WorldWideScience

Sample records for salt loop applied

  1. Experimental research on molten salt thermofluid technology using a high-temperature molten salt loop applied for a fusion reactor Flibe blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Saburo; Chiba, Shinya E-mail: schiba@karma.qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Yuki, Kazuhisa; Omae, Masahiro; Sagara, Akio

    2002-12-01

    Experimental research on molten salt thermofluid technology using a high-temperature molten salt loop (MSL) is described in this paper. The MSL was designed to be able to use Flibe as a coolant, however, a simulant, heat transfer salt (HTS) has to be used alternatively since Flibe is difficult to operate under avoiding a biohazard of Be. Experiment on heat-transfer enhancement, that is required for applying to cool the high heat flux components of fusion reactors, is ongoing. Preliminary experimental results showed that an internal structure of a mixing chamber in the MSL was important to obtain accurate bulk temperatures under severe thermal conditions. For operating the loop, careful handling are needed to proceed how to melt the salt and to circulate it in starting the operation of the MSL. It is concluded that several improvements proposed from the present experiences should be applied for the future Flibe operation.

  2. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    with 3 cm diameter graphite-based fuel pebbles slowly circulating up through the core. Molten salt coolant (FLiBe) at 700°C flows concurrently (at significantly higher velocity) with the pebbles and is used to remove heat generated in the reactor core (approximately 1280 W/pebble), and supply it to a power conversion system. Refueling equipment continuously sorts spent fuel pebbles and replaces spent or damaged pebbles with fresh fuel. By combining greater or fewer numbers of pebble channel assemblies, multiple reactor designs with varying power levels can be offered. The PB-AHTR design is discussed in detail in Reference [1] and is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. PB-AHTR concept (drawing taken from Peterson et al., Design and Development of the Modular PB-AHTR Proceedings of ICApp 08). Pebble behavior within the core is a key issue in proving the viability of this concept. This includes understanding the behavior of the pebbles thermally, hydraulically, and mechanically (quantifying pebble wear characteristics, flow channel wear, etc). The experiment being developed is an initial step in characterizing the pebble behavior under realistic PB-AHTR operating conditions. It focuses on thermal and hydraulic behavior of a static pebble bed using a convective salt loop to provide prototypic fluid conditions to the bed, and a unique inductive heating technique to provide prototypic heating in the pebbles. The facility design is sufficiently versatile to allow a variety of other experimentation to be performed in the future. The facility can accommodate testing of scaled reactor components or sub-components such as flow diodes, salt-to-salt heat exchangers, and improved pump designs as well as testing of refueling equipment, high temperature instrumentation, and other reactor core designs.

  3. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  4. Conformal Field Theory Applied to Loop Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke

    The application of methods of quantum field theory to problems of statistical mechanics can in some sense be traced back to Onsager's 1944 solution [1] of the two-dimensional Ising model. It does however appear fair to state that the 1970's witnessed a real gain of momentum for this approach, when Wilson's ideas on scale invariance [2] were applied to study critical phenomena, in the form of the celebrated renormalisation group [3]. In particular, the so-called ɛ expansion permitted the systematic calculation of critical exponents [4], as formal power series in the space dimensionality d, below the upper critical dimension d c . An important lesson of these efforts was that critical exponents often do not depend on the precise details of the microscopic interactions, leading to the notion of a restricted number of distinct universality classes.

  5. Storm water monitoring along loop 202 and Salt River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    A comprehensive research program for the characterization of storm water runoff from an Arizona : highway was conducted from January through December 2007. The study area covered a portion of : the Loop 202 freeway west of Mesa Drive to a retention b...

  6. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  7. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535ÀC. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535ÀC and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice wont be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  8. Customer interface document for the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettit, Kathleen; Kolb, William J.; Gill, David Dennis; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2012-03-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate 'solar salt' and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 600psi, temperature to 585 C, and flow rate of 400-600GPM depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  9. Applying a Consumer Behavior Lens to Salt Reduction Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Áine; Kent, Monique Potvin; Raats, Monique M; McConnon, Áine; Wall, Patrick; Dubois, Lise

    2017-08-18

    Reformulation of food products to reduce salt content has been a central strategy for achieving population level salt reduction. In this paper, we reflect on current reformulation strategies and consider how consumer behavior determines the ultimate success of these strategies. We consider the merits of adopting a 'health by stealth', silent approach to reformulation compared to implementing a communications strategy which draws on labeling initiatives in tandem with reformulation efforts. We end this paper by calling for a multi-actor approach which utilizes co-design, participatory tools to facilitate the involvement of all stakeholders, including, and especially, consumers, in making decisions around how best to achieve population-level salt reduction.

  10. Applying a Consumer Behavior Lens to Salt Reduction Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin Kent, Monique; Raats, Monique M.; McConnon, Áine; Wall, Patrick; Dubois, Lise

    2017-01-01

    Reformulation of food products to reduce salt content has been a central strategy for achieving population level salt reduction. In this paper, we reflect on current reformulation strategies and consider how consumer behavior determines the ultimate success of these strategies. We consider the merits of adopting a ‘health by stealth’, silent approach to reformulation compared to implementing a communications strategy which draws on labeling initiatives in tandem with reformulation efforts. We end this paper by calling for a multi-actor approach which utilizes co-design, participatory tools to facilitate the involvement of all stakeholders, including, and especially, consumers, in making decisions around how best to achieve population-level salt reduction. PMID:28820449

  11. System design description of forced-convection molten-salt corrosion loops MSR-FCL-3 and MSR-FCL-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, W.R.; Silverman, M.D.

    1976-11-01

    Molten-salt corrosion loops MSR-FCL-3 and MSR-FCL-4 are high-temperature test facilities designed to evaluate corrosion and mass transfer of modified Hastelloy N alloys for future use in Molten-Salt Breeder Reactors. Salt is circulated by a centrifugal sump pump to evaluate material compatibility with LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ThF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ fuel salt at velocities up to 6 m/s (20 fps) and at salt temperatures from 566 to 705/sup 0/C (1050 to 1300/sup 0/F). The report presents the design description of the various components and systems that make up each corrosion facility, such as the salt pump, corrosion specimens, salt piping, main heaters, salt coolers, salt sampling equipment, and helium cover-gas system, etc. The electrical systems and instrumentation and controls are described, and operational procedures, system limitations, and maintenance philosophy are discussed.

  12. Molten Salt Heat Transport Loop: Materials Corrosion and Heat Transfer Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Mark Anderson; Dr. Michael Corradini; Dr. Todd Allen; Luke Olson; James Ambrosek; Daniel Ludwig

    2008-07-09

    An experimental system for corrosion testing of candidate materials in molten FLiNaK salt at 850 degree C has been designed and constructed. While molten FLiNaK salt was the focus of this study, the system can be utilized for evaluation of materials in other molten salts that may be of interest in the future. Using this system, the corrosion performance of a number of code-certified alloys of interest to NGNP as well as the efficacy of Ni-electroplating have been investigated. The mechanisums underlying corrosion processes have been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the materials after the corrosion tests, as well as by the post-corrosion analysis of the salts using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques.

  13. Applying the Triangle Taste Test to Assess Differences between Low Sodium Salts and Common Salt: Evidence from Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Garcia, Lorena; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Gilman, Robert H.; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Cárdenas, María Kathia; Sacksteder, Katherine A.; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Background In resourced-constrained settings, daily cooking practices are still the norm. Replacing sodium in regular salt to produce potassium-enriched salts are potential alternative routes to reduce sodium intake, paired with the benefit associated with potassium intake. This change would likely have effects on palatability and taste of prepared foods, yet a threshold to discriminate sensorial changes can be determined. The main goal of this study was to assess if the use of potassium-enriched salt substitutes lead to perceived differences in taste utilizing a sensory discrimination test. Methods and Results A triangle taste test was conducted and participants were offered samples of cooked rice prepared with different salts. The only ingredient that differed in the preparation was the salt used: 100%NaCl (regular salt) and salts where sodium was replaced by 50%, 33% or 25% KCl (potassium-enriched salt). Comparisons were carried out according to the minimum number of correct judgments. A total of 156 subjects, 49% males, mean age 41.0 years (SD±15.5) years, participated in the study. Samples using 25% potassium-enrichment were indistinguishable in terms of taste from regular salt, whereas samples with 33% and 50% potassium-enrichment were distinguishable. Results were consistent when stratified by sex and age. Less than 10% of participants attributed the differences to bitterness or metallic flavor. Conclusions The 25% potassium-enriched salt is indistinguishable from regular salt. These findings suggest a potential to achieve sodium intake reduction strategies in cooking practices by substituting regular salt with potassium-enriched salt without affecting palatability. PMID:26225848

  14. Consolidating and water repellent treatments applied to wet and salt contaminated granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva, B.

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparison was made of the efficacy of two consolidants and two water repellents applied to samples of granite under optimum conditions, with the efficacy of the same products applied to the granite in the presence of soluble salts or water. The amount of product absorbed and the amount of dry polymer remaining after treatment were compared. The results show that the presence of water and soluble salts in the stone significantly modifies the consumption of the products (in particular the water repellents and also the level of dry polymer retained. The water repellents were found to be much less effective when the substrate contained salts, whereas the presence of water did not appear to influence their efficacy. The lack of correlation between uptake, active dry polymer, and efficacy led to the conclusion that the presence of salts or water markedly changes the kinetics of the polymerization of the products.

    Se analiza la eficacia de dos consolidantes y dos hidrofugantes aplicados a rocas graníticas en condiciones óptimas comparativamente a la eficacia de los mismos productos aplicados sobre los mismos sustratos conteniendo cierta cantidad de sales solubles o de agua. Se compara la cantidad de producto absorbido y la cantidad de materia seca presente tras el curado. Los resultados indican que la presencia de agua y de sales solubles en la piedra modifica significativamente el consumo de los productos, sobre todo el de los hidrofugantes, así como la cantidad de materia seca. Se observa, asimismo, un fuerte detrimento en la eficacia de los hidrofugantes cuando el sustrato contiene sales mientras que, al contrario, la presencia de agua no parece infiuir en dicha eficacia. La falta de correlación entre el consumo, materia seca activa y eficacia lleva a concluir que la presencia de sales o agua modifica sensiblemente la cinética de la polimeración de los productos.

  15. Exhaust Aftertreatment and Low Pressure Loop EGR Applied to an Off-Highway Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgard, Kirby; Triana, Antonio; Johnson, John; Yang, Song; Premchand, Kiran

    2006-01-30

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate that low pressure loop EGR incorporating a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) can be applied to an off-highway engine to meet Tier 3 (Task I) and Interim Tier 4 (Task II) off-road emissions standards. Task I data was collected using a John Deere 8.1 liter engine modified with a low pressure loop EGR system. The engine and EGR system was optimized and final data over the ISO 8178 eight mode test indicated the NOx emissions were less than 4 g/kWh and the PM was less than 0.02 g/kWh which means the engine met the Tier 3 off-road standard. Considerable experimental data was collected and used by Michigan Tech University to develop and calibrate the MTU-Filter 1D DPF model. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO{sub 2}-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO{sub 2} upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to the experimental data at temperatures from 230 C to 550 C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m{sup 3}/min. Model predictions of the solid particulate mass deposited in the DPF after each loading and regeneration case were in agreement within +/-10g (or +/-10%) of experimental measurements at the majority of the engine operating conditions. The activation temperatures obtained from the model calibration are in good agreement with values reported in the literature and gave good results in the model calibration by using constant pre-exponential factors throughout the entire range of conditions evaluated. The average clean filter permeability was 2.372 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. Estimates of the solid particulate mass

  16. Applying Loop-Flower Basis Functions to Analyze Electromagnetic Scattering Problems of PEC Scatterers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaobiao Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of loop-flower basis functions for solving surface integral equations involved in electromagnetic scattering problems on perfectly electrically conducting surfaces. Flower-shaped basis functions are proposed to replace the conventional star basis functions. The flower basis functions are defined based on mesh nodes instead of surface triangles. It is shown that the loop-flower basis functions not only can be used to handle the electromagnetic scattering problems at very low frequencies, but also can be directly used to implement Calderon preconditioners for EFIEs.

  17. Bio-Inspired Controller on an FPGA Applied to Closed-Loop Diaphragmatic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbrzeski, Adeline; Bornat, Yannick; Hillen, Brian; Siu, Ricardo; Abbas, James; Jung, Ranu; Renaud, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can disrupt connections between the brain respiratory network and the respiratory muscles which can lead to partial or complete loss of ventilatory control and require ventilatory assistance. Unlike current open-loop technology, a closed-loop diaphragmatic pacing system could overcome the drawbacks of manual titration as well as respond to changing ventilation requirements. We present an original bio-inspired assistive technology for real-time ventilation assistance, implemented in a digital configurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The bio-inspired controller, which is a spiking neural network (SNN) inspired by the medullary respiratory network, is as robust as a classic controller while having a flexible, low-power and low-cost hardware design. The system was simulated in MATLAB with FPGA-specific constraints and tested with a computational model of rat breathing; the model reproduced experimentally collected respiratory data in eupneic animals. The open-loop version of the bio-inspired controller was implemented on the FPGA. Electrical test bench characterizations confirmed the system functionality. Open and closed-loop paradigm simulations were simulated to test the FPGA system real-time behavior using the rat computational model. The closed-loop system monitors breathing and changes in respiratory demands to drive diaphragmatic stimulation. The simulated results inform future acute animal experiments and constitute the first step toward the development of a neuromorphic, adaptive, compact, low-power, implantable device. The bio-inspired hardware design optimizes the FPGA resource and time costs while harnessing the computational power of spike-based neuromorphic hardware. Its real-time feature makes it suitable for in vivo applications.

  18. Belgian experience in applying the {open_quotes}leak-before-break{close_quotes} concept to the primary loop piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, R.; Malekian, C.; Meessen, O. [Tractebel Energy Engineering, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-04-01

    The Leak Before Break (LBB) concept allows to eliminate from the design basis the double-ended guillotine break of the primary loop piping, provided it can be demonstrated by a fracture mechanics analysis that a through-wall flaw, of a size giving rise to a leakage still well detectable by the plant leak detection systems, remains stable even under accident conditions (including the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE)). This concept was successfully applied to the primary loop piping of several Belgian Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) units, operated by the Utility Electrabel. One of the main benefits is to permit justification of supports in the primary loop and justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and internals in case of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in stretch-out conditions. For two of the Belgian PWR units, the LBB approach also made it possible to reduce the number of large hydraulic snubbers installed on the primary coolant pumps. Last but not least, the LBB concept also facilitates the steam generator replacement operations, by eliminating the need for some pipe whip restraints located close to the steam generator. In addition to the U.S. regulatory requirements, the Belgian safety authorities impose additional requirements which are described in details in a separate paper. An novel aspect of the studies performed in Belgium is the way in which residual loads in the primary loop are taken into account. Such loads may result from displacements imposed to close the primary loop in a steam generator replacement operation, especially when it is performed using the {open_quote}two cuts{close_quotes} technique. The influence of such residual loads on the LBB margins is discussed in details and typical results are presented.

  19. Desalination of salt damaged Obernkirchen sandstone by an applied DC field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matyščák, Ondřej; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2014-01-01

    as the outer surface was scaling due to salts.The focus of the work was on the effect of electrokinetic desalination for removal of unevenly distributed mixtures of salts. Previous reported studies were conducted with laboratory contaminated stones with single salts, which were relatively evenly distributed...... the treatment the water content was very low in the stones, between 1.3% and 2.1%. Electroosmotic water transport was observed in the clay poultices, however, there was no decrease of the water contents in the stones at the end of the experiments, so there was no indication of an electroosmotic effect......Soluble salts are considered as one of the most common causes for decay of building materials. In the present work, an electrokinetic method for desalination of sandstones from a historic warehouse was tested. The sandstones claddings were removed from the warehouse during a renovation action...

  20. Stability of Closed Loop Controlled Repetitive Periodic System applied to control of CD-Player

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2005-01-01

    stability criterion is derived. This criterion is following applied to an example on a feature based control scheme for handling CD-players playing CDs with surface faults. This feature based control scheme is handling repetitive periodic sensor faults. The feature based control scheme approximates...... the repetitive sensor faults (surface faults). The fault approximations are subsequently subtracted from the measurements, and the influence from these repetitive sensor faults are thereby removed from the computed control signals....

  1. Analysis, Modelling, and Simulation of Droop Control with Virtual Impedance Loop Applied to Parallel UPS Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Francisco Kleber A.; Branco, Carlos Gustavo C.; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores a control strategy for parallel uninterruptible power systems (UPS). The control technique used in that work was based on the droop control method. This method is usually applied to achieve good active and reactive power sharing when communication between the inverters...... is difficult due to its physical location. This paper has considered that the UPS systems there were no comunication between their controls. A detailed mathematical model about the explored system is shown in that work and simulation results are presented in order to prove the theory presented....

  2. Impact of fuel selection on the environmental performance of post-combustion calcium looping applied to a cement plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, Wouter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369280784; Hung, Christine Roxanne; Tokheim, Lars Andre; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Worrell, Ernst|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/106856715; Ramírez, Andrea|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/284852414

    2018-01-01

    Calcium looping CO2 capture is a promising technology to reduce CO2 emissions from cement production. Coal has been seen as a logical choice of fuel to drive the calcium looping process as coal is already the primary fuel used to produce cement. This study assesses the impact of using different

  3. Is It the Appropriate Time to Stop Applying Selenium Enriched Salt in Kashin-Beck Disease Areas in China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Ning

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify significant factors of selenium (Se nutrition of children in Kashin-Beck disease (KBD endemic areas and non-KBD area in Shaanxi Province for providing evidence of whether it is the time to stop applying Se-enriched salt in KBD areas. A cross-sectional study contained 368 stratified randomly selected children aged 4–14 years was conducted with 24-h retrospective questionnaire based on a pre-investigation. Food and hair samples were collected and had Se contents determined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Average hair Se content of 349.0 ± 60.2 ng/g in KBD-endemic counties was significantly lower than 374.1 ± 47.0 ng/g in non-KBD counties. It was significantly higher in the male children (365.2 ± 52.3 ng/g than in the female (345.0 ± 62.2 ng/g, p = 0.002 and significantly higher in the 4.0–6.9 years group (375.2 ± 58.9 ng/g than the 7.0–14.0 years group (347.0 ± 56.1 ng/g, p < 0.01. Gender, living area, Se intake without supplements, Se-enriched salt, oil source and protein intake were identified as significant factors of hair Se contents. Cereals, meat and milk were commonly included as significant food categories that mainly contributed to Se intake without supplement of the whole population. Balanced dietary structure without Se supplement could effectively enhance and maintain children’s Se nutrition. It may be the time to stop applying Se-enriched salt in KBD areas in Shaanxi Province.

  4. Response of Two Tomato Cultivars to Field-applied Proline and Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlaoui B.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out using saline water (6.57 dS.m-1 and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI on two tomato cultivars (Solanum lycopersicum, cv. Rio Grande and Heinz-2274 in a silty clay soil. The former is a salinity tolerant and the latter a sensitive cultivar. Exogenous application of proline was done by foliar spray at two concentrations: 10 and 20 mg.L-1, with a control (saline water without proline, during the flowering stage. As a result of the proline applied, significant effects were observed on both cultivars of tomato, particularly with low concentration of proline (10 mg.L-1. It led to increase of leaf area, growth length and fruit yield. Regarding mineral nutrition, Ca2+ was higher in different organs while low accumulation of Na+ occurred. However, Cl- was very low significantly in all tissues of plants of Rio Grande at the higher concentration of proline applied.

  5. Bow-tie risk assessment combining causes and effects applied to gasoil storage in an abandoned salt cavern,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, K; Hendriks, D.; Wildenborg, T.; Duijne, H.

    2014-01-01

    A semi-quantitative risk assessment is presented for the storage of gas oil in depleted salt caverns in the Twente region, the Netherlands. It is based on a bow-tie model, in which an incident, leakage of gas oil from the storage system (cavern and wells), is evaluated by assessing its possible

  6. Comparison of two different sea-salt aerosol schemes as implemented in air quality models applied to the Mediterranean Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jiménez-Guerrero

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A number of attempts have been made to incorporate sea-salt aerosol (SSA source functions in chemistry transport models with varying results according to the complexity of the scheme considered. This contribution compares the inclusion of two different SSA algorithms in two chemistry transport models: CMAQ and CHIMERE. The main goal is to examine the differences in average SSA mass and composition and to study the seasonality of the prediction of SSA when applied to the Mediterranean area with high resolution for a reference year. Dry and wet deposition schemes are also analyzed to better understand the differences observed between both models in the target area. The applied emission algorithm in CHIMERE uses a semi-empirical formulation which obtains the surface emission rate of SSA as a function of the particle size and the surface wind speed raised to the power 3.41. The emission parameterization included within CMAQ is somehow more sophisticated, since fluxes of SSA are corrected with relative humidity. In order to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, the participating algorithms as implemented in the chemistry transport models were evaluated against AOD measurements from Aeronet and available surface measurements in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area, showing biases around −0.002 and −1.2 μg m−3, respectively. The results indicate that both models represent accurately the patterns and dynamics of SSA and its non-uniform behavior in the Mediterranean basin, showing a strong seasonality. The levels of SSA strongly vary across the Western and the Eastern Mediterranean, reproducing CHIMERE higher annual levels in the Aegean Sea (12 μg m−3 and CMAQ in the Gulf of Lion (9 μg m−3. The large difference found for the ratio PM2.5/total SSA in CMAQ and CHIMERE is also investigated. The dry and wet removal rates are very similar for both models despite the different schemes

  7. On the use of a molten salt fast reactor to apply an idealized transmutation scenario for the nuclear phase out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Bruno; Rohde, Ulrich; Glivici-Cotruţă, Varvara; Litskevich, Dzianis; Scholl, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In the view of transmutation of transuranium (TRU) elements, molten salt fast reactors (MSFRs) offer certain advantages compared to solid fuelled reactor types like sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). In the first part these advantages are discussed in comparison with the SFR technology, and the research challenges are analyzed. In the second part cycle studies for the MSFR are given for different configurations--a core with U-238 fertile, a fertile free core, and a core with Th-232 as fertile material. For all cases, the transmutation potential is determined and efficient transmutation performance for the case with thorium as a fertile material as well as for the fertile free case is demonstrated and the individual advantages are discussed. The time evolution of different important isotopes is analyzed. In the third part a strategy for the optimization of the transmutation efficiency is developed. The final aim is dictated by the phase out decision of the German government, which requests to put the focus on the determination of the maximal transmutation efficiency and on an as much as possible reduced leftover of transuranium elements at the end of the reactor life. This minimal leftover is achieved by a two step procedure of a first transmuter operation phase followed by a second deep burning phase. There the U-233, which is bred in the blanket of the core consisting of thorium containing salt, is used as feed. It is demonstrated, that transmutation rates up to more than 90% can be achieved for all transuranium isotopes, while the production of undesired high elements like californium is very limited. Additionally, the adaptations needed for the simulation of a MSFR, and the used tool HELIOS 1.10 is described.

  8. On the use of a molten salt fast reactor to apply an idealized transmutation scenario for the nuclear phase out.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Merk

    Full Text Available In the view of transmutation of transuranium (TRU elements, molten salt fast reactors (MSFRs offer certain advantages compared to solid fuelled reactor types like sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs. In the first part these advantages are discussed in comparison with the SFR technology, and the research challenges are analyzed. In the second part cycle studies for the MSFR are given for different configurations--a core with U-238 fertile, a fertile free core, and a core with Th-232 as fertile material. For all cases, the transmutation potential is determined and efficient transmutation performance for the case with thorium as a fertile material as well as for the fertile free case is demonstrated and the individual advantages are discussed. The time evolution of different important isotopes is analyzed. In the third part a strategy for the optimization of the transmutation efficiency is developed. The final aim is dictated by the phase out decision of the German government, which requests to put the focus on the determination of the maximal transmutation efficiency and on an as much as possible reduced leftover of transuranium elements at the end of the reactor life. This minimal leftover is achieved by a two step procedure of a first transmuter operation phase followed by a second deep burning phase. There the U-233, which is bred in the blanket of the core consisting of thorium containing salt, is used as feed. It is demonstrated, that transmutation rates up to more than 90% can be achieved for all transuranium isotopes, while the production of undesired high elements like californium is very limited. Additionally, the adaptations needed for the simulation of a MSFR, and the used tool HELIOS 1.10 is described.

  9. On the Use of a Molten Salt Fast Reactor to Apply an Idealized Transmutation Scenario for the Nuclear Phase Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Bruno; Rohde, Ulrich; Glivici-Cotruţă, Varvara; Litskevich, Dzianis; Scholl, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    In the view of transmutation of transuranium (TRU) elements, molten salt fast reactors (MSFRs) offer certain advantages compared to solid fuelled reactor types like sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). In the first part these advantages are discussed in comparison with the SFR technology, and the research challenges are analyzed. In the second part cycle studies for the MSFR are given for different configurations – a core with U-238 fertile, a fertile free core, and a core with Th-232 as fertile material. For all cases, the transmutation potential is determined and efficient transmutation performance for the case with thorium as a fertile material as well as for the fertile free case is demonstrated and the individual advantages are discussed. The time evolution of different important isotopes is analyzed. In the third part a strategy for the optimization of the transmutation efficiency is developed. The final aim is dictated by the phase out decision of the German government, which requests to put the focus on the determination of the maximal transmutation efficiency and on an as much as possible reduced leftover of transuranium elements at the end of the reactor life. This minimal leftover is achieved by a two step procedure of a first transmuter operation phase followed by a second deep burning phase. There the U-233, which is bred in the blanket of the core consisting of thorium containing salt, is used as feed. It is demonstrated, that transmutation rates up to more than 90% can be achieved for all transuranium isotopes, while the production of undesired high elements like californium is very limited. Additionally, the adaptations needed for the simulation of a MSFR, and the used tool HELIOS 1.10 is described. PMID:24690768

  10. Behavioural implications of traditional treatment and closed-loop automated insulin delivery systems in Type 1 diabetes: applying a cognitive restraint theory framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahkoska, A R; Mayer-Davis, E J; Hood, K K; Maahs, D M; Burger, K S

    2017-11-01

    As the prevalence of obesity in Type 1 diabetes rises, the effects of emerging therapy options should be considered in the context of both weight and glycaemic control outcomes. Artificial pancreas device systems will 'close the loop' between blood glucose monitoring and automated insulin delivery and may transform day-to-day dietary management for people with Type 1 diabetes in multiple ways. In the present review, we draw directly from cognitive restraint theory to consider unintended impacts that closed-loop systems may have on ingestive behaviour and food intake. We provide a brief overview of dietary restraint theory and its relation to weight status in the general population, discuss the role of restraint in traditional Type 1 diabetes treatment, and lastly, use this restraint framework to discuss the possible behavioural implications and opportunities of closed-loop systems in the treatment of Type 1 diabetes. We hypothesize that adopting closed-loop systems will lift the diligence and restriction that characterizes Type 1 diabetes today, thus requiring a transition from a restrained eating behaviour to a non-restrained eating behaviour. Furthermore, we suggest this transition be leveraged as an opportunity to teach people lifelong eating behaviour to promote healthy weight status by incorporating education and cognitive reappraisal. Our aim was to use a transdisciplinary approach to highlight critical aspects of the emerging closed-loop technologies relating to eating behaviour and weight effects and to promote discussion of strategies to optimize long-term health in Type 1 diabetes via two key outcomes: glycaemic control and weight management. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  11. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  12. Determination of Fusarium toxins in functional vegetable milks applying salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction combined with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Ahmed M; Arroyo-Manzanares, Natalia; García-Campaña, Ana M; Gámiz-Gracia, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Vegetable milks are considered as functional foods due to their physiological benefits. Although the consumption of these products has significantly increased, they have received little attention in legislation with regard to contaminants. However, they may contain mycotoxins resulting from the use of contaminated raw materials. In this work, ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been proposed for the determination of the most relevant Fusarium toxins (fumonisin B1 and B2, HT-2 and T-2 toxins, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol and fusarenon-X) in different functional beverages based on cereals, legumes and seeds. Sample treatment consisted of a simple salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with no further clean-up. The method provided limits of quantification between 3.2 and 57.7 µg L-1, recoveries above 80% and precision with RSD lower than 12%. The method was also applied for studying the occurrence of these mycotoxins in market samples of vegetable functional beverages and deoxynivalenol was found in three oat-based commercial drinks.

  13. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  14. Artificial neural networks (Fuzzy ARTMAP) analysis of the dataobtained with an electronic tongue applied to a ham-curing processwith different salt formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Sánchez, Luís; Garrigues Baixauli, José; Garcia-Breijo, Eduardo; Grau Meló, Raúl; Aliño Alfaro, Marta; Baigts Allende, Diana Karina; Barat Baviera, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    tThis paper describes the determination of optimum values of the parameters of a Simplified FuzzyARTMAP neural network for monitoring dry-cured ham processing with different salt formulations tobe implemented in a microcontroller device. The employed network must be set to the limited micro-controller memory but, at the same time, should achieve optimal performance to classify the samplesobtained from this application.Hams salted with different salt formulations (100% NaCl; 50% NaCl + 50% KCl...

  15. Geomechanical analysis applied to geological carbon dioxide sequestration, induced seismicity in deep mines, and detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sub-salt environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucier, Amie Marie

    and injection induced micro-seismicity are implemented. The second issue to which we apply geomechanical analysis in this thesis is mining-induced stress perturbations and induced seismicity in the TauTona gold mine, which is located in the Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa and is one of the deepest underground mines in the world. In the first investigation, we developed and tested a new technique for determining the virgin stress state near the TauTona gold mine. This technique follows an iterative forward modeling approach that combines observations of drilling induced borehole failures in borehole images, boundary element modeling of the mining-induced stress perturbations, and forward modeling of borehole failures based on the results of the boundary element modeling. The final result was a well constrained range of principal stress orientations and magnitudes that are consistent with all the observed failures and other stress indicators. In the second investigation, we used this constrained stress state to examine the likelihood of faulting to occur both on pre-existing fault planes that are optimally oriented to the virgin stress state and on faults affected by the mining-perturbed stress field, the latter of which is calculated with boundary element modeling. We made several recommendations that could potentially increase safety in deep South African mines as development continues. Finally, the third issue addressed in this thesis is the detection of stress-induced shear wave velocity anisotropy in a sub-salt environment. In this study, we tested a technique proposed by Boness and Zoback (2006) to identify structure-induced velocity anisotropy and isolate possible stress-induced velocity anisotropy. The investigation used cross-dipole sonic data from three deep water sub-salt wells in the Gulf of Mexico. First, we determined the parameters necessary to ensure the quality of the fast azimuth data used in our analysis. We then characterized the quality

  16. INNER SALTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    been characterized include: (1) mesomeric phosphonium salts possessing phototropic properties; (2) pentavalent phosphorus compounds; and (3) a...Products that have been characterized include: (1) mesomeric phosphonium salts possessing phototropic properties; (2) pentavalent phosphorus compounds; and (3) a mesomeric inner salt . (Author)...Novel phosphonium and phosphorane compounds ere prepared by a variety of m hods from triphenylphosphine and methylene bromide. Products that have

  17. Self-organizing maps applied to two-phase flow on natural circulation loop study; Aplicacao de mapas auto-organizaveis na classificacao de padroes de escoamento bifasico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Leonardo Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    Two-phase flow of liquid and gas is found in many closed circuits using natural circulation for cooling purposes. Natural circulation phenomenon is important on recent nuclear power plant projects for decay heat removal. The Natural Circulation Facility (Circuito de Circulacao Natural CCN) installed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, is an experimental circuit designed to provide thermal hydraulic data related to single and two-phase flow under natural circulation conditions. This periodic flow oscillation behavior can be observed thoroughly in this facility due its glass-made tubes transparency. The heat transfer estimation has been improved based on models that require precise prediction of pattern transitions of flow. This work presents experiments realized at CCN to visualize natural circulation cycles in order to classify two-phase flow patterns associated with phase transients and static instabilities of flow. Images are compared and clustered using Kohonen Self-organizing Maps (SOM's) applied on different digital image features. The Full Frame Discret Cosine Transform (FFDCT) coefficients were used as input for the classification task, enabling good results. FFDCT prototypes obtained can be associated to each flow pattern, enabling a better comprehension of each observed instability. A systematic test methodology was used to verify classifier robustness.

  18. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  19. Study of loop-loop and loop-edge dislocation interactions in bcc iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osetsky, Y.N.; Bacon, D.J.; Gao, F.

    2000-01-01

    that the evolution of heterogeneities such as dislocation decoration and rafts has serious impacts on the mechanical properties on neutron-irradiated metals. In the present work, atomic-scale computer modelling (ASCM) has been applied to study the mechanisms for the formation of such microstructure in bcc iron....... It is shown that glissile clusters with parallel Burgers vectors interact strongly and can form extended immobile complexes, i.e., rafts. Similar attractive interaction exists between dislocation loops and an edge dislocation. These two mechanisms may be responsible for the formation of extended complexes...... of dislocation loops below the extra half-plane of edge dislocations. The interaction energies between loops and between an edge dislocation and loops has been calculated as a function of distance using ASCM and the results for long-range interactions are in good agreement with the results of isotropic...

  20. Salting-out homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction approach applied in sample pre-processing for the quantitative determination of entecavir in human plasma by LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng-Juan; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Yang, Jin; Davey, Andrew K; Wang, Ji-Ping

    2012-01-15

    A convenient, robust, economical and selective sample preparation method for the quantitative determination of entecavir in human plasma by LC-MS was developed and validated. Entecavir and the internal standard of acyclovir were extracted from 500 μL of human plasma by a salting-out homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction approach (SHLLE) with acetonitrile as the organic extractant and magnesium sulfate as the salting-out reagent. They were analyzed on a Hanbon® Lichrospher RP C18 HPLC column (150 mm×2.0 mm; 5 μm) with gradient elution. The mobile phase comprised 0.1% acetic acid-0.2 mmol ammonium acetate in water (mobile phase A) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B). The flow rate is 0.2 mL/min. The analytes were detected by a LC-MS 2010 single quadrupole mass spectrometer instrument equipped with an electrospray ionization interface using selective ion monitoring positive mode. A "post cut" column switch technique was incorporated into the method to remove interferences of earlier and later eluting matrix components than entecavir and internal standard, including salting-out reagent used in sample pre-processing. The method was validated over the concentration range of 0.05-20 ng/mL. The intra-day and inter-day precision of the assay, as measured by the coefficient of variation (%CV), was within 3.59%, and the intra-day assay accuracy was found to be within 4.88%. The average recovery of entecavir was about 50% and the ion suppression was approximately 44% over the standard curve. Comparison of matrix effect between SHLLE and SPE by continuous post column infusion showed that these two methods got similar, slight ion suppression. The SHLLE method has been successfully utilized for the analysis of entecavir in post-dose samples from a clinical study. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. N -loop running should be combined with N -loop matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Johannes; Goodsell, Mark D.; Krauss, Manuel E.; Opferkuch, Toby; Staub, Florian

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the high-scale behavior of Higgs sectors beyond the Standard Model, pointing out that the proper matching of the quartic couplings before applying the renormalization group equations (RGEs) is of crucial importance for reliable predictions at larger energy scales. In particular, the common practice of leading-order parameters in the RGE evolution is insufficient to make precise statements on a given model's UV behavior, typically resulting in uncertainties of many orders of magnitude. We argue that, before applying N -loop RGEs, a matching should even be performed at N -loop order in contrast to common lore. We show both analytical and numerical results where the impact is sizable for three minimal extensions of the Standard Model: a singlet extension, a second Higgs doublet and finally vector-like quarks. We highlight that the known two-loop RGEs tend to moderate the running of their one-loop counterparts, typically delaying the appearance of Landau poles. For the addition of vector-like quarks we show that the complete two-loop matching and RGE evolution hints at a stabilization of the electroweak vacuum at high energies, in contrast to results in the literature.

  2. Newtonian gravity in loop quantum gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Smolin, Lee

    2010-01-01

    We apply a recent argument of Verlinde to loop quantum gravity, to conclude that Newton's law of gravity emerges in an appropriate limit and setting. This is possible because the relationship between area and entropy is realized in loop quantum gravity when boundaries are imposed on a quantum spacetime.

  3. Nonlinear Bayesian Tracking Loops for Multipath Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Closas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies Bayesian filtering techniques applied to the design of advanced delay tracking loops in GNSS receivers with multipath mitigation capabilities. The analysis includes tradeoff among realistic propagation channel models and the use of a realistic simulation framework. After establishing the mathematical framework for the design and analysis of tracking loops in the context of GNSS receivers, we propose a filtering technique that implements Rao-Blackwellization of linear states and a particle filter for the nonlinear partition and compare it to traditional delay lock loop/phase lock loop-based schemes.

  4. Salt cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional associated with system and infrastructure management, looking at automated infrastructure and deployments, then this book is for you. No prior experience of Salt is required.

  5. Approximate Loop Unrolling

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Cancio, Marcelino; Combemale, Benoit; Baudry, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Approximate Unrolling, a loop optimization that reduces execution time and energy consumption, exploiting the existence of code regions that can endure some degree of approximation while still producing acceptable results. This work focuses on a specific kind of forgiving region: counted loops that map a given functions over the elements of an array. Approximate Unrolling transforms loops in a similar way Loop Unrolling does. However, unlike its exact counterpart, our optimizatio...

  6. Blind Loop Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breeding ground for bacteria. The bacteria may produce toxins as well as block the absorption of nutrients. The greater the length of small bowel involved in the blind loop, the greater the chance of bacterial overgrowth. What triggers blind loop syndrome? Blind loop ...

  7. Dietary salt reduction for control of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In developed as well as developing countries, the four main factors affecting blood pressure are high salt intake, low potassium intake, overweight, and low physical activity level. This is also true for the increase in blood pressure with advancing age, occurring in all societies. It is now accepted that excess dietary salt raises blood pressure levels, whereas dietary salt reduction reduces blood pressure and prevents vascular complications.(1 The effect of salt on blood pressure is presumably due to the inability of the kidneys to excrete large amounts of salt, as humans are evolutionary adapted to ingest and excrete less than 1 gram of salt per day.(2 In this connection it should be noted that the more important element in common salt (sodium chloride is the sodium ion, and any restrictions applying to common salt also apply to all food items that contain sodium ions, such as sodium glutamate and baking soda.

  8. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  9. Thermochemical investigation of molten fluoride salts for Generation IV nuclear applications - an equilibrium exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.P.M. van der

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the Molten Salt Reactor, one of the so-called Generation IV future reactors, is that the fuel, a fissile material, which is dissolved in a molten fluoride salt, circulates through a closed circuit. The heat of fission is transferred to a second molten salt coolant loop, the heat of

  10. ELECTRODIALYSIS IN THE CONVERSION STEP OF THE CONCENTRATED SALT SOLUTIONS IN THE PROCESS OF BATTERY SCRAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Niftaliev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The concentrated sodium sulfate solution is formed during the processing of waste battery scrap. A promising way to further treatment of the concentrated salt solution could be the conversion of these salts into acid and bases by electrodialysis, that can be reused in the same technical process cycle. For carrying out the process of conversion of salts into the corresponding acid and base several cells schemes with different combinations of cation, anion and bipolar membranes are used. At this article a comparative analysis of these cells is carried out. In the cells there were used the membranes МC-40, МА-41 and МB-2I. Acid and base solutions with higher concentration may be obtained during the process of electrodialysis in the circulation mode, when a predetermined amount of salt in the closed loop is run through a set of membranes to obtain the desired concentration of the product. The disadvantages of this method are the high cost of buffer tanks and the need to work with small volumes of treated solutions. In industrial applications it is advisable to use continuous electrodialysis with bipolar membranes, since this configuration allows to increase the number of repeating sections, which is necessary to reduce the energy costs. The increase of the removal rate of salts can be achieved by increasing the process steps, and to produce a more concentrated products after the conversion step can be applied electrodialysis-concentrator or evaporator.

  11. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years

  12. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gadbury, Casey [USDOE Carlsbad Field Office, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  13. BPS Wilson loops and Bremsstrahlung function in ABJ(M): a two loop analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Marco S. [Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin,Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Griguolo, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Parmaand INFN Gruppo Collegato di Parma,Viale G.P. Usberti 7/A, 43100 Parma (Italy); Leoni, Matias [Physics Department, FCEyN-UBA & IFIBA-CONICETCiudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Penati, Silvia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicoccaand INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca,Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Seminara, Domenico [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Firenzeand INFN Sezione di Firenze,via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-06-19

    We study a family of circular BPS Wilson loops in N=6 super Chern-Simons-matter theories, generalizing the usual 1/2-BPS circle. The scalar and fermionic couplings depend on two deformation parameters and these operators can be considered as the ABJ(M) counterpart of the DGRT latitudes defined in N=4 SYM. We perform a complete two-loop analysis of their vacuum expectation value, discuss the appearance of framing-like phases and propose a general relation with cohomologically equivalent bosonic operators. We make an all-loop proposal for computing the Bremsstrahlung function associated to the 1/2-BPS cusp in terms of these generalized Wilson loops. When applied to our two-loop result it reproduces the known expression. Finally, we comment on the generalization of this proposal to the bosonic 1/6-BPS case.

  14. The Universal One-Loop Effective Action

    CERN Document Server

    Drozd, Aleksandra; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong

    2016-01-01

    We present the universal one-loop effective action for all operators of dimension up to six obtained by integrating out massive, non-degenerate multiplets. Our general expression may be applied to loops of heavy fermions or bosons, and has been checked against partial results available in the literature. The broad applicability of this approach simplifies one-loop matching from an ultraviolet model to a lower-energy effective field theory (EFT), a procedure which is now reduced to the evaluation of a combination of matrices in our universal expression, without any loop integrals to evaluate. We illustrate the relationship of our results to the Standard Model (SM) EFT, using as an example the supersymmetric stop and sbottom squark Lagrangian and extracting from our universal expression the Wilson coefficients of dimension-six operators composed of SM fields.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Loop Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Tarik; Ku, Jentung; Hoang, Triem T.; Cheung, Mark L.

    1998-01-01

    The primary focus of this study is to model steady-state performance of a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP). The mathematical model is based on the steady-state energy balance equations at each component of the LHP. The heat exchange between each LHP component and the surrounding is taken into account. Both convection and radiation environments are modeled. The loop operating temperature is calculated as a function of the applied power at a given loop condition. Experimental validation of the model is attempted by using two different LHP designs. The mathematical model is tested at different sink temperatures and at different elevations of the loop. Tbc comparison of the calculations and experimental results showed very good agreement (within 3%). This method proved to be a useful tool in studying steady-state LHP performance characteristics.

  16. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  17. Blind Loop Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of tissue that protrude through the intestinal wall (diverticulosis) Certain medical conditions, including Crohn's disease, radiation enteritis, ... History of radiation therapy to the abdomen Diabetes Diverticulosis of the small intestine A blind loop can ...

  18. Open-loop versus closed-loop control of MEMS devices: choices and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovic, B.; Liu, A. Q.; Popa, D.; Cai, H.; Lewis, F. L.

    2005-10-01

    From a controls point of view, micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) can be driven in an open-loop and closed-loop fashion. Commonly, these devices are driven open-loop by applying simple input signals. If these input signals become more complex by being derived from the system dynamics, we call such control techniques pre-shaped open-loop driving. The ultimate step for improving precision and speed of response is the introduction of feedback, e.g. closed-loop control. Unlike macro mechanical systems, where the implementation of the feedback is relatively simple, in the MEMS case the feedback design is quite problematic, due to the limited availability of sensor data, the presence of sensor dynamics and noise, and the typically fast actuator dynamics. Furthermore, a performance comparison between open-loop and closed-loop control strategies has not been properly explored for MEMS devices. The purpose of this paper is to present experimental results obtained using both open- and closed-loop strategies and to address the comparative issues of driving and control for MEMS devices. An optical MEMS switching device is used for this study. Based on these experimental results, as well as computer simulations, we point out advantages and disadvantages of the different control strategies, address the problems that distinguish MEMS driving systems from their macro counterparts, and discuss criteria to choose a suitable control driving strategy.

  19. Exploiting loop level parallelism in nonprocedural dataflow programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Maya B.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are how loop level parallelism is detected in a nonprocedural dataflow program, and how a procedural program with concurrent loops is scheduled. Also discussed is a program restructuring technique which may be applied to recursive equations so that concurrent loops may be generated for a seemingly iterative computation. A compiler which generates C code for the language described below has been implemented. The scheduling component of the compiler and the restructuring transformation are described.

