WorldWideScience

Sample records for salt removal methods

  1. Modeling of electromigration salt removal methods in building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2008-01-01

    for salt attack of various kinds, is one potential method to preserve old building envelopes. By establishing a model for ionic multi-species diffusion, which also accounts for external applied electrical fields, it is proposed that an important complement to the experimental tests and that verification...... with its ionic mobility properties. It is, further, assumed that Gauss’s law can be used to calculate the internal electrical field induced by the diffusion it self. In this manner the external electrical field applied can be modeled, simply, by assigning proper boundary conditions for the equation...

  2. Electrokinetic removal of salt from brick masonry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2006-01-01

    A method to effectively remove salts from masonry is lacking. The present study aims at determining the removal efficiency of salts from bricks in an applied low current electric DC field. At first an investigation on removal of NaCl and Na(NO3)2 from spiked bricks in laboratory scale was conducted...

  3. Ion exchange removal of technetium from salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Ion exchange methods for removing technetium from waste salt solutions have been investigated by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). These experiments have shown: Commercially available anion exchange resins show high selectivity and capacity for technetium. In column runs, 150 column volumes of salt solution were passed through an ion exchange column before 50% 99 Tc breakthrough was reached. The technetium can be eluted from the resin with nitric acid. Reducing resins (containing borohydride) work well in simple hydroxide solutions, but not in simulated salt solutions. A mercarbide resin showed a very high selectivity for Tc, but did not work well in column operation

  4. Salt removal from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant (SRP), there are 23 waste storage tanks containing high-level radioactive wastes that are to be retired. These tanks contain about 23 million liters of salt and about 10 million liters of sludge, that are to be relocated to new Type III, fully stress-relieved tanks with complete secondary containment. About 19 million liters of salt cake are to be dissolved. Steam jet circulators were originally proposed for the salt dissolution program. However, use of steam jet circulators raised the temperature of the tank contents and caused operating problems. These included increased corrosion risk and required long cooldown periods prior to transfer. Alternative dissolution concepts were investigated. Examination of mechanisms affecting salt dissolution showed that the ability of fresh water to contact the cake surface was the most significant factor influencing dissolution rate. Density driven and mechanical agitation techniques were developed on a bench scale and then were demonstrated in an actual waste tank. Actual waste tank demonstrations were in good agreement with bench-scale experiments at 1/85 scale. The density driven method utilizes simple equipment, but leaves a cake heel in the tank and is hindered by the presence of sludge or Zeolite in the salt cake. Mechanical agitation overcomes the problems found with both steam jet circulators and the density driven technique and is the best method for future waste tank salt removal

  5. Molten salt electrorefining method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Shoji, Yuichi; Matsumaru, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    A molten cadmium phase (lower side) and a molten salt phase (upper side) are filled in an electrolytic bath. A basket incorporating spent nuclear fuels is inserted/disposed in the molten cadmium phase. A rotatable solid cathode is inserted/disposed in the molten salt phase. The spent fuels, for example, natural uranium, incorporated in the basket is dissolved in the molten cadmium phase. In this case, the uranium concentration in the molten salt phase is determined as from 0.5 to 20wt%. Then, electrolysis is conducted while setting a stirring power for stirring at least the molten salt phase of from 2.5 x 10 2 to 1 x 10 4 based on a reynolds number. Crystalline nuclei of uranium are precipitated uniformly on the surface of the solid cathode, and they grow into fine dendrites. With such procedures, since short-circuit between the cathode precipitates and the molten cadmium phase (anode) is scarcely caused, to improve the recovering rate of uranium. (I.N.)

  6. Removal of uranium and salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.; Rushton, J.E.; Faulkner, R.L.; Walker, K.L.; Del Cul, G.D.

    1998-01-01

    In 1994, migration of 233 U was discovered to have occurred at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper describes the actions now underway to remove uranium from the off-gas piping and the charcoal bed, to remove and stabilize the salts, and to convert the uranium to a stable oxide for long-term storage

  7. Removal of uranium from spent salt from the moltensalt oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, L.; Hsu, P.C.; Holtz, E.V.; Hipple, D.; Wang, F.; Adamson, M.

    1997-03-01

    Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that has the capability of destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials. In this process, combustible waste and air are introduced into the molten sodium carbonate salt. The organic constituents of the waste materials are oxidized to carbon dioxide and water, while most of the inorganic constituents, including toxic metals, minerals, and radioisotopes, are retained in the molten salt bath. As these impurities accumulate in the salt, the process efficiency drops and the salt must be replaced. An efficient process is needed to separate these toxic metals, minerals, and radioisotopes from the spent carbonate to avoid generating a large volume of secondary waste. Toxic metals such as cadmium, chromium, lead, and zinc etc. are removed by a method described elsewhere. This paper describes a separation strategy developed for radioisotope removal from the mixed spent salt, as well as experimental results, as part of the spent salt cleanup. As the MSO system operates, inorganic products resulting from the reaction of halides, sulfides, phosphates, metals and radionuclides with carbonate accumulate in the salt bath. These must be removed to prevent complete conversion of the sodium carbonate, which would result in eventual losses of destruction efficiency and acid scrubbing capability. There are two operational modes for salt removal: (1) during reactor operation a slip-stream of molten salt is continuously withdrawn with continuous replacement by carbonate, or (2) the spent salt melt is discharged completely and the reactor then refilled with carbonate in batch mode. Because many of the metals and/or radionuclides captured in the salt are hazardous and/or radioactive, spent salt removed from the reactor would create a large secondary waste stream without further treatment. A spent salt clean up/recovery system is necessary to segregate these materials and minimize the amount of

  8. Detection and removal of molten salts from molten aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Butcher; D. Smith; C. L. Lin; L. Aubrey

    1999-08-02

    Molten salts are one source of inclusions and defects in aluminum ingots and cast shapes. A selective adsorption media was used to remove these inclusions and a device for detection of molten salts was tested. This set of experiments is described and the results are presented and analyzed.

  9. Actinide removal from molten salts by chemical oxidation and salt distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeese, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Dole, V.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Actinide removal from molten salts can be accomplished by a two step process where the actinide is first oxidized to the oxide using a chemical oxidant such as calcium carbonate or sodium carbonate. After the actinide is precipitated as an oxide the molten salt is distilled away from the actinide oxides leaving a oxide powder heel and an actinide free distilled salt that can be recycled back into the processing stream. This paper discusses the chemistry of the oxidation process and the physical conditions required to accomplish a salt distillation. Possible application of an analogous process sequence for a proposed accelerator driven transmutation molten salt process is also discussed.

  10. Actinide removal from molten salts by chemical oxidation and salt distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, James A.; Garcia, Eduardo; Dole, Vonda R.; Griego, Walter J.

    1995-01-01

    Actinide removal from molten salts can be accomplished by a two step process where the actinide is first oxidized to the oxide using a chemical oxidant such as calcium carbonate or sodium carbonate. After the actinide is precipitated as an oxide the molten salt is distilled away from the actinide oxides leaving a oxide powder heel and an actinide free distilled salt that can be recycled back into the processing stream. This paper discusses the chemistry of the oxidation process and the physical conditions required to accomplish a salt distillation. Possible application of an analogous process sequence for a proposed accelerator driven transmutation molten salt process is also discussed

  11. Laboratory simulation of salt dissolution during waste removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.J.; Parish, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to support the field demonstration of improved techniques for salt dissolution in waste tanks at the Savannah River Site. The tests were designed to investigate three density driven techniques for salt dissolution: (1) Drain-Add-Sit-Remove, (2) Modified Density Gradient, and (3) Continuous Salt Mining. Salt dissolution was observed to be a very rapid process as salt solutions with densities between 1.38-1.4 were frequently removed. Slower addition and removal rates and locating the outlet line at deeper levels below the top of the saltcake provided the best contact between the dissolution water and the saltcake. It was observed that dissolution with 1 M sodium hydroxide solution resulted in salt solutions that were within the current inhibitor requirements for the prevention of stress corrosion cracking. This result was independent of the density driven technique. However, if inhibited water (0.01 M sodium hydroxide and 0.011 M sodium nitrite) was utilized, the salt solutions were frequently outside the inhibitor requirements. Corrosion testing at conditions similar to the environments expected during waste removal was recommended

  12. Removal of salt from rare earth precipitates by vacuum distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hee-Chul; Eun, Hee-Chul; Cho, Yong-Zun; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, In-Tae

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the distillation rates of LiCl-KCl eutectic salt from the rare earth (RE) precipitates originating from the oxygen-sparging RE precipitation process. The first part study investigated distillation rates of eutectic salt under different vacuums at high temperatures by using thermo-gravimetric furnace system. The second part study tested the removal efficiency of eutectic salt from RE precipitates by using the laboratory vacuum distillation furnace system. Investigated variables were the temperature, the degree of vacuum and the time. Salt distillation operation with a moderated distillation rate of 10 -4 - 10 -5 mole sec -1 cm -2 is possible at temperature less than 1300 K and vacuums of 5-50 Torr, by minimizing the potentials of the RE particle entrainment. An increase in the vaporizing surface area is relatively effective for removing the residual salt in pores of bulk of the precipitated RE particles, when compared to that for the vaporizing time. Over 99.9% of the salt removal from the salt-RE precipitate mixture could be achieved by increasing the vaporizing surface area under moderate vacuum conditions of 50 Torr at 1200 K. (author)

  13. Removal of uranium and salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretz, F.J.; Rushton, J.E.; Faulkner, R.L.; Walker, K.L.; Del Cul, G.D.

    1998-06-01

    In 1994, migration of {sup 233}U was discovered to have occurred at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper describes the actions now underway to remove uranium from the off-gas piping and the charcoal bed, to remove and stabilize the salts, and to convert the uranium to a stable oxide for long-term storage.

  14. Fission product removal from molten salt using zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Babcock, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) can be treated in a molten salt electrorefiner for conversion into metal and mineral waste forms for geologic disposal. The fuel is dissolved in molten chloride salt. Non-transuranic fission products in the molten salt are ion-exchanged into zeolite A, which is subsequently mixed with glass and consolidated. Zeolite was found to be effective in removing fission product cations from the molten salt. Breakthrough of cesium and the alkaline earths occurred more rapidly than was observed for the rare earths. The effluent composition as a function of time is presented, as well as results for the distribution of fission products along the length of the column. Effects of temperature and salt flow rate are also discussed

  15. Method and composition for removing iodine from gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.A.; O'Hara, D.K.; Pasha, M.

    1980-01-01

    A method and composition for removing iodine and organic iodides from an iodine-containing off-gas stream is provided. The composition for the removal is a ceramic material impregnated with a mixture of a metallic salt with a water-soluble secondary amine. The method for removing the iodine and iodide is accomplished by passing the off-gas stream over the ceramic impregnated with the metallic salt-amine mixture

  16. Salt Removal from the Uranium Deposits of Electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Lee, S. J.; Park, S. B.; Cho, C. H.; Choi, S. Y.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Electrorefining is a key step in pyroprocessing. The electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps. The deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode and the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode. The solid cathode processing is necessary to separate the salt from the cathode since the uranium deposit in a solid cathode contains electrolyte salt. In the liquid cathode, cadmium metal should be removed to recover actinide product. A physical separation process, such as distillation separation, is more attractive than a chemical or dissolution process because physical processes generate much less secondary process. Distillation process was employed for the cathode processing due to the advantages of minimal generation of secondary waste, compact unit process, simple and low cost equipment. The basis for vacuum distillation separation is the difference in vapor pressures between salt and uranium. A solid cathode deposit is heated in a heating region and salt vaporizes, while non volatile uranium remains behind. It is very important to increase the throughput of the salt separation system due to the high uranium content of spent nuclear fuel and high salt fraction of uranium dendrites. The evaporation rate of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in vacuum distiller is not so high to come up with the generation capacity of uranium dendrites in electro-refiner. Therefore, wide evaporation area or high distillation temperature is necessary for the successful salt separation. In this study, the solid-liquid separation was proposed prior to distillation of salt and a feasibility of the separation of the liquid salt by a metallic wire mesh (sieve) was tested for the reduction of the burden of the following vacuum distillation process

  17. Salt Removal from the Uranium Deposits of Electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Lee, S. J.; Park, S. B.; Cho, C. H.; Choi, S. Y.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Electrorefining is a key step in pyroprocessing. The electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps. The deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode and the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode. The solid cathode processing is necessary to separate the salt from the cathode since the uranium deposit in a solid cathode contains electrolyte salt. In the liquid cathode, cadmium metal should be removed to recover actinide product. A physical separation process, such as distillation separation, is more attractive than a chemical or dissolution process because physical processes generate much less secondary process. Distillation process was employed for the cathode processing due to the advantages of minimal generation of secondary waste, compact unit process, simple and low cost equipment. The basis for vacuum distillation separation is the difference in vapor pressures between salt and uranium. A solid cathode deposit is heated in a heating region and salt vaporizes, while non volatile uranium remains behind. It is very important to increase the throughput of the salt separation system due to the high uranium content of spent nuclear fuel and high salt fraction of uranium dendrites. The evaporation rate of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in vacuum distiller is not so high to come up with the generation capacity of uranium dendrites in electro-refiner. Therefore, wide evaporation area or high distillation temperature is necessary for the successful salt separation. In this study, the solid-liquid separation was proposed prior to distillation of salt and a feasibility of the separation of the liquid salt by a metallic wire mesh (sieve) was tested for the reduction of the burden of the following vacuum distillation process

  18. Electrochemical removal of salts from masonry - Experiences from pilot scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge; Villumsen, Arne

    2008-01-01

    A pilot experiment with newly developed electrodes was tested for removal of contaminating salts from brick masonry where plaster peeling was a problem. A high concentration of sulfate was found at the height where the paint peeling was most pronounced. The concentrations of chloride and nitrate ...

  19. Protein removal from waste brines generated during ham salting through acidification and centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Maria del Rosario; Muñoz-Guerrero, Hernán; Alcaína-Miranda, Maria Isabel; Barat, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    The salting step in food processes implies the production of large quantities of waste brines, having high organic load, high conductivity, and other pollutants with high oxygen demand. Direct disposal of the residual brine implies salinization of soil and eutrophication of water. Since most of the organic load of the waste brines comes from proteins leaked from the salted product, precipitation of dissolved proteins by acidification and removal by centrifugation is an operation to be used in waste brine cleaning. The aim of this study is optimizing the conditions for carrying out the separation of proteins from waste brines generated in the pork ham salting operation, by studying the influence of pH, centrifugal force, and centrifugation time. Models for determining the removal of proteins depending on the pH, centrifugal force, and time were obtained. The results showed a high efficacy of the proposed treatment for removing proteins, suggesting that this method could be used for waste brine protein removal. The best pH value to be used in an industrial process seems to be 3, while the obtained results indicate that almost 90% of the proteins from the brine can be removed by acidification followed by centrifugation. A further protein removal from the brine should have to be achieved using filtrating techniques, which efficiency could be highly improved as a consequence of the previous treatment through acidification and centrifugation. Waste brines from meat salting have high organic load and electrical conductivity. Proteins can be removed from the waste brine by acidification and centrifugation. The total protein removal can be up to 90% of the initial content of the waste brine. Protein removal is highly dependent on pH, centrifugation rate, and time. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Pilot-Scale Removal Of Fluoride From Legacy Plutonium Materials Using Vacuum Salt Distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R. A.; Pak, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. In 2011, SRNL adapted the technology for the removal of fluoride from fluoride-bearing salts. The method involved an in situ reaction between potassium hydroxide (KOH) and the fluoride salt to yield potassium fluoride (KF) and the corresponding oxide. The KF and excess KOH can be distilled below 1000°C using vacuum salt distillation (VSD). The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated by a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attaned, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile material in the feed boat. Studies discussed in this report were performed involving the use of non-radioactive simulants in small-scale and pilot-scale systems as well as radioactive testing of a small-scale system with plutonium-bearing materials. Aspects of interest include removable liner design considerations, boat materials, in-line moisture absorption, and salt deposition

  1. Removal of alkaline-earth elements by a carbonate precipitation in a chloride molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung-Zun Cho; In-Tae Kim; Hee-Chui Yang; Hee-Chui Eun; Hwan-Seo Park; Eung-Ho Kim

    2007-01-01

    Separation of some alkaline-earth chlorides (Sr, Ba) was investigated by using carbonate injection method in LiCl-KCl eutectic and LiCl molten salts. The effects of the injected molar ratio of carbonate([K 2 (or Li 2 )CO 3 /Sr(or Ba)Cl 2 ]) and the temperature(450-750 deg.) on the conversion ratio of the Sr or Ba carbonate were determined. In addition, the form of the Sr and Ba carbonate resulting from the carbonation reaction with carbonates was identified via XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. In these experiments, the carbonate injection method can remove Sr and Ba chlorides effectively over 99% in both LiCl-KCl eutectic and LiCl molten salt conditions. When Sr and Ba were co-presented in the eutectic molten salt, they were carbonated in a form of Ba 0.5 Sr 0.3 CO 3 . And when Sr was present in LiCl molten salt, it was carbonated in the form of SrCO 3 . Carbonation ratio increased with a decreasing temperature and it was more favorable in the case of a K 2 CO 3 injection than that of Li 2 CO 3 . Based on this experiment, it is postulated that carbonate precipitation method has the potential for removing alkali-earth chlorides from LiCl-KCl eutectic and LiCl molten salts. (authors)

  2. Method removing radioactivity from kaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    A method of reducing the radioactivity found in naturally occurring kaolins to about 40% below its native value, and the leachable radiogenic components to less than 20% is described. This reduction is achieved by removing from the kaolin particles of a size less than 0.5 microns. This removal may be carried out by gravitational settling, flocculation of non-colloidal particles, or acid leaching

  3. Combining Ferric Salt and Cactus Mucilage for Arsenic Removal from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Dawn I; Stebbins, Daniela M; Alcantar, Norma A

    2016-03-01

    New methods to remediate arsenic-contaminated water continue to be studied, particularly to fill the need for accessible methods that can significantly impact developing communities. A combination of cactus mucilage and ferric (Fe(III)) salt was investigated as a flocculation-coagulation system to remove arsenic (As) from water. As(V) solutions, ferric nitrate, and mucilage suspensions were mixed and left to stand for various periods of time. Visual and SEM observations confirmed the flocculation action of the mucilage as visible flocs formed and settled to the bottom of the tubes within 3 min. The colloidal suspensions without mucilage were stable for up to 1 week. Sample aliquots were tested for dissolved and total arsenic by ICP-MS and HGAFS. Mucilage treatment improved As removal (over Fe(III)-only treatment); the system removed 75-96% As in 30 min. At neutral pH, removal was dependent on Fe(III) and mucilage concentration and the age of the Fe(III) solution. The process is fast, achieving maximum removal in 30 min, with the majority of As removed in 10-15 min. Standard jar tests with 1000 μg/L As(III) showed that arsenic removal and settling rates were pH-dependent; As removal was between 52% (high pH) and 66% (low pH).

  4. Method of removing radioactive waste from oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belanger, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a method of removing particulates, radioactive contaminants, and moisture from oil, which consists of: straining out the particulates by passing the oil through a coarse filter screen to a receiving vessel; forming an upper stratum of oil and a lower stratum of sludge, consisting of mud, oil, particulates, and moisture, by heating the upper two-thirds of the receiving vessel; skimming off the stratum of oil from the receiving vessel; transferring the sludge from the receiving vessel to a container; transferring additional separated oil to the receiving vessel; conveying the oil skimmed from the receiving vessel to a mixing vessel; adding an effective amount of Calcium Hypochlorite crystals containing 65% free Chlorine to the mixing vessel to initiate salt formation with the radioactive contaminants; mixing the contents of the mixing vessel for at least ten minutes; transferring the mixture from the mixing vessel to a circulating heater; outputting the mixture from the circulating heater to a second mixing vessel; removing moisture from the oil; and filtering from the oil, the solid radioactive contaminant-salts and residual particulate matter

  5. Influence of road salt on the biological removal of nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliška Horniaková

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Processes occuring in the aeration tank remove nitrogen from the organic substances in wastewater by using the bacterii. Nitrification utilize the metabolism of aerobic bacterii Nitrosomonas, Nitrococus, Nitrospira, Nitrobacter Nitrocystis a Nitrosobolus. Pseudosomonas, Chromobacterium, Denitrobacillus a Micrococus are denitrification anaerobic bacterii. The bacterii are lithotrophic and they are sensitive to pH of wastewater. Chlorine and heavy metals are toxic for these bacterii. For a correct grow, reproduction and metabolism, temperature above 10 ºC is needed but the ideal temperature is from 20 to 30 ºC. An intensive cold reduces or even stops the activity of bacterii.Cold road salt flow to a sewage and then to the aeration basin. Many of nitrification microorganisms dead because their cells lyse and their content flow into the tank. NaCl is toxic for bacterii. From aeration basin a high amount of N-NH4 flows out. The sludge may be a slightly flocculate and the effluent water may be turbid

  6. Electrokinetic removal of Ca(NO3)2 from bricks to avoid salt induced decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2007-01-01

    Salt-induced decay of masonry is a serious threat to our cultural heritage. In buildings near agricultural land or stables the masonry may suffer seriously from salt-induced decay from nitrates. It was investigated in laboratory scale with a single brick if Ca(NO$-3$/) $-2$/ could be removed by e...

  7. Removal of Oil Spills from Salt Water by Magnesium, Calcium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnesium, calcium carbonates and oxides that are widely used in cement industries were employed in studying sorption of petroleum oil spills from salt water at different condition parameters such as temperature, loading weight, degree of salinity. Treatment of magnesium, calcium carbonates and oxides by dodecyl ...

  8. Alternative methods of salt disposal at the seven salt sites for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This study discusses the various alternative salt management techniques for the disposal of excess mined salt at seven potentially acceptable nuclear waste repository sites: Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas; Richton and Cypress Creek Domes, Mississippi; Vacherie Dome, Louisiana; and Davis and Lavender Canyons, Utah. Because the repository development involves the underground excavation of corridors and waste emplacement rooms, in either bedded or domed salt formations, excess salt will be mined and must be disposed of offsite. The salt disposal alternatives examined for all the sites include commercial use, ocean disposal, deep well injection, landfill disposal, and underground mine disposal. These alternatives (and other site-specific disposal methods) are reviewed, using estimated amounts of excavated, backfilled, and excess salt. Methods of transporting the excess salt are discussed, along with possible impacts of each disposal method and potential regulatory requirements. A preferred method of disposal is recommended for each potentially acceptable repository site. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  9. Comparison of Freezing and Hydrate Formation Methods in Removing Chloride and Bromide Ions from Brine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Fattahi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing population and enhanced industrial activities coupled with limitations on freshwater availability have led to efforts to desalinate salt water from the seas. Membrane and thermal technologies are the two commonly used for this purpose. In this study, the direct freezing and hydrate formation techniques were used for salt water desalination. Materials and Methods: Distilled water, sodium chloride, and sodium bromide were used as raw materials in the experiments. The experimental setup included a stationary reactor with two coaxial cylinders, in which ice crystals were deposited outside the cool inner cylinder to increase the salt concentration in the residual brine. An electrical conductivity instrument was used to measure sal removal. Results: Salt removal was shown to decrease with increasing salt concentration in the direct freeze method. A different trend was, however, observed in the hydrate formation method; salt removal was negligible at low concentrations in this method but increased at high concentrations before a constant value was reached. Overall, the hydrate formation recorded a higher salt removal efficiency than the other method. To investigate the effect of anion size on salt removal efficiency, experiments were carried out using NaCl and NaBr, which have the same cation but different anion sizes. Result showed that removal efficiency increased with increasing anion size. Conclusion: It was found that increasing ion radius leads to the lower likelihood of ion presence in the crystal lattice, thereby reducing salt removal efficiency. On the other hand, low concentrations of salt serve as site for the generation of cores, which naturally serve as removal accelerators.

  10. Potential of duckweed (Lemna minor) for removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from water under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunguang; Dai, Zheng; Sun, Hongwen

    2017-02-01

    Duckweed plays a major role in the removal of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from water. To determine the effect of salt stress on the removal of N and P by duckweed, we cultured Lemna minor, a common species of duckweed, in N and P-rich water with NaCl concentrations ranging from 0 to 100 mM for 24 h and 72 h, respectively. The results show that the removal capacity of duckweed for N and P was reduced by salt stress. Higher salt stress with longer cultivation period exerts more injury to duckweed and greater inhibition of N and P removal. Severe salt stress (100 mM NaCl) induced duckweed to release N and P and even resulted in negative removal efficiencies. The results indicate that L. minor should be used to remove N and P from water with salinities below 75 mM NaCl, or equivalent salt stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simultaneous removal of organic matter and salt ions from saline wastewater in bioelectrochemical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Younggy

    2013-01-01

    A new bioelectrochemical system is proposed for simultaneous removal of salinity and organic matter. In this process, exoelectrogenic microorganisms oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons to the anode, hydrogen is evolved at the cathode by supplying additional voltage, and salt is removed from the wastewater due to the electric potential generated and the use of two ion-exchange membranes. Salinity removal (initial conductivity ~40mS/cm) increased from 21 to 84% by increasing the substrate (sodium acetate) from 2 to 8g/L. A total of 72-94% of the chemical oxygen demand was degraded in the anode and cathode chambers, with 1-4% left in the anode chamber and the balance lost through the anion-exchange membrane into the concentrate waste chamber. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 3.6m3-H2/m3-electrolyte per day at an applied potential of 1.2V. The Coulombic efficiency was ~100%, while the cathode recovery varied from 57 to 100%, depending on the extent of methanogenesis. Exoelectrogenic microbes generated high current densities (7.8mA/cm2) at ≤36g/L of total dissolved solids, but >41g/L eliminated current. These results provide a new method for achieving simultaneous removal of salinity and organic matter from a saline wastewater with H2 production. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Compositions and methods for removing arsenic in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok Jagannth [El Cerrito, CA

    2011-02-22

    Compositions and methods and for contaminants from water are provided. The compositions comprise ferric hydroxide and ferric oxyhydride coated substrates for use in removing the contaminant from the water. Contacting water bearing the contaminant with the substrates can substantially reduce contaminant levels therein. Methods of oxidizing the contaminants in water to facilitate their removal by the ferric hydroxide and ferric oxyhydride coated substrates are also provided. The contaminants include, but are not limited to, arsenic, selenium, uranium, lead, cadmium, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium and vanadium, their oxides and soluble salts thereof.

  13. Bile salt deconjugation and cholesterol removal from media by Lactobacillus strains used as probiotics in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Kalavathy; Abdullah, Norhani; Wong, Michael Cvl; Karuthan, Chinna; Ho, Yin Wan

    2010-01-15

    Bile salt deconjugation by Lactobacillus strains is often closely linked to bile tolerance and survival of the strains in the gut and lowering of cholesterol in the host. The present study investigated the deconjugation of bile salts and removal of cholesterol by 12 Lactobacillus strains in vitro. The 12 strains were previously isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of chickens. The 12 Lactobacillus strains could deconjugate sodium glycocholate (GCA, 16.87-100%) and sodium taurocholate (TCA, 1.69-57.43%) bile salts to varying degrees, with all strains except L. salivarius I 24 having a higher affinity for GCA. The 12 Lactobacillus strains also showed significant (P strains (C1, C10 and C16) and between cholesterol removal and deconjugation of TCA (r = 0.38) and GCA (r = 0.70) among the L. brevis strains (I 12, I 23, I 25, I 211 and I 218). In contrast, although L. gallinarum I 16 and I 26 and L. panis C 17 showed high deconjugating activity, there was no correlation between cholesterol removal and deconjugation of bile salts in these strains. The results showed that the 12 Lactobacillus strains were able to deconjugate bile salts and remove cholesterol in vitro, but not all strains with high deconjugating activity removed cholesterol effectively. Copyright (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Salt-and-pepper noise removal using modified mean filter and total variation minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajarian, Mickael; McInroy, John E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.

    2018-01-01

    The search for effective noise removal algorithms is still a real challenge in the field of image processing. An efficient image denoising method is proposed for images that are corrupted by salt-and-pepper noise. Salt-and-pepper noise takes either the minimum or maximum intensity, so the proposed method restores the image by processing the pixels whose values are either 0 or 255 (assuming an 8-bit/pixel image). For low levels of noise corruption (less than or equal to 50% noise density), the method employs the modified mean filter (MMF), while for heavy noise corruption, noisy pixels values are replaced by the weighted average of the MMF and the total variation of corrupted pixels, which is minimized using convex optimization. Two fuzzy systems are used to determine the weights for taking average. To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, several test images with different noise levels are restored, and the results are quantitatively measured by peak signal-to-noise ratio and mean absolute error. The results show that the proposed scheme gives considerable noise suppression up to a noise density of 90%, while almost completely maintaining edges and fine details of the original image.

  15. Does Avicennia germinans expansion alter salt marsh nitrogen removal capacity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatariw, C.; Kleinhuizen, A.; Rajan, S.; Flournoy, N.; Sobecky, P.; Mortazavi, B.

    2017-12-01

    Plant species expansion poses risks to ecosystem services through alterations to plant-microbiome interactions associated with changes to key microbial drivers such as organic carbon (C) substrates, nitrogen (N) availability, and rhizosphere-associated microbial communities. In the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM), warming winter temperatures associated with climate change have promoted Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) expansion into salt marshes. To date, there is limited knowledge regarding the effects of mangrove expansion on vital ecosystem services such as N cycling in the northern GOM. We designed a field-based study to determine the potential effects of mangrove expansion on salt marsh N biogeochemical cycling in the Spartina alterniflora dominated Chandeleur Islands (LA, USA). We used a combination of process rate measurements and metadata to: 1) Determine the impact of mangrove expansion on salt marsh denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), with the goal of quantifying losses or gains in ecosystem services; and 2) identify the mechanisms driving changes in ecosystem services to improve predictions about the impacts of mangrove expansion on salt marsh functional resiliency. The pneumatophore root structure of A. germinans is efficient at delivering oxygen (O2) to sediment, which can promote coupled nitrification-denitrification and decrease sulfide inhibition. We hypothesized that increased sediment O2, when coupled with cooler soil temperatures caused by plant shading, will favor denitrification instead of the DNRA process. An increase in sediment O2, as well as higher N content of A. germinans litter, will also result in a shift in the microbial community. Initial findings indicated that the denitrification pathway dominates over DNRA regardless of vegetation type, with average denitrification rates of 30.1 µmol N kg-1 h-1 versus average DNRA rates of 8.5 µmol N kg-1 h-1. However, neither denitrification nor DNRA rates

  16. Evaluation of Salt Removal from Azulejo Tiles and Mortars using Electrodesalination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren

    2011-01-01

    Azulejo tiles are part of the Portuguese cultural heritage and are worldwide appreciated. The durability of this building material is affected by the accumulation of salts, causing fractures and peeling of the glazing and ultimately leading to the degradation of the tile panels and the irremediable...... loss of historic value. In this work preliminary studies with single tiles presenting an underlying layer of mortar have been conducted to assess the amount of salts that can be removed from the building material using a new technique called “electrodesalination”, in which the salt’s ions...... are transported out from the tiles by applying an electric current on the backside. Results shown here include an assessment of how much of the salts did come out in comparison to what was originally there, and additionally if the electrodesalination succeeded in removing salts down to a point where the tile...

  17. Different Methods for Conditioning Chloride Salt Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.; Fedeli, C.; Capone, M.; Marzo, G.A.; Mariani, M.; Da Ros, M.; Giacobbo, F.; Macerata, E.; Giola, M.

    2015-01-01

    Three different methods have been used to condition chloride salt wastes coming from pyro-processes. Two of them allow to synthesise sodalite, a naturally occurring mineral containing chlorine: the former, starting from Zeolite 4A, which transforms the zeolite into sodalite; the latter, which starts from kaolinite, giving sodalite as well. In addition, a new matrix, termed SAP (SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -P 2 O 5 ), has been synthesised. It is able to form different mineral phases which occlude fission metals. The products from the different processes have been fully characterised. In particular the chemical durability of the final waste forms has been determined using the standard product consistency test. According to the results obtained, SAP seems to be a promising matrix for the incorporation of chloride salt wastes from pyro-processes. Financial support from the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Union (projects ACSEPT, contract FP7-CP-2007- 211 267, and SACSESS, Collaborative Project 323282), as well as from Italian Ministry for Economic Development (Accordo di Programma: Piano Annuale di Realizzazione 2008-2009) is gratefully acknowledged. (authors)

  18. Influence of road salt on the biological removal of nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Eliška Horniaková; Milan Búgel

    2007-01-01

    Processes occuring in the aeration tank remove nitrogen from the organic substances in wastewater by using the bacterii. Nitrification utilize the metabolism of aerobic bacterii Nitrosomonas, Nitrococus, Nitrospira, Nitrobacter Nitrocystis a Nitrosobolus. Pseudosomonas, Chromobacterium, Denitrobacillus a Micrococus are denitrification anaerobic bacterii. The bacterii are lithotrophic and they are sensitive to pH of wastewater. Chlorine and heavy metals are toxic for these bacterii. For a corr...

  19. Method for estimating road salt contamination of Norwegian lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitterød, Nils-Otto; Wike Kronvall, Kjersti; Turtumøygaard, Stein; Haaland, Ståle

    2013-04-01

    Consumption of road salt in Norway, used to improve winter road conditions, has been tripled during the last two decades, and there is a need to quantify limits for optimal use of road salt to avoid further environmental harm. The purpose of this study was to implement methodology to estimate chloride concentration in any given water body in Norway. This goal is feasible to achieve if the complexity of solute transport in the landscape is simplified. The idea was to keep computations as simple as possible to be able to increase spatial resolution of input functions. The first simplification we made was to treat all roads exposed to regular salt application as steady state sources of sodium chloride. This is valid if new road salt is applied before previous contamination is removed through precipitation. The main reasons for this assumption are the significant retention capacity of vegetation; organic matter; and soil. The second simplification we made was that the groundwater table is close to the surface. This assumption is valid for major part of Norway, which means that topography is sufficient to delineate catchment area at any location in the landscape. Given these two assumptions, we applied spatial functions of mass load (mass NaCl pr. time unit) and conditional estimates of normal water balance (volume of water pr. time unit) to calculate steady state chloride concentration along the lake perimeter. Spatial resolution of mass load and estimated concentration along the lake perimeter was 25 m x 25 m while water balance had 1 km x 1 km resolution. The method was validated for a limited number of Norwegian lakes and estimation results have been compared to observations. Initial results indicate significant overlap between measurements and estimations, but only for lakes where the road salt is the major contribution for chloride contamination. For lakes in catchments with high subsurface transmissivity, the groundwater table is not necessarily following the

  20. Heat transfer and flow characteristics of a cooling thimble in a molten salt reactor residual heat removal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonghao Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the passive residual heat removal system of a molten salt reactor, one of the residual heat removal methods is to use the thimble-type heat transfer elements of the drain salt tank to remove the residual heat of fuel salts. An experimental loop is designed and built with a single heat transfer element to analyze the heat transfer and flow characteristics. In this research, the influence of the size of a three-layer thimble-type heat transfer element on the heat transfer rate is analyzed. Two methods are used to obtain the heat transfer rate, and a difference of results between methods is approximately 5%. The gas gap width between the thimble and the bayonet has a large effect on the heat transfer rate. As the gas gap width increases from 1.0 mm to 11.0 mm, the heat transfer rate decreases from 5.2 kW to 1.6 kW. In addition, a natural circulation startup process is described in this paper. Finally, flashing natural circulation instability has been observed in this thimble-type heat transfer element.

  1. The influence of temperature and salt on metal and sediment removal in stormwater biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søberg, Laila C; Viklander, Maria; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Stormwater biofilters are used to treat stormwater runoff. In countries with cold winter climates, biofilters are subject to low temperatures which, in some cases, are combined with potentially high salt concentrations from road de-icing, potentially affecting the biofilter's performance. Since stormwater biofilters have been developed without consideration of their critical winter use, a laboratory study was carried out to evaluate the performance of stormwater biofilters subjected to low and high temperatures, with and without salt. Both factors and their interaction had a significant effect on outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Salt had a negative impact on outflow concentrations, causing lower removal percentages for (especially dissolved) metals, this impact being most pronounced for Cu and Pb. The unrealistic combination of salt with high temperature seemed to further amplify the negative impacts of salt despite the fact that temperature alone did not cause significant differences in outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Still, biofilters showed the ability to treat stormwater efficiently under the simulated winter conditions; outflow concentrations for total metals as a minimum met the class 4 threshold value defined in the Swedish freshwater quality guidelines, while inflow concentrations clearly exceeded the threshold value for class 5. The relatively coarse filter material (which is recommended to facilitate infiltration during winter) did not seem to exacerbate biofilter performance.

  2. Molten Salt Breeder Reactor Analysis Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinsu; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Utilizing the uranium-thorium fuel cycle shows considerable potential for the possibility of MSR. The concept of MSBR should be revised because of molten salt reactor's advantage such as outstanding neutron economy, possibility of continuous online reprocessing and refueling, a high level of inherent safety, and economic benefit by keeping off the fuel fabrication process. For the development of MSR research, this paper provides the MSBR single-cell, two-cell and whole core model for computer code input, and several calculation results including depletion calculation of each models. The calculations are carried out by using MCNP6, a Monte Carlo computer code, which has CINDER90 for depletion calculation using ENDF-VII nuclear data. From the calculation results of various reactor design parameters, the temperature coefficients are all negative at the initial state and MTC becomes positive at the equilibrium state. From the results of core rod worth, the graphite control rod alone cannot makes the core subcritical at initial state. But the equilibrium state, the core can be made subcritical state only by graphite control rods. Through the comparison of the results of each models, the two-cell method can represent the MSBR core model more accurately with a little more computational resources than the single-cell method. Many of the thermal spectrum MSR have adopted a multi-region single-fluid strategy.

  3. Electrokinetic salt removal from porous building materials using ion exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamran, K.; Van Soestbergen, M.; Pel, L.

    The removal of salt from porous building materials under the influence of an applied voltage gradient normally results in high pH gradients due to the formation of protons and hydroxyl ions at the electrodes. The formed acidic and alkaline regions not only lead to disintegration of the porous

  4. Electrokinetic salt removal from porous building materials using ion exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamran, K.; Soestbergen, van M.; Pel, L.

    2012-01-01

    The removal of salt from porous building materials under the influence of an applied voltage gradient normally results in high pH gradients due to the formation of protons and hydroxyl ions at the electrodes. The formed acidic and alkaline regions not only lead to disintegration of the porous

  5. Method to remove methyl iodide131 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, V.R.; Blachly, C.H.

    1977-01-01

    A two-stage impregnation process for charcoal is presented which is to be used for radioactive iodine or methyl iodide removal from the waste gas of a nuclear reactor. In the first stage, the coal is treated at pH 10 with an aqueous mixture of a salt of iodic acid (hypoiodite, iodate, or periodate) with iodine or iodide. In the second stage, impregnation with a tertiary amine occurs. The concentrations are chosen so that the charcoal will take up between 0.5 and 4% by weight of iodine. (UWI) [de

  6. Small Column Ion Exchange Analysis for Removal of Cesium from SRS Low Curie Salt Solutions Using Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALEMAN, SEBASTIAN

    2004-01-01

    Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) researchers modeled ion exchange removal of cesium from dissolved salt waste solutions. The results assist in evaluating proposed configurations for an ion exchange process to remove residual cesium from low curie waste streams. A process for polishing (i.e., removing small amounts) of cesium may prove useful should supernate draining fail to meet the Low Curie Salt (LCS) target limit of 0.1 Ci of Cs-137 per gallon of salt solution. Cesium loading isotherms and column breakthrough curves for Low Curie dissolved salt solutions were computed to provide performance predictions for various column designs

  7. Method for removing radioactive iodine and radioactive organic iodides from effluent gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A method and composition for removing radioactive and organic iodides from an 131 I-containing off-gas stream is provided. The composition for removal by adsorption is a ceramic material with a surface area of from about 5 m 2 /g to about 250 m 2 /g impregnated with a metallic salt. The method for removing the iodine or iodide is accomplished by passing the off-gas stream over the ceramic material impregnated with the metallic salt. It finds special application in air filters for nuclear power plants

  8. Removal of amino groups from anilines through diazonium salt-based reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Linman; Qiu, Guanyinsheng; Gao, Yueqiu; Wu, Jie

    2014-09-28

    This minireview describes the applications of in situ generated diazonium salts from anilines in organic synthesis. In situ generation of diazonium salts from anilines represents an efficient and practical pathway, leading to a series of useful structures. In these transformations, the amino group of aniline formally acts as a leaving group. Two distinctive kinds of mechanisms, including transition metal (especially palladium)-catalyzed oxidative addition-reductive elimination and a radical process, are involved in the removal of amino groups from anilines, and both catalytic processes are described in this minireview.

  9. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  10. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  11. Method for the production of uranium chloride salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Brian R.; Mariani, Robert D.

    2013-07-02

    A method for the production of UCl.sub.3 salt without the use of hazardous chemicals or multiple apparatuses for synthesis and purification is provided. Uranium metal is combined in a reaction vessel with a metal chloride and a eutectic salt- and heated to a first temperature under vacuum conditions to promote reaction of the uranium metal with the metal chloride for the production of a UCl.sub.3 salt. After the reaction has run substantially to completion, the furnace is heated to a second temperature under vacuum conditions. The second temperature is sufficiently high to selectively vaporize the chloride salts and distill them into a condenser region.

  12. The effectiveness of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) on the impurities removal of saturated salt solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiastuti, C.; Ngatilah, Y.; Sumada, K.; Muljani, S.

    2018-01-01

    Increasing the quality of salt can be done through various methods such as washing (hydro-extraction), re-crystallization, ion exchange methods and others. In the process of salt quality improvement by re-crystallization method where salt product diluted with water to form saturated solution and re-crystallized through heating process. The quality of the salt produced is influenced by the quality of the dissolved salt and the crystallization mechanism applied. In this research is proposed a concept that before the saturated salt solution is recrystallized added a chemical for removal of the impurities such as magnesium ion (Mg), calcium (Ca), potassium (K) and sulfate (SO4) is contained in a saturated salt solution. The chemical reagents that used are sodium hydroxide (NaOH) 2 N and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) 2 N. This research aims to study effectiveness of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate on the impurities removal of magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), potassium (K) and sulfate (SO4). The results showed that the addition of sodium hydroxide solution can be decreased the impurity ions of magnesium (Mg) 95.2%, calcium ion (Ca) 45%, while the addition of sodium carbonate solution can decreased magnesium ion (Mg) 66.67% and calcium ion (Ca) 77.5%, but both types of materials are not degradable sulfate ions (SO4). The sodium hydroxide solution more effective to decrease magnesium ion than sodium carbonate solution, and the sodium carbonate solution more effective to decrease calcium ion than sodium hydroxide solution.

  13. Development of a mathematical model of a packed column for benzene removal from salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeton, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model of a packed column was developed to describe the removal of benzene from radioactive salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. The model was developed from existing, generalized mass transfer correlations for randomly dumped packing, and the correlations were adapted for structured packing. Thermophysical data specific to the solutions of interest were incorporated into the model. Verification of the code was completed using operating data from stripping columns at other locations

  14. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-01-01

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material

  15. A spray based method for biofilm removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cense, A.W.

    2005-01-01

    Biofilm growth on human teeth is the cause of oral diseases such as caries (tooth decay), gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) and periodontitis (inflammation of the tooth bone). In this thesis, a water based cleaning method is designed for removal of oral biofilms, or dental plaque. The first part

  16. ELECTROCOAGULATION METHOD FOR COLOUR REMOVAL IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    is a multi-stage process that requires considerable land area and a continual supply of chemicals ... In view of this, it was necessary to develop and optimize an effective electrochemical method for colour removal using a two-electrode system.

  17. A Simple Halide-to-Anion Exchange Method for Heteroaromatic Salts and Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Mesquida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A broad and simple method permitted halide ions in quaternary heteroaromatic and ammonium salts to be exchanged for a variety of anions using an anion exchange resin (A− form in non-aqueous media. The anion loading of the AER (OH− form was examined using two different anion sources, acids or ammonium salts, and changing the polarity of the solvents. The AER (A− form method in organic solvents was then applied to several quaternary heteroaromatic salts and ILs, and the anion exchange proceeded in excellent to quantitative yields, concomitantly removing halide impurities. Relying on the hydrophobicity of the targeted ion pair for the counteranion swap, organic solvents with variable polarity were used, such as CH3OH, CH3CN and the dipolar nonhydroxylic solvent mixture CH3CN:CH2Cl2 (3:7 and the anion exchange was equally successful with both lipophilic cations and anions.

  18. Iodine removing method in organic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Sakurai, Manabu

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively remove iodine in an organic solvent to thereby remove iodine in the solvent that can be re-used or put to purning treatment. Method: Organic solvent formed from wastes of nuclear facilities is mixed with basic lead acetate, or silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with such a compound to adsorb iodine in the organic solvent to the basic lead acetate. Then, iodine in the organic solvent is removed by separating to eliminate the basic lead acetate adsorbing iodine from the organic solvent or by passing the organic solvent through a tower or column charged or pre-coated with silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with lead acetate. By using basic lead acetate as the adsorbents, iodine can effective by adsorbed and eliminated. Thus, the possibility of circumstantial release of iodine can be reduced upon reusing or burning treatment of the organic solvent. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Removal of arsenic from water by Friedel's salt (FS: 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCl2·10H2O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danni; Jia, Yongfeng; Ma, Jiayu; Li, Zhibao

    2011-11-15

    Low levels of arsenic can be effectively removed from water by adsorption onto various materials and searching for low-cost, high-efficiency new adsorbents has been a hot topic in recent years. In the present study, the performance of Friedel's salt (FS: 3CaO·Al(2)O(3)·CaCl(2)·10H(2)O), a layered double hydroxide (LDHs), as an adsorbent for arsenic removal from aqueous solution was investigated. Friedel's salt was synthesized at lower temperature (50°C) compared to traditional autoclave methods by reaction of calcium chloride with sodium aluminate. Kinetic study revealed that adsorption of arsenate by Friedel's salt was fast in the first 12h and equilibrium was achieved within 48 h. The adsorption kinetics are well described by second-order Lageren equation. The adsorption capacity of the synthesized sorbent for arsenate at pH 4 and 7 calculated from Langmuir adsorption isotherms was 11.85 and 7.80 mg/g, respectively. Phosphate and silicate markedly decreased the removal of arsenate, especially at higher pH, but sulfate was found to suppress arsenate adsorption at lower pH and the adverse effect was disappeared at pH ≥ 6. Common metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) enhanced arsenate adsorption. The results suggest that Friedel's salt is a potential cost-effective adsorbent for arsenate removal in water treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Salt removal using multiple microbial desalination cells under continuous flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Youpeng

    2013-05-01

    Four microbial desalination cells (MDCs) were hydraulically connected and operated under continuous flow conditions. The anode solution from the first MDC flowed into the cathode, and then on to the anode of the next reactor, which avoided pH imbalances that inhibit bacterial metabolism. The salt solution also moved through each desalination chamber in series. Increasing the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of the salt solution from 1 to 2. days increased total NaCl removal from 76 ± 1% to 97 ± 1%, but coulombic efficiencies decreased from 49 ± 4% to 35 ± 1%. Total COD removals were similar at both HRTs (60 ± 2%, 2. days; 59 ± 2%, 1. day). Community analysis of the anode biofilms showed that bacteria most similar to the xylose fermenting bacterium Klebsiella ornithinolytica predominated in the anode communities, and sequences most similar to Geobacter metallireducens were identified in all MDCs except the first one. These results demonstrated successful operation of a series of hydraulically connected MDCs and good desalination rates. © 2013 Elsevier B.V..

  1. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phytodesalinization potential of Typha angustifolia, Juncus maritimus, and Eleocharis palustris for removal of de-icing salts from runoff water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesdon, Gaëlle; de Santiago-Martín, Ana; Galvez-Cloutier, Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Typha angustifolia, Juncus maritimus, and Eleocharis palustris were evaluated for de-icing salt removal from runoff water. Plants were exposed to a range of de-icing salt levels (0.2, 0.7, 4, 8, and 13 dS m(-1)) in laboratory-scale subsurface constructed wetlands (CWs) for 2 months under greenhouse conditions. Effluent characteristics, plant height, biomass, and Cl and Na removal rates and uptake were monitored. More water volume was retained in CWs of T. angustifolia (∼60 %) than of J. maritimus and E. palustris (∼37.5 %), which accounted for the electrical conductivity increase in effluents (1.3-1.9-fold). Based on the NaCl removal rate, T. angustifolia showed the greatest phytodesalinization ability (31-60 %) with the highest removal at the lowest salt levels (0.2-0.7 dS m(-1)), followed by J. maritimus (22-36 %) without differences in removal among levels, and E. palustris (3-26 %) presenting a removal rate highly decreased with increasing salt levels. Plant height and biomass were stimulated at low de-icing salt levels, but, at higher levels, T. angustifolia and E. palustris growth was inhibited (tolerance index ∼67 and 10 %, respectively, in the worst cases). Salt amounts in aboveground biomass in g m(-2) differed among levels and ranged as follows: 13.6-29.1 (Cl), 4.2-9.3 (Na; T. angustifolia); 7.0-12.0 (Cl), 2.7-6.4 (Na; J. maritimus); and 0.9-7.6 (Cl), 0.3-1.6 (Na; E. palustris). Chloride and Na translocation decreased with de-icing salt increase in T. angustifolia, while no significant differences were found in J. maritimus, which is interesting for harvesting purposes.

  3. Behavior study on Na heat pipe in passive heat removal system of new concept molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chenglong; Tian Wenxi; Su Guanghui; Zhang Dalin; Wu Yingwei; Qiu Suizheng

    2013-01-01

    The high temperature Na heat pipe is an effective device for transporting heat, which is characterized by remarkable advantages in conductivity, isothermally and passively working. The application of Na heat pipe on passive heat removal system of new concept molten salt reactor (MSR) is significant. The transient performance of high temperature Na heat pipe was simulated by numerical method under the MSR accident. The model of the Na heat pipe was composed of three conjugate heat transfer zones, i.e. the vapor, wick and wall. Based on finite element method, the governing equations were solved by making use of FORTRAN to acquire the profiles of the temperature, velocity and pressure for the heat pipe transient operation. The results show that the high temperature Na heat pipe has a good performance on operating characteristics and high heat transfer efficiency from the frozen state. (authors)

  4. Innovative methods to reduce salt water intrusion in harbours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenenboom, J.; Uittenbogaard, R.; Hulsen, L.; van der Kaaij, T.; Kielen, N.

    2017-12-01

    The availability of fresh water in densely populated estuarine environments will in the future more often be threatened due to both human (e.g. channel deepening) and natural (sea-level rise, storm surges, extremely low river discharges) causes. Here, the salt water intrusion into the New Waterway, the main navigation channel of the port of Rotterdam, is used as a case study to elaborate on two innovative ways to mitigate the effects of salt water intrusion. The first method is based on the concept that vertical mixing of a salt wedge reduces its intrusion length. The idea is to equip a vessel with cranes that hold perforated tubes close to the bed alongside the vessel. By connecting compressors to the perforated tubes, a bubble screen with an adjustable vertical location can be created. Since the horizontal location of the bubble screens is not fixed, the vessel can sail in the vicinity of the moving salt wedge therewith increasing the effectiveness of the method. Another advantage of this intervention is that it can be deployed temporarily when the urgency for the prevention of salt water intrusion is high. The second method originates from the Port of Rotterdam Authority and is inspired by a small bypass that is present between two parallel channels (New Waterway and Caland Canal) connecting the North Sea to the Port of Rotterdam. Due to the different hydrodynamic characteristics of the hinterland of both channels, a difference in salinity and water level is present between both ends of the bypass. As a result, a lateral inflow of water into the New Waterway occurs at the same moment that the flood velocities transport saline water landwards. The lateral inflow of water into this channel has no momentum in the landward direction and therefore decreases the landward flow velocity and therewith the salt water intrusion. In addition, the inflow drives a vertical circulation that mixes the water column close to the bypass. Similar to the bubble screens mentioned

  5. Reducing Moose-Vehicle Collisions through Salt Pool Removal and Displacement: an Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Grosman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1990 and 2002, more than 200 moose-vehicle collisions occurred each year in Quebec, including about 50/yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve. One cause is the presence of roadside salt pools that attract moose near roads in the spring and summer. Using the computer simulation technique of agent-based modeling, this study investigated whether salt pool removal and displacement, i.e., a compensatory salt pool set up 100 to 1500 m away from the road shoulder, would reduce the number of moose-vehicle collisions. Moose road crossings were used as a proxy measure. A GPS telemetry data set consisting of approximately 200,000 locations of 47 moose over 2 yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve was used as an empirical basis for the model. Twelve moose were selected from this data set and programmed in the model to forage and travel in the study area. Five parameters with an additional application of stochasticity were used to determine moose movement between forest polygons. These included food quality; cover quality, i.e., protection from predators and thermal stress; proximity to salt pools; proximity to water; and slope. There was a significant reduction in road crossings when either all or two thirds of the roadside salt pools were removed, with and/or without salt pool displacement. With 100% salt pool removal, the reduction was greater (49% without compensatory salt pools than with them (18%. When two thirds of the salt pools were removed, the reduction was the same with and without compensatory salt pools (16%. Although moose-vehicle collisions are not a significant mortality factor for the moose population in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve, in areas with higher road densities, hunting pressure, and/or predator densities it could mean the difference between a stable and a declining population, and salt pool removal could be part of a good mitigation plan to halt population declines. This model can be used, with improvements such as

  6. Method of arsenic removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2010-10-26

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  7. Kinetic studies on the removal of fission products from molten salt using Zeolite-4A. Contributed Paper RD-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Suheel; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Perumal, S.V.; Nagarajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt electrorefining process is one of the nonaqueous processes, being developed for reprocessing metallic spent fuel. This process uses liquid metals and molten salts and is operated at elevated temperatures. In the electro-refining process, the spent fuel is used as the anode of the electro-refiner and the actinide elements in the spent fuel are electrotransported from the anode through the molten salt electrolyte onto a suitable cathode where they are collected as metals in pure form. After some batches are processed, chlorides of fission products such as alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth metals accumulate in the electrolyte salt. The accumulated FPs in the salt will be removed by adsorption/ion-exchange by using zeolite columns. Hence, kinetic studies on the adsorption of Cs, Ba which are some of the major FP products in LiCI-KCI eutectic, have been carried out

  8. Technetium removal column flow testing with alkaline, high salt, radioactive tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, D.L. Jr.; Kurath, D.E.; Golcar, G.R.; Conradson, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes two bench-scale column tests conducted to demonstrate the removal of Tc-99 from actual alkaline high salt radioactive waste. The waste used as feed for these tests was obtained from the Hanford double shell tank AW-101, which contains double shell slurry feed (DSSF). The tank sample was diluted to approximately 5 M Na with water, and most of the Cs-137 was removed using crystalline silicotitanates. The tests were conducted with two small columns connected in series, containing, 10 mL of either a sorbent, ABEC 5000 (Eichrom Industries, Inc.), or an anion exchanger Reillex trademark-HPQ (Reilly Industries, Inc.). Both materials are selective for pertechnetate anion (TcO 4 - ). The process steps generally followed those expected in a full-scale process and included (1) resin conditioning, (2) loading, (3) caustic wash to remove residual feed and prevent the precipitation of Al(OH) 3 , and (4) elution. A small amount of Tc-99m tracer was added as ammonium pertechnetate to the feed and a portable GEA counter was used to closely monitor the process. Analyses of the Tc-99 in the waste was performed using ICP-MS with spot checks using radiochemical analysis. Technetium x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) spectra of 6 samples were also collected to determine the prevalence of non-pertechnetate species [e.g. Tc(IV)

  9. Testing of compact electrostatic precipitator for removal of hygroscopic ammonium salts from flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iller, E.; Chmielewska, D.K.; Koczy, B.; Rygula, Cz.

    2002-01-01

    Among many new technologies for purification of flue gases the process using electron beam for simultaneous removal of SO 2 and NO x is developing successfully and is entering to industrial applications. The product being the mixture of ammonium sulfate and nitrate is formed during the process of pollution reduction. Solid particles of this product are hydroscopic aerosol with submicron size. Results of investigation of ammonium aerosol salts removal by electrostatic precipitator of special construction co-operating with irradiation purification of the flue gas installation placed in EC 'Kaweczyn' area have been presented in the report. Influence of different parameters on the efficiency is discussed as well. Maximum removal efficiency was equal to 99.7%. Particulate emission and aerosol particle sizes distribution in the electrostatic precipitator inlet and outlet were measured using universal cascade impactor Andersen Mark III. Chemical composition of the soluble part of the by-product collected in electrostatic precipitator was examined with ion chromatography. The insoluble part and water content of the samples was measured as well. (author)

  10. Reducing Moose-Vehicle Collisions through Salt Pool Removal and Displacement: an Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Paul D. Grosman; Jochen A. G. Jaeger; Pascale M. Biron; Christian Dussault; Jean-Pierre Ouellet

    2009-01-01

    Between 1990 and 2002, more than 200 moose-vehicle collisions occurred each year in Quebec, including about 50/yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve. One cause is the presence of roadside salt pools that attract moose near roads in the spring and summer. Using the computer simulation technique of agent-based modeling, this study investigated whether salt pool removal and displacement, i.e., a compensatory salt pool set up 100 to 1500 m away from the road shoulder, would reduce the number of ...

