180 h incubation. On the basis of quadratic polynomial equation and response surfaces given by the response surface methodology (RSM), optimal salt content, pH, carbon co-substrate content, and level of multi-metal mixtures for decolorization of reactive red-120 in a simulated textile wastewater by the strain ZM130 were predicted to be 19.8, 7.8, and 6.33 g L(-1) and a multi-metal mixture (Cr 13.10 mg L(-1), Pb 26.21 mg L(-1), Cd 13.10 mg L(-1), Zn 26.21 mg L(-1)), respectively. Moreover, the strain ZM130 also exhibited laccase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced)-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (NADH-DCIP reductase) activity during the decolorization of reactive red-120. However, the laccase activity was found to be maximum in the presence of 300 mg L(-1) of the dye as compared to other concentrations. Hence, the isolation of this strain might serve as a potential bio-resource required for developing the strategies aiming at bioremediation of the

  17. Prospective observational study for perioperative volume replacement with 6% HES 130/0,42, 4% gelatin and 6% HES 200/0,5 in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winterhalter M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The constantly growing amount of different kinds of colloid fluids necessitates comparative investigations with regards to the safety and effectivity in clinical use of these preparations. Hence we compared three colloid fluids in an observational study. The objective was the exploration of the influence of these three colloids on blood coagulation, hemodynamics and renal function of the cardiac surgical patient. Methods We included 90 patients undergoing an elective open-heart surgery with the use of the heart-lung machine and observed them consecutively. Group 1 [gelatin 4% (n = 30], Group 2 [HES 200/0,5 (n = 30] and Group 3 [HES 130/0,42 (n = 30]. We measured the perioperative volume replacement, the administration of blood- and coagulation-products, the application of catecholamines, the renal function, blood gas and the platelet aggregation using multiplate electrode analyzer (Multiplate®, Dynabyte medical, Munich, Germany. Results The gelatin-group needed significantly more norepinephrine than the HES 130/0.42 group. The responsible surgeon considered the blood coagulation in the HES 200/0.5 group most frequently as impaired. Furthermore we saw a significant decrease in platelet function in the HES 200/0.5 group when performing the multiplate®-analysis (ADP-and COL-test. HES 130/0.4 as well as gelatin 4% showed no significant change in platelet function. The gelatin-group and the HES 200/0.5 needed significantly more aprotinine than the HES 130/0.4 group. We saw no significant difference with regards to administration of blood and coagulation products between the three groups. The urinary excretion during the intervention was significantly higher in the HES 200/0.5 group and in the gelatin group than in the HES 130/0.4 group. Conclusions Our results confirm the lower stabilizing effect of gelatin on circulation during fluid resuscitation. The blood coagulation was mostly impaired due to HES 200/0.5 confirmed by the

  18. Acquisition of Airborne Sea Ice Remote Sensing Data with CULPIS-X: an Instrument Mounted on a US Coast Guard C-130

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudi, M. A.; Tooth, M.; Barton-Grimley, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    To obtain high-resolution observations of sea ice, we developed the University of Colorado LIDAR Profiler Instrument Suite - Extended (CULPIS-X). CULPIS-X, originally funded by NASA and currently supported by ONR, is being deployed in the flare tube of a US Coast Guard (USCG) C-130 aircraft, during Arctic Domain Awareness (ADA) flights from Kodiak, AK to the Arctic, in cooperation with the Coast Guard and with the Seasonal Ice Zone Remote Sensing (SIZRS, J. Morrison, PI) program. CULPIS-X (Figure 1) contains a LIDAR, digital camera, thermal infrared and hyperspectral radiometers, along with a GPS for aircraft altitude and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) for aircraft attitude, and a computer to process and write the instrument data to SD cards. The package is designed to fly over Arctic sea ice for the purposes of measuring sea ice roughness, estimating sea ice thickness, and measuring ice surface temperature and reflectance. CULPIS-X had its inaugural flight aboard a C-130 out of USCG Air Station Sacramento in April 2016. This flight tested the structure of CULPIS-X, along with instrument readiness. The inaugural Arctic flight of CULPIS-X took place on June 15, 2016. The C-130 took off from Kodiak and flew towards Deadhorse, where it turned on to the 150W longitude line and proceeded north to 76N. The C-130 descended to a lower altitude ( 500 feet) during several flight segments along the 150W line, from Deadhorse to 76N and back. The lower altitude is required to obtain ULS LIDAR return pulses as they reflect off the ocean and sea ice. A similar flight was also performed on July 13, 2016. LIDAR data will be utilized to determine the surface roughness of the overflown ice pack. Furthermore, we will pick locations where open water occurred near or within the ice pack, to establish the freeboard of the ice pack, which will be used to estimate the sea ice thickness. More flights are scheduled for this season, in mid-Aug, Sept, and Oct, and are designed to overfly