  20. Reconsolidation of Crushed Salt to 250°C Under Hydrostatic and Shear Stress Conditions Scott Broome, Frank Hansen, and SJ Bauer Sandia National Laboratories, Geomechanics Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    Design, analysis and performance assessment of potential salt repositories for heat-generating nuclear waste require knowledge of thermal, mechanical, and fluid transport properties of reconsolidating granular salt. Mechanical properties, Bulk (K) and Elastic (E) Moduli and Poisson's ratio (ν) are functions of porosity which decreases as the surrounding salt creeps inward and compresses granular salt within the rooms, drifts or shafts. To inform salt repository evaluations, we have undertaken an experimental program to determine K, E, and ν of reconsolidated granular salt as a function of porosity and temperature and to establish the deformational processes by which the salt reconsolidates. The experiments will be used to populate the database used in the reconsolidation model developed by Callahan (1999) which accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent on effective stress to account for the effects of porosity. Mine-run salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Program (WIPP) was first dried at 105 °C for a few days. Undeformed right-circular cylindrical sample assemblies of unconsolidated granular salt with an initial porosity of ~ 40%, nominally 10 cm in diameter and 17.5 cm in length, are jacketed in lead. Samples are placed in a pressure vessel and kept at test temperatures of 100, 175 or 250 °C; samples are vented to the atmosphere during the entire test procedure. At these test conditions the consolidating salt is always creeping, the creep rate increases with increasing temperature and stress and decreases as porosity decreases. In hydrostatic tests, confining pressure is increased to 20 MPa with periodic unload/reload loops to determine K. Volume strain increases with increasing temperature. In shear tests at 2.5 and 5 MPa confining pressure, after confining pressure is applied, the crushed salt is subjected to a differential stress, with periodic unload/reload loops to determine E and

  1. The Cinderella loop project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Beene, J.; Coyle, T.; Douglass, J.; Nasraoui, K.; O'Connor, J.; Roames, J.; Scott, M.

    2006-01-01

    The solar loop that formed off the northeast limb of the Sun on 1999 November 6 (a.k.a. the Cinderella loop) is one of the few examples of a loop on the limb observed with all three of the following imaging instruments: the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), the SOHO Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), and the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT). In this project we investigate the temperature differences that result when examining the Cinderella loop with one instrument compared with another. For example, what temperature differences result from the increased spatial resolution between the two EUV imagers? More specifically, given that TRACE and EIT have almost identical temperature response to coronal plasma, does the different spatial resolution of TRACE (with 0.5″ pixels) and EIT (with 2.6″ pixels) produce statistically different results? We find that the answer is no, and that our results do not change after background subtraction. In addition, the spatial resolution of EIT and SXT is similar, but the temperature responses of the two instruments are quite different. The two instruments do not seem to be viewing the same loop strands, and the plasma temperature differences are significant.

  2. Loop quantum gravity; Gravedad cuantica de lazos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullin, J.

    2015-07-01

    Loop quantum gravity is one of the approaches that are being studied to apply the rules of quantum mechanics to the gravitational field described by the theory of General Relativity . We present an introductory summary of the main ideas and recent results. (Author)

  3. Advanced Instrumentation for Molten Salt Flow Measurements at NEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyishimire, Olive

    2017-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy eXperiment Testing (NEXT) Lab at Abilene Christian University is building a Molten Salt Loop to help advance the technology of molten salt reactors (MSR). NEXT Lab's aim is to be part of the solution for the world's top challenges by providing safe, clean, and inexpensive energy, clean water and medical Isotopes. Measuring the flow rate of the molten salt in the loop is essential to the operation of a MSR. Unfortunately, there is no flow meter that can operate in the high temperature and corrosive environment of a molten salt. The ultrasonic transit time method is proposed as one way to measure the flow rate of high temperature fluids. Ultrasonic flow meter uses transducers that send and receive acoustic waves and convert them into electrical signals. Initial work presented here focuses on the setup of ultrasonic transducers. This presentation is the characterization of the pipe-fluid system with water as a baseline for future work.

  4. High-Temperature Salt Pump Review and Guidelines - Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hazelwood, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Fluoride salt cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) concepts include pumps for forced circulation of the primary and secondary coolants. As part of a cooperative research and development agreement between the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a research project was initiated to aid in the development of pumps for high-temperature salts. The objectives of the task included characterization of the behavior of an existing ORNL LSTL pump; design and test a modified impeller and volute for improved pump characteristics; and finally, provide lessons learned, recommendations, and guidelines for salt pump development and design. The pump included on the liquid salt test loop (LSTL) at ORNL served as a case study. This report summarizes the progress to date. The report is organized as follows. First, there is a review, focused on pumps, of the significant amount of work on salts at ORNL during the 1950s 1970s. The existing pump on the LSTL is then described. Plans for hot and cold testing of the pump are then discussed, including the design for a cold shakedown test stand and the required LSTL modifications for hot testing. Initial hydraulic and vibration modeling of the LSTL pump is documented. Later, test data from the LSTL will be used to validate the modeling approaches, which could then be used for future pump design efforts. Some initial insights and test data from the pump are then provided. Finally, some preliminary design goals and requirements for a future LSTL pump are provided as examples of salt pump design considerations.

  5. Inverse spin Hall effect in a closed loop circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, Y.; Auvray, F.; Wakamura, T.; Niimi, Y., E-mail: niimi@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Fert, A. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 91767 Palaiseau France associée à l' Université de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Otani, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); RIKEN-CEMS, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-06-16

    We present measurements of inverse spin Hall effects (ISHEs), in which the conversion of a spin current into a charge current via the ISHE is detected not as a voltage in a standard open circuit but directly as the charge current generated in a closed loop. The method is applied to the ISHEs of Bi-doped Cu and Pt. The derived expression of ISHE for the loop structure can relate the charge current flowing into the loop to the spin Hall angle of the SHE material and the resistance of the loop.

  6. Closing global material loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosman, Ernst-Jan; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Liotta, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Replacing virgin materials with waste materials, a practice known as Industrial Symbiosis (IS), has been identified as a key strategy for closing material loops. This article adopts a critical view on geographic proximity and external coordinators – two key enablers of IS. By ‘uncovering’ a case...... for geographic proximity and external coordinators. In doing so, our insights into firm-level challenges of long-distance IS exchanges contribute to closing global material loops by increasing the number of potential circular pathways....

  7. Hidden-loop colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombeau, J L; Turnbul, R B

    1978-04-01

    Records of 15 patients having hidden-loop colostomies were reviewed. All patients had metastatic colonic cancers with impending obstructions. Six colostomies were subsequently opened because of obstructions due to cancer. All colostomy openings were done using local anesthesia in the emergency room. This technique prevented six major celiotomies and provided additional time of living without a stoma. There were two postoperative stomal prolapses, one of which necessitated reoperation. A hidden-loop colostomy is easily constructed and readily opened. It should be considered at celiotomy for selected patients who have metastatic colonic cancer with impending obstruction.

  8. Thermal coupling within LTP dynamics control loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nofrarias, M; Garcia Marin, A F; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Danzmann, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert Einstein Institut (AEI), Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Lobo, A; Sanjuan, J [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (ICE-CSIC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ramos-Castro, J, E-mail: miquel.nofrarias@aei.mpg.d [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Edifici C4, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The Diagnostic Subsytem in the LISA Technology Package (LTP) on board the LISA Pathfinder mission (LPF) will characterise those external disturbances with a potential impact on the performance of the experiment coming from either thermal, magnetic or charged particles perturbations. A correct design of the experiments to measure these effects in flight requires a closed loop analysis that takes into account the dynamics of the test masses, the force applied by the controllers and those noisy terms (coming from sensing or force noise) that enters into the loop. We describe this analysis in the thermal case and we give a first numerical example of the instrument response to controlled thermal inputs.

  9. Water and salt balances of two shallow groundwater cropping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salt tends to accumulate in poorly drained soils under irrigation if inadequate water and salt management practices are applied. Furthermore, over- irrigation may deteriorate the quality of water resources, because of salt pollution resulting from excessive drainage and leaching (United States Salinity Laboratory Staff, 1954; ...

  10. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  11. LAPAROSCOPIC ILEAL LOOP CONDUIT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Then the right ureter was laparoscopically spa- tulated and anastomosed to the ileostomy opening using interrupted 4/0 vicryl sutures. After finishing half the circumference of the anastomotic line, a 4 Fr. ureteric catheter was introduced through the external stoma of the loop up to the site of the anastomosis with the aid of a ...

  12. Improving Loop Dependence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Programmers can no longer depend on new processors to have significantly improved single-thread performance. Instead, gains have to come from other sources such as the compiler and its optimization passes. Advanced passes make use of information on the dependencies related to loops. We improve th...

  13. Timetable Optimization of Rail Transit Loop Line with Transfer Coordination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shi, Rui-Jia; Mao, Bao-Hua; Ding, Yong; Bai, Yun; Chen, Yao

    2016-01-01

    .... This is performed by adjusting the headways and dwell times of trains on the loop line. A genetic algorithm is applied to solve the proposed model, and a numerical example is used to verify its effectiveness...

  14. Loop Quantum Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2008-4.

  15. PAR Loop Schedule Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, Jr.; W.F.

    1958-04-30

    The schedule for the installation of the PAR slurry loop experiment in the South Facility of the ORR has been reviewed and revised. The design, fabrications and Installation is approximately two weeks behind schedule at this time due to many factors; however, indications are that this time can be made up. Design is estimated to be 75% complete, fabrication 32% complete and installation 12% complete.

  16. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  17. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  18. Sequence motifs capable of forming DNA stem-loop structures act as a replication diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirak, Andrey; Seroussi, Uri; Gootwine, Elisha; Seroussi, Eyal

    2017-07-01

    Calculating peak-height ratios between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) alleles in sequencing chromatograms is a practical method for estimating their copy number proportions (CNPs). However, it is surprising that sequencing DNA from different directions might yield different results. We analyzed three adjacent SNPs within the ovine period circadian-clock 2 (PER2) gene that displayed such behavior. We compared Sanger and DNA-seq sequencing for this locus and applied high-resolution melt and MFOLD analyses to point to the DNA secondary structure that underlined this phenomenon. A synthetic system of oligonucleotides cloned into plasmids was used to further test the effect of such structures on sequencing. Our analyses indicated that a stem-loop structure capable of G-T pairing mediated the orientation bias by stabilizing this structure for specific alleles in heterozygous situations. We propose that this wobble-like pairing hinders DNA polymerase passage on one strand while, on the complementary strand, the nonpaired A-C nucleotide counterparts allow unobstructed replication. Experimentation with synthetic amplicons that form similar stem-loop structures supported our hypothesis. We coined the term 'replication diode' for this effect and demonstrated that we can minimize it by lowering DNA and salt concentration. We also demonstrated that common genomic palindromes might induce the replication diode effect by applying bidirectional sequencing to an amplicon containing the palindrome within the human miRNA 1-1 gene. Hence, to obtain reliable peak-height ratios, bidirectional sequencing should be practiced at the lowest possible ionic strength whenever estimating CNPs. Further research is needed to determine whether the observed variable stem-loop structures affect PER2 regulation in vivo.

  19. Finding the positive feedback loops underlying multi-stationarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2015-05-28

    Bistability is ubiquitous in biological systems. For example, bistability is found in many reaction networks that involve the control and execution of important biological functions, such as signaling processes. Positive feedback loops, composed of species and reactions, are necessary for bistability, and generally for multi-stationarity, to occur. These loops are therefore often used to illustrate and pinpoint the parts of a multi-stationary network that are relevant ('responsible') for the observed multi-stationarity. However positive feedback loops are generally abundant in reaction networks but not all of them are important for understanding the network's dynamics. We present an automated procedure to determine the relevant positive feedback loops of a multi-stationary reaction network. The procedure only reports the loops that are relevant for multi-stationarity (that is, when broken multi-stationarity disappears) and not all positive feedback loops of the network. We show that the relevant positive feedback loops must be understood in the context of the network (one loop might be relevant for one network, but cannot create multi-stationarity in another). Finally, we demonstrate the procedure by applying it to several examples of signaling processes, including a ubiquitination and an apoptosis network, and to models extracted from the Biomodels database. The procedure is implemented in Maple. We have developed and implemented an automated procedure to find relevant positive feedback loops in reaction networks. The results of the procedure are useful for interpretation and summary of the network's dynamics.

  20. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  1. The behaviour of salt and salt caverns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Salts are mined for both storage and extraction purposes, either via dry or solution mining techniques. For operational, environmental and geological purposes, it is important to understand and predict the in situ behaviour of salt, in particular the creep and strength characteristics. A

  2. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivit...

  3. Low-salt diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-sodium diet; Salt restriction ... control many functions. Too much sodium in your diet can be bad for you. For most people, ... you limit salt. Try to eat a balanced diet. Buy fresh vegetables and fruits whenever possible. They ...

  4. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2015-08-06

    Predicting the structure of protein loops is very challenging, mainly because they are not necessarily subject to strong evolutionary pressure. This implies that, unlike the rest of the protein, standard homology modeling techniques are not very effective in modeling their structure. However, loops are often involved in protein function, hence inferring their structure is important for predicting protein structure as well as function.We describe a method, LoopIng, based on the Random Forest automated learning technique, which, given a target loop, selects a structural template for it from a database of loop candidates. Compared to the most recently available methods, LoopIng is able to achieve similar accuracy for short loops (4-10 residues) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has the advantage of being very fast (on average: 1 min/loop).www.biocomputing.it/loopinganna.tramontano@uniroma1.itSupplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  6. Harmonic Oscillator SUSY Partners and Evolution Loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Fernández

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Supersymmetric quantum mechanics is a powerful tool for generating exactly solvable potentials departing from a given initial one. If applied to the harmonic oscillator, a family of Hamiltonians ruled by polynomial Heisenberg algebras is obtained. In this paper it will be shown that the SUSY partner Hamiltonians of the harmonic oscillator can produce evolution loops. The corresponding geometric phases will be as well studied.

  7. Modeling of Salt Solubilities in Mixed Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiavone-Filho, O.; Rasmussen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    constants and the liquid densities of the solvent media. To normalize the activity coefficients, the symmetric convention is adopted. Thermochemical properties of the salt are used to estimate the solubility product. It is shown that the proposed procedure can describe with good accuracy a series of salt......A method to correlate and predict salt solubilities in mixed solvents using a UNIQUAC+Debye-Huckel model is developed. The UNIQUAC equation is applied in a form with temperature-dependent parameters. The Debye-Huckel model is extended to mixed solvents by properly evaluating the dielectric...

  8. Wilson loops as precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susskind, Leonard [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4060 (United States); Toumbas, Nicolaos [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4060 (United States)

    2000-02-15

    There is substantial evidence that string theory on AdS{sub 5}xS{sub 5} is a holographic theory in which the number of degrees of freedom scales as the area of the boundary in Planck units. Precisely how the theory can describe bulk physics using only surface degrees of freedom is not well understood. A particularly paradoxical situation involves an event deep in the interior of the bulk space. The event must be recorded in the (Schroedinger picture) state vector of the boundary theory long before a signal, such as a gravitational wave, can propagate from the event to the boundary. In a previous paper with Polchinski, we argued that the ''precursor'' operators which carry information stored in the wave during the time when it vanishes in a neighborhood of the boundary are necessarily non-local. In this paper we argue that the precursors cannot be products of local gauge invariant operators such as the energy momentum tensor. In fact gauge theories have a class of intrinsically non-local operators which cannot be built from local gauge invariant objects. These are the Wilson loops. We show that the precursors can be identified with Wilson loops whose spatial size is dictated by the UV-IR connection. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  10. Numerical implementation of the loop-tree duality method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchta, Sebastian; Rodrigo, German [Universitat de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Parc Cientific, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Chachamis, Grigorios [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Draggiotis, Petros [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , Agia Paraskevi (Greece)

    2017-05-15

    We present a first numerical implementation of the loop-tree duality (LTD) method for the direct numerical computation of multi-leg one-loop Feynman integrals. We discuss in detail the singular structure of the dual integrands and define a suitable contour deformation in the loop three-momentum space to carry out the numerical integration. Then we apply the LTD method to the computation of ultraviolet and infrared finite integrals, and we present explicit results for scalar and tensor integrals with up to eight external legs (octagons). The LTD method features an excellent performance independently of the number of external legs. (orig.)

  11. Loop securities of arthroscopic sliding-knot techniques when the suture loop is not evenly tensioned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Glaser, Diana; Doan, Josh; Chung, Seok Won; Choi, Hye Yeon; Oh, Joo Han; Hargens, Alan R

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the loop security of arthroscopic sliding knots when tension is only applied to the post strand and not the loop strand. Six different locking sliding knots (Weston, Nicky, Roeder, SMC, San Diego, and Dines) were included. Loop securities were evaluated in 2 ways: with a conventional method (equal tension applied to the suture loop) and with a worst-case scenario (WCS) method (only the post strand of the suture loop was tensioned). Differences between test methods were evaluated for significance. To help assess the applicability of each test method, loop-security testing in a cadaveric shoulder was performed with 1 type of knot (SMC). Loop securities with the conventional method versus the WCS method were as follows: 10.74 ± 4.20 N versus 6.90 ± 3.90 N for Weston, 21.25 ± 14.74 N versus 8.73 ± 3.35 N for Nicky, 26.14 ± 15.57 N versus 7.95 ± 4.23 N for Roeder, 42.67 ± 22.96 N versus 8.67 ± 4.33 N for SMC, 52.99 ± 21.36 N versus 18.25 ± 10.58 N for San Diego, and 89.27 ± 27.96 N versus 12.48 ± 3.40 N for Dines (P security of 5.53 ± 6.06 N, which was similar to the WCS setting. The locking mechanism of the sliding knots is maintained when the suture loop is evenly tensioned at both post and non-post strands. When tension is not applied to the non-post strand side, the knots slide more easily and fail at lower loads than previously reported. When surgeons tie locking sliding knots in single-row rotator cuff repair, they should be aware that the knots could fail at much lower loads than previously reported. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermodynamic Analysis of an Electrochemically Driven Chemical Looping Heat Pump

    OpenAIRE

    James, Nelson A.; Braun, James E.; Groll, Eckhard A.; Horton, W. Travis

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical cells have been widely explored for their use in high efficiency energy systems. In this paper a novel heat pump cycle is proposed which utilizes chemical looping driven by electrochemical cells. Chemical looping is a method that has been applied to various applications such as combustion and air separation. It consists of the cycling of a substance between different chemical compositions in order to produce a desired effect. When the chemical composition of a fluid changes, v...

  13. Two-Loop Four-Gluon Amplitudes from Numerical Unitarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, S.; Cordero, F. Febres; Ita, H.; Jaquier, M.; Page, B.; Zeng, M.

    2017-10-01

    We present the first numerical computation of two-loop amplitudes based on the unitarity method. As a proof of principle, we compute the four-gluon process in the leading-color approximation. We discuss the new method, analyze its numerical properties, and apply it to reconstruct the analytic form of the amplitudes. The numerical method is universal, and can be automated to provide multiscale two-loop computations for phenomenologically relevant signatures at hadron colliders.

  14. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  15. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  16. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  17. Effect of hurricanes and violent storms on salt marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, N.; Ganju, N. K.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marsh losses have been documented worldwide because of land use change, wave erosion, and sea-level rise. It is still unclear how resistant salt marshes are to extreme storms and whether they can survive multiple events without collapsing. Based on a large dataset of salt marsh lateral erosion rates collected around the world, here, we determine the general response of salt marsh boundaries to wave action under normal and extreme weather conditions. As wave energy increases, salt marsh response to wind waves remains linear, and there is not a critical threshold in wave energy above which salt marsh erosion drastically accelerates. We apply our general formulation for salt marsh erosion to historical wave climates at eight salt marsh locations affected by hurricanes in the United States. Based on the analysis of two decades of data, we find that violent storms and hurricanes contribute less than 1% to long-term salt marsh erosion rates. In contrast, moderate storms with a return period of 2.5 mo are those causing the most salt marsh deterioration. Therefore, salt marshes seem more susceptible to variations in mean wave energy rather than changes in the extremes. The intrinsic resistance of salt marshes to violent storms and their predictable erosion rates during moderate events should be taken into account by coastal managers in restoration projects and risk management plans.

  18. Pathophysiology and clinical presentations of salt-losing tubulopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyberth, Hannsjörg W

    2016-03-01

    At least three renal tubular segments are involved in the pathophysiology of salt-losing tubulopathies (SLTs). Whether the pathogenesis starts either in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL) or in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), it is the function of the downstream-localized aldosterone sensitive distal tubule (ASDT) to contribute to the adaptation process. In isolated TAL defects (loop disorders) ASDT adaptation is supported by upregulation of DCT, whereas in DCT disorders the ASDT is complemented by upregulation of TAL function. This upregulation has a major impact on the clinical presentation of SLT patients. Taking into account both the symptoms and signs of primary tubular defect and of the secondary reactions of adaptation, a clinical diagnosis can be made that eventually leads to an appropriate therapy. In addition to salt wasting, as occurs in all SLTs, characteristic features of loop disorders are hypo- or isosthenuric polyuria and hypercalciuria, whereas characteristics of DCT disorders are hypokalemia and (symptomatic) hypomagnesemia. In both SLT categories, replacement of urinary losses is the primary goal of treatment. In loop disorders COX inhibitors are also recommended to mitigate polyuria, and in DCT disorders magnesium supplementation is essential for effective treatment. Of note, the combination of a salt- and potassium-rich diet together with an adequate fluid intake is always the basis of long-term treatment in all SLTs.

  19. Permanent Disposal of Nuclear Waste in Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, F. D.

    2016-12-01

    Salt formations hold promise for eternal removal of nuclear waste from our biosphere. Germany and the United States have ample salt formations for this purpose, ranging from flat-bedded formations to geologically mature dome structures. Both nations are revisiting nuclear waste disposal options, accompanied by extensive collaboration on applied salt repository research, design, and operation. Salt formations provide isolation while geotechnical barriers reestablish impermeability after waste is placed in the geology. Between excavation and closure, physical, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and hydrological processes ensue. Salt response over a range of stress and temperature has been characterized for decades. Research practices employ refined test techniques and controls, which improve parameter assessment for features of the constitutive models. Extraordinary computational capabilities require exacting understanding of laboratory measurements and objective interpretation of modeling results. A repository for heat-generative nuclear waste provides an engineering challenge beyond common experience. Long-term evolution of the underground setting is precluded from direct observation or measurement. Therefore, analogues and modeling predictions are necessary to establish enduring safety functions. A strong case for granular salt reconsolidation and a focused research agenda support salt repository concepts that include safety-by-design. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Author: F. D. Hansen, Sandia National Laboratories

  20. Loop quantum cosmology: Recent progress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aspects of the full theory of loop quantum gravity can be studied in a simpler context by reducing to symmetric models like cosmological ones. This leads to several applications where loop effects play a significant role when one is sensitive to the quantum regime. As a consequence, the structure of and the approach to ...

  1. Dynamics and control of molten-salt breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sing, Vikram; Lish, Matthew R.; Chvala, Ondrej; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Preliminary results of the dynamic analysis of a two-fluid molten-salt breeder reactor (MSBR) system are presented. Based on an earlier work on the preliminary dynamic model of the concept, the model presented here is nonlinear and has been revised to accurately reflect the design exemplified in ORNL-4528. A brief overview of the model followed by results from simulations performed to validate the model is presented. Simulations illustrate stable behavior of the reactor dynamics and temperature feedback effects to reactivity excursions. Stable and smooth changes at various nodal temperatures are also observed. Control strategies for molten-salt reactor operation are discussed, followed by an illustration of the open-loop load-following capability of the molten-salt breeder reactor system. It is observed that the molten-salt breeder reactor system exhibits “self-regulating” behavior, minimizing the need for external controller action for load-following maneuvers.

  2. Salt processed food and gastric cancer in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Si-Hao; Li, Yuan-Hang; Leung, Kayee; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between salt processed food and gastric cancer, a hospital based case-control study was conducted in a high risk area of China. One hundred and seven newly diagnosed cases with histological confirmation of gastric cancer and 209 controls were recruited. Information on dietary intake was collected with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was applied to estimate the odds ratios with adjustment for other potential confounders. Comparing the high intake group with never consumption of salt processed foods, salted meat, pickled vegetables and preserved vegetables were significantly associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Meanwhile, salt taste preference in diet showed a dose-response relationship with gastric cancer. Our results suggest that consumption of salted meat, pickled and preserved vegetables, are positively associated with gastric cancer. Reduction of salt and salt processed food in diets might be one practical measure to preventing gastric cancer.

  3. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  4. SALT for Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Schuster's Suggestive-Accelerative Learning Techniques (SALT) Method, which combines Lozanov's Suggestopedia with such American methods as Asher's Total Physical Response and Galyean's Confluent Education. The article argues that students trained with the SALT Method have higher achievement scores and better attitudes than others. (14…

  5. The loop gravity string

    CERN Document Server

    Freidel, Laurent; Pranzetti, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study canonical gravity in finite regions for which we introduce a generalisation of the Gibbons-Hawking boundary term including the Immirzi parameter. We study the canonical formulation on a spacelike hypersuface with a boundary sphere and show how the presence of this term leads to an unprecedented type of degrees of freedom coming from the restoration of the gauge and diffeomorphism symmetry at the boundary. In the presence of a loop quantum gravity state, these boundary degrees of freedom localize along a set of punctures on the boundary sphere. We demonstrate that these degrees of freedom are effectively described by auxiliary strings with a 3-dimensional internal target space attached to each puncture. We show that the string currents represent the local frame field, that the string angular momenta represent the area flux and that the string stress tensor represents the two dimensional metric on the boundary of the region of interest. Finally, we show that the commutators of these broken...

  6. Antimicrobial Polymeric Materials with Quaternary Ammonium and Phosphonium Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Xue; Huining Xiao; Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric materials containing quaternary ammonium and/or phosphonium salts have been extensively studied and applied to a variety of antimicrobial-relevant areas. With various architectures, polymeric quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts were prepared using different approaches, exhibiting different antimicrobial activities and potential applications. This review focuses on the state of the art of antimicrobial polymers with quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts. In particular, it discusses...

  7. How long is a piece of loop?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonjoo Choi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Loops are irregular structures which connect two secondary structure elements in proteins. They often play important roles in function, including enzyme reactions and ligand binding. Despite their importance, their structure remains difficult to predict. Most protein loop structure prediction methods sample local loop segments and score them. In particular protein loop classifications and database search methods depend heavily on local properties of loops. Here we examine the distance between a loop’s end points (span. We find that the distribution of loop span appears to be independent of the number of residues in the loop, in other words the separation between the anchors of a loop does not increase with an increase in the number of loop residues. Loop span is also unaffected by the secondary structures at the end points, unless the two anchors are part of an anti-parallel beta sheet. As loop span appears to be independent of global properties of the protein we suggest that its distribution can be described by a random fluctuation model based on the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution. It is believed that the primary difficulty in protein loop structure prediction comes from the number of residues in the loop. Following the idea that loop span is an independent local property, we investigate its effect on protein loop structure prediction and show how normalised span (loop stretch is related to the structural complexity of loops. Highly contracted loops are more difficult to predict than stretched loops.

  8. Protein Loop Closure Using Orientational Restraints from NMR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Chittaranjan; Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    Protein loops often play important roles in biological functions such as binding, recognition, catalytic activities and allosteric regulation. Modeling loops that are biophysically sensible is crucial to determining the functional specificity of a protein. A variety of algorithms ranging from robotics-inspired inverse kinematics methods to fragmentbased homology modeling techniques have been developed to predict protein loops. However, determining the 3D structures of loops using global orientational restraints on internuclear vectors, such as those obtained from residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data in solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, has not been well studied. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm that determines the protein loop conformations using a minimal amount of RDC data. Our algorithm exploits the interplay between the sphero-conics derived from RDCs and the protein kinematics, and formulates the loop structure determination problem as a system of low-degree polynomial equations that can be solved exactly and in closed form. The roots of these polynomial equations, which encode the candidate conformations, are searched systematically, using efficient and provable pruning strategies that triage the vast majority of conformations, to enumerate or prune all possible loop conformations consistent with the data. Our algorithm guarantees completeness by ensuring that a possible loop conformation consistent with the data is never missed. This data-driven algorithm provides a way to assess the structural quality from experimental data with minimal modeling assumptions. We applied our algorithm to compute the loops of human ubiquitin, the FF Domain 2 of human transcription elongation factor CA150 (FF2), the DNA damage inducible protein I (DinI) and the third IgG-binding domain of Protein G (GB3) from experimental RDC data. A comparison of our results versus those obtained by using traditional structure determination protocols on the

  9. Resedimented salt deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaczka, A.; Kolasa, K. (Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland))

    1988-08-01

    Carparthian foredeep's Wieliczka salt mine, unique gravity deposits were lately distinguished. They are mainly built of salt particles and blocks with a small admixture of fragments of Miocene marls and Carpathian rocks, deposited on precipitated salt. The pattern of sediment distribution is similar to a submarine fan. Gravels are dominant in the upper part and sands in lower levels, creating a series of lobes. Coarse-grained deposits are represented by disorganized, self-supported conglomerates passing into matrix-supported ones, locally with gradation, and pebbly sandstones consisting of salt grains and scattered boulder-size clasts. The latter may show in the upper part of a single bed as indistinct cross-bedding and parallel lamination. These sediments are interpreted as debris-flow and high-density turbidity current deposits. Salt sandstones (saltstones) which build a lower part of the fan often show Bouma sequences and are interpreted as turbidity-current deposits. The fan deposits are covered by a thick series of debrites (olistostromes) which consist of clay matrix with salt grains and boulders. The latter as represented by huge (up to 100,000 m{sup 3}) salt blocks, fragments of Miocene marls and Carpathian rocks. These salt debrites represent slumps and debris-flow deposits. The material for resedimented deposits was derived from the southern part of the salt basin and from the adjacent, advancing Carpathian orogen. The authors believe the distinct coarsening-upward sequence of the series is the result of progressive intensification of tectonic movements with paroxysm during the sedimentation of salt debrites (about 15 Ma).

  10. Formation and Properties of Molecular Loops at Polymeric Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. Kevin

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the formation, kinetics, and resultant strength improvements of multiply bound polymer loops at multicomponent polymeric interfaces. We have first studied a model system consisting of a silicon substrate, an epoxy terminated monolayer, and dicarboxy terminated polystyrene to characterize the formation of the surface bound molecular loops. Interfacial strength improvement via loop formation in this model system has also been investigated using asymmetric double cantilever beam (ADCB) analysis. Further, the kinetics of loop formation at a soft interface between polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) has been investigated with neutron reflectivity. This data will then be used to apply the technique to a range of real systems, such as layered-silicate or carbon nanotube filled polymeric systems, with the goal of improving dispersion and desired property enhancement within these systems.

  11. The modified Altemeier procedure for a loop colostomy prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Makoto; Murakami, Masahiko; Ozawa, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Marie; Yamazaki, Kimiyasu; Fujimori, Akira; Otsuka, Koji; Aoki, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Loop colostomy prolapse is associated with an impaired quality of life. Surgical treatment may sometimes be required for cases that cannot be closed by colon colostomy because of high-risk morbidities or advanced disease. We applied the Altimeter operation for patients with transverse loop colostomy. The Altemeier operation is therefore indicated for rectal prolapse. This technique involves a simple operation, which includes a circumferential incision through the full thickness of the outer and inner cylinder of the prolapsed limb, without incising the abdominal wall, and anastomosis with sutures using absorbable thread. We performed the Altemeier operation for three cases of loop stomal prolapse. Those patients demonstrated no postoperative complications (including obstruction, prolapse recurrence, or hernia). Our findings suggest that this procedure is useful as an optional surgical treatment for cases of transverse loop colostomy prolapse as a permanent measure in patients with high-risk morbidities or advanced disease.

  12. Water purification using organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  13. Advanced Hardware Protection of Metallic Loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mach Václav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the advanced protection of metallic loops using addition electronic components. The main goal of this article is to improve especially Advanced Technology Zone (ATZ, which is the most applied method. The improvement consists of protection against overvoltage which can destroy the Control and Indicating Equipment (CIE and it consist of adding more states which have the impact of numbers of connected detectors. All ideas are introduced with technical details, schematic and every idea also comes with an explanation.

  14. Extracting information from the molten salt database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzuric, Slobodan; Suh, Changwon; Gaune-Escard, Marcelle; Rajan, Krishna

    2006-12-01

    Molten salt technology is a catchall phrase that includes some very diverse technologies; electrochemistry, heat transfer, chemical oxidation/reduction baths, and nuclear reactors. All of these technologies are linked by the general characteristics of molten salts that can function as solvents, have good heat-transfer characteristics, function like a fluid, can attain very high temperatures, can conduct electricity, and also may have chemical catalytic properties. The Janz molten salt database is the most comprehensive compilation of property data about molten salts available today and is widely used for both fundamental and applied purposes. Databases are traditionally viewed as “static” documents that are used in a “search and retrieval” mode. These static data can be transformed by informatics and data mining tools into a dynamic dataset for analysis of the properties of the, materials and for making predictions. While this approch has been successful in the chemical and biochemical sciences in searching for and establishing structure-property relationships, it is not widely used in the materials science community. Because the design of the original molten salt database was not oriented toward this informatics goal, it was essential to evaluate this dataset in terms of data mining standards. Two techniques were used—a projection (principal components analysis (PCA)) and a predictive method (partial least squares (PLS))—in conjunction with fundamental knowledge acquired from the long-term practice of molten salt chemistry.

  15. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  16. Numerical simulation of ice-load induced salt movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Joerg; Al-Hseinat, Muayyad; Brandes, Christian; Hampel, Andrea; Hübscher, Christian; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    A correlation between salt structures, glacigenic features and faulting of Pleistocene deposits above salt structures has been recognised in many places of the formerly glaciated areas in northern central Europe and attributed to ice-sheet loading. Conceptual models predict that the load applied by an ice sheet will favour ice-marginal salt rise and obstruct salt rise beneath the ice sheet (e.g., Liszkowski, 1993). To test these models, we simulated the response of salt structures to ice-sheet loading using a 2D finite-element model (ABAQUS). The subsurface geometries used in our models are based on regional geological cross-sections and 2D seismic profiles of salt structures in the Central European Basin System. The model layers represent (i) sedimentary rocks of elastoplastic rheology, (ii) a viscoelastic salt structure and (iii) elastoplastic basement rocks. At the model surface a temporarily and spatially variable pressure simulates ice-sheet loading. All our simulations show a response of salt structures to ice-sheet loading, which strongly depends on the location of the ice margin relative to the salt structure. Salt structures rise in front of the ice margin (up to 4 m), if load is applied to the salt source layer. Beneath an ice sheet salt structures are pushed down (up to 36 m). Much of the subglacial downwards displacement is compensated by a reversal of the movement during ice retreat. The resulting surface displacements are therefore rather low and depend on the spatial and temporal configuration of the ice load (Lang et al., 2014). Permanent deformation is restricted to the model layers above the salt structure, which either have a low yield stress to represent the unconsolidated infill of secondary rim-synclines or are dissected by steeply dipping crestal graben faults. Ice-induced salt movements will reactivate faults above the crests of salt structures, although the resulting displacements will be low due to the repeated reversals of the sense of

  17. Amine salts of nitroazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1993-10-26

    Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

  18. What Are Bath Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reports of people becoming psychotic (losing touch with reality) and violent. Although it is rare, there have ... in bath salts can produce: feelings of joy increased social interaction increased sex drive paranoia nervousness hallucinations ( ...

  19. Invasive Knotweeds are Highly Tolerant to Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouifed, Soraya; Byczek, Coline; Laffray, Daniel; Piola, Florence

    2012-12-01

    Japanese knotweed s.l. are some of the most invasive plants in the world. Some genotypes are known to be tolerant to the saline concentrations found in salt marshes. Here we focus on tolerance to higher concentrations in order to assess whether the species are able to colonize and establish in highly stressful environments, or whether salt is an efficient management tool. In a first experiment, adult plants of Fallopia japonica, Fallopia × bohemica and Fallopia sachalinensis were grown under salt stress conditions by watering with saline concentrations of 6, 30, 120, or 300 g L-1 for three weeks to assess the response of the plants to a spill of salt. At the two highest concentrations, their leaves withered and fell. There were no effects on the aboveground parts at the lowest concentrations. Belowground dry weight and number of buds were reduced from 30 and 120 g L-1 of salt, respectively. In a second experiment, a single spraying of 120 g L-1 of salt was applied to individuals of F. × bohemica and their stems were clipped to assess the response to a potential control method. 60 % of the plants regenerated. Regeneration was delayed by the salt treatment and shoot growth slowed down. This study establishes the tolerance of three Fallopia taxa to strong salt stress, with no obvious differences between taxa. Their salt tolerance could be an advantage in their ability to colonize polluted environments and to survive to spills of salt.

  20. Variance-based Salt Body Reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Ovcharenko, Oleg

    2017-05-26

    Seismic inversions of salt bodies are challenging when updating velocity models based on Born approximation- inspired gradient methods. We propose a variance-based method for velocity model reconstruction in regions complicated by massive salt bodies. The novel idea lies in retrieving useful information from simultaneous updates corresponding to different single frequencies. Instead of the commonly used averaging of single-iteration monofrequency gradients, our algorithm iteratively reconstructs salt bodies in an outer loop based on updates from a set of multiple frequencies after a few iterations of full-waveform inversion. The variance among these updates is used to identify areas where considerable cycle-skipping occurs. In such areas, we update velocities by interpolating maximum velocities within a certain region. The result of several recursive interpolations is later used as a new starting model to improve results of conventional full-waveform inversion. An application on part of the BP 2004 model highlights the evolution of the proposed approach and demonstrates its effectiveness.

  1. Iodized Salt Use and Salt Iodine Content among Household Salts from Six Districts of Eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwada, S; Gelal, B; Tamang, M K; Kc, R; Singh, S; Lamsal, M; Baral, N

    2014-01-01

    Universal salt iodization is considered the best strategy for controlling iodine deficiency disorders in Nepal. This study was done to find iodized salt use among Nepalese population and the iodine content of household salts. Six districts (Siraha, Saptari, Jhapa, Udayapur, Ilam and Panchthar) were chosen randomly from 16 districts of eastern Nepal for the study. In each district, three schools (private and government) were chosen randomly for sample collection. A total of 1803 salt samples were collected from schools of those districts. For sample collection a clean air tight plastic pouch was provided to each school child and was asked to bring approximately 15 gm of their kitchen salt. The information about type of salt used; 'two child logo' iodized salt or crystal salt was obtained from each child and salt iodine content was estimated using iodometric titration. At the time of study, 85% (n=1533) of Nepalese households were found to use iodized salt whereas 15% (n=270) used crystal salt. The mean iodine content in iodized and crystal salt was 40.8±12.35 ppm and 18.43±11.49 ppm respectively. There was significant difference between iodized and crystal salts use and salt iodine content of iodized and crystal salt among different districts (p value <0.001 at confidence level of 95%). Of the total samples, only 169 samples (9.4% of samples) have iodine content<15 ppm. Most Nepalese households have access to iodized salt most salt samples have sufficient iodine content.

  2. Not salt taste perception but self-reported salt eating habit predicts actual salt intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hajeong; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    Excessive dietary salt intake is related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although dietary salt restriction is essential, it is difficult to achieve because of salt palatability. However, the association between salt perception or salt eating habit and actual salt intake remains uncertain. In this study, we recruited 74 healthy young individuals. We investigated their salt-eating habits by questionnaire and salt taste threshold through a rating scale that used serial dilution of a sodium chloride solution. Predicted 24-hr urinary salt excretions using Kawasaki's and Tanaka's equations estimated dietary salt intake. Participants' mean age was 35 yr, and 59.5% were male. Salt sense threshold did not show any relationship with actual salt intake and a salt-eating habit. However, those eating "salty" foods showed higher blood pressure (P for trend=0.048) and higher body mass index (BMI; P for trend=0.043). Moreover, a salty eating habit was a significant predictor for actual salt intake (regression coefficient [β] for Kawasaki's equation 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-2.69, P=0.048; β for Tanaka's equation 0.66, 95% CI 0.01-1.31, P=0.047). In conclusion, a self-reported salt-eating habit, not salt taste threshold predicts actual salt intake.

  3. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  4. Study of the Open Loop and Closed Loop Oscillator Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imel, George R. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Baker, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riley, Tony [Knolls Atomic Power Lab. (KAPL), Schenectady, NY (United States); Langbehn, Adam [Puget Sound Naval Base, Bremerton, WA (United States); Aryal, Harishchandra [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Benzerga, M. Lamine [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2015-04-11

    This report presents the progress and completion of a five-year study undertaken at Idaho State University of the measurement of very small worth reactivity samples comparing open and closed loop oscillator techniques.The study conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of the two techniques with regard to uncertainties in reactivity values, i.e., limited by reactor noise. As those results are thoroughly documented in recent publications, in this report we will concentrate on the support work that was necessary. For example, we describe in some detail the construction and calibration of a pilot rod for the closed loop system. We discuss the campaign to measure the required reactor parameters necessary for inverse-kinetics. Finally, we briefly discuss the transfer of the open loop technique to other reactor systems.

  5. Electrokinetic removal of salt from brick masonry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2006-01-01

    A method to effectively remove salts from masonry is lacking. The present study aims at determining the removal efficiency of salts from bricks in an applied low current electric DC field. At first an investigation on removal of NaCl and Na(NO3)2 from spiked bricks in laboratory scale was conducted......, a cathode and an anode, that were placed on a masonry wall of an old stable. The masonry had a high concentration of nitrates and problems with hygroscopic moisture. The electrodes consisted of reinforcement steel in carbonate-rich clay. The clay was chosen mainly to improve electric contact between metal...

  6. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from

  7. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure >15mmHg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% Females, 16% Blacks, BMI 28.5±4.2 Kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mmHg) as compared to high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mmHg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dl, 10.8±7.3 mIU/L and 2.6±1.9) as compared to high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dl, 9.4±5.8 mIU/L and 2.1±1.4) (p salt sensitive (N=193) versus salt resistant (N=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in HOMA on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt resistant subjects (p=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in HOMA after including age, BMI, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. PMID:25185125

  8. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop AntennaPrinted Slot Loop Antenna (invited)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel verticall A novel vertically polarized dpolarize , omnidirection omnidirectional l , printed slot loop antenna h sprinted slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated, and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform a...

  9. A self-organizing algorithm for modeling protein loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Liu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein loops, the flexible short segments connecting two stable secondary structural units in proteins, play a critical role in protein structure and function. Constructing chemically sensible conformations of protein loops that seamlessly bridge the gap between the anchor points without introducing any steric collisions remains an open challenge. A variety of algorithms have been developed to tackle the loop closure problem, ranging from inverse kinematics to knowledge-based approaches that utilize pre-existing fragments extracted from known protein structures. However, many of these approaches focus on the generation of conformations that mainly satisfy the fixed end point condition, leaving the steric constraints to be resolved in subsequent post-processing steps. In the present work, we describe a simple solution that simultaneously satisfies not only the end point and steric conditions, but also chirality and planarity constraints. Starting from random initial atomic coordinates, each individual conformation is generated independently by using a simple alternating scheme of pairwise distance adjustments of randomly chosen atoms, followed by fast geometric matching of the conformationally rigid components of the constituent amino acids. The method is conceptually simple, numerically stable and computationally efficient. Very importantly, additional constraints, such as those derived from NMR experiments, hydrogen bonds or salt bridges, can be incorporated into the algorithm in a straightforward and inexpensive way, making the method ideal for solving more complex multi-loop problems. The remarkable performance and robustness of the algorithm are demonstrated on a set of protein loops of length 4, 8, and 12 that have been used in previous studies.

  10. Comparison of an empirical and a theoretical linear solvation energy relationship applied to the characterization of solute distribution in a poly(ethylene) glycol-salt aqueous biphasic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Jonathan G; Willauer, Heather D; Burney, Marcel T; Tate, Lakeshia J; Carruth, Ashley D; Rogers, Robin D

    2004-01-01

    A Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER) developed by Abraham has been applied to the partition of organic solutes in an Aqueous Biphasic System (ABS) and to published values of their 1-octanol/water partition coefficients. The results are compared to the application of a conceptually similar Theoretical Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (TLSER) developed by Famini and co-workers. Differences and similarities in the molecular properties highlighted by each LSER are discussed. The theoretical relationship of Famini, although modeled on the approach of Abraham, seems not to encapsulate molecular properties in the same way as the Abraham's empirical relationship. However, this theoretical approach has the great merit of computational simplicity, and it is concluded that efforts directed toward its improvement could be rewarding.

  11. Loop for the observation of film temperature effects on decomposition (LOFTED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Chemistry; Kolb, William J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Concentrating Solar Technologies Dept.; Briggs, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Concentrating Solar Technologies Dept.; Christian, Joshua Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Concentrating Solar Technologies Dept.; Ray, Daniel A [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Concentrating Solar Technologies Dept.; Gill, David. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Concentrating Solar Technologies Dept.; Kelton, John W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Concentrating Solar Technologies Dept.; Chisman, Kye Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Concentrating Solar Technologies Dept.

    2014-09-01

    Molten nitrate salt Loop for the Observation of Film Temperature Effects on Decomposition (LOFTED) was designed, fabricated, and tested. This unique experimental arrangement allowed a 60/40 molten nitrate salt to be continuously pumped through a Haynes 230 pipe, allowing simulation of a solar receiver. The wall temperature was held at 670°C during the test and the bulk temperature range from 600-610°C for approximately 1200 hours. Salt decomposition was tested using a calibrated total alkalinity methodology to assess oxide content over time. Several alloys (347SS, HR-224, In625-SQ, Haynes 230) were tested for corrosion performance over the duration of the study and compared to previous static tests. Results yielded nearly a tenfold increase in corrosion rate as compared to 600°C, owing to the need to understand the effects of flow and mass transport on corrosion in molten salt environments.