  11. Removal of Cr(III ions from salt solution by nanofiltration: experimental and modelling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik-Klimczak Anna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was experimental and modelling analysis of the nanofiltration process used for the removal of chromium(III ions from salt solution characterized by low pH. The experimental results were interpreted with Donnan and Steric Partitioning Pore (DSP model based on the extended Nernst-Planck equation. In this model, one of the main parameters, describing retention of ions by the membrane, is pore dielectric constant. In this work, it was identified for various process pressures and feed compositions. The obtained results showed the satisfactory agreement between the experimental and modelling data. It means that the DSP model may be helpful for the monitoring of nanofiltration process applied for treatment of chromium tannery wastewater.

  12. Statistical methods for mechanistic model validation: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggett, D.L.

    1988-07-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's Salt Repository Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying the emplacement of nuclear waste containers in a salt repository. One objective of the SRP program is to develop an overall waste package component model which adequately describes such phenomena as container corrosion, waste form leaching, spent fuel degradation, etc., which are possible in the salt repository environment. The form of this model will be proposed, based on scientific principles and relevant salt repository conditions with supporting data. The model will be used to predict the future characteristics of the near field environment. This involves several different submodels such as the amount of time it takes a brine solution to contact a canister in the repository, how long it takes a canister to corrode and expose its contents to the brine, the leach rate of the contents of the canister, etc. These submodels are often tested in a laboratory and should be statistically validated (in this context, validate means to demonstrate that the model adequately describes the data) before they can be incorporated into the waste package component model. This report describes statistical methods for validating these models. 13 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  13. Unsupervised detection of salt marsh platforms: a topographic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Guillaume C. H.; Mudd, Simon M.; Clubb, Fiona J.

    2018-03-01

    Salt marshes filter pollutants, protect coastlines against storm surges, and sequester carbon, yet are under threat from sea level rise and anthropogenic modification. The sustained existence of the salt marsh ecosystem depends on the topographic evolution of marsh platforms. Quantifying marsh platform topography is vital for improving the management of these valuable landscapes. The determination of platform boundaries currently relies on supervised classification methods requiring near-infrared data to detect vegetation, or demands labour-intensive field surveys and digitisation. We propose a novel, unsupervised method to reproducibly isolate salt marsh scarps and platforms from a digital elevation model (DEM), referred to as Topographic Identification of Platforms (TIP). Field observations and numerical models show that salt marshes mature into subhorizontal platforms delineated by subvertical scarps. Based on this premise, we identify scarps as lines of local maxima on a slope raster, then fill landmasses from the scarps upward, thus isolating mature marsh platforms. We test the TIP method using lidar-derived DEMs from six salt marshes in England with varying tidal ranges and geometries, for which topographic platforms were manually isolated from tidal flats. Agreement between manual and unsupervised classification exceeds 94 % for DEM resolutions of 1 m, with all but one site maintaining an accuracy superior to 90 % for resolutions up to 3 m. For resolutions of 1 m, platforms detected with the TIP method are comparable in surface area to digitised platforms and have similar elevation distributions. We also find that our method allows for the accurate detection of local block failures as small as 3 times the DEM resolution. Detailed inspection reveals that although tidal creeks were digitised as part of the marsh platform, unsupervised classification categorises them as part of the tidal flat, causing an increase in false negatives and overall platform

  14. Unsupervised detection of salt marsh platforms: a topographic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. H. Goodwin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Salt marshes filter pollutants, protect coastlines against storm surges, and sequester carbon, yet are under threat from sea level rise and anthropogenic modification. The sustained existence of the salt marsh ecosystem depends on the topographic evolution of marsh platforms. Quantifying marsh platform topography is vital for improving the management of these valuable landscapes. The determination of platform boundaries currently relies on supervised classification methods requiring near-infrared data to detect vegetation, or demands labour-intensive field surveys and digitisation. We propose a novel, unsupervised method to reproducibly isolate salt marsh scarps and platforms from a digital elevation model (DEM, referred to as Topographic Identification of Platforms (TIP. Field observations and numerical models show that salt marshes mature into subhorizontal platforms delineated by subvertical scarps. Based on this premise, we identify scarps as lines of local maxima on a slope raster, then fill landmasses from the scarps upward, thus isolating mature marsh platforms. We test the TIP method using lidar-derived DEMs from six salt marshes in England with varying tidal ranges and geometries, for which topographic platforms were manually isolated from tidal flats. Agreement between manual and unsupervised classification exceeds 94 % for DEM resolutions of 1 m, with all but one site maintaining an accuracy superior to 90 % for resolutions up to 3 m. For resolutions of 1 m, platforms detected with the TIP method are comparable in surface area to digitised platforms and have similar elevation distributions. We also find that our method allows for the accurate detection of local block failures as small as 3 times the DEM resolution. Detailed inspection reveals that although tidal creeks were digitised as part of the marsh platform, unsupervised classification categorises them as part of the tidal flat, causing an increase in false negatives

  15. [Influence of removing iodized salt on children's goiter status in areas with high iodine in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shengmin; Xu, Dong; Wang, Yuchun; Du, Yonggui; Jia, Lihui; Liang, Suoli

    2015-05-01

    To explore the changes of goiter prevalence of children living in areas with high iodine in drinking water after removing iodized salt from their diet. Three towns with median water iodine of 150 - 300 μg/L were selected randomly in Hengshui city of Hebei province of China. A total of 452 and 459 children in the 3 towns were randomly selected to measure thyroid volume by ultrasound before and after removing iodized salt, respectively. Their goiter status was judged using the criteria of age-specific thyroid volume recommended by the WHO. After removing iodized salt, the overall goiter prevalence in the three towns significantly decreased from 24.56% (111/452) to 5.88% (27/459) (P < 0.01). The goiter prevalence in 8, 9 and 10 year-old children decreased respectively from 33.70% (31/92), 23.32% (45/193) and 20.96% (35/167) to 6.10% (10/164), 5.52% (9/163) and 6.06% (8/132). The goiter prevalence in boys and girls decreased from 27.05% (66/244) and 21.63% (45/208 ) to 6.66% (15/226 ) and 5.15% (12/233), respectively. The decreases in children's goiter prevalence across gender and age group were all significant. Children's goiter prevalence decreased significantly after removing iodized salt from their diet for about one and half years in the HIA in Hebei province.

  16. Method for treating electrolyte to remove Li.sub.2 O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Miller, William E.; Johnson, Gerald K.; Willit, James L.

    1998-01-01

    A method of removing Li.sub.2 O present in an electrolyte predominantly of LiCl and KCl. The electrolyte is heated to a temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. and then Al is introduced into the electrolyte in an amount in excess of the stoichiometric amount needed to convert the Li.sub.2 O to a Li-Al alloy and lithium aluminate salt. The salt and aluminum are maintained in contact with agitation for a time sufficient to convert the Li.sub.2 O.

  17. Method for treating electrolyte to remove Li{sub 2}O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.; Johnson, G.K.; Willit, J.L.

    1998-01-20

    A method is described for removing Li{sub 2}O present in an electrolyte predominantly of LiCl and KCl. The electrolyte is heated to a temperature not less than about 500 C and then Al is introduced into the electrolyte in an amount in excess of the stoichiometric amount needed to convert the Li{sub 2}O to a Li-Al alloy and lithium aluminate salt. The salt and aluminum are maintained in contact with agitation for a time sufficient to convert the Li{sub 2}O.

  18. A simple, rapid method to isolate salt glands for three-dimensional visualization, fluorescence imaging and cytological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Tit-Meng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some plants inhabiting saline environment remove salts via the salt glands embedded in the epidermal tissues. Cytological studies of salt glands will provide valuable information to our understanding of the secretory process. Previous studies on salt gland histology relied mainly on two-dimensional microscopic observations of microtome sections. Optical sectioning properties of confocal laser scanning microscope offer alternative approach for obtaining three-dimensional structural information of salt glands. Difficulty in light penetration through intact leaves and interference from neighbouring leaf cells, however, impede the acquiring of good optical salt gland sections and limit its applications in salt gland imaging. Freeing the glands from adjacent leaf tissues will allow better manipulations for three-dimensional imaging through confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Here, we present a simple and fast method for the isolation of individual salt glands released from the interference of neighbouring cells. About 100-200 salt glands could be isolated from just one cm2 of Avicennia officinalis leaf within hours and microscopic visualization of isolated salt glands was made possible within a day. Using these isolated glands, confocal laser scanning microscopic techniques could be applied and better resolution salt gland images could be achieved. By making use of their intrinsic fluorescent properties, optical sections of the gland cells could be acquired without the use of fluorescent probes and the corresponding three-dimensional images constructed. Useful cytological information of the salt gland cells could also be obtained through the applications of fluorescent dyes (e.g., LysoTracker® Red, FM®4-64, Texas Red®. Conclusions The study of salt glands directly at the glandular level are made possible with the successful isolation of these specialized structures. Preparation of materials for subsequent microscopic

  19. Method for converting UF5 to UF4 in a molten fluoride salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, M.R.; Bamberge, C.E.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    The subject relates to fuel preparation for molten salt breeder reactors, and more particularly to the reconstitution of spent molten fuel salt after fission product removal. During the course of reactor operation, fission products including rare earths and bred-in protactinium build up in the fuel salt and adversely affect the nuclear properties of the fuel. In order to more efficiently operate the reactor, the level of neutron poison fission products must be kept at a minimum. This is accomplished by continuously removing spent fuel from the primary circuit, processing it to remove fission products, and returning the reprocessed molten salt to the primary circuit. It is desirable for safety and economy that the fuel processing plant be a component of the reactor itself and that the salt be kept in the molten state throughout the processing system. (auth)

  20. Investigation of Climate Change Impact on Salt Lake by Statistical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Orhan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to investigate climate change impact that have been occurred on Salt Lake located in the central Anatolia is one of the area that has been faced to extinction. In order to monitor current status of the Salt Lake, Landsat satellite images has been obtained between the year of 2000 and 2014 (for the months of February, May, August and November. Satellite images has been processed by using ArcGIS and ERDAS softwares and the water surface area has been determined. The time series of water surface areas has been analyzed with auto-correlation method and repeated pattern has been detected. The seasonal part of the time series which period is 1 year and causes about 400 km² fluctuations has been removed with Moving Average filter, successfully. As a result of filtration process, non-seasonal time series of water surface area of Salt Lake were obtained. It is understood from the non-seasonal time series that the water surface area showed variability between 2000 and 2010 and after 2010 it is stable until 2014. In order to explain the variability, meteorological data (precipitation and temperature of the surrounding area has been acquired from the related service. The cross-correlation analyses has been performed with the movement of the water surface area and meteorological time series. As a result of analysis, the relationship between water surface changes in Salt Lake and meteorological data have correlated up to 80%. Consequently, several conclusion have been detected that the topography of the region play a direct role of the correlation coefficients and the water surface changes are effected from the environmental events that is occurred in the south of Salt Lake sub-Basin.

  1. Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine and recovery of barium as a barium salt mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Zvimba, John N; Mulopo, Jean; Motaung, Solly

    2013-01-01

    Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine using barium hydroxide and recovery of the barium salts has been investigated. The sodium sulphate-rich brine treated with different dosages of barium hydroxide to precipitate barium sulphate showed sulphate removal from 13.5 g/L to less than 400 mg/L over 60 min using a barium to sulphate molar ratio of 1.1. The thermal conversion of precipitated barium sulphate to barium sulphide achieved a conversion yield of 85% using coal as both a reducing agent and an energy source. The recovery of a pure mixture of barium salts from barium sulphide, which involved dissolution of barium sulphide and reaction with ammonium hydroxide resulted in recovery of a mixture of barium carbonate (62%) and barium hydroxide (38%), which is a critical input raw material for barium salts based acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination technologies. Under alkaline conditions of this barium salt mixture recovery process, ammonia gas is given off, while hydrogen sulfide is retained in solution as bisulfide species, and this provides basis for ammonium hydroxide separation and recovery for reuse, with hydrogen sulfide also recoverable for further industrial applications such as sulfur production by subsequent stripping.

  2. Performance assessment plans and methods for the Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This document presents the preliminary plans and anticipated methods of the Salt Repository Project (SRP) for assessing the postclosure and radiological aspects of preclosure performance of a nuclear waste repository in salt. This plan is intended to be revised on an annual basis. The emphasis in this preliminary effort is on the method of conceptually dividing the system into three subsystems (the very near field, the near field, and the far field) and applying models to analyze the behavior of each subsystem and its individual components. The next revision will contain more detailed plans being developed as part of Site Characterization Plan (SCP) activities. After a brief system description, this plan presents the performance targets which have been established for nuclear waste repositories by regulatory agencies (Chapter 3). The SRP approach to modeling, including sensitivity and uncertainty techniques is then presented (Chapter 4). This is followed by a discussion of scenario analysis (Chapter 5), a presentation of preliminary data needs as anticipated by the SRP (Chapter 6), and a presentation of the SRP approach to postclosure assessment of the very near field, the near field, and the far field (Chapters 7, 8, and 9, respectively). Preclosure radiological assessment is discussed in Chapter 10. Chapter 11 presents the SRP approach to code verification and validation. Finally, the Appendix lists all computer codes anticipated for use in performance assessments. The list of codes will be updated as plans are revised

  3. Removal of salt from high-level waste tanks by density-driven circulation or mechanical agitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-two high-level waste storage tanks at the Savannah River Plant are to be retired in the tank replacement/waste transfer program. The salt-removal portion of this program requires dissolution of about 19 million liters of salt cake. Steam circulation jets were originally proposed to dissolve the salt cake. However, the jets heated the waste tank to 80 to 90 0 C. This high temperature required a long cooldown period before transfer of the supernate by jet, and increased the risk of stress-corrosion cracking in these older tanks. A bench-scale investigation at the Savannah River Laboratory developed two alternatives to steam-jet circulation. One technique was density-driven circulation, which in bench tests dissolved salt at the same rate as a simulated steam circulation jet but at a lower temperature. The other technique was mechanical agitation, which dissolved the salt cake faster and required less fresh water than either density-driven circulation or the simulated steam circulation jet. Tests in an actual waste tank verified bench-scale results and demonstrated the superiority of mechanical agitation

  4. Application Of Vacuum Salt Distillation Technology For The Removal Of Fluoride And Chloride From Legacy Fissile Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

    2011-01-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO 2 ). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ), calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ), and plutonium fluoride (PuF 3 ) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl 2 , CaF 2 and PuF 3 below 1000 C using VSD technology.

  5. Study of methods for removing strontium, plutonium, and ruthenium from Savannah River Plant waste supernate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.

    1976-06-01

    As a part of long-term waste management studies at the Savannah River Laboratory, tests were made to study removal of strontium, plutonium, and ruthenium from simulated and actual waste supernates. Plutonium was sorbed by Duolite ARC-359 ion exchange resin, the same resin that is used to remove cesium from waste supernate. Strontium was removed from supernate by sorption on a chelating resin Chelex 100, or by precipitation as Sr 3 (PO 4 ) 2 . Activities of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and 238-241 Pu remaining in processed waste supernate should be 1-10 nanocuries of each element per gram of salt. Of the methods that were tested, none was adequate for plant-scale removal of ruthenium

  6. Soft Shadow Removal and Image Evaluation Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Gryka, M.

    2016-01-01

    High-level image manipulation techniques are in increasing demand as they allow users to intuitively edit photographs to achieve desired effects quickly. As opposed to low-level manipulations, which provide complete freedom, but also require specialized skills and significant effort, high-level editing operations, such as removing objects (inpainting), relighting and material editing, need to respect semantic constraints. As such they shift the burden from the user to the algorithm to only al...

  7. Tritium removing method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, Hisao.

    1993-01-01

    A part of cleaned gases introduced from the exit of an adsorber is used for regeneration of the adsorbent which removes tritium water by processing gases to be cleaned, and off-gases are dehydrated and joined with the gases to be cleaned before compression. Further, the exits of a plurality of adsorbers for the cleaned gases are in communication with each other by a regenerated gas supply channel having a heater, and a circulation channel is disposed for circulating the regenerated gases on the suction side of the compressor by way of a cooling dehydration device. Then, it is not necessary to prepare exclusive gases for regeneration, and in the regeneration system, only heating to the temperature for regeneration is sufficient for cleaned gases. Further, regenerated gases can be introduced only by switching of adsorption and removing steps and by operating valves for regeneration and, in addition, gases after regeneration are circulated after joining to the gases to be cleaned. Accordingly, it is not necessary to completely remove tritium water upon dehydration treatment and cold trap is also unnecessary. (N.H.)

  8. Technetium in alkaline, high-salt, radioactive tank waste supernate: Preliminary characterization and removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, D.L. Jr.; Brown, G.N.; Conradson, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the initial work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to study technetium (Tc) removal from Hanford tank waste supernates and Tc oxidation state in the supernates. Filtered supernate samples from four tanks were studied: a composite double shell slurry feed (DSSF) consisting of 70% from Tank AW-101, 20% from AP-106, and 10% from AP-102; and three complexant concentrate (CC) wastes (Tanks AN-107, SY-101, ANS SY-103) that are distinguished by having a high concentration of organic complexants. The work included batch contacts of these waste samples with Reillex trademark-HPQ (anion exchanger from Reilly Industries) and ABEC 5000 (a sorbent from Eichrom Industries), materials designed to effectively remove Tc as pertechnetate from tank wastes. A short study of Tc analysis methods was completed. A preliminary identification of the oxidation state of non-pertechnetate species in the supernates was made by analyzing the technetium x-ray absorption spectra of four CC waste samples. Molybdenum (Mo) and rhenium (Re) spiked test solutions and simulants were tested with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry to evaluate the feasibility of the technique for identifying Tc species in waste samples

  9. Method for calculating the steady-state distribution of tritium in a molten-salt breeder reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.B.; Nestor, C.W.

    1975-04-01

    Tritium is produced in molten salt reactors primarily by fissioning of uranium and absorption of neutrons by the constituents of the fuel carrier salt. At the operating temperature of a large power reactor, tritium is expected to diffuse from the primary system through pipe and vessel walls to the surroundings and through heat exchanger tubes into the secondary system which contains a coolant salt. Some tritium will pass from the secondary system into the steam power system. This report describes a method for calculating the steady state distribution of tritium in a molten salt reactor plant and a computer program for making the calculations. The method takes into account the effects of various processes for removing tritium, the addition of hydrogen or hydrogenous compounds to the primary and secondary systems, and the chemistry of uranium in the fuel salt. Sample calculations indicate that 30 percent or more of the tritium might reach the steam system in a large power reactor unless special measures are taken to confine the tritium. (U.S.)

  10. HIGH YIELD AND RAPID SYNTHESES METHODS FOR PRODUCING METALLO-ORGANIC SALTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    A new method for preparing salts of metal cations and organic acids, especially divalent salts of alkaline earth metal ions from group II of the periodic system and carboxylic acids. The method comprising the use of a high temperature (about 90° or more) and, optionally. high pressure, in order...... to obtain a higher yield, purity and faster reaction speed than obtained with known synthesis methods. In particular, the present invention relates to the production of strontium salts of carboxylic acids. Novel strontium salts are also provided by the present method....

  11. Methods and costs for soil removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toomey, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Methods utilized in the surface stabilization of Hanford outdoor radiation areas are discussed. The work is divided into three major tasks: soil transport, surface preparation, and surface stabilization

  12. Hydrological methods preferentially recover cesium from nuclear waste salt cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooke, J.N.; Hamm, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site is treating high level radioactive waste in the form of insoluble solids (sludge), crystallized salt (salt cake), and salt solutions. High costs and operational concerns have prompted DOE to look for ways to improve the salt cake treatment process. A numerical model was developed to evaluate the feasibility of pump and treat technology for extracting cesium from salt cake. A modified version of the VAM3DCG code was used to first establish a steady-state flow field, then to simulate 30 days of operation. Simulation results suggest that efficient cesium extraction can be obtained with low displacement volumes. The actual extraction process will probably be less impressive because of nonuniform properties. 2 refs., 2 figs

  13. Removable dental prosthesis as periodontal treatment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilia Adenan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of prostheses are to restore mastication force, improve esthetics and maintain gingival health. The construction and function of prosthesis restoration are mutually interdependent with condition of periodontal tissues. A properly constructed prosthesis is an integral phase of complete treatment of periodontal disease in order to maintain periodontal tissues health. This paper reports case of a man aged 47 years who came to Dental Specialist Clinic in Oral and Dental Hospital Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran with chief complaint of mobility in almost all his teeth and they seems to look longer. The patient has no systemic disease and did not want his teeth to be extracted. Clinical and panoramic radiographic and laboratoris examinations has been done. During treatment, oclusal adjustment and splinting had been done on tooth 33,34,35 and tooth 44,43 also tooth 43,42 splinting with composite. The following treatment was the acrylic removable partial denture for upper jaw while mandible was fitted a frame denture which functioned as a semi permanent splint. One month post treatment, patien felt comfort and the denture was well functioning.

  14. Significance, evolution and recent advances in adsorption technology, materials and processes for desalination, water softening and salt removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaei Shahmirzadi, Mohammad Amin; Hosseini, Seyed Saeid; Luo, Jianquan; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2018-06-01

    Desalination and softening of sea, brackish, and ground water are becoming increasingly important solutions to overcome water shortage challenges. Various technologies have been developed for salt removal from water resources including multi-stage flash, multi-effect distillation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, electrodialysis, as well as adsorption. Recently, removal of solutes by adsorption onto selective adsorbents has shown promising perspectives. Different types of adsorbents such as zeolites, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), activated carbons, graphenes, magnetic adsorbents, and low-cost adsorbents (natural materials, industrial by-products and wastes, bio-sorbents, and biopolymer) have been synthesized and examined for salt removal from aqueous solutions. It is obvious from literature that the existing adsorbents have good potentials for desalination and water softening. Besides, nano-adsorbents have desirable surface area and adsorption capacity, though are not found at economically viable prices and still have challenges in recovery and reuse. On the other hand, natural and modified adsorbents seem to be efficient alternatives for this application compared to other types of adsorbents due to their availability and low cost. Some novel adsorbents are also emerging. Generally, there are a few issues such as low selectivity and adsorption capacity, process efficiency, complexity in preparation or synthesis, and problems associated to recovery and reuse that require considerable improvements in research and process development. Moreover, large-scale applications of sorbents and their practical utility need to be evaluated for possible commercialization and scale up. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Removal Mechanisms in a Graphene Oxide-Coated Ceramic Ultrafiltration Membrane for Retention of Natural Organic Matter, Pharmaceuticals, and Inorganic Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Fathizadeh, Mahdi; Yu, Miao; Flora, Joseph R V; Jang, Am; Jang, Min; Park, Chang Min; Yoo, Sung Soo; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin

    2017-11-22

    Functionalized graphene oxide (GO), derived from pure graphite via the modified Hummer method, was used to modify commercially available ceramic ultrafiltration membranes using the vacuum method. The modified ceramic membrane functionalized with GO (ceramic GO ) was characterized using a variety of analysis techniques and exhibited higher hydrophilicity and increased negative charge compared with the pristine ceramic membrane. Although the pure water permeability of the ceramic GO membrane (14.4-58.6 L/m 2 h/bar) was slightly lower than that of the pristine membrane (25.1-62.7 L/m 2 h/bar), the removal efficiencies associated with hydrophobic attraction and charge effects were improved significantly after GO coating. Additionally, solute transport in the GO nanosheets of the ceramic GO membrane played a vital role in the retention of target compounds: natural organic matter (NOM; humic acid and tannic acid), pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole), and inorganic salts (NaCl, Na 2 SO 4 , CaCl 2 , and CaSO 4 ). While the retention efficiencies of NOM, pharmaceuticals, and inorganic salts in the pristine membrane were 74.6%, 15.3%, and 2.9%, respectively, these increased to 93.5%, 51.0%, and 31.4% for the ceramic GO membrane. Consequently, the improved removal mechanisms of the membrane modified with functionalized GO nanosheets can provide efficient retention for water treatment under suboptimal environmental conditions of pH and ionic strength.

  16. Rootkits. Methods of detecting and removing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagutina, A.M.; Bogdanovich, A.A.; Ivanov, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The problems connected with the threat of the infection of computer systems by rootkits have been examined, and the methods for providing a guard from this type of malicious software have been analyzed [ru

  17. Influence of the Chemical Interactions on the Removal Rate of Different Salts in Electrokinetic Desalination Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetic desalination techniques have been successfully applied for the prevention of salt-induced deterioration problems of masonry and other construction materials. A mathematical model for electrochemical desalination treatments is described, based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system...... of equations and accounting for the chemical interactions between the species in the pore solution and the solid matrix. Due to their high abundance in the natural environment, chlorides, nitrates and sulfates are considered the main ions responsible to the salt decay processes in buildings materials...

  18. A review of salt transport in porous media : assessment methods and salt reduction treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawdy - Heritage, A.M.; Heritage, A.; Pel, L.

    2008-01-01

    It is an unpalatable fact that while objects can deteriorate through lack of care and attention, they can also deteriorate as a result of inappropriate and misguided interventions. This is particularly the case with regard to salt-related deterioration problems. A successful treatment outcome using

  19. Wastewater parameters after the process of phosphorus compounds removal by the metal dissolution method in comparison with precipitation and electrocoagulation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysocka Izabela

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation methods are commonly used for removing phosphorus compounds from wastewater. Chemical precipitation method, based on adding iron, aluminium or calcium salts to the treated wastewater, is often used. Another possible way of precipitating phosphates is metal dissolution method, which is presented in this paper. The main difference between these two methods is how the phosphate precipitating ions are introduced to the wastewater.

  20. Method for removing soot from exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suib, Steven L.; Dharmarathna, D. A. Saminda; Pahalagedara, Lakshitha R.

    2018-01-16

    A method for oxidizing soot from diesel exhaust gas from a diesel engine. The method involves providing a diesel particulate filter for receiving the diesel exhaust gas; coating a catalyst composition on the diesel particulate filter; and contacting the soot from the diesel exhaust gas with the catalyst coated diesel particulate filter at a temperature sufficient to oxidize the soot to carbon dioxide. The catalyst composition is a doped or undoped manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) material. A diesel exhaust gas treatment system that includes a diesel particulate filter for receiving diesel exhaust gas from a diesel engine and collecting soot; and a catalyst composition coated on the diesel particulate filter. The catalyst composition is a doped or undoped manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2).

  1. Removal of arsenate from groundwater by electrocoagulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Khan, Tabrez A; Asim, Mohd

    2012-06-01

    Arsenic, a toxic metalloid in drinking water, has become a major threat for human beings and other organisms. In the present work, attempts have been made to remove arsenate from the synthetic as well as natural water of Ballia district, India by electrocoagulation method. Efforts have also been made to optimize the various parameters such as initial arsenate concentration, pH, applied voltage, processing time, and working temperature. Electrocoagulation is a fast, inexpensive, selective, accurate, reproducible, and eco-friendly method for arsenate removal from groundwater. The present paper describes an electrocoagulation method for arsenate removal from groundwater using iron and zinc as anode and cathode, respectively. The maximum removal of arsenate was 98.8% at 2.0 mg L(-1), 7.0, 3.0 V, 10.0 min, and 30°C as arsenate concentration, pH, applied voltage, processing time, and working temperature, respectively. Relative standard deviation, coefficient of determination (r (2)), and confidence limits were varied from 1.50% to 1.59%, 0.9996% to 0.9998%, and 96.0% to 99.0%, respectively. The treated water was clear, colorless, and odorless without any secondary contamination. The developed and validated method was applied for arsenate removal of two samples of groundwater of Ballia district, U.P., India, having 0.563 to 0.805 mg L(-1), arsenate concentrations. The reported method is capable for the removal of arsenate completely (100% removal) from groundwater of Ballia district. There was no change in the groundwater quality after the removal of arsenate. The treated water was safe for drinking, bathing, and recreation purposes. Therefore, this method may be the choice of arsenate removal from natural groundwater.

  2. Removal method of radium in mine water by filter sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Naganuma, Masaki

    2003-01-01

    Trace radium is contained in mine water from the old mine road in Ningyo-Toge Environmental Engineering Center, JNC. We observed that filter sand with hydrated manganese oxide adsorbed radium in the mine water safely for long time. The removal method of radium by filter sand cladding with hydrated manganese oxide was studied. The results showed that radium was removed continuously and last for a long time from mine water with sodium hypochlorite solution by passing through the filter sand cladding with hydrated manganese. Only sodium hypochlorite solution was used. When excess of it was added, residue chlorine was used as chlorine disinfection. Filter sand cladding with hydrated manganese on the market can remove radium in the mine water. The removal efficiency of radium is the same as the radium coprecipitation method added with barium chloride. The cost is much lower than the ordinary methods. Amount of waste decreased to about 1/20 of the coprecipitation method. (S.Y.)

  3. Operation method for after-heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamano, Toyomi; Sakuragi, Masanori; Kogiso, Zen-ichi; Wake, Minoru.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To moderate thermal shocks applied to a feedwater pipe plate portion at the inlet of a steam generator thereby maintaining the integrity and safety of an LMFBR type plant. Method: Water with feed from the condenser to a steam generator. Steams generated in the steam generator are introduced to an air/water separator in a recycling system and a control device is actuated. Water separated by the air/water separator is recycled to the steam generator, while monitoring the temperature variation coefficient for the feedwater temperature at the inlet of the steam generator. If the temperature variation coefficient exceeds a predetermined setting value, the recycling flow rate is decreased in accordance with the deviation. This can greatly moderate the thermal shocks applied to the feedwater pipe plate portion at the inlet of the steam generator upon starting of the recycling system. (Takahashi, M.)

  4. Study of tritium removal from fusion reactor blankets of molten salt and lithium--aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.B.

    1976-03-01

    The sorption of tritium by molten lithium--bismuth (Li--Bi, approx. 15 at. % lithium) and solid equiatomic lithium--aluminum (Li--Al) was investigated experimentally to evaluate the potential applications of both materials in a controlled thermonuclear reactor. The Li--Bi alloy was proposed to countercurrently extract tritium from a molten salt (Li 2 BeF 4 ) blanket. However, because of the low solubility ( 0 C, the extraction process is not attractive

  5. Method for removal of mercury from various gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

    2003-06-10

    The invention provides for a method for removing elemental mercury from a fluid, the method comprising irradiating the mercury with light having a wavelength of approximately 254 nm. The method is implemented in situ at various fuel combustion locations such as power plants and municipal incinerators.

  6. Colour removal from magnesium bisulphite pulp and paper mill effluent using lignite adsorption and salt coagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yuliani, Galuh

    2017-01-01

    The removal of colour, organics and phosphorus from pulp and paper mill effluent and the development of colour of the wastewater were investigated. These contaminants are considered to be the most important due to their resistance over common treatment applied by the mill. Two approaches, adsorption and coagulation, were chosen for investigation of the removal of colour, organics and phosphorus from aqueous discharges of a bisulphite pulp and paper mill. Additionally, the colour generatio...

  7. Methods of removing uranium from drinking water. 1. A literature survey. 2. Present municipal water treatment and potential removal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Michelson, D.; Ensminger, J.T.; Lee, S.Y.; White, S.K.

    1982-12-01

    Literature was searched for methods of removing uranium from drinking water. U.S. manufacturers and users of water-treatment equipment and products were also contacted regarding methods of removing uranium from potable water. Based on the results of these surveys, it was recommended that untreated, partially treated, and finished water samples from municipal water-treatment facilities be analyzed to determine the extent of removal of uranium by presently used procedures, and that additional laboratory studies be performed to determine what changes are needed to maximize the effectiveness of treatments that are already in use in existing water-treatment plants

  8. The investigation of parameters affecting boron removal by electrocoagulation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, A. Erdem [Department of Environmental Engineering, Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Erzurum (Turkey)]. E-mail: aerdemy@atauni.edu.tr; Boncukcuoglu, Recep [Department of Environmental Engineering, Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering, Erzurum (Turkey); Kocakerim, M. Muhtar [Department of Chemical Engineering, 25240, Atatuerk University, Faculty of Engineering Erzurum (Turkey); Keskinler, Buelent [Department of Environmental Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, Gebze/Kocaeli 41400 (Turkey)

    2005-10-17

    Boron removal from wastewaters by electrocoagulation using aluminum electrode material was investigated in this paper. Several working parameters, such as pH, current density, boron concentration and type and concentration of supporting electrolyte were studied in an attempt to achieve a higher removal capacity. The experiments were carried out by keeping the pH of solution constant and optimum pH of solution was determined 8.0 for the aluminum electrode. Although energy consumption increased with decreasing boron concentration, which conductivity of these solutions were low, boron removal efficiency was higher at 100 mg/L than that of 1000 mg/L. Current density was an important parameter affecting removal efficiency. Boron removal efficiency and energy consumption increased with increasing current density from 1.2 to 6.0 mA/cm{sup 2}. The types of different supporting electrolyte were experimented in order to investigate to this parameter effect on boron removal. The highest boron removal efficiency, 97%, was found by CaCl{sub 2}. Added CaCl{sub 2} increased more the conductivity of solution according to other supporting electrolytes, but decreased energy consumption. The results showed to have a high effectiveness of the electrocoagulation method in removing boron from aqueous solutions.

  9. The investigation of parameters affecting boron removal by electrocoagulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, A. Erdem; Boncukcuoglu, Recep; Kocakerim, M. Muhtar; Keskinler, Buelent

    2005-01-01

    Boron removal from wastewaters by electrocoagulation using aluminum electrode material was investigated in this paper. Several working parameters, such as pH, current density, boron concentration and type and concentration of supporting electrolyte were studied in an attempt to achieve a higher removal capacity. The experiments were carried out by keeping the pH of solution constant and optimum pH of solution was determined 8.0 for the aluminum electrode. Although energy consumption increased with decreasing boron concentration, which conductivity of these solutions were low, boron removal efficiency was higher at 100 mg/L than that of 1000 mg/L. Current density was an important parameter affecting removal efficiency. Boron removal efficiency and energy consumption increased with increasing current density from 1.2 to 6.0 mA/cm 2 . The types of different supporting electrolyte were experimented in order to investigate to this parameter effect on boron removal. The highest boron removal efficiency, 97%, was found by CaCl 2 . Added CaCl 2 increased more the conductivity of solution according to other supporting electrolytes, but decreased energy consumption. The results showed to have a high effectiveness of the electrocoagulation method in removing boron from aqueous solutions

  10. Study of tritium removal from fusion reactor blankets of molten salt and lithium--aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.B.

    1976-03-01

    The sorption of tritium by molten lithium--bismuth (Li--Bi, approximately 15 at. percent lithium) and solid equiatomic lithium--aluminum (Li--Al) was investigated experimentally to evaluate the potential applications of both materials in a controlled thermonuclear reactor. The Li--Bi alloy was proposed to countercurrently extract tritium from a molten salt (Li 2 BeF 4 ) blanket. However, because of the low solubility (less than 10 ppb) at temperatures ranging from 500 to 700 0 C, the extraction process is not attractive

  11. Improvement of seawater salt quality by hydro-extraction and re-crystallization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumada, K.; Dewati, R.; Suprihatin

    2018-01-01

    Indonesia is one of the salt producing countries that use sea water as a source of raw materials, the quality of salt produced is influenced by the quality of sea water. The resulting average salt quality contains 85-90% NaCl. The Indonesian National Standard (SNI) for human salt’s consumption sodium chloride content is 94.7 % (dry base) and for industrial salt 98,5 %. In this study developed the re-crystallization without chemical and hydro-extraction method. The objective of this research to choose the best methods based on efficiency. The results showed that re-crystallization method can produce salt with NaCl content 99,21%, while hydro-extraction method content 99,34 % NaCl. The salt produced through both methods can be used as a consumption and industrial salt, Hydro-extraction method is more efficient than re-crystallization method because re-crystallization method requires heat energy.

  12. Development of a method for controlling salt and sodium use during meal preparation for food services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Barbosa Frantz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study developed a method for controlling the amount of salt and sodium during food preparation, Controlling Salt and Sodium use During Meal Preparation for food services based on the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points principles. METHODS: The method was conceived and perfected during a study case in a commercial food service located in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Data were collected from technical cards, recipes and measurements during food preparation. The preparations were monitored and compared with criteria about the use of salt and sodium found in the literature. Critical control points were identified and corrective measures were proposed. RESULTS: The result was a method consisting of 9 stages: (1 determination of the sodium content in the ingredients; (2 and 3 analysis of menu planning and sodium content; (4 follow-up of food preparation; (5 estimate of the amount of sodium used in the preparations; (6 and 7 selection and following of the preparations with average- and high-sodium content; (8 definition of the critical points and establishment of corrective actions for the use of salt and sodium; and (9 creation of recommendations for the use of salt and sodium. CONCLUSION: The Controlling Salt and Sodium use During Meal Preparation may contribute to global discussions regarding the reduction of salt and sodium intakes and collaborate for the supply of nutritionally and sensorially appropriate meals with respect to salt and sodium content. It may also help to prevent non-communicable chronic diseases.

  13. Assessment of active methods for removal of LEO debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakima, Houman; Emami, M. Reza

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of five active methods for removal of large low Earth orbit debris. The removal methods, namely net, laser, electrodynamic tether, ion beam shepherd, and robotic arm, are selected based on a set of high-level space mission constraints. Mission level criteria are then utilized to assess the performance of each redirection method in light of the results obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation provides an insight into the removal time, performance robustness, and propellant mass criteria for the targeted debris range. The remaining attributes are quantified based on the models provided in the literature, which take into account several important parameters pertaining to each removal method. The means of assigning attributes to each assessment criterion is discussed in detail. A systematic comparison is performed using two different assessment schemes: Analytical Hierarchy Process and utility-based approach. A third assessment technique, namely the potential-loss analysis, is utilized to highlight the effect of risks in each removal methods.

  14. Salt removal using multiple microbial desalination cells under continuous flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Youpeng; Feng, Yujie; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Shi, Xinxin; Yang, Qiao; Lv, Jiangwei; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    %, but coulombic efficiencies decreased from 49 ± 4% to 35 ± 1%. Total COD removals were similar at both HRTs (60 ± 2%, 2. days; 59 ± 2%, 1. day). Community analysis of the anode biofilms showed that bacteria most similar to the xylose fermenting bacterium

  15. Development of contaminated concrete removing system 'Clean cut method'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Takehiko; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Funakawa, Naoyoshi; Idemura, Hajime; Sakashita, Fumio; Tajitsu, Yoshiteru

    1989-01-01

    In the case of decommissioning nuclear facilities such as nuclear power stations, nuclear fuel facilities and RI handling facilities and carrying out reconstruction works, if there is radioactive contamination on the surfaces of concrete structures such as the floors and walls of the buildings for nuclear facilities, it must be removed. Since concrete is porous, contamination infiltrates into the inside of concrete, and the wiping of surfaces only or chemical decontamination cannot remove it, therefore in most cases, contaminated concrete must be removed. The removal of concrete surfaces has been carried out with chipping hammers, grinders and so on, but many problems arise due to it. In order to solve these problems, the mechanical cutting method was newly devised, and clean cut method (CCRS) was completed. The depth of cutting from concrete surface is set beforehand, and the part to be removed is accurately cut, at the same time, the concrete powder generated is collected nearly perfectly, and recovered into a drum. The outline of the method and the constitution of the system, the features of the clean cut method, the development of the technology for cutting concrete and the technology for recovering concrete powder, and the test of verifying decontamination are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Methods of ammonia removal in anaerobic digestion: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakat, Niclas; Demirel, Burak; Anjum, Reshma; Dietz, Donna

    2017-10-01

    The anaerobic digestion of substrates with high ammonia content has always been a bottleneck in the methanisation process of biomasses. Since microbial communities in anaerobic digesters are sensitive to free ammonia at certain conditions, the digestion of nitrogen-rich substrates such as livestock wastes may result in inhibition/toxicity eventually leading to process failures, unless appropriate engineering precautions are taken. There are many different options reported in literature to remove ammonia from anaerobic digesters to achieve a safe and stable process so that along with high methane yields, a good quality of effluents can also be obtained. Conventional techniques to remove ammonia include physical/chemical methods, immobilization and adaptation of microorganisms, while novel methods include ultrasonication, microwave, hollow fiber membranes and microbial fuel cell applications. This paper discusses conventional and novel methods of ammonia removal from anaerobic digesters using nitrogen-rich substrates, with particular focus on recent literature available about this topic.

  17. Soluble salt removal from MSWI fly ash and its stabilization for safer disposal and recovery as road basement material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, F; Cioffi, R; Montagnaro, F; Santoro, L

    2012-06-01

    Fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) is classified as hazardous in the European Waste Catalogue. Proper stabilization processes should be required before any management option is put into practice. Due to the inorganic nature of MSWI fly ash, cementitious stabilization processes are worthy of consideration. However, the effectiveness of such processes can be severely compromised by the high content of soluble chlorides and sulphates. In this paper, a preliminary washing treatment has been optimized to remove as much as possible soluble salts by employing as little as possible water. Two different operating conditions (single-step and two-step) have been developed to this scope. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that stabilized systems containing 20% of binder are suitable for safer disposal as well as for material recovery in the field of road basement (cement bound granular material layer). Three commercially available cements (pozzolanic, limestone and slag) have been employed as binders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Methods for removing radioactive isotopes from contaminated streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, D.R.; Hickey, T.N.; Spulgis, I.S.; Parish, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Methods for removing radioactive isotopes from contaminated gas streams for use in atmospheric containment and cleanup systems in nuclear power plants are provided. The methods provide for removal of radioactive isotopes from a first portion of the contaminated stream, separated from the remaining portion of the stream, so that adsorbent used to purify the first portion of the contaminated stream by adsorption of the radioactive isotopes therefrom can be tested to determine the adsorbing efficacy of the generally larger portion of adsorbent used to purify the remaining portion of the stream

  19. Method for the removal and recovery of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterly, Clay E.; Vass, Arpad A.; Tyndall, Richard L.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

  20. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  1. Creep in rock salt with temperature. Testing methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, J.P.; Berest, P.

    1985-01-01

    The growing interest shown in the delayed behaviour of rocks at elevated temperature has led the Solid Mechanics Laboratory to develop specific equipment designed for creep tests. The design and dimensioning of these units offer the possibility of investigating a wide range of materials. The article describes the test facilities used (uni-axial and tri-axial creep units) and presents the experimental results obtained on samples of Bresse salt [fr

  2. Salt intake and the validity of a salt intake assessment system based on a 24-h dietary recall method in pregnant Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Michihiro; Tanno, Yumi; Hosaka, Miki; Metoki, Hirohito; Obara, Taku; Asayama, Kei; Hoshi, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Masakuni; Mano, Nariyasu; Imai, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Information regarding salt intake in pregnant women in Japan is limited. An electronic system for the assessment of salt intake using a 24-h dietary recall method has been developed in Japan. The objectives of the present study were to investigate salt intake in pregnant women and to compare the salt intake estimated by the electronic salt intake assessment system with that measured by 24-h urinary salt excretion (24-hUNaCl). Data were collected on 24-hUNaCl and salt intake estimated by the salt intake assessment system for 35 pregnant Japanese women at approximately 20 weeks of gestation. The adjusted 24-hUNaCl (24-hUNaCl/[the number of urinations during the examination day--the number of missing urine collections] × the number of urinations during the examination day, g/day) was used as a standard. The mean adjusted 24-hUNaCl was 7.7 ± 2.5 g/day, and mean systolic/diastolic blood pressure values were 106.1 ± 8.6/62.8 ± 6.5 mmHg. The adjusted 24-hUNaCl was significantly correlated with the salt intake estimated by the salt intake assessment system (r = 0.47, p = 0.004). Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant mean difference (adjusted 24-hUNaCl--salt intake estimated by the assessment system = -0.36 g/day, p = 0.4) and no significant proportional bias (p = 0.1). These results suggest that pregnant women in Japan restrict their salt intake, at least when they are being examined for salt intake. They also suggest that repeated use of the described system may be useful in estimating salt intake in pregnant women.

  3. Method to synthesize dense crystallized sodalite pellet for immobilizing halide salt radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tadafumi.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as cesium and strontium and hazardous materials such as barium. A sodalite intermediate is prepared by mixing appropriate amounts of silica, alumina and sodium hydroxide with respect to sodalite and heating the mixture to form the sodalite intermediate and water. Heating is continued to drive off the water to form a water-free intermediate. The water-free intermediate is mixed with either waste salt or waste salt which has been contacted with zeolite to concentrate the radionuclides and hazardous material. The waste salt-intermediate mixture is then compacted and heated under conditions of heat and pressure to form sodalite with the waste salt, radionuclides and hazardous material trapped within the sodalite cage structure. This provides a final product having excellent leach resistant capabilities

  4. A Simple Method for Removal of Particles from the Retinal Surface during Vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal of particulate materials from the retinal surface is somewhat difficult during small gauge vitrectomy. Simple injection of balanced salt solution into the vitreous cavity in a controlled manner using a connector tubing between the syringe and needle can produce enough turbulence to float the deposited material and remove it.

  5. Removal of phenol from water : a comparison of energization methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabowski, L.R.; Veldhuizen, van E.M.; Rutgers, W.R.

    2005-01-01

    Direct electrical energization methods for removal of persistent substances from water are under investigation in the framework of the ytriD-project. The emphasis of the first stage of the project is the energy efficiency. A comparison is made between a batch reactor with a thin layer of water and

  6. A Finite Element Removal Method for 3D Topology Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akif Kütük

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Topology optimization provides great convenience to designers during the designing stage in many industrial applications. With this method, designers can obtain a rough model of any part at the beginning of a designing stage by defining loading and boundary conditions. At the same time the optimization can be used for the modification of a product which is being used. Lengthy solution time is a disadvantage of this method. Therefore, the method cannot be widespread. In order to eliminate this disadvantage, an element removal algorithm has been developed for topology optimization. In this study, the element removal algorithm is applied on 3-dimensional parts, and the results are compared with the ones available in the related literature. In addition, the effects of the method on solution times are investigated.

  7. Method selection for mercury removal from hard coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziok Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is commonly found in coal and the coal utilization processes constitute one of the main sources of mercury emission to the environment. This issue is particularly important for Poland, because the Polish energy production sector is based on brown and hard coal. The forecasts show that this trend in energy production will continue in the coming years. At the time of the emission limits introduction, methods of reducing the mercury emission will have to be implemented in Poland. Mercury emission can be reduced as a result of using coal with a relatively low mercury content. In the case of the absence of such coals, the methods of mercury removal from coal can be implemented. The currently used and developing methods include the coal cleaning process (both the coal washing and the dry deshaling as well as the thermal pretreatment of coal (mild pyrolysis. The effectiveness of these methods various for different coals, which is caused by the diversity of coal origin, various characteristics of coal and, especially, by the various modes of mercury occurrence in coal. It should be mentioned that the coal cleaning process allows for the removal of mercury occurring in mineral matter, mainly in pyrite. The thermal pretreatment of coal allows for the removal of mercury occurring in organic matter as well as in the inorganic constituents characterized by a low temperature of mercury release. In this paper, the guidelines for the selection of mercury removal method from hard coal were presented. The guidelines were developed taking into consideration: the effectiveness of mercury removal from coal in the process of coal cleaning and thermal pretreatment, the synergy effect resulting from the combination of these processes, the direction of coal utilization as well as the influence of these processes on coal properties.

  8. Nitrogen removal from wastewater by a catalytic oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T L; Macinnes, J M; Cliffe, K R

    2001-06-01

    The ammonia-containing waste produced in industries is usually characterized by high concentration and high temperature, and is not treatable by biological methods directly. In this study, a hydrophobic Pt/SDB catalyst was first used in a trickle-bed reactor to remove ammonia from wastewater. In the reactor, both stripping and catalytic oxidation occur simultaneously. It was found that higher temperature and higher oxygen partial pressure enhanced the ammonia removal. A reaction pathway, which involves oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, which then further reacts with ammonia to produce nitrogen and water, was confirmed. Small amounts of by-products, nitrites and nitrates were also detected in the resultant reaction solution. These compounds came from the absorption of nitrogen oxides. Both the minimum NO2- selectivity and maximum ammonia removal were achieved when the resultant pH of treated water was near 7.5 for a feed of unbuffered ammonia solution.

  9. Integration of membrane distillation into traditional salt farming method: Process development and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizam, S.; Bilad, M. R.; Putra, Z. A.

    2017-10-01

    Farmers still practice the traditional salt farming in many regions, particularly in Indonesia. This archaic method not only produces low yield and poor salt quality, it is also laborious. Furthermore, the farming locations typically have poor access to fresh water and are far away from electricity grid, which restrict upgrade to a more advanced technology for salt production. This paper proposes a new concept of salt harvesting method that improves the salt yield and at the same time facilitates recovery of fresh water from seawater. The new concept integrates solar powered membrane distillation (MD) and photovoltaic cells to drive the pumping. We performed basic solar still experiments to quantify the heat flux received by a pond. The data were used as insight for designing the proposed concept, particularly on operational strategy and the most effective way to integrate MD. After the conceptual design had been developed, we formulated mass and energy balance to estimate the performance of the proposed concept. Based on our data and design, it is expected that the system would improve the yield and quality of the salt production, maximizing fresh water harvesting, and eventually provides economical gain for salt farmers hence improving their quality of life. The key performance can only be measured via experiment using gain output ratio as performance indicator, which will be done in a future study.

  10. ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSING TO REDUCE SALT IN MEAT PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Tunieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The world trends in table salt reduction in meat products contemplate the use of different methods for preservation of taste and consistency in finished products as well as shelf life prolongation. There are several approaches to a sodium chloride reduction in meat products. The paper presents a review of the foreign studies that give evidence of the possibility to maintain quality of traditional meat products produced with the reduced salt content. The studies in the field of salty taste perception established that a decrease in a salt crystal size to 20 µm enabled reducing an amount of added table salt due to an increase in the salty taste intensity in food products. Investigation of the compatibility of different taste directions is also interesting as one of the approaches to a sodium chloride reduction in food products. The use of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w double emulsions allows controlling a release of encapsulated ingredients (salt, which enables enhancement of salty taste. The other alternative method of technological processing of meat raw material for reducing salt in meat products is the use of high pressure processing. This method has several advantages and allows not only an increase in the salty taste intensity, but also formation of a stable emulsion, an increase in water binding capacity of minced meat and extension of shelf-life.

  11. Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  12. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Troy J [Idaho Falls, ID; Herbst, R Scott [Idaho Falls, ID; Mann, Nicholas R [Blackfoot, ID; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID

    2011-10-25

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  13. Comparison between two methods for resin removing after bracket debonding

    OpenAIRE

    Marchi, Rodrigo De; Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Terada, Hélio Hissashi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess - using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - the effectiveness of two abrasive discs, one made from silicon and one from aluminum oxide, in removing adhesive remnants (AR) after debonding orthodontic brackets. METHODS: Ten randomly selected bovine teeth were used, i.e., 2 in the control group, and the other 8 divided into two groups, which had orthodontic brackets bonded to their surface with Concise Orthodontic Adhesive (3M). The following metho...

  14. Study of composite adsorbent synthesis and characterization for the removal of Cs in the high-salt and high-radioactive wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jimin; Lee, Keun Young; Kim, Kwang Wook; Lee, Eil Hee; Chung, Dong Yong; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Jae Hyuk [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    For the removal of cesium (Cs) from high radioactive/high salt-laden liquid waste, this study synthesized a highly efficient composite adsorbent (potassium cobalt ferrocyanide (PCFC)-loaded chabazite (CHA)) and evaluated its applicability. The composite adsorbent used CHA, which could accommodate Cs as well as other molecules, as a supporting material and was synthesized by immobilizing the PCFC in the pores of CHA through stepwise impregnation/precipitation with CoCl{sub 2} and K{sub 4}Fe (CN){sub 6} solutions. When CHA, with average particle size of more than 10 μm, is used in synthesizing the composite adsorbent, the PCFC particles were immobilized in a stable form. Also, the physical stability of the composite adsorbent was improved by optimizing the washing methodology to increase the purity of the composite adsorbent during the synthesis. The composite adsorbent obtained from the optimal synthesis showed a high adsorption rate of Cs in both fresh water (salt-free condition) and seawater (high-salt condition), and had a relatively high value of distribution coefficient (larger than 10{sup 4} mL·g{sup -1}) regardless of the salt concentration. Therefore, the composite adsorbent synthesized in this study is an optimized material considering both the high selectivity of PCFC on Cs and the physical stability of CHA. It is proved that this composite adsorbent can remove rapidly Cs contained in high radioactive/high salt-laden liquid waste with high efficiency.

  15. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Henrique Bortolaz; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated.

  16. Methods for producing nanoparticles using palladium salt and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-Wai; Liang, Hongying

    2015-12-01

    The disclosed subject matter is directed to a method for producing nanoparticles, as well as the nanoparticles produced by this method. In one embodiment, the nanoparticles produced by the disclosed method have a high defect density.

  17. Immobilization of LiCl-Li 2 O pyroprocessing salt wastes in chlorosodalite using glass-bonded hydrothermal and salt-occlusion methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Kroll, Jared O.; Frank, Steven M.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, salt occlusion and hydrothermal processes were used to make chlorosodalite through reaction with a high-LiCl salt simulating a waste stream following pyrochemical treatment of oxide-based used nuclear fuel. Some products were reacted with glass binders to increase chlorosodalite yield through alkali ion exchange and aide in densification. Hydrothermal processes included reaction of the salt simulant in an acid digestion vessel with either zeolite 4A or sodium aluminate and colloidal silica. Chlorosodalite yields in the crystalline products were nearly complete in the glass-bonded materials at values of 100 mass% for the salt-occlusion method, up to 99.0 mass% for the hydrothermal synthesis with zeolite 4A, and up to 96 mass% for the hydrothermal synthesis with sodium aluminate and colloidal silica. These results show promise for using chemically stable chlorosodalite to immobilize oxide reduction salt wastes.

  18. Immobilization of LiCl-Li2O pyroprocessing salt wastes in chlorosodalite using glass-bonded hydrothermal and salt-occlusion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Brian J.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Kroll, Jared O.; Frank, Steven M.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, hydrothermal and salt-occlusion processes were used to make chlorosodalite through reactions with a high-LiCl salt simulating a waste stream generated from pyrochemical treatment of oxide-based used nuclear fuel. Some products were reacted with glass binders to increase chlorosodalite yield through alkali ion exchange and to aid in densification. Hydrothermal processes included reaction of the salt simulant in an autoclave with either zeolite 4A or sodium aluminate and colloidal silica. Chlorosodalite yields in the crystalline products were nearly complete in the glass-bonded materials at values of 100 mass% for the salt-occlusion method, up to 99.0 mass% for the hydrothermal synthesis with zeolite 4A, and up to 96 mass% for the hydrothermal synthesis with sodium aluminate and colloidal silica. These results show promise for using chemically stable chlorosodalite to immobilize oxide reduction salt wastes.

  19. Landslides Monitoring on Salt Deposits Using Geophysical Methods, Case study - Slanic Prahova, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovidiu, Avram; Rusu, Emil; Maftei, Raluca-Mihaela; Ulmeanu, Antonio; Scutelnicu, Ioan; Filipciuc, Constantina; Tudor, Elena

    2017-12-01

    Electrometry is most frequently applied geophysical method to examine dynamical phenomena related to the massive salt presence due to resistivity contrasts between salt, salt breccia and geological covering formations. On the vertical resistivity sections obtained with VES devices these three compartments are clearly differentiates by high resistivity for the massive salt, very low for salt breccia and variable for geological covering formations. When the land surface is inclined, shallow formations are moving gravitationally on the salt back, producing a landslide. Landslide monitoring involves repeated periodically measurements of geoelectrical profiles into a grid covering the slippery surface, in the same conditions (climate, electrodes position, instrument and measurement parameters). The purpose of monitoring landslides in Slanic Prahova area, was to detect the changes in resistivity distribution profiles to superior part of subsoil measured in 2014 and 2015. Measurement grid include several representative cross sections in susceptibility to landslides point of view. The results are graphically represented by changing the distribution of topography and resistivity differences between the two sets of geophysical measurements.

  20. Innovative method and apparatus for the deep cleaning of soluble salts from mortars and lithic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Laura; Ferretti, Maurizio; Torrielli, Giulia; Caratto, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    Porous materials (e.g. plasters, mortars, concrete, and the like) used in the building industry or in artworks fail to develop, after their genesis, salts such as nitrates, carbonates (e.g. potassium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, calcium carbonate), chlorides (e.g. sodium chloride) and/or others, which are a concurrent cause of material deterioration phenomena. In the case of ancient or cultural heritage buildings, severe damage to structures and works of art, such as fresco paintings are possible. In general, in situ alteration pattern in mortars and frescoes by crystallization of soluble salts from solutions is caused by capillar rise or circulation in damp walls. Older buildings can be more subject to capillary rise of ion-rich waters, which, as water evaporates, create salt crystals inside the walls. If this pattern reveals overwhelming upon other environmental decay factors, the extraction of salts is the first restoration to recover the artpiece after the preliminary assessment and mitigation of the causes of soaking. A new method and apparatus, patented by University of Genoa [1] improves the quality and durability of decontamination by soluble salts, compared with conventional application of sepiolite or cellulose wraps. The conventional application of cellulose or sepiolite requires casting a more or less thick layer of wrap on the mortar, soaking with distilled water, and waiting until dry. The soluble salts result trapped within the wrap. A set of artificial samples reproducing the stratigraphy of frescoes was contaminated with saline solution of known concentration. The higher quality of the extraction was demonstrated by trapping the salts within layers of Japanese paper juxtaposed to the mortar; the extraction with the dedicated apparatus was operated in a significantly shorter time than with wraps (some hours vs. several days). Two cycles of about 15 minutes are effective in the deep cleaning from contaminant salts. The decontamination was

  1. Doxycycline delivery from PLGA microspheres prepared by a modified solvent removal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Roshni S; Cho, Daniel Y; Tian, Cheng; Chang, Amy; Estrellas, Kenneth M; Lavin, Danya; Furtado, Stacia; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development of a modified solvent removal method for the encapsulation of hydrophilic drugs within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Using a water/oil/oil double emulsion, hydrophilic doxycycline was encapsulated within PLGA spheres with particle diameters ranging from approximately 600 nm to 19 µm. Encapsulation efficiencies of up to 74% were achieved for theoretical loadings from 1% to 10% (w/w), with biphasic release over 85 days with nearly complete release at the end of this time course. About 1% salt was added to the formulations to examine its effects on doxycycline release; salt modulated release only by increasing the magnitude of initial release without altering kinetics. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated no characteristic differences between doxycycline-loaded and control spheres. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction suggest that there may be a molecular dispersion of the doxycycline within the spheres and the doxycycline may be in an amorphous state, which could explain the slow, prolonged release of the drug.