  19. THE FIRST RUSSIAN STRATEGIC STUDY OF PHARMACOTHERAPY FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (REMARCA TRIAL: RESULTS OF 12-MONTH TREATMENT IN 130 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To introduce treat-to-target recommendations is an important task of modern rheumatology; however, there is still a diversity of serious problems relating to a scientific rationale and a clinical one for this strategy and to the possibilities of its implementation in real clinical practice, in the rheumatology service of the Russian Federation in particular, by taking into account the specific features of funding for high-tech medical care.Objective: to determine the efficiency and safety of combined therapy with subcutaneous methotrexate (MT and biological agents (BA when using the treat-to-target strategy in patients with active early and extended-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA who have risk factors for a poor prognosis.Subjects and methods.The results of the REMARCA (Russian InvEstigation of MethotrexAte and biologicals in eaRly aCtive inflammatory Arthritis trial of 130 patients followed up for 12 months or more were given. There was a female preponderance; mean age 48.9±13.9 years, rheumatoid factor positivity (86.9%; anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity (89.2%. Seventy patients formed a subgroup of early RA (disease duration ≤6 months (mean 4.17±1.39 months; 60 patients were a subgroup of advanced-stage RA (disease duration >6 months (mean 30.8±32.7 months. In all the patients, therapy was initiated by using subcutaneous MT with its rapid dose escalation up to 20–30 mg/week and the achievement of the treatment goal (low disease activity or remission was checked every 3 months and depending on the result a decision had been taken to add or not to add a biological agent (BA (a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor or abatacept. If the former was insufficiently effective, it was substituted for a BA from another class.Results. Subcutaneous MT monotherapy provided remission or low disease activity in 49 (37.7% patients; a BA was given to 81 (62.3% patients. Following 6 and 12 months, low activity or remission

  20. THE FIRST RUSSIAN STRATEGIC STUDY OF PHARMACOTHERAPY FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (REMARCA TRIAL: RESULTS OF 12-MONTH TREATMENT IN 130 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karatee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To introduce treat-to-target recommendations is an important task of modern rheumatology; however, there is still a diversity of serious problems relating to a scientific rationale and a clinical one for this strategy and to the possibilitiesof its implementation in real clinical practice, in the rheumatology service of the Russian Federation in particular, by taking into account the specific features of funding for high-tech medical care.Objective: to determine the efficiency and safety of combined therapy with subcutaneous methotrexate (MT and biological agents (BA when using the treat-to-target strategy in patients with active early and extended-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA who have risk factors for a poor prognosis.Subjects and methods. The results of the REMARCA (Russian InvEstigation of MethotrexAte and biologicals in eaRly aCtive inflammatory Arthritis trial of 130 patients followed up for 12 months or more were given. There was a female preponderance; mean age 48.9±13.9 years, rheumatoid factor positivity (86.9%; anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide anti body positivity (89.2%. Seventy patients formed a subgroup of early RA (disease duration ≤6 months (mean 4.17±1.39 months; 60 patients were a subgroup of advanced-stage RA (disease duration >6 months (mean 30.8±32.7 months. In all the patients, therapy was initiated by using subcutaneous MT with its rapid dose escalation up to 20–30 mg/week and the achievement of the treatment goal (low disease activity or remission was checked every 3 months and depending on the result a decision had been taken to add or not to add a biological agent (BA (a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor or abatacept. If the former was insufficientlyeffective, it was substituted for a BA from another class.Results. Subcutaneous MT monotherapy provided remission or low disease activity in 49 (37.7% patients; a BA was given to 81 (62.3% patients. Following 6 and 12 months, low activity or remission according to