  12. Closed loop obstruction: pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbengue, A; Ndiaye, A; Soko, T O; Sahnoun, M; Fall, A; Diouf, C T; Régent, D; Diakhaté, I C

    2015-02-01

    Closed loop obstruction occurs when a segment of bowel is incarcerated at two contiguous points. The diagnosis is based on multiple transitional zones. The incarcerated loops appear in U or C form or present a radial layout around the location of the obstruction. It's very important to specify the type of obstruction because, in patients with simple bowel obstruction, a conservative approach is often advised. On the other hand, a closed loop obstruction immediately requires a surgical approach because of its high morbidity and the risk of death in case of a late diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Effective potential at three loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2017-11-01

    I present the effective potential at three-loop order for a general renormalizable theory, using the MS ¯ renormalization scheme and Landau gauge fixing. As applications and illustrative points of reference, the results are specialized to the supersymmetric Wess-Zumino model and to the standard model. In each case, renormalization group scale invariance provides a consistency check. In the Wess-Zumino model, the required vanishing of the minimum vacuum energy yields an additional check. For the standard model, I carry out the resummation of Goldstone boson contributions, which provides yet more opportunities for nontrivial checks, and obtain the minimization condition for the Higgs vacuum expectation value at full three-loop order. An infrared divergence due to doubled photon propagators appears in the three-loop standard model effective potential, but it does not affect the minimization condition or physical observables and can be eliminated by resummation.

  14. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  15. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  16. Measurement of spontaneous Brillouin scattering in optical fiber with a fiber Bragg grating Sagnac loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lixun; Dai, Zhiyong; Liu, Yongzhi

    2008-04-01

    A novel method for direct optical detection of spontaneous Brillouin scattering in optical fiber by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) Sagnac loop is introduced. The transmission character as an optical filter of FBG Sagnac loop is investigated theoretically. The filter which is based on an asymmetric grating Sagnac loop is manufactured and used in the measurement of spontaneous Brillouin scattering sensing system, and the separation of backscattered spontaneous Brillouin from Rayleigh is achieved effectively. It is demonstrated that the fiber grating Sagnac loop filter can be applied in the distributed sensing system based on spontaneous Brillouin scattering.

  17. Evolution of nanoscale interstitial dislocation loops under coupling effect of stress and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ning; Shen, Tielong; Kurtz, Richard; Wang, Zhiguang; Gao, Fei

    2017-07-01

    The properties of nano-scale interstitial dislocation loops under the coupling effect of stress and temperature are studied using atomistic simulation methods and experiments. The decomposition of a loop by the emission of smaller loops is identified as one of the major mechanisms to release the localized stress induced by the coupling effect, which is validated by the TEM observations. The classical conservation law of Burgers vector cannot be applied during such decomposition process. The dislocation network is formed from the decomposed loops, which may initiate the irradiation creep much earlier than expected through the mechanism of climb-controlled glide of dislocations.

  18. Percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Han, Yoon Hee

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of afferent loop syndrome, jejunostomy or Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy have tended to represent the preferred procedures. In patients who are not good candidates for surgery, palliative treatment-i.e., percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or percutaneous direct transperitoneal jejunostomy techniques-have been applied. Transhepatic biliary drainage confers a risk of ascending cholangitis. Direct percutaneous transperitoneal drainage may be impractical when overlying bowel loops prevent access to deeply located afferent loops. In the present case, percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma was performed successfully for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

  19. LISA Pathfinder: OPD loop characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Michael; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The optical metrology system (OMS) of the LISA Pathfinder mission is measuring the distance between two free-floating test masses with unprecedented precision. One of the four OMS heterodyne interferometers reads out the phase difference between the reference and the measurement laser beam. This phase from the reference interferometer is common to all other longitudinal interferometer read outs and therefore subtracted. In addition, the phase is fed back via the digital optical pathlength difference (OPD) control loop to keep it close to zero. Here, we analyse the loop parameters and compare them to on-ground measurement results.

  20. Chinese Magic in Loop Integrals

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, B. F. L.

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to higher point loop integrals using Chinese magic in the virtual loop integration variable. We show, using the five point function in the important e^+e^-\\to f\\bar{f}+\\gamma process for ISR as a pedagogical vehicle, that we get an expression for it directly reduced to one scalar 5-point function and 4-, 3-, and 2- point integrals, thereby avoiding the computation of the usual three tensor 5-pt Passarino-Veltman reduction. We argue that this offers potential for greater...

  1. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  2. Salt deposition at particle contact points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiaodong; Evitts, Richard W.; Besant, Robert W.; Kennell, Glyn F.

    2015-09-01

    Caking may occur when granular potash fertilizer with a moisture content greater than 0.25 % (w/w) undergoes drying. Since cake strength is proportional to the mass of crystal deposited per unit volume near contact points (and other factors) the modelling of mass deposition near contact points is important. The Young-Laplace equation for the air-salt-solution interface is used to determine the geometry of a 2-D planar saline film between two cubic potash particles. A 2-D theoretical model is developed and applied for ion diffusion and deposition near the contact point during drying. The numerical predictions of ion diffusion in an initially saturated salt illustrate the transient spatial distribution of new KCl deposits along the solid surfaces near the contact line. These results indicate the average salt deposition commences at the air-liquid-solid intersection, where the liquid film is thinnest, and moves toward the particle contact point with increasing area averaged KCl deposits, causing the formation of crystal deposits and bridges near contact points. It is concluded that the average salt deposit height increases inversely with distance from the contact point and decreases with initial contact angle of the contact region, but the deposition is nearly independent of the evaporation or drying rate near each contact region. Caking strength depends on, among other parameters, the amount of salt deposition near contact points.

  3. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  4. New Hamiltonian constraint operator for loop quantum gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A new symmetric Hamiltonian constraint operator is proposed for loop quantum gravity, which is well defined in the Hilbert space of diffeomorphism invariant states up to non-planar vertices with valence higher than three. It inherits the advantage of the original regularization method to create new vertices to the spin networks. The quantum algebra of this Hamiltonian is anomaly-free on shell, and there is less ambiguity in its construction in comparison with the original method. The regularization procedure for this Hamiltonian constraint operator can also be applied to the symmetric model of loop quantum cosmology, which leads to a new quantum dynamics of the cosmological model.

  5. Gas releases from salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  6. Mechanism for salt scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, John J., II

    Salt scaling is superficial damage caused by freezing a saline solution on the surface of a cementitious body. The damage consists of the removal of small chips or flakes of binder. The discovery of this phenomenon in the early 1950's prompted hundreds of experimental studies, which clearly elucidated the characteristics of this damage. In particular it was shown that a pessimum salt concentration exists, where a moderate salt concentration (˜3%) results in the most damage. Despite the numerous studies, the mechanism responsible for salt scaling has not been identified. In this work it is shown that salt scaling is a result of the large thermal expansion mismatch between ice and the cementitious body, and that the mechanism responsible for damage is analogous to glue-spalling. When ice forms on a cementitious body a bi-material composite is formed. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ice is ˜5 times that of the underlying body, so when the temperature of the composite is lowered below the melting point, the ice goes into tension. Once this stress exceeds the strength of the ice, cracks initiate in the ice and propagate into the surface of the cementitious body, removing a flake of material. The glue-spall mechanism accounts for all of the characteristics of salt scaling. In particular, a theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the pessimum concentration is a consequence of the effect of brine pockets on the mechanical properties of ice, and that the damage morphology is accounted for by fracture mechanics. Finally, empirical evidence is presented that proves that the glue-small mechanism is the primary cause of salt scaling. The primary experimental tool used in this study is a novel warping experiment, where a pool of liquid is formed on top of a thin (˜3 mm) plate of cement paste. Stresses in the plate, including thermal expansion mismatch, result in warping of the plate, which is easily detected. This technique revealed the existence of

  7. Oxygen sparging of residue salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, E.; Griego, W.J.; Owens, S.D.; Thorn, C.W.; Vigil, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    Oxygen sparge is a process for treating salt residues at Los Alamos National Laboratory by sparging oxygen through molten salts. Oxygen reacts with the plutonium trichloride in these salts to form plutonium dioxide. There is further reaction of the plutonium dioxide with plutonium metal and the molten salt to form plutonium oxychloride. Both of the oxide plutonium species are insoluble in the salt and collect atthe bottom of the crucible. This results in a decrease of a factor of 2--3 in the amount of salt that must be treated, and the amount of waste generated by aqueous treatment methods.

  8. Dirac Induction for loop groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma, H.

    2011-01-01

    Using a coset version of the cubic Dirac operators for affine Lie algebras, we give an algebraic construction of the Dirac induction homomorphism for loop group representations. With this, we prove a homogeneous generalization of the Weyl-Kac character formula and show compatibility with Dirac

  9. Loop quantum cosmology and singularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyve, Ward

    2017-08-15

    Loop quantum gravity is believed to eliminate singularities such as the big bang and big crunch singularity. This belief is based on studies of so-called loop quantum cosmology which concerns symmetry-reduced models of quantum gravity. In this paper, the problem of singularities is analysed in the context of the Bohmian formulation of loop quantum cosmology. In this formulation there is an actual metric in addition to the wave function, which evolves stochastically (rather than deterministically as the case of the particle evolution in non-relativistic Bohmian mechanics). Thus a singularity occurs whenever this actual metric is singular. It is shown that in the loop quantum cosmology for a homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-time with arbitrary constant spatial curvature and cosmological constant, coupled to a massless homogeneous scalar field, a big bang or big crunch singularity is never obtained. This should be contrasted with the fact that in the Bohmian formulation of the Wheeler-DeWitt theory singularities may exist.

  10. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Barrau, A

    2014-01-01

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  11. Scalar one-loop integrals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.; Hooft, G. 't

    1979-01-01

    The completely general one-loop scalar one-, two-, three- and four-point functions are studied. Also an integral occurring in connection with soft bremsstrahlung is considered. Formulas in terms of Spence functions are given. An expansion for Spence functions with complex argument is presented.

  12. Two loops in eleven dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Michael B.; Vanhove, Pierre; Green, Michael B.; Kwon, Hwang-h.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    The two-loop Feynman diagram contribution to the four-graviton amplitude of eleven-dimensional supergravity compactified on a two-torus, T^2, is analyzed in detail. The Schwinger parameter integrations are re-expressed as integration over the moduli space of a second torus, \\hat T^2, which enables the leading low-momentum contribution to be evaluated in terms of maps of \\hat T^2 into T^2. The ultraviolet divergences associated with boundaries of moduli space are regularized in a manner that is consistent with the expected duality symmetries of string theory. This leads to an exact expression for terms of order contraction of four Weyl tensors), thereby extending earlier results for the R^4 term that were based on the one-loop eleven-dimensional amplitude. Precise agreement is found with terms in type IIA and IIB superstring theory that arise from the low energy expansion of the tree-level and one-loop string amplitudes and predictions are made for the coefficients of certain two-loop string theory terms as we...

  13. Numerical model of halite precipitation in porous sedimentary rocks adjacent to salt diapirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyuan; Reuning, Lars; Marquart, Gabriele; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Pengyun

    2017-10-01

    Salt diapirs are commonly seen in the North Sea. Below the Zechstein Group exist possibly overpressured salt-anhydrite formations. One explanation as to the salt precipitation in areas with salt diapirs is that salt cementation is thermally driven and occurs strongly in places adjacent to salt diapirs. This paper assumes that the sealing effect of the cap rock above the salt formations is compromised and overpressured fluids, carrying dissolved minerals such as anhydrite (CaSO4) and salt mineral components (NaCl of halite), flow into the porous sedimentary layers above the salt formations. Additionally, a salt-diapir-like structure is assumed to be at one side of the model. The numerical flow and heat transport simulator SHEMAT-Suite was developed and applied to calculating the concentrations of species, and dissolution and precipitation amounts. Results show that the overpressured salt-anhydrite formations have higher pressure heads and the species elements sodium and chlorite are transported into porous sediment rocks through water influx (saturated brine). Halite can precipitate as brine with sodium and chlorite ions flows to the cooler environment. Salt cementation of reservoir rocks leads to decreasing porosity and permeability near salt domes, and cementation of reservoir formations decreases with growing distance to the salt diapir. The proposed approach in this paper can also be used to evaluate precipitation relevant to scaling problems in geothermal engineering.

  14. Semi-numerical evaluation of one-loop corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, R.K.; Giele, W.T.; Zanderighi, G.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    We present a semi-numerical algorithm to calculate one-loop virtual corrections to scattering amplitudes. The divergences of the loop amplitudes are regulated using dimensional regularization. We treat in detail the case of amplitudes with up to five external legs and massless internal lines, although the method is more generally applicable. Tensor integrals are reduced to generalized scalar integrals, which in turn are reduced to a set of known basis integrals using recursion relations. The reduction algorithm is modified near exceptional configurations to ensure numerical stability. To test the procedure we apply these techniques to one-loop corrections to the Higgs to four quark process for which analytic results have recently become available.

  15. Ground Loop Impedance of Long EHV Cable Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohno, Teruo; Bak, Claus Leth; Sørensen, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    The distance protection scheme without communication is often applied to the backup protection of EHV cable lines. For a reliable operation of a ground distance relay, the ground loop impedance of EHV cable lines needs to have a linear relationship to the distance from the relay location...... to the fault location. The discontinuity of the ground loop impedance at cross-bonding points may have an ill effect on the reliable operation of the ground distance relay. However, the cause and parameters of the discontinuity and its effects on the ground distance relay protection have not been discussed...... in literature. Through the calculation of the ground loop impedance for cable lines, it has been found that, for long EHV cable lines, the reliable operation of the ground distance relay is possible with a typical relay setting. Effects of parameters, such as substation grounding, cable layouts...

  16. Massive loop corrections for collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yundin, Valery

    2012-02-01

    In this thesis we discuss the problem of evaluation of tensor integrals appearing in a typical one-loop Feynman diagram calculation. We present a computer library for the numerical evaluation of tensor integrals with up to 5 legs and arbitrary kinematics. The code implements algorithms based on the formalism which avoids the appearance of inverse Gram determinants in the reduction of pentagon diagrams. The Gram determinants of box integrals are isolated in the set of new basis integrals by using dimensional recurrence relations. These integrals are then evaluated by dimensional recurrence or expansion in small Gram determinant, which is improved by Pade extrapolation. A cache system allows reuse of identical building blocks and increases the efficiency. After describing the cross checks and accuracy tests, we show a sample application to the evaluation of five gluon helicity amplitudes, which is compared with the output of the program NGluon. In the last part the program is applied to the calculation of the one-loop virtual corrections to the muon pair production with hard photon emission. The computation method is explained, followed by a discussion of renormalization and pole structure. Finally, we present numerical results for differential cross sections with kinematics of the KLOE and BaBar detectors.

  17. Black holes in loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alejandro

    2017-12-01

    This is a review of results on black hole physics in the context of loop quantum gravity. The key feature underlying these results is the discreteness of geometric quantities at the Planck scale predicted by this approach to quantum gravity. Quantum discreteness follows directly from the canonical quantization prescription when applied to the action of general relativity that is suitable for the coupling of gravity with gauge fields, and especially with fermions. Planckian discreteness and causal considerations provide the basic structure for the understanding of the thermal properties of black holes close to equilibrium. Discreteness also provides a fresh new look at more (at the moment) speculative issues, such as those concerning the fate of information in black hole evaporation. The hypothesis of discreteness leads, also, to interesting phenomenology with possible observational consequences. The theory of loop quantum gravity is a developing program; this review reports its achievements and open questions in a pedagogical manner, with an emphasis on quantum aspects of black hole physics.

  18. Black holes in loop quantum gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alejandro

    2017-12-01

    This is a review of results on black hole physics in the context of loop quantum gravity. The key feature underlying these results is the discreteness of geometric quantities at the Planck scale predicted by this approach to quantum gravity. Quantum discreteness follows directly from the canonical quantization prescription when applied to the action of general relativity that is suitable for the coupling of gravity with gauge fields, and especially with fermions. Planckian discreteness and causal considerations provide the basic structure for the understanding of the thermal properties of black holes close to equilibrium. Discreteness also provides a fresh new look at more (at the moment) speculative issues, such as those concerning the fate of information in black hole evaporation. The hypothesis of discreteness leads, also, to interesting phenomenology with possible observational consequences. The theory of loop quantum gravity is a developing program; this review reports its achievements and open questions in a pedagogical manner, with an emphasis on quantum aspects of black hole physics.

  19. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized...

  20. Learning SaltStack

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Colton

    2015-01-01

    If you are a system administrator who manages multiple servers, then you know how difficult it is to keep your infrastructure in line. If you've been searching for an easier way, this book is for you. No prior experience with SaltStack is required.

  1. A Bayesian Approach to Period Searching in Solar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Bryan; McKenzie, David

    2017-03-01

    We have applied a Bayesian generalized Lomb-Scargle period searching algorithm to movies of coronal loop images obtained with the Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) to search for evidence of periodicities that would indicate resonant heating of the loops. The algorithm makes as its only assumption that there is a single sinusoidal signal within each light curve of the data. Both the amplitudes and noise are taken as free parameters. It is argued that this procedure should be used alongside Fourier and wavelet analyses to more accurately extract periodic intensity modulations in coronal loops. The data analyzed are from XRT Observation Program #129C: “MHD Wave Heating (Thin Filters),” which occurred during 2006 November 13 and focused on active region 10293, which included coronal loops. The first data set spans approximately 10 min with an average cadence of 2 s, 2″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-mesh analysis filter. The second data set spans approximately 4 min with a 3 s average cadence, 1″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. The final data set spans approximately 22 min at a 6 s average cadence, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. In total, 55 periods of sinusoidal coronal loop oscillations between 5.5 and 59.6 s are discussed, supporting proposals in the literature that resonant absorption of magnetic waves is a viable mechanism for depositing energy in the corona.

  2. Tiling arbitrarily nested loops by means of the transitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielecki Włodzimierz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to generation of tiled code for arbitrarily nested loops is presented. It is derived via a combination of the polyhedral and iteration space slicing frameworks. Instead of program transformations represented by a set of affine functions, one for each statement, it uses the transitive closure of a loop nest dependence graph to carry out corrections of original rectangular tiles so that all dependences of the original loop nest are preserved under the lexicographic order of target tiles. Parallel tiled code can be generated on the basis of valid serial tiled code by means of applying affine transformations or transitive closure using on input an inter-tile dependence graph whose vertices are represented by target tiles while edges connect dependent target tiles. We demonstrate how a relation describing such a graph can be formed. The main merit of the presented approach in comparison with the well-known ones is that it does not require full permutability of loops to generate both serial and parallel tiled codes; this increases the scope of loop nests to be tiled.

  3. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Lowering Salt in Your Diet Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... and can be used by individuals to replace salt in their diet. There are no known undesirable effects in healthy ...

  4. Carpinteria Salt Marsh Habitat Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — We identified five common habitat types in Carpinteria Salt Marsh: channels, pans (flats), marsh, salt flat and upland. We then drew polygons around each habitat...

  5. Applied Control Systems Design

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmoud, Magdi S

    2012-01-01

    Applied Control System Design examines several methods for building up systems models based on real experimental data from typical industrial processes and incorporating system identification techniques. The text takes a comparative approach to the models derived in this way judging their suitability for use in different systems and under different operational circumstances. A broad spectrum of control methods including various forms of filtering, feedback and feedforward control is applied to the models and the guidelines derived from the closed-loop responses are then composed into a concrete self-tested recipe to serve as a check-list for industrial engineers or control designers. System identification and control design are given equal weight in model derivation and testing to reflect their equality of importance in the proper design and optimization of high-performance control systems. Readers’ assimilation of the material discussed is assisted by the provision of problems and examples. Most of these e...

  6. Salt ingestion caves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundquist Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Large vertebrate herbivores, when they find a salt-bearing layer of rock, say in a cliff face, can produce sizable voids where, overgenerations, they have removed and consumed salty rock. The cavities formed by this natural animal process constitute a uniqueclass of caves that can be called salt ingestion caves. Several examples of such caves are described in various publications. Anexample in Mississippi U.S.A., Rock House Cave, was visited by the authors in 2000. It seems to have been formed by deer orbison. Perhaps the most spectacular example is Kitum Cave in Kenya. This cave has been excavated to a length over 100 metersby elephants. An ancient example is La Cueva del Milodon in Chile, which is reported to have been excavated by the now extinctmilodon, a giant ground sloth. Still other possible examples can be cited. This class of caves deserves a careful definition. First, thecavity in rock should meet the size and other conventions of the locally accepted definition of a cave. Of course this requirement differsin detail from country to country, particularly in the matter of size. The intent is to respect the local conventions. The characteristicthat human entry is possible is judged to be a crucial property of any recognized cave definition. Second, the cavity should besignificantly the result of vertebrate animal consumption of salt-bearing rock. The defining process is that rock removed to form thecave is carried away in the digestive track of an animal. While sodium salts are expected to be the norm, other salts for which thereis animal hunger are acceptable. Also some other speleogenesis process, such as solution, should not be excluded as long as it issecondary in formation of a cave in question.

  7. Active fault diagnosis in closed-loop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2005-01-01

    Active fault diagnosis (AFD) of parametric faults is considered in connection with closed loop feedback systems. AFD involves auxiliary signals applied on the closed loop system. A fault signature matrix is introduced in connection with AFD and it is shown that if a limited number of faults can...... occur in the system, a fault separation in the fault signature matrix can be obtained. Then the single elements in the matrix only depend of a reduced number of parametric faults. This can directly be applied for fault isolation. If it is not possible to obtain this separation, it is shown how the fault...... signature matrix can be applied for a dynamical fault isolation, i.e. fault isolation based on the dynamic characteristic of the fault signature matrix as function of the different parametric faults....

  8. Modified Continuous Loop Technique for microvascular anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified method of continuous loop technique for microvascular anastomosis is described. The handling of loop is easier & even last suture is placed under vision. This makes the microvascular anastomosis easier and simpler.

  9. Microbial Diversity of Culinary Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Muske, Galen; Baxter, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Extremophiles are exceptional microorganisms that live on this planet in extraordinarily harsh environments. One such extremophiles are Halophiles, salt-loving microorganisms that can survive in extreme salinity levels, and have been found to survive inside salt crystals. We were curious is about the potential diversity of halophiles surviving in salts harvested from around the world. For this experiment various culinary salts were suspended in a 23 % NaCL growth media broth and allowed to gr...

  10. A True Open-Loop Synchronization Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Vidal, Ana; Yepes, Alejandro G.

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization techniques can be broadly classified into two major categories: Closed-loop and open-loop methods. The open-loop synchronization (OLS) techniques, contrary to the closed-loop ones, are unconditionally stable and benefit from a fast dynamic response. Their performance, however, tends...... is to develop a true OLS (and therefore, unconditionally stable) technique without any need for the calculation of sine and cosine functions. The effectiveness of the proposed synchronization technique is confirmed through the simulation and experimental results....

  11. Estimation of complex permittivity using loop antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A method for estimating the complex permittivity of materials in the vicinity of a loop antenna is proposed. The method is based on comparing measured and numerically calculated input admittances for the loop antenna.......A method for estimating the complex permittivity of materials in the vicinity of a loop antenna is proposed. The method is based on comparing measured and numerically calculated input admittances for the loop antenna....

  12. Multi-loop decentralized PID control based on covariance control criteria: an LMI approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Huang, Biao

    2004-01-01

    PID control is well known and widely applied in industry and many design algorithms are readily available in the literature. However, systematic design of multi-loop or decentralized PID control for multivariable processes to meet certain objectives simultaneously is still a challenging task. Designing multi-loop PID controllers such that the process variables satisfy the generalized covariance constraints is studied in this paper. A convergent computational algorithm is proposed to calculate the multi-loop PID controller for a process with stable disturbances. This algorithm is then extended to a process with random-walk disturbances. The feasibility of the proposed algorithm is verified by applying it to several simulation examples.

  13. Salting Constants of Small Organic Molecules in Aerosol-Relevant Salts and Application to Aerosol Formation in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, E.; Carlton, A. M. G.; Ziemann, P. J.; Volkamer, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from small water-soluble molecules such as glyoxal and methyl glyoxal is a topic of emerging interest. Results from recent field campaigns, e.g. Waxman et al. (2013, GRL) and Knote et al. (2014, ACP), show that these molecules can form significant SOA mass as a result of 'salting-in'. Salting-in happens when a molecule's solubility increases with salt concentration and salting-out is the reverse. Salting effects modify the solubility exponentially with increasing salt concentration, and thus the effective Henry's law constant can strongly modify partitioning, and multiphase chemical reaction rates in aerosol water. Moreover, the solubility in aerosol water cannot easily inferred based on the solubility in cloud water, as the salting effects could change the solubility by a factor of 104 or more. In this work, we have devised and applied a novel experimental setup to measure salting constants using an ion trap mass spectrometer. We focus on small, water soluble molecules like methyl glyoxal and similar compounds and measure salting constants for aerosol-relevant salts including ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, and sodium chloride. The Setschenow salting-constant values are then used to parameterize the effects of salting in CMAQ. We present a series of sensitivity studies of the effects that inorganic aerosols have on the SOA formation from small soluble molecules in the southeastern United States.

  14. Simple Device for Treating Prolapsing Loop Colostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yu Hsieh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Stoma prolapse is a common complication of intestinal stoma. Although various surgical methods yield satisfactory results, nonsurgical treatment may be better for a temporary stoma. We report a case of a patient with a distal limb prolapse of a right transverse colostomy who received nonsurgical treatment with satisfactory results. For the treatment of a temporary transverse loop colostomy with distal limb prolapse, we designed a simple device consisting of a pediatric plastic medicine cup, which was rolled into a towel to shape the bottom of the cup into a compressor. The towel was put on the stoma outside of the colostomy bag with the compressor above the prolapsing limb of the colostomy. An abdominal binder was applied to fix the towel.

  15. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    Research at the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility was successfully concluded in September 1979. In 13,000 hours of operation over a three and one half year period, the nominal 10 megawatt electrical equivalent GLEF provided the opportunity to identify problems in working with highly saline geothermal fluids and to develop solutions that could be applied to a commercial geothermal power plant producing electricity. A seven and one half year period beginning in April 1972, with early well flow testing and ending in September 1979, with the completion of extensive facility and reservoir operations is covered. During this period, the facility was designed, constructed and operated in several configurations. A comprehensive reference document, addressing or referencing documentation of all the key areas investigated is presented.

  16. Liquid Salt Heat Exchanger Technology for VHTR Based Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark; Sridhara, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Peterson, Per

    2012-10-11

    The objective of this research is to evaluate performance of liquid salt fluids for use as a heat carrier for transferring high-temperature process heat from the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) to chemical process plants. Currently, helium is being considered as the heat transfer fluid; however, the tube size requirements and the power associated with pumping helium may not be economical. Recent work on liquid salts has shown tremendous potential to transport high-temperature heat efficiently at low pressures over long distances. This project has two broad objectives: To investigate the compatibility of Incoloy 617 and coated and uncoated SiC ceramic composite with MgCl2-KCl molten salt to determine component lifetimes and aid in the design of heat exchangers and piping; and, To conduct the necessary research on the development of metallic and ceramic heat exchangers, which are needed for both the helium-to-salt side and salt-to-process side, with the goal of making these heat exchangers technologically viable. The research will consist of three separate tasks. The first task deals with material compatibility issues with liquid salt and the development of techniques for on-line measurement of corrosion products, which can be used to measure material loss in heat exchangers. Researchers will examine static corrosion of candidate materials in specific high-temperature heat transfer salt systems and develop an in situ electrochemical probe to measure metallic species concentrations dissolved in the liquid salt. The second task deals with the design of both the intermediate and process side heat exchanger systems. Researchers will optimize heat exchanger design and study issues related to corrosion, fabrication, and thermal stresses using commercial and in-house codes. The third task focuses integral testing of flowing liquid salts in a heat transfer/materials loop to determine potential issues of using the salts and to capture realistic behavior of the salts in a

  17. RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE HERRING SALTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Shumanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To the salting process of fish many studies are devoted, both in experimental and in theoretical terms. Study of features of fish salting in historical terms can be divided into 3 groups. One group of researchers believes that osmotic pressure has a major influence during the salting process. Another group attributed this process to the influence of molecular diffusion. The third group considers that during this process takes place both osmosis and diffusion. Determination of the main characteristics (salinity, diffusion coefficients, time of salting, etc. is a very time-consuming task. This leads to the idea of searching for innovative research methods. Current state of science, in addition to theoretical solutions points to the possibility to determine the basic characteristics of salting and applying methods associated with the interaction of ultrasound and electromagnetic radiation with matter. In our studies, we have been producing laser beam scanning of salt solution and fish meat thickness. Scattered radiation is determined by the salt concentration, diffusion coefficients, the size of the diffusing particles. This method is called a photon correlation spectroscopy. It has been applied in our work. The dependence of the scattered light intensity on the concentration of sodium chloride solution (brine has been investigated. According to diffusion coefficient a diffusion in solution to herring skin a conclusion was made that salt solution obtains fractal structure and its size was determined. Also we determined diffusion coefficients depending on the temperature in the layers. The layers are brine-leather, leather, and herring meat thickness. The process of diffusion-osmotic equilibrium revealed at temperatures of 10-12 ° C. Suggested the possibility of higher quality of fish salting at low temperatures. On the basis of the selfsimilar solution of the differential diffusion equation, a formula for calculating time salting fish was obtained

  18. Loop connectors in dentogenic diastema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a missing tooth along with diastema have limited treatment options to restore the edentulous space. The use of a conventional fixed partial denture (FPD to replace the missing tooth may result in too wide anterior teeth leading to poor esthetics. Loss of anterior teeth with existing diastema may result in excess space available for pontic. This condition presents great esthetic challenge for prosthodontist. If implant supported prosthesis is not possible because of inadequate bone support, FPD along with loop connector may be a treatment option to maintain the diastema and provide optimal esthetic restoration. Here, we report a clinical case where FPD along with loop connector was used to achieve esthetic rehabilitation in maxillary anterior region in which midline diastema has been maintained.

  19. An approach to better understanding of salt weathering on stone monuments - the "petraSalt" research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, K.; Azzam, R.

    2012-04-01

    Salt weathering is known as a major cause of damage on stone monuments. However, processes and mechanisms of salt weathering still can not be explained satisfactorily. From the expertś point of view, better understanding of salt weathering deserves further comprehensive in-situ investigation jointly addressing active salt weathering processes and controlling factors. The 'petraSalt' research project takes this approach. The rock-cut monuments of Petra / Jordan were selected for studies, since stone type and spectra of monument exposure regimes, environmental influences, salt loading and weathering damage are representative for many stone monuments worldwide. The project aims at real-time / real-scale weathering models that depict characteristic interdependencies between stone properties, monument exposure regimes, environmental influences, salt loading and salt weathering damage. These models are expected to allow reliable rating and interpretation of aggressiveness and damage potential of the salt weathering regimes considering their variability under range of lithology, monument exposure scenarios, environmental conditions and time. The methodological approach systematically combines assessment of weathering damage (type, extent, spatial distribution and progression of damage), assessment of monument exposure characteristics and environmental influences acting on the monuments (monument orientation / geometry, lithology, rain impact, water run-off, rising humidity, wind impact, insolation, heating-cooling and drying-wetting behaviour, etc.), engineering geological studies (structural discontinuities and related failure processes) and investigation of salt loading (type, concentration, spatial distribution and origin of salt, salt crystallization / dissolution, phase transitions, etc.). Besides established methods, very innovative technologies are applied in the course of investigation such as high-resolution 3D terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and wireless

  20. Optimal Performance Design Guideline of Hybrid Reference Frame-based Dual Loop Control Strategy for Stand-Alone Single-Phase Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yang; Jiang, Ai-Ting; Coelho, Ernane A. A.

    2018-01-01

    The dual-loop control strategies in hybrid reference frame (HRF) for single-phase voltage source inverters (VSIs) in islanded operation mode is studied, which applies a capacitor voltage shaping loop in the synchronous reference frame (SRF) and a capacitor current shaping loop in the stationary r...

  1. Chiral logarithms to five loops

    OpenAIRE

    Bissegger, Moritz; Fuhrer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    We investigate two specific Green functions in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. We show that, using analyticity and unitarity, their leading logarithmic singularities can be evaluated in the chiral limit to any desired order in the chiral expansion, with a modest calculational cost. The claim is illustrated with an evaluation of the leading logarithm for the scalar two-point function to five-loop order.

  2. Mixed salt crystallisation fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Helalizadeh, A

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation was to study the mechanisms of mixed salt crystallisation fouling on heat transfer surfaces during convective heat transfer and sub-cooled flow boiling conditions. To-date no investigations on the effects of operating parameters on the deposition of mixtures of calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate, which are the most common constituents of scales formed on heat transfer surfaces, have been reported. As part of this research project, a substantial number of experiments were performed to determine the mechanisms controlling deposition. Fluid velocity, heat flux, surface and bulk temperatures, concentration of the solution, ionic strength, pressure and heat transfer surface material were varied systematically. After clarification of the effect of these parameters on the deposition process, the results of these experiments were used to develop a mechanistic model for prediction of fouling resistances, caused by crystallisation of mixed salts, under convective heat transfer...

  3. Thermochemical Properties of Nicotine Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggs DM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results presented in this report clearly show that the thermal stability and the endothermic peak nicotine release temperatures are different for different nicotine salts and these temperatures appear to be linked to the general microstructural details of the salt itself. In addition, the peak nicotine release temperatures are highly dependent upon the sample size used. The heat of vaporization for neat (non-protonated nicotine is also sample-size dependent. The TGA data showed that the least stable of the salts tested at elevated temperatures was the liquid salt nicotine triacetate followed by the crystalline materials (e.g., nicotine gallate and finally, the amorphous salts (e.g., nicotine alginate. The DSC results revealed that the liquid and crystalline salts exhibit nicotine release endotherms that are strongly related to the sample weight being tested. The amorphous salts show nicotine endotherm peak temperatures that are nearly independent of the sample weight. The range of peak nicotine release temperatures varied depending upon the specific salts and the sample size from 83 oC to well over 200 oC. Based on these results, the evolution of nicotine from the nicotine salt should be expected to vary based on the composition of the salt, the details of its microstructure, and the amount of nicotine salt tested.

  4. Microemulsion of Molten Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    then to an oil-rich, upper phase as salinity increases in a system of brine/octane/ TRS surfactant/tertiary amyl alcohol . Borkovec et al. (1988) have...11 4. Partial Pseudotemary Phase Diagram .................................. 12 5. Micrograph of Molten Salts/SDS/Pentanol/Decane System...negligible interfacial tension between microdomains. Theoretical work in ternary and pseudotemary systems has shown that the middle phase is a

  5. Antimicrobial polymeric materials with quaternary ammonium and phosphonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Huining; Zhang, Yi

    2015-02-06

    Polymeric materials containing quaternary ammonium and/or phosphonium salts have been extensively studied and applied to a variety of antimicrobial-relevant areas. With various architectures, polymeric quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts were prepared using different approaches, exhibiting different antimicrobial activities and potential applications. This review focuses on the state of the art of antimicrobial polymers with quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts. In particular, it discusses the structure and synthesis method, mechanisms of antimicrobial action, and the comparison of antimicrobial performance between these two kinds of polymers.

  6. Antimicrobial Polymeric Materials with Quaternary Ammonium and Phosphonium Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xue

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials containing quaternary ammonium and/or phosphonium salts have been extensively studied and applied to a variety of antimicrobial-relevant areas. With various architectures, polymeric quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts were prepared using different approaches, exhibiting different antimicrobial activities and potential applications. This review focuses on the state of the art of antimicrobial polymers with quaternary ammonium/phosphonium salts. In particular, it discusses the structure and synthesis method, mechanisms of antimicrobial action, and the comparison of antimicrobial performance between these two kinds of polymers.

  7. Chemical Looping Technology: Oxygen Carrier Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Siwei; Zeng, Liang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping processes are characterized as promising carbonaceous fuel conversion technologies with the advantages of manageable CO2 capture and high energy conversion efficiency. Depending on the chemical looping reaction products generated, chemical looping technologies generally can be grouped into two types: chemical looping full oxidation (CLFO) and chemical looping partial oxidation (CLPO). In CLFO, carbonaceous fuels are fully oxidized to CO2 and H2O, as typically represented by chemical looping combustion with electricity as the primary product. In CLPO, however, carbonaceous fuels are partially oxidized, as typically represented by chemical looping gasification with syngas or hydrogen as the primary product. Both CLFO and CLPO share similar operational features; however, the optimum process configurations and the specific oxygen carriers used between them can vary significantly. Progress in both CLFO and CLPO is reviewed and analyzed with specific focus on oxygen carrier developments that characterize these technologies.

  8. Uncertainty analysis and flow measurements in an experimental mock-up of a molten salt reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaji, Bogdan; Aszodi, Attila [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Hungary). Inst. of Nuclear Techniques

    2016-09-15

    In the paper measurement results from the experimental modelling of a molten salt reactor concept will be presented along with detailed uncertainty analysis of the experimental system. Non-intrusive flow measurements are carried out on the scaled and segmented mock-up of a homogeneous, single region molten salt fast reactor concept. Uncertainty assessment of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement system applied with the scaled and segmented model is presented in detail. The analysis covers the error sources of the measurement system (laser, recording camera, etc.) and the specific conditions (de-warping of measurement planes) originating in the geometry of the investigated domain. Effect of sample size in the ensemble averaged PIV measurements is discussed as well. An additional two-loop-operation mode is also presented and the analysis of the measurement results confirm that without enhancement nominal and other operation conditions will lead to strong unfavourable separation in the core flow. It implies that use of internal flow distribution structures will be necessary for the optimisation of the core coolant flow. Preliminary CFD calculations are presented to help the design of a perforated plate located above the inlet region. The purpose of the perforated plate is to reduce recirculation near the cylindrical wall and enhance the uniformity of the core flow distribution.

  9. Applied Macroeconomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, W.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    This book contains a course in applied macroeconomics. Macroeconomic theory is applied to real world cases. Students are expected to compute model results with the help of a spreadsheet program. To that end the book also contains descriptions of the spreadsheet applications used, such as linear

  10. Salt supply to and significance of asymmetric salt diapirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, H.; Burliga, S.; Chemia, Zurab

    2012-01-01

    Salt diapirs can be asymmetric both internally and externally reflecting their evolution history. As such, this asymmetry bear a significant amount of information about the differential loading (± lateral forces) and in turn the salt supply that have shaped the diapir. In two dimensions...... southeastern overhang due to salt extrusion during Middle Cretaceous followed by its burial in Tertiary. This external asymmetry is also reflected in the internal configuration of the diapir which shows different rates of salt flow on the two halves of the structure. The asymmetric external and internal...... sediments, the diapir extruded an overhang. Using the asymmetric Klodawa Salt Structure (KSS) in central Poland as a prototype, a series of analogue models were carried out to investigate the evolution history and salt supply driven by asymmetric differential loading. During extension of the model, a daipir...

  11. Fast protein loop sampling and structure prediction using distance-guided sequential chain-growth Monte Carlo method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Tang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Loops in proteins are flexible regions connecting regular secondary structures. They are often involved in protein functions through interacting with other molecules. The irregularity and flexibility of loops make their structures difficult to determine experimentally and challenging to model computationally. Conformation sampling and energy evaluation are the two key components in loop modeling. We have developed a new method for loop conformation sampling and prediction based on a chain growth sequential Monte Carlo sampling strategy, called Distance-guided Sequential chain-Growth Monte Carlo (DISGRO. With an energy function designed specifically for loops, our method can efficiently generate high quality loop conformations with low energy that are enriched with near-native loop structures. The average minimum global backbone RMSD for 1,000 conformations of 12-residue loops is 1:53 A° , with a lowest energy RMSD of 2:99 A° , and an average ensembleRMSD of 5:23 A° . A novel geometric criterion is applied to speed up calculations. The computational cost of generating 1,000 conformations for each of the x loops in a benchmark dataset is only about 10 cpu minutes for 12-residue loops, compared to ca 180 cpu minutes using the FALCm method. Test results on benchmark datasets show that DISGRO performs comparably or better than previous successful methods, while requiring far less computing time. DISGRO is especially effective in modeling longer loops (10-17 residues.

  12. Counting to one: reducibility of one- and two-loop amplitudes at the integrand level

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiss, Ronald H.P.; Papadopoulos, Costas G.; Verheyen, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Calculation of amplitudes in perturbative quantum field theory involve large loop integrals. The complexity of those integrals, in combination with the large number of Feynman diagrams, make the calculations very difficult. Reduction methods proved to be very helpful, lowering the number of integrals that need to be actually calculated. Especially, the reduction at the integrand level technique, improves the speed and set-up of these calculations. In this article we demonstrate, by counting the numbers of tensor structures and independent coefficients, how to write such relations at the integrand level for one- and two-loop amplitudes. We clarify their connection to the so-called spurious terms at one loop and discuss their structure in the two-loop case. This method is also applicable to higher loops, and the results obtained apply to both planar and non-planar diagrams.

  13. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception

    OpenAIRE

    Tournier, Carole; Knoop, Janine E.; Kooyman, Gonnie; Smit, Gerrit

    2009-01-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various stimulation conditions involving relative changes in NaCl concentration of 20% and 38%. Changes in salt delivery profile had similar effect on saltiness perception when delivered either by a sipwise m...

  14. Closed loop models for analyzing engineering requirements for simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, S.; Muralidharan, R.; Kleinman, D.

    1980-01-01

    A closed loop analytic model, incorporating a model for the human pilot, (namely, the optimal control model) that would allow certain simulation design tradeoffs to be evaluated quantitatively was developed. This model was applied to a realistic flight control problem. The resulting model is used to analyze both overall simulation effects and the effects of individual elements. The results show that, as compared to an ideal continuous simulation, the discrete simulation can result in significant performance and/or workload penalties.

  15. Singularities in loop quantum cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailleteau, Thomas; Cardoso, Antonio; Vandersloot, Kevin; Wands, David

    2008-12-19

    We show that simple scalar field models can give rise to curvature singularities in the effective Friedmann dynamics of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We find singular solutions for spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies with a canonical scalar field and a negative exponential potential, or with a phantom scalar field and a positive potential. While LQC avoids big bang or big rip type singularities, we find sudden singularities where the Hubble rate is bounded, but the Ricci curvature scalar diverges. We conclude that the effective equations of LQC are not in themselves sufficient to avoid the occurrence of curvature singularities.

  16. Closed-loop neuromorphic benchmarks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stewart, TC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available the study was exempt from ethical approval procedures.) Did the study presented in the manuscript involve human or animal subjects: No I v i w 1Closed-loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks Terrence C. Stewart 1,∗, Travis DeWolf 1, Ashley Kleinhans 2 and Chris..._link335 program from ev3dev-c (https://github.com/in4lio/ev3dev-c). This allows the EV3 to336 listen for UDP commands that tell it to set motor values and read sensor values. Communication with337 a PC was over a USB link (although the system also...

  17. Holomorphic curves in loop groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, M.A.; Pressley, A.N.

    1988-09-01

    It was observed by Atiyah that there is a correspondence between based gauge equivalence classes of SU/sub n/-instantons over S/sup 4/ of charge d on the one hand, and based holomorphic curves of genus zero in ..cap omega..SU/sub n/ of degree d on the other hand. In this paper we study the parameter space of such holomorphic curves which have the additional property that they lie entirely in the subgroup ..cap omega../sub alg/SU/sub n/ of algebraic loops. We describe a cell decomposition of this parameter space, and compute its complex dimension to be (2n-1)d.

  18. Gauge theory loop operators and Liouville theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Nadav [Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Gomis, Jaume; Okuda, Takuda [Perimeter Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Teschner, Joerg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    We propose a correspondence between loop operators in a family of four dimensional N=2 gauge theories on S{sup 4} - including Wilson, 't Hooft and dyonic operators - and Liouville theory loop operators on a Riemann surface. This extends the beautiful relation between the partition function of these N=2 gauge theories and Liouville correlators found by Alday, Gaiotto and Tachikawa. We show that the computation of these Liouville correlators with the insertion of a Liouville loop operator reproduces Pestun's formula capturing the expectation value of a Wilson loop operator in the corresponding gauge theory. We prove that our definition of Liouville loop operators is invariant under modular transformations, which given our correspondence, implies the conjectured action of S-duality on the gauge theory loop operators. Our computations in Liouville theory make an explicit prediction for the exact expectation value of 't Hooft and dyonic loop operators in these N=2 gauge theories. The Liouville loop operators are also found to admit a simple geometric interpretation within quantum Teichmueller theory as the quantum operators representing the length of geodesics. We study the algebra of Liouville loop operators and show that it gives evidence for our proposal as well as providing definite predictions for the operator product expansion of loop operators in gauge theory. (orig.)

  19. Rheology of rock salt for salt tectonics modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerical modeling of salt tectonics is a rapidly evolving field; however, the constitutive equations to model long-term rock salt rheology in nature still remain controversial. Firstly, we built a database about the strain rate versus the differential stress through collecting the data from salt creep experiments at a range of temperatures (20–200 °C in laboratories. The aim is to collect data about salt deformation in nature, and the flow properties can be extracted from the data in laboratory experiments. Moreover, as an important preparation for salt tectonics modeling, a numerical model based on creep experiments of rock salt was developed in order to verify the specific model using the Abaqus package. Finally, under the condition of low differential stresses, the deformation mechanism would be extrapolated and discussed according to microstructure research. Since the studies of salt deformation in nature are the reliable extrapolation of laboratory data, we simplified the rock salt rheology to dislocation creep corresponding to power law creep (n = 5 with the appropriate material parameters in the salt tectonic modeling.