  2. The Fe removal in pyrophyllite by physical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kanghee; Jo, Jiyu; Bak, GeonYeong; Choi, NagChoul; Park*, CheonYoung

    2015-04-01

    The presence of Fe in ingredient material such as limestone, borax and pyrophyllite can prevent their use mainly in the glass fiber manufacturing industry. The red to yellow pigmentation in pyrophyllite is mainly due to the associated oxides and sulfides of Fe such as hematite, pyrite, etc. The removal of Fe in the pyrophyllite was investigated using high frequency treatment and magnetic separation under various alumina grades in pyrophyllite. The hematite and pyrite were observed in the pyrophyllite from photomicrograph and XRD analysis results. On the decrease of Al2O3 content in pyrophyllite was showed that SiO2, Fe2O3 and TiO2 content were increased by XRF analysis. The high frequency treatment experiment for the pyrophyllite showed that the (1) pyrite phase was transformed hematite and magnetite, (2) mass loss of the sample by volatilization of included sulfur(S) in pyrite. The results of magnetic separation for treated sample by high frequency were identified that Fe removal percent were in the range of 97.6~98.8%. This study demonstrated that physical method (high frequency treatment and magnetic separation) was effective for the removal of Fe in pyrophyllite. This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment(MOE) as "Advanced Technology Program for Environmental Industry".

  3. Fuel processing for molten-salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, J.R. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Research devoted to development of processes for the isolation of protactinium and for the removal of fission products from molten-salt breeder reactors is reported. During this report period, engineering development progressed on continuous fluorinators for uranium removal, the metal transfer process for rare-earth removal, the fuel reconstitution step, and molten salt--bismuth contactors to be used in reductive extraction processes. The metal transfer experiment MTE-3B was started. In this experiment all parts of the metal transfer process for rare-earth removal are demonstrated using salt flow rates which are about 1 percent of those required to process the fuel salt in a 1000-MW(e) MSBR. During this report period the salt and bismuth phases were transferred to the experimental vessels, and two runs with agitator speeds of 5 rps were made to measure the rate of transfer of neodymium from the fluoride salt to the Bi--Li stripper solution. The uranium removed from the fuel salt by fluorination must be returned to the processed salt in the fuel reconstitution step before the fuel salt is returned to the reactor. An engineering experiment to demonstrate the fuel reconstitution step is being installed. In this experiment gold-lined equipment will be used to avoid introducing products of corrosion by UF 6 and UF 5 . Alternative methods for providing the gold lining include electroplating and mechanical fabrication

  4. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortolaz de Oliveira, Henrique; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO 4 2− /g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO 4 2− /g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated. - Highlights: • Zinc hydroxide nitrate and Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate or acetate were synthesized. • The interlayer anions were replaced by chromate anions at pH=8.0. • Only Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate or acetate have the structure preserved after exchange. • Fast exchange reaction and high capacity of chromate removal were observed. • Magnetic materials were obtained to facilitate the solids removal the from solutions.

  5. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortolaz de Oliveira, Henrique; Wypych, Fernando, E-mail: wypych@ufpr.br

    2016-11-15

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−}/g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated. - Highlights: • Zinc hydroxide nitrate and Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate or acetate were synthesized. • The interlayer anions were replaced by chromate anions at pH=8.0. • Only Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate or acetate have the structure preserved after exchange. • Fast exchange reaction and high capacity of chromate removal were observed. • Magnetic materials were obtained to facilitate the solids removal the from solutions.

  6. Method of removing niobium from uranium-niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, E.N.; Schlier, D.S.; Shinopulos, G.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of removing niobium from a uranium-niobium alloy. It comprises dissolving the uranium-niobium alloy metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing an acid selected from the group consisting of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid and fluoboric acid as a catalyst to provide a second aqueous solution, which includes uranium (U +4 ), acid radical ions, the acids insolubles including uranium oxides and niobium oxides; adding nitric acid to the insolubles to oxidize the niobium oxides to yield niobic acid and to complete the solubilization of any residual uranium; and separating the niobic acid from the nitric acid and solubilized uranium

  7. Method of removing crud deposited on fuel element clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Tokunobu; Yashima, Akira; Tajima, Jun-ichiro.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable easy elimination of claddings deposited on the surface of fuel element. Method: An operator manipulates a pole from above a platform, engages the longitudinal flange of the cover to the opening at the upper end of a channel box and starts up a suction pump. The suction amount of the pump is set such that water flow becomes within the channel box at greater flow rate than the operational flow rate in the channel box of the fuel element clusters during reactor operation. This enables to remove crud deposited on the surface of individual fuel elements with ease and rapidly without detaching the channel box. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Salt-stone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method - 13092

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Stefanko, D.B.; Burns, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    form, i.e., Cr +6 was detected in the top 15 to 20 mm of the sample spiked with 1000 mg/kg Cr. Below about 20 mm, the Cr concentrations in leachates were below the detection limit (< 0.010 mg/L) which indicates that the oxidation as the result of exposure to air was limited to the top 20 mm of the sample after exposure for 129 days and that the bulk of the waste form was not affected, i.e., the Cr was stabilized and insoluble. For samples cured in the laboratory, leachable Cr was detected in the top 8 mm of the Cr 1000 sample cured in the laboratory for 37 days. Between 8 and 14 mm, the concentration Cr in the leachate dropped by a factor of about 20 to just above the detection limit. These depth of penetration results indicate that the rate of advancement of the oxidation front for samples spiked with 1000 mg/kg Cr cured under 'field conditions' for 129 days is less than that for the sample cured in the laboratory for 37 days, i.e., 0.156 and 0.216 mm/day, respectively. Additional data are presented for samples spiked with 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr. In summary, cementitious waste forms are porous solids with a network of interconnected pores ranging in diameter from 10 E-10 m to greater than a few mm. The oxidation process is assumed to occur as the result of oxygen transport through the interconnected porosity which may be filled with air, aqueous salt solution, or both. Upon oxidation, the Cr becomes soluble and can be transported in solution through aqueous pore fluid or leachate. (authors)

  9. Salt-stone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method - 13092

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.A.; Stefanko, D.B.; Burns, H.H. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    under field conditions, leachable Cr (assumed to be the oxidized form, i.e., Cr{sup +6} was detected in the top 15 to 20 mm of the sample spiked with 1000 mg/kg Cr. Below about 20 mm, the Cr concentrations in leachates were below the detection limit (< 0.010 mg/L) which indicates that the oxidation as the result of exposure to air was limited to the top 20 mm of the sample after exposure for 129 days and that the bulk of the waste form was not affected, i.e., the Cr was stabilized and insoluble. For samples cured in the laboratory, leachable Cr was detected in the top 8 mm of the Cr 1000 sample cured in the laboratory for 37 days. Between 8 and 14 mm, the concentration Cr in the leachate dropped by a factor of about 20 to just above the detection limit. These depth of penetration results indicate that the rate of advancement of the oxidation front for samples spiked with 1000 mg/kg Cr cured under 'field conditions' for 129 days is less than that for the sample cured in the laboratory for 37 days, i.e., 0.156 and 0.216 mm/day, respectively. Additional data are presented for samples spiked with 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr. In summary, cementitious waste forms are porous solids with a network of interconnected pores ranging in diameter from 10 E-10 m to greater than a few mm. The oxidation process is assumed to occur as the result of oxygen transport through the interconnected porosity which may be filled with air, aqueous salt solution, or both. Upon oxidation, the Cr becomes soluble and can be transported in solution through aqueous pore fluid or leachate. (authors)

  10. Cloud-point measurement for (sulphate salts + polyethylene glycol 15000 + water) systems by the particle counting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imani, A.; Modarress, H.; Eliassi, A.; Abdous, M.

    2009-01-01

    The phase separation of (water + salt + polyethylene glycol 15000) systems was studied by cloud-point measurements using the particle counting method. The effect of three kinds of sulphate salt (Na 2 SO 4 , K 2 SO 4 , (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 ) concentration, polyethylene glycol 15000 concentration, mass ratio of polymer to salt on the cloud-point temperature of these systems have been investigated. The results obtained indicate that the cloud-point temperatures decrease linearly with increase in polyethylene glycol concentrations for different salts. Also, the cloud points decrease with an increase in mass ratio of salt to polymer.

  11. Comparison of methods for removing electromagnetic noise from electromyographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W; Stock, Matt S

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare three different methods of removing noise from monopolar electromyographic (EMG) signals: (a) electrical shielding with a Faraday cage, (b) denoising with a digital notch-filter and (c) applying a bipolar differentiation with another monopolar EMG signal. Ten men and ten women (mean age = 24.0 years) performed isometric muscle actions of the leg extensors at 10-100% of their maximal voluntary contraction on two separate occasions. One trial was performed inside a Faraday tent (a flexible Faraday cage made from conductive material), and the other was performed outside the Faraday tent. The EMG signals collected outside the Faraday tent were analyzed three separate ways: as a raw signal, as a bipolar signal, and as a signal digitally notch filtered to remove 60 Hz noise and its harmonics. The signal-to-noise ratios were greatest after notch-filtering (range: 3.0-33.8), and lowest for the bipolar arrangement (1.6-10.2). Linear slope coefficients for the EMG amplitude versus force relationship were also used to compare the methods of noise removal. The results showed that a bipolar arrangement had a significantly lower linear slope coefficient when compared to the three other conditions (raw, notch and tent). These results suggested that an appropriately filtered monopolar EMG signal can be useful in situations that require a large pick-up area. Furthermore, although it is helpful, a Faraday tent (or cage) is not required to achieve an appropriate signal-to-noise ratio, as long as the correct filters are applied.

  12. Comparison of methods for removing electromagnetic noise from electromyographic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W; Stock, Matt S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare three different methods of removing noise from monopolar electromyographic (EMG) signals: (a) electrical shielding with a Faraday cage, (b) denoising with a digital notch-filter and (c) applying a bipolar differentiation with another monopolar EMG signal. Ten men and ten women (mean age = 24.0 years) performed isometric muscle actions of the leg extensors at 10–100% of their maximal voluntary contraction on two separate occasions. One trial was performed inside a Faraday tent (a flexible Faraday cage made from conductive material), and the other was performed outside the Faraday tent. The EMG signals collected outside the Faraday tent were analyzed three separate ways: as a raw signal, as a bipolar signal, and as a signal digitally notch filtered to remove 60 Hz noise and its harmonics. The signal-to-noise ratios were greatest after notch-filtering (range: 3.0–33.8), and lowest for the bipolar arrangement (1.6–10.2). Linear slope coefficients for the EMG amplitude versus force relationship were also used to compare the methods of noise removal. The results showed that a bipolar arrangement had a significantly lower linear slope coefficient when compared to the three other conditions (raw, notch and tent). These results suggested that an appropriately filtered monopolar EMG signal can be useful in situations that require a large pick-up area. Furthermore, although it is helpful, a Faraday tent (or cage) is not required to achieve an appropriate signal-to-noise ratio, as long as the correct filters are applied. (paper)

  13. Investigating salt frost scaling by using statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2010-01-01

    A large data set comprising data for 118 concrete mixes on mix design, air void structure, and the outcome of freeze/thaw testing according to SS 13 72 44 has been analysed by use of statistical methods. The results show that with regard to mix composition, the most important parameter...

  14. Automated Detection of Salt Marsh Platforms : a Topographic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G.; Mudd, S. M.; Clubb, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring the topographic evolution of coastal marshes is a crucial step toward improving the management of these valuable landscapes under the pressure of relative sea level rise and anthropogenic modification. However, determining their geometrically complex boundaries currently relies on spectral vegetation detection methods or requires labour-intensive field surveys and digitisation.We propose a novel method to reproducibly isolate saltmarsh scarps and platforms from a DEM. Field observations and numerical models show that saltmarshes mature into sub-horizontal platforms delineated by sub-vertical scarps: based on this premise, we identify scarps as lines of local maxima on a slope*relief raster, then fill landmasses from the scarps upward, thus isolating mature marsh platforms. Non-dimensional search parameters allow batch-processing of data without recalibration. We test our method using lidar-derived DEMs of six saltmarshes in England with varying tidal ranges and geometries, for which topographic platforms were manually isolated from tidal flats. Agreement between manual and automatic segregation exceeds 90% for resolutions of 1m, with all but one sites maintaining this performance for resolutions up to 3.5m. For resolutions of 1m, automatically detected platforms are comparable in surface area and elevation distribution to digitised platforms. We also find that our method allows the accurate detection of local bloc failures 3 times larger than the DEM resolution.Detailed inspection reveals that although tidal creeks were digitised as part of the marsh platform, automatic detection classifies them as part of the tidal flat, causing an increase in false negatives and overall platform perimeter. This suggests our method would benefit from a combination with existing creek detection algorithms. Fallen blocs and pioneer zones are inconsistently identified, particularly in macro-tidal marshes, leading to differences between digitisation and the automated method

  15. FUSED SALT METHOD FOR COATING URANIUM WITH A METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubank, L.D.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for coating uranium with a less active metal such as Cr, Ni, or Cu comprising immersing the U in a substantially anhydrous molten solution of a halide of these less active metals in a ternary chloride composition which consists of selected percentages of KCl, NaCl and another chloride such as LiCl or CaCl/sub 2/.

  16. ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSING TO REDUCE SALT IN MEAT PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    E. K. Tunieva; N. A. Gorbunova

    2017-01-01

    The world trends in table salt reduction in meat products contemplate the use of different methods for preservation of taste and consistency in finished products as well as shelf life prolongation. There are several approaches to a sodium chloride reduction in meat products. The paper presents a review of the foreign studies that give evidence of the possibility to maintain quality of traditional meat products produced with the reduced salt content. The studies in the field of salty taste percep...

  17. [Comparison of dietary survey, frequency and 24 hour urinary Na methods in evaluation of salt intake in the population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhong; Lu, Zilong; Yan, Liuxia; Zhang, Jiyu; Tang, Junli; Cai, Xiaoning; Guo, Xiaolei; Ma, Jixiang; Xu, Aiqiang

    2014-12-01

    To compare the difference and correlation between dietary salt intakes assessed by 24 hours urinary Na method, food weighted record method and food frequency questionnaire method. All 2 184 subjects aged 18 to 69 were selected by multi stage stratified cluster random sampling method in Shandong province in June to September, 2011. Dietary salt intakes were measured by 24 hours urinary Na method, food weighted record method and food frequency questionnaire method. The information on gender, age, dining locations and labour intensity of members dining at home for 3 days were recorded. And the dietary habits were surveyed by questionnaire. Salt intakes were 14.0, 12.0 and 10.5 g/d assessed by 24 hours urinary Na method, food weighted record method and food frequency questionnaire, respectively. Comparing with 24 hours urinary Na method, salt intakes assessed by food weighted record method and food frequency questionnaire method were 2.0 g (14.3% undervalued) and 3.4 g (24.3% undervalued) less, respectively. Comparing with 24 hours urinary Na method, the proportion of individuals with salt intake over-reported and under-reported were 42.4% (856/2 020) and 55.3% (1 117/2 020) by food weighted record method, and were 20.7% (418/2 020) and 16.3% (329/2 020) by food frequency questionnaire method, respectively; the proportion of individuals with salt intakes within ± 25% of 24 hours urinary Na method were 36.9% (745/2 020) and 28.4% (574/2 020), respectively. Salt intakes assessed by 24 hours urinary method correlated significantly with both salt intakes assessed by food weighted record method and food frequency questionnaire method; the correlation coefficients were 0.13 and 0.07, respectively. With the increasing of salt intakes by subjects' self-judgment, salt intakes were all rising significantly using three survey methods. Salt intakes of three group population of light, moderate and partial taste salty were 13.6, 13.6 and 14.7 g/d by 24 hours urinary Na method (F

  18. Removal of uranium from gravel using soil washing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ilgook; Kim, Kye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Choi, Jong-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The development of nuclear technology has led to increasing radioactive waste containing uranium being released and disposed in the nuclear sites. Fine grained soils with a size of less than 4 mm are normally decontaminated using soil washing and electro-kinetic technologies. However, there have been few studies on the decontamination of gravels with a size of more than 4 mm. Therefore, it is necessary to study the decontamination of gravel contaminated with radionuclides. The main objective of the present study on soil washing was to define the optimal condition for acid treatment of uranium-polluted gravel. In this study, soil washing method was applied to remove uranium from gravel. The gravel was crushed and classified as particle sizes. The gravel particles were treated with sulfuric acid in a shaking incubator at 60 .deg. C and 150 rpm for 3 h. The optimal particle size of gravel for soil washing in removal of uranium was between 0.45 and 2.0 mm.

  19. Method and apparatus for removing ions from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibler, Jane P.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for selectively removing species of ions from an area of soil. Permeable membranes 14 and 18 impregnated with an ion exchange resin that is specific to one or more species of chemical ions are inserted into ground 12 in close proximity to, and on opposing sides of, a soil area of interest 22. An electric potential is applied across electrodes 26 and 28 to cause the migration of ions out of soil area 22 toward the membranes 14 and 18. Preferably, the resin exchanges ions of sodium or hydrogen for ions of mercury that it captures from soil area 22. Once membranes 14 and 18 become substantially saturated with mercury ions, the potential applied across electrodes 26 and 28 is discontinued and membranes 14 and 18 are preferably removed from soil 12 for storage or recovery of the ions. The membranes are also preferably impregnated with a buffer to inhibit the effect of the hydrolysis of water by current from the electrodes.

  20. The effects of pre-salting methods on salt and water distribution of heavily salted cod, as analyzed by 1H and 23Na MRI, 23Na NMR, low-field NMR and physicochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðjónsdóttir, María; Traoré, Amidou; Jónsson, Ásbjörn

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different pre-salting methods (brine injection with salt with/without polyphosphates, brining and pickling) on the water and salt distribution in dry salted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) fillets was studied with proton and sodium NMR and MRI methods, supported by physicochemical analy...

  1. Removing efficiency of radon from water by different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerova, M.; Holy, K.; Gulasova, Z.; Polaskova, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution problem of radon removing from water samples by different methods was tested. Lowest efficiency of deemanation was achieved at tossing of water from one vessel into the other. For increasing of efficiency deemanation of radon use of needle-bath principle was also used. Low efficiency deemanation was found at trapping of radon from sample of water by toluene (83 ± 5) %, too. Reversal highest efficiency deemanation of radon from water was reached at aerating by argon (95 ± 6)%. It is shown, that reduction of volume activity of radon in water under 0.1 Bq/dm l - 3 is big problem. Suppression of this limit will claim use of more completion and sophistic approaches. (author)

  2. Comparison between two methods for resin removing after bracket debonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo De Marchi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess - using scanning electron microscopy (SEM - the effectiveness of two abrasive discs, one made from silicon and one from aluminum oxide, in removing adhesive remnants (AR after debonding orthodontic brackets. METHODS: Ten randomly selected bovine teeth were used, i.e., 2 in the control group, and the other 8 divided into two groups, which had orthodontic brackets bonded to their surface with Concise Orthodontic Adhesive (3M. The following methods were employed - in one single step - to remove AR after debracketing: Group A, Optimize discs (TDV and Group B, Onegloss discs (Shofu, used at low speed. After removing the AR with the aforementioned methods, the teeth were prepared to undergo SEM analysis, and photographs were taken of the enamel surface with 50x magnification. Six examiners evaluated the photographs applying the Zachrisson and Årtun enamel surface index (ESI system (1979. RESULTS: Group A exhibited minor scratches on the enamel surface as well as some AR in some of the photographs, while Group B showed a smoother surface, little or no AR and some abrasion marks in the photographs. No statistically significant differences were found between the two methods and the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The two abrasive discs were effective in removing the AR after bracket debonding in one single step.OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar, por microscopia eletrônica de varredura, a eficácia de dois discos abrasivos de silicone e óxido de alumínio para a remoção da resina remanescente após a descolagem de braquetes ortodônticos. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados 10 dentes bovinos selecionados aleatoriamente, sendo 2 para o grupo controle e os demais divididos em dois grupos, os quais receberam colagem de braquetes ortodônticos com resina ortodôntica Concise (3M. Os métodos de remoção da resina após a descolagem dos acessórios ortodônticos em apenas uma etapa foram: Grupo A - disco

  3. Using microbiological leaching method to remove heavy metals from sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuyu Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial leaching is one of the most effective methods to remove heavy metals from sludge. In the conducted researches, the sludge samples were processed with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans obtained via cultivation, extraction and purification processes. Heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni were leached from sludge by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans within different substrate concentration and pH value conditions. It is defined that from the point of view of economy and efficiency the optimal concentration of FeSO4.7H2O and sulfur for bio-leaching process was 0.2 g. The leaching rates of heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni of the same concentration were 74.72%, 81.54%, 70.46% and 77.35% respectively. However, no significant differences depending on the pH value among the leaching rates were defined, even for the pH value of 1.5. Along with the removal of heavy metals from sludge, the organic matter, N, P, K were also leached to some extent. The losing rate of phosphorus was the highest and reached 38.44%. However, the content of organic matter, N, P, K in the processed sludge were higher in comparison with level I of the National Soil Quality Standards of China. Ecological risk of heavy metals in sludge before and after leaching was assessed by Index of Geo-accumulation (Igeo and comprehensive potential risk (RI. The results of research defined that the content of heavy metals in sludge meets the level of low ecological risk after leaching and their contents is lower in comparison with the National Agricultural Sludge Standard of China. Sludge leached by biological methods is possible to use for treatment for increasing soil fertility.

  4. Performance of titanium salts compared to conventional FeCl 3 for the removal of algal organic matter (AOM) in synthetic seawater: Coagulation performance, organic fraction removal and floc characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Chekli, L.; Corjon, E.; Tabatabai, S. Assiyeh Alizadeh; Naidu, G.; Tamburic, B.; Park, S.H.; Shon, H.K.

    2017-01-01

    During algal bloom periods, operation of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) pretreatment processes (e.g. ultrafiltration (UF)) has been hindered due to the high concentration of algal cells and algal organic matter (AOM). The present study evaluated for the first time the performance of titanium salts (i.e. titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and polytitanium tetrachloride (PTC)) for the removal of AOM in seawater and results were compared with the conventional FeCl3 coagulant. Previous studies already demonstrated that titanium salts not only provide a cost-effective alternative to conventional coagulants by producing a valuable by-product but also minimise the environmental impact of sludge production. Results from this study showed that both TiCl4 and PTC achieved better performance than FeCl3 in terms of turbidity, UV254 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal at similar coagulant dose. Liquid chromatography – organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) was used to determine the removal of AOM compounds based on their molecular weight (MW). This investigation revealed that both humic substances and low MW organics were preferentially removed (i.e. up to 93% removal) while all three coagulants showed poorer performance for the removal of high MW biopolymers (i.e. less than 50% removal). The detailed characterization of flocs indicated that both titanium coagulants can grow faster, reach larger size and present a more compact structure, which is highly advantageous for the design of smaller and more compact mixing and sedimentation tanks. Both titanium coagulants also presented a higher ability to withstand shear force, which was related to the higher amount of DOC adsorbed with the aggregated flocs. Finally, TiCl4 had a better recovery after breakage suggesting that charge neutralization may be the dominant mechanism for this coagulant, while the lower recovery of both PTC and FeCl3 indicated that sweep flocculation is also a contributing mechanism for the coagulation of AOM.

  5. Performance of titanium salts compared to conventional FeCl 3 for the removal of algal organic matter (AOM) in synthetic seawater: Coagulation performance, organic fraction removal and floc characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Chekli, L.

    2017-06-20

    During algal bloom periods, operation of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) pretreatment processes (e.g. ultrafiltration (UF)) has been hindered due to the high concentration of algal cells and algal organic matter (AOM). The present study evaluated for the first time the performance of titanium salts (i.e. titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and polytitanium tetrachloride (PTC)) for the removal of AOM in seawater and results were compared with the conventional FeCl3 coagulant. Previous studies already demonstrated that titanium salts not only provide a cost-effective alternative to conventional coagulants by producing a valuable by-product but also minimise the environmental impact of sludge production. Results from this study showed that both TiCl4 and PTC achieved better performance than FeCl3 in terms of turbidity, UV254 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal at similar coagulant dose. Liquid chromatography – organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) was used to determine the removal of AOM compounds based on their molecular weight (MW). This investigation revealed that both humic substances and low MW organics were preferentially removed (i.e. up to 93% removal) while all three coagulants showed poorer performance for the removal of high MW biopolymers (i.e. less than 50% removal). The detailed characterization of flocs indicated that both titanium coagulants can grow faster, reach larger size and present a more compact structure, which is highly advantageous for the design of smaller and more compact mixing and sedimentation tanks. Both titanium coagulants also presented a higher ability to withstand shear force, which was related to the higher amount of DOC adsorbed with the aggregated flocs. Finally, TiCl4 had a better recovery after breakage suggesting that charge neutralization may be the dominant mechanism for this coagulant, while the lower recovery of both PTC and FeCl3 indicated that sweep flocculation is also a contributing mechanism for the coagulation of AOM.

  6. Surface functionalization of cyclic olefin copolymer with aryldiazonium salts: A covalent grafting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisset, Florian; Vieillard, Julien; Berton, Benjamin; Morin-Grognet, Sandrine; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Le Derf, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An effective method to modify cyclic olefin copolymer surface. • The surface of COC was modified by covalent grafting of aryl diazonium salts. • The wettability of COC surface was modulated by diazonium salts. • Photoinitiation and chemical reduction have to be combined to graft diazonium salt on COC surface. - Abstract: Covalent immobilization of biomolecules on the surface of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) is still a tough challenge. We developed a robust method for COC surface grafting through reaction with aryldiazonium. Chemical diazonium reduction generated an aryl radical and the formation of a grafted film layer on the organic surface. We also demonstrated that the chemical reduction of diazonium salt was not sufficient to form a film on the COC surface. UV illumination had to be combined with chemical reduction to graft an aryl layer onto the COC surface. We optimized organic film deposition by using different chemical reducers, different reaction times and reagent proportions. We characterized surface modifications by fluorescence microscopy and contact angle measurements, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, and assessed the topography of the aryl film by atomic force microscopy. This original strategy allowed us to evidence various organic functions to graft biomolecules onto COC surfaces with a fast and efficient technique

  7. Surface functionalization of cyclic olefin copolymer with aryldiazonium salts: A covalent grafting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisset, Florian, E-mail: florian.brisset@etu.univ-rouen.fr [UMR CNRS 6014 COBRA, FR 3038, Université de Rouen, 55 rue Saint Germain, 27000 Evreux (France); Vieillard, Julien, E-mail: julien.vieillard@univ-rouen.fr [UMR CNRS 6014 COBRA, FR 3038, Université de Rouen, 55 rue Saint Germain, 27000 Evreux (France); Berton, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.berton@univ-rouen.fr [EA 3233 SMS, Université de Rouen, 1 rue du 7ème Chasseurs, BP281, 27002 Evreux Cedex (France); Morin-Grognet, Sandrine, E-mail: sandrine.morin@univ-rouen.fr [EA 3829 MERCI, Université de Rouen, 1 rue du 7ème Chasseurs, BP281, 27002 Evreux Cedex (France); Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile, E-mail: cecile.duclairoir@univ-rouen.fr [EA 4312 LMSM, Université de Rouen, 55 rue Saint Germain, 27000 Evreux (France); Le Derf, Franck, E-mail: franck.lederf@univ-rouen.fr [UMR CNRS 6014 COBRA, FR 3038, Université de Rouen, 55 rue Saint Germain, 27000 Evreux (France)

    2015-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An effective method to modify cyclic olefin copolymer surface. • The surface of COC was modified by covalent grafting of aryl diazonium salts. • The wettability of COC surface was modulated by diazonium salts. • Photoinitiation and chemical reduction have to be combined to graft diazonium salt on COC surface. - Abstract: Covalent immobilization of biomolecules on the surface of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) is still a tough challenge. We developed a robust method for COC surface grafting through reaction with aryldiazonium. Chemical diazonium reduction generated an aryl radical and the formation of a grafted film layer on the organic surface. We also demonstrated that the chemical reduction of diazonium salt was not sufficient to form a film on the COC surface. UV illumination had to be combined with chemical reduction to graft an aryl layer onto the COC surface. We optimized organic film deposition by using different chemical reducers, different reaction times and reagent proportions. We characterized surface modifications by fluorescence microscopy and contact angle measurements, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, and assessed the topography of the aryl film by atomic force microscopy. This original strategy allowed us to evidence various organic functions to graft biomolecules onto COC surfaces with a fast and efficient technique.

  8. [The method to remove nitrite from tap water by tea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M; Chen, L; Xian, H

    1997-03-01

    Drinking water (tap water) is polluted in pipelines by bacteria after long distance transportation. The water contains nitrite (NO2-) which is potentially harmful to human health. The nitrite concentrations range from 0.10 to 2.0 mg/L. Our experiment proved that NO2- could not be removed by boiling, but could be removed by tea. As a natural antioxidant, tea contains several antioxidants, such as ascorbic acid and catechins, which removed NO2- from tap water effectively.

  9. An empirical model for salt removal percentage in water under the effect of different current intensities of current carrying coil at different flow rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameen S. AbdelHady

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic treatment of hard water is an alternative, simple approach by which the hard water that needs to be treated flows through a magnetic field. This field is created by inducing current in a coil wrapped around a pipe. Consequently some of its properties, such as total dissolved salts (TDS, conductivity (Ec and PH change. The primary purpose of hard water treatment is to decrease TDS in the incoming liquid stream. Using performance data from the application of different magnetic field densities on the different flow levels of water, empirical mathematical models were developed relating the salt removal percentage (SRP to operating flow rate and current of the coil. The obtained experimental results showed that the SRP increased with increasing the current at low flow rates (up to 0.75 ml/s.

  10. A New Switching-Based Median Filtering Scheme and Algorithm for Removal of High-Density Salt and Pepper Noise in Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraj V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new switching-based median filtering scheme for restoration of images that are highly corrupted by salt and pepper noise is proposed. An algorithm based on the scheme is developed. The new scheme introduces the concept of substitution of noisy pixels by linear prediction prior to estimation. A novel simplified linear predictor is developed for this purpose. The objective of the scheme and algorithm is the removal of high-density salt and pepper noise in images. The new algorithm shows significantly better image quality with good PSNR, reduced MSE, good edge preservation, and reduced streaking. The good performance is achieved with reduced computational complexity. A comparison of the performance is made with several existing algorithms in terms of visual and quantitative results. The performance of the proposed scheme and algorithm is demonstrated.

  11. The comparison of placental removal methods on operative blood loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waqar, F.; Fawad, A.

    2008-01-01

    On an average 1 litre of blood is lost during Caesarean Section. Many variable techniques have been tried to reduce this blood loss. Many study trials have shown the spontaneous delivery of placenta method to be superior over manual method because of reduced intra operative blood loss and reduced incidence of post operative endometritis. The main objective of our study was to compare the risk of blood loss associated with spontaneous and manual removal of the placenta during caesarean section. This study was conducted at Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Islamic International Medical Complex, Islamabad from September 2004 to September 2005. All Women undergoing elective or emergency caesarean section were included in the study. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy below 37 weeks, severe maternal anaemia, and prolonged rupture of the membranes with fever, placenta praevia, placenta accreta and clotting disorders. Patients were allocated to the two groups randomly. Group A comprised of women in whom the obstetrician waited a maximum of 5 minutes till the placenta delivered spontaneously. In group B the obstetrician manually cleaved out the placenta as soon as the infant was delivered. The primary outcome measures noted were difference in haemoglobin of >2 gm/dl (preoperatively and postoperatively), time interval between delivery of baby and placenta, significant blood loss (>1000 cc), additional use of oxytocics, total operating time and blood transfusions. Data was analysed by SPSS. Statistical tests used for specific comparison were chi square-test and Student's t-test. One hundred and forty-five patients were allocated to two groups randomly. Seventy-eight patients were allocated to group A and 67 patients allocated to group B. Mean maternal age, birth weight, and total operating time were the same in two groups, but blood loss as measured by a difference in haemoglobin of greater then 2 grams/dl was statistically significant. Significant blood loss (>1000 cc

  12. Accuracy analysis of the thermal diffusivity measurement of molten salts by stepwise heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yoshio; Furukawa, Kazuo

    1976-11-01

    The stepwise heating method for measuring thermal diffusivity of molten salts is based on the electrical heating of a thin metal plate as a plane heat source in the molten salt. In this method, the following estimations on error are of importance: (1) thickness effect of the metal plate, (2) effective length between the plate and a temperature measuring point and (3) effect of the noise on the temperature rise signal. In this report, a measuring apparatus is proposed and measuring conditions are suggested on the basis of error estimations. The measurements for distilled water and glycerine were made first to test the performance; the results agreed well with standard values. The thermal diffusivities of molten NaNO 3 at 320-380 0 C and of molten Li 2 BeF 4 at 470-700 0 C were measured. (auth.)

  13. A new method to produce nanoscale iron for nitrate removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.-S.; Hsu, H.-D.; Li, C.-W.

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes a novel technology combining electrochemical and ultrasonic methods to produce nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI). With platinum placed in the cathode and the presence of the dispersion agent, 0.2g/l cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cation surfactant, in the solution, the nanoscale iron particle was successfully produced with diameter of 1-20 nm and specific surface area of 25.4m 2 /g. The produced NZVI was tested in batch experiments for nitrate removal. The results showed that the nitrate reduction was affected by pH. Al low pH, nitrate was shown faster decline and more reduction in term of g NO 3 - -N/g NZVI. The reaction was first order and kinetic coefficients for the four pHs were directly related to pH with R 2 >0.95. Comparing with microscale zero-valent iron (45μm, 0.183m 2 /g), microscale zero-valent iron converted nitrate to ammonia completely, but NZVI converted nitrate to ammonia partially from 36.2 to 45.3% dependent on pH. For mass balance of iron species, since the dissolved iron in the solution was very low ( 2 O 3 was recognized. Thus the reaction mechanisms can be determined

  14. Case studies of sealing methods and materials used in the salt and potash mining industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyermann, T.J.; Sambeek, L.L. Van; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-11-01

    Sealing methods and materials currently used in salt and potash industries were surveyed to determine if systems analogous to the shaft seal design proposed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) exist. Emphasis was first given to concrete and then expanded to include other materials. Representative case studies could provide useful design, construction, and performance information for development of the WIPP shaft seal system design. This report contains a summary of engineering and construction details of various sealing methods used by mining industries for bulkheads and shaft liners. Industrial experience, as determined from site visits and literature reviews, provides few examples of bulkheads built in salt and potash mines for control of water. Sealing experiences representing site-specific conditions often have little engineering design to back up the methods employed and even less quantitative evaluation of seal performance. Cases examined include successes and failures, and both contribute to a database of experiences. Mass salt-saturated concrete placement under ground was accomplished under several varied conditions. Information derived from this database has been used to assess the performance of concrete as a seal material. Concrete appears to be a robust material with successes in several case studies. 42 refs

  15. Case studies of sealing methods and materials used in the salt and potash mining industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyermann, T.J.; Sambeek, L.L. Van [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.

    1995-11-01

    Sealing methods and materials currently used in salt and potash industries were surveyed to determine if systems analogous to the shaft seal design proposed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) exist. Emphasis was first given to concrete and then expanded to include other materials. Representative case studies could provide useful design, construction, and performance information for development of the WIPP shaft seal system design. This report contains a summary of engineering and construction details of various sealing methods used by mining industries for bulkheads and shaft liners. Industrial experience, as determined from site visits and literature reviews, provides few examples of bulkheads built in salt and potash mines for control of water. Sealing experiences representing site-specific conditions often have little engineering design to back up the methods employed and even less quantitative evaluation of seal performance. Cases examined include successes and failures, and both contribute to a database of experiences. Mass salt-saturated concrete placement under ground was accomplished under several varied conditions. Information derived from this database has been used to assess the performance of concrete as a seal material. Concrete appears to be a robust material with successes in several case studies. 42 refs.

  16. Low temperature synthesis & characterization of lead-free BCZT ceramics using molten salt method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jai Shree, K.; Chandrakala, E.; Das, Dibakar

    2018-04-01

    Piezoelectric properties are greatly influenced by the synthesis route, microstructure, stoichiometry of the chemical composition, purity of the starting materials. In this study, molten salt method was used to prepare lead-free BCZT ceramics. Molten salt method is one of the simplestmethods to prepare chemically-purified, single phase powders in high yield often at lower temperatures and shorten reaction time. Calcination of the molten salt synthesized powders resulted in asingle-phase perovskite structure at 1000 °C which is ˜ 350 °C less than the conventional solid-sate reaction method. With increasing calcination temperature the average template size was increased (˜ 0.5-2 µm). Formation of well dispersive templates improves the sinterability at lower temperatures. Lead-free BCZT ceramics sintered at 1500 °C for 2 h resulted in homogenous and highly dense microstructure with ˜92% of the theoretical density and a grain size of ˜ 35 µm. This highly dense microstructure could enhance the piezoelectric properties of the system.

  17. Sulphate Removal from Water by Carbon Residue from Biomass Gasification: Effect of Chemical Modification Methods on Sulphate Removal Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Runtti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulphate removal from mine water is a problem because traditional chemical precipitation does not remove all sulphates. In addition, it creates lime sediment as a secondary waste. Therefore, an inexpensive and environmental-friendly sulphate removal method is needed in addition to precipitation. In this study, carbon residues from a wood gasification process were repurposed as precursors to a suitable sorbent for SO42- ion removal. The raw material was modified using ZnCl2, BaCl2, CaCl2, FeCl3, or FeCl2. Carbon residues modified with FeCl3 were selected for further consideration because the removal efficiency toward sulphate was the highest. Batch sorption experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of the initial pH, initial SO42- ion concentration, and contact time on sulphate removal. The removal of SO42- ions using Fe-modified carbon residue was notably higher compared with unmodified carbon residue and commercially available activated carbon. The sorption data exhibited pseudo-second-order kinetics. The isotherm analysis indicated that the sorption data of Fe-modified carbon residues can be represented by the bi-Langmuir isotherm model.

  18. Investigation to develop methods for removal of oxygen from coals. [None

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, N.E.; Khandhadia, P.S.; Furimsky, E.

    1985-02-01

    Several inorganic reducing agents of various chemical characteristics have been tested to see if they reduce the oxygen contained in coal. It was found that oxygen content of coals decreased when they were heated in only water (blank runs). The treatment with the reducing agents containing sulphur did not increase the oxygen removal over that achieved in the blank runs. However, it appears that the ferrous salt catalytically deoxygenated both the lignite and bituminous coals. 5 references.

  19. Method of preparation of a CO.sub.2 removal sorbent with high chemical stability during multiple cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Rosencwaig, Shira

    2015-07-14

    Method for the production of a clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent prepared by integrating a clay substrate, basic alkali salt, and amine liquid. The basic alkali salt is present relative to the clay substrate in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 50 parts per 100 parts of the clay substrate. The amine liquid is present relative to a clay-alkali combination in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 10 parts per 10 parts of the clay-alkali combination. The clay substrate and basic alkali salt may be combined in a solid-solid heterogeneous mixture and followed by introduction of the amine liquid. Alternatively, an alkaline solution may be blended with the amine solution prior to contacting the clay substrate. The clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent is particularly advantageous for low temperature CO.sub.2 removal cycles in a gas stream having a CO.sub.2 concentration less than around 2000 ppm and an oxygen concentration around 21%, such as air. Results are presented illustrating the performance of the clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent compared to a clay-amine sorbent lacking the alkali inclusion.

  20. Method of removing iodine and compounds thereof from gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keener, R.L.; Kittle, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including an acrylic backbone formed by the suspension polymerization of a mixture of an acrylic and a crosslinking monomer are useful in the removal of iodine and iodine compounds from gaseous effluents. Removal of radioactive iodine contaminants, particularly alkyl iodine compounds or hydrogen iodine, under extreme conditions, namely temperatures up to 180 0 C and humidities up to 100 percent, from effluents resulting from a major nuclear accident could probably be adsorbed by these resins described herein

  1. A method for polymerizing insaturated monomers through irradiation in the presence of a salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phalangas, C.J.; Restaino, A.J.; Yun, Hanbo.

    1975-01-01

    The method consists in irradiating an aqueous solution with a pH between about 2 and 12, comprising from 10 to 40% about an ethylene-insaturated monomer or of mixtures thereof with vinyl-sulfonic acid, an alkaline metal salt of said acid or acrylamide diacetone and at least 3% of a potassium, sodium, lithium, ammonium or aluminium salt, by means of highly powerful radiations, e.g. gamma rays, the radiation intensity being between 1000 and 200000 rads per hour and the overall radiation dose being in the 1000-30000 rads. The obtained product is a polymer aqueous solution either in the liquid state or in the form of a gel [fr

  2. Active methods of mercury removal from flue gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczak, Marta; Budzyń, Stanisław; Szczurowski, Jakub; Kogut, Krzysztof; Burmistrz, Piotr

    2018-03-23

    Due to its adverse impact on health, as well as its global distribution, long atmospheric lifetime and propensity for deposition in the aquatic environment and in living tissue, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has classified mercury and its compounds as a severe air quality threat. Such widespread presence of mercury in the environment originates from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Global anthropogenic emission of mercury is evaluated at 2000 Mg year -1 . According to the National Centre for Emissions Management (Pol. KOBiZE) report for 2014, Polish annual mercury emissions amount to approximately 10 Mg. Over 90% of mercury emissions in Poland originate from combustion of coal.The purpose of this paper was to understand mercury behaviour during sub-bituminous coal and lignite combustion for flue gas purification in terms of reduction of emissions by active methods. The average mercury content in Polish sub-bituminous coal and lignite was 103.7 and 443.5 μg kg -1 . The concentration of mercury in flue gases emitted into the atmosphere was 5.3 μg m -3 for sub-bituminous coal and 17.5 μg m -3 for lignite. The study analysed six low-cost sorbents with the average achieved efficiency of mercury removal from 30.6 to 92.9% for sub-bituminous coal and 22.8 to 80.3% for lignite combustion. Also, the effect of coke dust grain size was examined for mercury sorptive properties. The fine fraction of coke dust (CD) adsorbed within 243-277 μg Hg kg -1 , while the largest fraction at only 95 μg Hg kg -1 . The CD fraction physical oxidation of Hg in the flue gas, its effectiveness has increased twofold.

  3. Fundamental study on the salt distillation from the mixtures of rare earth precipitates and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H. C.; Eun, H. C.; Cho, Y. Z.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, I. T.

    2008-01-01

    An electrorefining process of spent nuclear fuel generates waste salt containing some radioactive metal chlorides. The most effective method to reduce salt waste volume is to separate radioactive metals from non-radioactive salts. A promising approach is to change radioactive metal chlorides into salt-insoluble oxides by an oxygen sparging. Following this, salt distillation process is available to effectively separate the precipitated particulate metal oxides from salt. This study investigated the distillation rates of LiCl-KCl eutectic salt under different vacuums at elevated temperatures. The first part study investigated distillation rates of eutectic salt under different vacuums at high temperatures by using thermo-gravimetric furnace system. In the second part, we tested the removal of eutectic salt from the RE precipitates by using the laboratory vacuum distillation furnace system. Investigated variables were the temperature of mixture, the degree of vacuum and the time

  4. Method and apparatus for removing an in-core monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomiji; Saito, Takashi; Ishii, Yoshimi; Arikawa, Isamu; Yamagata, Hiroko.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To cut an unremovable in-core monitor in a suitable position by remote control within a reactor and thereafter to remove the in-core monitor. Structure: A cutter body comprises an upper gripping mechanism, a mechanism for upwardly and downwardly moving the upper gripping mechanism, a cutter portion, and a lower gripping mechanism, and when the in-core monitor becomes impossible to be removed from a core, the cutter body is set within a cell of a top guide. First, the in-core monitor can be gripped by the gripping mechanism and then cut by operation of the cutter portion. Next, the lower part of the monitor is gripped by the lower gripping mechanism. Whereafter, the upwardly and downwardly moving mechanism can be operated to remove the head of the in-core monitor from a recess in a top guide. When the cutter body is then removed from the top guide, the in-core monitor is completed to be cut and removed. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Fuel removing method for high burnup fuel and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terakado, Shogo; Owada, Isao; Kanno, Yoshio; Aizawa, Sakue; Yamahara, Takeshi.

    1993-01-01

    A through hole is perforated at the center of a fuel rod in a cladding tube by a diamond drill in a water vessel. Further, the through hole is enlarged by the diamond drill. A pellet removing tool is attached to a drill chuck instead of the diamond drill. Then, the thin cylindrical fuel pellet remaining on the inner surface of the cladding tube is removed by using a pellet removing tool while applying vibrations. Subsequently, a wire brush having a slightly larger diameter than that of the inner diameter of the cladding tube is attached to the drill chuck and rotated to finish the inner surface, so that a small amount of pellets remained on the inner surface of the cladding tube is removed. Pellet powders in the water vessel are collected and recovered to the water container. This can remove high burnup fuels which are firmly sticked to the cladding tube, without giving thermal or mechanical influences on the cladding tube. (I.N.)

  6. Synthesis of surface imprinted nanospheres for selective removal of uranium from simulants of Sambhar salt lake and ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milja, Thazhathuparambil Elias; Prathish, Krishnapillai Padmajakumari; Prasada Rao, Talasila

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Surface imprinted nanospheres synthesized by modified precipitation polymerization method offer higher retention capacity and imprinting coefficients for removal of uranium from natural waters. - Abstract: Imprinted polymer nanospheres for uranium were prepared by complexing uranyl ion on to quinoline-8-ol functionalized 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane modified silica nanoparticles followed by surface imprinting with 4-VP (4-vinyl pyridine), HEMA (2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate) and EGDMA (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) as the functional monomers and cross linking agent respectively with AIBN (2,2'-azo-bis-isobutyronitrile) as initiator and 2-methoxyethanol as the porogen. Non-imprinted polymer material was also prepared under similar conditions omitting uranyl ion. The above materials were used for solid phase extraction of uranium. Recent realization that its chemical toxicity is dominant than radiation hazards makes decontamination a relevant topic for environmental point of view, particularly in the light of projected global thrust for uranium fuel based atomic power plants. The material offers high retention capacity of 97.1 μmol g -1 for 10 mg L -1 of uranium that does not require tedious grinding and sieving steps, is water compatible and works in the pH range of 5-7, making it ideal for possible use in decontamination of polluted natural water samples or front end effluents of nuclear power reactors.

  7. Removal of foot-and-mouth disease virus infectivity in salted natural casings by minor adaptation of standardized industrial procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnker, J J; Haas, B; Berends, B R

    2007-04-10

    Intestines are used for the production of natural casings as edible sausage containers. Derived from animals (pigs and sheep) experimentally infected with FMDV (initial dosage 10(7.3) PFU/ml, strain O(1Kaufbeuren)), these natural casings were treated with sodium chloride or a phosphate salts/sodium chloride mixture and the residual FMDV titres measured. After storage at about 20 degrees C, no remaining infectivity was found after either treatment, whereas casings stored at 4 degrees C still contained infectivity. Storage of salted casings at about 20 degrees C for 30 days is already part of the Standard Operating Procedures (included in HACCP) of the international casing industry and can therefore be considered as a protective measure for the international trade in natural casings.

  8. Present municipal water treatment and potential removal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; White, S.K.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium analyses of raw water, intermediate stage, and treated water samples from 20 municipal water treatment plants indicated that the present treatment practices were not effective in removing uranium from raw waters when the influent concentration was in the range of 0.1 to 16 μg/L uranium. Laboratory batch tests revealed that the water softening and coagulant chemicals commonly used were able to remove more than 90% of the dissolved uranium ( < 100 μg/L) in waters if an optimum pH and dosage were provided. Absorbents, titanium oxide and activated charcoal, were also effective in uranium removal under specific conditions. Strong base anion exchange resin was the most efficient uranium adsorbent, and an anion exchange column is a recommended option for the treatment of private well waters containing uranium at higher than desirable levels

  9. Performance of titanium salts compared to conventional FeCl3 for the removal of algal organic matter (AOM) in synthetic seawater: Coagulation performance, organic fraction removal and floc characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekli, L; Corjon, E; Tabatabai, S A A; Naidu, G; Tamburic, B; Park, S H; Shon, H K

    2017-10-01

    During algal bloom periods, operation of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) pretreatment processes (e.g. ultrafiltration (UF)) has been hindered due to the high concentration of algal cells and algal organic matter (AOM). The present study evaluated for the first time the performance of titanium salts (i.e. titanium tetrachloride (TiCl 4 ) and polytitanium tetrachloride (PTC)) for the removal of AOM in seawater and results were compared with the conventional FeCl 3 coagulant. Previous studies already demonstrated that titanium salts not only provide a cost-effective alternative to conventional coagulants by producing a valuable by-product but also minimise the environmental impact of sludge production. Results from this study showed that both TiCl 4 and PTC achieved better performance than FeCl 3 in terms of turbidity, UV 254 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal at similar coagulant dose. Liquid chromatography - organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) was used to determine the removal of AOM compounds based on their molecular weight (MW). This investigation revealed that both humic substances and low MW organics were preferentially removed (i.e. up to 93% removal) while all three coagulants showed poorer performance for the removal of high MW biopolymers (i.e. less than 50% removal). The detailed characterization of flocs indicated that both titanium coagulants can grow faster, reach larger size and present a more compact structure, which is highly advantageous for the design of smaller and more compact mixing and sedimentation tanks. Both titanium coagulants also presented a higher ability to withstand shear force, which was related to the higher amount of DOC adsorbed with the aggregated flocs. Finally, TiCl 4 had a better recovery after breakage suggesting that charge neutralization may be the dominant mechanism for this coagulant, while the lower recovery of both PTC and FeCl 3 indicated that sweep flocculation is also a contributing mechanism for the coagulation

  10. A new method to evaluate the sealing reliability of the flanged connections for Molten Salt Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiming, E-mail: liqiming@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Tian, Jian; Zhou, Chong [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wang, Naxiu, E-mail: wangnaxiu@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We novelly valuate the sealing reliability of the flanged connections for MSRs. • We focus on the passive decrease of the leak impetus in flanged connections. • The modified flanged connections are acquired a sealing ability of self-adjustment. • Effects of redesigned flange configurations on molten salt leakage are discussed. - Abstract: The Thorium based Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) project is a future Generation IV nuclear reactor system proposed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences with the strategic goal of meeting the growing energy needs in the Chinese economic development and social progress. It is based on liquid salts served as both fuel and primary coolant and consequently great challenges are brought into the sealing of the flanged connections. In this study, an improved prototype flange assembly is performed on the strength of the Freeze-Flange initially developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The calculation results of the finite element model established to analyze the temperature profile of the Freeze-Flange agree well with the experimental data, which indicates that the numerical simulation method is credible. For further consideration, the ideal-gas thermodynamic model, together with the mathematical approximation, is novelly borrowed to theoretically evaluate the sealing performance of the modified Freeze-Flange and the traditional double gaskets bolted flange joint. This study focuses on the passive decrease of the leak driving force due to multiple gaskets introduced in flanged connections for MSR. The effects of the redesigned flange configuration on molten salt leakage resistance are discussed in detail.

  11. Methods of characterization of salt formations in view of spent fuel final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconu, Daniela; Balan, Valeriu; Mirion, Ilie

    2002-01-01

    Deep disposal in geological formations of salt, granite and clay seems to be at present the most proper and commonly adopted solution for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and spent fuel. Disposing such wastes represents the top-priority issue of the European research community in the field of nuclear power. Although seemingly premature for Romanian power system, the interest for final disposal of spent fuel is justified by the long duration implied by the studies targeting this objective. At the same time these studies represent the Romanian nuclear research contribution in the frame of the efforts of integration within the European research field. Although Romania has not made so far a decision favoring a given geological formation for the final disposal of spent fuel resulting from Cernavoda NPP, the most generally taken into consideration appears the salt formation. The final decision will be made following the evaluation of its performances to spent fuel disposal based on the values of the specific parameters of the geological formation. In order to supply the data required as input parameters in the codes of evaluation of the geological formation performances, the INR Pitesti initiated a package of modern and complex methodologies for such determinations. The studies developed so far followed up the special phenomenon of salt convergence, a phenomenon characteristic for only this kind of rock, as well as the radionuclide migration. These studies allow a better understanding of these processes of upmost importance for disposal's safety. The methods and the experimental installation designed and realized at INR Pitesti aimed at determination of thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, specific heat, which are all parameters of high specific interest for high level radioactive waste or spent fuel disposal. The paper presents the results of these studies as well as the methodologies, the experimental installations and the findings

  12. A new method to evaluate the sealing reliability of the flanged connections for Molten Salt Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qiming; Tian, Jian; Zhou, Chong; Wang, Naxiu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We novelly valuate the sealing reliability of the flanged connections for MSRs. • We focus on the passive decrease of the leak impetus in flanged connections. • The modified flanged connections are acquired a sealing ability of self-adjustment. • Effects of redesigned flange configurations on molten salt leakage are discussed. - Abstract: The Thorium based Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) project is a future Generation IV nuclear reactor system proposed by the Chinese Academy of Sciences with the strategic goal of meeting the growing energy needs in the Chinese economic development and social progress. It is based on liquid salts served as both fuel and primary coolant and consequently great challenges are brought into the sealing of the flanged connections. In this study, an improved prototype flange assembly is performed on the strength of the Freeze-Flange initially developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The calculation results of the finite element model established to analyze the temperature profile of the Freeze-Flange agree well with the experimental data, which indicates that the numerical simulation method is credible. For further consideration, the ideal-gas thermodynamic model, together with the mathematical approximation, is novelly borrowed to theoretically evaluate the sealing performance of the modified Freeze-Flange and the traditional double gaskets bolted flange joint. This study focuses on the passive decrease of the leak driving force due to multiple gaskets introduced in flanged connections for MSR. The effects of the redesigned flange configuration on molten salt leakage resistance are discussed in detail

  13. Method of removing bulk sodium from metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffei, H.P.; Borisch, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    A process of removing sodium from an article, particularly one made of stainless steel, by treating it with a mixture of water vapor and a gas which is inert to sodium is described. By selecting combinations of temperature and water vapor-to-gas ratio, the reaction temperature is controlled to prevent damage to the articles

  14. Removal method of fluorescent dyes as pretreatment for measurement of major ion concentrations and hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Takuma; Kashiwaya, Koki; Kodama, Hiroki; Miyajima, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The major ion concentration and isotope ratio of hydrogen and oxygen can provide important information for migration of groundwater. Sometimes, quantitative estimation of these chemical and isotopic characteristics of solution is necessary for groundwater containing fluorescent dyes, which are used in drilling borehole and tracer experiments. However, sometimes correct estimation is disturbed by dyes and they become a cause of troubles for measurement equipments. Thus development of method to remove dyes is required so that the characteristics of groundwater can be estimated without the negative effect of dyes on measurement or equipments. In this study, removal of four representative dyes (Uranin, Eosin, Naphthalenesulfonic acid sodium(NAP) and Amino G acid potassium salt (AG)) was investigated. Uranin and Eosin were found to be removed by non-ionic synthetic resin: HP2MG. 99.99% of the dyes were removed from initial solutions containing dyes with 10 mg/L after contact with resin, while the contact had little effect on ion concentrations and oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. Thus the chemical and isotopic characteristics of groundwater samples containing Uranin and Eosin can be obtained by using the HP2MG resin. On the other hand, the NAP and AG were found to be difficult to remove by the HP2MG resin but they were able to be removed by anion exchange resin (Dowex 1x8). Though contact of solution with Dowex 1x8 did not affect cation concentrations and hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios, anion concentrations were changed by the contact. Therefore the Dowex 1x8 is only applicable to estimation of the cation concentrations and isotope ratio of hydrogen and oxygen. When both anion and cation concentrations from the samples were necessary, Uranin or Eosin were recommended as a tracer in drilling or tracer experiments. (author)

  15. Obstacle detection method, obstacle removing method, device and production line for practicing the methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Takao; Ishimatsu, Tsuneo; Komata, Hisashi; Suzuki, Keisaburo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides techniques for detecting and removing obstacles, which can be applied to pipelines and vessels to be used in structures such as nuclear power structures and electric power generation facilities. Namely, when the pipelines or vessels are in any of the stages, namely, production, installation, before the use after installation and before the reuse after inspection, obstacles remaining in the pipelines and vessels are blown off by using a fluid jetting mechanism (air compressor). Elastic waves generated when the blown off obstacles abut against the pipelines and vessels are detected by using a sensor. As a result, the remaining obstacles can be detected during any one of the stages described above. The blowing is repeated till the absence of the obstacles is confirmed by elastic wave signals detected by the sensor. As a result, the remaining obstacles can be removed. (I.S.)