  20. Reactive halogen species above salt lakes and salt pans

    OpenAIRE

    Holla, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Salt lakes can be found on all continents and saline soils cover 2.5% of the land surface of the earth (FAO, 2012). This thesis investigates the presence of reactive halogen species (RHS) above salt lakes and saline soils to evaluate their relevance for tropospheric chemistry of the planetary boundary layer. Ground-based MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS measurements were conducted at salt lakes and two other sites with high halogen content. Prior to this work, RHS were found at three salt ...

  1. Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

    2012-10-09

    Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

  2. Salt-Switchable Artificial Cellulase Regulated by a DNA Aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Mari; Budinova, Geisa Aparecida Lopes Gonçalves; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Mori, Yutaro; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-10-10

    A novel artificial cellulase was developed by conjugating a DNA aptamer to an endoglucanase catalytic domain, thereby substituting the natural carbohydrate-binding module. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and adsorption isotherm showed the binding motif of cellulose-binding DNA aptamer (CelApt) was G-quadruplex and stem-loop structures stabilized in the presence of salts, and CelApt binding preferred the amorphous region of the solid cellulose. By introducing the revealed salt-switchable cellulose-binding nature of CelApt into a catalytic domain of a cellulase, we created CelApt-catalytic domain conjugate possessing both controllable adsorption on the solid substrates and equal enzymatic activity to the wild-type cellulase. Thus potential use of a responsive DNA aptamer for biocatalysis at a solid surface was demonstrated.

  3. Magnetic fields with photon beams: use of circular current loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, D

    2001-10-01

    Strong transverse magnetic fields can produce very large dose enhancements and reductions in localized regions of a patient under irradiation by a photon beam. Through EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations, we have examined the effects of applying a magnetic field produced by a pair of circular current loops to a photon beam penetrating a water phantom of finite thickness. We have indeed found very substantial localized dose enhancements, albeit with no corresponding dose reduction just distal to the region of dose enhancement. (However, dose reduction does occur near the distal end of the phantom.) We have also observed two phenomena to be concerned with, for this configuration: significant broadening of the penumbra close to the current loop, and narrowness of the enhanced dose region in a plane parallel to the planes of the loops. We have also examined the use of a single current loop to produce the magnetic field, and have found great asymmetry in the dose distribution; this asymmetry appears to make it impossible to treat with a single circular magnet a tumor of large dimension extending below the application surface.

  4. String theory duals of Wilson loops from Higgsing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietti, Marco; Mauri, Andrea; Penati, Silvia; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2017-08-01

    For three-dimensional ABJ(M) theories and N=4 Chern-Simons-matter quiver theories, we construct two sets of 1/2 BPS Wilson loop operators by applying the Higgsing procedure along independent directions of the moduli space, and choosing different massive modes. For theories whose dual M-theory description is known, we also determine the corresponding spectrum of 1/2 BPS M2-brane solutions. We identify the supercharges in M-theory and field theory, as well as the supercharges preserved by M2-/anti-M2-branes and 1/2 BPS Wilson loops. In particular, in N=4 orbifold ABJM theory we find pairs of different 1/2 BPS Wilson loops that preserve exactly the same set of supercharges. In field theory they arise by Higgsing with the choice of either particles or antiparticles, whereas in the dual description they correspond to a pair of M2-/anti-M2-branes localized at different positions in the compact space. This result enlightens the origin of classical Wilson loop degeneracy in these theories, already discussed in arXiv:1506.07614. A discussion on possible scenarios that emerge by comparison with localization results is included.

  5. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  6. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  7. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  8. An application of LOTEM around salt dome near Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paembonan, Andri Yadi; Arjwech, Rungroj; Davydycheva, Sofia; Smirnov, Maxim; Strack, Kurt M.

    2017-07-01

    A salt dome is an important large geologic structure for hydrocarbon exploration. It may seal a porous reservoir of rocks that form petroleum reservoirs. Several techniques such as seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic including magnetotelluric have successfully yielded salt dome interpretation. Seismic has difficulties seeing through the salt because the seismic energy gets trapped by the salt due to its high velocity. Gravity and electromagnetics are more ideal methods. Long Offset Transient Electromagnetic (LOTEM) and Focused Source Electromagnetic (FSEM) were tested over a salt dome near Houston, Texas. LOTEM data were recorded at several stations with varying offset, and the FSEM tests were also made at some receiver locations near a suspected salt overhang. The data were processed using KMS's processing software: First, for assurance, including calibration and header checking; then transmitter and receiver data are merged and microseismic data is separated; Finally, data analysis and processing follows. LOTEM processing leads to inversion or in the FSEM case 3D modeling. Various 3D models verify the sensitivity under the salt dome. In addition, the processing was conducted pre-stack, stack, and post-stack. After pre-stacking, the noise was reduced, but showed the ringing effect due to a low-pass filter. Stacking and post-stacking with applying recursive average could reduce the Gibbs effect and produce smooth data.

  9. bHLH106 Integrates Functions of Multiple Genes through Their G-Box to Confer Salt Tolerance on Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Ahmad

    Full Text Available An activation-tagging methodology was applied to dedifferentiated calli of Arabidopsis to identify new genes involved in salt tolerance. This identified salt tolerant callus 8 (stc8 as a gene encoding the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor bHLH106. bHLH106-knockout (KO lines were more sensitive to NaCl, KCl, LiCl, ABA, and low temperatures than the wild-type. Back-transformation of the KO line rescued its phenotype, and over-expression (OX of bHLH106 in differentiated plants exhibited tolerance to NaCl. Green fluorescent protein (GFP fused with bHLH106 revealed that it was localized to the nucleus. Prepared bHLH106 protein was subjected to electrophoresis mobility shift assays against E-box sequences (5'-CANNTG-3'. The G-box sequence 5'-CACGTG-3' had the strongest interaction with bHLH106. bHLH106-OX lines were transcriptomically analyzed, and resultant up- and down-regulated genes selected on the criterion of presence of a G-box sequence. There were 198 genes positively regulated by bHLH106 and 36 genes negatively regulated; these genes possessed one or more G-box sequences in their promoter regions. Many of these genes are known to be involved in abiotic stress response. It is concluded that bHLH106 locates at a branching point in the abiotic stress response network by interacting directly to the G-box in genes conferring salt tolerance on plants.

  10. Analytical Computation of the Area of Pinched Hysteresis Loops of Ideal Mem-Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Biolek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The memory elements, memristor being the best known of them, driven by a periodical waveform exhibit the well-known pinched hysteresis loops. The hysteresis is caused by a memory effect which results in a nonzero area closed within the loop. This paper presents an analytical formula for the loop area. This formula is then applied to memory elements whose parameter-vs.-state maps are modeled in the polynomial form. The TiO2 memristor, a special subset of the above elements, is analyzed as a demonstration example.

  11. Polyakov loop modeling for hot QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Skokov, Vladimir

    2017-09-01

    We review theoretical aspects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) at finite temperature. The most important physical variable to characterize hot QCD is the Polyakov loop, which is an approximate order parameter for quark deconfinement in a hot gluonic medium. Additionally to its role as an order parameter, the Polyakov loop has rich physical contents in both perturbative and non-perturbative sectors. This review covers a wide range of subjects associated with the Polyakov loop from topological defects in hot QCD to model building with coupling to the Polyakov loop.

  12. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren H.; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...... pattern. The antenna is designed for the 2.45 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band. Applications of the antenna are many. One is for on-body applications since it is ideal for launching a creeping waves due to the polarization....

  13. Soft Neutrosophic Loops and Their Generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soft set theory is a general mathematical tool for dealing with uncertain, fuzzy, not clearly defined objects. In this paper we introduced soft neutrosophic loop,soft neutosophic biloop, soft neutrosophic N -loop with the discuission of some of their characteristics. We also introduced a new type of soft neutrophic loop, the so called soft strong neutrosophic loop which is of pure neutrosophic character. This notion also found in all the other corresponding notions of soft neutrosophic thoery. We also given some of their properties of this newly born soft structure related to the strong part of neutrosophic theory.

  14. Loop electrostatics modulates the intersubunit interactions in ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchioni, Caterina; Ghini, Veronica; Pozzi, Cecilia; Di Pisa, Flavio; Theil, Elizabeth C; Turano, Paola

    2014-11-21

    Functional ferritins are 24-mer nanocages that self-assemble with extended contacts between pairs of 4-helix bundle subunits coupled in an antiparallel fashion along the C2 axes. The largest intersubunit interaction surface in the ferritin nanocage involves helices, but contacts also occur between groups of three residues midway in the long, solvent-exposed L-loops of facing subunits. The anchor points between intersubunit L-loop pairs are the salt bridges between the symmetry-related, conserved residues Asp80 and Lys82. The resulting quaternary structure of the cage is highly soluble and thermostable. Substitution of negatively charged Asp80 with a positively charged Lys in homopolymeric M ferritin introduces electrostatic repulsions that inhibit the oligomerization of the ferritin subunits. D80K ferritin was present in inclusion bodies under standard overexpressing conditions in E. coli, contrasting with the wild type protein. Small amounts of fully functional D80K nanocages formed when expression was slowed. The more positively charged surface results in a different solubility profile and D80K crystallized in a crystal form with a low density packing. The 3D structure of D80K variant is the same as wild type except for the side chain orientations of Lys80 and facing Lys82. When three contiguous Lys groups are introduced in D80KI81K ferritin variant the nanocage assembly is further inhibited leading to lower solubility and reduced thermal stability. Here, we demonstrate that the electrostatic pairing at the center of the L-loops has a specific kinetic role in the self-assembly of ferritin nanocages.

  15. Relationship Between Salt Intake, Salt-Taste Threshold and Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Many studies have found an association between sodium intake and blood pressure. Salt taste threshold is thought to be another marker of sodium intake. Objective: This study sought to assess two markers of sodium intake, 24-hour-urinary sodium and salt-taste threshold. We also determined the relationship ...

  16. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, J.L.H.C.; Tournier, C.; Knoop, J.E.; Kooyman, G.; Smit, G.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various

  17. Experiments in connection with Salt Domes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escher, B.G.; Kuenen, Ph.H.

    1928-01-01

    The different theories concerning the origin of Salt Domes in Roumania, Germany, Texas, Louisiana, Colorado and Utah are discussed. In Roumania the salt occurs in cores of “Diapir” anticlines. The existance of hills of salt indicates, that the salt is still pushing upwards. In Germany the salt

  18. Sodium: How to Tame Your Salt Habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same amount of sodium as table salt. Use salt substitutes wisely. Some salt substitutes or light salts contain a mixture of table ... substitute — and get too much sodium. Also, many salt substitutes contain potassium chloride. Although potassium can lessen some ...

  19. Why do Physicists Love Charge-Transfer Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, John

    2002-11-01

    I describe some of the phenomena encountered in charge-transfer salts that make them very attractive for condensed-matter physicists. These materials exhibit many interesting electronic properties, including reduced dimensionality, strong electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions and the proximity of antiferromagnetism, insulator states and superconductivity. A wide variety of low-temperature groundstates have been observed in the salts; frequently, one is able to move between these states by applying magnetic field, temperature, pressure or "chemical pressure". In spite of this complex behavior, the charge-transfer salts possess very simple electronic bandstructure which it is often possible to measure in great detail. Hence, one can use the salts as "model systems" in which tractable theoretical calculations for phenomena such as superconductivity are compared directly with experiment.

  20. Salt pressure derived from GMS-B1 measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonka, V.

    1992-11-01

    The GMS system is successfully used to measure gaps between the liner tube and the disc in the B1 hole. GMS was designed for evaluation of minimum tube diameter. In this report measured results are used to estimate the tube compression. The compression is recalculated into the salt pressure acting on the liner tube from outside. It is concluded that the GMS measurements are accurately executed. Also the evaluation procedure to eliminate the thermal expansion effect is correctly applied. Through the B1 liner tube compression the salt pressure on the tube is evaluated. Apart from several thermocouples no other measuring instrument has been used. The resulting salt pressure estimate is consequently considered as independent of other HAW salt pressure measurements. (author). 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Benchmark Simulation of Natural Circulation Cooling System with Salt Working Fluid Using SAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, K. K.; Scarlat, R. O.; Hu, R.

    2017-09-03

    Liquid salt-cooled reactors, such as the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR), offer passive decay heat removal through natural circulation using Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) loops. The behavior of such systems should be well-understood through performance analysis. The advanced system thermal-hydraulics tool System Analysis Module (SAM) from Argonne National Laboratory has been selected for this purpose. The work presented here is part of a larger study in which SAM modeling capabilities are being enhanced for the system analyses of FHR or Molten Salt Reactors (MSR). Liquid salt thermophysical properties have been implemented in SAM, as well as properties of Dowtherm A, which is used as a simulant fluid for scaled experiments, for future code validation studies. Additional physics modules to represent phenomena specific to salt-cooled reactors, such as freezing of coolant, are being implemented in SAM. This study presents a useful first benchmark for the applicability of SAM to liquid salt-cooled reactors: it provides steady-state and transient comparisons for a salt reactor system. A RELAP5-3D model of the Mark-1 Pebble-Bed FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR), and in particular its DRACS loop for emergency heat removal, provides steady state and transient results for flow rates and temperatures in the system that are used here for code-to-code comparison with SAM. The transient studied is a loss of forced circulation with SCRAM event. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first application of SAM to FHR or any other molten salt reactors. While building these models in SAM, any gaps in the code’s capability to simulate such systems are identified and addressed immediately, or listed as future improvements to the code.

  2. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...

  3. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiridon, Alex; Benzel, Dave; Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2007-12-04

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  4. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  5. Lose Your Loops with Numpy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Developing in python is fast. Computation, however, can often be another story. Or at least that is how it may seem. When working with arrays and numerical datasets one can subvert many of python’s computational limitations by utilizing numpy. Numpy is python’s standard matrix computation library. Many python users only use numpy to store and generate arrays, failing to utilize one of python’s most powerful computational tools. By leveraging numpy’s ufuncs, aggregation, broadcasting and slicing/masking/indexing functionality one can cut back on slow python loops and increase the speed of their programs by as much as 100x. This talk aims at teaching attendees how to use these tools through toy examples.

  6. Fiber loop ringdown humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Haifa; Wang, Chuji

    2016-11-01

    An optical fiber relative humidity (RH) sensor based on the evanescent field-fiber loop ringdown (EF-FLRD) technique is demonstrated. The sensor was placed inside a chamber that provides a humidity reference and is monitored by a humidity meter. The presence of moisture in the chamber changes the refractive index of the medium; thus the ringdown time changes due to a change in the EF scattering loss induced in the sensor head. The sensor demonstrated a fast response (∼1  s), high sensitivity, and excellent reproducibility and reversibly. The EF-FLRD sensor can measure RH in a wide dynamic range of 4% to 100% at a constant temperature of 20±1°C.

  7. COMPARISON OF GEO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WHITE ROCK SALT AND PINK ROCK SALT IN KŁODAWA SALT DIAPIR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malwina Kolano; Danuta Flisiak

    2013-01-01

    .... The present article introduces strength-strain properties of white rock salt, building the nucleus of northeastern edge anticline, and pink rock salt that belongs to the series of youngest rock salt...

  8. Roles of the human Rad51 L1 and L2 loops in DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Sakane, Isao; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2006-07-01

    The human Rad51 protein, a eukaryotic ortholog of the bacterial RecA protein, is a key enzyme that functions in homologous recombination and recombinational repair of double strand breaks. The Rad51 protein contains two flexible loops, L1 and L2, which are proposed to be sites for DNA binding, based on a structural comparison with RecA. In the present study, we performed mutational and fluorescent spectroscopic analyses on the L1 and L2 loops to examine their role in DNA binding. Gel retardation and DNA-dependent ATP hydrolysis measurements revealed that the substitution of the tyrosine residue at position 232 (Tyr232) within the L1 loop with alanine, a short side chain amino acid, significantly decreased the DNA-binding ability of human Rad51, without affecting the protein folding or the salt-induced, DNA-independent ATP hydrolysis. Even the conservative replacement with tryptophan affected the DNA binding, indicating that Tyr232 is involved in DNA binding. The importance of the L1 loop was confirmed by the fluorescence change of a tryptophan residue, replacing the Asp231, Ser233, or Gly236 residue, upon DNA binding. The alanine replacement of phenylalanine at position 279 (Phe279) within the L2 loop did not affect the DNA-binding ability of human Rad51, unlike the Phe203 mutation of the RecA L2 loop. The Phe279 side chain may not be directly involved in the interaction with DNA. However, the fluorescence intensity of the tryptophan replacing the Rad51-Phe279 residue was strongly reduced upon DNA binding, indicating that the L2 loop is also close to the DNA-binding site.

  9. Comparison of hysteresis loop area scaling behavior of Co/Pt multilayers: Discrete and continuous field sweeping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handoko, Djati; Lee, Sang-Hyuk [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Min Lee, Kyung; Jeong, Jong-Ryul [Department of Material Science and Engineering and Graduate School of Green Energy Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Hyun, E-mail: donghyun@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    We have investigated the hysteresis loop shape changes with discrete and continuous magnetic field sweeping for Co/Pt multilayers with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The hysteresis loop shape was observed by measuring a polar magneto-optical Kerr effect. The loop area has been found to increase rapidly with an increase of the field step size as well as the sweeping frequency until the area reaches a maximum. The increase of the loop area has been analyzed based on the Steinmetz law, where a loop area scaling exponent determined from discrete field sweeping is compared to a scaling exponent from continuous field sweeping. The dynamic coercivity behavior with respect to discrete and continuous field sweeping is analyzed together with the loop area scaling behavior, suggesting that details of magnetic configuration disorders do not modify the loop area scaling exponent. - Highlights: • Co/Pt thin film multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have been prepared. • Discrete and continuous field sweeping is applied for MOKE measurement. • Loop area scaling exponent is observed. • The dynamic coercivity behavior is analyzed together with the loop area scaling behavior. • Disorder details of magnetic configuration do not modify the loop area scaling exponent.

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans response to salt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.O. Umuerri (Oluwatoroti Omowayewa)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes my work, where I used genetic methods to identify new genes involved in salt taste in C. elegans. In addition, I used calcium imaging to characterize the cellular response of C. elegans to salt. The thesis is divided into five sections and each section is summarized

  11. Bile salts secretion in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, J P; Areias, E; Meneses, L; Tiago, E

    1977-02-01

    The bile salts secretion was studied in ten normal subjects and sixteen patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, in a basal period and during 60 minutes after Secretin injection. Total bile salts were measured by a modification of the enzymatic method of Iwata and Yamasaki and the individual bile salts were separated by silica gel thin-layer chromatography. During the 60 minutes after Secretin the mean concentration was 2.88 +/- 2.58 muM/ml in normals and 1.96 +/- 1.25 muM/ml in cirrhotics. The difference is not significant. During the first 20 minutes however the concentration was higher than 3 muM/ml in 8 out of 10 normals and lower than 2 muM/ml in 10 out 16 cirrhotics. The ratios of tri-to dihydroxy bile salts was similar in both groups. The ratios between bile salts conjugated with glycine and with taurine was higher in normals, and the ratio between free to conjugated bile salts was higher in cirrhotics. The lower concentration of total bile salts immediatly after Secretin, the higher proportion of taurin conjugates and of free bile salts could be important factors in the difficulties of fact digestion and absorption frequently found in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.

  12. Compressibility of granulated rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinebaugh, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Crushed rock salt will be used extensively at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as a material for backfilling underground openings. This document addresses one of the characteristics of crushed salt which must be known to assess the consequences of its usage, namely, compressibility.

  13. Strategic need for a multi-purpose thermal hydraulic loop for support of advanced reactor technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yoon, Su -Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Housley, Gregory K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design for a new high-temperature multi fluid, multi loop test facility for the INL to support thermal hydraulic, materials, and thermal energy storage research for nuclear and nuclear-hybrid applications. In its initial configuration, the facility will include a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed with this facility include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions, flow and heat transfer issues related to core thermal hydraulics in advanced helium-cooled and salt-cooled reactors, and evaluation of corrosion behavior of new cladding materials and accident-tolerant fuels for LWRs at prototypical conditions. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) facility. Research performed in this facility will advance the state of the art and technology readiness level of high temperature intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) for nuclear applications while establishing the INL as a center of excellence for the development and certification of this technology. The thermal energy storage capability will support research and demonstration activities related to process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will assist in development of reliable predictive models for thermal hydraulic design and safety codes over the range of expected advanced reactor operating conditions. Proposed/existing IHX heat transfer and friction correlations and criteria will be assessed with information on materials compatibility and instrumentation

  14. Salt resistant crop plants

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Stuart J.

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker- assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement.

  15. History Leaves Salts Behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    These plots, or spectra, show that a rock dubbed 'McKittrick' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars, has higher concentrations of sulfur and bromine than a nearby patch of soil nicknamed 'Tarmac.' These data were taken by Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which uses curium-244 to assess the elemental composition of rocks and soil. Only portions of the targets' full spectra are shown to highlight the significant differences in elemental concentrations between 'McKittrick' and 'Tarmac.' Intensities are plotted on a logarithmic scale.A nearby rock named Guadalupe similarly has extremely high concentrations of sulfur, but very little bromine. This 'element fractionation' typically occurs when a watery brine slowly evaporates and various salt compounds are precipitated in sequence.

  16. Salt resistant crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Stuart J; Negrão, Sónia; Tester, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker-assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Seismology of contracting and expanding coronal loops using damping of kink oscillations by mode coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Russell, A. J. B.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Simões, P. J. A.; Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Fletcher, L.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We extend recently developed seismological methods to analyse oscillating loops which feature a large initial shift in the equilibrium position and investigate additional observational signatures related to the loop environment and oscillation driver. Methods: We model the motion of coronal loops as a kink oscillation damped by mode coupling, accounting for any change in loop length and the possible presence of parallel harmonics in addition to the fundamental mode. We apply our model to a loop which rapidly contracts due to a post-flare implosion (SOL2012-03-09) and a loop with a large lateral displacement (SOL2012-10-20). Results: The seismological method is used to calculate plasma parameters of the oscillating loops including the transverse density profile, magnetic field strength, and phase mixing timescale. For SOL2012-03-09 the period of oscillation has a linear correlation with the contracting motion and suggests the kink speed remains constant during the oscillation. The implosion excitation mechanism is found to be associated with an absence of additional parallel harmonics. Conclusions: The improved Bayesian analysis of the coronal loop motion allows for accurate seismology of plasma parameters, and the evolution of the period of oscillation compared with the background trend can be used to distinguish between loop motions in the plane of the loop and those perpendicular to it. The seismologically inferred kink speed and density contrast imply sub-Alfvénic (MA = 0.16 ± 0.03) propagation of the magnetic reconfiguration associated with the implosion, as opposed to triggering by a wave propagating at the Alfvén speed.

  18. Maximized Gust Loads of a Closed-Loop, Nonlinear Aeroelastic System Using Nonlinear Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of computing the maximized gust load for a nonlinear, closed-loop aeroelastic aircraft is discusses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems is applied in order to define a linearized system that provides a bounds on the response of the nonlinear system of interest. The method is applied to a simplified model of an Airbus A310.

  19. The origin of salt-encased sediment packages: Observations from the SE Precaspian Basin (Kazakhstan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Duffy, Oliver B.; Hudec, Michael R.; Jackson, Martin P. A.; Burg, George; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Dooley, Tim P.

    2017-04-01

    Intrasalt sediment packages containing siliciclastic sediments, carbonate sediments, or non-halite evaporites such as gypsum or anhydrite are common within most salt sequences. Intrasalt sediment packages may have been deposited before, during, or after salt deposition and be incorporated into the salt by various processes. Understanding the origin and evolution of intrasalt sediment packages may yield important insights into the tectonic and geodynamic history of the basin, and also into the understanding of salt tectonics. Despite the importance of intrasalt sediment packages, currently there is no systematic description of their possible origins and their distinguishing criteria. This work is divided into three parts. The first part outlines the possible origins of intrasalt sediment packages, as well as criteria to determine if they originated as subsalt, suprasalt or intrasalt sequences. The second part examines how sediment packages that originated on top of salt, such as minibasins, can be encased within salt. Four key encasement processes are proposed: a) salt expulsion from beneath a minibasin experiencing density-driven subsidence; b) salt expulsion from beneath adjacent subsiding minibasins; c) salt expulsion associated with lateral shortening; d) override of minibasins by a salt sheet sourced from elsewhere. The third part of the paper presents a case study from the SE Precaspian Basin, Kazakhstan, where, using a borehole-constrained 3D seismic reflection dataset, the proposed criteria are applied to an area with abundant, newly discovered sediment packages within salt.

  20. Genesis of Tuzla salt basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sušić, Amir; Baraković, Amir; Komatina, Snezana

    2017-04-01

    Salt is condition for the survival of the human race, and holds a special place in the exploitation of mineral resources. It is the only mineral raw material used in direct feeding, and therefore has its own specialty. Salt is a crystalline mineral that is found in seawater, as well as in underground areas where it is formed by deposition of salt sediments. Occurrences of salt water near Tuzla and Gornja Tuzla have been known since the time of the Romans as "ad salinas". The name itself connects Bosnia with its richness in salt, because the word barefoot, which is preserved in a north-Albanian dialect, means a place where boiling salted water are obtained. At the time of the Bosnian kings, these regions are named Soli, which is in connection with occurences of saline sources. Geological studies of rock salt in the area of Tuzla basin are practically began after the annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina by the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in the period from 1878 to 1918. Geological field work was conducted K. Paul, H. Hefer, E. Tietze and F. Katzer. Monomineral deposit of rock salt Tetima is made of halite and anhydrite mixed with marl belt, while the bay of salt in Tuzla is polymineral and contains a considerable amount of thenardite (Na2SO4) and rare minerals: nortupit, nahkolit, bradleit, probertit, glauberite and others. Both salt deposits were created as a product of chemical sedimentation in the lower Miocene Badenian sediments. The main objective of this paper is to show the genesis of the deposits and the spatial and genetic connection. In addition, genesis of geological research in the areas of Tuzla basin will be presented.

  1. Vacuum energy sequestering and graviton loops

    OpenAIRE

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We recently formulated a local mechanism of vacuum energy sequester. This mechanism automatically removes all matter loop contributions to vacuum energy from the stress energy tensor which sources the curvature. Here we adapt the local vacuum energy sequestering mechanism to also cancel all the vacuum energy loops involving virtual gravitons, in addition to the vacuum energy generated by matter fields alone.

  2. Loop calculus for lattice gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambini, R.; Leal, L.; Trias, A.

    1989-05-15

    Hamiltonian calculations are performed using a loop-labeled basis where the full set of identities for the SU(/ital N/) gauge models has been incorporated. The loops are classified as clusterlike structures and the eigenvalue problem leads to a linear set of finite-difference equations easily amenable to numerical treatment. Encouraging results are reported for SU(2) at spatial dimension 2.

  3. Design Principles for Closed Loop Supply Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Krikke (Harold); C.P. Pappis (Costas); G.T. Tsoulfas; J.M. Bloemhof-Ruwaard (Jacqueline)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we study design principles for closed loop supply chains. Closed loop supply chains aim at closing material flows thereby limiting emission and residual waste, but also providing customer service at low cost. We study 'traditional' and 'new' design principles known in the

  4. Holonomy loops, spectral triples and quantum gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Aastrup; Grimstrup, Jesper Møller; Nest, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    We review the motivation, construction and physical interpretation of a semi-finite spectral triple obtained through a rearrangement of central elements of loop quantum gravity. The triple is based on a countable set of oriented graphs and the algebra consists of generalized holonomy loops...

  5. Droplet flows through periodic loop networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneret, Raphael; Schindler, Michael; Bartolo, Denis

    2010-11-01

    Numerous microfluidic experiments have revealed non-trivial traffic dynamics when droplets flow through a channel including a single loop. A complex encoding of the time intervals between the droplets is achieved by the binary choices they make as they enter the loop. Very surprisingly, another set of experiments has demonstrated that the addition of a second loop does not increase the complexity of the droplet pattern. Conversely, the second loop decodes the temporal signal encrypted by the first loop [1]. In this talk we show that no first principle argument based on symmetry or conservation laws can account for this unexpected decoding process. Then, to better understand how a loop maps time intervals between droplets, we consider a simplified model which has proven to describe accurately microfluidic droplet flows. Combining numerical simulations and analytical calculations for the dynamic of three droplets travelling through N loops: (i) We show that three different traffic regimes exist, yet none of them yields exact decoding. (ii) We uncover that for a wide class of loop geometry, the coding process is analogous to a Hamiltonian mapping: regular orbits are destabilized in island chains and separatrix. (iii) Eventually, we propose a simple explanation to solve the apparent paradox with the coding/decoding dynamics observed in experiments. [1] M.J. Fuerstman, P. Garstecki, and G.M. Whitesides, Science, 315:828, 2007.

  6. Application of ISFETs in closed-loop systems for greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieling, Th. H.; van den Vlekkert, H. H.

    In horticulture, growing in artificial substrates such as rockwool is more and more considered to be a sound alternative to growing in soil. This development enables the opportunity to create closed-loop systems which lower the waste of raw materials and reduce pollution of the environment. Applying closed-loop systems needs precise knowledge of the composition of the recirculating nutrient solution. This paper presents basic principles of a measuring system, which can monitor continuously the concentration of nutrients in water. The system is based on ion-selective field effect transistors (ISFETs). By appropriate calibration, a high accuracy is achieved for pH and potassium measurements in the nutrient solution. An accuracy of better than 10% (mMol/l) has been achieved.

  7. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive......-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified...... rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. SUMMARY: Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable...

  8. Molten Salt Promoting Effect in Double Salt CO2 Absorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Chen, Haobo; Singh, Prabhakar; King, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of molten salts as catalysts for CO2 absorption by MgO, and extend these observations to the MgO-containing double salt oxides. We will show that the phenomena involved with CO2 absorption by MgO and MgO-based double salts are similar and general, but with some important differences. This paper focuses on the following key concepts: i) identification of conditions that favor or disfavor participation of isolated MgO during double salt absorption, and investigation of methods to increase the absorption capacity of double salt systems by including MgO participation; ii) examination of the relationship between CO2 uptake and melting point of the promoter salt, leading to the recognition of the role of pre-melting (surface melting) in these systems; and iii) extension of the reaction pathway model developed for the MgO-NaNO3 system to the double salt systems. This information advances our understanding of MgO-based CO2 absorption systems for application with pre-combustion gas streams.

  9. Mass Inflation in the Loop Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Eric G; Modesto, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    In classical general relativity the Cauchy horizon within a two-horizon black hole is unstable via a phenomenon known as mass inflation, in which the mass parameter (and the spacetime curvature) of the black hole diverges at the Cauchy horizon. Here we study this effect for loop black holes -- quantum gravitationally corrected black holes from loop quantum gravity -- whose construction alleviates the $r=0$ singularity present in their classical counterparts. We use a simplified model of mass inflation, which makes use of the generalized DTR relation, to conclude that the Cauchy horizon of loop black holes indeed results in a curvature singularity similar to that found in classical black holes. The DTR relation is of particular utility in the loop black hole because it does not directly rely upon Einstein's field equations. We elucidate some of the interesting and counterintuitive properties of the loop black hole, and corroborate our results using an alternate model of mass inflation due to Ori.

  10. Osmotic mechanism of the loop extrusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Schiessel, Helmut

    2017-09-01

    The loop extrusion theory assumes that protein factors, such as cohesin rings, act as molecular motors that extrude chromatin loops. However, recent single molecule experiments have shown that cohesin does not show motor activity. To predict the physical mechanism involved in loop extrusion, we here theoretically analyze the dynamics of cohesin rings on a loop, where a cohesin loader is in the middle and unloaders at the ends. Cohesin monomers bind to the loader rather frequently and cohesin dimers bind to this site only occasionally. Our theory predicts that a cohesin dimer extrudes loops by the osmotic pressure of cohesin monomers on the chromatin fiber between the two connected rings. With this mechanism, the frequency of the interactions between chromatin segments depends on the loading and unloading rates of dimers at the corresponding sites.

  11. Gauge and integrable theories in loop spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Luchini, G.

    2012-05-01

    We propose an integral formulation of the equations of motion of a large class of field theories which leads in a quite natural and direct way to the construction of conservation laws. The approach is based on generalized non-abelian Stokes theorems for p-form connections, and its appropriate mathematical language is that of loop spaces. The equations of motion are written as the equality of a hyper-volume ordered integral to a hyper-surface ordered integral on the border of that hyper-volume. The approach applies to integrable field theories in (1+1) dimensions, Chern-Simons theories in (2+1) dimensions, and non-abelian gauge theories in (2+1) and (3+1) dimensions. The results presented in this paper are relevant for the understanding of global properties of those theories. As a special byproduct we solve a long standing problem in (3+1)-dimensional Yang-Mills theory, namely the construction of conserved charges, valid for any solution, which are invariant under arbitrary gauge transformations.

  12. Carrier tracking algorithm based on joint acquisition of frequency locked loop and phase locked loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem of frequency step in the frequency lock loop (FLL - phase lock loop (PLL carrier tracking algorithm’s conversion state, presenting an improved algorithm: PLL and FLL joint acquisition to replace the single FLL acquires frequency, and deduce the loop state transition threshold. The simulation results show that the improved algorithm is more stable in the conversion process, and the loop performance is optimized. When the SNR is -10dB, and has the acceleration rate, the tracking loop does not have a frequency step at the time of conversion, achieving the design purpose.

  13. Iodized Salt Sales in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Maalouf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iodized salt has been an important source of dietary iodine, a trace element important for regulating human growth, development, and metabolic functions. This analysis identified iodized table salt sales as a percentage of retail salt sales using Nielsen ScanTrack. We identified 1117 salt products, including 701 salt blends and 416 other salt products, 57 of which were iodized. When weighted by sales volume in ounces or per item, 53% contained iodized salt. These findings may provide a baseline for future monitoring of sales of iodized salt.

  14. Does stress induce salt intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Susan J; Turner, Anne I; Nowson, Caryl A

    2010-06-01

    Psychological stress is a common feature of modern day societies, and contributes to the global burden of disease. It was proposed by Henry over 20 years ago that the salt intake of a society reflects the level of stress, and that stress, through its effect on increasing salt intake, is an important factor in the development of hypertension. This review evaluates the evidence from animal and human studies to determine if stress does induce a salt appetite and increase salt consumption in human subjects. Findings from animal studies suggest that stress may drive salt intake, with evidence for a potential mechanism via the sympatho-adrenal medullary system and/or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. In contrast, in the few laboratory studies conducted in human subjects, none has found that acute stress affects salt intake. However, one study demonstrated that life stress (chronic stress) was associated with increased consumption of snack foods, which included, but not specifically, highly salty snacks. Studies investigating the influence of chronic stress on eating behaviours are required, including consumption of salty foods. From the available evidence, we can conclude that in free-living, Na-replete individuals, consuming Na in excess of physiological requirements, stress is unlikely to be a major contributor to salt intake.

  15. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Alan L; Liu, Bo; Rogers, Troy D; Sartor, R Balfour; Miao, Edward A

    2017-08-01

    The Western diet is characterized by high protein, sugar, fat, and low fiber intake, and is widely believed to contribute to the incidence and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, high sodium chloride salt content, a defining feature of processed foods, has not been considered as a possible environmental factor that might drive IBD. We set out to bridge this gap. We examined murine models of colitis on either a high salt diet (HSD) or a low salt diet. We demonstrate that an HSD exacerbates inflammatory pathology in the IL-10-deficient murine model of colitis relative to mice fed a low salt diet. This was correlated with enhanced expression of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. Surprisingly, sodium accumulated in the colons of mice on an HSD, suggesting a direct effect of salt within the colon. Similar to the IL-10-deficient model, an HSD also enhanced cytokine expression during infection by Salmonella typhimurium This occurred in the first 3 d of infection, suggesting that an HSD potentiates an innate immune response. Indeed, in cultured dendritic cells we found that high salt media potentiates cytokine expression downstream of TLR4 activation via p38 MAPK and SGK1. A third common colitis model, administration of dextran sodium sulfate, was hopelessly confounded by the high sodium content of the dextran sodium sulfate. Our results raise the possibility that high dietary salt is an environmental factor that drives increased inflammation in IBD. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Testing of a Neon Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks is required for future NASA missions. A cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP) can provide a closed-loop cooling system for this purpose and has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A neon CLHP was tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryopump as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components. Tests conducted included loop cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, power cycle, heat removal capability, loop capillary limit and recovery from a dry-out, low power operation, and long duration steady state operation. The neon CLHP demonstrated robust operation. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully by applying power to both the pump and evaporator without any pre-conditioning. It could adapt to changes in the pump power andor evaporator power, and reach a new steady state very quickly. The evaporator could remove heat loads between 0.25W and 4W. When the pump capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the pump power. Steady state operations were demonstrated for up to 6 hours. The ability of the neon loop to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  17. Power Impact of Loop Buffer Schemes for Biomedical Wireless Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francky Catthoor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Instruction memory organisations are pointed out as one of the major sources of energy consumption in embedded systems. As these systems are characterised by restrictive resources and a low-energy budget, any enhancement in this component allows not only to decrease the energy consumption but also to have a better distribution of the energy budget throughout the system. Loop buffering is an effective scheme to reduce energy consumption in instruction memory organisations. In this paper, the loop buffer concept is applied in real-life embedded applications that are widely used in biomedical Wireless Sensor Nodes, to show which scheme of loop buffer is more suitable for applications with certain behaviour. Post-layout simulations demonstrate that a trade-off exists between the complexity of the loop buffer architecture and the energy savings of utilising it. Therefore, the use of loop buffer architectures in order to optimise the instructionmemory organisation from the energy efficiency point of view should be evaluated carefully, taking into account two factors: (1 the percentage of the execution time of the application that is related to the execution of the loops, and (2 the distribution of the execution time percentage over each one of the loops that form the application.

  18. Analyzing feed-forward loop relationship in aging phenotypes: physical activity and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Dam, Thuy-Tien L; Varadhan, Ravi; Xue, Qian-Li; Fried, Linda P

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence of feed-forward loop relationships and positive association between physical activity and performance levels, which are components of frailty, using measures from 431 high functioning women initially aged 70-79 years followed over 7 visits. Physical activity levels were assessed using a questionnaire. Grip strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer and usual walking speed was measured over 4-m. The results suggest that a reduction in physical activity would not only degrade physical performance, but it would further reduce physical activity through declines in physical performance. As both physical activity and physical performance impact frailty, improvement of physical activity could help reduce frailty directly as well as indirectly via improved physical performance. Our findings support a priori hypothesis that feed-forward loops are present in the phenotype of frailty, which is due to dysregulated energetics. A methodologically broader implication is that we introduce modeling and analysis of feed-forward loop data here. The feed-forward loop, as we define it, is different from the concept of feedback loops used in biochemical systems. Generalizing our model of two-variable feed-forward loop, three, four or multivariable feed-forward loop can be applied to other biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject to... this part apply to this section except as modified by this paragraph. (1) Recordkeeping. Recordkeeping...

  20. Behaviour of horses and cattle at two stocking densities in a coastal salt marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, S.; Weyde, van der C.; Esselink, P.; Smit, C.; Wieren, van S.E.; Bakker, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    Livestock grazing has been practiced in salt marshes in the Wadden Sea area since 600 B.C. Currently livestock grazing is also applied for conservation management. However, effects of such grazing management on salt marshes are likely to vary depending on the species of livestock and stocking

  1. Behaviour of horses and cattle at two stocking densities in a coastal salt marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, S.; Van der Weyde, C; Esselink, Peter; Smit, C.; Van Wieren, S.E.; Bakker, Jan P.

    Livestock grazing has been practiced in salt marshes in the Wadden Sea area since 600 B.C. Currently livestock grazing is also applied for conservation management. However, effects of such grazing management on salt marshes are likely to vary depending on the species of livestock and stocking

  2. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-09-30

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material

  3. Loops in exceptional field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossard, Guillaume [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay,91128 Palaiseau cedex (France); Kleinschmidt, Axel [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut),Am Mühlenberg 1, DE-14476 Potsdam (Germany); International Solvay Institutes,ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, BE-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-01-27

    We study certain four-graviton amplitudes in exceptional field theory in dimensions D≥4 up to two loops. As the formulation is manifestly invariant under the U-duality group E{sub 11−D}(ℤ), our resulting expressions can be expressed in terms of automorphic forms. In the low energy expansion, we find terms in the M-theory effective action of type R{sup 4}, ∇{sup 4}R{sup 4} and ∇{sup 6}R{sup 4} with automorphic coefficient functions in agreement with independent derivations from string theory. This provides in particular an explicit integral formula for the exact string theory ∇{sup 6}R{sup 4} threshold function. We exhibit moreover that the usual supergravity logarithmic divergences cancel out in the full exceptional field theory amplitude, within an appropriately defined dimensional regularisation scheme. We also comment on terms of higher derivative order and the role of the section constraint for possible counterterms.

  4. Elaboration of garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JÉSSICA F. RODRIGUES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Garlic and salt spice is widely used in Brazilian cookery, but it has a high sodium content; as high sodium intake has been strongly correlated to the incidence of chronic diseases. This study aimed to develop a garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake. Sensory evaluation was conducted by applying the spices to cooked rice. First, the optimal concentration of spice added during rice preparation was determined. Subsequently, seasonings (3:1 were prepared containing 0%, 50% and 25% less NaCl using a mixture of salts consisting of KCl and monosodium glutamate; a seasoning with a 0% NaCl reduction was established as a control. Three formulations of rice with different spices were assessed according to sensory testing acceptance, time-intensity and temporal domain of sensations. The proportions of salts used in the garlic and salt spice did not generate a strange or bad taste in the products; instead, the mixtures were less salty. However, the seasonings with lower sodium levels (F2 and F3 were better accepted in comparison to the traditional seasoning (F1. Therefore, a mixture of NaCl, KCl and monosodium glutamate is a viable alternative to develop a garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake.

  5. Theory of loop flows and instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, E. R.

    A preliminary theory for the steady and transient coronal loop flows in solar active regions and their magnetohydrodynamic instability is presented. Siphon flow is shown to be possible in the loops if a pressure difference is maintained between the footpoints, and to account for the presence of cool cores and appearances of only half a loop. The evolution of active region magnetic loops is found to lead to the continual evaporation and draining of the plasma contained within them, particularly as a result of an increase in heating rate. Consideration of static models for thermally isolated loops reveals them to be thermally unstable, implying that in the absence of some atmospheric stabilizing mechanism, the loops must be in a dynamic state of thermal activity. It is shown that kilogauss photospheric fields may be formed by an intense magnetic field instability, with an associated transient downflow which may induce coronal flows at enhanced velocities. Magnetohydrodynamic stability analysis suggests that the major cause of magnetic stability may be line-tying of loop footpoints in the dense photosphere.

  6. Iterative structure of finite loop integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron-Huot, Simon [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, Copenhagen 2100 (Denmark); Henn, Johannes M. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-06-18

    In this paper we develop further and refine the method of differential equations for computing Feynman integrals. In particular, we show that an additional iterative structure emerges for finite loop integrals. As a concrete non-trivial example we study planar master integrals of light-by-light scattering to three loops, and derive analytic results for all values of the Mandelstam variables s and t and the mass m. We start with a recent proposal for defining a basis of loop integrals having uniform transcendental weight properties and use this approach to compute all planar two-loop master integrals in dimensional regularization. We then show how this approach can be further simplified when computing finite loop integrals. This allows us to discuss precisely the subset of integrals that are relevant to the problem. We find that this leads to a block triangular structure of the differential equations, where the blocks correspond to integrals of different weight. We explain how this block triangular form is found in an algorithmic way. Another advantage of working in four dimensions is that integrals of different loop orders are interconnected and can be seamlessly discussed within the same formalism. We use this method to compute all finite master integrals needed up to three loops. Finally, we remark that all integrals have simple Mandelstam representations.

  7. Hexagon Wilson Loop OPE and Harmonic Polylogarithms

    CERN Document Server

    Papathanasiou, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    A recent, integrability-based conjecture in the framework of the Wilson loop OPE for N=4 SYM theory, predicts the leading OPE contribution for the hexagon MHV remainder function and NMHV ratio function to all loops, in integral form. We prove that these integrals evaluate to a particular basis of harmonic polylogarithms, at any order in the weak coupling expansion. The proof constitutes an algorithm for the direct computation of the integrals, which we employ in order to obtain the full (N)MHV OPE contribution in question up to 6 loops, and certain parts of it up to 12 loops. We attach computer-readable files with our results, as well as an algorithm implementation which may be readily used to generate higher-loop corrections. The feasibility of obtaining the explicit kinematical dependence of the first term in the OPE in principle at arbitrary loop order, offers promise for the suitability of this approach as a non-perturbative description of Wilson loops/scattering amplitudes.

  8. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  9. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Johanneke L H C; Tournier, Carole; Knoop, Janine E; Kooyman, Gonnie; Smit, Gerrit

    2009-05-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various stimulation conditions involving relative changes in NaCl concentration of 20% and 38%. Changes in salt delivery profile had similar effect on saltiness perception when delivered either by a sipwise method or by a gustometer. The impact of concentration variations and frequency of concentration changes was further investigated with the gustometer method. Five second boosts and 2 s pulses were delivered during 3 sequential 10-s intervals, whereas the delivered total salt content was the same for all conditions. Two second pulses were found to increase saltiness perception, but only when the pulses were delivered during the first seconds of stimulation. Results suggest that the frequency, timing, and concentration differences of salt stimuli can affect saltiness. Specifically, a short and intense stimulus can increase salt perception, possibly through a reduction of adaptation.

  10. Salt intake, plasma sodium, and worldwide salt reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng J; Macgregor, Graham A

    2012-06-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that a reduction in salt intake from the current level of approximately 9-12 g/d in most countries of the world to the recommended level of 5-6 g/d lowers blood pressure (BP) in both hypertensive and normotensive individuals. A further reduction to 3-4 g/d has a greater effect. Prospective studies and outcome trials have demonstrated that a lower salt intake is related to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Cost-effectiveness analyses have documented that salt reduction is more or at the very least just as cost-effective as tobacco control in reducing cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The mechanisms whereby salt raises blood pressure and increases cardiovascular risk are not fully understood. The existing concepts focus on the tendency for an increase in extracellular fluid volume. Increasing evidence suggests that small increases in plasma sodium may have a direct effect on BP and the cardiovascular system, independent of extracellular volume. All countries should adopt a coherent and workable strategy to reduce salt intake in the whole population. Even a modest reduction in population salt intake will have major beneficial effects on health, along with major cost savings.

  11. A hydrogen sulfate salt of chlordiazepoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Diesen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of the hydrogen sulfate salt of chlordiazepoxide (systematic name: 7-chloro-N-methyl-5-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-iminium 4-oxide hydrogen sulfate, C16H15ClN3O+·HSO4−, were obtained from a solution of chlordiazepoxide and sulfuric acid in methanol. The structure features chlordiazepoxide molecules that are protonated at the imine N atom. The seven-membered ring adopts a boat conformation with the CH2 group as the prow and the two aryl C atoms as the stern. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 72.41 (6°. In the crystal, the HSO4− anion acts as a bridging group between two chlordiazepoxide cations. The H atom of the protonated imino N forms an N—H...O hydrogen bond with a hydrogen sulfate ion. The anion in turn forms two hydrogen bonds, O—H...O with the anion as donor and N—H...O with the anion as acceptor, to generate an R22(10 loop. Each HSO4− anion connects two chlordiazepoxide moieties of the same chirality.

  12. Monitoring High Velocity Salt Tracer via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - Possibility for Salt Tracer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doro, K. O.; Cirpka, O. A.; Patzelt, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeological testing in a tomographic sequence as shown by the use of hydraulic tomography, allows an improvement of the spatial resolution of subsurface parameters. In this regard, recent studies show increasing interest in tracer tomography which involves sequential and spatially separated tracer injections and the measurement of their corresponding tracer breakthrough at different locations and depths. Such concentration measurements however require large experimental efforts and can be simplified by geophysical tracer monitoring techniques such as electrical resistivity. In this study, we present the use of 4-D, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for monitoring salt tracer experiments in high velocity flow fields. For our study, we utilized a set up that enables the conduction of salt tracer experiments with complete recovery within 84 hours over a transport distance of 16 m. This allows the repetition of the experiments with different injection depths for a tomographic salt tracer testing. For ERT monitoring, we designed modular borehole electrodes for repeated usage in a flexible manner. We also assess the use of a high speed resistivity data acquisition mode for field scale tracer monitoring ensuring high spatial and temporal resolution without sacrificing data accuracy. We applied our approach at the Lauswiesen test site, Tübingen, Germany. In our 10 m × 10 m tracer monitoring domain with 16 borehole electrodes, we acquired 4650 data points in less than 18 minutes for each monitoring cycle. Inversion results show that the tracer could be successfully imaged using this approach. The results show that repeated salt tracer tests can be efficiently monitored at a high resolution with ERT which gives the possibility for salt tracer tomography at field scale. Our results also provide a data base for extending current hydrogeophysical inversion approaches to field scale data.

  13. Interaction energy of interface dislocation loops in piezoelectric bi-crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Interface dislocations may dramatically change the electric properties, such as polarization, of the piezoelectric crystals. In this paper, we study the linear interactions of two interface dislocation loops with arbitrary shape in generally anisotropic piezoelectric bi-crystals. A simple formula for calculating the interaction energy of the interface dislocation loops is derived and given by a double line integral along two closed dislocation curves. Particularly, interactions between two straight segments of the interface dislocations are solved analytically, which can be applied to approximate any curved loop so that an analytical solution can be also achieved. Numerical results show the influence of the bi-crystal interface as well as the material orientation on the interaction of interface dislocation loops.

  14. Numerical simulations of loops heated to solar flare temperatures. III - Asymmetrical heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-C.; Doschek, G. A.; Karpen, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model is defined for asymmetric full solar flare loop heating and comparisons are made with observational data. The Dynamic Flux Tube Model is used to describe the heating process in terms of one-dimensional, two fluid conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum. An adaptive grid allows for the downward movement of the transition region caused by an advancing conduction front. A loop 20,000 km long is considered, along with a flare heating system and the hydrodynamic evolution of the loop. The model was applied to generating line profiles and spatial X-ray and UV line distributions, which were compared with SMM, P78-1 and Hintori data for Fe, Ca and Mg spectra. Little agreement was obtained, and it is suggested that flares be treated as multi-loop phenomena. Finally, it is concluded that chromospheric evaporation is not an effective mechanism for generating the soft X-ray bursts associated with flares.

  15. In-Silico Identification Of Micro-Loops In Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Dominik; Brandl, Miriam; Pham, Tuan D.; Chang, Chung-Che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-06-01

    Micro-loops are regulatory network motifs that leverage transcriptional and posttranscriptional control to effectively regulate the transcriptome. In this paper a regulatory network for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDSs) was constructed from the literature and publicly available data sources. The network was filtered using data from deep-sequencing of small RNAs, exon and microarrays. Motif discovery showed that micro-loops might exist in MDS. We further used the identified micro-loops and performed basic network analysis to identify the known disease gene RUNX1/AML, as well as miRNA family hsa-mir-181. This suggested that the concept of micro-loops can be applied to enhance disease gene identification and biomarker discovery.

  16. System Design Description Salt Well Liquid Pumping Dynamic Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-12-14

    The Salt Well Liquid (SWL) Pumping Dynamic Simulation used by the single-shell tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Project is described. A graphical dynamic simulation predicts SWL removal from 29 SSTs using an exponential function and unique time constant for each SST. Increasing quarterly efficiencies are applied to adjust the pumping rates during fiscal year 2000.

  17. Effects of salicylic acid on wheat salt sensitivity | Erdal | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like endogenous regulator, and there is a great interest to clarify its role in the defence mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stressors. In this study, investigations on the effects of foliar-applied SA on salt sensitivity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) ...

  18. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 721.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal salts... provisions of subpart A of this part apply to this section except as modified by this paragraph. (1...

  19. 40 CFR 721.333 - Dimethyl alkylamine salt (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). 721.333 Section 721.333 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as a Dimethyl alkylamine salt... provisions of subpart A of this part apply to this section except as modified by this paragraph. (1...

  20. 40 CFR 721.638 - Silyl amine, potassium salt (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). 721.638 Section 721.638 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as silyl amine, potassium salt... A of this part apply to this section except as modified by this paragraph. (1) Recordkeeping...

  1. 40 CFR 721.562 - Substituted alkylamine salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 721.562 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted alkylamine salt (PMN P-85-941... subpart A of this part apply to this section except as modified by this paragraph. (1) Recordkeeping...

  2. Salt intrusion study in Cochin estuary - Using empirical models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jacob, B.; Revichandran, C.; NaveenKumar, K.R.

    been applied to the Cochin estuary in the present study to identify the most suitable model for predicting the salt intrusion length. Comparison of the obtained results indicate that the model of Van der Burgh (1972) is the most suitable empirical model...

  3. Construction of the blowdown and condensation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choon Kyung; Song, Chul Kyung; Cho, Seok; Chun, S. Y.; Chung, Moon Ki

    1997-12-01

    The blowdown and condensation loop (B and C loop) has been constructed to get experimental data for designing the safety depressurization system (SDS) and steam sparger which are considered to implement in the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). In this report, system description on the B and C loop is given in detail, which includes the drawings and technical specification of each component, instrumentation and control system, and the operational procedures and the results of the performance testing. (author). 7 refs., 11 tabs., 48 figs.

  4. Polyakov loop correlator in perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwein, Matthias; Brambilla, Nora; Petreczky, Péter; Vairo, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    We study the Polyakov loop correlator in the weak coupling expansion and show how the perturbative series reexponentiates into singlet and adjoint contributions. We calculate the order g7 correction to the Polyakov loop correlator in the short distance limit. We show how the singlet and adjoint free energies arising from the reexponentiation formula of the Polyakov loop correlator are related to the gauge invariant singlet and octet free energies that can be defined in pNRQCD, namely we find that the two definitions agree at leading order in the multipole expansion, but differ at first order in the quark-antiquark distance.

  5. Salting-in and salting-out of water-soluble polymers in aqueous salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Jahani, Farahnaz

    2012-05-03

    To obtain further experimental evidence for the mechanisms of the salting effect produced by the addition of salting-out or sating-in inducing electrolytes to aqueous solutions of water-soluble polymers, systematic studies on the vapor-liquid equilibria and liquid-liquid equilibria of aqueous solutions of several polymers are performed in the presence of a large series of electrolytes. Polymers are polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 250 (PEGDME250), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 2000 (PEGDME2000), and polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG400), and the investigated electrolytes are KCl, NH(4)Cl, MgCl(2), (CH(3))(4)NCl, NaCl, NaNO(3), Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit (tri-sodium citrate). Aqueous solutions of PPG400 form aqueous two-phase systems with all the investigated salts; however, other investigated polymers form aqueous two-phase systems only with Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit. A relation was found between the salting-out or sating-in effects of electrolyte on the polymer aqueous solutions and the slopes of the constant water activity lines of ternary polymer-salt aqueous solutions, so that, in the case of the salting-out effect, the constant water activity lines had a concave slope, but in the case of the salting-in effects, the constant water activity lines had a convex slope. The effect of temperature, anion of electrolyte, cation of electrolyte, and type and molar mass of polymers were studied and the results interpreted in terms of the solute-water and solute-solute interactions. The salting-out effect results from the formation of ion (specially anion)-water hydration complexes, which, in turn, decreases hydration, and hence, the solubility of the polymer and the salting-in effect results from a direct binding of the cations to the ether oxygens of the polymers.

  6. Plant microbial fuel cell applied in wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetser, Koen; Liu, Jia; Buisman, Cees; Strik, David

    2015-01-01

    The plant microbial fuel cell (PMFC) has to be applied in wetlands to be able to generate electricity on a large scale. The objective of this PMFC application research is to clarify the differences in electricity generation between a Spartina anglica salt marsh and Phragmites australis peat soil

  7. Eigenvalue distributions of Wilson loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmayer, Robert

    2010-07-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we focus on the distribution of the eigenvalues of the unitary Wilson loop matrix in the two-dimensional case at arbitrary finite N. To characterize the distribution of the eigenvalues, we introduce three density functions (the ''symmetric'', the ''antisymmetric'', and the ''true'' eigenvalue density) which differ at finite N but possess the same infinite-N limit, exhibiting the Durhuus-Olesen phase transition. Using expansions of determinants and inverse determinants in characters of totally symmetric or totally antisymmetric representations of SU(N), the densities at finite N can be expressed in terms of simple sums involving only dimensions and quadratic Casimir invariants of certain irreducible representations of SU(N), allowing for a numerical computation of the densities at arbitrary N to any desired accuracy. We find that the true eigenvalue density, adding N oscillations to the monotonic symmetric density, is in some sense intermediate between the symmetric and the antisymmetric density, which in turn is given by a sum of N delta peaks located at the zeros of the average of the characteristic polynomial. Furthermore, we show that the dependence on N can be made explicit by deriving integral representations for the resolvents associated to the three eigenvalue densities. Using saddle-point approximations, we confirm that all three densities reduce to the Durhuus-Olesen result in the infinite-N limit. In the second part, we study an exponential form of the multiplicative random complex matrix model introduced by Gudowska-Nowak et al. Varying a parameter which can be identified with the area of the Wilson loop in the unitary case, the region of non-vanishing eigenvalue density of the N-dimensional complex product matrix undergoes a topological change at a transition point in the infinite-N limit. We study the transition by a detailed analysis of the average of the

  8. Application of fuzzy inference system by Sugeno method on estimating of salt production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, Tony; Komariyah, Siti; Ulfaniyah, Nurita

    2017-08-01

    Salt is one of the most important needs in everyday life. Making traditional salt largely is done by smallholder farmers in addition by manufacturers of industrial salt. factors that affect the production of salt include seawater, soil, water influence and weather conditions including rainfall wind speed and solar radiation or long dry erratic, these conditions obviously affect the salt farmers that will affect the production quantities of salt produced by salt farmers. In this study, the fuzzy logic method is applied to Sugeno fuzzy inference systems to estimate the production of salt by variables - variables that affect it. This study aims to estimate how much production by applying fuzzy inference systems zero-order Sugeno method based on the variable wind speed, solar radiation, rainfall and the amount of production. Retrieval of data obtained from the Air Quality Meteorology and Geophysics. salt farmers in Pamekasan District of Pademawu Village Majungan. Data taken within 2 years per week from June to December of 2014 and 2015. The Sugeno fuzzy logic model in this study using output (consequent) in the form of equation constants (Sugeno models Order zero). Apparently from the research results obtained by the error value most low at 0.0917, so it can be said to be close to zero.

  9. Mathematical Structure of Loop Quantum Cosmology: Homogeneous Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bojowald

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical structure of homogeneous loop quantum cosmology is analyzed, starting with and taking into account the general classification of homogeneous connections not restricted to be Abelian. As a first consequence, it is seen that the usual approach of quantizing Abelian models using spaces of functions on the Bohr compactification of the real line does not capture all properties of homogeneous connections. A new, more general quantization is introduced which applies to non-Abelian models and, in the Abelian case, can be mapped by an isometric, but not unitary, algebra morphism onto common representations making use of the Bohr compactification. Physically, the Bohr compactification of spaces of Abelian connections leads to a degeneracy of edge lengths and representations of holonomies. Lifting this degeneracy, the new quantization gives rise to several dynamical properties, including lattice refinement seen as a direct consequence of state-dependent regularizations of the Hamiltonian constraint of loop quantum gravity. The representation of basic operators - holonomies and fluxes - can be derived from the full theory specialized to lattices. With the new methods of this article, loop quantum cosmology comes closer to the full theory and is in a better position to produce reliable predictions when all quantum effects of the theory are taken into account.

  10. Microbiology of solar salt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, B.

    1985-01-01

    Solar salt ponds are shallow ponds of brines that range in salinity from that of normal seawater (3.4 percent) through NaCl saturation. Some salterns evaporate brines to the potash stage of concentration (bitterns). All the brines (except the bitterns, which are devoid of life) harbor high concentrations of microorganisms. The high concentrations of microorganisms and their adaptation to life in the salt pond are discussed.

  11. Recycling of aluminum salt cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1991-12-01

    The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.

  12. Homolytic reduction of onium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensterbank, Louis; Goddard, Jean-Philippe; Malacria, Max; Ollivier, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Onium salts have proved to be efficient sources of carbon-centered radicals. They can undergo homolytic reduction by single electron transfer (SET) and participate in subsequent synthetic transformations. This review aims to provide an overview on the behavior of onium salts including diazonium, sulfonium, selenonium, telluronium, phosphonium and iodonium cations toward various reductive methods such as radiolysis, electrolysis, photolysis or the use of SET reagents. Mechanistic and synthetic aspects are presented. Applications in polymers and materials science are not covered.

  13. Microplastics in Spanish Table Salt

    OpenAIRE

    I?iguez, Maria E.; Conesa, Juan A.; Fullana, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Marine debris is widely recognized as a global environmental problem. One of its main components, microplastics, has been found in several sea salt samples from different countries, indicating that sea products are irremediably contaminated by microplastics. Previous studies show very confusing results, reporting amounts of microparticles (MPs) in salt ranging from zero to 680 MPs/kg, with no mention of the possible causes of such differences. Several errors in the experimental procedures use...

  14. Liking, salt taste perception and use of table salt when consuming reduced-salt chicken stews in light of South Africa's new salt regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kock, H L; Zandstra, E H; Sayed, N; Wentzel-Viljoen, E

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of salt reduction on liking, salt taste perception, and use of table salt when consuming chicken stew in light of South Africa's new salt recommendations. In total, 432 South-African consumers (aged 35.2 ± 12.3 years) consumed a full portion of a chicken stew meal once at a central location. Four stock cube powders varying in salt content were used to prepare chicken stews: 1) no reduction - 2013 Na level; regular salt level as currently available on the South African market (24473 mg Na/100 g), 2) salt reduction smaller than 2016 level, i.e. 10%-reduced (22025 mg Na/100 g), 3) 2016 salt level, as per regulatory prescriptions (18000 mg Na/100 g), 4) 2019 salt level, as per regulatory prescriptions (13000 mg Na/100 g). Consumers were randomly allocated to consume one of the four meals. Liking, salt taste perception, and use of table salt and pepper were measured. Chicken stews prepared with reduced-salt stock powders were equally well-liked as chicken stews with the current salt level. Moreover, a gradual reduction of the salt in the chicken stews resulted in a reduced salt intake, up to an average of 19% for the total group compared to the benchmark 2013 Na level stew. However, 19% of consumers compensated by adding salt back to full compensation in some cases. More salt was added with increased reductions of salt in the meals, even to the point of full compensation. Further investigation into the impacts of nutrition communication and education about salt reduction on salt taste perception and use is needed. This research provides new consumer insights on salt use and emphasises the need for consumer-focused behaviour change approaches, in addition to reformulation of products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Strain measurements of a fiber loop rosette using high spatial resolution Rayleigh scatter distributed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Dawn K.; Sang, Alex K.; Kreger, Steven T.; Froggatt, Mark E.

    2010-09-01

    Strain is measured with high spatial resolution on fiber loops bonded to a metal test sample to form a fiber rosette. Strain measurements are made using an Optical Backscatter Reflectometer to detect changes in the phase of the Rayleigh Scatter of the fiber with 160 μm spatial resolution along the length of the fiber. Using this experimental set-up, applied strain levels as well as the axis along which the loads are applied are measured. Thermal gradients are also detected. The high spatial resolution and strain sensitivity of this technique enable highly functional fiber rosettes formed of small diameter loops of standard low-bend-loss optical fiber.

  16. A closer look at salt loaded microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, M.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Many walls of ancient buildings are covered with plaster layers. Amongst the most recurrent causes of damage of plasters and substrates are moisture and salt decay processes. To combat these salt problems, special salt resistant plasters have been developed for application on salt loaded substrates.

  17. Loop Diuretics in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malha, Line; Mann, Samuel J

    2016-04-01

    Loop diuretics are not recommended in current hypertension guidelines largely due to the lack of outcome data. Nevertheless, they have been shown to lower blood pressure and to offer potential advantages over thiazide-type diuretics. Torsemide offers advantages of longer duration of action and once daily dosing (vs. furosemide and bumetanide) and more reliable bioavailability (vs. furosemide). Studies show that the previously employed high doses of thiazide-type diuretics lower BP more than furosemide. Loop diuretics appear to have a preferable side effect profile (less hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and possibly less glucose intolerance). Studies comparing efficacy and side effect profiles of loop diuretics with the lower, currently widely prescribed, thiazide doses are needed. Research is needed to fill gaps in knowledge and common misconceptions about loop diuretic use in hypertension and to determine their rightful place in the antihypertensive arsenal.

  18. Force distribution in a semiflexible loop

    CERN Document Server

    Waters, James T

    2016-01-01

    Loops undergoing thermal fluctuations are prevalent in nature. Ring-like or cross-linked polymers, cyclic macromolecules, and protein-mediated DNA loops all belong to this category. Stability of these molecules are generally described in terms of free energy, an average quantity, but it may also be impacted by local fluctuating forces acting within these systems. The full distribution of these forces can thus give us insights into mechanochemistry beyond the predictive capability of thermodynamics. In this paper, we study the force exerted by an inextensible semiflexible polymer constrained in a looped state. By using a novel simulation method termed "phase-space sampling", we generate the equilibrium distribution of chain conformations in both position and momentum space. We compute the constraint forces between the two ends of the loop in this chain ensemble using Lagrangian mechanics, and show that the mean of these forces is equal to the thermodynamic force. By analyzing kinetic and potential contribution...

  19. A theory of desynchronisable closed loop system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Beohar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The task of implementing a supervisory controller is non-trivial, even though different theories exist that allow automatic synthesis of these controllers in the form of automata. One of the reasons for this discord is due to the asynchronous interaction between a plant and its controller in implementations, whereas the existing supervisory control theories assume synchronous interaction. As a consequence the implementation suffer from the so-called inexact synchronisation problem. In this paper we address the issue of inexact synchronisation in a process algebraic setting, by solving a more general problem of refinement. We construct an asynchronous closed loop system by introducing a communication medium in a given synchronous closed loop system. Our goal is to find sufficient conditions under which a synchronous closed loop system is branching bisimilar to its corresponding asynchronous closed loop system.

  20. Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTC has a suite of Hardware-in-the Loop facilities that include three operational facilities that provide performance assessment and production acceptance testing of...

  1. Nonequilibrium Chromosome Looping via Molecular Slip Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackley, C. A.; Johnson, J.; Michieletto, D.; Morozov, A. N.; Nicodemi, M.; Cook, P. R.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2017-09-01

    We propose a model for the formation of chromatin loops based on the diffusive sliding of molecular slip links. These mimic the behavior of molecules like cohesin, which, along with the CTCF protein, stabilize loops which contribute to organizing the genome. By combining 3D Brownian dynamics simulations and 1D exactly solvable nonequilibrium models, we show that diffusive sliding is sufficient to account for the strong bias in favor of convergent CTCF-mediated chromosome loops observed experimentally. We also find that the diffusive motion of multiple slip links along chromatin is rectified by an intriguing ratchet effect that arises if slip links bind to the chromatin at a preferred "loading site." This emergent collective behavior favors the extrusion of loops which are much larger than the ones formed by single slip links.

  2. Estimation of Parametric Fault in Closed-loop Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a method for estimation of parametric faults in closed-loop systems. The key technology applied in this paper is coprime factorization of both the dynamic system as well as the feedback controller. Using the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization......, it is shown that a certain matrix transfer function, the fault signature matrix, is an LFT (linear fractional transformation) of the parametric faults. Further, for limit parametric faults, the fault signature matrix transfer function can be approximated with a linear matrix function of the parametric faults....

  3. Dual conformal transformations of smooth holographic Wilson loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekel, Amit [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-01-19

    We study dual conformal transformations of minimal area surfaces in AdS{sub 5}×S{sup 5} corresponding to holographic smooth Wilson loops and some other related observables. To act with dual conformal transformations we map the string solutions to the dual space by means of T-duality, then we apply a conformal transformation and finally T-dualize back to the original space. The transformation maps between string solutions with different boundary contours. The boundary contours of the minimal surfaces are not mapped back to the AdS boundary, and the regularized area of the surface changes.

  4. Benchmarking and Hardware-In-The-Loop Operation of a ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engine Performance evaluation in support of LD MTE. EPA used elements of its ALPHA model to apply hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) controls to the SKYACTIV engine test setup to better understand how the engine would operate in a chassis test after combined with future leading edge technologies, advanced high-efficiency transmission, reduced mass, and reduced roadload. Predict future vehicle performance with Atkinson engine. As part of its technology assessment for the upcoming midterm evaluation of the 2017-2025 LD vehicle GHG emissions regulation, EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its ALPHA model

  5. Modulation of DNA loop lifetimes by the free energy of loop formation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Mulligan, Peter; Spakowitz, Andrew J; Phillips, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Storage and retrieval of the genetic information in cells is a dynamic process that requires the DNA to undergo dramatic structural rearrangements. DNA looping is a prominent example of such a structural rearrangement that is essential for transcriptional regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and the speed of such regulations affects the fitness of individuals. Here, we examine the in vitro looping dynamics of the classic Lac repressor gene-regulatory motif. We show that both loop association and loop dissociation at the DNA-repressor junctions depend on the elastic deformation of the DNA and protein, and that both looping and unlooping rates approximately scale with the looping J factor, which reflects the system's deformation free energy. We explain this observation by transition state theory and model the DNA-protein complex as an effective worm-like chain with twist. We introduce a finite protein-DNA binding interaction length, in competition with the characteristic DNA deformation length scale, ...

  6. Flow effect on {sup 135}I and {sup 135}Xe evolution behavior in a molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianhui; Guo, Chen [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Cai, Xiangzhou [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yu, Chenggang; Zou, Chunyan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Han, Jianlong [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Jingen, E-mail: chenjg@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • {sup 135}Xe and {sup 135}I evolution law in a molten salt reactor is analytically deduced. • The circulation of fuel salt through the primary loop decreases the concentration of {sup 135}I and {sup 135}Xe. • {sup 135}I and {sup 135}Xe concentration reduction is independent with the mass flow rate at normal core operating condition. • Increasing the external core volume would raise {sup 135}I and {sup 135}Xe concentration reduction caused by the flow effect. - Abstract: Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs fissile material dissolved in the fluoride salt as fuel which continuously circulates through the primary loop with the flow cycle time being a few tens of seconds. The nuclei evolution law is quite different from that in a solid fuel reactor. In this paper, we analytically deduce the nuclei evolution law of {sup 135}Xe and {sup 135}I which are entrained in the flowing salt, evaluate its concentration changing with the burnup time, and validate the result with the SCALE6. The circulation of fuel salt could decrease the concentration of {sup 135}Xe and {sup 135}I, and the reduction can achieve to around 40% and 50% for {sup 135}Xe and {sup 135}I respectively at a small power level (e.g., 2 MW) when the core has the same fuel salt volume as that of the outer-loop. Furthermore, it can be found that the reduction is inversely proportional to the core to outer-loop volume ratio, but uncorrelated with the mass flow rate under normal operating condition of a MSR. At low core power scale, the flow effect on {sup 135}Xe concentration reduction is apparent, but it is mitigated as the core power scale increases because of the rise of {sup 135}I concentration, which raises its decay to {sup 135}Xe and compensates the loss of {sup 135}Xe due to decay at the outer-loop. The decreased {sup 135}Xe concentration results in a core reactivity increase varying from around 150 pcm to 1000 pcm depending on the core power and core to outer-loop volume ratio.

  7. Laser welding closed-loop power control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    A closed-loop control system is developed to maintain an even seam width on the root side of a laser weld by continually controlling the output laser power of a 1500 W CO2 laser.......A closed-loop control system is developed to maintain an even seam width on the root side of a laser weld by continually controlling the output laser power of a 1500 W CO2 laser....

  8. Design configurations of the methanol synthesis loop

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhn, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the chemical industry has undergone considerable changes due to increased environmental regulations and energy costs. This master thesis has evaluated three different design considerations of the methanol synthesis loop using Honeywell's general purpose process simulator UniSim Design (R380 Build 14027) combined with MathWorks programming language MATLAB. The three configurations are Lurgis methanol reactor loop as built on Tjeldbergodden, the use of interstage methanol remova...

  9. Loop residues and catalysis in OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Gary P.; Hansen, Michael Riis; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2012-01-01

    (preceding paper in this issue, DOI 10.1021/bi300083p)]. The full expression of KIEs by H105A and E107A may result from a less secure closure of the catalytic loop. The lower level of expression of the KIE by K103A suggests that in these mutant proteins the major barrier to catalysis is successful closure...... of the catalytic loop, which when closed, produces rapid and reversible catalysis....

  10. Temperature effects on geotechnical and hydraulic properties of bentonite hydrated with inorganic salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, H. M. A.; Kawamoto, K.; Saito, T.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, International Journal of GEOMATE. This study investigated the combined effect of temperature and single-species salt solutions on geotechnical properties (swell index and liquid limit) and hydraulic conductivity of bentonite applying different cation types, concentrations, and temperatures...

  11. Optimal Pipe Size Design for Looped Irrigation Water Supply System Using Harmony Search: Saemangeum Project Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Min; Sadollah, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Water supply systems are mainly classified into branched and looped network systems. The main difference between these two systems is that, in a branched network system, the flow within each pipe is a known value, whereas in a looped network system, the flow in each pipe is considered an unknown value. Therefore, an analysis of a looped network system is a more complex task. This study aims to develop a technique for estimating the optimal pipe diameter for a looped agricultural irrigation water supply system using a harmony search algorithm, which is an optimization technique. This study mainly serves two purposes. The first is to develop an algorithm and a program for estimating a cost-effective pipe diameter for agricultural irrigation water supply systems using optimization techniques. The second is to validate the developed program by applying the proposed optimized cost-effective pipe diameter to an actual study region (Saemangeum project area, zone 6). The results suggest that the optimal design program, which applies an optimization theory and enhances user convenience, can be effectively applied for the real systems of a looped agricultural irrigation water supply. PMID:25874252

  12. Academic training: Applied superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    LECTURE SERIES 17, 18, 19 January from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs Council Room, Bldg 503 Applied Superconductivity : Theory, superconducting Materials and applications E. PALMIERI/INFN, Padova, Italy When hearing about persistent currents recirculating for several years in a superconducting loop without any appreciable decay, one realizes that we are dealing with a phenomenon which in nature is the closest known to the perpetual motion. Zero resistivity and perfect diamagnetism in Mercury at 4.2 K, the breakthrough during 75 years of several hundreds of superconducting materials, the revolution of the "liquid Nitrogen superconductivity"; the discovery of still a binary compound becoming superconducting at 40 K and the subsequent re-exploration of the already known superconducting materials: Nature discloses drop by drop its intimate secrets and nobody can exclude that the last final surprise must still come. After an overview of phenomenology and basic theory of superconductivity, the lectures for this a...

  13. Multiple Flow Loop SCADA System Implemented on the Production Prototype Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baily, Scott A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wheat, Robert Mitchell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-16

    The following report covers FY 15 activities to develop supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the Northstar Moly99 production prototype gas flow loop. The goal of this effort is to expand the existing system to include a second flow loop with a larger production-sized blower. Besides testing the larger blower, this system will demonstrate the scalability of our solution to multiple flow loops.

  14. Space Station evolution study oxygen loop closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. G.; Delong, D.

    1993-01-01

    In the current Space Station Freedom (SSF) Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC), physical scars for closing the oxygen loop by the addition of oxygen generation and carbon dioxide reduction hardware are not included. During station restructuring, the capability for oxygen loop closure was deferred to the B-modules. As such, the ability to close the oxygen loop in the U.S. Laboratory module (LAB A) and the Habitation A module (HAB A) is contingent on the presence of the B modules. To base oxygen loop closure of SSF on the funding of the B-modules may not be desirable. Therefore, this study was requested to evaluate the necessary hooks and scars in the A-modules to facilitate closure of the oxygen loop at or subsequent to PMC. The study defines the scars for oxygen loop closure with impacts to cost, weight and volume and assesses the effects of byproduct venting. In addition, the recommended scenarios for closure with regard to topology and packaging are presented.

  15. A note on two-loop superloop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belitsky, A.V., E-mail: Andrei.Belitsky@asu.edu [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    We explore the duality between supersymmetric Wilson loop on null polygonal contours in maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory and next-to-maximal helicity violating (NMHV) scattering amplitudes. Earlier analyses demonstrated that the use of a dimensional regulator for ultraviolet divergences, induced due to presence of the cusps on the loop, yields anomalies that break both conformal symmetry and supersymmetry. At one-loop order, these are present only in Grassmann components localized in the vicinity of a single cusp and result in a universal function for any number of sites of the polygon that can be subtracted away in a systematic manner leaving a well-defined supersymmetric remainder dual to corresponding components of the superamplitude. The question remains though whether components which were free from the aforementioned supersymmetric anomaly at leading order of perturbation theory remain so once computed at higher orders. Presently we verify this fact by calculating a particular component of the null polygonal super Wilson loop at two loops restricting the contour kinematics to a two-dimensional subspace. This allows one to perform all computations in a concise analytical form and trace the pattern of cancellations between individual Feynman graphs in a transparent fashion. As a consequence of our consideration we obtain a dual conformally invariant result for the remainder function in agreement with one-loop NMHV amplitudes.

  16. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2

  17. A linear relationship between wave power and erosion determines salt-marsh resilience to violent storms and hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Ganju, Neil K; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2016-01-05

    Salt marsh losses have been documented worldwide because of land use change, wave erosion, and sea-level rise. It is still unclear how resistant salt marshes are to extreme storms and whether they can survive multiple events without collapsing. Based on a large dataset of salt marsh lateral erosion rates collected around the world, here, we determine the general response of salt marsh boundaries to wave action under normal and extreme weather conditions. As wave energy increases, salt marsh response to wind waves remains linear, and there is not a critical threshold in wave energy above which salt marsh erosion drastically accelerates. We apply our general formulation for salt marsh erosion to historical wave climates at eight salt marsh locations affected by hurricanes in the United States. Based on the analysis of two decades of data, we find that violent storms and hurricanes contribute less than 1% to long-term salt marsh erosion rates. In contrast, moderate storms with a return period of 2.5 mo are those causing the most salt marsh deterioration. Therefore, salt marshes seem more susceptible to variations in mean wave energy rather than changes in the extremes. The intrinsic resistance of salt marshes to violent storms and their predictable erosion rates during moderate events should be taken into account by coastal managers in restoration projects and risk management plans.

  18. Diffusion in the pore water of compacted crushed salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Judith; Herr, Sebastian; Lauke, Thomas; Meleshyn, Artur; Miehe, Ruediger; Ruebel, Andre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion of dissolved radionuclides in the pore water of compacted crushed salt in the long-term is the most relevant process for the release of radionuclides from a dedicated repository for high-level waste in a salt formation as has been shown in latest safety assessments and research projects /BUH 16/. So far, diffusion coefficients for free water have been applied for the diffusion in pore water in models for long-term safety assessments. This conservative assumption was used, because data on the diffusion coefficient of dissolved substances in crushed salt have been missing. Furthermore, the diffusion coefficient in the pore water was assumed to be constant and independent from the degree of compaction of the crushed salt. The work presented in this report was intended to contribute to fill this gap of knowledge about how the diffusion of radionuclides takes place in the compacted backfill of a repository in salt. For the first time, the pore diffusion coefficient as well as its dependence on the porosity of the crushed salt was determined experimentally by means of through-diffusion experiments using caesium as tracer. The results achieved in this project suggest that the diffusion in compacted crushed salt is not fully comparable to that in a homogeneous, temporally stable porous medium like sand or clay. The results obtained from four diffusion experiments show a remarkably different behaviour and all yield unique concentration versus time plots which includes highly temporal variable tracer fluxes with even full interruptions of the flux for longer periods of time. This effect cannot be explained by assuming a tracer transport by diffusion in a temporarily invariant pore space and / or under temporally invariant experimental conditions. From our point of view, a restructuring of the pore space seems to lead to closed areas of pore water in the sample which may open up again after some time, leading to a variable pore space and hence variable diffusive

  19. A proof for loop-law constraints in stoichiometric metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Elad; Lewis, Nathan E; Milo, Ron

    2012-11-12

    Constraint-based modeling is increasingly employed for metabolic network analysis. Its underlying assumption is that natural metabolic phenotypes can be predicted by adding physicochemical constraints to remove unrealistic metabolic flux solutions. The loopless-COBRA approach provides an additional constraint that eliminates thermodynamically infeasible internal cycles (or loops) from the space of solutions. This allows the prediction of flux solutions that are more consistent with experimental data. However, it is not clear if this approach over-constrains the models by removing non-loop solutions as well. Here we apply Gordan's theorem from linear algebra to prove for the first time that the constraints added in loopless-COBRA do not over-constrain the problem beyond the elimination of the loops themselves. The loopless-COBRA constraints can be reliably applied. Furthermore, this proof may be adapted to evaluate the theoretical soundness for other methods in constraint-based modeling.

  20. A proof for loop-law constraints in stoichiometric metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Elad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constraint-based modeling is increasingly employed for metabolic network analysis. Its underlying assumption is that natural metabolic phenotypes can be predicted by adding physicochemical constraints to remove unrealistic metabolic flux solutions. The loopless-COBRA approach provides an additional constraint that eliminates thermodynamically infeasible internal cycles (or loops from the space of solutions. This allows the prediction of flux solutions that are more consistent with experimental data. However, it is not clear if this approach over-constrains the models by removing non-loop solutions as well. Results Here we apply Gordan’s theorem from linear algebra to prove for the first time that the constraints added in loopless-COBRA do not over-constrain the problem beyond the elimination of the loops themselves. Conclusions The loopless-COBRA constraints can be reliably applied. Furthermore, this proof may be adapted to evaluate the theoretical soundness for other methods in constraint-based modeling.

  1. A proof for loop-law constraints in stoichiometric metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Constraint-based modeling is increasingly employed for metabolic network analysis. Its underlying assumption is that natural metabolic phenotypes can be predicted by adding physicochemical constraints to remove unrealistic metabolic flux solutions. The loopless-COBRA approach provides an additional constraint that eliminates thermodynamically infeasible internal cycles (or loops) from the space of solutions. This allows the prediction of flux solutions that are more consistent with experimental data. However, it is not clear if this approach over-constrains the models by removing non-loop solutions as well. Results Here we apply Gordan’s theorem from linear algebra to prove for the first time that the constraints added in loopless-COBRA do not over-constrain the problem beyond the elimination of the loops themselves. Conclusions The loopless-COBRA constraints can be reliably applied. Furthermore, this proof may be adapted to evaluate the theoretical soundness for other methods in constraint-based modeling. PMID:23146116

  2. Double closed-loop cascade control for lower limb exoskeleton with elastic actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanhe; Zheng, Tianjiao; Jin, Hongzhe; Yang, Jixing; Zhao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Unlike traditional rigid actuators, the significant features of Series Elastic Actuator (SEA) are stable torque control, lower output impedance, impact resistance and energy storage. Recently, SEA has been applied in many exoskeletons. In such applications, a key issue is how to realize the human-exoskeleton movement coordination. In this paper, double closed-loop cascade control for lower limb exoskeleton with SEA is proposed. This control method consists of inner SEA torque loop and outer contact force loop. Utilizing the SEA torque control with a motor velocity loop, actuation performances of SEA are analyzed. An integrated exoskeleton control system is designed, in which joint angles are calculated by internal encoders and resolvers and contact forces are gathered by external pressure sensors. The double closed-loop cascade control model is established based on the feedback signals of internal and external sensor. Movement experiments are accomplished in our prototype of lower limb exoskeleton. Preliminary results indicate the exoskeleton movements with pilot can be realized stably by utilizing this double closed-loop cascade control method. Feasibility of the SEA in our exoskeleton robot and effectiveness of the control method are verified.

  3. Thumb-loops up for catalysis: a structure/function investigation of a functional loop movement in a GH11 xylanase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Siméon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics is a key feature of enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, current experimental and computational techniques do not yet provide a comprehensive understanding and description of functional macromolecular motions. In this work, we have extended a novel computational technique, which combines molecular modeling methods and robotics algorithms, to investigate functional motions of protein loops. This new approach has been applied to study the functional importance of the so-called thumb-loop in the glycoside hydrolase family 11 xylanase from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus (Tx-xyl. The results obtained provide new insight into the role of the loop in the glycosylation/deglycosylation catalytic cycle, and underline the key importance of the nature of the residue located at the tip of the thumb-loop. The effect of mutations predicted in silico has been validated by in vitro site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Overall, we propose a comprehensive model of Tx-xyl catalysis in terms of substrate and product dynamics by identifying the action of the thumb-loop motion during catalysis.

  4. Proteome profile of salt gland-rich epidermis extracted from a salt-tolerant tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wee-Kee; Ang, Yiqian; Lim, Teck-Kwang; Lim, Tit-Meng; Kumar, Prakash; Loh, Chiang-Shiong; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-10-01

    Preparation of proteins from salt-gland-rich tissues of mangrove plant is necessary for a systematic study of proteins involved in the plant's unique desalination mechanism. Extraction of high-quality proteins from the leaves of mangrove tree species, however, is difficult due to the presence of high levels of endogenous phenolic compounds. In our study, preparation of proteins from only a part of the leaf tissues (i.e. salt gland-rich epidermal layers) was required, rendering extraction even more challenging. By comparing several extraction methods, we developed a reliable procedure for obtaining proteins from salt gland-rich tissues of the mangrove species Avicennia officinalis. Protein extraction was markedly improved using a phenol-based extraction method. Greater resolution 1D protein gel profiles could be obtained. More promising proteome profiles could be obtained through 1D-LC-MS/MS. The number of proteins detected was twice as much as compared to TUTS extraction method. Focusing on proteins that were solely present in each extraction method, phenol-based extracts contained nearly ten times more proteins than those in the extracts without using phenol. The approach could thus be applied for downstream high-throughput proteomic analyses involving LC-MS/MS or equivalent. The proteomics data presented herein are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001691. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ambazone-lipoic acid salt: Structural and thermal characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacso, Irina [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Racz, Csaba-Pal; Santa, Szabolcs [Babes-Bolyai' University, Faculty of Chemistry, 11 Arany Janos street, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rus, Lucia [' Iuliu Hatieganu' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, 6 Louis Pasteur street, 400349 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dadarlat, Dorin; Borodi, Gheorghe [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Bratu, Ioan, E-mail: ibratu@gmail.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2012-12-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt of Ambazone with lipoic acid obtained by solvent-drop grinding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ambazone lipoate salt crystallizes in monoclinic system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR data suggest the deprotonation of the lipoic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal behaviour different of ambazone salt as compared to the starting compounds. - Abstract: A suitable method for increasing the solubility, dissolution rate and consequently the bioavailability of poor soluble acidic or basic drugs is their salt formation. The aim of this study is to investigate the structural and thermal properties of the compound obtained by solvent drop grinding (SDG) method at room temperature, starting from the 1:1 molar ratios of ambazone (AMB) and {alpha}-lipoic acid (LA). The structural characterization was performed with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The thermal behaviour of the obtained compound (AMB{center_dot}LA) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The photopyroelectric calorimetry, in front detection configuration (FPPE), was applied to measure and compare the room temperature values of one dynamic thermal parameter (thermal effusivity) for starting and resulting compounds. Both structural and supporting calorimetric techniques pointed out a salt structure for AMB{center_dot}LA compound as compared to those of the starting materials.

  6. Effect of water in salt repositories. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Gilpatrick, L.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Bronstein, H.R.; Shor, A.J.

    1983-09-01

    Additional results confirm that during most of the consolidation of polycrystalline salt in brine, the previously proposed rate expression applies. The final consolidation, however, proceeds at a lower rate than predicted. The presence of clay hastens the consolidation process but does not greatly affect the previously observed relationship between permeability and void fraction. Studies of the migration of brine within polycrystalline salt specimens under stress indicate that the principal effect is the exclusion of brine as a result of consolidation, a process that evidently can proceed to completion. No clear effect of a temperature gradient could be identified. A previously reported linear increase with time of the reciprocal permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine was confirmed, though the rate of increase appears more nearly proportional to the product of sigma ..delta..P rather than sigma ..delta..P/sup 2/ (sigma is the uniaxial stress normal to the interface and ..delta..P is the hydraulic pressure drop). The new results suggest that a limiting permeability may be reached. A model for the permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine is developed that is reasonably consistent with the present results and may be used to predict the permeability of bedded salt. More measurements are needed, however, to choose between two limiting forms of the model.

  7. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  8. Students' Understanding of Loops and Nested Loops in Computer Programming: An APOS Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore students' understanding of loops and nested loops concepts. Sixty-three mechanical engineering students attending an introductory programming course participated in the study. APOS (Action, Process, Object, Schema) is a constructivist theory developed originally for mathematics education. This study is the…

  9. Quantum hysteresis loops in microscopic system: The loop area as a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of non-zero temperatures are explored with reference to a symmetric double well potential. The barrier crossing or, relaxation rates are shown to correlate systematically with the area of the loop. The possible use of hysteresis loop area in designing field parameters for optimal control is suggested.

  10. Closed-loop seizure control on epileptic rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sheng-Fu; Liao, Yi-Cheng; Shaw, Fu-Zen; Chang, Da-Wei; Young, Chung-Ping; Chiueh, Herming

    2011-08-01

    In this paper numerous alternative treatments in addition to pharmacological therapy are proposed for their use in epileptic patients. Epileptic animal models can play a crucial role in the performance evaluation of new therapeutic techniques. The objective of this research is to first develop various epileptic rat models; second, develop a portable wireless closed-loop seizure controller including on-line seizure detection and real-time electrical stimulation for seizure elimination; and third, apply the developed seizure controller to the animal models to perform on-line seizure elimination. The closed-loop seizure controller was applied to three Long-Evans rats with spontaneous spike-wave discharges (non-convulsive) and three Long-Evans rats with epileptiform activities induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection (convulsive) for evaluation. The seizure detection accuracy is greater than 92% (up to 99%), and averaged seizure detection latency is less than 0.6 s for both spontaneous non-convulsive and PTZ-induced convulsive seizures. The average false stimulation rate is 3.1%. Near 30% of PTZ-induced convulsive seizures need more than two times of 0.5 s electrical stimulation for suppression and 90% of the non-convulsive seizures can be suppressed by only one 0.5 s electrical stimulation.