  16. Method of Black Liquor Combustion to Remove Silicon from Wheat Straw Pulping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aluminium sulphate and sodium aluminate on physical and chemical properties of wheat straw pulp black liquor were studied. Results showed that the expansion rate was enhanced by increasing the aluminum salt content; furthermore, the effect of sodium aluminate was better than that of aluminum sulfate. The maximum desilication rate of 92.31% was reached with the addition of 3% sodium aluminate. A rheometer showed that aluminum salt had little impact on the viscosity of thick black liquor, so even at a high temperature it could be conveyed by pumps in paper mill at 110 °C. The effect of aluminium salt on the silicon removal rate during black liquor combustion was also studied. The experimental results showed that both aluminium sulphate and sodium aluminate helped to remove silicon. The desilication rate of sodium aluminate reached 62.33%, higher than that of aluminum sulphate. SEM-EDX illustrated that the aluminum and silicon ions were formed into insoluble precipitates. It was optimal to use 3% sodium aluminate as desilication agent.

  17. Barium titanate coated with magnesium titanate via fused salt method and its dielectric property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Renzheng; Cui Aili; Wang Xiaohui; Li Longtu

    2003-01-01

    Barium titanate fine particles were coated homogeneously with magnesium titanate via the fused salt method. The thickness of the magnesium titanate film is 20 nm, as verified by TEM and XRD. The mechanism of the coating is that: when magnesium chloride is liquated in 800 deg. C, magnesium will replace barium in barium titanate, and form magnesium titanate film on the surface of barium titanate particles. Ceramics sintered from the coated particles show improved high frequency ability. The dielectric constant is about 130 at the frequency from 1 to 800 MHz

  18. Method for excluding salt and other soluble materials from produced water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Tommy J [Knoxville, TN; Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge, TN; Palumbo, Anthony V [Oak Ridge, TN; Riestenberg, David E [Knoxville, TN; McCallum, Scott D [Knoxville, TN

    2009-08-04

    A method for reducing the salinity, as well as the hydrocarbon concentration of produced water to levels sufficient to meet surface water discharge standards. Pressure vessel and coflow injection technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to mix produced water and a gas hydrate forming fluid to form a solid or semi-solid gas hydrate mixture. Salts and solids are excluded from the water that becomes a part of the hydrate cage. A three-step process of dissociation of the hydrate results in purified water suitable for irrigation.

  19. Waste salt recovery, recycle, and destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    Starting in 1943 and continuing into the 1970s, radioactive wastes resulting from plutonium processing at Hanford were stored underground in 149 single shell tanks. Of these tanks, 66 are known or believedto be leaking, and over a period are believed to have leaked about 750,000 gal into the surrounding soil. The bulk of the aqueous solution has been removed and transferred to double shell tanks, none of which are leaking. The waste consists of 37 million gallons of salt cake and sludge. Most of the salt cake is sodium nitrate and other sodium salts. A substantial fraction of the sludge is sodium nitrate. Small amounts of the radionuclides are present in the sludge as oxides or hydroxides. In addition, some of the tanks contain organic compounds and ferrocyanide complexes, many of which have undergone radiolytic induced chemical changes during the years of storage. As part of the Hanford site remediation effort, the tank wastes must be removed, treated, and the residuals must be immobilized and disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner. Removal methods of the waste from the tanks fall generally into three approaches: dry removal, slurry removal, and solution removed. The latter two methods are likely to result in some additional leakage to the surrounding soil, but that may be acceptable if the tank can be emptied and remediated before the leaked material permeates deeply into the soil. This effort includes three parts: salt splitting, acid separation, and destruction, with initial emphasis on salt splitting

  20. Method for removal of decay heat of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesky, H.; Wunderer, A.

    1981-01-01

    In this process, the decay heat from radioactive substances is removed by means of a liquid carried in the coolant loop. The liquid is partially evaporated by the decay heat. The steam is used to drive the liquid through the loop. When a static pressure level equivalent to the pressure drop in the loop is exceeded, the steam is separated from the liquid, condensed, and the condensate is reunited with the return flow of liquid for partial evaporation. (orig.) [de

  1. Removing method for radon gas exhausted from nuclear fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kenji.

    1993-01-01

    A centrifugal separator is disposed in the midway of an exhaustion pipe of a nuclear fuel handling facility, and exhausted gases are sent into a rotational cylinder of the separator. Radon gases in the midway of exhaustion are separated from the exhaustion gases by the centrifugal force of the separator and caused to stagnate at the periphery of the circumferential wall of the rotational cylinder. At the same time, the exhaustion gases having the radon gases separated therefrom are exhausted from the periphery of a rotational shaft of the rotational cylinder. Then, the radon gases stagnated in the rotational cylinder are decayed depending on the half-decay time. With such procedures, the radon gases can be removed continuously without discharging them to the outside. Further, it is preferred that an exhaustion blower or the like for putting the inside of the nuclear fuel handing facility to a negative pressure is disposed as in a conventional case. Further, a plurality of centrifugal separators may be disposed to exhaustion pipes, to remove radon gases in the exhaust gases by a multi stage way. Radon gases can be removed in a saved space with no requirement for exchange of adsorbents or temperature control. (T.M.)

  2. A new method of application of hydrated salts on textiles to achieve thermoregulating properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazemi, Zeinab; Mortazavi, Sayed Majid

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • No need to microencapsulate the salt. • New method Glauber's salt dehydration. • Supercooling decreased, heat storage increased. - Abstract: Recently there has been a lot of attention to fibers and fabrics with thermoregulatory effects. We can acquire this quality using Phase Change Materials (PCM). In this investigation a simple method was used to keep Na 2 SO 4 ·10H 2 O as an inorganic PCM on textile structure. By this method it is not necessary for PCMs to be microencapsulated. Thermophysical properties and thermal stability effects of treated fabric was checked out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) analysis were used to study the chemical structure of the fabric with PCMs. The air transfer, water permeability, and some physical properties of treated fabric were also investigated. The results showed that, silicone rubber polymer could be applied on textile structure to hold PCM without microencapsulating, and treated textile can be served as an appropriate smart thermal insulator

  3. A new method of application of hydrated salts on textiles to achieve thermoregulating properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Zeinab; Mortazavi, Sayed Majid, E-mail: mortaza@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2014-08-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • No need to microencapsulate the salt. • New method Glauber's salt dehydration. • Supercooling decreased, heat storage increased. - Abstract: Recently there has been a lot of attention to fibers and fabrics with thermoregulatory effects. We can acquire this quality using Phase Change Materials (PCM). In this investigation a simple method was used to keep Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·10H{sub 2}O as an inorganic PCM on textile structure. By this method it is not necessary for PCMs to be microencapsulated. Thermophysical properties and thermal stability effects of treated fabric was checked out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) analysis were used to study the chemical structure of the fabric with PCMs. The air transfer, water permeability, and some physical properties of treated fabric were also investigated. The results showed that, silicone rubber polymer could be applied on textile structure to hold PCM without microencapsulating, and treated textile can be served as an appropriate smart thermal insulator.

  4. Water purification using organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  5. The effective removal method of copper and cyanide in waste water of metal plating factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae, Won Mok; Hong, Zong Doo; Kim, Myun Sup

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the effective removal method of cooper and cyanide compounds in metal plating waste water, removal ratio of cooper and cyanide compounds in solution are measured with varying pH, concentration and contact time. As results of the present experiment, cyanide compounds in the solution are removed to 0.03mg/l or less with 5% NaOCl solution. The present result is satisfied to environmental disposal standards. The removal ratio against pH values show 99% over pH8. As results of neutral precipitation method, copper including solution are removed to 99% at pH8 in short time. The removal ratios of cyanide mixed copper solution against pH values show high efficiency(over 95%) at pH8 and 11 and removal ratios are decreased at pH10.(Author)

  6. A radioactive tracer dilution method to determine the mass of molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Cao; Jarrell, Josh; Hardtmayer, D.E.; White, Susan; Herminghuysen, Kevin; Kauffman, Andrew; Sanders, Jeff; Li, Shelly

    2017-01-01

    A new technique for molten salt mass determination, termed radioactive tracer dilution, that uses 22 Na as a tracer was validated at bench scale. It has been a challenging problem to determine the mass of molten salt in irregularly shaped containers, where a highly radioactive, high-temperature molten salt was used to process nuclear spent/used fuel during electrochemical recycling (pyro-processing) or for coolant/fuel salt from molten salt reactors. A radioactive source with known activity is dissolved into the salt. After a complete mixture, a small amount of the salt is sampled and measured in terms of its mass and radioactivity. By finding the ratio of the mass to radioactivity, the unknown salt mass in the original container can be precisely determined. (author)

  7. Method of removing hydrogen sulphide from hot gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Yumura, M.

    1987-12-22

    Hydrogen sulphide can be removed from hot gas mixtures by contacting the hot gas mixture at temperatures in the range of 500-900/sup 0/C with an adsorbent consisting of managanese nodules. The nodules may contain additional calcium cations. In sulphided form, the nodules are catalytically active for hydrogen sulphide decomposition to produce hydrogen. Regeneration of the adsorbent can be accomplished by roasting in an oxidizing atmosphere. The nodules can be used to treat gaseous mixtures containing up to 20% hydrogen sulfide, for example, gases produced during pyrolysis, cracking, coking, and hydrotreating processes. Experiments using the processes described in this patent are also outlined. 6 tabs.

  8. Comparison of salt solution and air drying methods for moisture fixation in highly porous building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonov, Yovko Ivanov; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Møldrup, Per

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, research has identified some bio-based, porous building materials as good or excellent regulators of moisture in buildings. The ability of a material to absorb, release and store moisture is described by vapour sorption isotherms. It is necessary input to simulations of indoor...... building materials by a standardized testing method, using saturated salt solutions. Furthermore, results from the standard method are compared to values of moisture content for the same materials, obtained by air-drying at different relative humidity. This is done with the aim to compare the findings from...... the two methods with respect to time and repeatability of the results. Derived isotherms are further used as direct input in the building simulation software BSim, which is capable of predicting indoor environment parameters by solving coupled, transient heat and moisture transport equations using finite...

  9. Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdWO4 nanorods and nanoparticles via a molten salt method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yonggang; Ma Junfeng; Tao Jiantao; Zhu Xiaoyi; Zhou Jun; Zhao Zhongqiang; Xie Lijin; Tian Hua

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium tungstate (CdWO 4 ) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized by a molten salt method at 270 deg. C, and the morphology of the nanocrystals can be controlled by adjusting such reaction conditions as the calcined time and the weight ratio of the salt to the CdWO 4 precursor. The resultant sample is a pure phase of CdWO 4 without any other impurities

  10. Improved method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for gas cleanup to remove one or more metallic contaminants present as vapor. More particularly, the invention relates to a gas cleanup process using mass transfer to control the saturation levels such that essentially no particulates are formed, and the vapor condenses on the gas passage surfaces. It addresses the need to cleanup an inert gas contaminated with cadmium which may escape from the electrochemical processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel in a hot cell. The IFR is a complete, self-contained, sodium-cooled, pool-type fast reactor fueled with a metallic alloy of uranium, plutonium and zirconium, and is equipped with a close-coupled fuel cycle. Tests with a model have shown that removal of cadmium from argon gas is in the order of 99.99%. The invention could also apply to the industrial cleanup of air or other gases contaminated with zinc, lead, or mercury. In addition, the invention has application in the cleanup of other gas systems contaminated with metal vapors which may be toxic or unhealthy

  11. Method for combined removal of mercury and nitrogen oxides from off-gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H [Downers Grove, IL; Livengood, C David [Lockport, IL

    2006-10-10

    A method for removing elemental Hg and nitric oxide simultaneously from a gas stream is provided whereby the gas stream is reacted with gaseous chlorinated compound to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds and the nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide. The method works to remove either mercury or nitrogen oxide in the absence or presence of each other.

  12. Validation of two ribosomal RNA removal methods for microbial metatranscriptomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Shaomei; Wurtzel, Omri; Singh, Kanwar; Froula, Jeff L; Yilmaz, Suzan; Tringe, Susannah G; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Feng; Lindquist, Erika A; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2010-10-01

    The predominance of rRNAs in the transcriptome is a major technical challenge in sequence-based analysis of cDNAs from microbial isolates and communities. Several approaches have been applied to deplete rRNAs from (meta)transcriptomes, but no systematic investigation of potential biases introduced by any of these approaches has been reported. Here we validated the effectiveness and fidelity of the two most commonly used approaches, subtractive hybridization and exonuclease digestion, as well as combinations of these treatments, on two synthetic five-microorganism metatranscriptomes using massively parallel sequencing. We found that the effectiveness of rRNA removal was a function of community composition and RNA integrity for these treatments. Subtractive hybridization alone introduced the least bias in relative transcript abundance, whereas exonuclease and in particular combined treatments greatly compromised mRNA abundance fidelity. Illumina sequencing itself also can compromise quantitative data analysis by introducing a G+C bias between runs.

  13. Comparative analysis of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture by using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radović Katarina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Various mobile devices are used in the therapy of unilateral free-end saddle. Unilateral dentures with precise connectivity elements are not used frequently. In this paper the problem of applying and functionality of unilateral freeend saddle denture without major connector was taken into consideration. Objective. The aim was to analyze and compare a unilateral RPD (removable partial denture and a classical RPD by calculating and analyzing stresses under different loads. Methods. 3D models of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture with casted clasps were made by using computer program CATIA V5 (abutment teeth, canine and first premolar, with crowns and abutment tissues were also made. The models were built in full-scale. Stress analyses for both models were performed by applying a force of 300 N on the second premolar, a force of 500 N on the first molar and a force of 700 N on the second molar. Results. The Fault Model Extractor (FME analysis and calculation showed the complete behavior of unilateral removable partial denture and abutments (canine and first premolar, as well as the behavior of RPD under identical loading conditions. Applied forces with extreme values caused high stress levels on both models and their abutments within physiological limits. Conclusion. Having analyzed stresses under same conditions, we concluded that the unilateral RPD and classical RPD have similar physiological values.

  14. Cathodic processes in high-temperature molten salts for the development of new materials processing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwandt, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Molten salts play an important role in the processing of a range of commodity materials. This includes the large-scale production of iron, aluminium, magnesium and alkali metals as well as the refining of nuclear fuel materials. This presentation focuses on two more recent concepts in which the cathodic reactions in molten salt electrolytic cells are used to prepare high-value-added materials. Both were developed and advanced at the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy at the University of Cambridge and are still actively being pursued. One concept is now generally known as the FFC-Cambridge process. The presentation will highlight the optimisation of the process towards high selectivities for tubes or particles depict a modification of the method to synthesize tin-filled carbon nanomaterial, and illustrate the implementation of a novel type of process control to enable the preparation of gramme quantities of material within a few hours with simple laboratory equipment. Also discussed will be the testing of these materials in lithium ion batteries

  15. Saturated salt solution method: a useful cadaver embalming for surgical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST.

  16. Milling tool and method for removing a packer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.P.; Beeman, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a packer milling and retrieval tool including a mandrel having an upper milling portion with cutting blades for engaging the upper milling portion with cutting blades for engaging the upper end of a packer in cutting relation, and a lower retrieval portion for contacting the lower end of the packer for removal of the packer from the casing. It comprises an improved release means; a sleeve mounted on the mandrel; the sleeve when fingers are disengaged from the packer abutment and spaced downwardly therefrom being slidable upwardly on the mandrel from a differential fluid pressure exerted against opposite ends of the sleeve provided by pressurized drilling fluid discharged from the tool upon the upper end portion approaching the small diameter bore portion from lifting of the mandrel to position the fingers adjacent the reduced diameter portion for inward deflection of the fingers to permit the fingers to pass the packer bore upon upward lifting movement of the mandrel to release the tool from the packer

  17. Method and apparatus for removing volatile hydrocarbons from particulate soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for heating solid particulate mineral compositions. It comprises: a counterflow ratable drum having a first end and an opposite second end, a first portion of the drum extending from the first end for a first length and having a first diameter along the first length, and a second portion of the drum secured to and extending from the first portion to the second end for a second length and having a second diameter along the second length, the second diameter being less than the first diameter, a burner adjacent the first end for introducing and directing hot gases of combustion into the first portion of the drum toward the second end, means for introducing particulate composition into the drum at the second end, means for directing the particulate composition along the drum from the second end toward the first end, and means for recovering composition at the first end, means for removing a gaseous mixture of organic volatiles, gases of combustion and fine particles of the particulate composition adjacent the second drum end, means for separating fine particles of the particulate composition from the gaseous mixture, and means for returning the separated fine particulate composition particles to the first portion of the drum

  18. Adsorption Characteristics of Different Adsorbents and Iron(III Salt for Removing As(V from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Ćurko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the adsorption performance of three types of adsorbents for removal of As(V from water: Bayoxide® E33 (granular iron(III oxide, Titansorb® (granular titanium oxide and a suspension of precipitated iron(III hydroxide. Results of As(V adsorption stoichiometry of two commercial adsorbents and precipitated iron(III hydroxide in tap and demineralized water were fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm equations, from which adsorption constants and adsorption capacity were calculated. The separation factor RL for the three adsorbents ranged from 0.04 to 0.61, indicating effective adsorption. Precipitated iron(III hydroxide had the greatest, while Titansorb had the lowest capacity to adsorb As(V. Comparison of adsorption from tap or demineralized water showed that Bayoxide and precipitated iron(III hydroxide had higher adsorption capacity in demineralized water, whereas Titansorb showed a slightly higher capacity in tap water. These results provide mechanistic insights into how commonly used adsorbents remove As(V from water.

  19. REMOVAL OF URANIUM FROM DRINKING WATER BY CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA currently does not regulate uranium in drinking water but will be revising the radionuclide regulations during 1989 and will propose a maximum contaminant level for uranium. The paper presents treatment technology information on the effectiveness of conventional method...

  20. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.

    1999-05-04

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents. 7 figs.

  1. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  2. Large-scale treatment of high-salt, high-pH wastewater for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr removal, using crystalline silicotitanate resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P.A.; Walker, J.F.; Lee, D.D.

    1998-04-01

    A full-scale demonstration of cesium removal technology has been conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This demonstration utilized a modular, mobile ion-exchange system and existing facilities for the off-gas system, secondary containment, and utilities. The ion-exchange material, crystalline silicotitanate (CST), was selected on the basis of its effectiveness in laboratory tests. The CST, which was developed through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between DOE and private industry, is highly selective for removing cesium from solutions containing high concentrations of other contaminants, such as sodium and potassium. Approximately 116,000 liters of supernate was processed during the demonstration with {approximately} 1,142 Ci of {sup 137}Cs removed from the supernate and loaded onto 266 liters of the CST sorbent. The supernate processed had a high salt content, about 4 M NaNO{sub 3} and a pH of 12 to 13. The CST also loaded Ba, Pb, Sr, U and Zn. Analysis of the spent sorbent has shown that it is not hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The cesium breakthrough curves for the lab and full-scale columns agreed very well, suggesting that lab-scale tests can be used to predict the performance of larger systems. The cesium breakthrough curves for runs at different flowrates show that film diffusion is significant in controlling the mass transfer process. Operational factors that increase the effect of film diffusion include the small size and high porosity of the CST sorbent, and the relatively low liquid velocity through the sorbent.

  3. Large-scale treatment of high-salt, high-pH wastewater for 137Cs and 90Sr removal, using crystalline silicotitanate resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.A.; Walker, J.F.; Lee, D.D.

    1998-04-01

    A full-scale demonstration of cesium removal technology has been conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This demonstration utilized a modular, mobile ion-exchange system and existing facilities for the off-gas system, secondary containment, and utilities. The ion-exchange material, crystalline silicotitanate (CST), was selected on the basis of its effectiveness in laboratory tests. The CST, which was developed through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between DOE and private industry, is highly selective for removing cesium from solutions containing high concentrations of other contaminants, such as sodium and potassium. Approximately 116,000 liters of supernate was processed during the demonstration with ∼ 1,142 Ci of 137 Cs removed from the supernate and loaded onto 266 liters of the CST sorbent. The supernate processed had a high salt content, about 4 M NaNO 3 and a pH of 12 to 13. The CST also loaded Ba, Pb, Sr, U and Zn. Analysis of the spent sorbent has shown that it is not hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The cesium breakthrough curves for the lab and full-scale columns agreed very well, suggesting that lab-scale tests can be used to predict the performance of larger systems. The cesium breakthrough curves for runs at different flowrates show that film diffusion is significant in controlling the mass transfer process. Operational factors that increase the effect of film diffusion include the small size and high porosity of the CST sorbent, and the relatively low liquid velocity through the sorbent

  4. A comparison of hydroponic and soil-based screening methods to identify salt tolerance in the field in barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Fatehi, Foad; Rengasamy, Pichu; McDonald, Glenn K.

    2012-01-01

    Success in breeding crops for yield and other quantitative traits depends on the use of methods to evaluate genotypes accurately under field conditions. Although many screening criteria have been suggested to distinguish between genotypes for their salt tolerance under controlled environmental conditions, there is a need to test these criteria in the field. In this study, the salt tolerance, ion concentrations, and accumulation of compatible solutes of genotypes of barley with a range of putative salt tolerance were investigated using three growing conditions (hydroponics, soil in pots, and natural saline field). Initially, 60 genotypes of barley were screened for their salt tolerance and uptake of Na+, Cl–, and K+ at 150 mM NaCl and, based on this, a subset of 15 genotypes was selected for testing in pots and in the field. Expression of salt tolerance in saline solution culture was not a reliable indicator of the differences in salt tolerance between barley plants that were evident in saline soil-based comparisons. Significant correlations were observed in the rankings of genotypes on the basis of their grain yield production at a moderately saline field site and their relative shoot growth in pots at ECe 7.2 [Spearman’s rank correlation (rs)=0.79] and ECe 15.3 (rs=0.82) and the crucial parameter of leaf Na+ (rs=0.72) and Cl– (rs=0.82) concentrations at ECe 7.2 dS m−1. This work has established screening procedures that correlated well with grain yield at sites with moderate levels of soil salinity. This study also showed that both salt exclusion and osmotic tolerance are involved in salt tolerance and that the relative importance of these traits may differ with the severity of the salt stress. In soil, ion exclusion tended to be more important at low to moderate levels of stress but osmotic stress became more important at higher stress levels. Salt exclusion coupled with a synthesis of organic solutes were shown to be important components of salt

  5. Functionalized paper--A readily accessible adsorbent for removal of dissolved heavy metal salts and nanoparticles from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyono, Daisy; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2016-01-25

    Paper, a readily available renewable resource, comprises of interwoven cellulosic fibers, which can be functionalized to develop interesting low-cost adsorbent material for water purification. In this study, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-functionalized paper was used for the removal of hazardous pollutants such as Au and Ag nanoparticles, Cr(VI) anions, Ni(2+), Cd(2+), and Cu(2+) cations from spiked water samples. Compared to untreated paper, the PEI-coated paper showed significant improvement in adsorption capacities toward the pollutants investigated in this study. Kinetics, isotherm models, pH, and desorption studies were carried out to study the adsorption mechanism of pollutants on the adsorbent surface. Adsorption of pollutants was better described by pseudo-second order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm model. Maximum adsorption of anionic pollutants was achieved at pH 5 while that of cations was at pH>6. Overall, the PEI-functionalized paper showed interesting Langmuir adsorption capacities for heavy metal ions such as Cr(VI) (68 mg/g), Ni(2+) (208 mg/g), Cd(2+) (370 mg/g), and Cu(2+) (435 mg/g) ions at neutral pH. In addition, the modified paper was also used to remove Ag-citrate (79 mg/g), Ag-PVP (46 mg/g), Au-citrate (30 mg/g), Au-PVP (17 mg/g) nanoparticles from water. Desorption of NPs from the adsorbent was done by washing with 2 M HCl or thiourea solution, while heavy metal ions were desorbed using 1 M NaOH or HNO3 solution. The modified paper retained its extraction efficiencies upon desorption of pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Unbiased methods for removing systematics from galaxy clustering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Franz; Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-02-01

    Measuring the angular clustering of galaxies as a function of redshift is a powerful method for extracting information from the three-dimensional galaxy distribution. The precision of such measurements will dramatically increase with ongoing and future wide-field galaxy surveys. However, these are also increasingly sensitive to observational and astrophysical contaminants. Here, we study the statistical properties of three methods proposed for controlling such systematics - template subtraction, basic mode projection, and extended mode projection - all of which make use of externally supplied template maps, designed to characterize and capture the spatial variations of potential systematic effects. Based on a detailed mathematical analysis, and in agreement with simulations, we find that the template subtraction method in its original formulation returns biased estimates of the galaxy angular clustering. We derive closed-form expressions that should be used to correct results for this shortcoming. Turning to the basic mode projection algorithm, we prove it to be free of any bias, whereas we conclude that results computed with extended mode projection are biased. Within a simplified setup, we derive analytical expressions for the bias and discuss the options for correcting it in more realistic configurations. Common to all three methods is an increased estimator variance induced by the cleaning process, albeit at different levels. These results enable unbiased high-precision clustering measurements in the presence of spatially varying systematics, an essential step towards realizing the full potential of current and planned galaxy surveys.

  7. Air pollution with gaseous emissions and methods for their removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, Venceslav; Boycheva, Sylvia; Fidancevska, Emilija

    2009-01-01

    Information concerning gaseous pollutants generated in the atmosphere, as a result of fuel incineration processes in thermal power and industrial plants, was summarized. The main methods and technologies for flue gases purification from the most ecologically hazardous pollutants are comparatively discussed. Keywords: gaseous pollutants, aerosols, flue gas purification systems and technologies, air ecology control

  8. Two Methods for Antialiased Wireframe Drawing with Hidden Line Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Munk-Lund, Steen; Gjøl, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    Two novel and robust techniques for wireframe drawing are proposed. Neither suffer from the well-known artifacts associated with the standard two pass, offset based techniques for wireframe drawing. Both methods draw prefiltered lines and produce high-quality antialiased results without super...

  9. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2013-12-10

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  10. Simultaneous removal of organic matter and salt ions from coal gasification wastewater RO concentrate and microorganisms succession in a MBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shengyong; Han, Yuxing; Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Li, Kun

    2017-10-01

    A lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) with intermittent aeration was operated to treat the reverse osmosis concentrate derived from coal gasification wastewater. Results showed intermittent aeration represented slight effect on organic matter reduction but significant effect on nitrite and nitrate reduction, with 6h aeration and 6h non-aeration, removal efficiencies of organic matter, chloride, sulfate, nitrite and nitrate reached 48.35%, 40.91%, 34.28%, -36.05% and 64.34%, respectively. High-throughput sequencing showed a microorganisms succession from inoculated activated sludge (S1) to activated sludge in MBR (S2) with high salinity. Richness and diversity of microorganisms in S2 was lower than S1 and the community structure of S1 exhibited more even than S2. The most relative abundance of genus in S1 and S2 were unclassified_Desulfarculaceae (9.39%) and Roseibaca (62.1%), respectively. High salinity and intermittent aeration represented different influence on the denitrifying genus, and non-aeration phase provided feasible dissolved oxygen condition for denitrifying genera realizing denitrification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sub-stoichiometric isotope dilution analysis method for the determination of iodine in common salts using iodine-131 tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vivek; Garg, A.N.

    1994-01-01

    A sub-stoichiometric isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) method was developed for the determination of iodine in different brands of common salts. An aqueous salt solution containing 131 I tracer and NaI as carrier is oxidized by tartaric acid and KIO 3 and the liberated iodine is extracted with CCl 4 . To the extract an aqueous solution of AgNO 3 is added in substoichiometric amount to obtain a colloidal solution of AgI. On adding sodium thiosulfate solution, the NaI so formed passes into aqueous solution, which is then counted. Several different brands of salt were analysed. The method is especially suitable for the determination of microgram amounts of iodide in the presence of excess of chloride. (Author)

  12. Application of the collapsing method to acoustic emissions in a rock salt sample during a triaxial compression experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manthei, G.; Eisenblaetter, J.; Moriya, H.; Niitsuma, H.; Jones, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Collapsing is a relatively new method. It is used for detecting patterns and structures in blurred and cloudy pictures of multiple soundings. In the case described here, the measurements were made in a very small region with a length of only a few decimeters. The events were registered during a triaxial compression experiment on a compact block of rock salt. The collapsing method showed a cellular structure of the salt block across the whole length of the test piece. The cells had a length of several cm, enclosing several grains of salt with an average grain size of less than one cm. In view of the fact that not all cell walls corresponded to acoustic emission events, it was assumed that only those grain boundaries are activated that are oriented at a favourable angle to the field of tension of the test piece [de

  13. Methods for removing transuranic elements from waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Connor, C.; Sedlet, J.; Srinivasan, B.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-11-01

    This report outlines a treatment scheme for separating and concentrating the transuranic (TRU) elements present in aqueous waste solutions stored at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The treatment method selected is carrier precipitation. Potential carriers will be evaluated in future laboratory work, beginning with ferric hydroxide and magnetite. The process will result in a supernatant with alpha activity low enough that it can be treated in the existing evaporator/concentrator at ANL. The separated TRU waste will be packaged for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  14. Four osteotomy methods with piezosurgery to remove complicated mandibular third molars: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Yang, Chi; Zheng, Jia-Wei; He, Dong-Mei; Zheng, Ling-Yan; Hu, Ying-Kai

    2014-11-01

    Piezosurgery has been used widely in oral and maxillofacial surgery, but there has been no report systematically describing an osteotomy method with piezosurgery for complicated mandibular third molar removal. The aim of this study was to introduce 4 osteotomy methods using piezosurgery and evaluate their effects. A retrospective study was conducted of patients with a complicated impacted mandibular third molar requiring extraction. The predictor variable was the extraction technique. Four osteotomy methods using piezosurgery were tested according to different impaction types: method 1 involved complete bone removal; method 2 involved segmental bone removal; method 3 involved bone removal combined with tooth splitting; and method 4 involved block bone removal. Outcome variables were success rate, operative time, major complications (including nerve injury, mandible fracture, severe hematoma, or severe edema), and serious pyogenic infection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The study was composed of 55 patients with 74 complicated impacted mandibular third molars. All impacted mandibular third molars were removed successfully. The average surgical time was 15 minutes (range, 8 to 26 minutes). Thirty-eight molars (51.4%) were extracted by method 1, 18 molars (24.3%) by method 2, 12 molars (16.2%) by method 3, and 6 molars (8.1%) by method 4. Two cases (2.7%) developed postoperative infections and recovered within 1 week using drainage and antibiotic administration. The 4 osteotomy methods with piezosurgery provide effective ways of removing complicated impacted mandibular third molars. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Method for removing trihalomethanes and/or emerging pollutants using plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Bayona Termens, Josep María; Molina, Ricardo; Erra Serrabasa, Pilar; Bertrán, Enric; Jover Comas, Eric; Reyes Contreras, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a method for removing trihalomethanes and refractory pollutants from aqueous environments by the direct application ofplasma in order to break down the polluting compounds in the water.

  16. A new method of removing the high value feedback resistor in the charge sensitive preamplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Deming

    1993-01-01

    A new method of removing the high value feedback resistor in the charge sensitive preamplifier is introduced. The circuit analysis of this novel design is described and the measured performances of a practical circuit are provided

  17. Method for making a Pellet-type LiCl-KCl-UCl{sub 3} SALT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, M. S.; JIN, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A pyrometallurgical partitioning technology to recover uranium from a uranium-TRU mixture which is the product material of electroreduction system is being developed at KAERI since 1997. In the process, the reactor of an electrorefiner consists of the electrodes and the molten chloride salt which is LiCl-KCl-UCl{sub 3}. The role of uranium chloride salt (UCl{sub 3}) is to stabilize the initial cell voltage between electrodes in the electrorefining reactor. The process to produce a uranium chloride salt includes two steps: a reaction process of gaseous chlorine with liquid cadmium to form CdCl{sub 2} occurring in a Cd layer, followed by a process to produce UCl{sub 3} by the reaction of U in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and CdCl{sub 2} The apparatus for producing UCl{sub 3} consists of a chlorine gas generator, a uranium chlorinator, a Cd distiller, the pelletizer, and a off-gas and a dry scrubber. The temperature of the reactants is maintained at about 600 .deg. C. After the reaction is completed in the uranium chlorinator, The salt products is transferred to the Cd distiller to decrease residual Cd concentration in the salts, and then salt is transferred to the mould of a pelletizer by a transfer system to make a pellet type salt

  18. Method for making a Pellet-type LiCl-KCl-UCl3 SALT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, M. S.; JIN, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    A pyrometallurgical partitioning technology to recover uranium from a uranium-TRU mixture which is the product material of electroreduction system is being developed at KAERI since 1997. In the process, the reactor of an electrorefiner consists of the electrodes and the molten chloride salt which is LiCl-KCl-UCl 3 . The role of uranium chloride salt (UCl 3 ) is to stabilize the initial cell voltage between electrodes in the electrorefining reactor. The process to produce a uranium chloride salt includes two steps: a reaction process of gaseous chlorine with liquid cadmium to form CdCl 2 occurring in a Cd layer, followed by a process to produce UCl 3 by the reaction of U in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and CdCl 2 The apparatus for producing UCl 3 consists of a chlorine gas generator, a uranium chlorinator, a Cd distiller, the pelletizer, and a off-gas and a dry scrubber. The temperature of the reactants is maintained at about 600 .deg. C. After the reaction is completed in the uranium chlorinator, The salt products is transferred to the Cd distiller to decrease residual Cd concentration in the salts, and then salt is transferred to the mould of a pelletizer by a transfer system to make a pellet type salt

  19. Method of removing deterioration product in hydrocarbon type solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yoshifumi; Takashina, Toru; Murasawa, Kenji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To remarkably reduce radioactive wastes by bringing adsorbents comprising titanium oxide and/or zirconium oxide into contact with hydrocarbon type solvents. Method: In a nuclear fuel re-processing step, an appropriate processing is applied to extraction solvents suffering from radioactive degradation, to separate the hydrocarbon solvents and store them in a solvent tank. Then, titanium oxide and/or zirconium oxide adsorbents are continuously mixed and agitated therewith to adsorb degradation products on the adsorbents. Then, they are introduced with adsorbent separators to recover purified hydrocarbon type solvents. Meanwhile, the separated adsorbents are discharged from pipeways. This enables to regenerate the hydrocarbon type solvents for reuse, as well as remarkably reduce the radioactive wastes. (Takahashi, M.)

  20. Waste management analysis for the nuclear fuel cycle. I. Actinide recovery from aqueous salt wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martella, L.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of solvent extraction methods has been completed for removing actinides from selected salt wastes likely to be produced during reactor fuel fabrication and reprocessing. The use of a two-step solvent extraction system, tributyl phosphate (TBP) followed by a bidentate organophosphorus extractant (DHDECMP), appears most efficient for removing actinides from salt waste. The TBP step would remove most of the plutonium and >99.99% of the uranium. The second step, using DHDECMP, would remove >99.91% of the americium, the remaining plutonium (>99.98%), and other actinides from the acidified salt waste

  1. Salt-stimulation of caesium accumulation in the euryhaline green microalga Chlorella salina: potential relevance to the development of a biological Cs-removal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, S. V.; Codd, G. A.; Gadd, G. M. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    1993-07-01

    Accumulation of Cs{sup +} by Chlorella salina was 28-fold greater in cells incubated in the presence than in the absence of 0.5 M-NaCl. An approximate 70% removal of external Cs{sup +} resulted after 15 h incubation of cells with 50 μ;M-CsCl and 0.5 M-NaCl. LiCl also had a stimulatory effect on Cs{sup +} uptake, although mannitol did not. Cs{sup +} influx increased with increasing external NaCl concentration and was maximal between 25-500 mM-NaCl at approximately 4 nmol Cs{sup +} h−1 (10{sup 6} cells){sup −1}. Little effect on Cs{sup +} uptake resulted from the presence of Mg{sup 2+} or Ca{sup 2+} or from varying the external pH, and Cs{sup +} was relatively non-toxic towards C. salina. At increasing cell densities (from 4 × 10{sup 5} to 1 × 10{sup 7} cells ml{sup +1}), decreasing amounts of Cs{sup +} were accumulated per cell although the rate of Cs{sup +} removal from the external medium was still greatest at the higher cell densities examined. Freely suspended C. salina and cell-loaded alginate microbeads accumulated similar levels of Cs{sup +}, however, 46% of total Cs{sup +} uptake was attributable to the calcium-alginate matrix in the latter case. When Cs{sup +}-loaded cells were subjected to hypoosmotic shock, loss of cellular Cs{sup +} occurred allowing easy Cs{sup +} recovery. This loss exceeded 90% of cellular Cs{sup +} when cells were washed with solutions containing ≤ 50 mM-NaCl between consecutive Cs{sup +} uptake periods; these cells subsequently lost their ability to accumulate large amounts of Cs{sup +}. Maximal Cs{sup +} uptake (approximately 85.1% removal after three 15 h incubations) occurred when cells were washed with a solution containing 500 mM-NaCl and 200 mM-KCl between incubations. The relevance of these results to the possible use of C. salina in a salt-dependent biological Cs-removal process is discussed. (author)

  2. A new shape design method of salt cavern used as underground gas storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tongtao; Yan, Xiangzhen; Yang, Henglin; Yang, Xiujuan; Jiang, Tingting; Zhao, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Safety factor contours of four salt cavern gas storages after running 10 years. Highlights: ► We propose a new model to design the shape of salt cavern gas storage. ► The concepts of slope instability and pressure arch are introduced into the shape design. ► The max. gas pressure determines the shapes and dimensions of cavern lower structure. ► The min. gas pressure decides the shapes and dimensions of cavern upper structure. - Abstract: A new model used to design the shape and dimension of salt cavern gas storage is proposed in the paper. In the new model, the cavern is divided into two parts, namely the lower and upper structures, to design. The concepts of slope instability and pressure arch are introduced into the shape design of the lower and upper structures respectively. Calculating models are established according to the concepts. Field salt cavern gas storage in China is simulated as examples, and its shape and dimension are proposed. The effects of gas pressure, friction angle and cohesion of rock salt on the cavern stability are discussed. Moreover, the volume convergence, displacement, plastic volume rate, safety factor, and effective strain are compared with that of three other existing shapes salt caverns to validate the performance of newly proposed cavern. The results show that the max. gas pressure determines the shape and dimension of cavern lower structure, while the min. gas pressure decides that of cavern upper structure. With the increase of friction angle and cohesion of rock salt, the stability of salt cavern is increased. The newly proposed salt cavern gas storage has more notable advantages than the existing shapes of salt cavern in volume convergence, displacement, plastic volume rate, safety factor, and effective strain under the same conditions

  3. Electrochemical performance of BaSnO3 anode material for lithium-ion battery prepared by molten salt method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nithyadharseni, P

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perovskite-like structure BaSnO(sub3) ceramic oxide has been prepared by low temperature molten salt method using KOH as a flux and Ba(OH)(sub2) and BaCl(sub2) as precursors. The as-prepared compounds were characterized by various techniques...

  4. New methods for removal of pollutants from exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braestrup, F.

    2009-06-15

    with the electrode materials during sintering and formed different oxides. In-situ high temperature neutron diffraction was performed on ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} in order to determine the cation distribution and to understand the electronic resistivity as well as the dilatometry measurement of the material. Data were analyzed with the Rietveld refinement method and results showed that cations start to rearrange at around 600 deg. C which, to some extend, confirm the behaviour of the resistivity data and the dilatometry measurement. X-ray adsorption spectroscopy was performed on MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiCrFeO{sub 4}. This was done in order to investigate possible changes in oxidation states of the transition elements. In the case of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} the cation distribution was tried analyzed in order to compare the results with Rietveld refinements on high temperature neutron diffraction. Results show that it was difficult to obtain a good quality refinement without violating the bond distances with respect to reported values found by neutron diffraction and literature. MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were also analyzed in different gases at 400 deg. C and results show that NO and NO{sub 2} adsorb very strongly on MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and decreases the X-ray signal significantly. A change in oxidation state of Ni was observed in atmospheres containing NO{sub 2}. (author)

  5. A novel pre-oxidation method for elemental mercury removal utilizing a complex vaporized absorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yi, E-mail: zhaoyi9515@163.com; Hao, Runlong; Guo, Qing

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An innovative liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) for Hg{sup 0} removal was prepared. • A novel integrative process for Hg{sup 0} removal was proposed. • The simultaneous removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. • The reaction mechanism of simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} was proposed. - Abstract: A novel semi-dry integrative method for elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) removal has been proposed in this paper, in which Hg{sup 0} was initially pre-oxidized by a vaporized liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) composed of a Fenton reagent, peracetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl), after which Hg{sup 2+} was absorbed by the resultant Ca(OH){sub 2}. The experimental results indicated that CH{sub 3}COOOH and NaCl were the best additives for Hg{sup 0} oxidation. Among the influencing factors, the pH of the LCA and the adding rate of the LCA significantly affected the Hg{sup 0} removal. The coexisting gases, SO{sub 2} and NO, were characterized as either increasing or inhibiting in the removal process, depending on their concentrations. Under optimal reaction conditions, the efficiency for the single removal of Hg{sup 0} was 91%. Under identical conditions, the efficiencies of the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Finally, the reaction mechanism for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} was proposed based on the characteristics of the removal products as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), the analysis of the electrode potentials, and through data from related research references.

  6. A novel pre-oxidation method for elemental mercury removal utilizing a complex vaporized absorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yi; Hao, Runlong; Guo, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An innovative liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) for Hg 0 removal was prepared. • A novel integrative process for Hg 0 removal was proposed. • The simultaneous removal efficiencies of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. • The reaction mechanism of simultaneous removal of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 was proposed. - Abstract: A novel semi-dry integrative method for elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) removal has been proposed in this paper, in which Hg 0 was initially pre-oxidized by a vaporized liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) composed of a Fenton reagent, peracetic acid (CH 3 COOOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl), after which Hg 2+ was absorbed by the resultant Ca(OH) 2 . The experimental results indicated that CH 3 COOOH and NaCl were the best additives for Hg 0 oxidation. Among the influencing factors, the pH of the LCA and the adding rate of the LCA significantly affected the Hg 0 removal. The coexisting gases, SO 2 and NO, were characterized as either increasing or inhibiting in the removal process, depending on their concentrations. Under optimal reaction conditions, the efficiency for the single removal of Hg 0 was 91%. Under identical conditions, the efficiencies of the simultaneous removal of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Finally, the reaction mechanism for the simultaneous removal of SO 2 , NO and Hg 0 was proposed based on the characteristics of the removal products as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), the analysis of the electrode potentials, and through data from related research references

  7. Ultrafine Iridium Oxide Nanorods Synthesized by Molten Salt Method toward Electrocatalytic Oxygen and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Jahangeer; Mao, Yuanbing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafine iridium oxide nanorods were synthesized by a molten salt method at 650 °C. • They show enhanced electrocatalytic activity to oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions. • These results are comparable with, and in most cases, higher than reported data in the literature. • This study reports a novel synthetic process for IrO_2 but also a high efficient IrO_2 nanostructure. • These IrO_2 NRs are expected to serve as a benchmark to develop active electrocatalysts. - Abstract: Ultrafine iridium oxide nanorods (IrO_2 NRs) were successfully synthesized using a molten salt method at 650 °C. The structural and morphological characterizations of these IrO_2 NRs were carried out by powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopic techniques. Compared to commercial IrO_2 nanoparticles (IrO_2 NPs) and previous reports, these IrO_2 NRs show enhanced electrocatalytic activity to oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions by passing either N_2 or O_2 gas in a 0.5 M KOH electrolyte before electrochemical measurements, including cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Specifically, the current densities from the as-synthesized IrO_2 NRs and commercial IrO_2 NPs were measured in 0.5 M KOH electrolyte to be 70 and 58 (OER, deaerated, at 0.6 V versus Ag/AgCl), 71 and 61 (OER, O_2, from −0.10 to 1.0 V versus Ag/AgCl at 50 mV/s), and 25 and 14 (HER, deaerated, at −1.4 V versus Ag/AgCl) mA/cm"2, respectively. These results are comparable with, and in most cases, higher than reported data in the literature. Therefore, the current study reports not only a novel synthetic process for IrO_2 but also a high efficient IrO_2 nanostructure, and it is expected that these IrO_2 NRs can serve as a benchmark in the development of active OER and HER (photo)electrocatalysts for various applications.

  8. Biotransformation and removal of sulfur from dibenzothiophene using improved bio catalytic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Rotta, C. E; Mora, A.L; Madero, A; Mogollon, L.I

    1998-01-01

    Three methods for the removal of sulfur from dibenzothiophene were evaluated using bio catalytic processes. The methods were a microbial, an enzymatic and a combined one that involves a previous enzymatic oxidation followed by microbial degradation. The bioconversion was evaluated over the molecular dibenzothiophene model, obtaining higher bioconversion percentages through the combined method. The microorganisms used in this study correspond to several Colombian indigenous strains isolated by direct methods from natural sources, and using a standard strain as positive control. All strains have shown sulfur removal capacity, and organic solvent tolerance. The enzyme used was a hemo protein with peroxidase activity, Cytochrome C, obtained from equine heart

  9. Noninvasive control of dental calculus removal: qualification of two fluorescence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.

    2013-02-01

    The main condition of periodontitis prevention is the full calculus removal from the teeth surface. This procedure should be fulfilled without harming adjacent unaffected tooth tissues. Nevertheless the problem of sensitive and precise estimating of tooth-calculus interface exists and potential risk of hard tissue damage remains. In this work it was shown that fluorescence diagnostics during calculus removal can be successfully used for precise noninvasive detection of calculus-tooth interface. In so doing the simple implementation of this method free from the necessity of spectrometer using can be employed. Such a simple implementation of calculus detection set-up can be aggregated with the devices of calculus removing.

  10. Noninvasive control of dental calculus removal: qualification of two fluorescence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Bakhmutov, D; Biryukova, T

    2013-01-01

    The main condition of periodontitis prevention is the full calculus removal from the teeth surface. This procedure should be fulfilled without harming adjacent unaffected tooth tissues. Nevertheless the problem of sensitive and precise estimating of tooth-calculus interface exists and potential risk of hard tissue damage remains. In this work it was shown that fluorescence diagnostics during calculus removal can be successfully used for precise noninvasive detection of calculus-tooth interface. In so doing the simple implementation of this method free from the necessity of spectrometer using can be employed. Such a simple implementation of calculus detection set-up can be aggregated with the devices of calculus removing.

  11. Analysis and study on the membrane method of CO2 removal of coal-fired boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fangqin, Li; Henan, Li; Jianxing, Ren; Jiang, Wu; Zhongzhu, Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is one kind of harmful substances from the burning process of fossil fuel. CO 2 emissions cause serious pollution on atmospheric environment, especially greenhouse effect. In this paper, CO 2 formation mechanism and control methods were researched. Membrane technology was studied to control CO 2 emissions from coal-fired boilers. The relationship between CO 2 removal efficiency and parameters of membrane contactor was analyzed. Through analysis and study, factors affecting on CO 2 removal efficiency were gotten. How to choose the best parameters was known. This would provide theoretical basis for coal-fired utility boilers choosing effective way of CO 2 removal. (author)

  12. Trace and low concentration co2 removal methods and apparatus utilizing metal organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-10

    In general, this disclosure describes techniques for removing trace and low concentration CO2 from fluids using SIFSIX-n-M MOFs, wherein n is at least two and M is a metal. In some embodiments, the metal is zinc or copper. Embodiments include devices comprising SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids. In particular, embodiments relate to devices and methods utilizing SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids, wherein CO2 concentration is trace. Methods utilizing SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids can occur in confined spaces. SIFSIX-n-M MOFs can comprise bidentate organic ligands. In a specific embodiment, SIFSIX-n-M MOFs comprise pyrazine or dipryidilacetylene ligands.

  13. Removal of lead ions from industrial waste water by using biomaterials – a novel method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malairajan Singanan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple cost effective and eco-friendly method for the remediation of lead from industrial wastewater has been investigated. A novel biomaterial, Tridax procumbens (Asteraceae a medicinal plant, was used for the removal of lead ions from synthetic wastewater and the method was also applied for real sample analysis. The operational pH of the experimental solution was fixed as 4.5. The optimum amount of bioadsorbent was 3.5 g. The Pb(II ions removal efficiency of the raw bioadsorbent was also determined. The removal efficiency of the activated carbon of the bioadsorbent was excellent. 98 % removal of Pb(II ions was achieved at the dose rate of 3.5 g. The optimum contact time was estimated to be 160 minutes.

  14. A new form of MgTa2O6 obtained by the molten salt method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Using molten salt route (with NaCl/KCl as the salt) we have been able to synthesize a new form of magnesium tantalate at 850°C. Powder X-ray diffraction data could be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with lattice parameters, 'a' = 15⋅36(1) Å, 'b' = 13⋅38(1) Å and 'c' = 12⋅10(1) Å. High resolution.

  15. An Appraisal of Methods Recently Recommended for Testing Salt Sensitivity of Blood Pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurtz, T. W.; DiCarlo, S. E.; Pravenec, Michal; Morris Jr., R. C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2017), č. článku e005653. ISSN 2047-9980 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1502 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : hypertension * salt intake * salt sensitivity hypertension * sodium Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery OBOR OECD: Cardiac and Cardiovascular systems Impact factor: 4.863, year: 2016

  16. Development of a method to determine the total C-14 content in saturated salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucks, C.; Prautsch, C.

    2016-01-01

    This two-step method described here for the determination of the total carbon-14 content in saturated salt solutions is divided in the analysis of the carbon-14 in the evaporable and the non-evaporable fraction. After driving off the inorganic carbon by acidification, the volatile carbon compounds and volatile decomposition products follow with rising temperature inside the sample vessel in a mild stream of oxygen to a tube furnace equipped with CuO catalyst for oxidizing the carbon compounds to CO 2 at a temperature of 800 C. Water is condensed out with an intensive condenser and the released CO 2 is absorbed in a wash bottle filled with sodium hydroxide. Similarly, an aliquot of the evaporation residue is put in the first zone of the tube furnace during the second step of the analysis. After heating the catalyst in the second zone of the furnace to 800 C the residue is heated stepwise to 800 C. By proceeding in this way, the non-volatile compounds are decomposed or oxidised in the oxygen stream and finally completely oxidized by the aid of the catalyst. The released CO 2 is again absorbed in another wash bottle. The carbonate of each fraction is then precipitated as BaCO 3 separately. Finally, the precipitate is washed, dried, finely grounded and covered with toluene scintillation cocktail for measurement in a LSC. The detection limit is about 0,2 Bq/l for a sample volume of 250 ml.

  17. Romanian experience with rock salt characterisation methods and the implications for disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconu, Daniela; Balan, Valeriu; Mirion, Ilie

    2001-01-01

    The disposal in deep geological formations as rock salt, granite or clay seems to be now the most appropriate solution for final storage of the spent fuel. At this moment, rock salt is one of the Romanian options for spent fuel disposal, but the final decision will be made only after a performance assessment of this geological formation, having as input data the specific characteristics of the salt rock. In order to provide the data requested by the safety assessment programs, the Institute for Nuclear Research - Pitesti developed complex and modern methodologies for thermodynamic parameter determination as well as studies on salt convergence and radionuclide migration. The methodologies pursued to determine those thermal properties specific for spent fuel disposal as dilatation coefficient, heat conductivity and specific heat. The convergence and migration studies pursued a better understanding of these processes, very important in the disposal safety. The paper is a review of those studies and presents the methodologies and the main results obtained on salt samples from Slanic Prahova Salt Mine. (authors)

  18. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Brandão Mollica

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10, according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. RESULTS: ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05 were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7±105.0; a, Caries-detector dye (370.5±78.3; ab, Tactile method (322.8±51.5; bc. Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2±10.5; bc, Caries-detector dye (44.6±11.8; abc, Tactile method (24.3±9.0; d. CONCLUSIONS: DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values.

  19. Cost effectiveness of methods for removing radium and thorium in uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.

    1981-01-01

    The potential health impact from uranium milling operations is mainly associated with long-term releases of radioactive contaminants from the mill tailings. The major mechanisms for mitigating these potential releases focus on increasing the tailings containment with the addition of migration barriers such as thick earthern covers and clay liners. Some limited investigation has also focused on reducing the radionuclide source terms. This alternative approach has some desirable features, but stringent cost requirements are placed upon source removal methods in order for them to be economically favorable. A cost effectiveness evaluation is presented herein, in which costs for containment methods are used to establish maximum cost guidelines for the source removal methods

  20. Enhanced Removal of Pb+2 from Wastewater Using Combination of Ultrasound and nZVI Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mirroozbeh jamei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research reported a new method of removal of Pb+2from water by using a nano zero valent iron (nZVI assisted ultrasonic wave. At first, nZVI was synthesized by an ultrasound assisted method. Particles morphology and surface composition were characterized by FESEM, XRD, and EDX. The XRD patterns showed that the crystallinity of the nZVI prepared using ultrasonic conditions was higher than the conventional method. According to the EDX pattern, 67% of particle composition was nZVI. The synthesized nanoparticles were then utilized as a Fenton-like catalyst for the removal of Pb+2from water using an ultrasound assisted method. In the present study, ultrasound power, temperature effects, nZVI, and reaction time were optimized. From the studies, it has been observed that removal does not increase indefinitely with an increase in ultrasound power, but it instead reaches an optimum value and decreases with a further increase in the ultrasound power. The removal of Pb+2increased with increasing temperature, nZVI, and H2O2 concentration. The result indicated that the efficiency of hydrocarbon removal by this novel method was 97.87%.

  1. Removal of colour, turbidity, oil and grease for slaughterhouse wastewater using electrocoagulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Azwan, Azlyza Mohd; Zamri, Mohd Faiz Muaz Ahmad; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul

    2017-10-01

    In this study electrocoagulation method is used to treat slaughterhouse wastewaters. The aim of this study is to determine the efficiency of electrocoagulation method for the removal of colour, turbidity, oil and grease of slaughterhouse wastewaters. The factors of electrode types, and voltage applied during treatment are the study parameters. The types of electrode used are Aluminium (Al) grade 6082 and Iron (Fe) grade 1050. Meanwhile, the ranges of voltage applied are 2, 4, 6, 8 volts at a time interval of 10, 20 and 30 minutes respectively. The effect of these factors on the removal of fat oil and grease (FOG), colour and turbidity are analyzed. The results show maximum removal of FOG, colour and turbidity are recorded using Fe electrode at 8 V of applied voltage with 30 minutes of treatment time. The increase in treatment time of the cell will also increase the amount of hydrogen bubbles at the cathode which results in a greater upwards flux and a faster removal of FOG,, turbidity and colour. The removal of FOG, colour and turbidity are 98%, 92% and 91 % respectively. Meanwhile, by using Al electrodes in the same condition, the removal of FOG, colour and turbidity are 91%, 85% and 87 % respectively. Whereas by using Fe-Al as electrodes pairs, the removal of FOG, colour and turbidity are found to be at 90%, 87% and 76 % respectively. In this case, the Fe-Fe pair electrodes have been proven to provide better performance for FOG, colour and turbidity removals of slaughterhouse wastewaters. Therefore, it is feasible to be considered as an alternative method for wastewater treatment.

  2. Experimental analysis on removal factor of smear method in measurement of surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Taira, Junichi; Takenaka, Keisuke; Yamanaka, Kazuo; Sugai, Kenji; Kosako, Toshiso

    2007-01-01

    The smear test is one of the important ways to measure surface contamination. The loose contamination under the high background radiation, which is more significant in handling non-sealed radioisotopes, can be evaluated by this method. The removal factor is defined as the ratio of the activity removed from the surface by one smear to the whole activity of the removable surface contamination. The removal factor is greatly changed by the quality and condition of surface materials. In this study, the values of removal factor at several typical surface conditions were evaluated experimentally and the practical application of those values was considered. It is required the smear should be pressed by moderate pressure when wiping the surface. The pressure from 1.0 kg to 1.5 kg per filter paper was recommended. The removal factor showed lower value in wiping by the pressure below 1.0 kg. The value of 0.5 for the removal factor could be applied to the smooth surface of linoleum, concrete coated with paint or epoxy resin, stainless steel and glass with the statistical allowance. (author)

  3. Nitrate removal from drinking water with a focus on biological methods: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Fariba; Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad-Hossein; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2017-05-31

    This article summarizes several developed and industrial technologies for nitrate removal from drinking water, including physicochemical and biological techniques, with a focus on autotrophic nitrate removal. Approaches are primarily classified into separation-based and elimination-based methods according to the fate of the nitrate in water treatment. Biological denitrification as a cost-effective and promising method of biological nitrate elimination is reviewed in terms of its removal process, applicability, efficiency, and associated disadvantages. The various pathways during biological nitrate removal, including assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, are also explained. A comparative study was carried out to provide a better understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification. Sulfur-based and hydrogen-based denitrifications, which are the most common autotrophic processes of nitrate removal, are reviewed with the aim of presenting the salient features of hydrogenotrophic denitrification along with some drawbacks of the technology and research areas in which it could be used but currently is not. The application of algae-based water treatment is also introduced as a nature-inspired approach that may broaden future horizons of nitrate removal technology.