  11. One-loop kink mass shifts: A computational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso Izquierdo, A., E-mail: alonsoiz@usal.es [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada and IUFFyM, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Guilarte, J. Mateos [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental and IUFFyM, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)

    2011-11-21

    In this paper we develop a procedure to compute the one-loop quantum correction to the kink masses in generic (1+1)-dimensional one-component scalar field theoretical models. The procedure uses the generalized zeta function regularization method helped by the Gilkey-de Witt asymptotic expansion of the heat function via Mellin's transform. We find a formula for the one-loop kink mass shift that depends only on the part of the energy density with no field derivatives, evaluated by means of a symbolic software algorithm that automates the computation. The improved algorithm with respect to earlier work in this subject has been tested in the sine-Gordon and {lambda}({phi}){sub 2}{sup 4} models. The quantum corrections of the sG-soliton and {lambda}({phi}{sup 4}){sub 2}-kink masses have been estimated with a relative error of 0.00006% and 0.00007% respectively. Thereafter, the algorithm is applied to other models. In particular, an interesting one-parametric family of double sine-Gordon models interpolating between the ordinary sine-Gordon and a re-scaled sine-Gordon model is addressed. Another one-parametric family, in this case of {phi}{sup 6} models, is analyzed. The main virtue of our procedure is its versatility: it can be applied to practically any type of relativistic scalar field models supporting kinks.

  12. Validation of the TRACE code for the system dynamic simulations of the molten salt reactor experiment and the preliminary study on the dual fluid molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xun

    2016-06-14

    one is about the demonstration of a new MSR concept using the mathematic tools. In particular, the aim of the first part is to demonstrate the suitability of the TRACE code for the similar MSR designs by using a modified version of the TRACE code to implement the simulations for the steady-state, transient and accidental conditions. The basic approach of this part is to couple the thermal-hydraulic model and the modified point-kinetic model. The equivalent thermal-hydraulic model of the MSRE was built in 1D with three loops including all the critical main components. The point-kinetic model was improved through considering the precursor drift in order to produce more practical results in terms of the delayed neutron behavior. Additionally, new working fluids, namely the molten salts, were embedded into the source code of TRACE. Most results of the simulations show good agreements with the ORNL's reports and with another recent study and the errors were predictable and in an acceptable range. Therefore, the necessary code modification of TRACE appears to be successful and the model will be refined and its functions will be extended further in order to investigate new MSR design. Another part of this thesis is to implement a preliminary study on a new concept of molten salt reactor, namely the Dual Fluid Reactor (DFR). The DFR belongs to the group of the molten salt fast reactors (MSFR) and it is recently considered to be an option of minimum-waste and inherently safe operation of the nuclear reactors in the future. The DFR is using two separately circulating fluids in the reactor core. One is the fuel salt based on the mixture of tri-chlorides of uranium and plutonium (UCl{sub 3}-PuCl{sub 3}), while another is the coolant composed of the pure lead (Pb). The current work focuses on the basic dynamic behavior of a scaled-down DFR with 500 MW thermal output (DFR-500) instead of its reference design with 3000 MW thermal output (DFR-3000). For this purpose 10 parallel

  13. Parameterizing loop fusion for automated empirical tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y; Yi, Q; Kennedy, K; Quinlan, D; Vuduc, R

    2005-12-15

    Traditional compilers are limited in their ability to optimize applications for different architectures because statically modeling the effect of specific optimizations on different hardware implementations is difficult. Recent research has been addressing this issue through the use of empirical tuning, which uses trial executions to determine the optimization parameters that are most effective on a particular hardware platform. In this paper, we investigate empirical tuning of loop fusion, an important transformation for optimizing a significant class of real-world applications. In spite of its usefulness, fusion has attracted little attention from previous empirical tuning research, partially because it is much harder to configure than transformations like loop blocking and unrolling. This paper presents novel compiler techniques that extend conventional fusion algorithms to parameterize their output when optimizing a computation, thus allowing the compiler to formulate the entire configuration space for loop fusion using a sequence of integer parameters. The compiler can then employ an external empirical search engine to find the optimal operating point within the space of legal fusion configurations and generate the final optimized code using a simple code transformation system. We have implemented our approach within our compiler infrastructure and conducted preliminary experiments using a simple empirical search strategy. Our results convey new insights on the interaction of loop fusion with limited hardware resources, such as available registers, while confirming conventional wisdom about the effectiveness of loop fusion in improving application performance.

  14. Logical inference techniques for loop parallelization

    KAUST Repository

    Oancea, Cosmin E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fully automatic approach to loop parallelization that integrates the use of static and run-time analysis and thus overcomes many known difficulties such as nonlinear and indirect array indexing and complex control flow. Our hybrid analysis framework validates the parallelization transformation by verifying the independence of the loop\\'s memory references. To this end it represents array references using the USR (uniform set representation) language and expresses the independence condition as an equation, S = Ø, where S is a set expression representing array indexes. Using a language instead of an array-abstraction representation for S results in a smaller number of conservative approximations but exhibits a potentially-high runtime cost. To alleviate this cost we introduce a language translation F from the USR set-expression language to an equally rich language of predicates (F(S) ⇒ S = Ø). Loop parallelization is then validated using a novel logic inference algorithm that factorizes the obtained complex predicates (F(S)) into a sequence of sufficient-independence conditions that are evaluated first statically and, when needed, dynamically, in increasing order of their estimated complexities. We evaluate our automated solution on 26 benchmarks from PERFECTCLUB and SPEC suites and show that our approach is effective in parallelizing large, complex loops and obtains much better full program speedups than the Intel and IBM Fortran compilers. Copyright © 2012 ACM.

  15. Numerical simulation of a natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verissimo, Gabriel L.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes; Faccini, Jose Luiz H., E-mail: gabrielverissimo@poli.ufrj.b, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.b, E-mail: faccini@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work presents a numerical simulation of a natural circulation loop using computational fluid dynamics. The simulated loop is an experimental model in a reduced scale of 1:10 of a passive heat removal system typical of advanced PWR reactors. The loop is composed of a heating vessel containing 52 electric heaters, a vertical shell-tube heat exchanger and a column of expansion. The working fluid is distilled water. Initially it was created a tridimensional geometric model of the loop components. After that, it was generated a tridimensional mesh of finite elements in order to calculate the variables of the problem. The boundaries of the numerical simulation were the power of the electric resistances and the cooling flow in the secondary side of the heat exchanger. The initial conditions were the temperature, the pressure and the fluid velocity at the time just before the power has been switched on. The results of this simulation were compared with the experimental data, in terms of the evolution of the temperatures in different locations of the loop, and of the average natural circulation flow as a function of time for a given power. (author)

  16. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics and flows are illustrated. In the modeling section some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying some fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are distinguished between those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. Then, more specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar X-ray emitting structures related to coronal loops is included and followed by conclusions and open questions.

  17. Salt effects in electromembrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seip, Knut Fredrik; Jensen, Henrik; Kieu, Thanh Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Electromembrane extraction (EME) was performed on samples containing substantial amounts of NaCl to investigate how the presence of salts affected the recovery, repeatability, and membrane current in the extraction system. A group of 17 non-polar basic drugs with various physical chemical...... this loss and the physical chemical properties of these substances was seen. The recovery loss was hypothesized to be caused by ion pairing in the SLM, and a mathematical model for the extraction recovery in the presence of salts was made according to the experimental observations. Some variations...... improves the theoretical understanding of the extraction process, and can contribute to the future development and optimization of the technique....

  18. Autoadjustable sutures and modified seldinger technique applied to laparoscopic jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pili, Diego; Ciotola, Franco; Riganti, Juan Martín; Badaloni, Adolfo; Nieponice, Alejandro

    2015-02-01

    This is a simple technique to be applied to those patients requiring an alternative feeding method. This technique has been successfully applied to 25 patients suffering from esophageal carcinoma. The procedure involves laparoscopic approach, suture of the selected intestinal loop to the abdominal wall and jejunostomy using Seldinger technique and autoadjustable sutures. No morbidity or mortality was reported.

  19. Thermodynamic characterization of salt components for Molten Salt Reactor fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelli, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a promising future nuclear fission reactor technology with excellent performance in terms of safety and reliability, sustainability, proliferation resistance and economics. For the design and safety assessment of this concept, it is extremely important to have a

  20. Salt tectonics in Santos Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, David G.; Nielsen, Malene; Raven, Madeleine [Maersk Oil and Gas, Copenhagen (Denmark); Menezes, Paulo [Maersk Oil and Gas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    From Albian to end Cretaceous times, the inboard part of the Santos Basin in Brazil was affected by extension as salt flowed basinwards under the effect of gravity. Salt rollers, flip-flop salt diapirs and the famous Albian Gap were all formed by this process. Outboard of these extensional structures, contraction was taken up in a wide zone of thickened salt where salt collected. The overburden was carried on top of the salt as it flowed down-dip, with up to 40 km of translation recorded in Albian strata. (author)

  1. Myocardial energetics is not compromised during compensated hypertrophy in the Dahl salt-sensitive rat model of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kenneth; Han, June-Chiew; Taberner, Andrew J; Barrett, Carolyn J; Crampin, Edmund J; Loiselle, Denis S

    2016-09-01

    Salt-induced hypertension leads to development of left ventricular hypertrophy in the Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl/SS) rat. Before progression to left ventricular failure, the heart initially undergoes a compensated hypertrophic response. We hypothesized that changes in myocardial energetics may be an early indicator of transition to failure. Dahl/SS rats and their salt-resistant consomic controls (SS-13(BN)) were placed on either a low- or high-salt diet to generate four cohorts: Dahl-SS rats on a low- (Dahl-LS) or high-salt diet (Dahl-HS), and SS-13(BN) rats on a low- (SSBN-LS) or high-salt diet (SSBN-HS). We isolated left ventricular trabeculae and characterized their mechanoenergetic performance. Our results show, at most, modest effects of salt-induced compensated hypertrophy on myocardial energetics. We found that the Dahl-HS cohort had a higher work-loop heat of activation (estimated from the intercept of the heat vs. relative afterload relationship generated from work-loop contractions) relative to the SSBN-HS cohort and a higher economy of contraction (inverse of the slope of the heat vs. active stress relation) relative to the Dahl-LS cohort. The maximum extent of shortening and maximum shortening velocity of the Dahl/SS groups were higher than those of the SS-13(BN) groups. Despite these differences, no significant effect of salt-induced hypertension was observed for either peak work output or peak mechanical efficiency during compensated hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Electrospinning Pullulan Fibers from Salt Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in applying the technology of electrospinning for making ultrafine fibers from biopolymers for food-grade applications, and using pullulan (PUL as a carrier to improve the electrospinnability of proteins and other naturally occurring polyelectrolytes. In this study, PUL solutions containing NaCl or Na3C6H5O7 at different concentrations were electrospun. The inclusion of salts interrupted the hydrogen bonding and altered solution properties, such as viscosity, electric conductivity, and surface tension, as well as physical properties of fibers thus obtained, such as appearance, size, and melting point. The exogenous Na+ associated to the oxygen in the C6 position of PUL as suggested by FTIR measurement and was maintained during electrospinning. Bead-free PUL fibers could be electrospun from PUL solution (8%, w/v in the presence of a 0.20 M NaCl (124 ± 34 nm or 0.05 M Na3C6H5O7 (154 ± 36 nm. The further increase of NaCl or Na3C6H5O7 resulted in fibers that were flat with larger diameter sizes and defects. SEM also showed excess salt adhering on the surfaces of PUL fibers. Since most food processing is not carried out in pure water, information obtained through the present research is useful for the development of electrospinning biopolymers for food-grade applications.

  3. SOLUTIONS TO ECOLOGICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF SALT LANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Constantin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents improvement solutions for the ecological reconstruction of salt land according to the characteristicsof their natural conditions. Agroameliorative, agrobiological, agrochemical and hydroameliorative methods may beused. Effectiveness of ecological restoration increases by applying complex ameliorative works. The main role of suchan undreground drainage facility is to collect the salt-loaded, leaching water. Drain distance is calculated for nonpermanentflow conditions, establishing a distance L that allows the lowering grounwater level from its highesthydraulic load to its best value, ht, withing a given time length. The sewer canals should have a depth of min. 1.2 if theland is not equipped with underground drains, and between 1.5 and 1.6 if underground drainage exists.The distancebetween the antenna and the sewer canal should be about 200 m or the length of the watering installation. Verticaldrainage consists in the use of wells with a depth of 25 m, equipped with selected gravel filter (Ø 2-7 mm and adecanter (1.5 m in length.

  4. Detection of Botrytis cinerea by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, J A; Dickinson, M J; Boonham, N

    2010-12-01

    To develop a sensitive, rapid and simple method for detection of Botrytis cinerea based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) that would be suitable for use outside a conventional laboratory setting. A LAMP assay was designed based on the intergenic spacer of the B. cinerea nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The resulting assay was characterized in terms of sensitivity and specificity using DNA extracted from cultures. The assay consistently amplified 65 pg B. cinerea DNA. No cross-reactivity was observed with a range of other fungal pathogens, with the exception of the closely related species Botrytis pelargonii. Use of a novel real-time LAMP platform (the OptiGene Genie I) allowed detection of B. cinerea in infected rose petals, with amplification occurring in cut flowers, fruit and vegetables. © 2010 British Crown Copyright. Letters in Applied Microbiology 51, 650-657 © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Recent Developments in Closed-Loop Approaches for Real-Time Mining and Petroleum Extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benndorf, J.; Jansen, J.D.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced data acquisition and process modelling technology provide ‘real-time’ data and decision support capacity for different aspects of the resource extraction process. Closed-loop approaches have recently been applied to utilize information extracted from these data in combination with

  6. Two-loop anomalous dimensions for four-Fermi operators in supersymmetric theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Junji; Kuwahara, Takumi; Omura, Yuji; Sato, Takeki

    2017-09-01

    We derive two-loop anomalous dimensions for four-Fermi operators in supersymmetric theories using the effective Kähler potential. We introduce the general forms in generic gauge theories and apply our results to the flavor-changing operators in (minimal) supersymmetric standard models.

  7. Two-loop anomalous dimensions for four-Fermi operators in supersymmetric theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Hisano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We derive two-loop anomalous dimensions for four-Fermi operators in supersymmetric theories using the effective Kähler potential. We introduce the general forms in generic gauge theories and apply our results to the flavor-changing operators in (minimal supersymmetric standard models.

  8. Visual Detection of Potato leafroll virus by One-step Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of DNA with Hydroxynaphthol Blue Dye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, S.; Almasi, A.M.; Fatehi, F.; Struik, P.C.; Moradi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay is a novel technique for amplifying DNA under constant temperature, with high specificity, sensitivity, rapidity and efficiency. We applied reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to visually detect Potato leafroll

  9. Covariant diagrams for one-loop matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhengkang [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    We present a diagrammatic formulation of recently-revived covariant functional approaches to one-loop matching from an ultraviolet (UV) theory to a low-energy effective field theory. Various terms following from a covariant derivative expansion (CDE) are represented by diagrams which, unlike conventional Feynman diagrams, involve gaugecovariant quantities and are thus dubbed ''covariant diagrams.'' The use of covariant diagrams helps organize and simplify one-loop matching calculations, which we illustrate with examples. Of particular interest is the derivation of UV model-independent universal results, which reduce matching calculations of specific UV models to applications of master formulas. We show how such derivation can be done in a more concise manner than the previous literature, and discuss how additional structures that are not directly captured by existing universal results, including mixed heavy-light loops, open covariant derivatives, and mixed statistics, can be easily accounted for.

  10. Solar flare loops observations and interpretations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Guangli; Ji, Haisheng; Ning, Zongjun

    2018-01-01

    This book provides results of analysis of typical solar events, statistical analysis, the diagnostics of energetic electrons and magnetic field, as well as the global behavior of solar flaring loops such as their contraction and expansion. It pays particular attention to analyzing solar flare loops with microwave, hard X-ray, optical and EUV emissions, as well as the theories of their radiation, and electron acceleration/transport. The results concerning influence of the pitch-angle anisotropy of non-thermal electrons on their microwave and hard X-ray emissions, new spectral behaviors in X-ray and microwave bands, and results related to the contraction of flaring loops, are widely discussed in the literature of solar physics. The book is useful for graduate students and researchers in solar and space physics.

  11. Automated one-loop calculations with GOSAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, Gavin [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Greiner, Nicolas [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Heinrich, Gudrun; Reiter, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Luisoni, Gionata [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Ossola, Giovanni [New York City Univ., NY (United States). New York City College of Technology; New York City Univ., NY (United States). The Graduate School and University Center; Tramontano, Francesco [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    We present the program package GoSam which is designed for the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes for multi-particle processes in renormalisable quantum field theories. The amplitudes, which are generated in terms of Feynman diagrams, can be reduced using either D-dimensional integrand-level decomposition or tensor reduction. GoSam can be used to calculate one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to Standard Model processes and offers the flexibility to link model files for theories Beyond the Standard Model. A standard interface to programs calculating real radiation is also implemented. We demonstrate the flexibility of the program by presenting examples of processes with up to six external legs attached to the loop. (orig.)

  12. Hybrid Models in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Navascués, B Elizaga; Marugán, G A Mena

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of Loop Quantum Cosmology, inhomogeneous models are usually quantized by means of a hybrid approach that combines loop quantization techniques with standard quantum field theory methods. This approach is based on a splitting of the phase space in a homogeneous sector, formed by global, zero-modes, and an inhomogeneous sector, formed by the remaining, infinite number of modes, that describe the local degrees of freedom. Then, the hybrid quantization is attained by adopting a loop representation for the homogeneous gravitational sector, while a Fock representation is used for the inhomogeneities. The zero-mode of the Hamiltonian constraint operator couples the homogeneous and inhomogeneous sectors. The hybrid approach, therefore, is expected to provide a suitable quantum theory in regimes where the main quantum effects of the geometry are those affecting the zero-modes, while the inhomogeneities, still being quantum, can be treated in a more conventional way. This hybrid strategy was first prop...

  13. All Digital Phase-Locked Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Jurgo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews working principles of phase-locked loop and drawbacks of classical PLL structure in nanometric technologies. It is proposed to replace the classical structure by all-digital phase-locked loop structure. Authors described the main blocks of all-digital phase-locked loop (time to digital converter and digitally controlled oscillator and overviewed the quantization noise arising in these blocks as well as its minimization strategies. The calculated inverter delay in 65 nm CMOS technology was from 8.64 to 27.71 ps and time to digital converter quantization noise was from −104.33 to −82.17 dBc/Hz, with tres = 8.64–27.71 ps, TSVG = 143–333 ps, FREF = 20–60 MHz.Article in Lithuanian

  14. The Two-loop Soft Anomalous Dimension Matrix and Resummation at Next-to-next-to Leading Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mert Aybat, S.; /SUNY, Stony Brook; Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC; Sterman, George; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-09-08

    We extend the resummation of dimensionally-regulated amplitudes to next-to-next-to-leading poles. This requires the calculation of two-loop anomalous dimension matrices for color mixing through soft gluon exchange. Remarkably, we find that they are proportional to the corresponding one-loop matrices. Using the color generator notation, we reproduce the two-loop single-pole quantities H{sup (2)} introduced by Catani for quark and gluon elastic scattering. Our results also make possible threshold and a variety of other resummations at next-to-next-to leading logarithm. All of these considerations apply to 2 {yields} n processes with massless external lines.

  15. Sources of household salt in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Pieter L

    2005-01-01

    Marketing of non-iodized salt through unconventional distribution channels is one of the factors weakening the national salt iodization program in South Africa. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the various sources of household salt, and to relate this information to socio-economic status. Questionnaire information was collected by personal interview during home visits from a multistage, cluster, probability sample of 2164 adults representative of the adult population. Nationally 77.7% of households obtained their table salt from the typical food shops distributing iodized salt. However, in the nine different provinces between 8 and 37.3% of households used unconventional sources, distributing mainly non-iodized salt, to obtain their household salt. These alternative sources include distributors of agricultural salt, small general dealer shops called spaza shops, in peri-urban and rural townships, street vendors and salt saches placed in the packaging of maize meal bags. Country-wide around 30% of low socio-economic households obtained their salt from unconventional sources compared to less than 5% in high socio-economic households, emphasizing the vulnerability of low socio-economic groups to the use of non-iodized salt. Intervention strategies should mobilize all role players involved in unconventional marketing channels of household salt to provide only iodized salt to consumers, as required by law.

  16. Ultrasonic characterization of pork meat salting

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, J. V.; De Prados, M.; Pérez-Muelas, N.; Cárcel, J. A.; Benedito, J.

    2012-12-01

    Salting process plays a key role in the preservation and quality of dry-cured meat products. Therefore, an adequate monitoring of salt content during salting is necessary to reach high quality products. Thus, the main objective of this work was to test the ability of low intensity ultrasound to monitor the salting process of pork meat. Cylindrical samples (diameter 36 mm, height 60±10 mm) of Biceps femoris were salted (brine 20% NaCl, w/w) at 2 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 7 days. During salting and at each experimental time, three cylinders were taken in order to measure the ultrasonic velocity at 2 °C. Afterwards, the cylinders were split in three sections (height 20 mm), measuring again the ultrasonic velocity and determining the salt and the moisture content by AOAC standards. In the whole cylinders, moisture content was reduced from 763 (g/kg sample) in fresh samples to 723 (g/kg sample) in samples salted for 7 days, while the maximum salt gain was 37.3 (g/kg sample). Although, moisture and salt contents up to 673 and 118 (g/kg sample) were reached in the sections of meat cylinders, respectively. During salting, the ultrasonic velocity increased due to salt gain and water loss. Thus, significant (pmeat salting processes carried out in the food industry.

  17. Key issues in the computational simulation of GPCR function: representation of loop domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, E. L.; Periole, X.; Hassan, S. A.; Weinstein, H.

    2002-11-01

    Some key concerns raised by molecular modeling and computational simulation of functional mechanisms for membrane proteins are discussed and illustrated for members of the family of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Of particular importance are issues related to the modeling and computational treatment of loop regions. These are demonstrated here with results from different levels of computational simulations applied to the structures of rhodopsin and a model of the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor, 5-HT2AR. First, comparative Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are reported for rhodopsin in vacuum and embedded in an explicit representation of the membrane and water environment. It is shown that in spite of a partial accounting of solvent screening effects by neutralization of charged side chains, vacuum MD simulations can lead to severe distortions of the loop structures. The primary source of the distortion appears to be formation of artifactual H-bonds, as has been repeatedly observed in vacuum simulations. To address such shortcomings, a recently proposed approach that has been developed for calculating the structure of segments that connect elements of secondary structure with known coordinates, is applied to 5-HT2AR to obtain an initial representation of the loops connecting the transmembrane (TM) helices. The approach consists of a simulated annealing combined with biased scaled collective variables Monte Carlo technique, and is applied to loops connecting the TM segments on both the extra-cellular and the cytoplasmic sides of the receptor. Although this initial calculation treats the loops as independent structural entities, the final structure exhibits a number of interloop interactions that may have functional significance. Finally, it is shown here that in the case where a given loop from two different GPCRs (here rhodopsin and 5-HT2AR) has approximately the same length and some degree of sequence identity, the fold adopted by the loops can be similar. Thus

  18. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  19. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  20. Rational Design of Nanobody80 Loop Peptidomimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Charlotte; Moors, Samuel L C; Danielsen, Mia

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an important role in many cellular responses; as such, their mechanism of action is of utmost interest. To gain insight into the active conformation of GPCRs, the X-ray crystal structures of nanobody (Nb)-stabilized β2 -adrenergic receptor (β2 AR) have been...... that peptidomimetics of the CDR3 loop might be sufficient for binding to the receptor, inhibiting the interaction of β2 AR with intracellular GPCR interacting proteins (e.g., G proteins). Based on previous crystallographic data, a set of peptidomimetics were synthesized that, similar to the Nb80 CDR3 loop, adopt a β...

  1. On closed loop transient response system identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Dalen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Some methods for transient closed loop step response system identification presented in the literature are reviewed. Interestingly some errors in a method published in the early 80's where propagated into a recently published method. These methods are reviewed and some improved methods are suggested and presented. The methods are compared against each other on some closed loop system examples, e.g. a well pipeline-riser severe-slugging flow regime example, using Monte Carlo simulations for comparison of the methods.

  2. Automation of one-loop QCD corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschi, Valentin; Frixione, Stefano; Garzelli, Maria Vittoria; Maltoni, Fabio; Pittau, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present the complete automation of the computation of one-loop QCD corrections, including UV renormalization, to an arbitrary scattering process in the Standard Model. This is achieved by embedding the OPP integrand reduction technique, as implemented in CutTools, into the MadGraph framework. By interfacing the tool so constructed, which we dub MadLoop, with MadFKS, the fully automatic computation of any infrared-safe observable at the next-to-leading order in QCD is attained. We demonstrate the flexibility and the reach of our method by calculating the production rates for a variety of processes at the 7 TeV LHC.

  3. Magic spinor product methods in loop integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, B F L

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to higher point loop integrals using Chinese magic in the virtual loop integration variable. We show, using the five point function in the important e^+e^-\\to f\\bar{f}+\\gamma process for ISR as a pedagogical vehicle, that we get an expression for it directly reduced to one scalar 5-point function and 4-, 3-, and 2- point integrals, thereby avoiding the computation of the usual three tensor 5-pt Passarino-Veltman reduction. We argue that this offers potential for greater numerical stability.

  4. Magic spinor product methods in loop integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B. F. L.

    2011-06-01

    We present an approach to higher point loop integrals using Chinese magic in the virtual loop integration variable. We show, using the five point function in the important e+e-→ff¯+γ process for initial state radiation as a pedagogical vehicle, that we get an expression for it directly reduced to one scalar 5-point function and 4-, 3-, and 2- point integrals, thereby avoiding the computation of the usual three tensor 5-pt Passarino-Veltman reduction. We argue that this offers potential for greater numerical stability.

  5. Tuning OpenACC loop execution

    KAUST Repository

    Feki, Saber

    2017-01-07

    The purpose of this chapter is to help OpenACC developer who is already familiar with the basic and essential directives to further improve his code performance by adding more descriptive clauses to OpenACC loop constructs. At the end of this chapter the reader will: • Have a better understanding of the purpose of the OpenACC loop construct and its associated clauses illustrated with use cases • Use the acquired knowledge in practice to further improve the performance of OpenACC accelerated codes

  6. Minimally doubled fermions at one loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Stefano; Weber, Johannes; Wittig, Hartmut

    2009-10-01

    Minimally doubled fermions have been proposed as a cost-effective realization of chiral symmetry at non-zero lattice spacing. Using lattice perturbation theory at one loop, we study their renormalization properties. Specifically, we investigate the consequences of the breaking of hyper-cubic symmetry, which is a typical feature of this class of fermionic discretizations. Our results for the quark self-energy indicate that the four-momentum undergoes a renormalization which is linearly divergent. We also compute renormalization factors for quark bilinears, construct the conserved vector and axial-vector currents and verify that at one loop the renormalization factors of the latter are equal to one.

  7. High-Order Frequency-Locked Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2017-01-01

    In very recent years, some attempts for designing high-order frequency-locked loops (FLLs) have been made. Nevertheless, the advantages and disadvantages of these structures, particularly in comparison with a standard FLL and high-order phase-locked loops (PLLs), are rather unclear. This lack...... study, and its small-signal modeling, stability analysis, and parameter tuning are presented. Finally, to gain insight about advantages and disadvantages of high-order FLLs, a theoretical and experimental performance comparison between the designed second-order FLL and a standard FLL (first-order FLL...

  8. Geometric structures on loop and path spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in M. This is naturally a Fréchet manifold. The tangent space to L(M) at a loop γ is. Tγ L(M) ∼= (S1,γ∗TM). The loop space L(M) is equipped with a natural section of its tangent bundle defined as ξ: L(M) → T L(M) γ ↦→ γ . Whenever we fix a Riemannian metric g on M, we can define an associated weak metric on the space of ...

  9. A keyboard control method for loop measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Z.W. [Universita Degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a keyboard control mode based on the DEC VAX computer. The VAX Keyboard code can be found under running of a program was developed. During the loop measurement or multitask operation, it ables to be distinguished from a keyboard code to stop current operation or transfer to another operation while previous information can be held. The combining of this mode, the author successfully used one key control loop measurement for test Dual Input Memory module which is used in a rearrange Energy Trigger system for LEP 8 Bunch operation.

  10. Salt decay of Morley limestone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Salt weathering is one of the main causes of decay of natural stone, and by consequence a major problem to the conservation of cultural heritage. In the present case, the performance of Morley limestone from the Département Meuse, France, as a replacement stone under saltloaded conditions is

  11. Genes and Salt Tolerance: Bringing Them Together

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rana Munns

    2005-01-01

    Salinity tolerance comes from genes that limit the rate of salt uptake from the soil and the transport of salt throughout the plant, adjust the ionic and osmotic balance of cells in roots and shoots...

  12. Plant salt tolerance: adaptations in halophytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flowers, Timothy J; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    ..., and to develop salt-tolerant crops. In this Preface to a Special Issue on halophytes and saline adaptations, the evolution of salt tolerance in halophytes, their life-history traits and progress in understanding...

  13. Fundamental and Harmonic Oscillations in Neighboring Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Liu, Yu; Vai Tam, Kuan

    2017-06-01

    We present observations of multimode (fundamental and harmonic) oscillations in a loop system, which appear to be simultaneously excited by a GOES C-class flare. Analysis of the periodic oscillations reveals that (1) the primary loop with a period of P a ≈ 4 minutes and a secondary loop with two periods of P a ≈ 4 minutes and P b ≈ 2 minutes are detected simultaneously in closely spaced loop strands; (2) both oscillation components have their peak amplitudes near the loop apex, while in the second loop the low-frequency component P a dominates in a loop segment that is two times larger than the high-frequency component P b ; (3) the harmonic mode P b shows the largest deviation from a sinusoidal loop shape at the loop apex. We conclude that multiple harmonic modes with different displacement profiles can be excited simultaneously even in closely spaced strands, similar to the overtones of a violin string.

  14. A closer look at salt loaded microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Rooij, M.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Many walls of ancient buildings are covered with plaster layers. Amongst the most recurrent causes of damage of plasters and substrates are moisture and salt decay processes. To combat these salt problems, special salt resistant plasters have been developed for application on salt loaded substrates. However, experience in the field has shown that failures regularly occur on these special mortars, making the situation little transparent for end-users. A European project called COMPASS has addr...

  15. Proteomics of Parma Dry-Cured Ham: Analysis of Salting Exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredi, Gianluca; Benoni, Roberto; Pighini, Giovanni; Ronda, Luca; Dowle, Adam; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry; Saccani, Giovanna; Virgili, Roberta; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2017-08-02

    The production of Parma dry-cured ham involves the steps of salting, drying, and ripening. Although sea salt is the only preserving agent, there are strategies being developed with the goal of reducing salt content in order to decrease its negative impact on consumer health. A 24 h pressure treatment was applied before salting to reduce thickness and inequalities in shape. To evaluate the potential impact of the pressure step on the process outcome, differential proteomic analyses by complementary 2D-PAGE and LC-MS/MS were carried out on exudates collected at day 1, 5, and 18 of the salting phase for hams treated or untreated with pressure. Specific proteins were found differentially abundant in exudates from pressed vs unpressed hams and as a function of time. These changes include glycolytic enzymes and several myofibrillar proteins. These findings indicate that pressure causes a faster loosening of the myofibrillar structure with the release of specific groups of proteins.

  16. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

  17. Modeling internal deformation of salt structures targeted for radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemia, Zurab

    2008-09-15

    This thesis uses results of systematic numerical models to argue that externally inactive salt structures, which are potential targets for radioactive waste disposal, might be internally active due to the presence of dense layers or blocks within a salt layer. The three papers that support this thesis use the Gorleben salt diapir (NW Germany), which was targeted as a future final repository for high-grade radioactive waste, as a general guideline. The first two papers present systematic studies of the parameters that control the development of a salt diapir and how it entrains a dense anhydrite layer. Results from these numerical models show that the entrainment of a dense anhydrite layer within a salt diapir depends on four parameters: sedimentation rate, viscosity of salt, perturbation width and the stratigraphic location of the dense layer. The combined effect of these four parameters, which has a direct impact on the rate of salt supply (volume/area of the salt that is supplied to the diapir with time), shape a diapir and the mode of entrainment. Salt diapirs down-built with sedimentary units of high viscosity can potentially grow with an embedded anhydrite layer and deplete their source layer (salt supply ceases). However, when salt supply decreases dramatically or ceases entirely, the entrained anhydrite layer/segments start to sink within the diapir. In inactive diapirs, sinking of the entrained anhydrite layer is inevitable and strongly depends on the rheology of the salt, which is in direct contact with the anhydrite layer. During the post-depositional stage, if the effective viscosity of salt falls below the threshold value of around 1018-1019 Pa s, the mobility of anhydrite blocks might influence any repository within the diapir. However, the internal deformation of the salt diapir by the descending blocks decreases with increase in effective viscosity of salt. The results presented in this thesis suggest that it is highly likely that salt structures

  18. Multilevel D-loop PCR identification of hunting game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Parkanyi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The control region of mtDNA (D-loop was used for hair samples of the five hunting game species identification: red deer (Cervus elaphus, roe deer (Capreolus capreolus, fallow deer (Dama dama, mouflon (Ovis aries musimon, and wild boar (Sus scrofa. For D-loop multilevel PCR detection scheme was applied in six primers (CE CVZV 1 = 5′-GATCACGAGCTTGATCACCA-3′; CE CVZV 2 = 5′-AGGAGTGGGCGATTTTAGGT-3′; DD CVZV 3 = 5′-CGCGTGAAACCAACAACCCGC-3′; DD CVZV 4 = 5′-CCGGGTCGGGGCCTTAGACG-3′; SSW CVZV 5 = 5′-ACACGTGCGTACACGCGCATA-3′; SSW CVZV 6 = 5′-GGTGCCTGCT T TCGTAGCACG-3′ designed to identify unknown biological samples of the hunting game animals. The PCR reaction volume was 25 μl at conditions 95 °C for 2 min, 94 °C for 30 s, 60 °C for 30 s, 72 °C for 30 s, 35 cycles, with last extension at 72 °C for 10 min. D-loop mtDNA amplicons of the game animals are characterized with specific PCR product sizes depending on species: red deer = 163 bp and 140 bp, fallow deer = 280 bp and 138 bp, roe deer = 303 bp, 280 bp, 160 bp and 138 bp, mouflon = 299 bp and 178 bp, wild boar = 137 bp and 229 bp.

  19. Can COSMOTherm Predict a Salting in Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivola, Martta; Prisle, Nønne L; Elm, Jonas; Waxman, Eleanor M; Volkamer, Rainer; Kurtén, Theo

    2017-08-24

    We have used COSMO-RS, a method combining quantum chemistry with statistical thermodynamics, to compute Setschenow constants (K S ) for a large array of organic solutes and salts. These comprise both atmospherically relevant solute-salt combinations, as well as systems for which experimental data are available. In agreement with previous studies on single salts, the Setschenow constants predicted by COSMO-RS (as implemented in the COSMOTherm program) are generally too large compared to experiments. COSMOTherm overpredicts salting out (positive K S ), and/or underpredicts salting in (negative K S ). For ammonium and sodium salts, K S values are larger for oxalates and sulfates, and smaller for chlorides and bromides. For chloride and bromide salts, K S values usually increase with decreasing size of the cation, along the series Pr 4 N + salting in is predicted only for oxalic acid in sodium and ammonium oxalate, and sodium sulfate, solutions. COSMOTherm was thus unable to replicate the experimentally observed salting in of glyoxal in sulfate solutions, likely due to the overestimation of salting out effects. By contrast, COSMOTherm does qualitatively predict the experimentally observed salting in of multiple organic solutes in solutions of alkylaminium salts.

  20. Salt loading affects cortisol metabolism in normotensive subjects : Relationships with salt sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, MN; van der Kleij, FGH; Boonstra, AH; Sluiter, WJ; Koerts, J; Navis, G; Dullaart, RPF

    We studied cortisol metabolism together with insulin sensitivity [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)] and renal hemodynamics in 19 salt-resistant (sr) and nine salt-sensitive ( ss) normotensive subjects after a low-and high-salt diet. Results are described as high- vs. low-salt diet. Sum of urinary

  1. Entropy and Free Energy of a Mobile Loop Based on the Crystal Structures of the Free and Bound Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Mihail; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2010-08-25

    A mobile loop changes its conformation from "open" (free enzyme) to "closed" upon ligand binding. The difference in the Helmholtz free energy, ΔF(loop) between these states sheds light on the mechanism of binding. With our "hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics" (HSMD-TI) method ΔF(loop) = F(free) - F(bound) where F(free) and F(bound) are calculated from two MD samples of the free and bound loop states; the contribution of water is obtained by a thermodynamic integration (TI) procedure. In previous work the free and bound loop structures were both attached to the same "template" which was "cut" from the crystal structure of the free protein. Our results for loop 287-290 of AcetylCholineEsterase agree with the experiment, ΔF(loop)~ -4 kcal/mol if the density of the TIP3P water molecules capping the loop is close to that of bulk water, i.e., N(water) = 140 - 180 waters in a sphere of a 18 Å radius. Here we calculate ΔF(loop) for the more realistic case, where two templates are "cut" from the crystal structures, 2dfp.pdb (bound) and 2ace.pdb (free), where N(water) = 40 - 160; this requires adding a computationally more demanding (second) TI procedure. While the results for N(water) ≤ 140 are computationally sound, ΔF(loop) is always positive (18 ± 2 kcal/mol for N(water) = 140). These (disagreeing) results are attributed to the large average B-factor, 41.6 of 2dfp (23.4 Å(2) for 2ace). While this conformational uncertainty is an inherent difficulty, the (unstable) results for N(water) = 160 suggest that it might be alleviated by applying different (initial) structural optimizations to each template.

  2. Transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping probed by high-resolution, single-molecule imaging in live E. coli cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Hensel

    Full Text Available DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The "genetic switch" of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences O(R and O(L (separated by 2.3 kb, mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034, play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms.

  3. Effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after 1 week of high salt (200 mmol per day sodium) and 1 week of low salt (10 mmol per day sodium) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure>15 mm Hg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% women; 16% blacks; body mass index, 28.5±4.2 kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mm Hg) as compared with high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mm Hg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dL; 10.8±7.3 mIU/L; 2.6±1.9) as compared with high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dL; 9.4±5.8 mIU/L; 2.1±1.4; Psalt-sensitive (n=193) versus salt-resistant (n=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in homeostasis model assessment on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt-sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt-resistant subjects (P=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in homeostasis model assessment after including age, body mass index, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone, and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Evaluation and Comparison of Biomechanical Properties of Snail Loop with that of Opus Loop and Teardrop Loop for en masse Retraction of Anterior Teeth: FEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Rajkumar Rao

    2013-01-01

    Results: Inherently the M/F ratio produced was higher and F/D rate produced was least for opus loop compared to snail loop and teardrop loop. Conclusion: With incorporation of 20°gable bends snail loop prepared in 0.017 × 0.025 inch and 0.019 × 0.025 inch TMA wire is very efficient to deliver M/F ratio required for translatory tooth movement with acceptable F/D rate. Snail loop is easy to fabricate and finer shape morphology prevents tissue impingement.

  5. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Loop-scale Testbed Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging to design and operate. Extreme environments limit the options for sensors and actuators and degrade their performance. Because sensors and actuators are necessary for feedback control, these limitations mean that designing embedded instrumentation and control systems for the challenging environments of nuclear reactors requires advanced technical solutions that are not available commercially. This report details the development of testbed that will be used for cross-cutting embedded instrumentation and control research for nuclear power applications. This research is funded by the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology program's Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic. The design goal of the loop-scale testbed is to build a low temperature pump that utilizes magnetic bearing that will be incorporated into a water loop to test control system performance and self-sensing techniques. Specifically, this testbed will be used to analyze control system performance in response to nonlinear and cross-coupling fluid effects between the shaft axes of motion, rotordynamics and gyroscopic effects, and impeller disturbances. This testbed will also be used to characterize the performance losses when using self-sensing position measurement techniques. Active magnetic bearings are a technology that can reduce failures and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. They are particularly relevant to liquid salt reactors that operate at high temperatures (700 C). Pumps used in the extreme environment of liquid salt reactors provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with magnetic bearings and their associated embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design and electromagnetic design of the loop-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed.

  6. Logical inference techniques for loop parallelization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oancea, Cosmin Eugen; Rauchwerger, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    of their estimated complexities. We evaluate our automated solution on 26 benchmarks from PERFECT-CLUB and SPEC suites and show that our approach is effective in parallelizing large, complex loops and obtains much better full program speedups than the Intel and IBM Fortran compilers....

  7. Phase locked loops design, simulation, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Best, Roland E

    2007-01-01

    The Definitive Introduction to Phase-Locked Loops, Complete with Software for Designing Wireless Circuits! The Sixth Edition of Roland Best's classic Phase-Locked Loops has been updated to equip you with today's definitive introduction to PLL design, complete with powerful PLL design and simulation software written by the author. Filled with all the latest PLL advances, this celebrated sourcebook now includes new chapters on frequency synthesis…CAD for PLLs…mixed-signal PLLs…all-digital PLLs…and software PLLs_plus a new collection of sample communications applications. An essential tool for achieving cutting-edge PLL design, the Sixth Edition of Phase-Locked Loops features: A wealth of easy-to-use methods for designing phase-locked loops Over 200 detailed illustrations New to this edition: new chapters on frequency synthesis, including fractional-N PLL frequency synthesizers using sigma-delta modulators; CAD for PLLs, mixed-signal PLLs, all-digital PLLs, and software PLLs; new PLL communications ap...

  8. Closed Loop System Identification with Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are di.cult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. Closed loop system identi.cation is often required to obtain a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data. In order to provide an accurate initial plant model to guarantee convergence for standard local optimization methods, this paper presents a global parameter optimization method using genetic algorithms. A minimal representation of the state space dynamics is employed to mitigate the non-uniqueness and over-parameterization of general state space realizations. This control-relevant system identi.cation procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identi.cation and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the di.erence between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance.

  9. Aesthetic rehabilitation with multiple loop connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a missing tooth along with diastema have limited treatment options to restore the edentulous space. The use of a conventional fixed partial denture (FPD to replace the missing tooth may result in too wide anterior teeth leading to poor esthetics. The diastema resulting from the missing central incisors can be managed with implant-supported prosthesis or FPD with loop connectors. An old lady reported with chief complaints of missing upper anterior teeth due to trauma. Her past dental history revealed that she was having generalized spacing between her upper anterior teeth. Considering her esthetic requirement of maintaining the diastema between 12, 11, 22, and 21, the treatment option of 06 units porcelain fused to metal FPD from canine to canine with intermittent loop connectors between 21, 22, 11, 12 was planned. Connectors basically link different parts of FPDs. The modified FPD with loop connectors enhanced the natural appearance of the restoration, maintained the diastemas and the proper emergence profile, and preserve the remaining tooth structure of abutment teeth. This clinical report discussed a method for fabrication of a modified FPD with loop connectors to restore the wide span created by missing central incisors.

  10. String loop corrected hypermultiplet moduli spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robles-Llana, D.; Saueressig, Frank; Vandoren, S.

    2006-01-01

    Using constraints from supersymmetry and string perturbation theory, we determine the string loop corrections to the hypermultiplet moduli space of type II strings compactified on a generic Calabi-Yau threefold. The corresponding quaternion-Kähler manifolds are completely encoded in terms of a

  11. Semiclassical analysis of loop quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrady, F.

    2005-10-17

    In this Ph.D. thesis, we explore and develop new methods that should help in determining an effective semiclassical description of canonical loop quantum gravity and spin foam gravity. A brief introduction to loop quantum gravity is followed by three research papers that present the results of the Ph.D. project. In the first article, we deal with the problem of time and a new proposal for implementing proper time as boundary conditions in a sum over histories: we investigate a concrete realization of this formalism for free scalar field theory. In the second article, we translate semiclassical states of linearized gravity into states of loop quantum gravity. The properties of the latter indicate how semiclassicality manifests itself in the loop framework, and how this may be exploited for doing semiclassical expansions. In the third part, we propose a new formulation of spin foam models that is fully triangulation- and background-independent: by means of a symmetry condition, we identify spin foam models whose triangulation-dependence can be naturally removed. (orig.)

  12. Introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    The goal of the lecture is to present a broad perspective on loop quantum gravity and cosmology for young researchers which would serve as an introduction to lectures by Rovelli and Bojowald. The first part is addressed to beginning students and the second to young researchers who are already working in quantum gravity.

  13. Closing the loop: towards strategic defence management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Spiegeleire, S.; van Hooft, P.; Culpepper, C.; Willems, R.

    2009-01-01

    How do defence-organisations (or organisations with comparable profiles) of other countries map out policy goals and how are policy goals related to activities and capabilities and the required financial means, and finally how does the feedback loop on the performance in all these areas take place?

  14. Closed-loop control of magnetotactic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Pichel, Marc Philippe; Pichel, M.P.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    Realization of point-to-point positioning of a magnetotactic bacterium (MTB) necessitates the application of a relatively large magnetic field gradients to decrease its velocity in the vicinity of a reference position. We investigate an alternative closed-loop control approach to position the MTB.

  15. Geometry of the analytic loop group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Concini, C.; Hernandez, D.; Reshetikhin, N.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce and study a notion of analytic loop group with a Riemann-Hilbert factorization relevant for the representation theory of quantum affine algebras at roots of unity View the MathML source with non-trivial central charge. We introduce a Poisson structure and study properties of its Poisson

  16. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  17. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    operating conditions as well as trade offs between efficiency and capital cost. Prametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling. Recommendations on the optimal working fluid for each configuration were made. A steady state model comparison was made with a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) power conversion system developed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). A preliminary model of the CBC was developed in HYSYS for comparison. Temperature and pressure ratio curves for the Capstone turbine and compressor developed at SNL were implemented into the HYSYS model. A comparison between the HYSYS model and SNL loop demonstrated power output predicted by HYSYS was much larger than that in the experiment. This was due to a lack of a model for the electrical alternator which was used to measure the power from the SNL loop. Further comparisons of the HYSYS model and the CBC data are recommended. Engineering analyses were performed for several configurations of the intermediate heat transport loop that transfers heat from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant. The analyses evaluated parallel and concentric piping arrangements and two different working fluids, including helium and a liquid salt. The thermal-hydraulic analyses determined the size and insulation requirements for the hot and cold leg pipes in the different configurations. Economic analyses were performed to estimate the cost of the va

  18. Thermal instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas - Solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined solar coronal structures ('loops') is investigated, following both normal mode and a new, global instability analysis. It is demonstrated that: (1) normal mode analysis shows modes with size scales comparable to that of loops to be unstable, but to be strongly affected by the loop boundary conditions; (2) a global analysis, based upon variation of the total loop energy losses and gains, yields loop stability conditions for global modes dependent upon the coronal loop heating process, with magnetically coupled heating processes giving marginal stability. The connection between the present analysis and the minimum flux corona of Hearn is also discussed.

  19. Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly E.; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergei; Walsh, Robert William; DeForest, Craig E.; De Pontieu, Bart; hide

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the evolution of EUV loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this presentation we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. In the past decade, the evolution of EUV loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this presentation we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data.

  20. Aluminum Manganese Molten Salt Plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    cyanide waste products are generated during all stages of the cadmium plating lifecycle . The cadmium plating process generates spent plating bath and...X Check caustic line and PVC circulation piping for leaks X Verify pH at laboratory X Measure conductivity X Replace rinse...tank, which is then routed to the rinse tank. At the rinse tank, the chemical will be injected via appropriate fittings into to a PVC pipe loop which

  1. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-02-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental

  2. Optimisation strategies for the preparation of bipolar membranes with reduced salt ion leakage in acid-base electrodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, F.G.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.

    2001-01-01

    The salt ion fluxes across commercial bipolar membranes (BPMs) result in the salt contamination of the produced acids or bases especially at increased product concentrations. Often, bipolar membrane electrodialysis can only be applied when these fluxes are reduced. Here, a model is presented to

  3. Molecular simulation studies of monovalent counterion-mediated interactions in a model RNA kissing loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alan A; Draper, David E; Pappu, Rohit V

    2009-07-24

    A kissing loop is a highly stable complex formed by loop-loop base-pairing between two RNA hairpins. This common structural motif is utilized in a wide variety of RNA-mediated processes, including antisense recognition, substrate recognition in riboswitches, and viral replication. Recent work has shown that the Tar-Tar(*) complex, an archetypal kissing loop, can form without Mg(2+), so long as high concentrations of alkali chloride salts are present. Interestingly, the stability of the complex is found to decrease with increasing cation size. In this work, we used molecular simulations to develop a molecular-level understanding of the origins of the observed counterion specificity. The ionic atmosphere of the Tar-Tar(*) complex was examined in the presence of 800 mm (where m denotes molality) NaCl, KCl, or CsCl. We used spatial free-energy density profiles to analyze differences in counterion accumulation at different spatial extents from the RNA molecule. We found that the lowest free-energy levels, which are situated in the vicinity of the loop-loop interface, can accommodate roughly two counterions, irrespective of counterion type. However, as we moved into higher free-energy levels, which are farther from the loop-loop interface, we observed increased differences in the numbers of accumulated counterions, with this number being largest for Na(+) and smallest for Cs(+). We analyzed the source of these differences and were able to attribute these to two distinct features: The extent of partial dehydration varies based on cation type; the smaller the cation, the greater the degree of dehydration. While smaller ions bind their first-hydration-shell water molecules more tightly than larger ions, they are also able to shed these water molecules for stronger electrostatic interactions with the RNA molecule. Secondly, we observed a distinct asymmetry in the numbers of accumulated cations around each hairpin in the Tar-Tar(*) complex. We were able to ascribe this

  4. Kekuatan Geser dan Pola Patahan Loop Space Maintainer yang Dibuat dengan Teknik Spot Welding Elektrik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Karlina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the effect of spot variations on shear strength of spot welds in an electric loop space maintainer. Stainless steel wire of 0.8 mm diameter and nickel chromium crwon for lower second molar of temporary teeth were used. A loop 1 cm wide, made of 3.5 cm stainless steel wire, was welded with 3 dots on the crown using an electric spot welder. Each dot for each group took different spot variations from 1 X – 4 X. A loop space maintainer made with the usual materials and techniques as applied at the IKGA FKG UI Clinic was used as a control, with a torch as heat source. Ten specimens each were prepared for shear testing and three spesimens each for metallography. Universal testing machine was used for shear strength testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min, and SEM/EDS was used for metallography and fractography. The data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA at p = 0.05, and Tukey post hoc test. The results show that the shear strength of the welded loop space maintainer was higher than that of a soldered loop space maintainer, although the difference was not statistically significant with spot variation 1 X. SEM/EDS analysis suggests that a new alloy forms at the contact area of welded and soldered loop space maintainer. Fractography of the joints suggests that welds are better than soldered joints, with higher ductility and toughness, as can be seen from the dimpled pattern of the welded joint and cleavage patterns in the control joints. In conclusion, the loop space maintainer is better made by welding than by soldering.

  5. MHD Modelling of Coronal Loops: Injection of High-Speed Chromospheric Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Observations reveal a correspondence between chromospheric type II spicules and bright upward-moving fronts in the corona observed in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) band. However, theoretical considerations suggest that these flows are probably not the main source of heating in coronal magnetic loops. Aims. We investigate the propagation of high-speed chromospheric flows into coronal magnetic flux tubes and the possible production of emission in the EUV band. Methods. We simulated the propagation of a dense 104 K chromospheric jet upward along a coronal loop by means of a 2D cylindrical MHD model that includes gravity, radiative losses, thermal conduction, and magnetic induction. The jet propagates in a complete atmosphere including the chromosphere and a tenuous cool (approximately 0.8 MK) corona, linked through a steep transition region. In our reference model, the jet initial speed is 70 km per second, its initial density is 10(exp 11) per cubic centimeter, and the ambient uniform magnetic field is 10 G. We also explored other values of jet speed and density in 1D and different magnetic field values in 2D, as well as the jet propagation in a hotter (approximately 1.5 MK) background loop. Results. While the initial speed of the jet does not allow it to reach the loop apex, a hot shock-front develops ahead of it and travels to the other extreme of the loop. The shock front compresses the coronal plasma and heats it to about 10(exp 6) K. As a result, a bright moving front becomes visible in the 171 Angstrom channel of the SDO/AIA mission. This result generally applies to all the other explored cases, except for the propagation in the hotter loop. Conclusions. For a cool, low-density initial coronal loop, the post-shock plasma ahead of upward chromospheric flows might explain at least part of the observed correspondence between type II spicules and EUV emission excess.

  6. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  7. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintentance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessonslearned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  8. Achieving peptide binding specificity and promiscuity by loops: case of the forkhead-associated domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Chang, Chia-En A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of a series of cellular events requires specific protein-protein interactions, which are usually mediated by modular domains to precisely select a particular sequence from diverse partners. However, most signaling domains can bind to more than one peptide sequence. How do proteins create promiscuity from precision? Moreover, these complex interactions typically occur at the interface of a well-defined secondary structure, α helix and β sheet. However, the molecular recognition primarily controlled by loop architecture is not fully understood. To gain a deep understanding of binding selectivity and promiscuity by the conformation of loops, we chose the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain as our model system. The domain can bind to diverse peptides via various loops but only interact with sequences containing phosphothreonine (pThr). We applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for multiple free and bound FHA domains to study the changes in conformations and dynamics. Generally, FHA domains share a similar folding structure whereby the backbone holds the overall geometry and the variety of sidechain atoms of multiple loops creates a binding surface to target a specific partner. FHA domains determine the specificity of pThr by well-organized binding loops, which are rigid to define a phospho recognition site. The broad range of peptide recognition can be attributed to different arrangements of the loop interaction network. The moderate flexibility of the loop conformation can help access or exclude binding partners. Our work provides insights into molecular recognition in terms of binding specificity and promiscuity and helpful clues for further peptide design.

  9. Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops: II. Improvements to the Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper further develops the zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic coronal loop model "Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops" (EBTEL) originally proposed by Klimchuk et al (2008), which studies the plasma response to evolving coronal heating. It has typically been applied to impulsive heating events. The basis of EBTEL is the modelling of mass exchange between the corona and transition region and chromosphere in response to heating variations, with the key parameter being the ratio of transition region to coronal radiation. We develop new models for this parameter that now include gravitational stratification and a physically motivated approach to radiative cooling. A number of examples are presented, including nanoflares in short and long loops, and a small flare. It is found that while the evolution of the loop temperature is rather insensitive to the details of the model, accurate tracking of the density requires the inclusion of our new features. In particular, we are able to now obtain highly over-dense loops in the late cooling phase and decreases to the coronal density arising due to stratification. The 0D results are compared to a 1D hydro code (Hydrad). The agreement is acceptable, with the exception of the flare case where some versions of Hydrad can give significantly lower densities. This is attributed to the method used to model the chromosphere in a flare. EBTEL is suitable for general use as a tool for (a) quick-look results of loop evolution in response to a given heating function and (b) situations where the modelling of hundreds or thousands of elemental loops is needed. A single run takes a few seconds on a contemporary laptop.

  10. From Loops to Trees By-passing Feynman's Theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catani, Stefano; Gleisberg, Tanju; Krauss, Frank; Rodrigo, German; Winter, Jan-Christopher

    2008-04-22

    We derive a duality relation between one-loop integrals and phase-space integrals emerging from them through single cuts. The duality relation is realized by a modification of the customary + i0 prescription of the Feynman propagators. The new prescription regularizing the propagators, which we write in a Lorentz covariant form, compensates for the absence of multiple cut contributions that appear in the Feynman Tree Theorem. The duality relation can be applied to generic one-loop quantities in any relativistic, local and unitary field theories. It is suitable for applications to the analytical calculation of one-loop scattering amplitudes, and to the numerical evaluation of cross-sections at next-to-leading order.

  11. A new look at one-loop integrals in string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Angelantonj, Carlo; Pioline, Boris

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the evaluation of one-loop modular integrals in string theory, employing new methods that keep T-duality manifest throughout. In particular, we apply the Rankin-Selberg-Zagier approach to cases where the integrand function grows at most polynomially in the IR and, furthermore, we introduce new techniques in the case where `unphysical tachyons' do contribute to the one-loop couplings. These methods can be viewed as a modular invariant version of dimensional regularisation, unlike the conventional orbit decomposition that obscures the underlying T-duality. As an example, we specialise to the study of one-loop BPS-saturated couplings involving the d-dimensional Narain lattice and the invariant Klein j-function. We relate them to (shifted) constrained Epstein Zeta series of O(d,d;Z), and recover the well-known result for Gamma_{(2,2)} in a few easy steps.

  12. One-loop Pfaffians and large-field inflation in string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehle, Fabian, E-mail: fabian.ruehle@physics.ox.ac.uk [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Wieck, Clemens, E-mail: clemens.wieck@uam.es [Departamento de Física Teórica and Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-06-10

    We study the consistency of large-field inflation in low-energy effective field theories of string theory. In particular, we focus on the stability of Kähler moduli in the particularly interesting case where the non-perturbative superpotential of the Kähler sector explicitly depends on the inflaton field. This situation arises generically due to one-loop corrections to the instanton action. The field dependence of the modulus potential feeds back into the inflationary dynamics, potentially impairing slow roll. We distinguish between world-sheet instantons from Euclidean D-branes, which typically yield polynomial one-loop Pfaffians, and gaugino condensates, which can yield exponential or periodic corrections. In all scenarios successful slow-roll inflation imposes bounds on the magnitude of the one-loop correction, corresponding to constraints on possible compactifications. While we put a certain emphasis on Type IIB constructions with mobile D7-branes, our results seem to apply more generally.

  13. On the DC loop modes in the MOT solution of the time domain EFIE

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yifei

    2014-07-01

    When marching-on-in-time (MOT) method is applied to solve the time domain electric field integral equation (TD-EFIE), DC loop modes are always observed in the solution. In theory these modes should not be observed since they do not satisfy the relaxed initial conditions. Their appearance is attributed to numerical errors. It is shown here that when Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis and Lagrange interpolation functions are used to discretize the TD-EFIE, errors due to this space-time discretization have zero impact on the DC loop modes. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the numerical errors due to approximate solution of the MOT matrix system have more dominant impact on DC loop modes in the MOT solution.

  14. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold C. Steinacker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  15. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinacker, Harold C., E-mail: harold.steinacker@univie.ac.at

    2016-09-15

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  16. A Systematic Approach to Design High-Order Phase-Locked Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Fernandez, Francisco Daniel Freijedo; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    A basic approach to improve the performance of phase-locked loop (PLL) under adverse grid condition is to incorporate a first-order low-pass filter (LPF) into its control loop. The first-order LPF, however, has a limited ability to suppress grid disturbances. A natural thought to further improve...... the disturbance rejection capability of PLL is to use high order LPFs, resulting in high order PLLs. Application of high order LPFs, however, results in high order PLLs, which rather complicates the PLL analysis and design procedure. To overcome this challenge, a systematic method to design high order PLLs...... is presented in this letter. The suggested approach has a general theme, which means it can be applied to design the PLL control parameters regardless of the order of in-loop LPF. The effectiveness of suggested design method is confirmed through different design cases....

  17. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S White

    Full Text Available Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake. In 1959, Union Pacific Railroad constructed a rock-filled causeway across the Great Salt Lake, separating the lake into a north and south arm. Flow between the two arms was limited to two 4.6 meter wide rectangular culverts installed during construction, an 88 meter opening (referred to locally as a breach installed in 1984, and the semi porous material of the causeway. A salinity gradient developed between the two arms of the lake over time because the south arm receives approximately 95% of the incoming streamflow entering Great Salt Lake. The north arm is often at, or near, salinity saturation, averaging 317 g/L since 1966, while the south is considerably less saline, averaging 142 g/L since 1966. Ecological and industrial uses of the lake are dependent on long-term salinity remaining within physiological and economic thresholds, although optimal salinity varies for the ecosystem and between diverse stakeholders. In 2013, Union Pacific Railroad closed causeway culverts amid structural safety concerns and proposed to replace them with a bridge, offering four different bridge designs. As of summer 2015, no bridge design has been decided upon. We investigated the effect that each of the proposed bridge designs would have on north and south arm Great Salt Lake elevation and salinity by updating and applying US Geological Survey's Great Salt Lake Fortran Model. Overall, we found that salinity is sensitive to bridge size and depth, with larger designs increasing salinity in the south arm and decreasing salinity in the north arm. This research illustrates that flow modifications within terminal lakes cannot be separated from lake salinity, ecology, management, and economic uses.

  18. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James S; Null, Sarah E; Tarboton, David G

    2015-01-01

    Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake. In 1959, Union Pacific Railroad constructed a rock-filled causeway across the Great Salt Lake, separating the lake into a north and south arm. Flow between the two arms was limited to two 4.6 meter wide rectangular culverts installed during construction, an 88 meter opening (referred to locally as a breach) installed in 1984, and the semi porous material of the causeway. A salinity gradient developed between the two arms of the lake over time because the south arm receives approximately 95% of the incoming streamflow entering Great Salt Lake. The north arm is often at, or near, salinity saturation, averaging 317 g/L since 1966, while the south is considerably less saline, averaging 142 g/L since 1966. Ecological and industrial uses of the lake are dependent on long-term salinity remaining within physiological and economic thresholds, although optimal salinity varies for the ecosystem and between diverse stakeholders. In 2013, Union Pacific Railroad closed causeway culverts amid structural safety concerns and proposed to replace them with a bridge, offering four different bridge designs. As of summer 2015, no bridge design has been decided upon. We investigated the effect that each of the proposed bridge designs would have on north and south arm Great Salt Lake elevation and salinity by updating and applying US Geological Survey's Great Salt Lake Fortran Model. Overall, we found that salinity is sensitive to bridge size and depth, with larger designs increasing salinity in the south arm and decreasing salinity in the north arm. This research illustrates that flow modifications within terminal lakes cannot be separated from lake salinity, ecology, management, and economic uses.

  19. Two strategies to engineer flexible loops for improved enzyme thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haoran; Yan, Yihan; Zhang, Cheng; Dalby, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    Flexible sites are potential targets for engineering the stability of enzymes. Nevertheless, the success rate of the rigidifying flexible sites (RFS) strategy is still low due to a limited understanding of how to determine the best mutation candidates. In this study, two parallel strategies were applied to identify mutation candidates within the flexible loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK). The first was a "back to consensus mutations" approach, and the second was computational design based on ΔΔG calculations in Rosetta. Forty-nine single variants were generated and characterised experimentally. From these, three single-variants I189H, A282P, D143K were found to be more thermostable than wild-type TK. The combination of A282P with H192P, a variant constructed previously, resulted in the best all-round variant with a 3-fold improved half-life at 60 °C, 5-fold increased specific activity at 65 °C, 1.3-fold improved kcat and a Tm increased by 5 °C above that of wild type. Based on a statistical analysis of the stability changes for all variants, the qualitative prediction accuracy of the Rosetta program reached 65.3%. Both of the two strategies investigated were useful in guiding mutation candidates to flexible loops, and had the potential to be used for other enzymes.

  20. Supervisory control of a pilot-scale cooling loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kris Villez; Venkat Venkatasubramanian; Humberto Garcia

    2011-08-01

    We combine a previously developed strategy for Fault Detection and Identification (FDI) with a supervisory controller in closed loop. The combined method is applied to a model of a pilot-scale cooling loop of a nuclear plant, which includes Kalman filters and a model-based predictive controller as part of normal operation. The system has two valves available for flow control meaning that some redundancy is available. The FDI method is based on likelihood ratios for different fault scenarios which in turn are derived from the application of the Kalman filter. A previously introduced extension of the FDI method is used here to enable detection and identification of non-linear faults like stuck valve problems and proper accounting of the time of fault introduction. The supervisory control system is designed so to take different kinds of actions depending on the status of the fault diagnosis task and on the type of identified fault once diagnosis is complete. Some faults, like sensor bias and drift, are parametric in nature and can be adjusted without need for reconfiguration of the regulatory control system. Other faults, like a stuck valve problem, require reconfiguration of the regulatory control system. The whole strategy is demonstrated for several scenarios.

  1. Simulations of magnetic hysteresis loops at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J. [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada); Ek, J. van [Western Digital Corporation, San Jose, California 94588 (United States); Mercer, J. I. [Department of Computer Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2014-09-28

    The kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm as well as standard micromagnetics are used to simulate MH loops of high anisotropy magnetic recording media at both short and long time scales over a wide range of temperatures relevant to heat-assisted magnetic recording. Microscopic parameters, common to both methods, were determined by fitting to experimental data on single-layer FePt-based media that uses the Magneto-Optic Kerr effect with a slow sweep rate of 700 Oe/s. Saturation moment, uniaxial anisotropy, and exchange constants are given an intrinsic temperature dependence based on published atomistic simulations of FePt grains with an effective Curie temperature of 680 K. Our results show good agreement between micromagnetics and kinetic Monte Carlo results over a wide range of sweep rates. Loops at the slow experimental sweep rates are found to become more square-shaped, with an increasing slope, as temperature increases from 300 K. These effects also occur at higher sweep rates, typical of recording speeds, but are much less pronounced. These results demonstrate the need for accurate determination of intrinsic thermal properties of future recording media as input to micromagnetic models as well as the sensitivity of the switching behavior of thin magnetic films to applied field sweep rates at higher temperatures.

  2. A gyro-stabilized platform leveling loop for marine gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P. F.; Liu, L. T.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, M.; Zhou, Z. B.; Zou, Z.

    2017-06-01

    An ultra-low-frequency platform leveling loop based on a mixed sensitivity H∞ approach, which considers both the system bandwidth and response speed, was designed and applied to a prototype, two-axis gyro-stabilized platform marine gravimeter CHZ-II. The instrument was developed for regional surveys in deep ocean areas where high-resolution gravity measurements with accuracy 1 mGal are required. Horizontal accelerations in the surge and sway directions are suppressed about 60 dB in the frequency range 0.05 to 0.5 Hz. This typically improves the quality of the gravity data before any processing corrections. The time required for stabilizing the platform at the beginning of a survey line or course change is about 3 min, which improves the data collection efficiency. In May 2015, the first test was conducted in open sea conditions aboard the Chinese State Oceanic Administration's R/V Xiangyanghong 10. Sixteen traverses were run in the South China Sea to evaluate the loop performance. Platform motion tracks and gravity data from the survey were of satisfactory quality. According to analyses of 16 sets of calculated errors, the root mean square repeatability of the pitch and roll off-level angles were less than 10 and 20 arc sec, respectively, with a horizontal acceleration of about 50 Gal. Errors derived from the inability of the platform to maintain perfect sensor leveling during the survey cruise were less than 0.3 mGal.

  3. One-loop renormalization of a gravity-scalar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, I.Y. [Philander Smith College, Department of Applied Mathematics, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Extending the renormalizability proposal of the physical sector of 4D Einstein gravity, we have recently proposed renormalizability of the 3D physical sector of gravity-matter systems. The main goal of the present work is to conduct systematic one-loop renormalization of a gravity-matter system by applying our foliation-based quantization scheme. In this work we explicitly carry out renormalization of a gravity-scalar system with a Higgs-type potential. With the fluctuation part of the scalar field gauged away, the system becomes renormalizable through a metric field redefinition. We use dimensional regularization throughout. One of the salient aspects of our analysis is how the graviton propagator acquires the ''mass'' term. One-loop calculations lead to renormalization of the cosmological and Newton constants. We discuss other implications of our results as well: time-varying vacuum energy density and masses of the elementary particles as well as the potential relevance of Neumann boundary condition for black hole information. (orig.)

  4. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-08-01

    To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to 'standardize' the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable potential to establish noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation as interventional therapeutic tool.

  5. Influence of extrinsic operational parameters on salt diffusion during ultrasound assisted meat curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguglia, Elena S; Zhang, Zhihang; Burgess, Catherine; Kerry, Joseph P; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2018-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of geometric parameters of the ultrasound instrument during meat salting in order to enhance salt diffusion and salt distribution in pork meat on a lab scale. The effects of probe size (∅2.5 and 1.3cm) and of different distances between the transducer and the meat sample (0.3, 0.5, and 0.8cm) on NaCl diffusion were investigated. Changes in the moisture content and NaCl gain were used to evaluate salt distribution and diffusion in the samples, parallel and perpendicular to ultrasound propagation direction. Results showed that 0.3cm was the most efficient distance between the probe and the sample to ensure a higher salt diffusion rate. A distance of 0.5cm was however considered as a trade-off distance to ensure salt diffusion and maintenance of meat quality parameters. The enhancement of salt diffusion by ultrasound was observed to decrease with increased horizontal distance from the probe. This study is of valuable importance for meat processing industries willing to apply new technologies on a larger scale and with defined operational standards. The data suggest that the geometric parameters of ultrasound systems can have strong influence on the efficiency of ultrasonic enhancement of NaCl uptake in meat and can be a crucial element in determining salt uptake during meat processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A modeling of radiation induced microstructural evolution under applied stress in austenitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Kohyama, Akira [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy; Katoh, Yutai; Kohno, Yutaka

    1996-10-01

    Effects of applied stress on interstitial type Frank loop evolution at early stages of irradiation were investigated by both numerical calculation and irradiation experiments. In the experimental part of this work, microstructural inspection has been made by transmission electron microscopy with a special emphasis on Frank loops and perfect loops on every {l_brace}111{r_brace} plane. The results of the TEM observation revealed that Frank loop concentration on a {l_brace}111{r_brace} plane increased as the resolved normal stress to a {l_brace}111{r_brace} plane increased and that small perfect loops were more likely produced on {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes where larger resolved shear stress was applied. The model of a stress effect on Frank loop unfaulting was provided, which is triggered by nucleation of a Shockley partial dislocation loop in a Frank loop, was proposed. The results of the numerical calculation was successful to predict the strong dependence of Frank loop concentration on the resolved normal stress to {l_brace}111{r_brace} plane, which was the characteristic feature seen in the irradiation experiments. (author)

  7. A digital wireless system for closed-loop inhibition of nociceptive signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Yang; Hagains, Christopher E.; Li, Ai-Ling; Peng, Yuan B.; Chiao, J.-C.

    2012-10-01

    Neurostimulation of the spinal cord or brain has been used to inhibit nociceptive signals in pain management applications. Nevertheless, most of the current neurostimulation models are based on open-loop system designs. There is a lack of closed-loop systems for neurostimulation in research with small freely-moving animals and in future clinical applications. Based on our previously developed analog wireless system for closed-loop neurostimulation, a digital wireless system with real-time feedback between recorder and stimulator modules has been developed to achieve multi-channel communication. The wireless system includes a wearable recording module, a wearable stimulation module and a transceiver connected to a computer for real-time and off-line data processing, display and storage. To validate our system, wide dynamic range neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn have been recorded from anesthetized rats in response to graded mechanical stimuli (brush, pressure and pinch) applied in the hind paw. The identified nociceptive signals were used to automatically trigger electrical stimulation at the periaqueductal gray in real time to inhibit their own activities by the closed-loop design. Our digital wireless closed-loop system has provided a simplified and efficient method for further study of pain processing in freely-moving animals and potential clinical application in patients. Groups 1, 2 and 3 contributed equally to this project.

  8. The 2-loop matter power spectrum and the IR-safe integrand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo, E-mail: jjmc@stanford.edu, E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu, E-mail: drgreen@stanford.edu, E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94306 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys are likely the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime, where dark matter correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k over the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. To push the predictions to higher wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute the 2-loop matter power spectrum. For equal-time correlators, exactly as with standard perturturbation theory, there are IR divergences present in each diagram that cancel completely in the final result. We develop a method by which all 2-loop diagrams are computed as one integral, with an integrand that is manifestly free of any IR divergences. This allows us to compute the 2-loop power spectra in a reliable way that is much less numerically challenging than standard techniques. We apply our method to scaling universes where the linear power spectrum is a single power law of k, and where IR divergences can particularly easily interfere with accurate evaluation of loop corrections if not handled carefully. We show that our results are independent of IR cutoff and, after renormalization, of the UV cutoff, and comment how the method presented here naturally generalizes to higher loops.

  9. Is Presence of Vascular Loop in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Always Related to Tinnitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensari, Nuray; Gür, Özer Erdem; Selçuk, Ömer Tarik; Renda, Levent; Osma, Üstün; Eyigör, Hülya; Çekiç, Bülent

    2017-05-01

    One of the most common otological complaints is tinnitus in adults. When there is a complaint of unilateral tinnitus and retrocochlear pathology is suspected, imaging methods are applied. However, the imaging findings obtained may not always be compatible with the severity and localization of the tinnitus. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not there was a significant correlation between the findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the presence and severity of tinnitus in patients with the complaint of unilateral tinnitus. The study included 44 patients with no loss of hearing who presented with the complaint of unilateral tinnitus. The relationship between tinnitus severity and vascular loop presence was investigated. Various types of vascular loop were determined in 14 patients. No statistically significant relationship was determined between the presence of vascular loop and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory scores. The results of this study showed no significant difference in respect of the presence of vascular loop on the MRI findings of symptomatic and healthy ears. The presence of vascular loop on MRI is not always a pathological event and should be considered only as an examination finding that could be an anatomic variation.

  10. Thermophysical properties of reconsolidating crushed salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Urquhart, Alexander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Reconsolidated crushed salt is being considered as a backfilling material placed upon nuclear waste within a salt repository environment. In-depth knowledge of thermal and mechanical properties of the crushed salt as it reconsolidates is critical to thermal/mechanical modeling of the reconsolidation process. An experimental study was completed to quantitatively evaluate the thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt as a function of porosity and temperature. The crushed salt for this study came from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In this work the thermal conductivity of crushed salt with porosity ranging from 1% to 40% was determined from room temperature up to 300°C, using two different experimental methods. Thermal properties (including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat) of single-crystal salt were determined for the same temperature range. The salt was observed to dewater during heating; weight loss from the dewatering was quantified. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt decreases with increasing porosity; conversely, thermal conductivity increases as the salt consolidates. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt for a given porosity decreases with increasing temperature. A simple mixture theory model is presented to predict and compare to the data developed in this study.

  11. Physicochemical Characteristics of Beef Jerky Cured with Salted-fermented Anchovy and Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gap-Don; Go, Gwang-Woong; Lim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Eun-Young; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Joo, Seon-Tea; Yang, Han-Sul

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the availability of salted and fermented fish (SFF) including salted and fermented anchovy (SFA) and shrimp (SFS) as a marinade of beef jerky. In curing solutions, half (SFA 1 and SFS 1) or whole (SFA 2 and SFS 2) salt-water was replaced with SFF juices. Higher water activity (aw) was found in the beef jerky cured with SFFs than the control (C) (pbeef jerky. In particular, the SFS is a good ingredient for the curing solution. However, studies are still needed on improving the aw, pH, and surface color of the beef jerky to apply the SFFs for making beef jerky.

  12. Age-related alterations of the functional interactions within the basal ganglia and cerebellar motor loops in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniwaki, Takayuki; Okayama, Akira; Yoshiura, Takashi; Togao, Osamu; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Yamasaki, Takao; Ogata, Katsuya; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2007-07-15

    Aging may alter the motor functions of the basal ganglia and cerebellum; however, no previous neuroimaging study has investigated the effect of aging on the functional connectivity of the motor loops involving these structures. Recently, using fMRI with a parametric approach and structural equation modeling (SEM), we demonstrated a significant functional interaction within the basal ganglia-thalamo-motor (BGTM) loop during self-initiated (SI) finger movement in young normal subjects, whereas cerebro-cerebellar (CC) loop was mainly involved during externally triggered (ET) movement. We applied this method to 12 normal aged subjects (53-72 years old) in order to study the effect of age on BGTM and CC loops. Compared with the functional connectivity seen in young subjects, SEM showed decreased connectivity in BGTM loops during SI task, decreased interaction in the CC loop during ET task, and increased connectivity within motor cortices and between hemispheres during both types of tasks. These results suggest an age-related decline of cortico-subcortical connectivity with increased interactions between motor cortices. Aging effects on SI and ET movements are probably caused by functional alterations within BGTM and CC loops.

  13. Early Holocene Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, Charles G.; Madsen, David B.; Miller, David; Thompson, Robert S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Shorelines and surficial deposits (including buried forest-floor mats and organic-rich wetland sediments) show that Great Salt Lake did not rise higher than modern lake levels during the earliest Holocene (11.5–10.2 cal ka BP; 10–9 14C ka BP). During that period, finely laminated, organic-rich muds (sapropel) containing brine-shrimp cysts and pellets and interbedded sodium-sulfate salts were deposited on the lake floor. Sapropel deposition was probably caused by stratification of the water column — a freshwater cap possibly was formed by groundwater, which had been stored in upland aquifers during the immediately preceding late-Pleistocene deep-lake cycle (Lake Bonneville), and was actively discharging on the basin floor. A climate characterized by low precipitation and runoff, combined with local areas of groundwater discharge in piedmont settings, could explain the apparent conflict between evidence for a shallow lake (a dry climate) and previously published interpretations for a moist climate in the Great Salt Lake basin of the eastern Great Basin.

  14. Supercritical water loop for in-pile materials testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzickova, M.; Vsolak, R.; Hajek, P.; Zychova, M.; Fukac, R. [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    The Supercritical Water Loop (SCWL) has been designed and built within the HPLWR Phase 2 project, with the objective of testing materials under supercritical water conditions and radiation. The design parameters are set to 25MPa and 600{sup o}C in the testing area, where material samples shall be located. The loop has recently undergone pressure and leakage tests, during which the strength and tightness of the loop were proved. The loop has been also subjected to the first trial operation at nearly maximum operating parameters (temperature 550 {sup o}C was reached); loop operation was steady during several days. Presently, loop operation is envisaged in order to test the loop's long term operation ability. Samples of a material that needs further testing under out- of-pile conditions shall be exposed in the loop; the choice shall be made in agreement with the results of the WP4 - Materials of the HPLWR Phase 2 project. (author)

  15. Vapor Compressor Driven Hybrid Two-Phase Loop Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will demonstrate a vapor compressor driven hybrid two-phase loop technology. The hybrid two-phase loop...

  16. Multi-loop calculations: numerical methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowka, S.; Heinrich, G.; Jahn, S.; Jones, S. P.; Kerner, M.; Schlenk, J.

    2017-11-01

    We briefly review numerical methods for calculations beyond one loop and then describe new developments within the method of sector decomposition in more detail. We also discuss applications to two-loop integrals involving several mass scales.

  17. Stability in Real Food Webs: Weak Links in Long Loops

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anje-Margriet Neutel; Johan A. P. Heesterbeek; Peter C. de Ruiter

    2002-01-01

    ... of these patterns, how they come about, and why they influence stability. We show that in real food webs, interaction strengths are organized in trophic loops in such a way that long loops contain relatively many weak links...

  18. The Seasonality Of The Loop Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Cody Alan

    A total of 20 Loop Current eddy separation event dates were derived from Seasat and ERS-1 satellite altimetry, Coastal Zone Color Scanner chlorophyll-a images, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sea surface temperature images, Horizon Marine, Inc. EddyWatch(TM) reports, and Climatology and Simulation of Eddies Eddy Joint Industry Project Gulf Eddy Model analyses spanning mid-1978 - 1992. There were many inconsistencies between the new "pre-altimetry" reanalysis dates derived from mostly non-altimeter data and dates published in past literature based on earlier versions of the pre-altimetry record. The reanalysis dates were derived from a larger compilation of data types and, consequently, were not as affected by intermittent and seasonal data outages common with past records. Therefore, the reanalysis dates are likely more accurate. About 30 Loop Current eddy separation dates were derived from altimetry data spanning 1993 -- 2012. The pre-altimetry and altimetry reanalysis dates along with similar altimetry dates published in other literature exhibit statistically significant seasonality. Eddy separation events are more likely in the months March, August, and September, and less likely in December. Reanalysis event dates were objectively divided into "spring" and "fall" seasons using a k-means clustering algorithm. The estimated spring and fall season centers are March 2nd and August 23 rd, respectively, with seasonal boundaries on May 22nd and December 3rd. The altimetry data suggest that Loop Current intrusion/retreat is dominantly an annual process. Loop Current metrics such as maximum northern boundary latitude and area are relatively high from January through about July and low in September and October. February metrics are statistically different than metrics in either October or November or both. This annual process is primarily driven by and dynamically linked to geostrophic currents seaward of the Campeche Bank shelf break forced by Kelvin waves

  19. Magnetic Monopoles and the Loop Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Paul Timothy

    My thesis relates three major works in gauge theory and geometry. I use a technique involving jumping lines in the study of holomorphic bundles over the projective plane to gain information about the loop group and hyperbolic monopoles. I also turn this around and get some information on the jumping lines of a holomorphic bundle. Hurtubise studied the local geometry of a holomorphic bundle on the projective plane around a jumping line, encoding this information into the Toeplitz space. Milgram identified a stratum of the projectivized Toeplitz space with a quotient of the space of rational maps from the two-sphere to itself. I associate the Toeplitz space to the loop group and use Milgram's result to get a description of a stratum of the loop group. By studying their jumping lines I construct those holomorphic bundles on the projective plane which are invariant under a circle action so in particular correspond to hyperbolic monopoles. Again I use Milgram's result to get a new proof of the theorem of Atiyah where he obtains a homeomorphism between the space of hyperbolic monopoles and the space of rational maps from the two-sphere to itself that fix infinity. Conversely using Atiyah's theorem I get a new proof of Milgram's result. This equivalence between the theorems of Milgram and Atiyah generalises to the case of higher rank so I get new results on the local geometry of jumping lines of a holomorphic bundle over the projective plane. There are two main ways to describe holomorphic bundles over the projective plane. Using the loop group I produce a third way to describe such bundles. With this description I show that there is a deeper equivalence between the theorems of Milgram and Atiyah. This work originated from questions about the relationship between the instantons of two dynamical theories --gauge theory over the four-sphere and holomorphic curves in the loop group. I study the gradient flows of the energy functional on the loop group and show how they

  20. Liquid electrolytes based on new lithium conductive imidazole salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzicki, L.; Kasprzyk, M.; Kuziak, K.; Zukowska, G.Z.; Marcinek, M.; Wieczorek, W. [Department of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Armand, M. [LRCS, University de Picardie Jules Verne, UMR 6007 CNRS, 33 rue de Saint-Leu, 80039 Amiens (France)

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper new generation of imidazole-derived lithium salts (LiTDI - lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)imidazolide, LiPDI - lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(pentafluoroethyl)imidazolide and LiHDI - lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(n-heptafluoropropyl)imidazolide) applied in a model liquid electrolyte, with propylene carbonate used as a solvent, is described. Room temperature ionic conductivities measured by Impedance Spectroscopy are as high as 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} for the 0.1-1 mol dm{sup -3} salt concentration range. Lithium cation transference numbers calculated using the Bruce-Vincent method exceed 0.4 at salt concentration equal to 1 mol dm{sup -3}. Interface resistance measurements showed good stability at high - 0.5 mol dm{sup -3} or low - 0.01 mol dm{sup -3} salt concentrations. Ionic associations were estimated using Fuoss-Kraus semiempirical method revealing relatively low association rates. The effect of anion structure on ionic interactions and electrochemical characteristics of the studied electrolytes is discussed. (author)

  1. Closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope with homodyne detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Qin, BingKun; Chen, Shufen

    1996-09-01

    Interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) has been analyzed with autocontrol theory in this paper. An open-loop IFOG system is not able to restrain the bias drift, but a closed-loop IFOG system can do it very well using negative feedback in order to suppress zero drift. The result of our theoretic analysis and computer simulation indicate that the bias drift of a closed-loop system is smaller than an open- loop one.

  2. Polyakov loops, Gross-Witten like point and Hagedorn states

    OpenAIRE

    Zakout, I.; Greiner, C.

    2011-01-01

    The phase transition for a finite volume system that incorporates the Polyakov loops and maintains the colorless state is explored using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. The order parameter for Polyakov loops is demonstrated to signal the appearance of a transition for $SU(3)_{c}$ analogous to Gross-Witten (GW-) phase transition instead of the deconfinement phase transition to quark-gluon plasma. The asymptotic restoration of Polyakov loops is conjectured to be a th...

  3. [Salt tolerance evaluation of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) at its germinating and seedling stages and selection of related indices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-wei; Lu, Hai-ling; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Bing-lin; Zhou, Zhi-guo

    2011-08-01

    A sand culture experiment was conducted to study the salt tolerance of 13 cotton cultivars at their germinating and seedling stages under the stress of different concentration NaCl, and a cluster analysis was made on the salt tolerance, according to the subjection values of salt toxicity coefficients of multi-indices and the sum subjection value. It was observed that the appropriate concentration of NaCl for the evaluation of salt tolerance was 150 mmol x L(-1). The salt tolerance differed with cultivar and growth stage. Among the 13 cultivars, the CCRI-44 and CCRI-177 were steadily salt-tolerant at both germinating and seedling stages, the CCRI-103, Dexiamian 1, and NuCOTN 33B were steadily and moderately salt-tolerant, while the CCRI-102, Sumian 12, and Simian 3 were steadily salt-sensitive. Germination rate, germination potential, germination index, vigor index, and fresh mass could be served as the indicators to evaluate the salt tolerance of the cultivars at germinating stage, while plant height, leaf expansion rate, shoot dry mass, root dry mass, root vigor, and net photosynthetic rate could be applied to assess the salt tolerance at seedling stage.

  4. An integrated model of tritium transport and corrosion in Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) – Part I: Theory and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D., E-mail: john.stempien@inl.gov; Ballinger, Ronald G., E-mail: hvymet@mit.edu; Forsberg, Charles W., E-mail: cforsber@mit.edu

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A model was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. • Model results match results of tritium diffusion experiments. • Corrosion simulations show reasonable agreement with molten salt loop experiments. • This is the only existing model of tritium transport and corrosion in FHRs. • Model enables proposing and evaluating tritium control options in FHRs. - Abstract: The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) is a pebble bed nuclear reactor concept cooled by a liquid fluoride salt known as “flibe” ({sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}). A model of TRITium Diffusion EvolutioN and Transport (TRIDENT) was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. TRIDENT is the first model to integrate the effects of tritium production in the salt via neutron transmutation, with the effects of the chemical redox potential, tritium mass transfer, tritium diffusion through pipe walls, tritium uptake by graphite, selective chromium attack by tritium fluoride, and corrosion product mass transfer. While data from a forced-convection polythermal loop of molten salt containing tritium did not exist for comparison, TRIDENT calculations were compared to data from static salt diffusion tests in flibe and flinak (0.465LiF-0.115NaF-0.42KF) salts. In each case, TRIDENT matched the transient and steady-state behavior of these tritium diffusion experiments. The corrosion model in TRIDENT was compared against the natural convection flow-loop experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from the 1960s and early 1970s which used Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel-salt containing UF{sub 4}. Despite the lack of data required by TRIDENT for modeling the loops, some reasonable results were obtained. The TRIDENT corrosion rates follow the experimentally observed dependence on the square root of the product of the chromium solid-state diffusion coefficient with time. Additionally the TRIDENT model predicts mass

  5. Loop-loop interactions govern multiple steps in indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccardi, Margot J; O'Rourke, Kathleen F; Yezdimer, Eric M; Loggia, Laura J; Woldt, Svenja; Boehr, David D

    2014-03-01

    Substrate binding, product release, and likely chemical catalysis in the tryptophan biosynthetic enzyme indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS) are dependent on the structural dynamics of the β1α1 active-site loop. Statistical coupling analysis and molecular dynamic simulations had previously indicated that covarying residues in the β1α1 and β2α2 loops, corresponding to Arg54 and Asn90, respectively, in the Sulfolobus sulfataricus enzyme (ssIGPS), are likely important for coordinating functional motions of these loops. To test this hypothesis, we characterized site mutants at these positions for changes in catalytic function, protein stability and structural dynamics for the thermophilic ssIGPS enzyme. Although there were only modest changes in the overall steady-state kinetic parameters, solvent viscosity and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects indicated that these amino acid substitutions change the identity of the rate-determining step across multiple temperatures. Surprisingly, the N90A substitution had a dramatic effect on the general acid/base catalysis of the dehydration step, as indicated by the loss of the descending limb in the pH rate profile, which we had previously assigned to Lys53 on the β1α1 loop. These changes in enzyme function are accompanied with a quenching of ps-ns and µs-ms timescale motions in the β1α1 loop as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Altogether, our studies provide structural, dynamic and functional rationales for the coevolution of residues on the β1α1 and β2α2 loops, and highlight the multiple roles that the β1α1 loop plays in IGPS catalysis. Thus, substitution of covarying residues in the active-site β1α1 and β2α2 loops of indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase results in functional, structural, and dynamic changes, highlighting the multiple roles that the β1α1 loop plays in enzyme catalysis and the importance of regulating the structural dynamics of this loop through noncovalent

  6. Towards the Two-Loop Lcc Vertex in Landau Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetič, Gorazd; Kondrashuk, Igor; Kotikov, Anatoly; Schmidt, Ivan

    We are interested in the structure of the Lcc vertex in the Yang-Mills theory, where c is the ghost field and L the corresponding BRST auxiliary field. This vertex can give us information on other vertices, and the possible conformal structure of the theory should be reflected in the structure of this vertex. There are five two-loop contributions to the Lcc vertex in the Yang-Mills theory. We present here calculation of the first of the five contributions. The calculation has been performed in the position space. One main feature of the result is that it does not depend on any scale, ultraviolet or infrared. The result is expressed in terms of logarithms and Davydychev integral J(1, 1, 1) that are functions of the ratios of the intervals between points of effective fields in the position space. To perform the calculation we apply Gegenbauer polynomial technique and uniqueness method.