  4. A summary of methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in numerical models of multiphase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davies, P.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Eight alternative methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in a multiphase flow model of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were implemented and evaluated: Three fixed-room geometries three porosity functions and two fluid-phase-salt methods. The pressure-time-porosity line interpolation method is the method used in current WIPP Performance Assessment calculations. The room closure approximation methods were calibrated against a series of room closure simulations performed using a creep closure code, SANCHO. The fixed-room geometries did not incorporate a direct coupling between room void volume and room pressure. The two porosity function methods that utilized moles of gas as an independent parameter for closure coupling. The capillary backstress method was unable to accurately simulate conditions of re-closure of the room. Two methods were found to be accurate enough to approximate the effects of room closure; the boundary backstress method and pressure-time-porosity line interpolation. The boundary backstress method is a more reliable indicator of system behavior due to a theoretical basis for modeling salt deformation as a viscous process. It is a complex method and a detailed calibration process is required. The pressure lines method is thought to be less reliable because the results were skewed towards SANCHO results in simulations where the sequence of gas generation was significantly different from the SANCHO gas-generation rate histories used for closure calibration. This limitation in the pressure lines method is most pronounced at higher gas-generation rates and is relatively insignificant at lower gas-generation rates. Due to its relative simplicity, the pressure lines method is easier to implement in multiphase flow codes and simulations have a shorter execution time.

  5. A summary of methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in numerical models of multiphase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    Eight alternative methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in a multiphase flow model of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were implemented and evaluated: Three fixed-room geometries three porosity functions and two fluid-phase-salt methods. The pressure-time-porosity line interpolation method is the method used in current WIPP Performance Assessment calculations. The room closure approximation methods were calibrated against a series of room closure simulations performed using a creep closure code, SANCHO. The fixed-room geometries did not incorporate a direct coupling between room void volume and room pressure. The two porosity function methods that utilized moles of gas as an independent parameter for closure coupling. The capillary backstress method was unable to accurately simulate conditions of re-closure of the room. Two methods were found to be accurate enough to approximate the effects of room closure; the boundary backstress method and pressure-time-porosity line interpolation. The boundary backstress method is a more reliable indicator of system behavior due to a theoretical basis for modeling salt deformation as a viscous process. It is a complex method and a detailed calibration process is required. The pressure lines method is thought to be less reliable because the results were skewed towards SANCHO results in simulations where the sequence of gas generation was significantly different from the SANCHO gas-generation rate histories used for closure calibration. This limitation in the pressure lines method is most pronounced at higher gas-generation rates and is relatively insignificant at lower gas-generation rates. Due to its relative simplicity, the pressure lines method is easier to implement in multiphase flow codes and simulations have a shorter execution time

  6. Removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid by column leaching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esther Phillip; Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2012-01-01

    In this study, evaluation of radium-226 removal from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid extracted from peat soil by column leaching method was carried out. Humic acid of concentration 100 ppm and pH 7 was leached through a column packed with radium-contaminated soil and leachates collected were analysed with gamma spectrometer to determine the leached radium-226. Results obtained indicated low removal of radium-226 between 1 - 4 %. Meanwhile, leaching profile revealed that radium-226 was bound to soil components with three different strength, thus resulting in three phases of radium-226 removal. It was estimated that the total removal of radium-226 from 10 g radium-contaminated soil sample studied could be achieved using approximately 31500 - 31850 ml HA solutions with leaching rate of 1 ml/ min. (author)

  7. A systematic technique for the sequential restoration of salt structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Mark G.

    1993-12-01

    A method is described for the sequential restoration of cross sections in areas of salt tectonics where deformation is confined to the salt and higher layers. The subsurface geometry evolves with time through the interaction of various processes: sedimentation, compaction, isostatic adjustment, thermal subsidence (if present), faulting, and salt withdrawal/ diapirism. The technique systematically calculates and removes the effects of each of these processes during specified time intervals defined by the interpreted horizons. It makes no assumptions about salt kinematics and generally results in the area of the salt layer changing through time. The method is described for restoration of extensional terranes, but it is also suitable for areas of contractional salt tectonics with only minor modifications. After converting an interpreted seismic profile to depth, the top layer is stripped off and the underlying section is decompacted according to standard porosity-depth functions. A deep baseline, unaffected by compaction or deformation, is used to restore any isostatic compensation or thermal subsidence. Isostasy is calculated according to the Airy model, and differential sedimentary loading across a section is shown to be approximately balanced by changes in salt thickness so that the load is evenly distributed. After these processes have been reversed, the resulting geometry and the seismic data are used to create the sea-floor template for structural restoration. Fault offsets are removed and the layers down to the top salt are restored to this template, while the base salt remains fixed. The resulting space between the restored top salt and the fixed base salt defines the restored salt geometry. In addition, the difference between the sea-floor template and a fixed sea level provides a measure of the change in water depth (ignoring eustatic changes in sea level). The technique is applied to an interpreted seismic profile from the eastern Green Canyon/Ewing Bank

  8. The use of halloysite functionalized with isothiouronium salts as an organic/inorganic hybrid adsorbent for uranium(VI) ions removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gładysz-Płaska, A; Majdan, M; Tarasiuk, B; Sternik, D; Grabias, E

    2018-07-15

    Elimination of U(VI) from nuclear wastes and from the underground water near the uranium mines is the serious problem. Therefore search for new sorbents for U(VI) is still a big challenge for the scientists. This paper investigates of U(VI) ions sorption on halloysite modified with the isothiouronium salts: S-dodecaneisothiouronium bromide (ligand 1), S,S'-dodecane-1,12-diylbis(isothiouronium bromide) (ligand 2), S-hexadecaneisothiouronium chloride (ligand 3), S,S'-naphthalene-1,4-diylbis(methylisothiouronium) dichloride (ligand 4), and S,S'-2,5-dimethylbenzene-1,4-diylbis(methylisothiouronium) dichloride (ligand 5). It was established that halloysite modified by the ligands with four nitrogen atoms in their structure (ligand-5, 2 and 4) was characterized by higher sorption capacity compared with that modified by the ligands with two donor nitrogens (ligand-1 and 3). The maximum sorption capacity of halloysite-5 toward U(VI) was 157 mg U/g and this places the modified mineral among the most effective sorbents for U(VI) removal from wastes. As follows from ATR, XPS and thermal degradation spectra of the sorption products [R-S-C(NH)(NH 2 )] n = 1-2 (UO 2 2+ ) complexes are formed on the external surface of the halloysite whereas oligomeric hydroxy complexes (UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 + and (UO 2 ) 4 (OH) 7 + are present in the interior of halloysite structure and interact predominantly with aluminols. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy Dissipation-Based Method for Fatigue Life Prediction of Rock Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingming; Huang, Bingqian; Zhu, Caihui; Chen, Yunsheng; Li, Ning

    2018-05-01

    The fatigue test for rock salt is conducted under different stress amplitudes, loading frequencies, confining pressures and loading rates, from which the evaluation rule of the dissipated energy is revealed and analysed. The evolution of energy dissipation under fatigue loading is divided into three stages: the initial stage, the second stage and the acceleration stage. In the second stage, the energy dissipation per cycle remains stable and shows an exponential relation with the stress amplitude; the failure dissipated energy only depends on the mechanical behaviour of the rock salt and confining pressure, but it is immune to the loading conditions. The energy dissipation of fatigued rock salt is discussed, and a novel model for fatigue life prediction is proposed on the basis of energy dissipation. A simple model for evolution of the accumulative dissipated energy is established. Its prediction results are compared with the test results, and the proposed model is validated.

  10. Determination of the calcium salt content on the trunk skeleton and on the peripheral bone applying the Compton backscattering method and the ashing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, K.W.

    1974-01-01

    The Compton backscattering method is applied to determine the bone decalcification. Post mortal excised calcanei and vertebral bodies of 50 people are taken as investigation objects which are examined for their calcium salt content and are then ashed for control measurement. The results show that the method would be better suited to early diagnosis of calcipenic osteopathy than the densitometric method used today on extremity bones. (ORU/LH) [de

  11. Dynamic flow method to study the CO2 loading capacity of amino acid salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Thomsen, Kaj

    Due to a number of advantages amino acid salt solutions have emerged as alternatives to the alkanolamine solvents for the chemical absorption of CO2 from flue gas. The use of amino acids in CO2 capture is a bio-mimetic process, as it is similar to CO2 binding by proteins in the blood......, such as hemoglobin. Amino acid salt solutions have the same amine functionality as alkanolamines, and are thus expected to behave similar towards CO2 in flue gas. Despite rising interest, few studies have been performed so far on amino acids as CO2 absorbents....

  12. BIOTRANSFORMATION AND REMOVAL OF SULFUR FROM DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING IMPROVED BIOCATALYTIC METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    LAROTTA, C. E; MORA, A. L; MADERO, A; MOGOLLÓN, L. I

    1998-01-01

    Three methods for the removal of sulfurfrom dibenzothiophene were evaluated using biocatalytic processes. The methods were a microbial, an enzymatic and a combined one that involves a previous enzymatic oxidation followed by microbial degradation. The byconversion was evaluated over the molecular dibenzothiophene model, obtaining higher byconversion percentages through the combined method. The microorganisms used in this study correspond to several Colombian indigenous strains isolated by dir...

  13. Metal Removal Process Optimisation using Taguchi Method - Simplex Algorithm (TM-SA) with Case Study Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ajibade, Oluwaseyi A.; Agunsoye, Johnson O.; Oke, Sunday A.

    2018-01-01

    In the metal removal process industry, the current practice to optimise cutting parameters adoptsa conventional method. It is based on trial and error, in which the machine operator uses experience,coupled with handbook guidelines to determine optimal parametric values of choice. This method is notaccurate, is time-consuming and costly. Therefore, there is a need for a method that is scientific, costeffectiveand precise. Keeping this in mind, a different direction for process optimisation is ...

  14. Validated UV-spectrophotometric method for the evaluation of the efficacy of makeup remover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoennit, P; Lourith, N

    2012-04-01

    A UV-spectrophotometric method for the analysis of makeup remover was developed and validated according to ICH guidelines. Three makeup removers for which the main ingredients consisted of vegetable oil (A), mineral oil and silicone (B) and mineral oil and water (C) were sampled in this study. Ethanol was the optimal solvent because it did not interfere with the maximum absorbance of the liquid foundation at 250 nm. The linearity was determined over a range of makeup concentrations from 0.540 to 1.412 mg mL⁻¹ (R² = 0.9977). The accuracy of this method was determined by analysing low, intermediate and high concentrations of the liquid foundation and gave 78.59-91.57% recoveries with a relative standard deviation of makeup remover efficacy. © 2011 The Authors. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  15. Scalable and reusable micro-bubble removal method to flatten large-area 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phi H. Q.; Quach, Nhi V.; Li, Jinfeng; Burke, Peter J.

    2018-04-01

    Bubbles generated during electro-delamination and chemical etch during large-area two-dimensional (2D) material transfer has been shown to cause rippling, and consequently, results in tears and wrinkles in the transferred film. Here, we demonstrate a scalable and reusable method to remove surface adhered micro-bubbles by using hydrophobic surfaces modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Bubble removal allows the 2D film to flatten out and prevents the formation of defects. Electrical characterization was used to verify improved transfer quality and was confirmed by increased field-effect mobility and decreased sheet resistance. Raman spectroscopy was also used to validate enhanced electrical quality following transfer. The bubble removal method can be applied to an assortment of 2D materials using diverse hydrophobic SAM variants. Our studies can be integrated into large scale applications and will lead to improved large-area 2D electronics in general.

  16. [Effects of different resin removal methods on shear bond strength of rebonded orthodontic brackets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-miao; Zhao, Bin-jiao; Chen, Dong

    2015-06-01

    To compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of rebonded orthodontic metal brackets with different resin removal methods. Forty extracted premolars were chosen as samples and divided into 4 experimental groups. The teeth were bonded with brackets. The brackets from 3 groups were debonded while adhesive remnants were removed from bracket bases by methods of grinding, sandblasting, and direct flaming, respectively and then rebonded. The SBS values of all rebonded brackets were determined after pH cycling experiment for 30 days. Some rebonded bracket bases were selected and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA test using SPSS 13.0 software package. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference of SBS values among the 4 experimental groups (Pbrackets after resin removal by grinding and sandblasting have a similar SBS compared to the initial brackets adhesive.

  17. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  18. Methods of removing a constituent from a feed stream using adsorption media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Troy J [Idaho Falls, ID; Mann, Nicholas R [Rigby, ID; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID; Herbst, Ronald S [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-05-24

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  19. Retention and removal 137Cs in Japanese catfish (Silurus asotus Linnaeus) in dressing and cooking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, M.A.; Nakahara, N.; Nakamura, R.

    2004-01-01

    Japanese catfish contaminated by 137 Cs have been used to investigate how the dressing and cook-ing method affect the removal of radioactivity from the fish. During the dressing, 6.0% of the initial 137 Cs activity was removed by washing the live fish, further 30.3% of the activity relative to washed fish was removed by discarding the non-edible body parts (skeletons, fins, visceral mass, liver, kidney etc.) and washing the chopped fish. Fish curry was cooked using various spices, green-stuffs and vegetable oil following a method commonly used in South East and East Asian countries. The cooking process removed a further 61.6% of the 137 Cs activity relative to the activity in dressed fish. Taken together, this normal domestic fish dressing and culinary process removed 74.7% of the initial 137 Cs activity present in the live fish. During the cook-ing, the radioactivity removed from the fish pieces was found to distributed over the ingredients of the curry. The cooked fish pieces retained an average, 38.5% of the radioactivity present in the dressed raw fish pieces. Among the ingredients, the gravy was found to contain an average of 34.8% of the activity of the dressed fish. The activity in green-stuffs was found to vary from 4.0% (in cauliflower) to 7.2% (in potato). It may be concluded that normal home preparation and culinary processes removed the radio-activity from the fish to a great extent. In addition, discarding the gravy and green-stuffs of the curry further reduce the radioactivity intake into the human body. (author)

  20. A novel method for the sequential removal and separation of multiple heavy metals from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Li, Liang; Qu, Zan; Xu, Haomiao; Xu, Jianfang; Yan, Naiqiang

    2018-01-15

    A novel method was developed and applied for the treatment of simulated wastewater containing multiple heavy metals. A sorbent of ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) was synthesized and showed extraordinary performance for the removal of Hg 2+ , Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ . The removal efficiencies of Hg 2+ , Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ were 99.9%, 99.9%, 90.8% and 66.3%, respectively. Meanwhile, it was determined that solubility product (K sp ) of heavy metal sulfides was closely related to adsorption selectivity of various heavy metals on the sorbent. The removal efficiency of Hg 2+ was higher than that of Cd 2+ , while the K sp of HgS was lower than that of CdS. It indicated that preferential adsorption of heavy metals occurred when the K sp of the heavy metal sulfide was lower. In addition, the differences in the K sp of heavy metal sulfides allowed for the exchange of heavy metals, indicating the potential application for the sequential removal and separation of heavy metals from wastewater. According to the cumulative adsorption experimental results, multiple heavy metals were sequentially adsorbed and separated from the simulated wastewater in the order of the K sp of their sulfides. This method holds the promise of sequentially removing and separating multiple heavy metals from wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Removal of algal blooms from freshwater by the coagulation-magnetic separation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Wang, Peng; Wei, Guanran; Dong, Wenbo; Hui, Franck

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of changing waste into useful materials for water treatment and proposed a coagulation-magnetic separation technique. This technique was rapid and highly effective for clearing up harmful algal blooms in freshwater and mitigating lake eutrophication. A magnetic coagulant was synthesized by compounding acid-modified fly ash with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). Its removal effects on algal cells and dissolved organics in water were studied. After mixing, coagulation, and magnetic separation, the flocs obtained from the magnet surface were examined by SEM. Treated samples were withdrawn for the content determination of chlorophyll-a, turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen, and total phosphorus. More than 99 % of algal cells were removed within 5 min after the addition of magnetic coagulant at optimal loadings (200 mg L(-1)). The removal efficiencies of COD, total nitrogen, and phosphorus were 93, 91, and 94 %, respectively. The mechanism of algal removal explored preliminarily showed that the magnetic coagulant played multiple roles in mesoporous adsorption, netting and bridging, as well as high magnetic responsiveness to a magnetic field. The magnetic-coagulation separation method can rapidly and effectively remove algae from water bodies and greatly mitigate eutrophication of freshwater using a new magnetic coagulant. The method has good performance, is low cost, can turn waste into something valuable, and provides reference and directions for future pilot and production scale-ups.

  2. Self-monitoring of urinary salt excretion as a method of salt-reduction education: a parallel, randomized trial involving two groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Kenichiro; Miyoshi, Emiko; Misumi, Yukiko; Kajiyama, Tomomi; Fukuda, Tamami; Ishii, Taeko; Moriguchi, Ririko; Murata, Yusuke; Ohe, Kenji; Enjoji, Munechika; Tsuchihashi, Takuya

    2018-02-20

    The present study aimed to evaluate salt-reduction education using a self-monitoring urinary salt-excretion device. Parallel, randomized trial involving two groups. The following parameters were checked at baseline and endline of the intervention: salt check sheet, eating behaviour questionnaire, 24 h home urine collection, blood pressure before and after urine collection. The intervention group self-monitored urine salt excretion using a self-measuring device for 4 weeks. In the control group, urine salt excretion was measured, but the individuals were not informed of the result. Seventy-eight individuals (control group, n 36; intervention group, n 42) collected two 24 h urine samples from a target population of 123 local resident volunteers. The samples were then analysed. There were no differences in clinical background or related parameters between the two groups. The 24 h urinary Na:K ratio showed a significant decrease in the intervention group (-1·1) compared with the control group (-0·0; P=0·033). Blood pressure did not change in either group. The results of the salt check sheet did not change in the control group but were significantly lower in the intervention group. The score of the eating behaviour questionnaire did not change in the control group, but the intervention group showed a significant increase in eating behaviour stage. Self-monitoring of urinary salt excretion helps to improve 24 h urinary Na:K, salt check sheet scores and stage of eating behaviour. Thus, usage of self-monitoring tools has an educational potential in salt intake reduction.

  3. A novel, efficient and facile method for the template removal from mesoporous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Lu; Jiang, Shang; Wang, Runwei; Zhang, Zongtao; Qiu, Shilun

    2014-01-01

    © 2014, Jilin University, The Editorial Department of Chemical Research in Chinese Universities and Springer-Verlag GmbH. A new catalytic-oxidation method was adopted to remove the templates from SBA-15 and MCM-41 mesoporous materials via Fenton

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE PIT REMOVAL METHODS IN DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS OF VARIOUS RESOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Šamanović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital terrain model (DTM is the base for calculation of the surface runoff under the influence of the gravity (gravity flow in hydrological analysis. It is important to produce hydrologically corrected DTM with the removed natural and artificial depressions to avoid numerical problems in algorithms of the gravity flow. The pit removal procedure changes geomorphometry of the DTM. GIS software packages use pit removal algorithm independently of geomorphmetric features of the analyzed area. In need of minimally modified DTM after the pit removal areas, the carving method (deepen drainage routes and the filling method (fill sink were analyzed on three different geomorphometric areas (bare mountain range, hilly wooded area and the plain area intersected with the network of the drainage canals. The recommendation is given for the choice of geomorphometric least changing DTM algorithm. The input data are raster data of elevation points created by stereoscopic photogrammetry method in 5x5 and 25x25 meter resolution. Differences have been noticed during the process of creating raster data. The recommendation is given for the choice of the most acceptable method for each type of area on the basis of comparison of the original elevation points with the elevation points in created DTM.

  5. Method for the removal of a gaseous fluid and arrangement therefore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursem, W.N.J.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The invention provides a method for the removal of a gaseous fluid comprising (a) applying an electric field between a first electrode arranged to generate a corona discharge and a second electrode, comprising a haze-permeable electrically conductive sieve of a plurality of conductive strands, (b)

  6. Ammonia removal from an aqueous solution and method for the production of a fertilizer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelder, E.M.; Ursem, W.N.J.; Roos, R.A.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The invention provides method for the removal of ammonia from air and converting the ammonia in a fertilizer material, comprising (a) contacting at least part of the air with an aqueous liquid, wherein the aqueous liquid is a solvent for ammonia, to provide an ammonia containing aqueous

  7. A simple one-step synthesis of ZnS nanoparticles via salt-alkali-composited-mediated method and investigation on their comparative photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Donghu; Zhu, Yabo; He, Zhanjun; Liu, Zhangsheng; Luo, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The TEM image shows that the as-synthesized ZnS particle size was estimated to be about 40 nm and this newly synthesized ZnS nanoparticles can be as a promising photocatalytic degradation material for the organic pollutant removal. Display Omitted Highlights: ► ZnS nanoparticles with cubic phase have been successfully synthesized via salt-alkali-composited-mediated method (SACM) for the first time and this method has not been found so far. ► Its band gap (E g ) is a little bigger than commercial ZnS particle mainly due to quantum size effect. ► The as-synthesized ZnS nanoparticles show much more efficient photocatalytic degradation on methyl orange than commercial ZnS powder. -- Abstract: ZnS nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized via salt-alkali-composited-mediated method (SACM) for the first time, using a mixture of LiNO 3 and LiOH (LiNO 3 /LiOH = 60.7:39.3) as a reaction solvent, sodium sulfide and zinc nitrate as reactants at temperature of 210 °C for 24 h in the absence of organic dispersant or capping agents. X-ray diffraction, environment scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the as-synthesized products were well crystallized and belonged to nano-scale. Their UV–vis absorption spectrum demonstrated a band gap of 3.6406 eV corresponding to the absorption edge of 340 nm. The experimental result of photocatalytic degradation on methyl orange by the nano-ZnS showed much better photocatalysis than that by the commercial ZnS powder under the irradiation of ultraviolet light and visible light, respectively.

  8. Novel geochemistry-inspired method for the deep removal of vanadium from molybdate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jialiang [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Recycling and Extraction of Metals, Beijing, 100083 (China); Deng, Yuping; Zhou, Qiuyue; Qin, Peixin; Liu, Yubo [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Wang, Chengyan, E-mail: chywang@yeah.net [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • A geochemistry-inspired method was developed for removal of V from molybdates. • Magnetic separation of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} adsorbent took 10 s. • Vanadium can be deeply removed in 5 min at pH of 7.0–11.0. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} adsorbent has excellent V selectivity and reusability. • A flowchart is presented for Mo/V separation in the leachate of spent HDS catalyst. - Abstract: Separation of vanadium from molybdates is an essential task for processing the leaching solution of hazardous spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst. In this study, the difference in the main naturally occurring mineral forms of Mo and V inspired us to develop a method for the deep removal of V from molybdate solution using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} as an adsorbent. First, the adsorbent was synthesized with coprecipitation method, and then it was characterized by XRD, TEM, and VSM. The synthesized material consisted of pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles that exhibited paramagnetic property, with a saturated magnetization of 68.6 emu g{sup −1}. The V removal efficiency was investigated using batch adsorption experiments in varying conditions. Results indicated that V could be deeply removed from various concentrations of molybdate solution at pH of 7.0–11.0 within 5 min. A slight decrease was found in the adsorption ratio after the adsorbent had been reused for 4 cycles. The resulting molybdate solution contained less than 0.02 g L{sup −1} of V, which satisfies the requirement for preparing high-quality products. Finally, a process flowchart is presented for the separation of Mo and V from the leaching solution of spent HDS catalyst, based on the excellent V removal performance and rapid separation rate of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} adsorbent.

  9. A novel method of non-violent dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshmanan, A.R.; Prasad, M.V.R.; Ponraju, D.; Krishnan, H.

    2004-01-01

    A new technique of non-violent and fast dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt (MgSO 4 .7H 2 O) at room temperature (RT) has been developed. The dissolution process is mildly exothermic but could be carried out even in a glass beaker in air under swift stirring condition. The reaction products consist of mixed salts of MgSO 4 and Na 2 SO 4 as well as Mg(OH) 2 which are only mildly alkaline and hence are non-corrosive and non-hazardous unlike NaOH. A 50 mL solution having Epsom salt concentration of 2 M was found to give the optimal composition for disposal of 1 g of sodium. Supersaturated (>2.7 M), as well as dilute (<1.1 M) solutions, however, cause violent reactions and hence should be avoided. Repeated sodium dissolution in Epsom solution produced a solid waste of 4.7 g per g of sodium dissolved which is comparable with the waste (4 g) produced in 8 M NaOH solution. A 1.4 M Epsom solution sprayed with a high-pressure jet cleaner at RT in air easily removed the sodium blocked inside a metal pipe made of mild steel. The above jet also dissolved peacefully residual sodium collected on the metal tray after a sodium fire experiment. No sodium fire or explosion was observed during this campaign. The Epsom solution spray effectively neutralized the minor quantity of sodium aerosol produced during this campaign. This novel technique would hence be quite useful for draining sodium from fast breeder reactor components and bulk processing of sodium as well as for sodium fire fighting

  10. Design of a natural draft air-cooled condenser and its heat transfer characteristics in the passive residual heat removal system for 10 MW molten salt reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hangbin; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Zhao, Kaibin; Fa, Dan

    2015-01-01

    As one of the Generation IV reactors, Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) has its superiorities in satisfying the requirements on safety. In order to improve its inherent safety, a concept of passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS) for the 10 MW Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was put forward, which mainly consisted of a fuel drain tank, a feed water tank and a natural draft air-cooled condenser (NDACC). Besides, several valves and pipes are also included in the PRHRS. A NDACC for the PRHRS was preliminarily designed in this paper, which contained a finned tube bundle and a chimney. The tube bundle was installed at the bottom of the chimney for increasing the velocity of the air across the bundle. The heat transfer characteristics of the NDACC were investigated by developing a model of the PRHRS using C++ code. The effects of the environmental temperature, finned tube number and chimney height on heat removal capacity of the NDACC were analyzed. The results show that it has sufficient heat removal capacity to meet the requirements of the residual heat removal for MSRE. The effects of these three factors are obvious. With the decay heat reducing, the heat dissipation power declines after a short-time rise in the beginning. The operation of the NDACC is completely automatic without the need of any external power, resulting in a high safety and reliability of the reactor, especially once the accident of power lost occurs to the power plant. - Highlights: • A model to study the heat transfer characteristics of the NDACC was developed. • The NDACC had sufficient heat removal capacity to remove the decay heat of MSRE. • NDACC heat dissipation power depends on outside temperature and condenser geometry. • As time grown, the effects of outside temperature and condenser geometry diminish. • The NDACC could automatically adjust its heat removal capacity

  11. Method of removing tritium in exhaust water in a nuclear equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, T

    1976-05-12

    A method is claimed to increase the efficiency of removing tritium from waste water through adsorption treatment. Steam is produced by heating waste water containing tritium, and it is passed through a tube filled with an adsorbent such as activated alumina, silica gel or zeolite. When a control limiting value is reached by the concentration of tritium within the steam, the flow of steam is stopped, and the adsorption tube is removed from the path of steam flow. Thereafter, another adsorption tube containing the afore-said adsorbent is provided in the steam flow path, and the steam is then allowed to flow again.

  12. A method for removing sulfur bearing compounds from paraffinous hydrocarbons or a directly distilled benzine fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konyukhova, T.P.; Bolotskaya, I.A.; Mikhaylova, L.A.; Sadykov, A.N.; Shitovkin, N.T.; Vlasov, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    In the known method for removing sulfurorganic compounds from paraffinous hydrocarbons or a directly distilled gasoline fraction through their adsorption using natural zeolite, in order to increase the degree of purification, clinoptilolite (Kp), which contains SiO2 and A12O3 in a molar ratio of 10.6 to 16.7 is used as the natural zeolite. The purification of the paraffinous hydrocarbons through clinoptilolite adsorption as compared with mordenite adsorption makes it possible to increase the degree of their purification of ethylmercaptane and dimethylsulfide. The effectiveness of clinoptilolite is also confirmed in removing mercaptanes and sulfides from directly distilled gasoline fractions.

  13. Method of removing paraffin from mineral oils, shale oils, tar oils, and their fractions or residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmquist, F T.E.

    1949-09-08

    A method is described for removing paraffin from mineral oils, shale oils, tar oils, and their fractions or residues by centrifuging in the presence of oil-dissolving and paraffin-precipitating solvents, by which the precipitated paraffin is made to pass through an indifferent auxiliary liquid, in which a removal of oil takes place, characterized in that as auxiliary liquid is used a liquid or mixture of liquids whose surface tension against the oil solution is sufficiently low for the paraffin to pass the layer of auxiliary liquid in the form of separate crystals.

  14. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  15. Methods and compositions for removing carbon dioxide from a gaseous mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Haohan

    2014-06-24

    Provided is a method for adsorbing or separating carbon dioxide from a mixture of gases by passing the gas mixture through a porous three-dimensional polymeric coordination compound having a plurality of layers of two-dimensional arrays of repeating structural units, which results in a lower carbon dioxide content in the gas mixture. Thus, this invention provides useful compositions and methods for removal of greenhouse gases, in particular CO.sub.2, from industrial flue gases or from the atmosphere.

  16. Removal of plutonium from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions using anion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasar, U.M.; Pawar, S.M.; Joshi, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    An anion exchange method using Amberlyst A-26 (MP) resin was developed for removal of Pu from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions without destroying oxalate. The method consists of sorption of Pu(IV) on Amberlyst A-26, a macroporous anion exchange resin, from nitric acid-oxalic acid medium in the presence of Al(NO 3 ) 3 . Pu(IV) breakthrough capacity of Amberlyst A-26 using synthetic feed solution was determined. (author)

  17. History and future of human cadaver preservation for surgical training: from formalin to saturated salt solution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shogo; Naito, Munekazu; Kawata, Shinichi; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Itoh, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, surgical training meant on-the-job training with live patients in an operating room. However, due to advancing surgical techniques, such as minimally invasive surgery, and increasing safety demands during procedures, human cadavers have been used for surgical training. When considering the use of human cadavers for surgical training, one of the most important factors is their preservation. In this review, we summarize four preservation methods: fresh-frozen cadaver, formalin, Thiel's, and saturated salt solution methods. Fresh-frozen cadaver is currently the model that is closest to reality, but it also presents myriad problems, including the requirement of freezers for storage, limited work time because of rapid putrefaction, and risk of infection. Formalin is still used ubiquitously due to its low cost and wide availability, but it is not ideal because formaldehyde has an adverse health effect and formalin-embalmed cadavers do not exhibit many of the qualities of living organs. Thiel's method results in soft and flexible cadavers with almost natural colors, and Thiel-embalmed cadavers have been appraised widely in various medical disciplines. However, Thiel's method is relatively expensive and technically complicated. In addition, Thiel-embalmed cadavers have a limited dissection time. The saturated salt solution method is simple, carries a low risk of infection, and is relatively low cost. Although more research is needed, this method seems to be sufficiently useful for surgical training and has noteworthy features that expand the capability of clinical training. The saturated salt solution method will contribute to a wider use of cadavers for surgical training.

  18. Effects of electrocardiography contamination and comparison of ECG removal methods on upper trapezius electromyography recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Ryan J; Maluf, Katrina S

    2014-12-01

    Electromyography (EMG) recordings from the trapezius are often contaminated by the electrocardiography (ECG) signal, making it difficult to distinguish low-level muscle activity from muscular rest. This study investigates the influence of ECG contamination on EMG amplitude and frequency estimations in the upper trapezius during muscular rest and low-level contractions. A new method of ECG contamination removal, filtered template subtraction (FTS), is described and compared to 30 Hz high-pass filter (HPF) and averaged template subtraction (ATS) methods. FTS creates a unique template of each ECG artifact using a low-pass filtered copy of the contaminated signal, which is subtracted from contaminated periods in the original signal. ECG contamination results in an over-estimation of EMG amplitude during rest in the upper trapezius, with negligible effects on amplitude and frequency estimations during low-intensity isometric contractions. FTS and HPF successfully removed ECG contamination from periods of muscular rest, yet introduced errors during muscle contraction. Conversely, ATS failed to fully remove ECG contamination during muscular rest, yet did not introduce errors during muscle contraction. The relative advantages and disadvantages of different ECG contamination removal methods should be considered in the context of the specific motor tasks that require analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Method of removing oxides of sulfur and oxides of nitrogen from exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    A continuous method is presented for removing both oxides of sulfur and oxides of nitrogen from combustion or exhaust gases with the regeneration of the absorbent. Exhaust gas is cleaned of particulates and HCl by a water scrub prior to contact with a liquid absorbent that includes an aqueous solution of bisulfite and sulfite ions along with a metal chelate, such as, an iron or zinc aminopolycarboxylic acid. Following contact with the combustion gases the spent absorbent is subjected to electrodialysis to transfer bisulfite ions into a sulfuric acid solution while splitting water with hydroxide and hydrogen ion migration to equalize electrical charge. The electrodialysis stack includes alternate layers of anion selective and bipolar membranes. Oxides of nitrogen are removed from the liquid absorbent by air stripping at an elevated temperature and the regenerated liquid absorbent is returned to contact with exhaust gases for removal of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides.

  20. A Saponification Method for Chlorophyll Removal from Microalgae Biomass as Oil Feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae oil is an optimal feedstock for nutraceutical, pharmaceutical and biodiesel production, but its high levels of chlorophyll limit its large-scale application. To date, few effective approaches have been developed to remove chlorophyll from microalgae oil. The main purpose of this study was to present a preprocessing method of algae oil feedstock (Scenedesmus to remove chlorophyll by saponification. The results showed that 96% of chlorophyll in biomass was removed. High quality orange transparent oil could be extracted from the chlorophyll reduced biomass. Specifically, the proportion of neutral lipids and saturation levels of fatty acids increased, and the pigments composition became carotenoids-based. The critical parameters of chlorophyll reduced biodiesel conformed to the standards of the USA, China and EU. Sodium copper chlorophyllin could be prepared from the bleaching effluent. The results presented herein offer a useful pathway to improve the quality of microalgae oil and reduce the cost of microalgae biodiesel.

  1. A Saponification Method for Chlorophyll Removal from Microalgae Biomass as Oil Feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Xu, Jin; Wu, Hualian; Wang, Guanghua; Dai, Shikun; Fan, Jiewei; He, Hui; Xiang, Wenzhou

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae oil is an optimal feedstock for nutraceutical, pharmaceutical and biodiesel production, but its high levels of chlorophyll limit its large-scale application. To date, few effective approaches have been developed to remove chlorophyll from microalgae oil. The main purpose of this study was to present a preprocessing method of algae oil feedstock (Scenedesmus) to remove chlorophyll by saponification. The results showed that 96% of chlorophyll in biomass was removed. High quality orange transparent oil could be extracted from the chlorophyll reduced biomass. Specifically, the proportion of neutral lipids and saturation levels of fatty acids increased, and the pigments composition became carotenoids-based. The critical parameters of chlorophyll reduced biodiesel conformed to the standards of the USA, China and EU. Sodium copper chlorophyllin could be prepared from the bleaching effluent. The results presented herein offer a useful pathway to improve the quality of microalgae oil and reduce the cost of microalgae biodiesel. PMID:27618070

  2. A Saponification Method for Chlorophyll Removal from Microalgae Biomass as Oil Feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Xu, Jin; Wu, Hualian; Wang, Guanghua; Dai, Shikun; Fan, Jiewei; He, Hui; Xiang, Wenzhou

    2016-09-07

    Microalgae oil is an optimal feedstock for nutraceutical, pharmaceutical and biodiesel production, but its high levels of chlorophyll limit its large-scale application. To date, few effective approaches have been developed to remove chlorophyll from microalgae oil. The main purpose of this study was to present a preprocessing method of algae oil feedstock (Scenedesmus) to remove chlorophyll by saponification. The results showed that 96% of chlorophyll in biomass was removed. High quality orange transparent oil could be extracted from the chlorophyll reduced biomass. Specifically, the proportion of neutral lipids and saturation levels of fatty acids increased, and the pigments composition became carotenoids-based. The critical parameters of chlorophyll reduced biodiesel conformed to the standards of the USA, China and EU. Sodium copper chlorophyllin could be prepared from the bleaching effluent. The results presented herein offer a useful pathway to improve the quality of microalgae oil and reduce the cost of microalgae biodiesel.

  3. Method and apparatus for removably mounting a top nozzle on a nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Gjertsen, R.K.; Schallenberger, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having a top nozzle and control rod guide thimbles, a method is described of removably mounting the top nozzle on the ends of the guide thimbles, comprising the steps of: (a) releasably mating hollow outer sockets defined in the top nozzle with hollow inner sockets defined on the ends of the guide thimbles. The inner sockets are movable between compressed conditions for removing and inserting the inner sockets from and into the outer sockets in mounting and removing the top nozzle on and from the guide thimbles and expanded conditions for mating the inner and outer sockets together and the top nozzle on the guide thimbles; (b) supporting elongated locking tubes such that end portions thereof extend into the outer sockets defined in the top nozzle; and (c) moving all of the locking tubes at the same time between unlocking and locking positions to displace their end portions axially within the outer sockets between first and second locations

  4. Carbon Dioxide Nucleation as a Novel Cleaning Method for Sodium Alginate Fouling Removal from Reverse Osmosis Membranes desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Alnajjar, Heba

    2017-05-01

    The use of Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes have been significantly increasing in water desalination, and the main operational obstacle in RO desalination plants is membrane fouling. Among other solutes, dissolved biopolymers, such as polysaccharides can lead to severe membrane fouling especially with the addition of calcium ions because of the complexation formation between the surface of membrane and foulants materials. However, this complexation can also take place in the feed bulk, resulting in foulants aggregates formation. Although there are some physical techniques that can maintain the membrane performance without reducing its lifetime, only chemical cleanings are still commonly used in RO plants. In this study, a novel cleaning method is proposed to restore the membrane performance by removing the deposited foulants without reducing the membrane lifetime. The cleaning method is based on using water saturated with dissolved CO2 gas, and its principle is based on producing spontaneous CO2 bubbles due to local pressure difference leading to nucleation of bubbles throughout the membrane surface, especially at nucleation sites, which improve the cleaning efficiency. Alginic acid sodium salt was used as a model of polysaccharides foulants in presence of different concentrations of NaCl and calcium ions aiming to enhance membrane fouling, and then CO2 cleaning solution efficiency, in terms flux recovery (FR), was tested under different operating conditions and compared to other cleaning methods. Average FR of 20%±3, 25%±3 and 80%±3 for MilliQ water, a cleaning solution at pH4, and CO2 solution at 6 bar, 0.17 m/s, and 23 ̊C ±0.2 for 6 minutes were obtained, respectively. The efficiency of this novel cleaning method was also compared to direct osmosis overnight, and the average flux was comparable (about 60%±3), though that the cleaning time was significantly different. Various calcium concentrations (0-10 mM) were added in the alginate solution to study the

  5. Determination of the point-of-zero, charge of manganese oxides with different methods including an improved salt titration method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, W.F.; Lu, S.J.; Liu, F.; Feng, X.H.; He, J.Z.; Koopal, L.K.

    2008-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are important components in soils and sediments. Points-of-zero charge (PZC) of three synthetic Mn oxides (birnessite, cryptomelane, and todorokite) were determined by using three classical techniques (potentiometric titration or PT, rapid PT or R-PT, and salt titration or ST)

  6. Removal of organic wastes containing tributyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobnik, S.

    TBP in dodecane and kerosene is one of the waste solutions from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels by the Purex process. The following methods were investigated for removing the organic solvents: adsorption on suitable solids, extraction, reaction with neutral salts, and saponification with acids or alkalis. Results showed that the best method of TBP removal is saponification with alkali hydroxides, either with dibutyl phosphate or with ortho-phosphate

  7. Treatment methods and comparative risks of thorium removal from waste residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, R.D.; Hamby, D.M.; Martin, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    This study was done to examine the risks of remediation and the effectiveness of removal methods for thorium and its associated radioactive decay products from various soils and wastes associated with DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Removal of {sup 230}Th from uranium process residues would significantly reduce the buildup of {sup 226}Ra (half-life of 1600 years), and since {sup 230}Th concentrations at most of the important sites greatly exceed the {sup 226}Ra concentrations, such removal would reduce the accumulation of additional radiation risks associated with {sup 226}Ra and its products; and, if treatment also removed {sup 226}Ra, these risks could be mitigated even further. Removal of {sup 232}Th from thorium process residues would remove the source material for {sup 228}Ra, and since {sup 228}Ra has a half-life of 5.76 years, its control at FUSRAP sites could be done with land use controls for the 30--50 years required for {sup 228}Ra and the risks associated with its decay products to decay away. It must be recognized, however, that treatment methods invariably require workers to process residues and waste materials usually with bulk handling techniques. These processes expose workers to the radioactivity in the materials, therefore, workers would incur radiological risks in addition to industrial accident risks. An important question is whether the potential reduction of future radiological risks to members of the public justifies the risks that are incurred by remediation workers due to handling materials. This study examines, first, the effectiveness of treatment and then the risks that would be associated with remediation.

  8. Treatment methods and comparative risks of thorium removal from waste residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, R.D.; Hamby, D.M.; Martin, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    This study was done to examine the risks of remediation and the effectiveness of removal methods for thorium and its associated radioactive decay products from various soils and wastes associated with DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Removal of 230 Th from uranium process residues would significantly reduce the buildup of 226 Ra (half-life of 1600 years), and since 230 Th concentrations at most of the important sites greatly exceed the 226 Ra concentrations, such removal would reduce the accumulation of additional radiation risks associated with 226 Ra and its products; and, if treatment also removed 226 Ra, these risks could be mitigated even further. Removal of 232 Th from thorium process residues would remove the source material for 228 Ra, and since 228 Ra has a half-life of 5.76 years, its control at FUSRAP sites could be done with land use controls for the 30--50 years required for 228 Ra and the risks associated with its decay products to decay away. It must be recognized, however, that treatment methods invariably require workers to process residues and waste materials usually with bulk handling techniques. These processes expose workers to the radioactivity in the materials, therefore, workers would incur radiological risks in addition to industrial accident risks. An important question is whether the potential reduction of future radiological risks to members of the public justifies the risks that are incurred by remediation workers due to handling materials. This study examines, first, the effectiveness of treatment and then the risks that would be associated with remediation

  9. Suppressing carrier removal error in the Fourier transform method for interferogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Qi; Yang, Hongru; Li, Gaoping; Zhao, Jianlin

    2010-01-01

    A new carrier removal method for interferogram analysis using the Fourier transform is presented. The proposed method can be used to suppress the carrier removal error as well as the spectral leakage error. First, the carrier frequencies are estimated with the spectral centroid of the up sidelobe of the apodized interferogram, and then the up sidelobe can be shifted to the origin in the frequency domain by multiplying the original interferogram by a constructed plane reference wave. The influence of the carrier frequencies without an integer multiple of the frequency interval and the window function for apodization of the interferogram can be avoided in our work. The simulation and experimental results show that this method is effective for phase measurement with a high accuracy from a single interferogram

  10. Subspace-based interference removal methods for a multichannel biomagnetic sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. In biomagnetic signal processing, the theory of the signal subspace has been applied to removing interfering magnetic fields, and a representative algorithm is the signal space projection algorithm, in which the signal/interference subspace is defined in the spatial domain as the span of signal/interference-source lead field vectors. This paper extends the notion of this conventional (spatial domain) signal subspace by introducing a new definition of signal subspace in the time domain. Approach. It defines the time-domain signal subspace as the span of row vectors that contain the source time course values. This definition leads to symmetric relationships between the time-domain and the conventional (spatial-domain) signal subspaces. As a review, this article shows that the notion of the time-domain signal subspace provides useful insights over existing interference removal methods from a unified perspective. Main results and significance. Using the time-domain signal subspace, it is possible to interpret a number of interference removal methods as the time domain signal space projection. Such methods include adaptive noise canceling, sensor noise suppression, the common temporal subspace projection, the spatio-temporal signal space separation, and the recently-proposed dual signal subspace projection. Our analysis using the notion of the time domain signal space projection reveals implicit assumptions these methods rely on, and shows that the difference between these methods results only from the manner of deriving the interference subspace. Numerical examples that illustrate the results of our arguments are provided.

  11. Study on efficient methods for removal and treatment of graphite blocks in a gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, S.; Shirakawa, M.; Murakami, T.

    2001-01-01

    Tokai Power Station (GCR, 166 MWe) started its commercial operation on July 1966 and ceased activities at the end of March 1998 after 32 years of operation. The decommissioning plans are being developed, to prepare for near future dismantling. In the study, the methods for removal of the graphite blocks of about 1,600 ton have been developed to carrying it out safely and in a short period of time, and the methods of treatment of graphite have also been developed. All technological items have been identified for which R and D work will be required for removal from the core and treatment for disposal. (1) In order to reduce the programme required for the dismantling of reactor internals, an efficient method for removal of the graphite blocks is necessary. For this purpose the design of a dismantling machine has been investigated which can extract several blocks at a time. The conceptual design has being developed and the model has been manufactured and tested in a mock-up facility. (2) In order to reduce disposal costs, it will be necessary to segment the graphite blocks, maximising the packing density available in the disposal containers. Some of the graphite blocks will be cut into pieces longitudinally by a remote machine. Relevant technical matters have been identified, such as graphite cutting methods, the nature of fine particles arising from the cutting operation, the treatment of fine particles for disposal, and the method of mortar filling inside the waste container. (author)

  12. Methods for artifact detection and removal from scalp EEG: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Kafiul; Rastegarnia, Amir; Yang, Zhi

    2016-11-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the most popular brain activity recording technique used in wide range of applications. One of the commonly faced problems in EEG recordings is the presence of artifacts that come from sources other than brain and contaminate the acquired signals significantly. Therefore, much research over the past 15 years has focused on identifying ways for handling such artifacts in the preprocessing stage. However, this is still an active area of research as no single existing artifact detection/removal method is complete or universal. This article presents an extensive review of the existing state-of-the-art artifact detection and removal methods from scalp EEG for all potential EEG-based applications and analyses the pros and cons of each method. First, a general overview of the different artifact types that are found in scalp EEG and their effect on particular applications are presented. In addition, the methods are compared based on their ability to remove certain types of artifacts and their suitability in relevant applications (only functional comparison is provided not performance evaluation of methods). Finally, the future direction and expected challenges of current research is discussed. Therefore, this review is expected to be helpful for interested researchers who will develop and/or apply artifact handling algorithm/technique in future for their applications as well as for those willing to improve the existing algorithms or propose a new solution in this particular area of research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Stripping methods studies for HVOF WC-10Co-4Cr coating removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menini, Richard; Salah, Nihad Ben; Nciri, Rachid

    2004-04-01

    The use of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) cermet coatings is considered to be a valuable and innovative alternative technology to replace Cr(VI) electroplating. Among others, a WC-10Co-4Cr coating is one of the best choices for landing gear components due to its excellent tribology and corrosion properties. The stripping process of such a cermet coating was studied due to its importance for the repair and overhaul of landing gear components. Stripping solutions fulfill the following criteria: keep substrate integrity; exhibit a high strip rate (SR); lead to uniform dissolution; show no galvanic corrosion; and be environmentally friendly. Three different high-strength steel substrates (4340, 300M, and Aermet100) were studied. Five different stripping solutions were selected for the electrochemical study. Only three met the targeted criteria: the meta-nitrobenzane sulfonate-sodium cyanide solution; the Rochelle salt; and a commercial nickel stripper. It was found that the process must be electrolytic, and that ultrasonic agitation is needed to enhance the overall mass transport and removal of WC particles and metallic matrix residues. When choosing the most efficient solution and conditions, the SR was found to be as high as 162 µm h-1, which is a very acceptable SR for productivity sake.

  14. Tests of some methods to remove I-131 from contaminated tap water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    Following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, iodine-131 concentrations in tap water higher than 100 Bq L"-"1 were reported by several local governments in the Kanto Plain in March 2011. To remove iodine-131 from tap water, five methods were tested in this study, that is, (1) boiling, (2) adding charcoals from oak or bamboo, (3) activated charcoals, (4) water purifiers, and (5) reverse osmosis (RO) treatments. Boiling was shown to be not effective in removing iodine-131 from tap water; indeed even higher concentrations may result from the liquid-volume reduction accompanying this process. Adding charcoals and activated charcoal treatment could not remove iodine-131, because no reduction of iodine-131 was observed in tap water samples after these treatments. Only limited effect was found with water purifiers with first several portions; no effect was expected with further water treatment. On the other hand, the RO showed high iodine-131 removal percentage of more than 95%, although the method needs about 5-10 L water to obtain 1 L of RO treated water. (author)

  15. Value of modified Foley catheter method in the removal of blunt esophageal foreign bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung In; Cha, Yoo Mi; Han, Heon; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Young Seok

    1993-01-01

    Removal of blunt esophageal foreign bodies using Foley catheter under a fluoroscopic guidance is a well recognized procedure. However, since this procedure is rather cumbersome and uncomfortable to the patient, the authors tried to find an easier and more convenient modified technique. For 10 patients with esophageal foreign body, we tried the method to the patient who is lying in the right lateral decubitus position and 3 assistants hold head, arms, trunk and legs of the patient without tilting the table and without using immobilizer. Foley catheter is inserted through nostril, nasal cavity and pharynx to esophagus. in order to identify the Foley catheter in esophagus, 0.025 inch short wire was inserted in the Foley catheter. The balloon of a Foley catheter was inflated by 10 cc of air, and the syringe was kept attached to the Foley catheter during the procedure. After passage of the foreign body through the upper esophageal sphinter, the balloon was deflated immediately and the foreign body was removed through the mouth. We successfully removed in removing all the blunt esophageal foreign body with ease. This modified method is also fast, safe and efficient

  16. Continuous extraction of molten chloride salts with liquid cadmium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.S.; Basco, J.K.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    A pyrochemical method is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to provide contnuous multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and liquid cadmium alloys at 500 degrees C. The extraction method will be used to recover transuranic (TRU) elements from the process salt in the electroretiner used in the pyrochemical reprocessing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The IFR is one of the Department of Energy's advanced power reactor concepts. The recovered TRU elements are returned to the electrorefiner. The extracted salt undergoes further processing to remove rare earths and other fission products so that most of the purified salt can also be returned to the electrorefiner, thereby extending the useful life of the process salt many times

  17. Structural analysis of salt cavities formed by solution mining: I. Method of analysis and preliminary results for spherical cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossum, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort is an analysis of the structural stability of cavities formed by solution mining in salt domes. In particular, the effects of depth (i.e. initial state of in situ stress), shape, volume (i.e. physical dimensions of the cavity), and sequence of salt excavation/fluid evacuation on the timewise structural stability of a cavity are of interest. It is anticipated that an assessment can be made of the interrelation between depth, cavern size, and cavern shape or of the practical limits therewith. In general, the cavity shape is assumed to be axisymmetric and the salt is assumed to exhibit nonlinear creep behavior. The primary emphasis is placed on the methodology of the finite element analysis, and the results of preliminary calculations for a spherically shaped cavity. It is common practice for engineers to apply elasticity theory to the behavior of rock in order to obtain near field stresses and displacements around an underground excavation in an effort to assess structural stability. Rock masses, particularly at depth, may be subjected to a rather complex state of initial stress, and may be nonhomogeneous and anisotropic. If one also includes complex geometrical excavation shape, the use of analytical techniques as an analysis tool is practically impossible. Thus, it is almost a necessity that approximate solution techniques be employed. In this regard, the finite element method is ideal as it can handle complex geometries and nonlinear material behavior with relative ease. An unusual feature of the present study is the incorporation into the finite element code of a procedure for handling the gradual creation or excavation of an underground cavity. During the excavation sequence, the salt is permitted to exhibit nonlinear stress-strain-time dependence. The bulk of this report will be devoted to a description of the analysis procedures, together with a preliminary calculation for a spherically shaped cavity

  18. Continuous Preparation of 1:1 Haloperidol-Maleic Acid Salt by a Novel Solvent-Free Method Using a Twin Screw Melt Extruder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hung Lin; Vasoya, Jaydip M; Cirqueira, Marilia de Lima; Yeh, Kuan Lin; Lee, Tu; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2017-04-03

    Salts are generally prepared by acid-base reaction in relatively large volumes of organic solvents, followed by crystallization. In this study, the potential for preparing a pharmaceutical salt between haloperidol and maleic acid by a novel solvent-free method using a twin-screw melt extruder was investigated. The pH-solubility relationship between haloperidol and maleic acid in aqueous medium was first determined, which demonstrated that 1:1 salt formation between them was feasible (pH max 4.8; salt solubility 4.7 mg/mL). Extrusion of a 1:1 mixture of haloperidol and maleic acid at the extruder barrel temperature of 60 °C resulted in the formation of a highly crystalline salt. The effects of operating temperature and screw configuration on salt formation were also investigated, and those two were identified as key processing parameters. Salts were also prepared by solution crystallization from ethyl acetate, liquid-assisted grinding, and heat-assisted grinding and compared with those obtained by melt extrusion by using DSC, PXRD, TGA, and optical microscopy. While similar salts were obtained by all methods, both melt extrusion and solution crystallization yielded highly crystalline materials with identical enthalpies of melting. During the pH-solubility study, a salt hydrate form was also identified, which, upon heating, converted to anhydrate similar to that obtained by other methods. There were previous reports of the formation of cocrystals, but not salts, by melt extrusion. 1 H NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction confirmed that a salt was indeed formed in the present study. The haloperidol-maleic acid salt obtained was nonhygroscopic in the moisture sorption study and converted to the hydrate form only upon mixing with water. Thus, we are reporting for the first time a relatively simple and solvent-free twin-screw melt extrusion method for the preparation of a pharmaceutical salt that provides material comparable to that obtained by solution

  19. Optimization of the Electrocoagulation Process for Removal of Cr(VI Using Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Asadi Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to optimize electrocoagulation process for removal of chromium (VI using Taguchi method. An elecrtrocoagulation reactor with six parallel electrodes was used in this study. For this purpose, effects of 7 parameters such as electrode material, electric current, time of reactions, initial pH, initial voltage, initial chromium concentration and rpm of impeller (agitation intensity in two different levels were studied. Model of "OA_32" of Taguchi experimental design method was used. Among the above-mentioned parameters, electric current and electrode material had highest effects and rpm of impeller had the lowest effect on the electrocoagulation performance. According to the obtained results, highest chromium removal (168.33 mg/L observed in the following conditions: electric current=3A, time of reaction=20min, initial pH=4, initial voltage=6v, initial chromium concentration=400mg/L, rpm of impeller=0rpm and iron as electrode material

  20. Method for removing impurities from an impurity-containing fluid stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2010-04-06

    A method of removing at least one polar component from a fluid stream. The method comprises providing a fluid stream comprising at least one nonpolar component and at least one polar component. The fluid stream is contacted with a supercritical solvent to remove the at least one polar component. The at least one nonpolar component may be a fat or oil and the at least one polar component may be water, dirt, detergents, or mixtures thereof. The supercritical solvent may decrease solubility of the at least one polar component in the fluid stream. The supercritical solvent may function as a solvent or as a gas antisolvent. The supercritical solvent may dissolve the nonpolar components of the fluid stream, such as fats or oils, while the polar components may be substantially insoluble. Alternatively, the supercritical solvent may be used to increase the nonpolarity of the fluid stream.

  1. Energy efficient SO2 removal from flue gases using the method Wellman-Lord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhonova-Atanasova, D.; Razkazova-Velkova, E.; Ljutzkanov, L.; Kolev, N.; Kolev, D.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Investigations on development of energy efficient technology for SO 2 removal from flue gases of combustion systems by using the method Wellman-Lord are presented. It is characterized by absorption of sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite solution, which reacts to form sodium bisulfite. The absorber is a packed column with multiple stages. After evaporation of the solution, SO 2 and sodium sulfite are obtained. The latter is dissolved in water from condensation of the steam carrying SO 2 from the evaporator. The regenerated solution returns in the absorber. The SO 2 removed from the flue gases is obtained as a pure product for use in chemical, food or wine production. The data discussed in the literature sources on flue gas desulfurization demonstrate the predominance of the methods with lime or limestone as absorbent, due to higher capital investments associated with the method of Wellman-Lord. A technological and economical evaluation of this regenerative method is presented in comparison to the non-regenerative gypsum method, using data from the existing sources and our own experience from the development of an innovative gypsum technology. Three solutions are discussed for significant enhancement of the method efficiency on the basis of a considerable increasing of the SO 2 concentration in the saturated absorbent. The improved method uses about 40% less heat for absorbent regeneration, in comparison to the existing applications of the method Wellman-Lord, and gives in addition the possibility to regenerate 95% of the consumed heat for heating water streams to about 90°C. Moreover, the incorporation in the installation of our system with contact economizers of second generation, already in industrial application, enables utilization of the waste heat of the flue gases for district heating. The employment of this system also leads to significant decreasing of the NO x emissions. key words: SO 2 removal, flue gases, absorption

  2. New method for recognition of sterol signalling molecules: Methinium salts as receptors for sulphated steroids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kejík, Z.; Bříza, T.; Králová, Jarmila; Mikula, I.; Poučková, P.; Martásek, P.; Král, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 94, February 2015 (2015), s. 15-20 ISSN 1878-5867 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020028; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14008; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.300/30.0060; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Polymethinium salts * Sulphated sterols * Molecular recognition * Synthetic receptors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. The method of manufacture of nylon dental partially removable prosthesis using additive technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashapov, R. N.; Korobkina, A. I.; Platonov, E. V.; Saleeva, G. T.

    2014-12-01

    The article is devoted to the topic of creating new methods of dental prosthesis. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of using additive technology to create nylon prosthesis. As a result of experimental studies, was made a sample of nylon partially removable prosthesis using 3D printing has allowed to simplify, accelerate and reduce the coat of manufacturing high-precision nylon dentures.

  4. Effect of a New Salivary Contaminant Removal Method on Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    was to evaluate the effect of various salivary- contaminant removal methods on the shear bond strength of resin cement to hydrofluoric-acid (HF) etched...mold (Ultradent) to a height of 3mm and light cured . Specimens were stored for 24 hours in 37°C distilled water and then tested in shear in a... contamination which may compromise the bond strength of the resin cement to the ceramic (Aboush, 1998; van Schalkwyk et al., 2003). Saliva affects bond

  5. A novel method to remove the background from x-ray diffraction signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yi; Speller, Robert; Griffiths, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The first step that is required to extract the correct information from a two-dimensional (2D) diffraction signature is to remove the background accurately. However, direct background subtraction inevitably overcorrects the signal as it does not take into account the attenuation by the sample. Ot...... proposes a novel method that combines peak fitting and experimental results to estimate the background for 2D XRD signals....