  7. Channel equalized DC squid flux-locked loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenson, Meir; McDonald, Robert J.

    1995-02-01

    A DC superconductor quantum interference device (i.e. DC SQUID) is used in a flux-looked loop as a sensitive detector of magnetic flux. Prior art devices of this sort had a transfer function which was frequency-limited by the transfer function of impedance matching circuitry which is used to connect the DC SQUID with the first preamplifier, which amplifies the DC SQUID signal before it is applied to a detector circuit. The present invention corrects this frequency limitation by creating a compensating circuit having a transfer function which is the inverse of that of the impedance matching circuitry and inserting it in the system after the first preamplifier and before the detector circuit.

  8. Solutions of selected pseudo loop equations in water distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper demonstrated the use of Microsoft Excel Solver (a computer package) in solving selected pseudo loop equations in pipe network analysis problems. Two pipe networks with pumps and overhead tanks were used to demonstrate the use of Microsoft Excel Solver in solving pseudo loops (open loops; networks with ...

  9. The autoregulatory loop: A common mechanism of regulation of key ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... an autoregulatory positive feedback loop. In this review, by taking examples from various insects, we propose the hypothesis that autoregulatory loop mechanisms of sex determination might be a general strategy. We also discuss the possible reasons for the evolution of autoregulatory loops in sex determination cascades ...

  10. Rare Case of Double Looped Ansa Cervicalis Associated with its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fibers of C1‑C3 nerves arose from this loop and ran obliquely downwards superficial to CCA and branched out to supply the infrahyoid muscles. Rare Case of Double Looped Ansa ... Keywords: Ansa cervicalis, Double loop, Nerve muscle transplant, Variation ... categorized as type 3 with the prevalence of 4% and double.

  11. Closed-Loop Optimal Control Implementations for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    COVERED Master’s thesis , Jan-Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLOSED-LOOP OPTIMAL CONTROL IMPLEMENTATIONS FOR SPACE APPLICATIONS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS... Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT This thesis explores concepts for a closed-loop optimal...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. CLOSED-LOOP

  12. Modulation of RNA polymerase activity through trigger loop folding

    OpenAIRE

    Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Nikiforov, Vadim; Klimašauskas, Saulius; Artsimovitch, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    Folding of the trigger loop of RNA polymerase promotes nucleotide addition through creating a closed, catalytically competent conformation of the active center. Here, we discuss the impact of adjacent RNA polymerase elements, including the F loop and the jaw domain, as well as external regulatory factors on the trigger loop folding and catalysis.

  13. Increased water resistance of paper treated with amylose-fatty ammonium salt inclusion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylose inclusion complexes were prepared from high amylose corn starch and the HCl salts of hexadecylamine and octadecylamine. Solutions of the complexes were applied to paper at concentrations of 2-4%. After the treated papers were dried, sodium hydroxide solution was applied to convert the adsorb...

  14. Lagrangian perturbations and the matter bispectrum II: the resummed one-loop correction to the matter bispectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampf, Cornelius; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y., E-mail: rampf@physik.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: yvonne.wong@physik.rwth-aachen.de [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-06-01

    This is part two in a series of papers in which we investigate an approach based on Lagrangian perturbation theory (LPT) to study the non-linear evolution of the large-scale structure distribution in the universe. Firstly, we compute the matter bispectrum in real space using LPT up one-loop order, for both Gaussian and non-Gaussian initial conditions. In the initial position limit, we find that the one-loop bispectrum computed in this manner is identical to its counterpart obtained from standard Eulerian perturbation theory (SPT). Furthermore, the LPT formalism allows for a simple reorganisation of the perturbative series corresponding to the resummation of an infinite series of perturbations in SPT. Applying this method, we find a resummed one-loop bispectrum that compares favourably with results from N-body simulations. We generalise the resummation method also to the computation of the redshift-space bispectrum up to one loop.

  15. The analytical basis for the resonances and anti-resonances of loop antennas and meta-material ring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, A. F.; White, T. P.; Maksymov, I. S.; Catchpole, K. R.

    2012-11-01

    Interest in the electromagnetic properties of loop structures has surged with the recent appearance of split-ring resonator meta-materials (SRRs) and nano-antennas. Understanding the resonances, anti-resonances, and harmonics of these loops is key to understanding their response to a wide range of excitation wavelengths. We present the classical analytical solution for the input impedance of a loop structure with circumference on the order of the wavelength, and we show how to identify these resonances from the function. We transform the classical solution into a new RLC formulation and show that each natural mode of the loop can be represented as a series resonant circuit, such that the full response function can be resolved by placing all of these circuits in parallel. We show how this formulation applies to SRRs.

  16. Color-Kinematics Duality and Sudakov Form Factor at Five Loops for N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang

    2016-12-30

    Using color-kinematics duality, we construct for the first time the full integrand of the five-loop Sudakov form factor in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory, including nonplanar contributions. This result also provides a first manifestation of the color-kinematics duality at five loops. The integrand is explicitly ultraviolet finite when D<26/5, coincident with the known finiteness bound for amplitudes. If the double-copy method could be applied to the form factor, this would indicate an interesting ultraviolet finiteness bound for N=8 supergravity at five loops. The result is also expected to provide an essential input for computing the five-loop nonplanar cusp anomalous dimension.

  17. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  18. A new vacuum for Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    We construct a new vacuum for loop quantum gravity, which is dual to the Ashtekar-Lewandowski vacuum. Because it is based on BF theory, this new vacuum is physical for $(2+1)$-dimensional gravity, and much closer to the spirit of spin foam quantization in general. To construct this new vacuum and the associated representation of quantum observables, we introduce a modified holonomy-flux algebra which is cylindrically consistent with respect to the notion of refinement by time evolution suggested in [1]. This supports the proposal for a construction of a physical vacuum made in [1,2], also for $(3+1)$-dimensional gravity. We expect that the vacuum introduced here will facilitate the extraction of large scale physics and cosmological predictions from loop quantum gravity.

  19. Loop transfer recovery for general observer architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Søgaard-Andersen, Per; Stoustrup, Jakob

    1991-01-01

    A general and concise formulation is given of the loop transfer recovery (LTR) design problem based on recovery errors. Three types of recovery errors are treated: open loop recovery, sensitivity recovery and input-output recovery errors. The three corresponding versions of the asymptotic recovery...... recovery cases. This general recovery formulation covers all known observer based compensator types as special cases. The conditions given in this setting are effectively the aim of all known LTR design methods. The recovery formulation is interpreted in terms of a modelmatching problem as well, which...... is examined by means of the Q-parametrization. It is shown how the general controller obtained by the Q-parametrization can be written as a Luenberger observer based controller. In all cases, n controller states suffice to achieve recovery. The compensators are characterized for errors both on the input...

  20. Loop quantization of the Schwarzschild black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2013-05-24

    We quantize spherically symmetric vacuum gravity without gauge fixing the diffeomorphism constraint. Through a rescaling, we make the algebra of Hamiltonian constraints Abelian, and therefore the constraint algebra is a true Lie algebra. This allows the completion of the Dirac quantization procedure using loop quantum gravity techniques. We can construct explicitly the exact solutions of the physical Hilbert space annihilated by all constraints. New observables living in the bulk appear at the quantum level (analogous to spin in quantum mechanics) that are not present at the classical level and are associated with the discrete nature of the spin network states of loop quantum gravity. The resulting quantum space-times resolve the singularity present in the classical theory inside black holes.

  1. MBNL expression in autoregulatory feedback loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczny, Patryk; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2017-09-26

    Muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins bind to hundreds of pre- and mature mRNAs to regulate their alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, stability and subcellular localization. Once MBNLs are withheld from transcript regulation, cellular machineries generate products inapt for precise embryonal/adult developmental tasks and myotonic dystrophy, a devastating multi-systemic genetic disorder, develops. We have recently demonstrated that all three MBNL paralogs are capable of fine-tuning cellular content of one of the three MBNL paralogs, MBNL1, by binding to the first coding exon (e1) of its pre-mRNA. Intriguingly, this autoregulatory feedback loop grounded on alternative splicing of e1 appears to play a crucial role in delaying the onset of myotonic dystrophy. Here, we describe this process in the context of other autoregulatory and regulatory loops that maintain the content and diverse functions of MBNL proteins at optimal level in health and disease, thus supporting the overall cellular homeostasis.

  2. Dynamical Casimir effect and loop corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, E. T.; Alexeev, S. O.

    2017-09-01

    We calculate quantum loop corrections to the stress-energy flux caused by moving mirrors. We consider massless, self-interacting, ϕ4, real scalar theory. In these calculations we encounter new and quite unexpected subtleties due to the absence of global hyperbolicity in the presence of mirrors. We attempt to clearly phrase as many hidden assumptions and complications as possible that appear while solving the problem in question. On top of that, we find that quantum loop corrections to the stress-energy flux grow with time and are not suppressed in comparison with the semiclassical contributions. Thus, we observe the breakdown of the perturbation theory, and we discuss its physical origin and ways to deal with such a situation. As a byproduct, we observe a similarity of the problem in question with that for the minimally coupled, massless scalar field in de Sitter space.

  3. The gluon beam function at two loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J.

    2014-08-01

    The virtuality-dependent beam function is a universal ingredient in the resummation for observables probing the virtuality of incoming partons, including N -jettiness and beam thrust. We compute the gluon beam function at two-loop order. Together with our previous results for the two-loop quark beam function, this completes the full set of virtuality-dependent beam functions at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). Our results are required to account for all collinear initial-state radiation effects on the N -jettiness event shape through N3LL order. We present numerical results for both the quark and gluon beam functions up to NNLO and N3LL order. Numerically, the NNLO matching corrections are important. They reduce the residual matching scale dependence in the resummed beam function by about a factor of two.

  4. The gluon beam function at two loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2014-05-15

    The virtuality-dependent beam function is a universal ingredient in the resummation for observables probing the virtuality of incoming partons, including N-jettiness and beam thrust. We compute the gluon beam function at two-loop order. Together with our previous results for the two-loop quark beam function, this completes the full set of virtuality-dependent beam functions at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). Our results are required to account for all collinear ISR effects to the N-jettiness event shape through N{sup 3}LL order. We present numerical results for both the quark and gluon beam functions up to NNLO and N{sup 3}LL order. Numerically, the NNLO matching corrections are important. They reduce the residual matching scale dependence in the resummed beam function by about a factor of two.

  5. Two-loop statsum of superstrings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.

    1988-06-01

    We discuss, whether there is a choice of odd moduli on super-Riemann surfaces of genus p≳2, which leads to the vanishing of statistical sums of superstrings before integration over the space of even moduli. The answer is shown to be positive at least for p=2, when odd moduli are localized at ramification points. The relation between various definitions of many-loop statistical sums in superstring theory is discussed.

  6. A Review on the Salt Bridge Between ASP177 and ARG163 of Wild-Type Rabbit Prion Protein

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species such as sheep and goats, cattle, deer, elks, humans and mice etc., but rabbits have a low susceptibility to be infected by prion diseases with respect to other species. The stability of rabbit prion protein is due to its highly ordered beta2-alpha2 loop [PLoS One 5 (10) e13273 (2010); Journal of Biological Chemistry 285 (41) 31682-31693 (2010)] and a helix-capping motif within this loop [PLoS One 8 (5) e63047 (2013)]. The beta2-alpha2 loop has been a focus in prion studies. For this loop we found a salt bridge linkage ASP177-ARG163 (O-N) [Journal of Theoretical Biology 342 (7 February 2014) 70-82 (2014)]. Some scientists said on the 2FJ3.pdb NMR file of the rabbit prion protein, the distance of ASP177-ARG163 (O-N) gives the salt bridge of about 10 angstroms which is nearly null in terms of energy thus think our result is wrong. This opinion is clearly wrong simply due to the 3O7...

  7. Comparative physiology of salt and water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, R.

    2002-02-01

    Plant responses to salt and water stress have much in common. Salinity reduces the ability of plants to take up water, and this quickly causes reductions in growth rate, along with a suite of metabolic changes identical to those caused by water stress. The initial reduction in shoot growth is probably due to hormonal signals generated by the roots. There may be salt-specific effects that later have an impact on growth; if excessive amounts of salt enter the plant, salt will eventually rise to toxic levels in the older transpiring leaves, causing premature senescence, and reduce the photosynthetic leaf area of the plant to a level that cannot sustain growth. These effects take time to develop. Salt-tolerant plants differ from salt-sensitive ones in having a low rate of Na+ and Cl-- transport to leaves, and the ability to compartmentalize these ions in vacuoles to prevent their build-up in cytoplasm or cell walls and thus avoid salt toxicity. In order to understand the processes that give rise to tolerance of salt, as distinct from tolerance of osmotic stress, and to identify genes that control the transport of salt across membranes, it is important to avoid treatments that induce cell plasmolysis, and to design experiments that distinguish between tolerance of salt and tolerance of water stress.

  8. Transverse loop colostomy and colonic motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciani, F; Ringressi, M N; Maltinti, G; Bechi, P

    2014-11-01

    The motility of the defunctionalized colon, distal to transverse loop colostomy, has never been studied "in vivo." The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of transverse loop colostomy on colonic motility. Thirteen patients were examined before stoma closure by means of clinical evaluation and colonic manometry; we studied both the right and distal colon in both fasting and fed patients in order to detect motor activity. Quantitative and qualitative manometric analyses showed that the diverted colon had motor activity even if no regular colonic motor pattern was observed. The spreading of aboral propagated contractions (PCs) was sometimes recorded from the right colon to the distal colon. The response of the proximal and distal colon to a standard meal, when compared to fasting values, increased more than 40 and 35 %, respectively. Stool and gas ejections from the colostomy were never related to a particular type of colonic motility: Motor quiescence such as PCs was chaotically related to stool escape. In conclusion, motility of the defunctionalized colon is preserved in patients with transverse loop colostomy.

  9. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M. [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-05

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  10. Quantum Loop Topography for Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2017-05-01

    Despite rapidly growing interest in harnessing machine learning in the study of quantum many-body systems, training neural networks to identify quantum phases is a nontrivial challenge. The key challenge is in efficiently extracting essential information from the many-body Hamiltonian or wave function and turning the information into an image that can be fed into a neural network. When targeting topological phases, this task becomes particularly challenging as topological phases are defined in terms of nonlocal properties. Here, we introduce quantum loop topography (QLT): a procedure of constructing a multidimensional image from the "sample" Hamiltonian or wave function by evaluating two-point operators that form loops at independent Monte Carlo steps. The loop configuration is guided by the characteristic response for defining the phase, which is Hall conductivity for the cases at hand. Feeding QLT to a fully connected neural network with a single hidden layer, we demonstrate that the architecture can be effectively trained to distinguish the Chern insulator and the fractional Chern insulator from trivial insulators with high fidelity. In addition to establishing the first case of obtaining a phase diagram with a topological quantum phase transition with machine learning, the perspective of bridging traditional condensed matter theory with machine learning will be broadly valuable.

  11. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  12. The quark beam function at two loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J.

    2014-04-01

    In differential measurements at a hadron collider, collinear initial-state radiation is described by process-independent beam functions. They are the field-theoretic analog of initial-state parton showers. Depending on the measured observable they are differential in the virtuality and/or transverse momentum of the colliding partons in addition to the usual longitudinal momentum fraction. Perturbatively, the beam functions can be calculated by matching them onto standard quark and gluon parton distribution functions. We calculate the inclusive virtuality-dependent quark beam function at NNLO, which is relevant for any observables probing the virtuality of the incoming partons, including N -jettiness and beam thrust. For such observables, our results are an important ingredient in the resummation of large logarithms at N3LL order, and provide all contributions enhanced by collinear t-channel singularities at NNLO for quark-initiated processes in analytic form. We perform the calculation in both Feynman and axial gauge and use two different methods to evaluate the discontinuity of the two-loop Feynman diagrams, providing nontrivial checks of the calculation. As part of our results we reproduce the known two-loop QCD splitting functions and confirm at two loops that the virtuality-dependent beam and final-state jet functions have the same anomalous dimension.

  13. The quark beam function at two loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J.

    2014-01-15

    In differential measurements at a hadron collider, collinear initial-state radiation is described by process-independent beam functions. They are the field-theoretic analog of initial-state parton showers. Depending on the measured observable they are differential in the virtuality and/or transverse momentum of the colliding partons in addition to their usual longitudinal momentum fractions. Perturbatively, the beam functions can be calculated by matching them onto standard quark and gluon parton distribution functions. We calculate the inclusive virtuality-dependent quark beam function at NNLO, which is relevant for any observables probing the virtuality of the incoming partons, including N-jettiness and beam thrust. For such observables, our results are an important ingredient in the resummation of large logarithms at N{sup 3}LL order, and provide all contributions enhanced by collinear t-channel singularities at NNLO for quark-initiated processes in analytic form. We perform the calculation in both Feynman and axial gauge and use two different methods to evaluate the discontinuity in the two-loop Feynman diagrams, providing nontrivial checks of the calculation. As part of our results we reproduce the known two-loop QCD splitting functions and confirm at two loops that the virtuality-dependent beam and final-state jet functions have the same anomalous dimension.

  14. The quark beam function at two loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J. [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY),D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-04-16

    In differential measurements at a hadron collider, collinear initial-state radiation is described by process-independent beam functions. They are the field-theoretic analog of initial-state parton showers. Depending on the measured observable they are differential in the virtuality and/or transverse momentum of the colliding partons in addition to the usual longitudinal momentum fraction. Perturbatively, the beam functions can be calculated by matching them onto standard quark and gluon parton distribution functions. We calculate the inclusive virtuality-dependent quark beam function at NNLO, which is relevant for any observables probing the virtuality of the incoming partons, including N-jettiness and beam thrust. For such observables, our results are an important ingredient in the resummation of large logarithms at N{sup 3}LL order, and provide all contributions enhanced by collinear t-channel singularities at NNLO for quark-initiated processes in analytic form. We perform the calculation in both Feynman and axial gauge and use two different methods to evaluate the discontinuity of the two-loop Feynman diagrams, providing nontrivial checks of the calculation. As part of our results we reproduce the known two-loop QCD splitting functions and confirm at two loops that the virtuality-dependent beam and final-state jet functions have the same anomalous dimension.

  15. Closed-Loop Characterization of Neuronal Activation Using Electrical Stimulation and Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. Kuykendal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a closed-loop, high-throughput system that applies electrical stimulation and optical recording to facilitate the rapid characterization of extracellular, stimulus-evoked neuronal activity. In our system, a microelectrode array delivers current pulses to a dissociated neuronal culture treated with a calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye; automated real-time image processing of high-speed digital video identifies the neuronal response; and an optimized search routine alters the applied stimulus to achieve a targeted response. Action potentials are detected by measuring the post-stimulus, calcium-sensitive fluorescence at the neuronal somata. The system controller performs directed searches within the strength–duration (SD stimulus-parameter space to build probabilistic neuronal activation curves. This closed-loop system reduces the number of stimuli needed to estimate the activation curves when compared to the more commonly used open-loop approach. This reduction allows the closed-loop system to probe the stimulus regions of interest in the multi-parameter waveform space with increased resolution. A sigmoid model was fit to the stimulus-evoked activation data in both current (strength and pulse width (duration parameter slices through the waveform space. The two-dimensional analysis results in a set of probability isoclines corresponding to each neuron–electrode pair. An SD threshold model was then fit to the isocline data. We demonstrate that a closed-loop methodology applied to our imaging and micro-stimulation system enables the study of neuronal excitation across a large parameter space.

  16. Sampling multiple scoring functions can improve protein loop structure prediction accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaohang; Rata, Ionel; Jakobsson, Eric

    2011-07-25

    Accurately predicting loop structures is important for understanding functions of many proteins. In order to obtain loop models with high accuracy, efficiently sampling the loop conformation space to discover reasonable structures is a critical step. In loop conformation sampling, coarse-grain energy (scoring) functions coupling with reduced protein representations are often used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom as well as sampling computational time. However, due to implicitly considering many factors by reduced representations, the coarse-grain scoring functions may have potential insensitivity and inaccuracy, which can mislead the sampling process and consequently ignore important loop conformations. In this paper, we present a new computational sampling approach to obtain reasonable loop backbone models, so-called the Pareto optimal sampling (POS) method. The rationale of the POS method is to sample the function space of multiple, carefully selected scoring functions to discover an ensemble of diversified structures yielding Pareto optimality to all sampled conformations. The POS method can efficiently tolerate insensitivity and inaccuracy in individual scoring functions and thereby lead to significant accuracy improvement in loop structure prediction. We apply the POS method to a set of 4-12-residue loop targets using a function space composed of backbone-only Rosetta and distance-scale finite ideal-gas reference (DFIRE) and a triplet backbone dihedral potential developed in our lab. Our computational results show that in 501 out of 502 targets, the model sets generated by POS contain structure models are within subangstrom resolution. Moreover, the top-ranked models have a root mean square deviation (rmsd) less than 1 A in 96.8, 84.1, and 72.2% of the short (4-6 residues), medium (7-9 residues), and long (10-12 residues) targets, respectively, when the all-atom models are generated by local optimization from the backbone models and are ranked by our

  17. Transcriptome-based gene expression profiling identifies differentially expressed genes critical for salt stress response in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaochuan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaobo; Zhu, Xianwen; Kinuthia, Karanja Benard; Nie, Shanshan; Feng, Haiyang; Li, Chao; Liu, Liwang

    2016-02-01

    Transcriptome-based gene expression analysis identifies many critical salt-responsive genes in radish and facilitates further dissecting the molecular mechanism underlying salt stress response. Salt stress severely impacts plant growth and development. Radish, a moderately salt-sensitive vegetable crop, has been studied for decades towards the physiological and biochemical performances under salt stress. However, no systematic study on isolation and identification of genes involved in salt stress response has been performed in radish, and the molecular mechanism governing this process is still indistinct. Here, the RNA-Seq technique was applied to analyze the transcriptomic changes on radish roots treated with salt (200 mM NaCl) for 48 h in comparison with those cultured in normal condition. Totally 8709 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) including 3931 up- and 4778 down-regulated genes were identified. Functional annotation analysis indicated that many genes could be involved in several aspects of salt stress response including stress sensing and signal transduction, osmoregulation, ion homeostasis and ROS scavenging. The association analysis of salt-responsive genes and miRNAs exhibited that 36 miRNA-mRNA pairs had negative correlationship in expression trends. Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that the expression profiles of DEGs were in line with results from the RNA-Seq analysis. Furthermore, the putative model of DEGs and miRNA-mediated gene regulation was proposed to elucidate how radish sensed and responded to salt stress. This study represents the first comprehensive transcriptome-based gene expression profiling under salt stress in radish. The outcomes of this study could facilitate further dissecting the molecular mechanism underlying salt stress response and provide a valuable platform for further genetic improvement of salt tolerance in radish breeding programs.

  18. Effects of sodium chloride salting and substitution with potassium chloride on whey expulsion of Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; McMahon, D J

    2015-01-01

    A challenge in manufacturing reduced-sodium cheese is that whey expulsion after salting decreases when less salt is applied. Our objectives were (1) to determine whether changing the salting method would increase whey syneresis when making a lower sodium cheese and (2) to better understand factors contributing to salt-induced curd syneresis. Unsalted milled Cheddar curds were salted using different salting intervals (5 or 10 min), different salting levels (20, 25, or 30g/kg), different numbers of applications when using only 20g/kg salt (1, 2, or 3 applications), and salting with the equivalent of 30g/kg NaCl using a 2:1 molar ratio of NaCl and KCl. Whey from these curds was collected every 5 or 10 min until 30 or 40 min after the start of salting, and curds were subsequently pressed for 3h. Additional trials were conducted in which salted milled Cheddar cheese curd was immersed at 22°C for 6h in various solutions to determine how milled curd pieces respond to different levels of salt and Ca. The use of 10-min intervals delayed whey syneresis without influencing total whey expulsion or cheese composition after pressing. Lowering the salt level reduced whey expulsion, resulting in cheeses with higher moisture and slightly lower pH. Adding salt faster did not increase whey expulsion in reduced-salt cheese. Partial substitution with KCl restored the extent of whey expulsion. When salted milled curd was immersed in a 30g/L salt solution, there was a net influx of salt solution into the curd and curd weight increased. When curd was immersed in 60g/L salt solution, a contraction of curd occurred. Curd shrinkage was more pronounced as the salt solution concentration was increased to 90 and 120g/L. Increasing the Ca concentration in test solutions (such that both serum and total Ca in the curd increased) also promoted curd contraction, resulting in lower curd moisture and pH and less weight gain by the curd. The proportion of Ca in the curd that was bound to the para

  19. Remaining porosity and permeability of compacted crushed rock salt backfill in a HLW repository. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M.; Mueller, C.; Schirmer, S.

    2015-11-15

    filling of the pore spaces with solution. In this context, the porosity range of < 3% has special significance. The relevant processes influencing the hydraulic parameters of the crushed salt backfill are still not described in sufficient detail. For the compaction of dry crushed salt, various theoretical constitutive approaches have been developed (Spiers et al., 1989, Hein, 1991, Zhang et al., 1993, Heemann, 2004) and verified within the scope of the BAMBUS project (Bechthold, 2004) where the porosity range 10%<φ<35% has been calibrated. The contribution of DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH to the project consisted mainly of microstructural investigations and by applying discrete element computer codes to evaluate their applicability to simulate compaction processes. This work is described in this report.

  20. Gravitational smoothing of kinks on cosmic string loops

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the effect of gravitational back reaction on cosmic string loops with kinks, which is an important determinant of the shape, and thus the potential observability, of string loops which may exist in the universe today. Kinks are not rounded off, but may be straightened out. In some loops, symmetries prevent even this process, so that the loop evaporates in a self-similar fashion and the kinks are unchanged. As an example, we give results for the rectangular Garfinkle-Vachaspati loop.

  1. On Vanishing Two Loop Cosmological Constants in Nonsupersymmetric Strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, S

    1998-10-22

    It has recently been suggested that in certain special nonsupersymmetric type II string compactifications, at least the first two perturbative contributions to the cosmological constant Lambda vanish. Support for perturbative vanishing beyond 1-loop (as well as evidence for the absence of some nonperturbative contributions) has come from duality arguments. There was also a direct 2-loop computation which was incomplete; in this note we explain the deficiency of the previous 2-loop calculation and discuss the complete 2-loop computation in two different models. The corrected analysis yields a vanishing 2-loop contribution to Lambda in these models.

  2. Simulaciones numéricas en modelos de loops

    OpenAIRE

    Serna Martínez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo de esta tesis consiste en el estudio de varias familias de modelos de loops en dos y tres dimensiones, donde se encuentran dos fases diferentes: una con loops finitos y otra donde hay al menos uno infinito. En concreto, se han estudiado tres clases de modelos de loops. El primero, un modelo de loops tridimensionales con orientación y color, definidos en redes con número de coordinación cuatro. El segundo, una modificación de estos modelos de loops que es un firme candidato ...

  3. On the loop-loop scattering amplitudes in Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meggiolaro, Enrico [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: enrico.meggiolaro@df.unipi.it

    2005-02-14

    The high-energy elastic scattering amplitude of two colour-singlet qq-bar pairs is governed by the correlation function of two Wilson loops, which follow the classical straight lines for quark (antiquark) trajectories. This quantity is expected to be free of IR divergences, differently from what happens for the parton-parton elastic scattering amplitude, described, in the high-energy limit, by the expectation value of two Wilson lines. We shall explicitly test this IR finiteness by a direct non-perturbative computation of the loop-loop scattering amplitudes in the (pedagogic, but surely physically interesting) case of quenched QED. The results obtained for the Abelian case will be generalized to the case of a non-Abelian gauge theory with Nc colours, but stopping to the order O(g4) in perturbation theory. In connection with the above-mentioned IR finiteness, we shall also discuss some analytic properties of the loop-loop scattering amplitudes in both Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories, when going from Minkowskian to Euclidean theory, which can be relevant to the still unsolved problem of the s-dependence of hadron-hadron total cross-sections.

  4. Carpinteria salt marsh habitat polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Dunham, Eleca J.; Mancini, Frank T.; Stewart, Tara E.; Hechinger, Ryan F.

    2017-01-01

    We identified five common habitat types in Carpinteria Salt Marsh: channels, pans (flats), marsh, salt flat and upland.  We then drew polygons around each habitat type identified from a registered and orthorectified aerial photograph and created a GIS shapefile. Polygons were ground-truthed in the field. From these habitat polygons, one can use GIS applications to estimate the area of each habitat type in this estuary. These data support the following publications: Kuris, Armand M., et al. "Ecosystem energetic implications of parasite and free-living biomass in three estuaries." Nature 454.7203 (2008): 515-518.Hechinger, Ryan F., Kevin D. Lafferty, Andy P. Dobson, James H. Brown, and Armand M. Kuris. "A common scaling rule for abundance, energetics, and production of parasitic and free-living species." Science 333, no. 6041 (2011): 445-448.Hechinger, Ryan F., Kevin D. Lafferty, John P. McLaughlin, Brian L. Fredensborg, Todd C. Huspeni, Julio Lorda, Parwant K. Sandhu et al. "Food webs including parasites, biomass, body sizes, and life stages for three California/Baja California estuaries." Ecology 92, no. 3 (2011): 791-791.Buck, J.C., Hechinger, R.F., Wood, A.C., Stewart, T.E., Kuris, A.M., and Lafferty, K.D., "Host density increases parasite recruitment but decreases host risk in a snail-trematode system." Manuscript submitted for publication. Lafferty, K.D., Stewart, T.E., and Hechinger, R.F. (in press). Bird distribution surveys at Carpinteria Salt Marsh, California USA, January 2012 to March 2013: U.S. Geological Survey data release, http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7F47M95. 

  5. Makgadikgadi Salt Pan, Botswana, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Makgadikgadi Salt Pan of Botswana, an ancient lake bed, (19.0S, 26.0E) is one of the largest features in Botswana visible from orbit. Any water that spills out of the Okavango Swamplands flows into the Makagadikgadi where it evaporates. An ancient beach line can be seen as a smooth line around the west side of the pan and to the south, the Orapa diamond mine is seen as a small rectangle. Far to the east, can be seen the Great Dike of Zimbabwe.

  6. Gauge and Gravity Amplitudes from Trees to Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Rijun

    This thesis describes two subjects that I mainly work on during my PhD study. They are both about scattering amplitudes, covering gravity and gauge theories, tree and loop level, with or without supersymmetry. The rst subject is Kawai-Lewellen-Tye(KLT) relation in field theory, which mysteriously...... a special type of two-loop and three-loop diagrams where equations of maximal unitarity cut de ne complex curve. Geometry genus of complex curve is a topological invariant, and characterizes the property of curve. We compute the genus of complex curve for some two-loop and three-loop diagrams from...... for vanishing identities of Yang-Mills amplitudes as violation of linear symmetry groups based on KLT relation argument. The second subject is integrand reduction of multi-loop amplitude. The recent methods based on computational algebraic geometry make it possible to systematically study multi-loop amplitude...

  7. Optimatization of loop heat pipe for cooling of electrotechnical box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Banovcan; Tomas, Puchor; Andrej, Kapjor; Milan, Malcho

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with use of LOOP thermosyphon heat pipe to transfer heat from electrotechnical box and describe of construction individual types of LOOP heat pipes. The LOOP heat pipe is very good cooling device which requires no mechanical parts in their design. LOOP heat pipe use only phase change during heat transfer, without a compressor, fan or pump. LOOP heat pipe is more energy saving compared to conventional cooling systems with forced convection. The main advantage of cooling by heat pipe is that electrotechnical box can be hermetically closed (dust -free construction), because dust reduces the lifetime of electrotechnical elements in box. Lifetime of LOOP heat pipe equals to the lifetime of construction material. The paper describes mathematical model of LOOP thermosyphon heat pipe (condenser). Compares selected types of working fluids which are filled with a heat pipe and construction materials of heat pipe.

  8. Impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachshon, Uri

    2017-04-01

    Field measurements indicated on high variability in salt accumulation along natural and cultivated slopes, even for relatively homogeneous soil conditions. It was hypothesised that slope inclination has an impact on the location of salt accumulation along the slope. A set of laboratory experiments and numerical models were used to explore the impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation. It was shown, experimentally, that for conditions of saline water source at the lower boundary of the slope - salt accumulates in low concentrations and homogeneously along the entire slope, for moderate slopes. However, as inclination increases high salt concentrations were observed at the upper parts of the slope, leaving the lower parts of the slope relatively free of salt. The traditional flow and transport models did not predict the experimental observations as they indicated also for the moderate slopes on salt accumulation in the elevated parts of the slope, away of the saline water source. Consequently - a conceptual model was raised to explain the laboratory observations. It was suggested that the interactions between slope angle, evaporation rates, hydraulic conductivity of the medium and distribution of wetness along the slope affect the saline water flow path through the medium. This lead to preferential flow path close to the soil-atmosphere interface for the steep slopes, which leads to constant wash of the salts from the evaporation front upward towards the slope upper parts, whereas for the moderate slopes, flow path is below the soil-atmosphere interface, therefore salt that accumulates at the evaporation front is not being transported upward. Understanding of salt dynamics along slopes is important for agricultural and natural environments, as well as for civil engineering purposes. Better understanding of the salt transport processes along slopes will improve our ability to minimize and to cope with soil salinization processes. The laboratory experiments and

  9. Monitoring Change in Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Carling, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Great Salt Lake is the largest hypersaline lake in the Western Hemisphere and the fourth largest terminal lake in the world (Figure 1). The open water and adjacent wetlands of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem support millions of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds from throughout the Western Hemisphere [Aldrich and Paul, 2002]. In addition, the area is of important economic value: Brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) residing in Great Salt Lake support an aquaculture shrimp cyst industry with annual revenues as high as $60 million.

  10. Macroevolutionary patterns of salt tolerance in angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromham, Lindell

    2015-01-01

    Background Halophytes are rare, with only 0·25 % of angiosperm species able to complete their life cycle in saline conditions. This could be interpreted as evidence that salt tolerance is difficult to evolve. However, consideration of the phylogenetic distribution of halophytes paints a different picture: salt tolerance has evolved independently in many different lineages, and halophytes are widely distributed across angiosperm families. In this Viewpoint, I will consider what phylogenetic analysis of halophytes can tell us about the macroevolution of salt tolerance. Hypothesis Phylogenetic analyses of salt tolerance have shown contrasting patterns in different families. In some families, such as chenopods, salt tolerance evolved early in the lineage and has been retained in many lineages. But in other families, including grasses, there have been a surprisingly large number of independent origins of salt tolerance, most of which are relatively recent and result in only one or a few salt-tolerant species. This pattern of many recent origins implies either a high transition rate (salt tolerance is gained and lost often) or a high extinction rate (salt-tolerant lineages do not tend to persist over macroevolutionary timescales). While salt tolerance can evolve in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, some lineages are more likely to produce halophytes than others. This may be due to enabling traits that act as stepping stones to developing salt tolerance. The ability to tolerate environmental salt may increase tolerance of other stresses or vice versa. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses suggest that enabling traits and cross-tolerances may make some lineages more likely to adapt to increasing salinization, a finding that may prove useful in assessing the probable impact of rapid environmental change on vegetation communities, and in selecting taxa to develop for use in landscape rehabilitation and agriculture. PMID:25452251

  11. THEME: a web tool for loop-design microarray data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaang-Ray; Shu, Wun-Yi; Tsai, Min-Lung; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Hsu, Ian C

    2012-02-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that loop-design is more efficient than reference control design. Data analysis for loop-design microarray experiments is commonly undertaken using linear models and statistical tests. These techniques require specialized knowledge in statistical programming. However, limited loop-design web-based tools are available. We have developed the THEME (Tsing Hua Engine of Microarray Experiment) that exploits all necessary data analysis tools for loop-design microarray studies. THEME allows users to construct linear models and to apply multiple user-defined statistical tests of hypotheses for detection of DEG (differentially expressed genes). Users can modify entries of design matrix for experimental design as well as that of contrast matrix for statistical tests of hypotheses. The output of multiple user-defined statistical tests of hypotheses, DEG lists, can be cross-validated. The web platform provides data assessment and visualization tools that significantly assist users when evaluating the performance of microarray experimental procedures. THEME is also a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment) compliant system, which enables users to export formatted files for GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus) submission. THEME offers comprehensive web services to biologists for data analysis of loop-design microarray experiments. This web-based resource is especially useful for core facility service as well as collaboration projects when researchers are not at the same site. Data analysis procedures, starting from uploading raw data files to retrieving DEG lists, can be flexibly operated with natural workflows. These features make THEME a reliable and powerful on-line system for data analysis of loop-design microarrays. The THEME server is available at http://metadb.bmes.nthu.edu.tw/theme/. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improving predicted protein loop structure ranking using a Pareto-optimality consensus method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaohang; Rata, Ionel; Chiu, See-wing; Jakobsson, Eric

    2010-07-20

    Accurate protein loop structure models are important to understand functions of many proteins. Identifying the native or near-native models by distinguishing them from the misfolded ones is a critical step in protein loop structure prediction. We have developed a Pareto Optimal Consensus (POC) method, which is a consensus model ranking approach to integrate multiple knowledge- or physics-based scoring functions. The procedure of identifying the models of best quality in a model set includes: 1) identifying the models at the Pareto optimal front with respect to a set of scoring functions, and 2) ranking them based on the fuzzy dominance relationship to the rest of the models. We apply the POC method to a large number of decoy sets for loops of 4- to 12-residue in length using a functional space composed of several carefully-selected scoring functions: Rosetta, DOPE, DDFIRE, OPLS-AA, and a triplet backbone dihedral potential developed in our lab. Our computational results show that the sets of Pareto-optimal decoys, which are typically composed of approximately 20% or less of the overall decoys in a set, have a good coverage of the best or near-best decoys in more than 99% of the loop targets. Compared to the individual scoring function yielding best selection accuracy in the decoy sets, the POC method yields 23%, 37%, and 64% less false positives in distinguishing the native conformation, indentifying a near-native model (RMSD functions based on Pareto optimality and fuzzy dominance, the POC method is effective in distinguishing the best loop models from the other ones within a loop model set.

  13. Analytical on shell QED results 3-loop vacuum polarization, 4-loop $\\beta$-function and the muon anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Broadhurst, D J; Tarasov, O V

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of analytical calculations of the 3-loop contributions to the asymptotic photon vacuum polarization function, in the on shell scheme, and of the 4-loop contributions to the on shell QED beta-function. These are used to evaluate various 4-loop and 5-loop contributions to the muon anomaly. Our analytical contributions to (g-2)_\\mu differ significantly from previous numerical results. A very recent numerical re-evaluation of 4-loop muon-anomaly contributions has yielded results much closer to ours.

  14. Current systems of coronal loops in 3D MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, J.; Chen, F.; Bingert, S.; Peter, H.

    2017-11-01

    Aims: We study the magnetic field and current structure associated with a coronal loop. Through this we investigate to what extent the assumptions of a force-free magnetic field break down and where they might be justified. Methods: We analyze a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the solar corona in an emerging active region with the focus on the structure of the forming coronal loops. The lower boundary of this simulation is taken from a model of an emerging active region. As a consequence of the emerging magnetic flux and the horizontal motions at the surface a coronal loop forms self-consistently. We investigate the current density along magnetic field lines inside (and outside) this loop and study the magnetic and plasma properties in and around this loop. The loop is defined as the bundle of field lines that coincides with enhanced emission in extreme UV. Results: We find that the total current along the emerging loop changes its sign from being antiparallel to parallel to the magnetic field. This is caused by the inclination of the loop together with the footpoint motion. Around the loop, the currents form a complex non-force-free helical structure. This is directly related to a bipolar current structure at the loop footpoints at the base of the corona and a local reduction of the background magnetic field (I.e., outside the loop) caused by the plasma flow into and along the loop. Furthermore, the locally reduced magnetic pressure in the loop allows the loop to sustain a higher density, which is crucial for the emission in extreme UV. The action of the flow on the magnetic field hosting the loop turns out to also be responsible for the observed squashing of the loop. Conclusions: The complex magnetic field and current system surrounding it can only be modeled in 3D MHD models where the magnetic field has to balance the plasma pressure. A one-dimensional coronal loop model or a force-free extrapolation cannot capture the current system

  15. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction for bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong Q; Weng, Naidong

    2013-06-01

    Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) applies the salting-out effect to separate water-miscible organic solvent such as acetonitrile from plasma or other aqueous biofluids, and can extract a wide range of drug and metabolites, including many hydrophilic compounds. In most cases, the separated organic phase can be directly injected for bioanalysis, or with a simple dilution. SALLE provides similar simplicity to protein precipitation, but cleaner extracts due to a true phase separation. SALLE is also faster, more environmentally friendly and more cost-efficient than conventional liquid-liquid extraction and SPE. Through 96-well automation, SALLE can be easily integrated into the overall high-throughput LC-MS/MS bioanalysis strategy to increase productivity. This article provides a critical overview of the literatures on SALLE and perspectives of the future bioanalytical application of this often overlooked extraction technique. Important parameters impacting SALLE-LC-MS/MS assays are also discussed.

  16. Brine Transport Experiments in Granular Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-06

    To gain confidence in the predictive capability of numerical models, experimental validation must be performed to ensure that parameters and processes are correctly simulated. The laboratory investigations presented herein aim to address knowledge gaps for heat-generating nuclear waste (HGNW) disposal in bedded salt that remain after examination of prior field and laboratory test data. Primarily, we are interested in better constraining the thermal, hydrological, and physicochemical behavior of brine, water vapor, and salt when moist salt is heated. The target of this work is to use run-of-mine (RoM) salt; however during FY2015 progress was made using high-purity, granular sodium chloride.

  17. Granular Salt Summary: Reconsolidation Principles and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Frank; Popp, Till; Wieczorek, Klaus; Stuehrenberg, Dieter

    2014-07-01

    The purposes of this paper are to review the vast amount of knowledge concerning crushed salt reconsolidation and its attendant hydraulic properties (i.e., its capability for fluid or gas transport) and to provide a sufficient basis to understand reconsolidation and healing rates under repository conditions. Topics covered include: deformation mechanisms and hydro-mechanical interactions during reconsolidation; the experimental data base pertaining to crushed salt reconsolidation; transport properties of consolidating granulated salt and provides quantitative substantiation of its evolution to characteristics emulating undisturbed rock salt; and extension of microscopic and laboratory observations and data to the applicable field scale.

  18. Strategies for salt reduction in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldrá, Fidel; Barat, José M

    2012-04-01

    The amounts of sodium chloride in the formulation of a variety of foods like bakery, meats and dairy foods, ready meals, sauces and snacks, are relatively large and thus, have a strong contribution on the salt dietary intake. There is a clear demand by the consumers and medical associations to reduce the salt content in foods. Different strategies have been proposed and most of them consist of the replacement of sodium chloride by other salts and the addition of other substances for an acceptable sensory quality. The recent patents for salt reduction and their applications in foods are reviewed in this manuscript.

  19. Salt reduction initiatives around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jacqueline L; Dunford, Elizabeth K; Hawkes, Corinna; Neal, Bruce C

    2011-06-01

    To provide an overview of national salt reduction initiatives around the world, describe core characteristics and develop a framework for future strategy development. National strategies were identified from existing reviews and from searches of the literature and relevant websites. Standardized information was extracted about governance and strategy development, baseline assessments and monitoring and implementation. Thirty-two country salt reduction initiatives were identified. The majority of activity was in Europe (19 countries). Most countries (27) had maximum population salt intake targets, ranging from 5 to 8 g/person per day. Twenty-six of the 32 strategies were led by government, five by nongovernment organizations and one by industry. Twenty-eight countries had some baseline data on salt consumption and 18 had data on sodium levels in foods. Twenty-eight countries were working with the food industry to reduce salt in foods, 10 had front-of-pack labelling schemes and 28 had consumer awareness or behaviour change programs. Five countries had demonstrated an impact, either on population salt consumption, salt levels in foods or consumer awareness. These strategies were led by government and were multifaceted including food reformulation, consumer awareness initiatives and labelling actions. This is the first review to concisely summarize the most important elements of the many existing salt reduction programmes and highlight the characteristics most likely to be important to programme efficacy. For most countries, implementing a national salt reduction programme is likely to be one of simplest and most cost-effective ways of improving public health.

  20. Uninephrectomy in young age or chronic salt loading causes salt-sensitive hypertension in adult rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlström, Mattias; Sällström, Johan; Skøtt, Ole

    2007-01-01

    The importance of nephron endowment and salt intake for the development of hypertension is under debate. The present study was designed to investigate whether reduced nephron number, after completion of nephrogenesis, or chronic salt loading causes renal injury and salt-sensitive hypertension...... in adulthood. Rats were operated at 3 weeks of age (after completed nephrogenesis) and then subjected to either normal or high-salt diets for 6 to 8 weeks. Four different experimental groups were used: sham-operated animals raised with normal-salt diet (controls) or high-salt diet (HS) and uninephrectomized...... animals raised with normal-salt diet (UNX) or high-salt diet (UNX+HS). In the adult animals, renal and cardiovascular functions were evaluated and blood pressure recorded telemetrically under different sodium conditions (normal, high, and low). Hypertension was present in UNX+HS (122+/-9 mm Hg), UNX (101...