  6. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  7. Physical abrasion method using submerged spike balls to remove algal biofilm from photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawar, Azra; Khoja, Asif Hussain; Akbar, Naveed; Ansari, Abeera Ayaz; Qayyum, Muneeb; Ali, Ehsan

    2017-12-02

    A major factor in practical application of photobioreactors (PBR) is the adhesion of algal cells onto their inner walls. Optimized algal growth requires an adequate sunlight for the photosynthesis and cell growth. Limitation in light exposure adversely affects the algal biomass yield. The removal of the biofilm from PBR is a challenging and expansive task. This study was designed to develop an inexpensive technique to prevent adhesion of algal biofilm on tubular PBR to ensure high efficiency of light utilization. Rubber balls with surface projections were introduced into the reactor, to remove the adherent biofilm by physical abrasion technique. The floatation of spike balls created a turbulent flow, thereby inhibiting further biofilm formation. The parameters such as, specific growth rate and doubling time of the algae before introducing the balls were 0.451 day -1 and 1.5 days respectively. Visible biofilm impeding light transmission was formed by 15-20 days. The removal of the biofilm commenced immediately after the introduction of the spike balls with visibly reduced deposits in 3 days. This was also validated by enhance cell count (6.95 × 106 cells mL -1 ) in the medium. The employment of spike balls in PBR is an environmental friendly and economical method for the removal of biofilm.

  8. Handling tool for, and method of use of, ice basket removable cruciform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrabis, C.M.; Mazza, G.E.; Golick, L.R.; Pomaibo, P.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a method for selectively installing and removing a removable cruciform of a resiliently compressible type, in and from the interior of a generally cylindrical, elongated and vertically oriented ice containment structure, which interior is accessible from an open, upper and thereof. Each such removable cruciform comprises a central housing defining an axis of compression and expansion, means normally biasing the housing in the direction of expansion, legs extending from the housing in a generally radially oriented direction and means on the outer edges of the legs configured to engage a corresponding stiffenning ring rigidly secured on the interior of the cylindrical sidewall of the ice basket, comprising: providing a handling tool having an elongated frame defining an axis, guide means connected to the frame and comprising at least first and second guide fingers extending radially from the axis and angularly displaced thereabout and selectively moveable between retracted and extended positions, and clamping means mounted to the frame and extending axially outwardly therefrom, positioning the tool, with the clamping shoes in the disengaged positions, in axial alignment with and disposed radially outwardly about the central housing of a removable cruciform of the resiliently compressible type; selectively actuating the clamping means to the engaged positions of the clamping shoes for engaging and compressing the central housing of the cruciform and retracting the legs thereof; lowering the tool with the cruciform engaged thereby, axially downwardly through the ice basket to a desired elevation

  9. A novel background field removal method for MRI using projection onto dipole fields (PDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Khalidov, Ildar; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Spincemaille, Pascal; Liu, Jing; Tsiouris, A John; Wang, Yi

    2011-11-01

    For optimal image quality in susceptibility-weighted imaging and accurate quantification of susceptibility, it is necessary to isolate the local field generated by local magnetic sources (such as iron) from the background field that arises from imperfect shimming and variations in magnetic susceptibility of surrounding tissues (including air). Previous background removal techniques have limited effectiveness depending on the accuracy of model assumptions or information input. In this article, we report an observation that the magnetic field for a dipole outside a given region of interest (ROI) is approximately orthogonal to the magnetic field of a dipole inside the ROI. Accordingly, we propose a nonparametric background field removal technique based on projection onto dipole fields (PDF). In this PDF technique, the background field inside an ROI is decomposed into a field originating from dipoles outside the ROI using the projection theorem in Hilbert space. This novel PDF background removal technique was validated on a numerical simulation and a phantom experiment and was applied in human brain imaging, demonstrating substantial improvement in background field removal compared with the commonly used high-pass filtering method. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Sediment diffusion method improves wastewater nitrogen removal in the receiving lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Sanni L; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Ropponen, Janne; Juntunen, Janne; Rissanen, Antti J; Tiirola, Marja

    2018-07-01

    Sediment microbes have a great potential to transform reactive N to harmless N 2 , thus decreasing wastewater nitrogen load into aquatic ecosystems. Here, we examined if spatial allocation of the wastewater discharge by a specially constructed sediment diffuser pipe system enhanced the microbial nitrate reduction processes. Full-scale experiments were set on two Finnish lake sites, Keuruu and Petäjävesi, and effects on the nitrate removal processes were studied using the stable isotope pairing technique. All nitrate reduction rates followed nitrate concentrations, being highest at the wastewater-influenced sampling points. Complete denitrification with N 2 as an end-product was the main nitrate reduction process, indicating that the high nitrate and organic matter concentrations of wastewater did not promote nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production (truncated denitrification) or ammonification (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium; DNRA). Using 3D simulation, we demonstrated that the sediment diffusion method enhanced the contact time and amount of wastewater near the sediment surface especially in spring and in autumn, altering organic matter concentration and oxygen levels, and increasing the denitrification capacity of the sediment. We estimated that natural denitrification potentially removed 3-10% of discharged wastewater nitrate in the 33 ha study area of Keuruu, and the sediment diffusion method increased this areal denitrification capacity on average 45%. Overall, our results indicate that sediment diffusion method can supplement wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) nitrate removal without enhancing alternative harmful processes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of Unsupervised Vegetation Classification Methods from Vhr Images after Shadows Removal by Innovative Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movia, A.; Beinat, A.; Crosilla, F.

    2015-04-01

    The recognition of vegetation by the analysis of very high resolution (VHR) aerial images provides meaningful information about environmental features; nevertheless, VHR images frequently contain shadows that generate significant problems for the classification of the image components and for the extraction of the needed information. The aim of this research is to classify, from VHR aerial images, vegetation involved in the balance process of the environmental biochemical cycle, and to discriminate it with respect to urban and agricultural features. Three classification algorithms have been experimented in order to better recognize vegetation, and compared to NDVI index; unfortunately all these methods are conditioned by the presence of shadows on the images. Literature presents several algorithms to detect and remove shadows in the scene: most of them are based on the RGB to HSI transformations. In this work some of them have been implemented and compared with one based on RGB bands. Successively, in order to remove shadows and restore brightness on the images, some innovative algorithms, based on Procrustes theory, have been implemented and applied. Among these, we evaluate the capability of the so called "not-centered oblique Procrustes" and "anisotropic Procrustes" methods to efficiently restore brightness with respect to a linear correlation correction based on the Cholesky decomposition. Some experimental results obtained by different classification methods after shadows removal carried out with the innovative algorithms are presented and discussed.

  12. A High-Fidelity Haze Removal Method Based on HOT for Visible Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatially varying haze is a common feature of most satellite images currently used for land cover classification and mapping and can significantly affect image quality. In this paper, we present a high-fidelity haze removal method based on Haze Optimized Transformation (HOT, comprising of three steps: semi-automatic HOT transform, HOT perfection and percentile based dark object subtraction (DOS. Since digital numbers (DNs of band red and blue are highly correlated in clear sky, the R-squared criterion is utilized to search the relative clearest regions of the whole scene automatically. After HOT transform, spurious HOT responses are first masked out and filled by means of four-direction scan and dynamic interpolation, and then homomorphic filter is performed to compensate for loss of HOT of masked-out regions with large areas. To avoid patches and halo artifacts, a procedure called percentile DOS is implemented to eliminate the influence of haze. Scenes including various land cover types are selected to validate the proposed method, and a comparison analysis with HOT and Background Suppressed Haze Thickness Index (BSHTI is performed. Three quality assessment indicators are selected to evaluate the haze removed effect on image quality from different perspective and band profiles are utilized to analyze the spectral consistency. Experiment results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method for haze removal and the superiority of it in preserving the natural color of object itself, enhancing local contrast, and maintaining structural information of original image.

  13. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of salts in non-Newtonian liquids by the Taylor dispersion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mey, Paula; Varges, Priscilla R.; Mendes, Paulo R. de Souza [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. Pontificia Universidade Catolica do RJ (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)], e-mails: prvarges@puc-rio.br, pmendes@puc-rio.br

    2010-07-01

    This research looked for a method to determine the binary diffusion coefficient D of salts in liquids (especially in drilling fluids) not only accurately, but in a reasonable time. We chose to use the Taylor Dispersion Method. This technique has been used for measuring binary diffusion coefficients in gaseous, liquid and supercritical fluids, due to its simplicity and accuracy. In the method, the diffusion coefficient is determined by the analysis of the dispersion of a pulse of soluble material in a solvent flowing laminarly through a tube. This work describes the theoretical basis and the experimental requirements for the application of the Taylor Dispersion Method, emphasizing the description of our experiment. A mathematical formulation for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids is presented. The relevant sources of errors are discussed. The experimental procedure and associated analysis are validated by applying the method in well known systems, such as NaCl in water.D of salts in liquids (especially in drilling fluids) not only accurately, but in a reasonable time. We chose to use the Taylor Dispersion Method. This technique has been used for measuring binary diffusion coefficients in gaseous, liquid and supercritical fluids, due to its simplicity and accuracy. In the method, the diffusion coefficient is determined by the analysis of the dispersion of a pulse of soluble material in a solvent flowing laminarly through a tube. This work describes the theoretical basis and the experimental requirements for the application of the Taylor Dispersion Method, emphasizing the description of our experiment. A mathematical formulation for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids is presented. The relevant sources of errors are discussed. The experimental procedure and associated analysis are validated by applying the method in well known systems, such as NaCl in water. (author)

  14. Evaluation of Different Methods for Removing Oral Biofilm in Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Sonia; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Mattos, Fernanda Zanol; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Della Vedove; Segundo, Alex Semenoff; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bandeca, Matheus Coêlho; Porto, Alessandra Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to evaluate the different methods for removing oral biofilm in combination with 0.12% chlorhexidine, in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the General University Hospital. Materials and Methods: Initially, the patients were included in the study and underwent periodontal evaluation by means of the visible plaque index (VPI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI). The removal of visible biofilm, by a professional, was carried out using a toothbrush and dental floss, followed by the application of a 0.12% chlorhexidine solution. The patients were included in this randomized and controlled study into four groups (total n = 48), as follows: Chlorhexidine and gauze 12/12 h; chlorhexidine and gauze 24/24 h; chlorhexidine and brushing 12/12 h; chlorhexidine and brushing 24/24 h. The patients underwent the biofilm removal protocol for 7 days and then were subjected to a new clinical evaluation as to VPI and GBI. Data analysis was performed through stratification and arrangement of the records, in order to carry out the associations with health indicators used in the study, and the statistical tests used were Kappa and t-test for independent and paired samples. Results: A decrease in the VPI and GBI values when comparing baseline to the final evaluation for all groups was observed. Conclusion: Based on the methodology, it was possible to concluded that chlorhexidine associated with the mechanical action of the toothbrush or gauze in the times 12 h and 24 h in the ICU environment presented the same results as regards amount of visible biofilm. How to cite the article: Oliveira MS, Borges AH, Mattos FZ, Semenoff TA, Segundo AS, Tonetto MR, Bandeca MC, Porto AN. Evaluation of different methods for removing oral biofilm in patients admitted to the intensive care unit. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):61-4. PMID:25083034

  15. An integrated method for removal of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhicong; Li Dunhai; Qin Hongjie; Li Yinxia

    2012-01-01

    As the eutrophication of lakes becomes an increasingly widespread phenomenon, cyanobacterial blooms are occurring in many countries. Although some research has been reported, there is currently no good method for bloom removal. We propose here a new two-step integrated approach to resolve this problem. The first step is the inactivation of the cyanobacteria via the addition of H 2 O 2 . We found 60 mg/L was the lowest effective dose for a cyanobacterial concentration corresponding to 100 μg/L chlorophyll-a. The second step is the flocculation and sedimentation of the inactivated cyanobacteria. We found the addition of lake sediment clay (2 g/L) plus polymeric ferric sulfate (20 mg/L) effectively deposited them on the lake bottom. Since algaecides and flocculants had been used separately in previous reports, we innovatively combined these two types of reagents to remove blooms from the lake surface and to improve the dissolved oxygen content of lake sediments. - Graphical abstract: The mechanism for the removal of cyanobacterial blooms by using H 2 O 2 , polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) and lake sediment clay. Display Omitted Highlights: ► We combined algaecide and flocculants together to control cyanobacterial blooms. ► H 2 O 2 was used to irreversibly inactivate the photosynthesis of cyanobacteria. ► Lake sediment clay and polymeric ferric sulfate were used to deposit cyanobacteria. ► Removal rate was very high and re-suspension rate was very low under disturbance. ► The inactivated cyanobacteria could not serve as a seed source for the next bloom. - Inactivation by H 2 O 2 and sedimentation using polymeric ferric sulfate and sediment clay demonstrated high integrated efficiency in removal of cyanobacterial blooms.

  16. Saturated salt method determination of hysteresis of Pinus sylvestris L. wood for 35 ºC isotherms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Esteban, L.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The saturated salts method was used in this study to quantify hysteresis in Pinus sylvestris L. wood, in an exercise that involved plotting the 35 ºC desorption and sorption isotherms. Nine salts were used, all of which establish stable and known relative humidity values when saturated in water The wood was kept at the relative humidity generated by each of these salts until the equilibrium moisture content (EMC was reached, both in the water loss or desorption, and the water uptake or sorption processes. The Guggenheim method was used to fit the values obtained to the respective curves. Hysteresis was evaluated in terms of the hysteresis coefficient, for which a mean value of 0.87 was found.

    Con este trabajo se ha cuantificado la histéresis de la madera de Pinus sylvestris L. Para ello, se han construido las isotermas de 35 ºC de adsorción y sorción, mediante el método de las sales saturadas. Se han utilizado nueve sales que cuando se saturan en agua dan lugar a unas humedades relativas estables y conocidas. La madera fue colocada bajo las distintas humedades relativas que confieren cada una de las sales hasta que alcanzaron las distintas humedades de equilibrio higroscópico, tanto en el proceso de pérdida de agua o desorción, como en el de adquisición de agua o de sorción. Los valores obtenidos fueron ajustados a las respectivas sigmoides, haciendo uso del método de Guggenheim. La valoración de la histéresis se determinó mediante el coeficiente de histéresis, obteniendo un valor medio de 0,87.

  17. Development of a Rapid and Simple Method to Remove Polyphenols from Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imali Ranatunge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols are secondary metabolites of plants, which are responsible for prevention of many diseases. Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP has a high affinity towards polyphenols. This method involves the use of PVPP column to remove polyphenols under centrifugal force. Standards of gallic acid, epigallocatechin gallate, vanillin, and tea extracts (Camellia sinensis were used in this study. PVPP powder was packed in a syringe with different quantities. The test samples were layered over the PVPP column and subjected to centrifugation. Supernatant was tested for the total phenol content. The presence of phenolic compounds and caffeine was screened by HPLC and measuring the absorbance at 280. The antioxidant capacity of standards and tea extracts was compared with the polyphenol removed fractions using DPPH scavenging assay. No polyphenols were found in polyphenolic standards or tea extracts after PVPP treatment. The method described in the present study to remove polyphenols is simple, inexpensive, rapid, and efficient and can be employed to investigate the contribution of polyphenols present in natural products to their biological activity.

  18. Integrated method of thermosensitive triblock copolymer-salt aqueous two phase extraction and dialysis membrane separation for purification of lycium barbarum polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Hu, Xiaowei; Han, Juan; Ni, Liang; Tang, Xu; Hu, Yutao; Chen, Tong

    2016-03-01

    A polymer-salt aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) consisting of thermosensitive copolymer ethylene-oxide-b-propylene-oxide-b-ethylene-oxide (EOPOEO) and NaH2PO4 was employed in deproteinization for lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP). The effects of salt type and concentration, EOPOEO concentration, amount of crude LBP solution and temperature were studied. In the primary extraction process, LBP was preferentially partitioned to the bottom (salt-rich) phase with high recovery ratio of 96.3%, while 94.4% of impurity protein was removed to the top (EOPOEO-rich) phase. Moreover, the majority of pigments could be discarded to top phase. After phase-separation, the LBP in the bottom phase was further purified by dialysis membrane to remove salt and other small molecular impurities. The purity of LBP was enhanced to 64%. Additionally, the FT-IR spectrum was used to identify LBP. EOPOEO was recovered by a temperature-induced separation, and reused in a new ATPS. An ideal extraction and recycle result were achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450-470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl-KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. •The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept.•This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L.•The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going.

  20. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450–470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl–KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. • The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept. • This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L. • The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going. PMID:26150977

  1. Bioelectrochemical removal of carbon dioxide (CO2): an innovative method for biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Heng; Wang, Kaijun; Holmes, Dawn E

    2014-12-01

    Innovative methods for biogas upgrading based on biological/in-situ concepts have started to arouse considerable interest. Bioelectrochemical removal of CO2 for biogas upgrading was proposed here and demonstrated in both batch and continuous experiments. The in-situ biogas upgrading system seemed to perform better than the ex-situ one, but CO2 content was kept below 10% in both systems. The in-situ system's performance was further enhanced under continuous operation. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and alkali production with CO2 absorption could be major contributors to biogas upgrading. Molecular studies showed that all the biocathodes associated with biogas upgrading were dominated by sequences most similar to the same hydrogenotrophic methanogen species, Methanobacterium petrolearium (97-99% sequence identity). Conclusively, bioelectrochemical removal of CO2 showed great potential for biogas upgrading. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2009-06-09

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  3. Development of a method employing chitosan to remove metallic ions from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janegitz, Bruno Campos; Lourencao, Bruna Claudia; Lupetti, Karina Omuro; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2007-01-01

    In this work a method was developed for removing metallic ions from wastewaters by co-precipitation of Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ , Cr 3+ and Hg 2+ with chitosan and sodium hydroxide solution. Solutions of these metallic ions in the range from 0.55 to 2160 mg L -1 were added to chitosan dissolved in 0.05 mol L -1 HCl. For the co-precipitation of metal-chitosan-hydroxide a 0.17 mol L -1 NaOH solution was added until pH 8.5-9.5. A parallel study was carried out applying a 0.17 mol L -1 NaOH solution to precipitate those metallic ions. Also, a chitosan solid phase column was used for removing those metallic ions from wastewaters. (author)

  4. Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

    1987-08-10

    Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to ''float'' in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields. 6 figs.

  5. Application of the PSA method to decay heat removal systems in a large scale FBR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotake, S.; Satoh, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Sugawara, M.; Sakata, K.; Okabe, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) method is applied to a large scale loop-type FBR in its conceptual design stage in order to establish a well-balanced safety. Both the reactor shut down and decay heat removal systems are designed to be highly reliable, e.g. 10 -7 /d. In this paper the results of several reliability analyses concerning the DHRS have been discussed, where the effects of the analytical assumptions, design options, accident managements on the reliability are examined. The reliability is evaluated small enough, since DRACSs consists of four independent loops with sufficient heat removal capacity and both forced and natural circulation capabilities are designed. It is found that the common mode failures for the active components in the DRACS dominate the reliability. The design diversity concerning these components can be effective for the improvements and the accident managements on BOP are also possible by making use of the long grace period in FBR. (author)

  6. Application of the PSA method to decay heat removal systems in a large scale FBR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotake, S; Satoh, K [Japan Atomic Power Company, Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Matsumoto, H; Sugawara, M [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Sakata, K [Mitsubishi Atomic Power Industries Inc. (Japan); Okabe, A [Hitachi Engineering Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    1993-02-01

    The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) method is applied to a large scale loop-type FBR in its conceptual design stage in order to establish a well-balanced safety. Both the reactor shut down and decay heat removal systems are designed to be highly reliable, e.g. 10{sup -7}/d. In this paper the results of several reliability analyses concerning the DHRS have been discussed, where the effects of the analytical assumptions, design options, accident managements on the reliability are examined. The reliability is evaluated small enough, since DRACSs consists of four independent loops with sufficient heat removal capacity and both forced and natural circulation capabilities are designed. It is found that the common mode failures for the active components in the DRACS dominate the reliability. The design diversity concerning these components can be effective for the improvements and the accident managements on BOP are also possible by making use of the long grace period in FBR. (author)

  7. A novel, efficient and facile method for the template removal from mesoporous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Lu

    2014-11-12

    © 2014, Jilin University, The Editorial Department of Chemical Research in Chinese Universities and Springer-Verlag GmbH. A new catalytic-oxidation method was adopted to remove the templates from SBA-15 and MCM-41 mesoporous materials via Fenton-like techniques under microwave irradiation. The mesoporous silica materials were treated with different Fenton agents based on the template’s property and textural property. The samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction(XRD) measurement, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, infrared spectroscopy, 29Si MAS NMR and thermo gravimetric analysis(TGA). The results reveal that this is an efficient and facile approach to the thorough template-removal from mesoporous silica materials, as well as to offering products with more stable structures, higher BET surface areas, larger pore volumes and larger quantity of silanol groups.

  8. A clutter removal method for the Doppler ultrasound signal based on a nonlinear diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peng; Xin Pengcheng; Bian Zhengzhong; Yu Gang

    2008-01-01

    Strong clutter components produced by stationary and slow-moving tissue structures render the lower frequency part of the spectrogram useless and degrade the accuracy of clinical ultrasound indices. An adaptive method based on the nonlinear forward-and-backward diffusion equation (FAB-DE) is proposed to remove strong clutter components from the contaminated Doppler signal. The clutter signal is extracted first by the FAB-DE accurately, in which the nonlinear diffusion coefficient function of the FAB-DE locally adjusts according to signal features and the diffusion adaptively switches between forward and backward mode. The present method has been validated by simulated and realistic pulse wave Doppler signals, and compared with the conventional high pass filter and the matching pursuit method. The simulation results, including spectrogram, mean velocity error, standard deviation of mean velocity and signal-to-clutter ratio of a decontaminated signal, demonstrate that the present FAB-DE method can remove clutter sufficiently and retain more low blood components simultaneously as compared with the other two methods. Results of the realistic Doppler blood signal, including spectrogram and low-frequency part of the spectrum, support the conclusion drawn from simulation cases

  9. Probabilistic methods as a tool aiding dimensioning drift and shaft seals for a repository in rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen; Plischke, Elmar; Li, Xiaoshuo [TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Disposal Research (IELF)

    2015-07-01

    For repositories in rock salt, demonstrating the integrity of drift and shaft seals is an indispensable part of the long-term safety case. In this study, probabilistic methods are applied to assess the fictitious abutment length for a shaft seal and the effective permeability of a drift seal (dam), i.e. the integral entity for the whole structure including contact zone and damaged salt zone. For the seal permeability, the question arises how to derive it based on permeability measurements with a limited number of samples due to cost restrictions. Furthermore, it is of interest which conclusions can be derived regarding the minimum length of drift seals if the failure probability should be smaller than e.g. 10{sup -4}. Based on numerical experiments it was demonstrated that small-scale measurements can be upscale using known averaging methods. This suggests that dimensioning can be carried out based on cautions average estimates and the required reliability statement (e.g. about a failure probability smaller than e.g. 10{sup -4}) can be derived for realistic dam lengths. However, due to the limited amount of data available there are remaining uncertainties concerning the underlying model assumptions.

  10. Probabilistic methods as a tool aiding dimensioning drift and shaft seals for a repository in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen; Plischke, Elmar; Li, Xiaoshuo

    2015-01-01

    For repositories in rock salt, demonstrating the integrity of drift and shaft seals is an indispensable part of the long-term safety case. In this study, probabilistic methods are applied to assess the fictitious abutment length for a shaft seal and the effective permeability of a drift seal (dam), i.e. the integral entity for the whole structure including contact zone and damaged salt zone. For the seal permeability, the question arises how to derive it based on permeability measurements with a limited number of samples due to cost restrictions. Furthermore, it is of interest which conclusions can be derived regarding the minimum length of drift seals if the failure probability should be smaller than e.g. 10 -4 . Based on numerical experiments it was demonstrated that small-scale measurements can be upscale using known averaging methods. This suggests that dimensioning can be carried out based on cautions average estimates and the required reliability statement (e.g. about a failure probability smaller than e.g. 10 -4 ) can be derived for realistic dam lengths. However, due to the limited amount of data available there are remaining uncertainties concerning the underlying model assumptions.

  11. Comparative evaluation of the efficacy of chemomechanical caries removal agent (Papacarie and conventional method of caries removal: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawa D

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Painless dentistry, minimal intervention and thus giving comfort, relief and solace and instill positive attitude toward dental treatments, are some of the factors justifying the specialty of pediatric dentistry. Thus, this in vitro study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of a new chemomechanical caries removal agent, Papacarie (Formula and Acao, with conventional slow-speed rotary instrument (bur. Papacarie is a new formulation and has the main active ingredient papain, an endoprotein with bactericidal, bacteriostatic and anti-inflammatory actions. Twenty extracted human molar teeth with deep dentine caries and no enamel coverage were selected for the study. After the preparation of the teeth and removal of the caries with the respective methods, they were decalcified, dehydrated and embedded in paraffin blocks for histologic studies. Serial sections of 5 μm thickness were examined for the presence of bacteria under light microscope. Though complete removal of caries was achieved significantly in both the methods, there was less marked destruction of dentinal tubules in chemomechanical caries removal method by Papacarie. Thus, Papacarie is recommended as an efficient, easy to perform, comfortable and less destructive solution for the patient seeking an alternative to the conventional method.

  12. Laser tattoo removal as an ablation process monitored by acoustical and optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencič, Boris; Gregorčič, Peter; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-07-01

    Strength of the laser-tissue interaction varies even within a single tattoo because of the inhomogeneous distribution of the tattoo pigment embedded in the skin. A monitoring system is therefore developed for simultaneous monitoring of the laser tattoo removal process based on acoustical and optical techniques. A laser-beam-deflection probe is used for measuring the acoustical signals accompanying the breakdown, and a CCD camera captures the level and the spatial distribution of the plasma radiation. Using these methods we examine the degree of excitation-pulse absorption within the pigment and the degree of the structural changes of the skin. A Nd:YAG laser with a top-hat beam profile, designed for tattoo removal, is used as the excitation source in our experiments. Special attention is given to structural changes in the skin, which depend on the applied fluence. Tattoo removal with multiple pulses is also analyzed. Experiments are made in vitro (skin phantoms) and ex vivo (marking tattoos on the pig skin). The presented results are important for the understanding and optimization of the process used in medical therapies.

  13. Evaluation of the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Three Minimally Invasive Methods of Caries Removal: An in vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Boob, Ankush Ramnarayan; Manjula, M; Reddy, E Rajendra; Srilaxmi, N; Rani, Tabitha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Many chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR) agents have been introduced and marketed since 1970s, with each new one being better and effective than the previously introduced. Papacarie and Carisolv are new systems in the field of CMCR techniques. These are reportedly minimally invasive methods of removing carious dentin while preserving sound dentin. Aim: To compare the Efficiency (time taken for caries removal) and effectiveness (Knoop hardness number of the remaining den...

  14. Colour and organic removal of biologically treated coffee curing wastewater by electrochemical oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejankiwar, Rajesh S; Lokesh, K S; Gowda, T P Halappa

    2003-05-01

    The treatment of biologically treated wastewater of coffee-curing industry by the electrochemical oxidation using steel anode was investigated. Bench-scale experiments were conducted for activated sludge process on raw wastewater and the treated effluents were further treated by electrochemical oxidation method for its colour and organic content removal. The efficiency of the process was determined in terms of removal percentage of COD, BOD and colour during the course of reaction. Several operating parameters like time, pH and current density were examined to ascertain their effects on the treatment efficiency. Steel anode was found to be effective for the COD and colour removal with anode efficiency of 0.118 kgCOD x h(-1) x A(-1) x m(-2) and energy consumption 20.61 kWh x kg(-1) of COD at pH 9. The decrease in pH from 9 to 3 found to increase the anode efficiency from 0.118 kgCOD x h(-1) x A(-1) x m(-2) to 0.144 kWh x kg(-1) of COD while decrease the energy consumption from 20.61 kWh x kg(-1) of COD to 12.86 kWh x kg(-1) of COD. The pH of 5 was considered an ideal from the present treatment process as it avoids the addition of chemicals for neutralization of treated effluents and also economical with respect to energy consumption. An empirical relation developed for relationship between applied current density and COD removal efficiency showed strong predictive capability with coefficient of determination of 96.5%.

  15. Magnetite–hematite nanoparticles prepared by green methods for heavy metal ions removal from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.A.; Ali, S.M.; El-Dek, S.I.; Galal, A.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The negatively charged cubic magnetite nanoparticles, prepared by the coprecipitation method in N 2 atmosphere, can adsorb up to 99% of the positively charged toxic heavy metal ions at a proper pH value. -- Highlights: • Mixed magnetite–hematite nanoparticles were synthesized via different routes. • Prepared samples were characterized by XRD, HRTEM, BET and magnetic hysteresis. • The material was employed as a sorbent for removal of some heavy metal ions from water. • The effects of pH and the contact time on the adsorption process were studied and optimized. -- Abstract: Mixed magnetite–hematite nanoparticles were synthesized via different routes such as, coprecipitation in air and N 2 atmosphere, citrate–nitrate, glycine–nitrate and microwave-assisted citrate methods. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), BET measurements and magnetic hysteresis. XRD data showed the formation of magnetite–hematite mixture with different compositions according to the synthesis method. The particle size was in the range of 4–52 nm for all the prepared samples. From HRTEM micrographs, it was found that, the synthesis method affects the moropholgy of the prepared samples in terms of crystallinity and porosity. The magnetite–hematite mixture was employed as a sorbent material for removal of some heavy metal ions from water such as lead(II), cadmium(II) and chromium(III). The effects of pH value and the contact time on the adsorption process were studied and optimized in order to obtain the highest possible adsorption efficiency of the magnetite–hematite mixture. The effect of the synthesis method of the magnetite–hematite mixture on the adsorption process was also investigated. It was found that samples prepared by the coprecipitation method had better adsorption efficiency than those prepared by other combustion methods

  16. Deactivation of nuclear explosions cavities in the salt domes by freezing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyashov, D.N.; Mokhov, V.A.; Murzadilov, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    I. There is a lot of negative consequences of underground nuclear explosions, conducted for creating some cavities of the gas condensate saving at the Azgir site and Karachaganak deposit. Some of them are radioactivity escape, ground pollution, underground water pollution, as result of depressurization and irrigation of cavities. Besides that there are dissolution of infected salt, displacement of brine from the cavities. Existing prolonged exchanges of rock-salt, brines and water can be accompanied by accumulation and throw outing of free chlorine and hydrogen with hydrochloric acid formation, ('white fog' of Azgir site). These questions demand supplementary researches. 2. It is known that more dangerous fission fragments are 9 0S r and 1 31C s, with half life periods equaled 27.7 and 30.3. Duration of their existence determines a period of an object danger. Radionuclide migration come with rock dispersion or with their concentration on the different physical, chemical, including sorptive, barriers on the way of radioactive water displacement. 3. The task of prevention of negative consequences is to save the forms and sizes of cavities, to immobilize the radioactive fluid's in the cavities and closed zone for the half-life time of the main nuclide mass. 4. Solving the task by laying of empty space with hard materials (concrete, rock) demand of big expenses because of cavities size, occurrence depth (850-900 m), high value of materials, their processing and transportation. The problem to render harmless and to utilize of displacing radioactive brines is not solved yet. 5, Freezing of flooding cavities appears to be an alternative, which allows to fill the space by hard ice and to less the moving of radioactive brines into the rocks around the cavities, and, what is more important, along the bore-holes above the cavities, blocking the radionuclides moving into the fractured rocks. This process divides onto 2 stages: (1) freezing with organizing of intensive heat

  17. Removal of stored particle background via the electric dipole method in the KATRIN main spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilk, Daniel [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The goal of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is to determine the effective mass of the electron anti neutrino by measuring the electron energy spectrum of tritium beta decay near the endpoint. The goal is to reach a sensitivity on the neutrino mass of 200 meV for which a low background level of 10{sup -2} counts per second is mandatory. Electrons from single radioactive decays of radon and tritium in the KATRIN main spectrometer with energies in the keV range can be magnetically stored for hours. While cooling down via ionization of residual gas molecules, they produce hundreds of secondary electrons, which can reach the detector and contribute to the background signals. In order to suppress this background component, several methods are investigated to remove stored electrons, such as the application of an electric dipole field and the application of magnetic pulses. This talk introduces the mechanism of background production due to stored electrons and their removal by the electric dipole method in the main spectrometer. In context of the spectrometer- and detector-commissioning phase in summer 2015, measurement results of the application of the electric dipole method are presented.

  18. Automatic Tree Data Removal Method for Topography Measurement Result Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, H.; Chikatsu, H.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, laser scanning has been receiving greater attention as a useful tool for real-time 3D data acquisition, and various applications such as city modelling, DTM generation and 3D modelling of cultural heritage sites have been proposed. And, former digital data processing were demanded in the past digital archive techniques for cultural heritage sites. However, robust filtering method for distinguishing on- and off-terrain points by terrestrial laser scanner still have many issues. In the past investigation, former digital data processing using air-bone laser scanner were reported. Though, efficient tree removal methods from terrain points for the cultural heritage are not considered. In this paper, authors describe a new robust filtering method for cultural heritage using terrestrial laser scanner with "the echo digital processing technology" as latest data processing techniques of terrestrial laser scanner.

  19. Experimental validation of a method for removing the capacitive leakage artifact from electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buendia, R; Seoane, F; Gil-Pita, R

    2010-01-01

    Often when performing electrical bioimpedance (EBI) spectroscopy measurements, the obtained EBI data present a hook-like deviation, which is most noticeable at high frequencies in the impedance plane. The deviation is due to a capacitive leakage effect caused by the presence of stray capacitances. In addition to the data deviation being remarkably noticeable at high frequencies in the phase and the reactance spectra, the measured EBI is also altered in the resistance and the modulus. If this EBI data deviation is not properly removed, it interferes with subsequent data analysis processes, especially with Cole model-based analyses. In other words, to perform any accurate analysis of the EBI spectroscopy data, the hook deviation must be properly removed. Td compensation is a method used to compensate the hook deviation present in EBI data; it consists of multiplying the obtained spectrum, Z meas (ω), by a complex exponential in the form of exp(–jωTd). Although the method is well known and accepted, Td compensation cannot entirely correct the hook-like deviation; moreover, it lacks solid scientific grounds. In this work, the Td compensation method is revisited, and it is shown that it should not be used to correct the effect of a capacitive leakage; furthermore, a more developed approach for correcting the hook deviation caused by the capacitive leakage is proposed. The method includes a novel correcting expression and a process for selecting the proper values of expressions that are complex and frequency dependent. The correctness of the novel method is validated with the experimental data obtained from measurements from three different EBI applications. The obtained results confirm the sufficiency and feasibility of the correcting method

  20. Molten salt burner fuel behaviour and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.V.; Zakirov, R.Y.; Grebenkine, K.F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the feasibility of molten salt reactor technology for treatment of Pu, minor actinides and fission products, when the reactor and fission product clean-up unit are planned as an integral system. This contribution summarises the available R and D which led to selection of the fuel compositions for the molten salt reactor of the TRU burner type (MSB). Special characteristics of behaviour of TRUs and fission products during power operation of MSB concepts are presented. The present paper briefly reviews the processing developments underlying the prior molten salt reactor programmes and relates them to the separation requirements of the MSB concept, including the permissible range of processing cycle times and removal times. Status and development needs in the thermodynamic properties of fluorides, fission product clean-up methods and container materials compatibility with the working fluids for the fission product clean-up unit are discussed. (authors)

  1. SOURCES OF COPPER IONS AND SELECTED METHODS OF THEIR REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER FROM THE PRINTED CIRCUITS BOARD PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the issues related to the presence and removal of copper compounds from industrial effluents with including wastewater from plants involved in the production of printed circuit boards. Characterized the toxicological properties of selected copper compounds, described the applicable technological processes, sources of copper ions in the effluents and selected methods for their removal.

  2. Mitoxantrone removal by electrochemical method: A comparison of homogenous and heterogenous catalytic reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Jafarizad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mitoxantrone (MXT is a drug for cancer therapy and a hazardous pharmaceutical to the environment which must be removed from contaminated waste streams. In this work, the removal of MXT by the electro-Fenton process over heterogeneous and homogenous catalysts is reported. Methods: The effects of the operational conditions (reaction medium pH, catalyst concentration and utilized current intensity were studied. The applied electrodes were carbon cloth (CC without any processing (homogenous process, graphene oxide (GO coated carbon cloth (GO/CC (homogenous process and Fe3O4@GO nanocomposite coated carbon cloth (Fe3O4@GO/CC (heterogeneous process. The characteristic properties of the electrodes were determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and cathode polarization. MXT concentrations were determined by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Results: In a homogenous reaction, the high concentration of Fe catalyst (>0.2 mM decreased the MXT degradation rate. The results showed that the Fe3O4@GO/CC electrode included the most contact surface. The optimum operational conditions were pH 3.0 and current intensity of 450 mA which resulted in the highest removal efficiency (96.9% over Fe3O4@GO/CC electrode in the heterogeneous process compared with the other two electrodes in a homogenous process. The kinetics of the MXT degradation was obtained as a pseudo-first order reaction. Conclusion: The results confirmed the high potential of the developed method to purify contaminated wastewaters by MXT.

  3. Evaluation of methods for stain removal in acrylic resin denture teeth: in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Balestrero CASSIANO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The staining of artificial teeth can be related to the acrylic resin abrasion caused by brushing, resulting in higher deposition of dyes from the beverage, and consequently higher aesthetic damage. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate methods for removal of stains from acrylic denture teeth using spectrophotometric analysis. Material and method Artificial teeth were divided into twelve groups (n=10 according to the type of treatment (re-polishing - Re or immersion in Corega Tabs - Sp, staining solutions, coffee (Cf and Coca-Cola® (Cc or water (W and with/without toothbrushing (B. The Sp specimens were submitted to seven immersion cycles (5 min each. The Re specimens were polished with pumice stone followed by Spain white paste. Color differences (ΔE were captured by a spectrophotometer: T0 (baseline, T1 (after brushing/immersion in solutions and T2 (after Re or Sp. Result Statistically significant color change between T1 and T2 (paired T-test; α =.05 was observed for the group CfSp (p=.032; and for the groups BWRe (p=.000, BCfRe (p=.049 and CcRe (p=.042. Higher color changes were observed for the specimens submitted to toothbrushing (ANOVA two way; p<.001. Conclusion It could be concluded that the immersion in sodium perborate (Corega Tabs can be used for removal of coffee stains from denture teeth, and re-polishing for removal of Coca-Cola® stains. Still, toothbrushing produced greater color changes on denture teeth, regardless of the immersion solution.

  4. Invalid-point removal based on epipolar constraint in the structured-light method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhaoshuai; Wang, Zhao; Huang, Junhui; Xing, Chao; Gao, Jianmin

    2018-06-01

    In structured-light measurement, there unavoidably exist many invalid points caused by shadows, image noise and ambient light. According to the property of the epipolar constraint, because the retrieved phase of the invalid point is inaccurate, the corresponding projector image coordinate (PIC) will not satisfy the epipolar constraint. Based on this fact, a new invalid-point removal method based on the epipolar constraint is proposed in this paper. First, the fundamental matrix of the measurement system is calculated, which will be used for calculating the epipolar line. Then, according to the retrieved phase map of the captured fringes, the PICs of each pixel are retrieved. Subsequently, the epipolar line in the projector image plane of each pixel is obtained using the fundamental matrix. The distance between the corresponding PIC and the epipolar line of a pixel is defined as the invalidation criterion, which quantifies the satisfaction degree of the epipolar constraint. Finally, all pixels with a distance larger than a certain threshold are removed as invalid points. Experiments verified that the method is easy to implement and demonstrates better performance than state-of-the-art measurement systems.

  5. Removal of blue-green algae using the hybrid method of hydrodynamic cavitation and ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhilin; Shen, Haifeng; Ondruschka, Bernd; Zhang, Yongchun; Wang, Weimin; Bremner, David H

    2012-10-15

    A suspension of Microcystis aeruginosa (30 μg L(-1)chlorophyll a) was circulated in a hydrodynamic cavitation device and ozone was introduced at the suction side of the pump. The removal of algae over 10 min using hydrodynamic cavitation alone and ozone alone is less than 15% and 35%, respectively. The destruction of algae rises significantly from 24% in the absence of the orifice to 91% with the optimized orifice on 5 min of processing using hydrodynamic cavitation along with ozone (HC/O(3)) and the utilization of ozone increases from 32% to 61%. Interestingly, the suction process is more effective than the extrusion method (positive pressure) and the optimal bulk temperature for algal elimination was found to be 20 °C. Increasing the input concentration of ozone is favorable for the removal of algae but leads to a greater loss of ozone and a decrease in the utilization of ozone. Under the optimal conditions, the algal cells and chlorophyll a are completely destroyed in 10 min by use of the hybrid method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Method and apparatus for removal of residual sludge from a nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahoda, E.J.; Echardt, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a method for removing sludge deposits from the tube sheet of a nuclear steam generator vessel to which is connected a bundle of parallel heat exchange tubes arranged in parallel rows separated by lanes and parallel columns separated by channels. The method includes the steps of: directing a cleaning stream of sequentially advancing a lance past the channels one channel at a time, fluid along a first channel for dislodging sludge deposits and moving them toward the periphery of the bundle of tubes, substantially simultaneously directing a barrier stream of fluid from the lance in substantially the same direction as the cleaning stream. Stream continues along a second channel spaced from the first channel by at least two columns of tubes with no streams directed from the lance along any other channel between the first and second channels to prevent the dislodged sludge from being moved past the barrier stream into previously cleaned channels. Each of the streams has an axis immovable with respect to the other stream in directions parallel to the tube sheet and having a width in directions perpendicular to the axis and parallel to the tube sheet less than the width of the associated channel along which the stream is directed. This removes sludge-loaded fluid from the periphery of the bundle of tubes

  7. REMOVAL OF HARDLY BIO-DEGRADABALE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM WASTEWATER BY MEANS OF REAGENTLESS METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Szulżyk-Cieplak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issue of removing persistent organic pollutants (POPs from wastewater, especially the polycyclic organic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The results obtained in literature studies indicate that the commonly employed traditional methods of wastewater treatment are not always efficient in eliminating the hardly bio-degradable pollutants. Therefore, extensive research is being conducted on the application of efficient POPs removal technologies. One of the considered variants involves incorporating advanced oxidation processes (AOP into the wastewater treatment systems based on the biological processes. These include the reagentless methods, e.g. the processes involving ultrasounds and hydrodynamic cavitation. On the basis of the author’s own studies conducted in a laboratory system comprising a static cavitation reactor, the possibility of applying hydrodynamic cavitation for the decomposition of PAHs was evaluated on the basis of model solutions of anthracene and phenanthrene. It was shown that the employed advanced oxidation process with hydro-cavitation has a significant impact on reducing the concentration of the considered PAHs. It was confirmed that the degradation degree of a substance depends on the intensity and the course of the cavitation process. The energy efficiency of the conducted process was analyzed as well and expressed as the ratio pertaining to the amount of the degraded compound to the electric energy supplied to the system.

  8. Methods of removal of tritium from aqueous effluent: a review of international research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Tritium is formed in thermal nuclear reactors both by neutron activation of elements such as deuterium and lithium and by ternary fission in the fuel. It is a weak beta-emitter with a short half-life, 12.3 years, and its radiological significance in reactor discharges is very low. In heavy-water-cooled and -moderated reactors, such as the CANDU stations, the tritium concentration in the moderator is sufficiently high to cause a potential hazard to operators, and so a major research and development programme has been carried out on processes to remove the tritium. Detritiation of light water has also been the subject of major R and D effort world-wide, because reprocessing operations can generate significant quantities of tritium in liquid waste, and high concentrations of tritium may arise in some aqueous streams in fusion reactors. This Report presents a review of the methods that have been proposed, studied and developed for removal of tritium from light and heavy water: the principles of individual methods are discussed, and the current status of their development is reviewed. (author)

  9. A Review of Photocatalysts Prepared by Sol-Gel Method for VOCs Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ke Tseng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The sol-gel process is a wet-chemical technique (chemical solution deposition, which has been widely used in the fields of materials science, ceramic engineering, and especially in the preparation of photocatalysts. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are prevalent components of indoor air pollution. Among the approaches to remove VOCs from indoor air, photocatalytic oxidation (PCO is regarded as a promising method. This paper is a review of the status of research on the sol-gel method for photocatalyst preparation and for the PCO purification of VOCs. The review and discussion will focus on the preparation and coating of various photocatalysts, operational parameters, and will provide an overview of general PCO models described in the literature.

  10. An Electronic Method for Measuring the Fit of Removable Partial Denture Frameworks to Dental Casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Williams

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the Removable Partial Denture (RPD is an effective treatment prosthesis. The objectives of a successful RPD are: to preserve the health of remaining oral structure, restore function and restore esthetics. To achieve these objectives, an RPD framework must fit accurately to the supporting structures. This paper presents a method for measuring the gaps or spaces present between the RPD framework and supporting structures which will enable the dentist and the dental technician to evaluate the accuracy of fitting of the prosthesis before it is delivered to the patient. The method used in this research is based on the principle of electric capacitance and uses a specially designed prototype measurement system.

  11. Signal Processing Methods for Removing the Effects of Whole Body Vibration upon Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitner, Rachel M.; Begault, Durand R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans may be exposed to whole-body vibration in environments where clear speech communications are crucial, particularly during the launch phases of space flight and in high-performance aircraft. Prior research has shown that high levels of vibration cause a decrease in speech intelligibility. However, the effects of whole-body vibration upon speech are not well understood, and no attempt has been made to restore speech distorted by whole-body vibration. In this paper, a model for speech under whole-body vibration is proposed and a method to remove its effect is described. The method described reduces the perceptual effects of vibration, yields higher ASR accuracy scores, and may significantly improve intelligibility. Possible applications include incorporation within communication systems to improve radio-communication systems in environments such a spaceflight, aviation, or off-road vehicle operations.

  12. The plant virus microscope image registration method based on mismatches removing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lifang; Zhou, Shucheng; Dong, Heng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Lin, Jiaxiang; Chen, Riqing

    2016-01-01

    The electron microscopy is one of the major means to observe the virus. The view of virus microscope images is limited by making specimen and the size of the camera's view field. To solve this problem, the virus sample is produced into multi-slice for information fusion and image registration techniques are applied to obtain large field and whole sections. Image registration techniques have been developed in the past decades for increasing the camera's field of view. Nevertheless, these approaches typically work in batch mode and rely on motorized microscopes. Alternatively, the methods are conceived just to provide visually pleasant registration for high overlap ratio image sequence. This work presents a method for virus microscope image registration acquired with detailed visual information and subpixel accuracy, even when overlap ratio of image sequence is 10% or less. The method proposed focus on the correspondence set and interimage transformation. A mismatch removal strategy is proposed by the spatial consistency and the components of keypoint to enrich the correspondence set. And the translation model parameter as well as tonal inhomogeneities is corrected by the hierarchical estimation and model select. In the experiments performed, we tested different registration approaches and virus images, confirming that the translation model is not always stationary, despite the fact that the images of the sample come from the same sequence. The mismatch removal strategy makes building registration of virus microscope images at subpixel accuracy easier and optional parameters for building registration according to the hierarchical estimation and model select strategies make the proposed method high precision and reliable for low overlap ratio image sequence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The safety and effectiveness of different methods of earwax removal: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, A J; Loveman, E; Gospodarevskaya, E; Harris, P; Bird, A; Bryant, J; Scott, D A; Davidson, P; Little, P; Coppin, R

    2010-06-01

    Build-up of earwax is a common reason for attendance in primary care. Current practice for earwax removal generally involves the use of a softening agent, followed by irrigation of the ear if required. However, the safety and benefits of the different methods of removal are not known for certain. To conduct evidence synthesis of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the interventions currently available for softening and/or removing earwax and any adverse events (AEs) associated with the interventions. Eleven electronic resources were searched from inception to November 2008, including: The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OVID), PREMEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations (OVID), EMBASE (OVID); and CINAHL. Two reviewers screened titles and abstracts for eligibility. Inclusion criteria were applied to the full text or retrieved papers and data were extracted by two reviewers using data extraction forms developed a priori. Any differences were resolved by discussion or by a third reviewer. Study criteria included: interventions - all methods of earwax removal available and combinations of these methods; participants - adults/children presenting requiring earwax removal; outcomes - measures of hearing, adequacy of clearance of wax, quality of life, time to recurrence or further treatment, AEs and measures of cost-effectiveness; design - randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) for clinical effectiveness, cohort studies for AEs and cost-effectiveness, and costing studies for cost-effectiveness. For the economic evaluation, a deterministic decision tree model was developed to evaluate three options: (1) the use of softeners followed by irrigation in primary care; (2) softeners followed by self-irrigation; and (3) a 'no treatment' option. Outcomes were assessed in terms of benefits to patients and costs incurred, with costs presented by exploratory cost-utility analysis. Twenty-six clinical trials conducted in primary

  14. A Quantitative Analytical Method to Test for Salt Effects on Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadorn, Maik; Bönzli, Eva; Eggenberger Hotz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    preparation method with automatic haemocytometry. We found that this new quantitative screening method is highly reliable and consistent with previously reported results. Thus, this method may provide a significant methodological advance in analysis of effects on free-standing model membranes....

  15. A novel method to rapidly distinguish the geographical origin of traditional fermented-salted vegetables by mass fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, So-Ra; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Hae-Won; Ha, Ji-Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    The geographical origin of kimchi is of interest to consumers and producers because the prices of commercial kimchi products can vary significantly according to the geographical origin. Hence, social issues related to the geographical origin of kimchi in Korea have emerged as a major problem. In this study, the geographical origin of kimchi was determined by comparing the mass fingerprints obtained for Korean and Chinese kimchi samples by MALDI-TOF MS with multivariate analysis. The results obtained herein provide an accurate, powerful tool to clearly discriminate kimchi samples based on their geographical origin within a short time and to ensure food authenticity, which is of significance in the kimchi industry. Furthermore, our MALDI-TOF MS method could be applied to determining the geographical origin of other fermented-salted vegetables at a reduced cost in shorter times.

  16. Limitations of amorphous content quantification by isothermal calorimetry using saturated salt solutions to control relative humidity: alternative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalef, Nawel; Pinal, Rodolfo; Bakri, Aziz

    2010-04-01

    Despite the high sensitivity of isothermal calorimetry (IC), reported measurements of amorphous content by this technique show significant variability even for the same compound. An investigation into the reasons behind such variability is presented using amorphous lactose and salbutamol sulfate as model compounds. An analysis was carried out on the heat evolved as a result of the exchange of water vapor between the solid sample during crystallization and the saline solution reservoir. The use of saturated salt solutions as means of control of the vapor pressure of water within sealed ampoules bears inherent limitations that lead in turn to the variability associated with the IC technique. We present an alternative IC method, based on an open cell configuration that effectively addresses the limitations encountered with the sealed ampoule system. The proposed approach yields an integral whose value is proportional to the amorphous content in the sample, thus enabling reliable and consistent quantifications. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  17. Iterative Outlier Removal: A Method for Identifying Outliers in Laboratory Recalibration Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Christina M; Grams, Morgan E; Sang, Yingying; Couper, David; Wruck, Lisa M; Li, Danni; Eckfeldt, John H; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef

    2016-07-01

    Extreme values that arise for any reason, including those through nonlaboratory measurement procedure-related processes (inadequate mixing, evaporation, mislabeling), lead to outliers and inflate errors in recalibration studies. We present an approach termed iterative outlier removal (IOR) for identifying such outliers. We previously identified substantial laboratory drift in uric acid measurements in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study over time. Serum uric acid was originally measured in 1990-1992 on a Coulter DACOS instrument using an uricase-based measurement procedure. To recalibrate previous measured concentrations to a newer enzymatic colorimetric measurement procedure, uric acid was remeasured in 200 participants from stored plasma in 2011-2013 on a Beckman Olympus 480 autoanalyzer. To conduct IOR, we excluded data points >3 SDs from the mean difference. We continued this process using the resulting data until no outliers remained. IOR detected more outliers and yielded greater precision in simulation. The original mean difference (SD) in uric acid was 1.25 (0.62) mg/dL. After 4 iterations, 9 outliers were excluded, and the mean difference (SD) was 1.23 (0.45) mg/dL. Conducting only one round of outlier removal (standard approach) would have excluded 4 outliers [mean difference (SD) = 1.22 (0.51) mg/dL]. Applying the recalibration (derived from Deming regression) from each approach to the original measurements, the prevalence of hyperuricemia (>7 mg/dL) was 28.5% before IOR and 8.5% after IOR. IOR is a useful method for removal of extreme outliers irrelevant to recalibrating laboratory measurements, and identifies more extraneous outliers than the standard approach. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  18. Evaluation of the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Three Minimally Invasive Methods of Caries Removal: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boob, Ankush Ramnarayan; Manjula, M; Reddy, E Rajendra; Srilaxmi, N; Rani, Tabitha

    2014-01-01

    Many chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR) agents have been introduced and marketed since 1970s, with each new one being better and effective than the previously introduced. Papacarie and Carisolv are new systems in the field of CMCR techniques. These are reportedly minimally invasive methods of removing carious dentin while preserving sound dentin. To compare the Efficiency (time taken for caries removal) and effectiveness (Knoop hardness number of the remaining dentin) of caries removal by three minimally invasive methods, i.e. hand excavation and chemomechanical caries removal using Carisolv and Papacarie. Thirty recently extracted human permanent molars with occlusal carious lesions were divided randomly in three equal groups and bisected through the middle of the lesion mesiodistally and excavated by two methods on each tooth. Statistically significant difference was present among three methods with respect to time and knoop hardness values (KHN) of the remaining dentin. The Efficiency of Hand method is better compared to CMCR techniques and effectiveness of CMCR techniques is better than Hand method in terms of dentin preservation so the chances of maintaining vitality of the pulp will be enhanced. How to cite this article: Boob AR, Manjula M, Reddy ER, Srilaxmi N, Rani T. Evaluation of the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Three Minimally Invasive Methods of Caries Removal: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):11-18.

  19. Optimization of two methods based on ultrasound energy as alternative to European standards for soluble salts extraction from building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Taboada, N; Gómez-Laserna, O; Martinez-Arkarazo, I; Olazabal, M A; Madariaga, J M

    2012-11-01

    The Italian recommendation NORMAL 13/83, later replaced by the UNI 11087/2003 norm, were used as standard for soluble salts extraction from construction materials. These standards are based on long-time stirring (72 and 2h, respectively) of the sample in deionized water. In this work two ultrasound based methods were optimized in order to reduce the extraction time while efficiency is improved. The instrumental variables involved in the extraction assisted by ultrasound bath and focused ultrasounds were optimized by experimental design. As long as it was possible, the same non-instrumental parameters values as those of standard methods were used in order to compare the results obtained on a mortar sample showing a black crust by the standards and the optimized methods. The optimal extraction time for the ultrasounds bath was found to be of two hours. Although the extraction time was equal to the standard UNI 11087/2003, the obtained extraction recovery was improved up to 119%. The focused ultrasound system achieved also better recoveries (up to 106%) depending on the analyte in 1h treatment time. The repeatabilities of the proposed ultrasound based methods were comparables to those of the standards. Therefore, the selection of one or the other of the ultrasound based methods will depend on topics such as laboratory facilities or number of samples, and not in aspects related with their quality parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Methods for removal of resin remaining after debonding of orthodontic brackets: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Rodrigues Tonetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of resin debris and/or resin cement from the enamel surface without causing iatrogenic is the main objective when removing the orthodontic brackets. Some factors such as the time required for removal, damage to the tooth structure, are essential factors for the clinician at the time of removal. Various techniques are used for the removal of orthodontic brackets after the treatment; it is known that the use of clinical procedures such as the use of diamond burs and some pliers removers can damage the structure of the enamel, often depending on the bond strength that should be taken into consideration at the time of removal. This literature review aims to gather the most relevant studies that can clarify the clinical technique, which may be more suitable for removal of the brackets.

  1. Evaluation of Various Cleaning Methods to Remove Bacillus Spores from Spacecraft Hardware Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-09-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm × 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 × 103 cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  2. Restoring stream habitat connectivity: a proposed method for prioritizing the removal of resident fish passage barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanley, Jesse R; Wright, Jed; Diebel, Matthew; Fedora, Mark A; Soucy, Charles L

    2013-08-15

    Systematic methods for prioritizing the repair and removal of fish passage barriers, while growing of late, have hitherto focused almost exclusively on meeting the needs of migratory fish species (e.g., anadromous salmonids). An important but as of yet unaddressed issue is the development of new modeling approaches which are applicable to resident fish species habitat restoration programs. In this paper, we develop a budget constrained optimization model for deciding which barriers to repair or remove in order to maximize habitat availability for stream resident fish. Habitat availability at the local stream reach is determined based on the recently proposed C metric, which accounts for the amount, quality, distance and level of connectivity to different stream habitat types. We assess the computational performance of our model using geospatial barrier and stream data collected from the Pine-Popple Watershed, located in northeast Wisconsin (USA). The optimization model is found to be an efficient and practical decision support tool. Optimal solutions, which are useful in informing basin-wide restoration planning efforts, can be generated on average in only a few minutes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Removal of Heavy Metals and Organic Contaminants from Wwater by Novel Filtration Methods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The removal of hazardous waste, generated by the dismantling of nuclear weapons is a problem that requires urgent attention by the US Department of Energy. Low levels of radioactive contaminants combined with organic solvent residues have leaked from aging containers into the soil and underground water in the surrounding area. Due to the complexity of the problem, it is evident that traditional adsorption methods are ineffective, since the adsorbent tends to saturate with the aqueous component. It has become apparent that a much more aggressive approach is required which involves the use of specially designed materials. We have investigated the potential of solids that combine high surface area/high pore volume and high electrical conductivity, a rare combination of properties found in a single material. In this program we examined the potential of newly developed materials for the trapping of organic solvents within specially engineered cavities without allowing the material to become saturated with water. Catalytically grown carbon nanofibers are a set of novel structures that are produced by the decomposition of selected carbon-containing gases over metal particles. These materials consist of extremely small graphite platelets stacked in various orientations with respect to the fiber axis. Such an arrangement results in a unique structure that is composed of an infinite number of extremely short and narrow pores, suitable for sequestering small molecules. In addition, when the graphene layers are aligned parallel to the fiber axis, an unusual combination of high surface area and low electrical resistivity solids are attained. We have attempted to capitalize on this blend of properties by using such structures for the selective removal of organic contaminants from aqueous streams. Experimental results indicate that nanofibers possessing a structure in which the graphite platelets are aligned perpendicular to the fiber axis and possessing a high degree of

  4. Simulated microbe removal around finger rings using different hand sanitation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alur, Archana A; Rane, Madhavi J; Scheetz, James P; Lorenz, Douglas J; Gettleman, Lawrence

    2009-09-01

    It is our opinion that the CDC and the WHO have underestimated cross-contamination under examination gloves in dental clinics while wearing jewelry, such as finger rings. These agencies only "recommend" removing jewelry, and only washing hands for 15 seconds with soap and warm water before donning gloves. This study examined several washing procedures and finger rings using simulated microbes. A gloved rubber hand manikin was made and fitted with a fresh disposable vinyl glove. Four fingers were fitted with rings or no ring, dusted with simulated microbes, and washed with a scrub brush for 5, 15, and 25 seconds under 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C water alone, or with liquid hand soap. Light levels (in lux) of fluorescent powder before and after washing were measured and delta scores calculated for changes in light levels, equivalent to effectiveness of hand washing procedures. A full-factorial, 3-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test for differences among levels of the three study factors-time, temperature, and soap use. Tukey's post hoc honestly significant difference (HSD) test was applied to significant factors to examine pair-wise differences between factor levels. It was found that the longer the hands with rings were washed with a scrub brush under flowing water, the more simulated microbes were removed. By 25 seconds, all methods were essentially the same. Simulated microbes were more difficult to remove from the palm compared to the back of the hand. The liquid hand soap used in this study was more effective with warm water than cold. When given a choice of washing with cold water up to 15 seconds, it would be preferable not to use soap to remove simulated microbes. Qualitatively, the outer surface of finger rings were more effectively cleaned than the crevice below the ring, and the ring with a stone setting appeared to accumulate and retain simulated microbes more than other rings. The most effective treatment was washing with warm water

  5. An efficient way to prepare silver nanorods in high concentration by polyol method without adding other metal or salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yong; Guan Jianguo; Xie Hongquan

    2012-01-01

    Using ethylene glycol as solvent and reductant, polyvinyl pyrrolidone(PVP) as capping agent under the action of appropriately preformed silver crystal seeds and controlled addition rates of silver nitrate and PVP solution, silver nanorods with length of 2–15 μm and diameter of 200–880 nm can be obtained in high concentration of AgNO 3 as 0.50 M. In the absence of the preformed seeds, nanorods cannot be obtained as the main product, if the AgNO 3 concentration is over 0.10 M. It is necessary to use the appropriately preformed silver crystal seeds for the high concentration preparation of silver nanorods. Transmission Electron Microscopy images showed that Ag seeds preformed at appropriate silver nitrate concentrations exhibited the multiply twinned particles of decahedral shape(MTPs), which formed Ag nanorods in the presence of PVP. Through study of the effects of various factors on the nanostructure of silver, the favorable conditions are: appropriately preformed seeds concentration at 6.54–9.81 mM, addition rate of AgNO 3 solution at 0.30–0.43 mL min −1 and molar ratio of PVP/AgNO 3 at 1.1–1.4, in order to control the crystal growth rate of silver matching the reduction rate of AgNO 3 by ethylene glycol. The nanorods obtained were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, EDX, XRD, Raman spectrometry, Infrared Spectrophotometry and Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry. On the base of the above results, the mechanism of rates matching for obtaining silver nanorods was briefly discussed. This method is a simple, facile and economical method using high concentration with high yield without using other metal or salt to massively synthesize silver nanorods through adding preformed silver seeds to control the reduction rate of silver nitrate and the crystal growth rate of silver nanorods. As compared to the conventional polyol method using lower silver nitrate concentration, this method can save ethylene glycol used and time of operation and the as

  6. Study on effective laser cleaning method to remove carbon layer from a gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amol; Modi, Mohammed H; Lodha, G S; Choubey, A K; Upadhyaya, B N

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon cracking and carbon contamination is a common problem in soft x-ray Synchrotron Radiation (SR) beamlines. Carbon contamination on optics is known to absorb and scatter radiation close to the C K-edge (284 eV) spectral region. The purpose of this work is to study and develop a laser cleaning method that can effectively remove the carbon contaminations without damaging the underneath gold-coated optics. The laser cleaning process is a non-contact, accurate, efficient and safe. Nd:YAG laser of 100 ns pulse duration is used for carbon cleaning. The effect of laser pulse duration, laser fluence, number of laser passes, angle of incidence and spot overlapping on the cleaning performance is studied. Cleaning effect and subsequent film quality after laser irradiation is analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray reflectivity (SXR) techniques.

  7. Kmeans-ICA based automatic method for ocular artifacts removal in a motorimagery classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Assi, Elie; Rihana, Sandy; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings aroused as inputs of a motor imagery based BCI system. Eye blinks contaminate the spectral frequency of the EEG signals. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has been already proved for removing these artifacts whose frequency band overlap with the EEG of interest. However, already ICA developed methods, use a reference lead such as the ElectroOculoGram (EOG) to identify the ocular artifact components. In this study, artifactual components were identified using an adaptive thresholding by means of Kmeans clustering. The denoised EEG signals have been fed into a feature extraction algorithm extracting the band power, the coherence and the phase locking value and inserted into a linear discriminant analysis classifier for a motor imagery classification.

  8. Case study for one-piece removal method of reactor vessel of nuclear ship 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagane, Satoru; Kitahara, Katsumi; Yoshikawa, Seiji; Miyasaka, Yasuhiko; Fukumura, Nobuo; Nisizawa, Ichiou

    2010-01-01

    A reactor installed at the center part of the nuclear ship 'Mutsu' has been stored safely and exhibited in a reactor room building since 1996. The reactor vessel and its internals are key components because of main radioactive wastes for the reasonable decommissioning plan in the future. This report describes the one-piece removal method as the one package of the reactor vessel with its internals intact with a shipping container or additional shields. The reactor vessel package (Max.100ton) will be classified acceptable for burial at the low level radioactive waste (LLW), which will be buried at a LLW pit facility under waste disposal regulations. And also, the package will be classified as an IP-2-equivalent package according to the requirement for Shipments and Packagings. (author)

  9. Method and apparatus for removing radioactive gases from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frumerman, R.; Brown, W.W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a method for removing radioactive gases from a nuclear reactor including the steps of draining coolant from a nuclear reactor to a level just below the coolant inlet and outlet nozzles to form a vapor space and then charging the space with an inert gas, circulating coolant through the reactor to assist the release of radioactive gases from the coolant into the vapor space, withdrawing the radioactive gases from the vapor space by a vacuum pump which then condenses and separates water from gases carried forward by the vacuum pump, discharging the water to a storage tank and supplying the separated gases to a gas compressor which pumps the gases to gas decay tanks. After the gases in the decay tanks lose their radioactive characteristics, the gases may be discharged to the atmosphere or returned to the reactor for further use

  10. A simple economic and quantitative method for the removal of uranium from Gogi mine water using powdered red brick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, Usha; Cyriac, Bincy; Hegde, G.N.; Premadas, A.; Rai, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and economical method for the removal of uranium from Gogi mine water using the powdered red brick as a good adsorbent is discussed. Preliminary studies for the removal of uranium using brick showed encouraging results. Further studies were carried to find the amount and size of brick for the quantitative removal of uranium. The results of these studies showed that 50 g of brick with 10 mesh size was enough to remove uranium quantitatively from 100 ml of mine water containing 1800 μg/L of uranium. However the column studies indicated considerable decrease (∼ 5 g for 100 ml of mine water) in the amount of brick required to remove uranium from 100 ml of mine water

  11. Catalyst of a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on a non-metallic porous support and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Peden, Charles H. F. [West Richland, WA; Choi, Saemin [Richland, WA

    2002-10-29

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Decontamination Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; Stephen Reese

    2014-09-01

    On February 14, 2014, americium and plutonium contamination was released in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt caverns. At the request of WIPP’s operations contractor, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel developed several methods of decontaminating WIPP salt, using surrogate contaminants and also americium (241Am). The effectiveness of the methods is evaluated qualitatively, and to the extent possible, quantitatively. One of the requirements of this effort was delivering initial results and recommendations within a few weeks. That requirement, in combination with the limited scope of the project, made in-depth analysis impractical in some instances. Of the methods tested (dry brushing, vacuum cleaning, water washing, strippable coatings, and mechanical grinding), the most practical seems to be water washing. Effectiveness is very high, and it is very easy and rapid to deploy. The amount of wastewater produced (2 L/m2) would be substantial and may not be easy to manage, but the method is the clear winner from a usability perspective. Removable surface contamination levels (smear results) from the strippable coating and water washing coupons found no residual removable contamination. Thus, whatever is left is likely adhered to (or trapped within) the salt. The other option that shows promise is the use of a fixative barrier. Bartlett Nuclear, Inc.’s Polymeric Barrier System (PBS) proved the most durable of the coatings tested. The coatings were not tested for contaminant entrapment, only for coating integrity and durability.

  13. Apparatus and methods for purifying lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunison, Harmon M.

    2016-01-12

    Disclosed is an exemplary method of purifying lead which includes the steps of placing lead and a fluoride salt blend in a container; forming a first fluid of molten lead at a first temperature; forming a second fluid of the molten fluoride salt blend at a second temperature higher than the first temperature; mixing the first fluid and the second fluid together; separating the two fluids; solidifying the molten fluoride salt blend at a temperature above a melting point of the lead; and removing the molten lead from the container. In certain exemplary methods the molten lead is removed from the container by decanting. In still other exemplary methods the molten salt blend is a Lewis base fluoride eutectic salt blend, and in yet other exemplary methods the molten salt blend contains sodium fluoride, lithium fluoride, and potassium fluoride.

  14. The comparison between the effectiveness of six different tooth brushing methods on removing dental bacterial plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghazadeh M.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are different tooth brushing methods for removing dental plaque from tooth surfaces. The effectiveness of these methods, and the time needed for instruction, learning and using seem to be different. Also, it is possible that the effectiveness of each method reduces with time, based on its difficulty level and the reduction of the patient s attention in following the given instructions. Purpose: The aim of this research was to compare the effectiveness of six different accepted tooth brushing methods on total and specific teeth, as well as on special tooth surfaces. The research also compared the time needed for instruction, learning and using the methods. Materials and Methods: The study was designed as a single blind randomised controlled trial protocol to compare the six accepted tooth brushing methods: Roll, Bass, Charters (C, Modified Stillman (MS, and Modified Bass in two ways (MB1-MB2. 15 volunteers were selected from the basic science level dental students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. All the six methods were instructed to each volunteer, using a randomly selected sequence. Each participant should, therefore, pass six consequent courses, by the same sequences as follow: 1st Visit: After polishing the teeth, the participant was asked to abstain any kind of tooth cleaning. - 2nd visit (48-72 hours later: O Leary Plaque Index (PI was recorded and then the randomised selected method was instructed. Then, the participant brushed his/her teeth and PI was registered again. The time needed for instruction and using the method was registered too. The participant was then asked to use this newly learned tooth brushing method twice a day for 7±1 days. - 3rd visit (7±1 days later: PI was recorded. The teeth were polished. The participant was asked to abstain any kind of tooth cleaning for 48-72 hours, as washout period of the previous method and preparation period for the next method (2nd visit of the next

  15. Ghost hunting—an assessment of ghost particle detection and removal methods for tomographic-PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsinga, G E; Tokgoz, S

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses and compares several methods, which aim to remove spurious peaks, i.e. ghost particles, from the volume intensity reconstruction in tomographic-PIV. The assessment is based on numerical simulations of time-resolved tomographic-PIV experiments in linear shear flows. Within the reconstructed volumes, intensity peaks are detected and tracked over time. These peaks are associated with particles (either ghosts or actual particles) and are characterized by their peak intensity, size and track length. Peak intensity and track length are found to be effective in discriminating between most ghosts and the actual particles, although not all ghosts can be detected using only a single threshold. The size of the reconstructed particles does not reveal an important difference between ghosts and actual particles. The joint distribution of peak intensity and track length however does, under certain conditions, allow a complete separation of ghosts and actual particles. The ghosts can have either a high intensity or a long track length, but not both combined, like all the actual particles. Removing the detected ghosts from the reconstructed volume and performing additional MART iterations can decrease the particle position error at low to moderate seeding densities, but increases the position error, velocity error and tracking errors at higher densities. The observed trends in the joint distribution of peak intensity and track length are confirmed by results from a real experiment in laminar Taylor–Couette flow. This diagnostic plot allows an estimate of the number of ghosts that are indistinguishable from the actual particles. (paper)

  16. Salt Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Studying salt stress is an important means to the understanding of plant ion homeostasis and osmo-balance. Salt stress research also benefits agriculture because soil salinity significantly limits plant productivity on agricultural lands. Decades of physiological and molecular studies have generated a large body of literature regarding potential salt tolerance determinants. Recent advances in applying molecular genetic analysis and genomics tools in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are sh...

  17. Sea salt

    OpenAIRE

    Galvis-Sánchez, Andrea C.; Lopes, João Almeida; Delgadillo, Ivone; Rangel, António O. S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The geographical indication (GI) status links a product with the territory and with the biodiversity involved. Besides, the specific knowledge and cultural practices of a human group that permit transforming a resource into a useful good is protected under a GI designation. Traditional sea salt is a hand-harvested product originating exclusively from salt marshes from specific geographical regions. Once salt is harvested, no washing, artificial drying or addition of anti-caking agents are all...

  18. New visible and selective DNA staining method in gels with tetrazolium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Aaron J; Naranjo-Palma, Tatiana; Alfaro-Valdés, Hilda M; Barriga, Andrés; Babul, Jorge; Wilson, Christian A M

    2017-01-15

    DNA staining in gels has historically been carried out using silver staining and fluorescent dyes like ethidium bromide and SYBR Green I (SGI). Using fluorescent dyes allows recovery of the analyte, but requires instruments such as a transilluminator or fluorimeter to visualize the DNA. Here we described a new and simple method that allows DNA visualization to the naked eye by generating a colored precipitate. It works by soaking the acrylamide or agarose DNA gel in SGI and nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) solution that, when exposed to sunlight, produces a purple insoluble formazan precipitate that remains in the gel after exposure to light. A calibration curve made with a DNA standard established a detection limit of approximately 180 pg/band at 500 bp. Selectivity of this assay was determined using different biomolecules, demonstrating a high selectivity for DNA. Integrity and functionality of the DNA recovered from gels was determined by enzymatic cutting with a restriction enzyme and by transforming competent cells after the different staining methods, respectively. Our method showed the best performance among the dyes employed. Based on its specificity, low cost and its adequacy for field work, this new methodology has enormous potential benefits to research and industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on concrete cask for practical use. Development of evaluation method of salt-induced deterioration of reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Takuro; Shirai, Koji; Saegusa, Toshiari

    2005-01-01

    We studied an evaluation method of salt-induced deterioration of reinforced concrete structures under high temperatures. For this purpose, we conducted chloride ion diffusion tests of concrete specimens, corrosion tests of reinforced concrete specimens and combined tests of carbonation and chloride ion penetration of concrete specimens under high temperatures. We discussed the effects of temperature on chloride ion diffusion coefficient in concrete, temperature on chloride ion concentration for initiation of reinforcing steel corrosion and carbonation on chloride ion diffusion coefficient at high temperatures. The findings obtained through this study can be summarized as follows: (a) The value of diffusion coefficient of chloride ion in concrete became larger with the increase of temperature. A roughly linear relationship between logarithm of the diffusion coefficient and reciprocal of absolute temperature was confirmed. (b) Threshold chloride ion concentration for initiation of steel corrosion stays almost unchanged even in high temperatures. (c) The value of diffusion coefficient of chloride ion is presumably larger in carbonated concrete. (d) A method to evaluate chloride effect on reinforced concrete structures was developed by incorporating the above test results into current design practice under normal temperatures. (author)

  20. An optimised method for electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from harbour sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristine B.; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    A 2-compartment electrodialytic cell set-up for treatment of solid materials has in many respects proven superior to other types of cells in removing heavy metals from sediments. Most notably, remediation times were shorter, energy consumption was lower and higher removal efficiencies were observed....... By employing m1ultivariate modelling and investigating additional experimental variables, the relative importance of variables effecting remediation was determined and response surfaces for heavy metal removal were calculated. Employing optimal conditions it was possible to remove targeted metals (Pb, Cu, Zn...

  1. A modified UCT method for biological nutrient removal: configuration and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiopoulou, E; Aivasidis, A

    2008-07-01

    A pilot-scale prototype activated sludge system is presented, which combines both, the idea of University of Cape Town (UCT) concept and the step denitrification cascade for removal of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. The experimental set-up consists of an anaerobic selector and stepwise feeding in subsequent three identical pairs of anoxic and oxic tanks. Raw wastewater with influent flow rates ranging between 48 and 168 l d(-1) was fed to the unit at hydraulic residence times (HRTs) of 5-18 h and was distributed at percentages of 60/25/15%, 40/30/30% and 25/40/35% to the anaerobic selector, 2nd and 3rd anoxic tanks, respectively (influent flow distribution before the anaerobic selector). The results for the entire experimental period showed high removal efficiencies of organic matter of 89% as total chemical oxygen demand removal and 95% removal for biochemical oxygen demand, 90% removal of total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total nitrogen removal through denitrification of 73%, mean phosphorus removal of 67%, as well as excellent settleability. The highest removal efficiency and the optimum performance were recorded at an HRT of about 9h and influent flow rate of 96 l d(-1), in which 60% is distributed to the anaerobic selector, 25% to the second anoxic tank and 15% to the last anoxic tank. Consequently, the plant configuration enhanced removal efficiency, optimized performance, saved energy, formed good settling sludge and provided operational assurance.

  2. Reprocessing method of ceramic nuclear fuels in low-melting nitrate molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.; Caporali, G.; Zambianchi, M.

    1976-01-01

    Ceramic nuclear fuel is reprocessed through a method wherein the fuel is dispersed in a molten eutectic mixture of at least two alkali metal nitrates and heated to a temperature in the range between 200 and 300 0 C. That heated mixture is then subjected to the action of a gaseous stream containing nitric acid vapors, preferably in the presence of a catalyst such as sodium fluoride. Dissolved fuel can then be precipitated out of solution in crystalline form by cooling the solution to a temperature only slightly above the melting point of the bath

  3. Removal of round off errors in the matrix exponential method for solving the heavy nuclide chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man; Joo, Hyung Kook

    2005-01-01

    Many nodal codes for core simulation adopt the micro-depletion procedure for the depletion analysis. Unlike the macro-depletion procedure, the microdepletion procedure uses micro-cross sections and number densities of important nuclides to generate the macro cross section of a spatial calculational node. Therefore, it needs to solve the chain equations of the nuclides of interest to obtain their number densities. There are several methods such as the matrix exponential method (MEM) and the chain linearization method (CLM) for solving the nuclide chain equations. The former solves chain equations exactly even when the cycles that come from the alpha decay exist in the chain while the latter solves the chain approximately when the cycles exist in the chain. The former has another advantage over the latter. Many nodal codes for depletion analysis, such as MASTER, solve only the hard coded nuclide chains with the CLM. Therefore, if we want to extend the chain by adding some more nuclides to the chain, we have to modify the source code. In contrast, we can extend the chain just by modifying the input in the MEM because it is easy to implement the MEM solver for solving an arbitrary nuclide chain. In spite of these advantages of the MEM, many nodal codes adopt the chain linearization because the former has a large round off error when the flux level is very high or short lived or strong absorber nuclides exist in the chain. In this paper, we propose a new technique to remove the round off errors in the MEM and we compared the performance of the two methods

  4. R and D activities on the management of waste chloride salts in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-Tae, Kim; Hwan-Seo, Park; Jeong-Gook, Kim; Hee-Chul, Yang; Yong-Joon, Cho; Eung-Ho Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Electrochemical treatment of spent oxide fuels has been intensively studied in KAERI to reduce the volume, heat load and radiotoxicity of high-level wastes. It consists of an electrolytic reduction process to convert the oxide fuel into a metallic form and an electro-refining process to separate TRU elements from the electro-reduced metal ingot. Two types of waste salts are expected to generate from the electrochemical pyro-processes, that is, LiCl salt from the reduction process and LiCl+KCl eutectic salt form the refining process. The R and D strategy of the waste salt management in KAERI can be categorized into two parts: 1) enhancement of safety by the stabilisation/solidification of waste salt that is to be finally disposed of and 2) reduction of the waste generation by the regeneration/recycle of the spent salt after removal of radionuclides in it. A sol-gel technique and a zeolite occlusion technique are under development to stabilize the waste salt. The LiCl salt is stabilised by a low-temperature sol-gel process and then the gel product is solidified into a ceramic-like waste form with an addition of glass frit. Another method uses Zeolite-4A to occlude the LiCl salt into its cage and adsorption site to immobilize the radionuclides. The product, salt-occluded zeolite, is fabricated into another type of a ceramic waste form. For the regeneration and recycle of the spent salt, the radionuclides in the salt are removed by a zeolite process for the LiCl salt and by an oxidation/distillation process for the eutectic salt. The target nuclides to be removed in each process are Cs/Sr and rare earth (RE) elements, respectively. In the oxidation/ distillation process, the rare earth chloride nuclides are oxidised by an oxygen sparging method, and the products are precipitated in the form of oxide or oxychloride REs. After separation of the RE elements from the precipitates by distillation, the refined spent salt with a low content

  5. Effect of salt stress and seed priming methods on emergence and seedling characteristics of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Salehi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available ]Introduction The main limiting factor for food security in Iran and world is water qualitative and quantitative. Agriculture sector is the main consumer of water and more vulnerable section from water crisis. In order to improve food security calorie requirement of growing population should be provided from nonsaline water resources. Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa is diploeid, allotetraploied, C3 and facultative halophyte from Amaranthace family and categorized in pseudo cereal group. This plant has cultivated 5000 years in Ands, and the highest cultivated area is in Bolivia near salt flats. This plant can grow successfully in different countries such as, Europe countries, USA, Canada, Africa, Morocco, Pakistan and India. Protein content is between 13.81-21.9% and flour is gluten free and provides all essential amino acid of human. Because of high potential of quinoa for providing human calories and high salt and drought tolerance it could be considered for saline and marginal area. Quinoa was selected for cultivation with saline water because of salt tolerance and economic production with saline water which are not use for conventional crop. The main problem of quinoa is emergence and stand establishment with saline water. The aim of this study is evaluation of salinity stress on plant emergence and priming effect of emergence improvement under saline condition. Materials and methods In order to evaluate salinity stress on emergence and establishment of quinoa an experiment was conducted based on CRD design with 5 levels of salinity (0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 dS/m with four replication in soil and cocopit. Emergence recorded daily and finally plant height and dry weight was measured. Two piece and modified discount function model was fitted to emergence percent. In order to improve emergence under saline condition an experiment was conducted with three treatments (Gibberlic acid (10 ppm, H2O and Ascorbic acid (3 ppm and four levels of salinity (0, 4 and

  6. Method for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas, device for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hann-Sheng; Livengood, Charles David

    1997-12-01

    A method for the simultaneous removal of oxides and heavy metals from a fluid is provided comprising combining the fluid with compounds containing alkali and sulfur to create a mixture; spray drying the mixture to create a vapor phase and a solid phase; and isolating the vapor phase from the solid phase. A device is also provided comprising a means for spray-drying flue gas with alkali-sulfide containing liquor at a temperature sufficient to cause the flue gas to react with the compounds so as to create a gaseous fraction and a solid fraction and a means for directing the gaseous fraction to a fabric filter.

  7. Tuning the pH-shift protein-isolation method for maximum hemoglobin-removal from blood rich fish muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Mehdi; Marmon, Sofia; Chaijan, Manat; Undeland, Ingrid

    2016-12-01

    A main challenge preventing optimal use of protein isolated from unconventional raw materials (e.g., small pelagic fish and fish by-products) using the pH-shift method is the difficulty to remove enough heme-pigments. Here, the distribution of hemoglobin (Hb) in the different fractions formed during pH-shift processing was studied using Hb-fortified cod mince. Process modifications, additives and prewashing were then investigated to further facilitate Hb-removal. The alkaline pH-shift process version could remove considerably more Hb (77%) compared to the acidic version (37%) when proteins were precipitated at pH 5.5; most Hb was removed during dewatering. Protein precipitation at pH 6.5 improved total Hb removal up to 91% and 74% during alkaline and acid processing, respectively. Adding phytic acid to the first supernatant of the alkaline process version yielded 93% Hb removal. Combining one prewash with phytic acid at pH 5.5 followed by alkaline/acid pH-shift processing increased Hb removal up to 96/92%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Salt drying: a low-cost, simple and efficient method for storing plants in the field and preserving biological repositories for DNA diversity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrió, Elena; Rosselló, Josep A

    2014-03-01

    Although a variety of methods have been optimized for the collection and storage of plant specimens, most of these are not suited for field expeditions for a variety of logistic reasons. Drying specimens with silica gel in polyethylene bags is currently the standard for field-sampling methods that are suitable for subsequent DNA extraction. However, silica-gel repositories are not readily available in remote areas, and its use is not very cost-effective for the long-term storage of collections or in developing countries with limited research budgets. Salting is an ancient and traditional drying process that preserves food samples by dehydrating tissues and inhibiting water-dependent cellular metabolism. We compared salt and silica-gel drying methods with respect to dehydration rates overtime, DNA quality and polymerase chain reaction(PCR) success to assess whether dry salting can be used as an effective plant preservation method for DNA analysis. Specimens from eleven plant species covering a variety of leaf structures, leaf thicknesses and water contents were analysed. Experimental work indicated that (i) levels of dehydration in sodium chloride were usually comparable to those obtained when silica gel was used, (ii) no spoilage, fungal or bacterial growth was observed for any of the species with all drying treatments and (iii) good yields of quality genomic DNA suitable for PCR applications were obtained in the salt-drying treatments. The preservation of plant tissues in commercial table salt appears to be a satisfactory, and versatile method that may be suitable in remote areas where cryogenic resources and silica repositories are not available. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The efficacy of selective calculus ablation at 400 nm: comparison to conventional calculus removal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, Joshua E.; Seka, Wolf; Romanos, Georgios; Rechmann, Peter

    A desired outcome of scaling and root planing is the complete removal of calculus and infected root tissue and preservation of healthy cementum for rapid healing of periodontal tissues. Conventional periodontal treatments for calculus removal, such as hand instrument scaling and ultrasonic scaling, often deeply scrape the surface of the underlying hard tissue and may leave behind a smear layer. Pulsed lasers emitting at violet wavelengths (specifically, 380 to 400 nm) are a potential alternative treatment since they can selectively ablate dental calculus without ablating pristine hard tissue (i.e., enamel, cementum, and dentin). In this study, light and scanning electron microscopy are used to compare and contrast the efficacy of in vitro calculus removal for several conventional periodontal treatments (hand instruments, ultrasonic scaler, and Er:YAG laser) to calculus removal with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire (λ = 400 nm). After calculus removal, enamel and cementum surfaces are investigated for calculus debris and damage to the underlying hard tissue surface. Compared to the smear layer, grooves, and unintentional hard tissue removal typically found using these conventional treatments, calculus removal using the 400-nm laser is complete and selective without any removal of pristine dental hard tissue. Based on these results, selective ablation from the 400-nm laser appears to produce a root surface that would be more suitable for successful healing of periodontal tissues.

  10. Apparatus and method for removing mercury vapor from a gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Kumar [Butte, MT

    2008-01-01

    A metallic filter effectively removes mercury vapor from gas streams. The filter captures the mercury which then can be released and collected as product. The metallic filter is a copper mesh sponge plated with a six micrometer thickness of gold. The filter removes up to 90% of mercury vapor from a mercury contaminated gas stream.

  11. Methods and results of the investigation of the thermomechanical behaviour of rock salt with regard to the final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieczorek, K.; Klarr, K.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the knowledge about thermal and mechanical behaviour of rock salt that has been accumulated by various R and D institutions in Germany from laboratory and in situ investigations. An important objective is to give a comprehensive overview of the investigation methods and instruments available and to discuss these methods and instruments with regard to their applicability and reliability for the investigation of the thermomechanical effects of high level radioactive waste emplacement in rock salt formations. The report is focused on the activities of the GSF-Institut fur Tieflagerung in the Asse mine regarding the disposal of high and intermediate level radioactive waste during the last decades. The design and the results of the most important in situ experiments are presented and discussed in detail. The results are compared to model calculations in order to evaluate the reliability of both the measurements and the calculation results. The relevance of the results for the situation in Spain is discussed in a separate chapter. As the investigations in Germany have been performed in domal salt, while the Spanish concept is based on waste disposal in bedded salt, significant differences in the thermomechanical behaviour cannot be excluded. The investigation methods, however, will be applicable. (Author)

  12. A novel inverse numerical modeling method for the estimation of water and salt mass transfer coefficients during ultrasonic assisted-osmotic dehydration of cucumber cubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Hosein; Karimi, Farzaneh; Labbafi, Mohsen; Fathi, Morteza

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the moisture and salt diffusivity during ultrasonic assisted-osmotic dehydration of cucumbers. Experimental measurements of moisture and salt concentration versus time were carried out and an inverse numerical method was performed by coupling a CFD package (OpenFOAM) with a parameter estimation software (DAKOTA) to determine mass transfer coefficients. A good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Mass transfer coefficients were from 3.5 × 10 -9 to 7 × 10 -9  m/s for water and from 4.8 × 10 -9  m/s to 7.4 × 10 -9  m/s for salt at different conditions (diffusion coefficients of around 3.5 × 10 -12 -11.5 × 10 -12  m 2 /s for water and 5 × 10 -12  m/s-12 × 10 -12  m 2 /s for salt). Ultrasound irradiation could increase the mass transfer coefficient. The values obtained by this method were closer to the actual data. The inverse simulation method can be an accurate technique to study the mass transfer phenomena during food processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Automated bone removal in CT angiography: Comparison of methods based on single energy and dual energy scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straten, Marcel van; Schaap, Michiel; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Greuter, Marcel J.; Lugt, Aad van der; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dual energy based methods for bone removal in computed tomography angiography (CTA) images and compare these with single energy based methods that use an additional, nonenhanced, CT scan. Methods: Four different bone removal methods were applied to CT scans of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom, acquired with a second generation dual source CT scanner. The methods differed by the way information on the presence of bone was obtained (either by using an additional, nonenhanced scan or by scanning with two tube voltages at the same time) and by the way the bone was removed from the CTA images (either by masking or subtracting the bone). The phantom contained parts which mimic vessels of various diameters in direct contact with bone. Both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of image quality after bone removal was performed. Image quality was quantified by the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) normalized to the square root of the dose (CNRD). At locations where vessels touch bone, the quality of the bone removal and the vessel preservation were visually assessed. The dual energy based methods were assessed with and without the addition of a 0.4 mm tin filter to the high voltage x-ray tube filtration. For each bone removal method, the dose required to obtain a certain CNR after bone removal was compared with the dose of a reference scan with the same CNR but without automated bone removal. The CNRD value of the reference scan was maximized by choosing the lowest tube voltage available. Results: All methods removed the bone completely. CNRD values were higher for the masking based methods than for the subtraction based methods. Single energy based methods had a higher CNRD value than the corresponding dual energy based methods. For the subtraction based dual energy method, tin filtration improved the CNRD value with approximately 50%. For the masking based dual energy method, it was easier to differentiate between iodine and bone when tin filtration

  14. Development of High Throughput Salt Separation System with Integrated Liquid Salt Separation - Salt Distillation Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sangwoon; Park, K. M.; Kim, J. G.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, S. J.; Park, S. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2013-01-15

    The capacity of a salt distiller should be sufficiently large to reach the throughput of uranium electro-refining process. In this study, an assembly composing a liquid separation sieve and a distillation crucible was developed for the sequential operation of a liquid salt separation and a vacuum distillation in the same tower. The feasibility of the sequential salt separation was examined by the rotation test of the sieve-crucible assembly and sequential operation of a liquid salt separation and a vacuum distillation. The adhered salt in the uranium deposits was removed successfully. The salt content in the deposits was below 0.1 wt% after the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation - salt distillation. From the results of this study, it could be concluded that efficient salt separation can be realized by the sequential operation of liquid salt separation and vacuum distillation in one distillation tower since the operation procedures are simplified and no extra operation of cooling and reheating is necessary.

  15. Costs for off-site disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes: Salt caverns versus other disposal methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    According to an American Petroleum Institute production waste survey reported on by P.G. Wakim in 1987 and 1988, the exploration and production segment of the US oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes, more than 20 billion bbl of produced water, and nearly 12 million bbl of associated wastes in 1985. Current exploration and production activities are believed to be generating comparable quantities of these oil field wastes. Wakim estimates that 28% of drilling wastes, less than 2% of produced water, and 52% of associated wastes are disposed of in off-site commercial facilities. In recent years, interest in disposing of oil field wastes in solution-mined salt caverns has been growing. This report provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in oil-and gas-producing states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and the amounts they charge. It also compares cavern disposal costs with the costs of other forms of waste disposal.

  16. Actinide-Lanthanide separation by an electrolytic method in molten salt media: feasibility assessment of a renewed liquid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, A.

    2009-12-01

    This study is part of a research program concerning the assessment of pyrochemical methods for the nuclear waste processing. The An-Ln partitioning could be achieved by an electrolytic selective extraction in molten salt media. It has been decided to focus on liquid reactive cathode which better suits to a group actinides co-recycling. The aim of the study is to propose, define and initiate the development of an electrolytic pyro-process dedicated to the quantitative and selective recovery of the actinides. Quantitativeness is related to technology, whereas selectivity is governed by chemistry. The first step consisted in selecting the adequate operating conditions, which enables a sufficient An-Ln separation. The first step consisted, by means of thermodynamic calculi and electrochemical investigations, in selecting a promising combination between molten electrolyte and cathodic material, regarding the process constraints. To improve the recovery yield, it is necessary to develop a disruptive technology: here comes the concept of a dynamic electrodeposition carried out onto liquid metallic drops. The next step consisted in designing and manufacturing a lab-scale device which enables dropping flow studies. Since interfacial phenomena are of primary meaning in such a concept, it has been decided to focus on high temperature liquid-liquid interfacial measurements. (author)

  17. Salt Damage and Rising Damp Treatment in Building Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. P. Q. Delgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salt damage can affect the service life of numerous building structures, both historical and contemporary, in a significant way. In this review, various damage mechanisms to porous building materials induced by salt action are analyzed. The importance of pretreatment investigations is discussed as well; in combination with the knowledge of salt and moisture transport mechanisms they can give useful indications regarding treatment options. The methods of salt damage treatment are assessed then, including both passive techniques based on environmental control, reduction of water transport, or conversion to less soluble salts and active procedures resulting in the removal of salts from deterioration zones. It is concluded that cellulose can still be considered as the favorite material presently used in desalination poultices but hydrophilic mineral wool can serve as its prospective alternative in future applications. Another important cause of building pathologies is the rising damp and, in this phenomenon, it is particularly severe considering the presence of salts in water. The treatment of rising damp in historic building walls is a very complex procedure and at Laboratory of Building Physics (LFC-FEUP a wall base hygroregulated ventilation system was developed and patented.

  18. An adaptive image sparse reconstruction method combined with nonlocal similarity and cosparsity for mixed Gaussian-Poisson noise removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-fei; Gao, Hong-xia; Wu, Zi-ling; Kang, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) has achieved great success in single noise removal. However, it cannot restore the images contaminated with mixed noise efficiently. This paper introduces nonlocal similarity and cosparsity inspired by compressed sensing to overcome the difficulties in mixed noise removal, in which nonlocal similarity explores the signal sparsity from similar patches, and cosparsity assumes that the signal is sparse after a possibly redundant transform. Meanwhile, an adaptive scheme is designed to keep the balance between mixed noise removal and detail preservation based on local variance. Finally, IRLSM and RACoSaMP are adopted to solve the objective function. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is superior to conventional CS methods, like K-SVD and state-of-art method nonlocally centralized sparse representation (NCSR), in terms of both visual results and quantitative measures.

  19. Quantitative mineral salt evaluation in the calcaneous bone using computed tomography, 125I-photon absorption and chemical analysis to compare the value of the individual methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitzler, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    It was the aim of the study described here to verify the accuracy of two different methods for the quantitative evaluation of mineral salts, which were the 125I-photon absorption technique on the one hand and wholebody CT on the other hand. For this purpose, post-mortem examinations of 31 calcaneous bones were carried out to evaluate their individual mineral salt contents in vitro using either of the above-mentioned methods. The results obtained were subsequently contrasted with calcium concentrations determined by chemical analysis. A comparison of the individual mineral salt evaluations with the results from calcium analyses pointed to a highly significant correlation (p=0.001) for both methods under investigation. The same held for the correlation of findings from CT and the 125I-hydroxylapatite technique, where the level of significance was also p=0.001. The above statements must, however, be modified in as much as the mineral salt values measured by CT were consistently lower than those obtained on the basis of 125I-photon absorption. These deviations are chiefly attributable to the fact that the values provided by CT are more susceptible to influences from the fat contained in the bones. In 125I-photon absorption a special formula may be derived to allow for the bias occurring here, provided that the composition of the bone is known. To summarise, the relative advantages and drawbacks of CT and 125I-photon absorption are carefully balanced. Mineral salt evaluations by CT permit incipient losses to be ascertained even in the trunk. The 125I-photon absorption technique would appear to be the obvious method for any kind of follow-up examination in the peripheral skeleton, as it is easily reproducible and radiation exposure can be kept to minimum. (TRV) [de

  20. Fabrication of titanium removable dental prosthesis frameworks with a 2-step investment coating method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Mari; Hummel, Susan K; Ball, John D; Okabe, Toru

    2012-06-01

    Although pure titanium is known to have good biocompatibility, a titanium alloy with better strength is needed for fabricating clinically acceptable, partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP) frameworks. The mechanical properties of an experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy cast with a 2-step investment technique were examined for RDP framework applications. Patterns for tests for various properties and denture frameworks for a preliminary trial casting were invested with a 2-step coating method using 2 types of mold materials: a less reactive spinel compound (Al(2)O(3)·MgO) and a less expensive SiO(2)-based material. The yield and tensile strength (n=5), modulus of elasticity (n=5), elongation (n=5), and hardness (n=8) of the cast Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy were determined. The external appearance and internal porosities of the preliminary trial castings of denture frameworks (n=2) were examined with a conventional dental radiographic unit. Cast Ti-6Al-4V alloy and commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) were used as controls. The data for the mechanical properties were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA (α=.05). The yield strength of the cast Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy was 851 MPa and the hardness was 356 HV. These properties were comparable to those of the cast Ti-6Al-4V and were higher than those of CP Ti (PAl-5Cu frameworks was found to have been incompletely cast. The cast biocompatible experimental Ti-5Al-5Cu alloy exhibited high strength when cast with a 2-step coating method. With a dedicated study to determine the effect of sprue design on the quality of castings, biocompatible Ti-5Al-5Cu RDP frameworks for a clinical trial can be produced. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of behavioral response to caries removal methods: A randomised controlled cross over trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Geetha Priya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The issue of dental fear and anxiety still poses a significant problem in treating children. Various caries management protocols have been tried to make the dental visit more compatible to the child patients. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the behavioral and physiological responses to chemo-mechanical caries removal (CMCR and conventional drilling method (CDM. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 children with an age range of 7 to 11 years with bilateral frank carious lesions were included in this study. They were randomized into two groups: Group A - treated with CDM first followed by CMCR and Group B - treated with CMCR first followed by CDM. The physiological signs (pulse, blood pressure and oxygen saturation were noted prior to treatment, during treatment, post treatment and 5 min after treatment. The behavioral responses were assessed by face, legs, activity, cry, and consolability scale and facial image scale. The participants were interviewed about pain, discomfort, taste, smell, preference and overall experience after every procedure. The pediatric dentist filled in details about patient behavior, time utilized and need for local anesthesia. The results were statistically analyzed using t-test and Chi-square test appropriately (SPSS version 11. Results: There was no significant difference in any of the physiological parameters assessed between the two groups. Discomfort was significantly more (P < 0.025 in the CDM group than CMCR group. The time taken by the dentist was significantly lesser (P < 0.01 in the CDM group. Conclusion: Techniques which enhance the behavioral response in children should be considered for a better pediatric dental practice.

  2. Test procedures for salt rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusseault, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Potash mining, salt mining, design of solution caverns in salt rocks, disposal of waste in salt repositories, and the use of granular halite backfill in underground salt rock mines are all mining activities which are practised or contemplated for the near future. Whatever the purpose, the need for high quality design parameters is evident. The authors have been testing salt rocks in the laboratory in a number of configurations for some time. Great care has been given to the quality of sample preparation and test methodology. This paper describes the methods, presents the elements of equipment design, and shows some typical results

  3. Methods and apparatus for carbon dioxide removal from a fluid stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Ruud, James Anthony; Ku, Anthony Yu-Chung; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Liu, Ke

    2010-01-19

    An apparatus for producing hydrogen gas wherein the apparatus includes a reactor. In one embodiment, the reactor includes at least two conversion-removal portions. Each conversion-removal portion comprises a catalyst section configured to convert CO in the stream to CO.sub.2 and a membrane section located downstream of and in flow communication with the catalyst section. The membrane section is configured to selectively remove the CO.sub.2 from the stream and to be in flow communication with a sweep gas.

  4. An improved method for removing transuranics from coral soil at Johnston Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroney, J.D. III.; Johnson, N.R.; Moroney, K.S.; Mercier, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    An improved approach for removing mixed plutonium and americium contamination from coral soil matrix at the Defense Nuclear Agency's (DNA's) Johnston Atoll site has been developed by DNA's contractor, TMA/Eberline. The system uses arrays of sensitive radiation detectors coupled with sophisticated computer software newly designed by Eberline Instrument Corporation. The software controls a unique segmented gate methodology for removing contaminated soil from a moving feed supply on conveyor belts. Contaminated soil is diverted to a metal drum for collecting larger sized 'hot' particles (< 5,000 Becquerels) or to a soil washing process designed to remove dispersed low level contamination from a soil fraction consisting of very small particles. Low to intermediate levels of contamination are removed from the soil to meet DNAs criteria for release for unrestricted use based on US EPA guidelines

  5. "Push back" technique: A simple method to remove broken drill bit from the proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Devendra K; Sharma, Siddhartha

    2015-11-18

    Broken drill bits can be difficult to remove from the proximal femur and may necessitate additional surgical exploration or special instrumentation. We present a simple technique to remove a broken drill bit that does not require any special instrumentation and can be accomplished through the existing incision. This technique is useful for those cases where the length of the broken drill bit is greater than the diameter of the bone.

  6. Removing Hair Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Removing Hair Safely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... related to common methods of hair removal. Laser Hair Removal In this method, a laser destroys hair ...

  7. Highly efficient removal of arsenic metal ions with high superficial area hollow magnetite nanoparticles synthetized by AACVD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monárrez-Cordero, B.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Leyva-Porras, C.; Pizá-Ruiz, P. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., and Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., and Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih. C.P. 31109 (Mexico)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: ► Fast and high arsenic removal efficiency, almost 100% in one minute. ► Successful synthesis of high purity magnetite hollow nanoparticles is reported. ► They were synthesized by one step aerosol assisted CVD technique. ► Detailed microstructural characterization by electron microscopy was performed. -- Abstract: New nanotechnology alternatives and methodologies have been developed in order to overcome the limitations of conventional techniques for metal ions removal from water. Currently, the removal of heavy metals requires multiple steps which include the separation and post-treatment of the generated sludge. Usually, this sludge is composed of dangerous environmental pollutants mixed with the material used for removing the metal ion. Thus, the removal of these metals becomes a challenging task. Herein we report the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles with high specific area by the aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Deposition temperature were fixed at 450 °C and a mixture of Ar–air were used as a carrier gas, a flow of 1.0 and 0.015 L min{sup −1} were used for Ar and air, respectively. The precursor solution was a dilution of Fe (II) chloride in methanol, with different concentration 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 mol dm{sup −3}. The crystalline structure of the nanoparticles was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Morphology and microstructure were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic properties were evaluated with a vibrating sample magnetometer and specific area was measured by the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller method. To determine the removal efficiency of arsenic ion from water, several tests were carried out at six exposition times 1, 3, 5, 10, 20 and 30 min. Results showed high removal efficiency, more than 99%, in less than 1 min.

  8. Method for correlating weathering data on adsorbents used for the removal of CH3I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, H.C.; Muhlenhaupt, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Traditionally, weathering data have been expressed in terms of removal efficiency as a function of time for a select number of bed depths. Variables include: (1) variations in the efficiency of the adsorbent when new; (2) guard bed design (bed depth, replacement schedule); (3) air quality; and (4) air velocity. This paper discusses the development of a single parameter, namely, the Effective Weathering Rate (EWR), its usefulness in correlating weathering data, and subsequent utilization during design. The effectiveness of the model was checked by analyzing several sets of data. Values of EWR were determined from the limited available experimental data for air which could be described only qualitatively as ranging from relatively clean to relatively dirty air from a heavily industrialized area. As quantitative data become available, it is expected that the EWR can be correlated with the character and concentration of air contaminants such as hydrocarbons, SO 2 , NO/sub x/ and O 3 . The EWR, determined from experimental data, can be used to predict adsorber efficiencies for conditions corresponding to a specific application. Some of the changes in conditions which can be treated by this method include: (1) bed depth of adsorbent, (2) addition of guard bed or depth of guard bed, (3) effectiveness of the carbon (new), (4) operating time, and (5) air velocity. Someparametric studies were performed analytically to demonstrate some applications of the weathering model. These included calculating the adsorber efficiency as a function of time and bed depth, for carbons having various efficiencies when new, and for guard beds of variable bed depth and having different replacement schedules for the guard bed material

  9. Removal of uranium from simulated fly ash by chloride volatilization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuaki, Sato; Yoshikatsu, Tochigi; Toshiki, Fukui; Takeo, Fujino

    2003-01-01

    Fly ash is generated from LWR nuclear power plant as a low-level waste, which is contaminated with a small amount of radioactive materials, composed mainly of uranium oxide. The constituents of the fly ash are similar to those of the ore; the major components of the ash are oxides of silicon, aluminum, sodium, magnesium, zinc, iron sodium and uranium. In this study, removal of uranium from the simulated fly ash, of which composition was U 3 O 8 : 10, CaO:25, SiO 2 : 25, Al 2 O 3 : 20, MgO: 10, ZnO:5, Fe 2 O 3 : 3 and Na 2 CO 3 : 2 wt%, by chloride volatilization method was examined. The simulated fly ash was chlorinated by the same manner as the dry way processing for the ore; namely, the ash was heated in a flow of chlorine in the presence of carbon at high temperatures. In the case of volatilization of uranium from U 3 O 8 and a simulated fly ash by chlorination using chlorine and carbon, it was seen that uranium of both samples showed similar volatilization behaviour: The volatilization ratio of uranium (VU) increased with increasing temperature from 800 to 1100 C. The VU value attained 99.9% at 1100 C. Iron, silicon and zinc showed similar behaviour to uranium, namely, they vaporized completely. The volatilization ratio of aluminum, magnesium and sodium were still high in a range 80-90%. The volatilization ratio of calcium was ∼40% under the same chlorination condition, though it changed to chloride. For recovery of uranium from fly ash by chlorination using chlorine in the presence of carbon, high volatilization ratio of uranium can be achieved at high temperatures. Volatilization ratio of other components also increases, which decreases the amount of decontaminated residue resulting in the reducing of decontamination effect. Selection of heating condition is important. (author)

  10. Development of evaluation method for heat removal design of dry storage facilities. pt. 1. Heat removal test on vault storage system of cross flow type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kazuaki; Koga, Tomonari; Wataru, Masumi; Hattori, Yasuo

    1997-01-01

    The report describes the result of heat removal test of passive cooling vault storage system of cross flow type using 1/5 scale model. Based on a prospect of steady increase in the amount of spent fuel, it is needed to establish large capacity dry storage technologies for spent fuel. Air flow patterns, distributions of air temperature and velocity were measured, by which heat removal characteristics of the system were made clear. Air flow patterns in the storage module depended on the ratio of the buoyant force to the inertial force; the former generated by the difference of air temperatures and the height of the storage module, the latter by the difference of air densities between the outlet of the storage module and ambience and the height of the chimney of the storage facility. A simple method to estimate air flow patterns in the storage module was suggested, where Ri(Richardson) number was applied to represent the ratio. Moreover, heat transfer coefficient from a model of storage tube to cooling air was evaluated, and it was concluded that the generalized expression of heat transfer coefficient for common heat exchangers could be applied to the vault storage system of cross flow type, in which dozens of storage tubes were placed in a storage module. (author)

  11. Effect of insertion method and postinsertion time interval prior to force application on the removal torque of orthodontic miniscrews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Maryam; Ghassemi, Amirreza; Bayani, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Success of orthodontic miniscrews in providing stable anchorage is dependent on their stability. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of insertion method and postinsertion time interval on the removal torque of miniscrews as an indicator of their stability. Seventy-two miniscrews (Jeil Medical) were inserted into the femoral bones of three male German Shepherd dogs and assigned to nine groups of eight miniscrews. Three insertion methods, including hand-driven, motor-driven with 5.0-Ncm insertion torque, and motor-driven with 20.0-Ncm insertion torque, were tested. Three time intervals of 0, 2, and 6 weeks between miniscrew insertion and removal were tested as well. Removal torque values were measured in newton centimeters by a removal torque tester (IMADA). Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Bonferroni post hoc test at a .05 level of significance. A miniscrew survival rate of 93% was observed in this study. The highest mean value of removal torque among the three postinsertion intervals (2.4 ± 0.59 Ncm) was obtained immediately after miniscrew insertion with a statistically significant difference from the other two time intervals (P torque values were obtained immediately after insertion.

  12. Optimizing Cu(II) removal from aqueous solution by magnetic nanoparticles immobilized on activated carbon using Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi Zarandi, Mohammad Javad; Sohrabi, Mahmoud Reza; Khosravi, Morteza; Mansouriieh, Nafiseh; Davallo, Mehran; Khosravan, Azita

    2016-01-01

    This study synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)) immobilized on activated carbon (AC) and used them as an effective adsorbent for Cu(II) removal from aqueous solution. The effect of three parameters, including the concentration of Cu(II), dosage of Fe(3)O(4)/AC magnetic nanocomposite and pH on the removal of Cu(II) using Fe(3)O(4)/AC nanocomposite were studied. In order to examine and describe the optimum condition for each of the mentioned parameters, Taguchi's optimization method was used in a batch system and L9 orthogonal array was used for the experimental design. The removal percentage (R%) of Cu(II) and uptake capacity (q) were transformed into an accurate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for a 'larger-the-better' response. Taguchi results, which were analyzed based on choosing the best run by examining the S/N, were statistically tested using analysis of variance; the tests showed that all the parameters' main effects were significant within a 95% confidence level. The best conditions for removal of Cu(II) were determined at pH of 7, nanocomposite dosage of 0.1 gL(-1) and initial Cu(II) concentration of 20 mg L(-1) at constant temperature of 25 °C. Generally, the results showed that the simple Taguchi's method is suitable to optimize the Cu(II) removal experiments.

  13. Salt cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional associated with system and infrastructure management, looking at automated infrastructure and deployments, then this book is for you. No prior experience of Salt is required.

  14. Separation of adhered salt from uranium deposits generated in electro-refiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.W.; Park, K.M.; Lee, H.S.; Kim, J.G.; Ahn, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    It is important to increase a throughput of the salt removal process from uranium deposits which is generated on the solid cathode of electro-refiner in pyroprocess. In this study, it was proposed to increase the throughput of the salt removal process by the separation of the liquid salt prior to the distillation of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt from the uranium deposits. The feasibility of liquid salt separation was examined by salt separation experiments on a stainless steel sieve. It was found that the amount of salt to be distilled could be reduced by the liquid salt separation prior to the salt distillation. The residual salt remained in the deposits after the liquid salt separation was successfully removed further by the vacuum distillation. It was concluded that the combination of a liquid salt separation and a vacuum distillation is an effective route for the achievement of a high throughput performance in the salt separation process. (author)

  15. A novel method to remove GPR background noise based on the similarity of non-neighboring regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Zafra, V.; Canadas-Quesada, F. J.; Vera-Candeas, P.; Ruiz-Reyes, N.; Rey, J.; Martinez, J.

    2017-09-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a non-destructive technique that has been widely used in many areas of research, such as landmine detection or subsurface anomalies, where it is required to locate targets embedded within a background medium. One of the major challenges in the research of GPR data remains the improvement of the image quality of stone materials by means of detection of true anisotropies since most of the errors are caused by an incorrect interpretation by the users. However, it is complicated due to the interference of the horizontal background noise, e.g., the air-ground interface, that reduces the high-resolution quality of radargrams. Thus, weak or deep anisotropies are often masked by this type of noise. In order to remove the background noise obtained by GPR, this work proposes a novel background removal method assuming that the horizontal noise shows repetitive two-dimensional regions along the movement of the GPR antenna. Specifically, the proposed method, based on the non-local similarity of regions over the distance, computes similarities between different regions of the same depth in order to identify most repetitive regions using a criterion to avoid closer regions. Evaluations are performed using a set of synthetic and real GPR data. Experimental results show that the proposed method obtains promising results compared to the classic background removal techniques and the most recently published background removal methods.

  16. A novel surface cleaning method for chemical removal of fouling lead layer from chromium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholivand, Kh.; Khosravi, M.; Hosseini, S.G.; Fathollahi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Most products especially metallic surfaces require cleaning treatment to remove surface contaminations that remain after processing or usage. Lead fouling is a general problem which arises from lead fouling on the chromium surfaces of bores and other interior parts of systems which have interaction with metallic lead in high temperatures and pressures. In this study, a novel chemical solution was introduced as a cleaner reagent for removing metallic lead pollution, as a fouling metal, from chromium surfaces. The cleaner aqueous solution contains hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) as oxidizing agent of lead layer on the chromium surface and acetic acid (CH 3 COOH) as chelating agent of lead ions. The effect of some experimental parameters such as acetic acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration and temperature of the cleaner solution during the operation on the efficiency of lead cleaning procedure was investigated. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that using this procedure, the lead pollution layer could be completely removed from real chromium surfaces without corrosion of the original surface. Finally, the optimum conditions for the complete and fast removing of lead pollution layer from chromium surfaces were proposed. The experimental results showed that at the optimum condition (acetic acid concentration 28% (V/V), hydrogen peroxide 8% (V/V) and temperature 35 deg. C), only 15-min time is needed for complete removal of 3 g fouling lead from a chromium surface.

  17. Management strategies to utilize salt affected soils. Isotopic and conventional research methods. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the results of a co-ordinated research programme on ``The Use of Nuclear Techniques for Improvement of Crop Production in Salt-affected Soils``. It aims at providing scientists experimental evidence of demonstrating technical feasibility of biological amelioration of salt affected soils as an alternative option of using expensive chemical amendments in soil reclamation complementing engineering structures of farm drainage systems or option of leaving the saline areas as barren lands in spite of the fact that arable agricultural lands have exhausted. 68 refs, 26 figs, 32 tabs.

  18. Management strategies to utilize salt affected soils. Isotopic and conventional research methods. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the results of a co-ordinated research programme on ''The Use of Nuclear Techniques for Improvement of Crop Production in Salt-affected Soils''. It aims at providing scientists experimental evidence of demonstrating technical feasibility of biological amelioration of salt affected soils as an alternative option of using expensive chemical amendments in soil reclamation complementing engineering structures of farm drainage systems or option of leaving the saline areas as barren lands in spite of the fact that arable agricultural lands have exhausted. 68 refs, 26 figs, 32 tabs

  19. Salt ingestion caves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundquist Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Large vertebrate herbivores, when they find a salt-bearing layer of rock, say in a cliff face, can produce sizable voids where, overgenerations, they have removed and consumed salty rock. The cavities formed by this natural animal process constitute a uniqueclass of caves that can be called salt ingestion caves. Several examples of such caves are described in various publications. Anexample in Mississippi U.S.A., Rock House Cave, was visited by the authors in 2000. It seems to have been formed by deer orbison. Perhaps the most spectacular example is Kitum Cave in Kenya. This cave has been excavated to a length over 100 metersby elephants. An ancient example is La Cueva del Milodon in Chile, which is reported to have been excavated by the now extinctmilodon, a giant ground sloth. Still other possible examples can be cited. This class of caves deserves a careful definition. First, thecavity in rock should meet the size and other conventions of the locally accepted definition of a cave. Of course this requirement differsin detail from country to country, particularly in the matter of size. The intent is to respect the local conventions. The characteristicthat human entry is possible is judged to be a crucial property of any recognized cave definition. Second, the cavity should besignificantly the result of vertebrate animal consumption of salt-bearing rock. The defining process is that rock removed to form thecave is carried away in the digestive track of an animal. While sodium salts are expected to be the norm, other salts for which thereis animal hunger are acceptable. Also some other speleogenesis process, such as solution, should not be excluded as long as it issecondary in formation of a cave in question.

  20. Arsenic removal methods for drinking water in the developing countries: technological developments and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Fayzul; Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2017-11-01

    Arsenic pollution of drinking water is a concern, particularly in the developing countries. Removal of arsenic from drinking water is strongly recommended. Despite the availability of efficient technologies for arsenic removal, the small and rural communities in the developing countries are not capable of employing most of these technologies due to their high cost and technical complexity. There is a need for the "low-cost" and "easy to use" technologies to protect the humans in the arsenic affected developing countries. In this study, arsenic removal technologies were summarized and the low-cost technologies were reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of these technologies were identified and their scopes of applications and improvements were investigated. The costs were compared in context to the capacity of the low-income populations in the developing countries. Finally, future research directions were proposed to protect the low-income populations in the developing countries.

  1. Using a Spectral Method to Evaluate Hyporheic Exchange and its Effect on Reach Scale Nitrate Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moren, I.; Worman, A. L. E.; Riml, J.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that hyporheic exchange processes can be of great importance for the transport, retention and mass removal of nutrients in streams. Specifically, the flow of surface water through the hyporheic zone enhances redox-sensitive reactions such as coupled nitrification-denitrification. This self-cleaning capacity of streams can be utilized in stream restoration projects aiming to improve water quality by reconstructing the geomorphology of the streams. To optimize the effect of restoration actions we need quantitative understanding of the linkage between stream geomorphology, hyporheic exchange processes and the desired water quality targets. Here we propose an analytical, spectral methodology to evaluate how different stream geomorphologies induce hyporheic exchange on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Measurements of streambed topographies and surface water profiles from agricultural streams were used to calculate the average hyporheic exchange velocity and residence times and the result was compared with in-stream tracer test. Furthermore, the hyporheic exchange induced by steps in the surface water profile was derived as a comparison of the theoretical capacity of the system. Based on differences in hyporheic exchange, the mass removal of nitrate could be derived for the different geomorphologies. The maximum nitrate mass removal was found to be related to a specific Damkhöler number, which reflects that the mass removal can be either reaction or transport controlled. Therefore, although hyporheic exchange induced by steps in the surface water profile was generally larger than the hyporheic exchange in the observed natural reaches, this would not necessarily lead a larger nitrate mass removal provided that the hyporheic residence times are not long enough to facilitate denitrification processes. The study illustrates the importance to investigate a stream thoroughly before any remediation actions are implemented, specifically

  2. Methods of removal of defects arising at liquid etching of polycrystalline silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanchykou A. E.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a model of generation of defects having the form of spots on the surface of the polycrystalline silicon during processing of semiconductor wafers with hydrofluoric acid based etchant, and a model of removal of such defects in chemical solutions. The authors investigate how the centrifuge speed during drying and the relief of structures, produced on the plate, effect the number of defects. It is shown that there is a possibility to remove defects by chemical treatment in the peroxide-ammonia solutions (PAS and also by sequence of chemical cleaning in Karo mixture, SiO2 etching and treatment in PAS.

  3. Reusable locking tube insertion and removal fixture and method in a reconstitutable fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallenberger, J.M.; Ferlan, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a locking tube insertion and removal fixture for use with a reconstitutable fuel assembly. The process includes a top nozzle with an adapter plate having at least one passageway, at least one guide thimble with an upper end portion, and an attaching structure having a hollow locking tube insertable and removable into and from a locking position in the upper end portion of the guide thimble for releasably locking the upper end portion of the guide thimble within the passageway of the top nozzle and adapter plate

  4. Paired methods to measure biofilm killing and removal: a case study with Penicillin G treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausbacher, D; Lorenz, L; Pitts, B; Stewart, P S; Goeres, D M

    2018-03-01

    Biofilms are microbial aggregates that show high tolerance to antibiotic treatments in vitro and in vivo. Killing and removal are both important in biofilm control, therefore methods that measure these two mechanisms were evaluated in a parallel experimental design. Kill was measured using the single tube method (ASTM method E2871) and removal was determined by video microscopy and image analysis using a new treatment flow cell. The advantage of the parallel test design is that both methods used biofilm covered coupons harvested from a CDC biofilm reactor, a well-established and standardized biofilm growth method. The control Staphylococcus aureus biofilms treated with growth medium increased by 0·6 logs during a 3-h contact time. Efficacy testing showed biofilms exposed to 400 μmol l -1 penicillin G decreased by only 0·3 logs. Interestingly, time-lapse confocal scanning laser microscopy revealed that penicillin G treatment dispersed the biofilm despite being an ineffective killing agent. In addition, no biofilm removal was detected when assays were performed in 96-well plates. These results illustrate that biofilm behaviour and impact of treatments can vary substantially when assayed by different methods. Measuring both killing and removal with well-characterized methods will be crucial for the discovery of new anti-biofilm strategies. Biofilms are tolerant to antimicrobial treatments and can lead to persistent infections. Finding new anti-biofilm strategies and understanding their mode-of-action is therefore of high importance. Historically, antimicrobial testing has focused on measuring the decrease in viability. While kill data are undeniably important, measuring biofilm disruption provides equally useful information. Starting with biofilm grown in the same reactor, we paired assessment of biofilm removal using a new treatment-flow-cell and real-time microscopy with kill data collected using the single tube method (ASTM E2871). Pairing these two methods

  5. Research on electrochemical methods for concentration measurement of dissolved ion in molten salt to apply to electrolytic process control. Innovative research adopted in 2002 fiscal year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Takayuki

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to establish the online (in-situ) technique for concentration measuring of dissolved ion in the molten salt, and this technique is due to the electrochemical method for the concentration measuring of dissolved ion in solutions like the polarization curve measurement. This research executed the following four items. 1) Examination of possibility for concentration measuring of dissolved ion in molten salt by cyclic voltammetry. 2) Examination of possibility for concentration measuring of dissolved ion in molten salt by various electrochemical methods. 3) Examination of suitable electrochemical method for concentration measuring of dissolved ion. 4) Confirmation of selected electrochemical method for concentration measuring of dissolved ion. It has been understood that the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) is a promising electrochemical technique for the concentration measuring of dissolved ion in the molten salt as a result of this research. An appropriate measurement condition is as follows, the potential sweep rate is -0.1 V/s, the pulse cycle is 0.1 s, the pulse width is 10 ms, and the pulse voltage is 50 mV. As for the electrodes, the platinum working electrode, the glassy carbon counter electrode, and silver/silver chloride reference electrode are suitable. Moreover, the molar absorptivities of U 3+ , U 4+ , UO 2 + , UO 2 2+ , and the standard redox potentials of couples of U 4+ /U 3+ and UO 2 2+ /UO 2 + were acquired as a basic data of the uranium and the uranyl ion in molten NaCl-2CsCl. (author)

  6. A two-dimensionally coincident second difference cosmic ray spike removal method for the fully automated processing of Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, H Georg; Turner, Robin F B

    2014-01-01

    Charge-coupled device detectors are vulnerable to cosmic rays that can contaminate Raman spectra with positive going spikes. Because spikes can adversely affect spectral processing and data analyses, they must be removed. Although both hardware-based and software-based spike removal methods exist, they typically require parameter and threshold specification dependent on well-considered user input. Here, we present a fully automated spike removal algorithm that proceeds without requiring user input. It is minimally dependent on sample attributes, and those that are required (e.g., standard deviation of spectral noise) can be determined with other fully automated procedures. At the core of the method is the identification and location of spikes with coincident second derivatives along both the spectral and spatiotemporal dimensions of two-dimensional datasets. The method can be applied to spectra that are relatively inhomogeneous because it provides fairly effective and selective targeting of spikes resulting in minimal distortion of spectra. Relatively effective spike removal obtained with full automation could provide substantial benefits to users where large numbers of spectra must be processed.

  7. Facile preparation of highly pure KF-ZrF4 molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Guoqiang; Cui, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Bing; Zhang, Long; Xiao, Ji-Chang

    2018-03-01

    The preparation of highly pure KF-ZrF4 (FKZr) molten salt, a potential secondary coolant in molten salt reactors, was realized simply by heating a mixture of (NH4)2ZrF6 and KF. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the FKZr molten salt was mainly composed of KZrF5 and K2ZrF6. The melting point of the prepared FKZr molten salt was 420-422 °C under these conditions. The contents of all metal impurities were lower than 20 ppm, and the content of oxygen was lower than 400 ppm. This one-step protocol avoids the need for a tedious procedure to prepare ZrF4 and for an additional purification process to remove oxide impurities, and is therefore a convenient, efficient and economic preparation method for high-purity FKZr molten salt.

  8. Synthesis and piezoelectric properties of KxNa1-xNbO3 ceramic by molten salt method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yueming; Wang Jinsong; Liao Runhua; Huang Dan; Jiang Xiangping

    2010-01-01

    K x Na 1-x NbO 3 ceramic powder with perovskite structure was synthesized in molten salt with a Na 2 CO 3 /K 2 CO 3 molar ratio of 1:1, under different salt-to-oxide weight ratios of 1:10, 1:5, 1:3, 1:2.5 and 1:2 in the temperatures range of 650-900 o C. It is found that the synthesizing temperature and salt-to-oxide ratios had significant effects on the morphology of K x Na 1-x NbO 3 powder. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that a pure perovskite structure of K x Na 1-x NbO 3 powder could be synthesized at 650 o C. The microstructure observation revealed that the crystal morphology of K x Na 1-x NbO 3 powder changed from spheroid to cube, and then became irregular after further increasing temperature. The grain size of the synthesized powder increased by an increment of the molten salt content. The K x Na 1-x NbO 3 ceramics were prepared at x = 0.345 by adding 1.0 mol% ZnO as sintering aid, and the optimized dielectric and piezoelectric properties are obtained as following: d 33 = 120 pC/N, T c = 406 o C, Q m = 126 and k p = 0.302.

  9. Study of water nature in some crystallohydrates of pentasubstituted alkali metal salts of borotungstic acid using thermochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosmodem'yanskaya, G.V.; Sadykova, M.M.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Kinetics of the dehydration process has been studied and heat of dehydration has been determined for salts 2.5Li 2 O x 0.5B 2 O 3 x 12.0WO 3 x 28.5H 2 O; 2.5Na 2 Ox0.5B 2 O 3 x 12.0WO 3 x 17.5H 2 O; 2.5K 2 O x 0.5B 2 O 3 x12.0WO 3 x 16.5H 2 O; 2.5Cs 2 O x 0.5B 2 O 3 x 12.0WO 3 x6.7H 2 O. Dehydration has been conducted in vacuum at 25-50 deg C. The study of the dehydration process has been performed thermochemically in a differential calorimeter. It has been shown that heat of dehydration depends on the nature of the cation. Lithium salt with a cation of a small radius has the highest heat of dehydration (6.4+-0.2 kcal/mol H 2 O). Cesium salt is dehydrated almost completely. A considerable part of water in crystallohydrates has a salting character. Kinetics of the dehydration process is described by the equation of the monomolecular reaction

  10. Effect of preparation temperature and cycling voltage range on molten salt method prepared SnO2

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reddy, MV

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We prepared nano-sized tin (IV) oxide (SnO(sub2)) via molten-salt technique: heating a mixture of tin tetrachloride, lithium nitrate and lithium chloride at 280 °C in air. The powders are characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission scanning...

  11. Improved removal of iodine-125 from effluents by the soil column method using a laterite soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, S H [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1997-02-01

    The soil column experiments were conducted to treat the liquid wastes from hospitals containing {sup 125}I. Three sorbent samples of laterite clay materials with different content of iron oxides (geothite, {alpha}-FeOOH) and hydroxides were used to sorb anionic iodate. Post-treatment of the liquid wastes with sodium hypochlorite (redox reagent) oxidized the iodide to the desirable iodate ion. pH after treatment ranges between 4.8 to 5.8 that is not very much different from the initial value pH4.5. The results show that 90 to 97% sorption of iodine with the decontamination factor between 10-32 could be obtained after the first two hours of experiments. The concentration has decreased from an initial value of 10 Bq{center_dot}mL{sup -1} to the concentration ranges 0.3 to 0.9 Bq{center_dot}mL{sup -1}. For the soil at pH between 4.5 to 6.0, positive charges predominated on the kaolinite, geothite and aluminum hydroxides. The negative {sup 125}I anions were electrostatically held by the positive charges on the mineral components of the laterite clay materials. The treated effluents could be released to the environment safely after further dilution and decay. The storage period will decrease tremendously providing better management for the disposal of the wastes by generators. The batch experiments conducted using different sorbent masses of soils, show that there was a drop in sorption where the mass of soils falls below approximately between 0 to 0.25 g. The sorption remains constant with the soil mass above 0.25 g. Another batch experiment using different concentration, shows that adsorption capacity of the laterite soil was 1.1 {mu}Ci/g. The adsorption is about 96% with a distribution coefficient of 1170. The experiments conducted show that anionic iodate in the liquid wastes can be removed by the laterite soil material. The column treatment method was more effective, easy to handle, and has low a capital and maintenance cost. (author). 9 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs.

  12. Our first experiences in applying an original method for removal of ABO-isoagglutinins in ABO-incompatible kidney recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Due to improved methods for removal of ABO isoagglutinins and novel immunosuppressive protocols, short and long term outcome in blood group incompatible is similar to blood group compatible kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of our original method for removal of ABO isoagglutinins from the blood in ABO-incompatible kidney allograft recipients. Method. Between 2006 and 2008 twelve patients were transplanted from ABO incompatible living donors. Titers of ABO isoagglutinins were 4-128 (IgG. Immunosuppressive therapy started 14 days before kidney transplantation with rituximab, followed by a triple therapy (prednisone + tacrolimus + mycophenolate mofetil and the first plasma exchange (PE procedure, in which one plasma volume was substituted with albumin and saline on day 7 before transplantation. For selective extracorporeal immunoadsorption, the removed plasma was mixed with donor blood type filtered red blood cells, centrifuged and the supernatant separated and preserved. In the next PE procedure, the removed plasma was replaced with immunoadsorbed plasma, and so on. Titers of ABO agglutinins, renal allograft function and survival were followed-up. Results. The pre-transplant treatment consisting of 1-5 PE procedures and immunosuppressive therapy resulted in target ABO agglutinins titers below 4. During a 10-24 month follow-up three patients had an early acute rejection, one patient acute rejection and hemolytic anemia, two patients surgical complications and one of them lost his graft. In the post-transplant period, the titers of ABO antibodies remained below 4. All the patients had stable kidney allograft function with mean serum creatinine ±SD of 129 ± 45 μmol/l at the end of the study. Conclusion. Our method for removal of ABO antibodies was effective in a limited series of patients and short-term follow-up.

  13. The "Hands Together" Method of Nonsterile Scalpel Blade Mounting and Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Scalpels are utilized by many different user groups for such purposes as medical procedures and dissection. Injuries caused by scalpels are a potential risk for scalpel users, and include injuries that may occur while mounting and removing the scalpel blade. Between 10% and 20% of all scalpel injuries in education and healthcare settings are…

  14. Method of removing arsenic and/or other amphoteric elements from sludge and solid waste materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breemen, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9006820 (A1) The noxious element arsenic may be removed with high efficiency from iron hydroxide sludge by first subjecting that sludge first to a thermal treatment in the presence of air or oxygen and of an alkaline reagent and next extracting the treated material with water. The

  15. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  16. A method for removing adobe-type manure from hides using an oxidizing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adobe-type (hardened) manure attached to bovine hair is a major source of meat contamination, hide quality deterioration, and devalued leather products. Therefore, it is important to develop cleaning solutions that can rapidly remove adobe-type manure to improve the quality of hides delivered to tan...

  17. Methods and systems for utilizing carbide lime or slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenney, Martin; Fernandez, Miguel; Chen, Irvin; Calas, Guillaume; Weiss, Michael Joseph; Tester, Chantel Cabrera

    2018-02-27

    Provided herein are methods comprising a) treating a slag solid or carbide lime suspension with an ammonium salt in water to produce an aqueous solution comprising calcium salt, ammonium salt, and solids; b) contacting the aqueous solution with carbon dioxide from an industrial process under one or more precipitation conditions to produce a precipitation material comprising calcium carbonate and a supernatant aqueous solution wherein the precipitation material and the supernatant aqueous solution comprise residual ammonium salt; and c) removing and optionally recovering ammonia and/or ammonium salt using one or more steps of (i) recovering a gas exhaust stream comprising ammonia during the treating and/or the contacting step; (ii) recovering the residual ammonium salt from the supernatant aqueous solution; and (iii) removing and optionally recovering the residual ammonium salt from the precipitation material.

  18. Physical, Chemical, and Biological Methods for the Removal of Arsenic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Lim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a toxic metalloid which is widely distributed in nature. It is normally present as arsenate under oxic conditions while arsenite is predominant under reducing condition. The major discharges of arsenic in the environment are mainly due to natural sources such as aquifers and anthropogenic sources. It is known that arsenite salts are more toxic than arsenate as it binds with vicinal thiols in pyruvate dehydrogenase while arsenate inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation process. The common mechanisms for arsenic detoxification are uptaken by phosphate transporters, aquaglyceroporins, and active extrusion system and reduced by arsenate reductases via dissimilatory reduction mechanism. Some species of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms use arsenic oxyanions for their regeneration of energy. Certain species of microorganisms are able to use arsenate as their nutrient in respiratory process. Detoxification operons are a common form of arsenic resistance in microorganisms. Hence, the use of bioremediation could be an effective and economic way to reduce this pollutant from the environment.

  19. Structure and thermodynamics of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papatheodorou, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates single-component molten salts and multicomponent salt mixtures. Molten salts provide an important testing ground for theories of liquids, solutions, and plasmas. Topics considered include molten salts as liquids (the pair potential, the radial distribution function, methods of characterization), single salts (structure, thermodynamic correlations), and salt mixtures (the thermodynamics of mixing; spectroscopy and structure). Neutron and X-ray scattering techniques are used to determine the structure of molten metal halide salts. The corresponding-states theory is used to obtain thermodynamic correlations on single salts. Structural information on salt mixtures is obtained by using vibrational (Raman) and electronic absorption spectroscopy. Charge-symmetrical systems and charge-unsymmetrical systems are used to examine the thermodynamics of salt mixtures

  20. Identification of wastewater treatment processes for nutrient removal on a full-scale WWTP by statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jakob; Madsen, Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    1994-01-01

    of the processes, i.e. including prior knowledge, with the significant effects found in data by using statistical identification methods. Rates of the biochemical and hydraulic processes are identified by statistical methods and the related constants for the biochemical processes are estimated assuming Monod...... kinetics. The models only include those hydraulic and kinetic parameters, which have shown to be significant in a statistical sense, and hence they can be quantified. The application potential of these models is on-line control, because the present state of the plant is given by the variables of the models......The introduction of on-line sensors of nutrient salt concentrations on wastewater treatment plants opens a wide new area of modelling wastewater processes. Time series models of these processes are very useful for gaining insight in real time operation of wastewater treatment systems which deal...

  1. Molten salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Molten salt reactor is an advanced breeder concept which is suited for the utilization of thorium for nuclear power production. This reactor is based on the use of solutions of uranium or plutonium fluorides in LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 as fuel. Unlike the conventional reactors, no external coolant is used in the reactor core and the fuel salt itself is circulated through heat exchangers to transfer the fission produced heat to a secondary salt (NaF-NaBF 4 ) for steam generation. A part of the fuel stream is continuously processed to isolate 233 Pa, so that it can decay to fissile 233 U without getting converted to 234 Pa, and for the removal of neutron absorbing fission products. This on-line processing scheme makes this reactor concept to achieve a breeding ratio of 1.07 which is the highest for any thermal breeder reactor. Experimental studies at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have established the use of plutonium as fuel for this reactor. This molten salt reactor concept is described and the work conducted at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is summarised. (auth.)

  2. Disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts from the Molten Salt Reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) is an 8 MW reactor that was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1965 through 1969. The reactor used a unique liquid salt fuel, composed of a mixture of LIF, BeF 2 , ZrF 4 , and UF 4 , and operated at temperatures above 600 degrees C. The primary fuel salt circulation system consisted of the reactor vessel, a single fuel salt pump, and a single primary heat exchanger. Heat was transferred from the fuel salt to a coolant salt circuit in the primary heat exchanger. The coolant salt was similar to the fuel salt, except that it contains only LiF (66%) and BeF, (34%). The coolant salt passed from the primary heat exchanger to an air-cooled radiator and a coolant salt pump, and then returned to the primary heat exchanger. Each of the salt loops was provided with drain tanks, located such that the salt could be drained out of either circuit by gravity. A single drain tank was provided for the non-radioactive coolant salt. Two drain tanks were provided for the fuel salt. Since the fuel salt contained radioactive fuel, fission products, and activation products, and since the reactor was designed such that the fuel salt could be drained immediately into the drain tanks in the event of a problem in the fuel salt loop, the fuel salt drain tanks were provided with a system to remove the heat generated by radioactive decay. A third drain tank connected to the fuel salt loop was provided for a batch of flush salt. This batch of salt, similar in composition to the coolant salt, was used to condition the fuel salt loop after it had been exposed to air and to flush the fuel salt loop of residual fuel salt prior to accessing the reactor circuit for maintenance or experimental activities. This report discusses the disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salt

  3. Simple simultaneous determination of soluble and insoluble trace metal components in sea salts by a combined coprecipitation/X-ray fluorescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Ali, Muhammad; Kyotani, Tomohiro; Fukasawa, Tsutomu

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescence method using the coprecipitation-preconcentration technique has been developed for simple determination of both acid-soluble and insoluble trace metal components, such as manganese, iron, nickel, copper and zinc in sea salts. A salt sample is dissolved in a nitric acid solution, and the residue is filtered off onto a membrane filter. After the pH is adjusted to 7-8, the filtrate is boiled, followed by addition of aluminum carrier, oxine and thionalide solutions. The solution is re-adjusted to pH 9, and kept at 80-85degC for 60 min. The precipitates are filtered off onto another membrane filter. X-Ray fluorescence intensities from two filters loaded with the residue and precipitates are measured and the concentrations of the elements are determined simultaneously using the calibration curves. Detection limits were 0.01 μg g -1 for manganese and copper, 0.04 μg g -1 for nickel and zinc, and 0.05 μg g -1 for iron, regardless of the soluble and the insoluble components. The present method was successfully applied to the analysis of sea salt samples. (author)

  4. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James

    2013-12-17

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogenous catalyst for gasification.

  5. Method to remove NO/sub x/ from combustion exhaust gases. [German patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, M.; Iwata, T.

    1975-11-13

    The invention to remove NO/sub x/ from combustion exhaust gases is proposed by means of an example and a drawing. The exhaust gas is washed with an aqueous 30% ammonium sulfite solution (pH = 6.1 - 6-6.5, d = 50 to 55/sup 0/C) and then reduced with waste ammonia in the catalyst bed at 200 to 450/sup 0/C. The total SO/sub 2/ is removed in the prewash procedure and the NH/sub 3/ required for the reduction is transferred from the washing solution to the exhaust gas. The washing solution is regenerated with coke gas containing NH/sub 3/ (150 to 500 ppM NH/sub 3/). Iron ore, tinder, hammer scale, iron-contained dust, copper oxide, chromium oxide, cobalt oxide, and vanadium oxide are suitable as catalyst for the reduction process.

  6. A combined chemical + enzymatic method to remove selected aromatics from aqueous streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.; John, V.

    1993-01-01

    Aromatics are major pollutants found in aqueous environments and in sediments. While there are many chemical and biochemical processes to remove and/or destroy these contaminants, they have to be considered in light of the economics and the time-scales for treatment. We describe our initial work on a hybrid chemical + enzymatic technique to remove aromatics from aqueous stream. The aromatic is first converted to the corresponding phenol through classical Fenton type chemistry involving catalysis by Fe(II). The phenol is subsequently polymerized through an enzymatic mechanism, using horseradish peroxidase as the oxidative enzyme. The polymer is insoluble in water and can be easily recovered. In addition, such phenolic polymers are useful products with varied applications in coatings and resin technologies. Thus, the pollutants can be eventually converted to useful products

  7. Method for removal and stabilization of mercury in mercury-containing gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Thomas E.

    2005-09-13

    The present invention is directed to a process and apparatus for removing and stabilizing mercury from mercury-containing gas streams. A gas stream containing vapor phase elemental and/or speciated mercury is contacted with reagent, such as an oxygen-containing oxidant, in a liquid environment to form a mercury-containing precipitate. The mercury-containing precipitate is kept or placed in solution and reacts with one or more additional reagents to form a solid, stable mercury-containing compound.

  8. Removal of Some Heavy Metals from Wastewater using Radiation- Adsorption Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessouki, A.M.; Hegazy, E.A.; El-Kelesh, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    Wastewater containing toxic materials poses a serious environmental problem. Many of the pollutants are not readily biodegradable and complete removal in many cases is a relatively expensive process. On the other hand, incomplete removal is a serious health hazard. In the present study, a try was made to explain the degradation kinetics due to gamma-irradiation and adsorption of some heavy metals: Uranium, Molybdenum, Zirconium, and Vanadium. Factors affecting the process such as concentration, irradiation dose and ph of the solution was studied. Gamma-radiation doses up to 50 kGy did not result in the degradation of the heavy metals. However, as expected gamma radiation resulted in a change in the valency of these heavy metal ions to other oxidation states which may have resulted in less toxicity. Adsorption and ion-exchange purification of the heavy metals onto GAC,Merck Ion Exchangers I, and IV and polymeric membranes showed that GAC has the highest adsorption capacity for all pollutants compared with the ion-exchangers and polymeric membranes which may be due to its very high surface area and high porous nature which causes internal and external distribution within the carbon particle more than it dose in the case of polymeric membranes and ion-exchangers. GAC was followed by the cation exchanger with different percent adsorption according to the type of pollutant and the least removal percent was shown by the polymeric membranes. Also, a study of the affinity of the pollutants towards the different adsorbents was carried out

  9. DEM Development from Ground-Based LiDAR Data: A Method to Remove Non-Surface Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Sharma

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Topography and land cover characteristics can have significant effects on infiltration, runoff, and erosion processes on watersheds. The ability to model the timing and routing of surface water and erosion is affected by the resolution of the digital elevation model (DEM. High resolution ground-based Light Detecting and Ranging (LiDAR technology can be used to collect detailed topographic and land cover characteristic data. In this study, a method was developed to remove vegetation from ground-based LiDAR data to create high resolution DEMs. Research was conducted on intensively studied rainfall–runoff plots on the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeast Arizona. LiDAR data were used to generate 1 cm resolution digital surface models (DSM for 5 plots. DSMs created directly from LiDAR data contain non-surface objects such as vegetation cover. A vegetation removal method was developed which used a slope threshold and a focal mean filter method to remove vegetation and create bare earth DEMs. The method was validated on a synthetic plot, where rocks and vegetation were added incrementally. Results of the validation showed a vertical error of ±7.5 mm in the final DEM.

  10. Development and Optimization of Voltammetric Methods for Real Time Analysis of Electrorefiner Salt with High Concentrations of Actinides and Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Michael F.; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2018-03-30

    This project addresses the problem of achieving accurate material control and accountability (MC&A) around pyroprocessing electrorefiner systems. Spent nuclear fuel pyroprocessing poses a unique challenge with respect to reprocessing technology in that the fuel is never fully dissolved in the process fluid. In this case, the process fluid is molten, anhydrous LiCl-KCl salt. Therefore, there is no traditional input accountability tank. However, electrorefiners (ER) accumulate very large quantities of fissile nuclear material (including plutonium) and should be well safeguarded in a commercial facility. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) currently operates a pyroprocessing facility for treatment of spent fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II with two such ER systems. INL implements MC&A via a mass tracking model in combination with periodic sampling of the salt and other materials followed by destructive analysis. This approach is projected to be insufficient to meet international safeguards timeliness requirements. A real time or near real time monitoring method is, thus, direly needed to support commercialization of pyroprocessing. A variety of approaches to achieving real time monitoring for ER salt have been proposed and studied to date—including a potentiometric actinide sensor for concentration measurements, a double bubbler for salt depth and density measurements, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for concentration measurements. While each of these methods shows some promise, each also involves substantial technical complexity that may ultimately limit their implementation. Yet another alternative is voltammetry—a very simple method in theory that has previously been tested for this application to a limited extent. The equipment for a voltammetry system consists of off-the-shelf components (three electrodes and a potentiostat), which results in substantial benefits relative to cost and robustness. Based on prior knowledge of electrochemical

  11. A simple chemical free arsenic removal method for community water supply - A case study from West Bengal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen Gupta, B.; Chatterjee, S.; Rott, U.; Kauffman, H.; Bandopadhyay, A.; DeGroot, W.; Nag, N.K.; Carbonell-Barrachina, A.A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a simple chemical free method that was successfully used by a team of European and Indian scientists ( (www.qub.ac.uk/tipot)) to remove arsenic (As) from groundwater in a village in West Bengal, India. Six such plants are now in operation and are being used to supply water to the local population ( (www.insituarsenic.org)). The study was conducted in Kasimpore, a village in North 24 Parganas District, approximately 25 km from Kolkata. In all cases, total As in treated water was less than the WHO guideline value of 10 μg L -1 . The plant produces no sludge and the operation cost is 1.0 US$ per day for producing 2000 L of potable water. - This work presents the chemical free arsenic removal method from groundwater and its successful implementation in West Bengal for community water supply.

  12. Impacts of using salt and salt brine for roadway deicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) uses a variety of methods to help ensure safe travel on the state highway system : following winter storm events. These methods include plowing, use of sand to improve traction, and use of salt and chemical : com...

  13. Assessment of Electrocoagulation Method for Simultaneous Removal of Phosphate, Nitrate and COD by Fe Electrodes from Laundry Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Razavi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Discharging of wastewaters containing detergents either by manufacturers or through domestic and industrial usages has caused the incidence of serious environmental problems. Entering these materials in to the surface waters reduces the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water and causes unsightly environment and groundwater pollution that is always has been notified by environmental experts. Methods: This study focuses on the treatment of laundry wastewater containing phosphate, nitrate and COD using iron as sacrificial electrode by EC process. Various operating conditions such as pH (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, distance between the electrode (3, 5, 10,15mm and current density (3, 6,9,12 mA/cm2 were investigated. Results: Experimental results showed that pollutant removal efficiency varied by changing pH, distance between the electrodes and current density. According to the results, optimum operating conditions for the removal of phosphate, nitrate and COD, were current density of 12mA/cm2, pH of 7.0, distance between the electrodes equal to 10 mm with Fe electrodes. The removal efficiency of phosphate, nitrate and COD were showed 99.33%, 96.67% and 91.43%. Also Kinetic analysis indicates that the adsorption system obeys a second- order kinetic model. Conclusion: According to the results, the Fe electrodes have been achieved the high removal efficiency of phosphate, nitrate and COD by using electrocoagulation.

  14. Removal of Methyl Red from Aqueous Solution by Adsorption on Treated Banana Pseudo stem Fibers Using Response Surface Method (RSM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaida Rahayu Yet; Mohd Zulkhairi Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The effect of adsorbent dose, pH and contact times on the removal of Methyl Red (MR) from aqueous solution by using agriculture waste (NaOH treated banana pseudo stem fibers) were studied. The influence of these parameters on the removal of Methyl Red was examined by using a response surface method (RSM). The experiment was conducted by combining three parameters: adsorbent dose (500-1500 mg/L), pH (2-8) dan contact time (5-75 minutes ). The Box-Behnken Design (BBD) in Response Surface Methodology (RSM) by Design Expert Version 8.0.4 (Stat Ease, USA) was used for designing the experiments. Results showed that the optimum conditions for removal of Methyl Red from an aqueous solution (100 mg/L) were as follows: adsorbent dose (1417.70 mg/L), pH (2.08) and contact time (42.94 minutes) with the value of a coefficient of determination, R2 is 98.98 %. Meanwhile, the second-order polynomial equation indicates that pH and contact times mostly affect the removal of Methyl Red. (author)

  15. Parametric studies on the fuel salt composition in thermal molten salt breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, K.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the salt composition and the fuel cycle of a graphite moderated molten salt self-breeder reactor operating on the thorium cycle is investigated. A breeder molten salt reactor is always coupled to a fuel processing plant which removes the fission products and actinides from the core. The efficiency of the removal process(es) has a large influence on the breeding capacity of the reactor. The aim is to investigate the effect on the breeding ratio of several parameters such as the composition of the molten salt, moderation ratio, power density and chemical processing. Several fuel processing strategies are studied. (authors)

  16. Impact of carbonate on the efficiency of heavy metal removal from kaolinite soil by the electrokinetic soil remediation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouhadi, V.R.; Yong, R.N.; Shariatmadari, N.; Saeidijam, S.; Goodarzi, A.R.; Safari-Zanjani, M.

    2010-01-01

    While the feasibility of using electrokinetics to decontaminate soils has been studied by several authors, the effects of soil composition on the efficiency of this method of decontamination has yet to be fully studied. This study focuses its attention on the effect of 'calcite or carbonate' (CaCO 3 ) on removal efficiency in electrokinetic soil remediation. Bench scale experiments were conducted on two soils: kaolinite and natural-soil of a landfill in Hamedan, Iran. Prescribed quantities of carbonates were mixed with these soils which were subsequently contaminated with zinc nitrate. After that, electrokinetic experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency of electrokinetic remediation. The results showed that an increase in the quantity of carbonate caused a noticeable increase on the contaminant retention of soil and on the resistance of soil to the contaminant removal by electrokinetic method. Because the presence of carbonates in the soil increases its buffering capacity, acidification is reduced, resulting in a decrease in the rate of heavy metal removed from the contaminant soil. This conclusion was validated by the evaluation of efficiency of electrokinetic method on a soil sample from the liner of a waste disposal site, with 28% carbonates.

  17. Impact of carbonate on the efficiency of heavy metal removal from kaolinite soil by the electrokinetic soil remediation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouhadi, V.R., E-mail: vahidouhadi@yahoo.ca [Faculty of Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yong, R.N. [RNY Geoenvironmental Research, North Saanich (Canada); Shariatmadari, N. [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saeidijam, S.; Goodarzi, A.R.; Safari-Zanjani, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    While the feasibility of using electrokinetics to decontaminate soils has been studied by several authors, the effects of soil composition on the efficiency of this method of decontamination has yet to be fully studied. This study focuses its attention on the effect of 'calcite or carbonate' (CaCO{sub 3}) on removal efficiency in electrokinetic soil remediation. Bench scale experiments were conducted on two soils: kaolinite and natural-soil of a landfill in Hamedan, Iran. Prescribed quantities of carbonates were mixed with these soils which were subsequently contaminated with zinc nitrate. After that, electrokinetic experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency of electrokinetic remediation. The results showed that an increase in the quantity of carbonate caused a noticeable increase on the contaminant retention of soil and on the resistance of soil to the contaminant removal by electrokinetic method. Because the presence of carbonates in the soil increases its buffering capacity, acidification is reduced, resulting in a decrease in the rate of heavy metal removed from the contaminant soil. This conclusion was validated by the evaluation of efficiency of electrokinetic method on a soil sample from the liner of a waste disposal site, with 28% carbonates.

  18. Bath Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deaths and been blamed for a handful of suicides and murders. Two of the chemicals in bath salts (mephedrone and MDPV) are Schedule I class drugs. That means they have a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use . People who are ...

  19. Engineering development studies for molten-salt breeder reactor processing No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hightower, J.R. Jr.

    1976-06-01

    Processing methods are being developed for use in a close-coupled facility for removing fission products, corrosion products, and fissile materials from the MSBR fuel. This report discusses the autoresistance heating for the continuous fluorinator, the metal transfer experiment, experiments for the salt-metal contactor, and fuel reconstitution. 10 fig

  20. Large-scale synthesis of Pb1-xLa xTiO3 ceramic powders by molten salt method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Zongying; Xing Xianran; Yu Ranbo; Liu Guirong; Xing Qifeng

    2006-01-01

    The ferroelectric perovskite type lanthanum doped lead titanate (PLT) ceramic powders were synthesized in one step with the starting materials of PbC 2 O 4 , La 2 O 3 and TiO 2 in NaCl-KCl molten salts in the temperature range of 700-950 deg. C. It was found that molten salt method was a large scale and easy preparation way to produce PLT powders with high dispersity. Tetragonal phase Pb 1-x La x TiO 3 ceramic powders were identified by XRD in the composition range 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3 and mono-dispersed particles with spheric shape and less than 100 nm size were observed by SEM. The grain sizes of Pb 1-x La x TiO 3 ceramic powders increased with the increase of La content and decreased with calcination temperature. The grain growth progress and the possible reaction mechanism in molten salts and its influencing factors were discussed in this work. The grain growth process was the main influencing factor of the grain size, which depended on the solubility in the flux

  1. Characterization and electrochemical properties of high tap-density LiFePO4/C cathode materials by a combination of carbothermal reduction and molten salt methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fey, George Ting-Kuo; Lin, Yi-Chuan; Kao, Hsien-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Olivine-structured LiFePO 4 cathode materials were prepared via a combination of carbothermal reduction (CR) and molten salt (MS) methods. To enhance the powder's tap density, the LiFePO 4 /C composite was pressed into pellets and then sintered for at least 1 h at 1028 K in the reaction environment of KCl molten salts. The use of molten salt can effectively influence unit cell volume, morphology and tap density of particles, and consequently change the electrochemical performance of LiFePO 4 /C. The composites were characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Raman spectroscopy and tap density testing. The final product with high tap density of 1.50 g cm −3 contains 4.58 wt% carbon and exhibits good discharge capacity of 141 mAh g −1 at a 0.2 C-rate in the potential range of 2.8–4.0 V.

  2. Evaluation of the effect of salts on chemical, structural, textural, sensory and heating properties of cheese: Contribution of conventional methods and spectral ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudiyi, M; Aït-Kaddour, A

    2018-03-21

    Chemical composition, sensory characteristics, textural and functional properties are among the most important characteristics, which directly relates to the global quality of cheese and to consumer acceptability. A number of factors including milk composition, processing conditions and salt content, influences these properties. The past decades many investigations were performed on the possibilities to reduce salt content of cheese due to its adverse health effects, the current lifestyle and the awareness of the consumers for nutrition quality products. Due to the multiple potential effects of reducing NaCl (simple reduction or substitution) on cheese attributes, it is of utmost importance to identify and understand those effects in order to control the global quality and safety of the final product. In the present review a collection of the different results and conclusions drawn after studying the effect of salts by conventional (e.g. wet chemistry) and instrumental (e.g. spectral) methods on chemical, structural, textural, sensory and heating properties of cheese are presented.

  3. Multivariate methods for evaluating the efficiency of electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from polluted harbour sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    , dry/wet sediment, cell set-up as well as sediment properties. Evaluation of the model showed that remediation time and current density had the highest comparative influence on the clean-up levels. Individual models for each heavy metal showed variance in the variable importance, indicating...... that the targeted heavy,metals were bound to different sediment fractions. Based on the results, a PLS model was used to design five new EDR experiments of a sixth sediment to achieve specified clean-up levels of Cu and Pb. The removal efficiencies were up to 82% for Cu and 87% for Pb and the targeted clean...

  4. Cloud-shadow removal for Unmanned Aerial System multispectral imagery based on tensor decomposition methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Andreas; Wang, Sheng; Garcia, Monica

    2017-01-01

    that are mosaicked into larger images to produce ortho-photomaps. Frequently, especially in northern latitudes, the images to be mosaicked have been acquired under varying irradiance conditions due to moving clouds that create artifacts in the detected signal unrelated to physical changes in vegetation properties......, this study succeeded to remove the cloud shadow effects and image noise in UAS imagery providing normalized reflectance. The comparison between the corrected and un-corrected images shows a significant improvement for reflectance estimation in the shadow areas. Further, analysis of vegetation indices e...

  5. Summary Report of Laboratory Testing to Establish the Effectiveness of Proposed Treatment Methods for Unremediated and Remediated Nitrate Salt Waste Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-12

    The inadvertent creation of transuranic waste carrying hazardous waste codes D001 and D002 requires the treatment of the material to eliminate the hazardous characteristics and allow its eventual shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report documents the effectiveness of two treatment methods proposed to stabilize both the unremediated and remediated nitrate salt waste streams (UNS and RNS, respectively). The two technologies include the addition of zeolite (with and without the addition of water as a processing aid) and cementation. Surrogates were developed to evaluate both the solid and liquid fractions expected from parent waste containers, and both the solid and liquid fractions were tested. Both technologies are shown to be effective at eliminating the characteristic of ignitability (D001), and the addition of zeolite was determined to be effective at eliminating corrosivity (D002), with the preferred option1 of zeolite addition currently planned for implementation at the Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. During the course of this work, we established the need to evaluate and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed remedy for debris material, if required. The evaluation determined that Wypalls absorbed with saturated nitrate salt solutions exhibit the ignitability characteristic (all other expected debris is not classified as ignitable). Follow-on studies will be developed to demonstrate the effectiveness of stabilization for ignitable Wypall debris. Finally, liquid surrogates containing saturated nitrate salts did not exhibit the characteristic of ignitability in their pure form (those neutralized with Kolorsafe and mixed with sWheat did exhibit D001). As a result, additional nitrate salt solutions (those exhibiting the oxidizer characteristic) will be tested to demonstrate the effectiveness of the remedy.

  6. Removal of radionuclides from partitioning waste solutions by adsorption and catalytic oxidation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Isao; Yamaguchi, Isoo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kubota, Masumitsu [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology (RIST), Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Adsorption of radionuclides with inorganic ion exchangers and catalytic oxidation of a complexant were studied for the decontamination of waste solutions generated in past partitioning tests with high-level liquid waste. Granulated ferrocyanide and titanic acid were used for adsorption of Cs and Sr, respectively, from an alkaline solution resulting from direct neutralization of an acidic waste solution. Both Na and Ba inhibited adsorption of Sr but Na did not that of Cs. These exchangers adsorbed Cs and Sr at low concentration with distribution coefficients of more than 10{sup 4}ml/g from 2M Na solution of pH11. Overall decontamination factors (DFs) of Cs and total {beta} nuclides exceeded 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 3}, respectively, at the neutralization-adsorption step of actual waste solutions free from a complexant. The DF of total {alpha} nuclides was less than 10{sup 3} for a waste solution containing diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). DTPA was rapidly oxidized by nitric acid in the presence of a platinum catalyst, and radionuclides were removed as precipitates by neutralization of the resultant solution. The DF of {alpha} nuclides increased to 8x10{sup 4} by addition of the oxidation step. The DFs of Sb and Co were quite low through the adsorption step. A synthesized Ti-base exchanger (PTC) could remove Sb with the DF of more than 4x10{sup 3}. (author)

  7. Chemical synthesis of membrane proteins by the removable backbone modification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shan; Zuo, Chao; Huang, Dong-Liang; Cai, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Long-Hua; Tian, Chang-Lin; Zheng, Ji-Shen; Liu, Lei

    2017-12-01

    Chemical synthesis can produce membrane proteins bearing specifically designed modifications (e.g., phosphorylation, isotope labeling) that are difficult to obtain through recombinant protein expression approaches. The resulting homogeneously modified synthetic membrane proteins are valuable tools for many advanced biochemical and biophysical studies. This protocol describes the chemical synthesis of membrane proteins by condensation of transmembrane peptide segments through native chemical ligation. To avoid common problems encountered due to the poor solubility of transmembrane peptides in almost any solvent, we describe an effective procedure for the chemical synthesis of membrane proteins through the removable-backbone modification (RBM) strategy. Two key steps of this protocol are: (i) installation of solubilizing Arg4-tagged RBM groups into the transmembrane peptides at any primary amino acid through Fmoc (9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl) solid-phase peptide synthesis and (ii) native ligation of the full-length sequence, followed by removal of the RBM tags by TFA (trifluoroacetic acid) cocktails to afford the native protein. The installation of RBM groups is achieved by using 4-methoxy-5-nitrosalicyladehyde by reduction amination to incorporate an activated O-to-N acyl transfer auxiliary. The Arg4-tag-modified membrane-spanning peptide segments behave like water-soluble peptides to facilitate their purification, ligation and mass characterization.

  8. Development of a method to determine the effectiveness of cleaning agents in removal of biofilm derived spores in milking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgeniia Ostrov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial damages caused by biofilm forming bacteria in the dairy industry are a fundamental threat to safety and quality of dairy products. In order to ensure the optimal level of equipment hygiene in the dairy industry, it is necessary to determine the biofilm removal efficiency of cleaning agents used for cleaning-in-place procedures. However, currently there is no standard method available for evaluating and comparing cleaning agents for use in cleaning-in-place procedures in the dairy industry under realistic conditions. The present study aims to establish a cleaning-in-place model system to evaluate the effectiveness of cleaning agents in removal of biofilm derived spores from the surfaces of stainless steel which is the predominant substrate in milking equipment on dairy farms. The system is based on Bacillus subtilis spores surrounded with exopolymeric substances produced by bacteria during biofilm formation. The spores applied on sampling plates were mounted on T-junctions protruding 1.5 – 11-times the milk pipe diameter from the main loop to resemble different levels of cleaning difficulty. The cleaning tests were conducted using commercial alkaline detergents and caustic soda at conditions which are relevant to actual farm environment. The spores removal effect was evaluated by comparing the number of viable spores (attached to sampling plates before and after cleaning. Evaluation of the cleaning and disinfecting effect of cleaning agents towards biofilm derived spores was further performed, which indicates whether spores elimination effect of an agent is due to killing the spores or removing them from the surfaces of dairy equipment. Moreover, it was established that the presence of extracellular matrix is an important factor responsible for high level of cleaning difficulty characteristic for surface attached spores. In overall, the results of this study suggest that the developed model system simulates actual farm conditions for

  9. A novel VIGS method by agroinoculation of cotton seeds and application for elucidating functions of GhBI-1 in salt-stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxia; Wang, Furong; Zhang, Chuanyun; Zhang, Junhao; Chen, Yu; Liu, Guodong; Zhao, Yanxiu; Hao, Fushun; Zhang, Jun

    2018-06-04

    A VIGS method by agroinoculation of cotton seeds was developed for gene silencing in young seedlings and roots, and applied in functional analysis of GhBI-1 in response to salt stress. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used to investigate the functions of genes expressed in mature leaves, but not yet in young seedlings or roots of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Here, we developed a simple and effective VIGS method for silencing genes in young cotton seedlings and roots by soaking naked seeds in Agrobacterium cultures carrying tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-VIGS vectors. When the naked seeds were soaked in Agrobacterium cultures with an OD600 of 1.5 for 90 min, it was optimal for silencing genes effectively in young seedlings as clear photo-bleaching phenotype in the newly emerging leaves of pTRV:GhCLA1 seedlings were observed at 12-14 days post inoculation. Silencing of GhPGF (cotton pigment gland formation) by this method resulted in a 90% decrease in transcript abundances of the gene in roots at the early development stage. We further used the tool to investigate function of GhBI-1 (cotton Bax inhibitor-1) gene in response to salt stress and demonstrated that GhBI-1 might play a protective role under salt stress by suppressing stress-induced cell death in cotton. Our results showed that the newly established VIGS method is a powerful tool for elucidating functions of genes in cotton, especially the genes expressed in young seedlings and roots.

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans response to salt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.O. Umuerri (Oluwatoroti Omowayewa)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes my work, where I used genetic methods to identify new genes involved in salt taste in C. elegans. In addition, I used calcium imaging to characterize the cellular response of C. elegans to salt. The thesis is divided into five sections and each section is summarized

  11. Where Does Road Salt Go - a Static Salt Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C. W.; Liu, F.; Moriarty, V. W.

    2017-12-01

    Each winter, more than 15 million tons of road salt is applied in the United States for the de-icing purpose. Considerable amount of chloride in road salt flows into streams/drainage systems with the snow melt runoff and spring storms, and eventually goes into ecologically sensitive low-lying areas in the watershed, such as ponds and lakes. In many watersheds in the northern part of US, the chloride level in the water body has increased significantly in the past decades, and continues an upward trend. The environmental and ecological impact of the elevated chloride level can no longer be ignored. However although there are many studies on the biological impact of elevated chloride levels, there are few investigations on how the spatially distributed road salt application affects various parts of the watershed. In this presentation, we propose a static road salt model as a first-order metric to address spacial distribution of salt loading. Derived from the Topological Wetness Index (TWI) in many hydrological models, this static salt model provides a spatial impact as- sessment of road salt applications. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the static model, National Elevation Dataset (NED) of ten-meter resolution of Lake George watershed in New York State is used to generate the TWI, which is used to compute a spatially dis- tributed "salt-loading coefficient" of the whole watershed. Spatially varying salt applica- tion rate is then aggregated, using the salt-loading coefficients as weights, to provide salt loading assessments of streams in the watershed. Time-aggregated data from five CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) sensors in selected streams are used for calibration. The model outputs and the sensor data demonstrate a strong linear correlation, with the R value of 0.97. The investigation shows that the static modeling approach may provide an effective method for the understanding the input and transport of road salt to within watersheds.

  12. Cleanup and treatment (CAT) test: a land-area decontamination project utilizing a vacuum method of soil removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orcutt, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Areas 11 and 13 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are contaminated with varying concentrations of Pu-239, 240 and Am-241. An investigation of a vacuum method of soil removal, the Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test, was conducted over a 3-month period in the plutonium safety shot or Plutonium Valley portion of Area 11. Soil in Plutonium Valley is of the Aridisol Order. The surface 0 to 10 cm is a gravelly loam, and is strongly alkaline (pH 8.8). A large truck-mounted vacuum unit, rather than conventional earth-moving equipment, was used as the primary soil collection unit. Effectiveness of the vacuum method of soil removal was evaluated in relation to conventional earthmoving procedures, particularly in terms of volume reduction of removed soil achieved over conventional techniques. Radiological safety considerations associated with use of the vacuum unit were evaluated in relation to their impact on a full-scale land decontamination program. Environmental and operational impacts of devegetation with retention of root crowns or root systems were investigated. It is concluded that the CAT test was successful under difficult environmental conditions

  13. Glycosaminoglycan-resistant and pH-sensitive lipid-coated DNA complexes produced by detergent removal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Julia; Hyvönen, Zanna; Subrizi, Astrid; Bunjes, Heike; Urtti, Arto

    2008-10-21

    Cationic polymers are efficient gene delivery vectors in in vitro conditions, but these carriers can fail in vivo due to interactions with extracellular polyanions, i.e. glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The aim of this study was to develop a stable gene delivery vector that is activated at the acidic endosomal pH. Cationic DNA/PEI complexes were coated by 1,2-dioleylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHEMS) (3:2 mol/mol) using two coating methods: detergent removal and mixing with liposomes prepared by ethanol injection. Only detergent removal produced lipid-coated DNA complexes that were stable against GAGs, but were membrane active at low pH towards endosome mimicking liposomes. In relation to the low cellular uptake of the coated complexes, their transfection efficacy was relatively high. PEGylation of the coated complexes increased their cellular uptake but reduced the pH-sensitivity. Detergent removal was thus a superior method for the production of stable, but acid activatable, lipid-coated DNA complexes.

  14. Study of Hot Salt Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloy IMI 834 by using DC Potential Drop Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustode, Mangesh D. [Bharat Forge Ltd., Pune (India); Dewangan, Bhupendra [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India); Raja, V. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Paulose, Neeta; Babu, Narendra [Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore (India)

    2016-10-15

    DC potential drop technique was employed during the slow strain rate tests to study the hot salt stress corrosion crack (HSSCC) initiation at 300 and 400 ℃. Threshold stresses for HSSCC initiation were found to about 88 % of the yield strength at both temperatures, but the time from crack initiation to final failure (Δtscc) decreased significantly with temperature, which reflects larger tendency for brittle fracture and secondary cracking. The brittle fracture features consisted of transgranular cracking through the primary α grain and discontinuous faceted cracking through the transformed β grains.

  15. Towards a method of rapid extraction of strontium-90 from urine: urine pretreatment and alkali metal removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dietz, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kaminski, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mertz, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shkrob, I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A technical program to support the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention is being developed to provide an analytical method for rapid extraction of Sr-90 from urine, with the intent of assessing the general population’s exposure during an emergency response to a radiological terrorist event. Results are presented on the progress in urine sample preparation and chemical separation steps that provide an accurate and quantitative detection of Sr-90 based upon an automated column separation sequence and a liquid scintillation assay. Batch extractions were used to evaluate the urine pretreatment and the column separation efficiency and loading capacity based upon commercial, extractant-loaded resins. An efficient pretreatment process for decolorizing and removing organics from urine without measurable loss of radiostrontium from the sample was demonstrated. In addition, the Diphonix® resin shows promise for the removal of high concentrations of common strontium interferents in urine as a first separation step for Sr-90 analysis.

  16. Salt disposal: Paradox Basin, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This report presents the findings of a study conducted for the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. Permanent disposal options are examined for salt resulting from the excavation of a waste repository in the bedded salt deposits of the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah. The study is based on a repository salt backfill compaction of 60% of the original density which leaves a total of 8 million tons of 95% pure salt to be disposed of over a 30-year period. The feasibility, impacts, and mitigation methods are examined for five options: commercial disposal, permanent onsite surface disposal, permanent offsite disposal, deepwell injection, and ocean and Great Salt Lake disposal. The study concludes the following: Commercial marketing of all repository salt would require a subsidy for transportation to major salt markets. Permanent onsite surface storage is both economically and technically feasible. Permanent offsite disposal is technically feasible but would incur additional transportation costs. Selection of an offsite location would provide a means of mitigating impacts associated with surface storage at the repository site. Deepwell injection is an attractive disposal method; however, the large water requirement, high cost of development, and poor performance of similar operating brine disposal wells eliminates this option from consideration as the primary means of disposal for the Paradox Basin. Ocean disposal is expensive because of high transportation cost. Also, regulatory approval is unlikely. Ocean disposal should be eliminated from further consideration in the Paradox Basin. Great Salt Lake disposal appears to be technically feasible. Great Salt Lake disposal would require state approval and would incur substantial costs for salt transportation. Permanent onsite disposal is the least expensive method for disposal of all repository salt

  17. Method and device to remove the decay heat produced in the core of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loimann, E.; Reutler, H.

    1977-01-01

    For decay haet removal of the HTGR the heat absorbed by the top reflector is discharged by means of heat exchangers. For this purpose the heat exchangers are arranged between the top bricks consisting of graphite blocks. By convection or forced circulation with the aid of pumps the liquid coolant is flowing in a cycle between the individual heat exchangers connected in parallel and a heat sink arranged outside the containment. The distributing and collection pipes are mounted between the upper and lower thermal shield. The heat exchanger compartments themselves consist of double-walled hollow bodies with a disc-shaped section and a columnar part extending from there to one side respectively. (RW) [de

  18. Atmospheric Pressure Method and Apparatus for Removal of Organic Matter with Atomic and Ionic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A gas stream containing ionic and atomic oxygen in inert gas is used to remove organic matter from a substrate. The gas stream is formed by flowing a mixture of gaseous oxygen in an inert gas such as helium at atmospheric pressure past a high voltage, current limited, direct current arc which contacts the gas mixture and forms the ionic and atomic oxygen. The arc is curved at the cathode end and the ionic oxygen formed by the arc nearer to the anode end of the arc is accelerated in a direction towards the cathode by virtue of its charge. The relatively high mass to charge ratio of the ionic oxygen enables at least some of it to escape the arc before contacting the cathode and it is directed onto the substrate. This is useful for cleaning delicate substrates such as fine and historically important paintings and delicate equipment and the like.

  19. Removal of nitrate from ammonium hydroxide solution containing organics by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal Chetty, K.; Gamare, Jayashree S.; Vaidya, V.N.

    2004-01-01

    Removal of nitrate from ammonium hydroxide solution containing HMTA (hexamethyltetramine) and Urea was studied using indigenously available anion exchange resins. This type of waste is produced during nuclear fuel preparation by internal gelation process. The resins used are Tulsion A-27(MP) and Duolite A. 102D. The time of equilibration and capacity of the resins were determined from distribution ratios obtained by equilibrating resin with nitrate solution. The loading, washing and elution behavior of nitrate on these resins were studied using synthetic mixture having similar composition of the waste produced. Elution studies were carried out using sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ammonium chloride. The studies were also carried out at higher temperature of around 60 degC. The data was compared with that obtained using Dowex 1x4 for the same purpose. (author)

  20. Method for removing trace contaminants from multicurie amounts of 144Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.A.; Kanapilly, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Removal of contaminants from stock solutions of 144 Ce(III) was required for large quantities of 144 Ce prior to incorporation into fused aluminosilicate particles for inhalation toxicology studies. Since available procedures for purification of 144 Ce could not be readily adapted to our laboratory conditions and requirements, a simple procedure was developed to purify 144 Ce in multicurie quantities of 144 Ce(III). This procedure consists of separation of 144 Ce from contaminants by precipitation and filtrations at different pH. Its simplicity and efficacy in providing a stock solution that would readily exchange into montmorillonite clay was demonstrated when it was used during the preparation of large amounts of 144 Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles