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Sample records for salt affected soils

  1. Salt-affected soils of the Barguzin Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernousenko, G. I.; Pankova, E. I.; Kalinina, N. V.; Ubugunova, V. I.; Rukhovich, D. I.; Ubugunov, V. L.; Tsyrempilov, E. G.

    2017-06-01

    Factual materials on salt-affected soils in the Barguzin Depression (Buryat Republic) are generalized. A geomorphic map of the depression has been developed. The distribution of salt-affected soils and the specificity of salinization in different geomorphic regions are characterized. These soils tend to be developed within the low lacustrine-alluvial plain of the depression, on the floodplain of the Barguzin River and its tributaries. Smaller areas of salt-affected soils are found on the river terraces. They are virtually absent on ancient sandy ridged terraces (kuituns). The genesis and chemistry of soil salinization are mainly related to the discharge of slightly saline deep water along tectonic faults and fissures. An additional source of soil salinity is represented by surface water flows. The presence of permafrost preventing the leaching of salts and the cryoarid climate favoring the migration of salts toward the soil surface during the dry spring and early summer periods and during the soil freezing in the winter contribute to the soil salinization. Slightly saline hydromorphic solonchakous soils predominate among salt-affected soils of the depression; the portion of semihydromorphic saline soils is smaller. Automorphic saline soils rarely occur in the depression. Strongly saline soils— solonchaks—are widespread within lacustrine depressions around salt lakes. Soils of the soda and sulfate salinization predominate. The content of chlorides is small; their increased amounts, as well as the presence of sulfates, are indicative of the discharge of dee ground water onto the surface. The soda type of salinization is also related to the discharge of deep stratal water with further transformation of salt solutions during freeze-thaw cycles. Under anaerobic conditions, the formation of soda is favored the processes of sulfate reduction.

  2. Salt Affected Soils Evaluation and Reclamative Approaches for Crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, a field experiment was conducted on salt (saline) affected soils during the cropping seasons of 2004/2005 and 2005/2006 to evaluate the soil properties, determine their effects on two test crop performances, and its reclaim ability under three different approaches. Reclamative approaches were employed not ...

  3. Monitoring the Remediation of Salt-Affected Soils and Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, L. R.; Callaghan, M. V.; Cey, E. E.

    2008-12-01

    Salt-affected soil is one of the most common environmental issues facing the petroleum hydrocarbon industry. Large quantities of brines are often co-produced with gas and oil and have been introduced into the environment through, for example, flare pits, drilling operations and pipe line breaks. Salt must be flushed from the soil and tile drain systems can be used to collect salt water which is then be routed for disposal. A flushing experiment over a 2 m deep tile drain system is being monitored by arrays of tensiometers, repeated soil coring, direct push electrical conductivity profiles (PTC), electromagnetic surveys and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys. Water table elevation is monitored with pressure transducers. Thermocouple arrays provide temperature profiles that are used to adjust electrical conductivity data to standard temperature equivalents. A 20 m by 20 m plot was deep tilled and treated with soil amendments. Numerous infiltration tests were conducted inside and outside the plot area using both a tension infiltrometer and Guelph permeameter to establish changes in soil hydraulic properties and macroporosity as a result of deep tillage. The results show that till greatly diminished the shallow macroporosity and increased the matrix saturated hydraulic conductivity. A header system is used to evenly flood the plot with 10 m3 of water on each of three consecutive days for an approximate total of 7.5 cm of water. The flood event is being repeated four times over a period of 6 weeks. Baseline PTC and ERT surveys show that the salt is concentrated in the upper 2 to 3 m of soil. Tensiometer data show that the soil at 30 cm depth responds within 2 to 3 hours to flooding events once the soil is wetted and begins to dry again after one week. Soil suction at 1.5 m does not show immediate response to the daily flooding events, but is steadily decreasing in response to the flooding and rainfall events. An ERT survey in October will provide the first

  4. Trifolium isthmocarpum Brot, a salt-tolerant wild leguminous forage crop in salt-affected soils

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    Kawtar Bennani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant scientists are investigating the potential of previously unexploited legume species where environmental and biological stresses constrain the use of more conventional forage crops or where these species are better suited to the needs of sustainable agriculture. Trifolium isthmocarpum Brot., Moroccan clover, occurs as a weed in different habitats in Morocco. It grows in moderately saline areas, where traditional forage legumes cannot be cultivated; however, it has not been widely studied despite its good palatability. The salt tolerance was studied between natural field conditions and glasshouse. The extensive field studies have recorded the species in many different habitats ranging from healthy agricultural lands to abandoned saline areas. The plants maintained high nodulation capacity (ranging between 60% and 97% and nitrogenase activities (average 2.04 µmol C2H4 plant-1 h-1 in different habitats. Shoot systems of plants collected from salt-affected soils exhibited higher concentrations of Na+ and Cl- than those collected from healthy soils. Greenhouse experiments showed that germination percentage and vigor value of the studied species was not significantly (P > 0.05 affected at 160 mM NaCl, and that 25% of the germination ability was maintained when growing on substrats containing 240 mM NaCl. The growth rate of seedlings was not signicantly affected by 160 mM NaCl but was reduced by 38% under 240 mM NaCl. Leaf succulence and indices of leaf water status did not differ among the salt treatments, whereas relative water content was reduced by only 8% and water content at saturation increased by about 12% at high salt concentrations in the growing medium. This study suggest recommending the cultivation of T. isthmocarpum in salt-affected soils, which are widespread and pose a problem for the farmers of Morocco and other countries in the world’s arid belt.

  5. Effect of biosolid waste compost on soil respiration in salt-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Silvia; Gómez, Ignacio; García, Fuensanta; Navarro, José; Jordán, Manuel Miguel; Belén Almendro, María; Martín Soriano, José

    2013-04-01

    A great part of mediterranean soils are affected by salinization. This is an important problem in semiarid areas increased by the use of low quality waters, the induced salinization due to high phreatic levels and adverse climatology. Salinization affects 25% of irrigated agriculture, producing important losses on the crops. In this situation, the application of organic matter to the soil is one of the possible solutions to improve their quality. The main objective of this research was to asses the relation between the salinity level (electrical conductivity, EC) in the soil and the response of microbial activity (soil respiration rate) after compost addition. The study was conducted for a year. Soil samples were collected near to an agricultural area in Crevillente and Elche, "El Hondo" Natural Park (Comunidad de Regantes from San Felipe Neri). The experiment was developed to determine and quantify the soil respiration rate in 8 different soils differing in salinity. The assay was done in close pots -in greenhouse conditions- containing soil mixed with different doses of sewage sludge compost (2, 4 and 6%) besides the control. They were maintained at 60% of water holding capacity (WHC). Soil samples were analyzed every four months for a year. The equipment used to estimate the soil respiration was a Bac-Trac and CO2 emitted by the soil biota was measured and quantified by electrical impedance changes. It was observed that the respiration rate increases as the proportion of compost added to each sample increases as well. The EC was incremented in each sampling period from the beginning of the experiment, probably due to the fact that soils were in pots and lixiviation was prevented, so the salts couldńt be lost from soil. Over time the compost has been degraded and, it was more susceptible to be mineralized. Salts were accumulated in the soil. Also it was observed a decrease of microbial activity with the increase of salinity in the soil. Keywords: soil

  6. Effectiveness of Organic Wastes as Fertilizers and Amendments in Salt-Affected Soils

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    Mariangela Diacono

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive salt rate can adversely influence the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils, mainly in arid and semi-arid world regions. Therefore, salt-affected soils must be reclaimed to maintain satisfactory fertility levels for increasing food production. Different approaches have been suggested to solve these issues. This short review focuses on selected studies that have identified organic materials (e.g., farmyard manures, different agro-industrial by-products, and composts as effective tools to improve different soil properties (e.g., structural stability and permeability in salt-affected soils. Organic fertilization is highly sustainable when compared to other options to date when taken into consideration as a solution to the highlighted issues. However, further experimental investigations are needed to validate this approach in a wider range of both saline and sodic soils, also combining waste recycling with other sustainable agronomic practices (crop rotations, cover crops use, etc..

  7. The potential of remediation of soils affected by salt using halophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaygan, Mandana; Mulligan, David; Baumgartl, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Evaporation ponds containing saline waters may cause soil salinization in the vicinity of these ponds through seeping and leaching of pond water through the embankment. Native set tolerant vegetation like halophytes may assist in the revegetation and rehabilitation of these salt affected soils. As native vegetation for this study of brine affected land native halophytes species were selected including Tecticornia pergranulata, Sclerolaena longicuspis and Frankenia serpyllifoli. Soil samples from adjacent bare and vegetated areas of brine affected land were analysed to assess the physico-chemical properties associated with the vegetation cover. Salt contents of the halophytes, plant bioaccumulation, bioconcentration and translocation factors were measured to evaluate the remediation capacity of the species. The hypothesis was tested whether the halophytes are able to reduce the salt concentrations and as a consequence the salinity (and sodicity) of the soil. The examined halophytes were associated with a reduction in salinity and sodality by an average of 38.5% and 33% in the top 10 cm of the soil, respectively. Tecticornia pergranulata had the highest shoot Na+ content (98 g kg-1 dry weight) and higher factors for bioaccumulation (factor of 14) and translocation (factor of 23) for Na+ and indicated the higher remediation potential of this species. Despite the potentially successful application of this species for remediation, halophytes are in general not able to reduce the salt content within the landscape to create a condition for the growth of glycophytes particularly on a short-term time scale. However, the salt affected land can be revegetated by halophytes, and halophytes probably provide a stable vegetation cover for the landscape in ecological succession. The results also showed that a greater salt leaching potential is likely linked to soil physical parameters and most likely achievable through higher soil hydraulic conductivity which is required for

  8. Impact of soil types and management practices on soil microbiological properties - a case study in salt affected area of Hungary

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    Gangwar, Ravi Kumar; Makádi, Marianna; Michéli, Erika; Weldmichael, Tsedekech G.; Szegi, Tamás

    2017-04-01

    The impact of different land use systems on soil microbiological properties in salt affected soils were investigated in the Nádudvar region of Hajdu-Bihar County, Hungary. The study area is characterized by associations of Solonetz and Chernozem soils. Soils were collected from both arable (cultivated) and pasture (non-cultivated) land from the upper 15 cm, in May, 2016. Besides soil physical and chemical properties (SOM, pH, CaCO3, EC, E4/E6, available macro, meso and micro nutrients and moisture content), soil microbiological properties were also investigated, phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities of the samples were measured, as well as soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil microbiological respiration. The results were statistically compared on the different soil types and land uses. It was concluded that land management has greater impact on soil microbiology than inherent properties or soil types.

  9. Geographic information science: Contribution to understanding salt and sodium affected soils in the Senegal River Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Ramatoulaye

    The Senegal River valley and delta (SRVD) are affected by long term climate variability. Indicators of these climatic shifts include a rainfall deficit, warmer temperatures, sea level rise, floods, and drought. These shifts have led to environmental degradation, water deficits, and profound effects on human life and activities in the area. Geographic Information Science (GIScience), including satellite-based remote sensing methods offer several advantages over conventional ground-based methods used to map and monitor salt-affected soil (SAS) features. This study was designed to assess the accuracy of information on soil salinization extracted from Landsat satellite imagery. Would available imagery and GIScience data analysis enable an ability to discriminate natural soil salinization from soil sodication and provide an ability to characterize the SAS trend and pattern over 30 years? A set of Landsat MSS (June 1973 and September 1979), Landsat TM (November 1987, April 1994 and November 1999) and ETM+ (May 2001 and March 2003) images have been used to map and monitor salt impacted soil distribution. Supervised classification, unsupervised classification and post-classification change detection methods were used. Supervised classifications of May 2001 and March 2003 images were made in conjunction field data characterizing soil surface chemical characteristics that included exchange sodium percentage (ESP), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the electrical conductivity (EC). With this supervised information extraction method, the distribution of three different types of SAS (saline, saline-sodic, and sodic) was mapped with an accuracy of 91.07% for 2001 image and 73.21% for 2003 image. Change detection results confirmed a decreasing trend in non-saline and saline soil and an increase in saline-sodic and sodic soil. All seven Landsat images were subjected to the unsupervised classification method which resulted in maps that separate SAS according to their degree of

  10. Fruit yield improvement of deteriorated guava plants in salt affected soil

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    Muhammad Jamil, Muhammad Sadiq, Shahzada Munawar Mehdi and Syed Saqlain Hussian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil Salinity is a common problem throughout the world. However, it is seriously affecting the economy of Pakistan by limiting crop productivity on a large area of 6.68 m ha. Various salt tolerant crop / plant varieties are grown in salt affected soil. Guava (Psidium Guajava L. is a salt tolerant fruit plant and is one of the most popular fruits in Pakistan. Guava has attained commercial importance in tropics and sub-tropics because of its adaptability to varied soil and climatic conditions. Most of the plants grown in salt affected soils lose their bearing after some time. The present study was conducted to improve the fruit bearing of guava plants grown through modified rhizosphere technique. For this purpose five years old guava plants growing in saline sodic field [pHs, 8.8; ECe, 4.70 dS m-1; SAR, 32.30 (m mol L-1½ and GR, 7.56 t ha-1] were selected. The treatments applied were: T1 = control; T2 =gypsum @ 100% GR; T3 = gypsum @ 100% GR + FYM @ 40 kg plant-1; T4 = gypsum @ 100% GR + FYM @ 40 kg + urea @ 1.0 kg plant-1; T5 = gypsum @ 100% GR + FYM @ 40 kg + urea @ 1.5 kg plant-1 and T6 = gypsum @ 100% GR + FYM @ 40 kg + urea @ 2.0 kg plant-1. All the gypsum, phosphorus, potash and half of the urea were applied in the month of February, and the remaining half of urea was applied in the month of August. Maximum fruit yield (28.13 kg plant-1 was obtained with the application of treatment T6 (gypsum @ 100% GR + FYM @ 40 kg + urea @ 2.0 kg plant-1 followed by the treatment T5 (gypsum 100% GR + FYM @ 40 kg + 1.5 kg urea plant-1 giving fruit yield of 22.35 kg plant-1 and least in control (4.29 kg plant-1.

  11. Detection of terrain indices related to soil salinity and mapping salt-affected soils using remote sensing and geostatistical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triki Fourati, Hela; Bouaziz, Moncef; Benzina, Mourad; Bouaziz, Samir

    2017-04-01

    Traditional surveying methods of soil properties over landscapes are dramatically cost and time-consuming. Thus, remote sensing is a proper choice for monitoring environmental problem. This research aims to study the effect of environmental factors on soil salinity and to map the spatial distribution of this salinity over the southern east part of Tunisia by means of remote sensing and geostatistical techniques. For this purpose, we used Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer data to depict geomorphological parameters: elevation, slope, plan curvature (PLC), profile curvature (PRC), and aspect. Pearson correlation between these parameters and soil electrical conductivity (EC soil ) showed that mainly slope and elevation affect the concentration of salt in soil. Moreover, spectral analysis illustrated the high potential of short-wave infrared (SWIR) bands to identify saline soils. To map soil salinity in southern Tunisia, ordinary kriging (OK), minimum distance (MD) classification, and simple regression (SR) were used. The findings showed that ordinary kriging technique provides the most reliable performances to identify and classify saline soils over the study area with a root mean square error of 1.83 and mean error of 0.018.

  12. Phytoremediation of salt-affected soils: a review of processes, applicability, and the impact of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, João M; Danko, Anthony S; Fiúza, António; Borges, Maria-Teresa

    2015-05-01

    Soil salinization affects 1-10 billion ha worldwide, threatening the agricultural production needed to feed the ever increasing world population. Phytoremediation may be a cost-effective option for the remediation of these soils. This review analyzes the viability of using phytoremediation for salt-affected soils and explores the remedial mechanisms involved. In addition, it specifically addresses the debate over plant indirect (via soil cation exchange enhancement) or direct (via uptake) role in salt remediation. Analysis of experimental data for electrical conductivity (ECe) + sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) reduction and plant salt uptake showed a similar removal efficiency between salt phytoremediation and other treatment options, with the added potential for phytoextraction under non-leaching conditions. A focus is also given on recent studies that indicate potential pathways for increased salt phytoextraction, co-treatment with other contaminants, and phytoremediation applicability for salt flow control. Finally, this work also details the predicted effects of climate change on soil salinization and on treatment options. The synergetic effects of extreme climate events and salinization are a challenging obstacle for future phytoremediation applications, which will require additional and multi-disciplinary research efforts.

  13. Assessment of Ammonia Volatilization Losses and Nitrogen Utilization during the Rice Growing Season in Alkaline Salt-Affected Soils

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    Yangyang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of different fertilizer types and application rates on ammonia volatilization loss and to explore nitrogen distribution and nitrogen use efficiency using the 15N isotope tracing technique in different alkaline salt-affected conditions in the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. The results showed a decreasing trend in ammonia volatilization loss from ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, but not that from urea, as the electrical conductivity gradient increased, whereas the reverse trend was found as the pH gradient increased. Ammonia volatilization loss increased in moderately salt-affected soil compared with that in slightly salt-affected soil, particularly during the tillering stage, regardless of the N fertilizer rate. The percentage of N absorbed by rice plants increased from urea but decreased from the soil as the amount of nitrogen was increased. Interestingly, the N retention rate in soil decreased and rice grain yield and nitrogen agronomic efficiency increased as the amount of nitrogen increased in both salt-affected soil conditions. The nitrogen application amount of highest N physiological efficiency was 225 kg·N/ha. Considering high rice production and a minimal environmental threat, we should fully consider controlling ammonia volatilization losses by adjusting the fertilizer type and the crop stage when the fertilizer is applied.

  14. Seasonal dynamics of trace elements in tidal salt marsh soils as affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering.

  15. Seasonal dynamics of trace elements in tidal salt marsh soils as affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhong Bai

    Full Text Available Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa in the Yellow River Delta (YRD of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008 after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering.

  16. Seasonal Dynamics of Trace Elements in Tidal Salt Marsh Soils as Affected by the Flow-Sediment Regulation Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected in three salt marshes with different plant species (i.e. Phragmites australis, Tamarix chinensis and Suaeda salsa) in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China during three seasons (summer and fall of 2007 and the following spring of 2008) after the flow-sediment regulation regime. Total elemental contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate temporal variations in trace elements in soil profiles of the three salt marshes, assess the enrichment levels and ecological risks of these trace elements in three sampling seasons and identify their influencing factors. Trace elements did not change significantly along soil profiles at each site in each sampling season. The highest value for each sampling site was observed in summer and the lowest one in fall. Soils in both P. australis and S. salsa wetlands tended to have higher trace element levels than those in T. chinensis wetland. Compared to other elements, both Cd and As had higher enrichment factors exceeding moderate enrichment levels. However, the toxic unit (TU) values of these trace elements did not exceed probable effect levels. Correlation analysis showed that these trace elements were closely linked to soil properties such as moisture, sulfur, salinity, soil organic matter, soil texture and pH values. Principal component analysis showed that the sampling season affected by the flow-sediment regulation regime was the dominant factor influencing the distribution patterns of these trace elements in soils, and plant community type was another important factor. The findings of this study could contribute to wetland conservation and management in coastal regions affected by the hydrological engineering. PMID:25216278

  17. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF DWARF COCONUT PLANTS UNDER WATER DEFICIT IN SALT - AFFECTED SOILS

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    ALEXANDRE REUBER ALMEIDA DA SILVA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the physiological acclimation responses of young plants of the dwarf coconut cultivar ̳Jiqui Green‘ associated with tolerance to conditions of multiple abiotic stresses (drought and soil salinity, acting either independently or in combination. The study was conducted under controlled conditions and evaluated the following parameters: leaf gas exchange, quantum yield of chlorophyll a fluorescence, and relative contents of total chlorophyll (SPAD index. The experiment was conducted under a randomized block experimental design, in a split plot arrangement. In the plots, plants were exposed to different levels of water stress, by imposing potential crop evapotranspiration replacement levels equivalent to 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20%, whereas in subplots, plants were exposed to different levels of soil salinity (1.72, 6.25, 25.80, and 40.70 dS m - 1 . Physiological mechanisms were effectively limited when water deficit and salinity acted separately and/or together. Compared with soil salinity, water stress was more effective in reducing the measured physiological parameters. The magnitudes of the responses of plants to water supply and salinity depended on the intensity of stress and evaluation period. The physiological acclimation responses of plants were mainly related to stomatal regulation. The coconut tree has a number of physiological adjustment mechanisms that give the species partial tolerance to drought stress and/or salt, thereby enabling it to revegetate salinated areas, provided that its water requirements are at least partially met.

  18. ESTABLISHMENT OF YOUNG “DWARF GREEN” COCONUT PLANTS IN SOIL AFFECTED BY SALTS AND UNDER WATER DEFICIT

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    ALEXANDRE REUBER ALMEIDA DA SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim was to analyze the establishment of young “Green Dwarf” coconut plants in soils affected by salts and under water stress, by evaluating leaf area, biomass production and allocation. In the experiment, conducted in protected environment in Fortaleza, CE, in statistical design of randomized blocks in a split plot arrangement, the effects of different water deficit levels (plots were evaluated, by imposing different percentages of replacement of water losses by potential crop evapotranspiration - ETpc (20, 40, 60, 80 and 100%, associated with subplots consisting of increasing soil salinity levels (1.72, 6.25, 25.80 and 40.70 dS m-1 provided by soil collected at different parts of the Morada Nova Irrigated Perimeter - PIMN. Leaf area and biomass production were sharply reduced by the conditions of water stress and high soil salinity, apparently being more critical to the crop under water restriction condition. The degree of water stress can increase the susceptibility to salinity and plants can be considered, in general terms, as moderately tolerant to the effects of salinity, when combined with water deficiency. Coconut seedlings show full capacity of establishment in PIMN saline soils, corresponding to the level of electrical conductivity of 6.50 dS m-1, but only when the water supply remains adequate. For higher salinity levels, plants survive, but their size is reduced by around 50%, even when fully irrigated.

  19. Soil amendments and cultivar selection can improve rice yield in salt-influenced (tsunami-affected) paddy fields in Sri Lanka.

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    Reichenauer, Thomas G; Panamulla, Sunil; Subasinghe, Siripala; Wimmer, Bernhard

    2009-10-01

    The tsunami disaster in the Indian Ocean in December 2004 caused devastation of agricultural soils by salt water over wide areas. Many rice fields located close to the coast were affected by the flood of seawater. Electric conductivity (EC) of soils in tsunami-affected rice fields was found to be higher compared to unaffected fields 2 years after the tsunami. Four soil amendments (gypsum, dolomite, cinnamon ash and rice-husk-charcoal) were tested for their influence on improving the yield parameters of rice grown in a tsunami-affected and a non-affected area. Yield parameters were compared with an untreated control of the same cultivar (AT362) and with a salt resistant rice variety (AT354). The salt resistant variety had the highest grain yield. The two amendments gypsum and rice-husk-charcoal led to an increase in grain yield compared to the untreated control, whereas dolomite and cinnamon ash had no significant effect on grain yield.

  20. Minjingu phosphate rock availability in low-pH highly weathered soil as affected by added salts

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    Isaac Savini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations and identity of ions in the soil solution may affect soil phosphorus (P reactions and P availability. In this study, the magnitude of these reactions was evaluated following the application of Minjingu phosphate rock (MPR combined with chloride and carbonate salts of Na and Ca within an incubation experiment. Twenty-one days later NaOH-P and HCl-P were determined. This investigation was undertaken with the aim of identifying the role of Ca-ion activity in the liquid phase on the solubilization of MPR and formation of insoluble Ca-P phases. The increase in pH was higher with Na2CO3 than with CaCO3, while both CaCl2 and NaCl resulted in slight decreases in pH. The dissolution of MPR was higher overall when MPR was applied singularly than for the combined application of the phosphate rock with salts of calcium or sodium after 60 days of incubation. Dissolution of MPR decreased as levels of CaCO3 or CaCl2 increased but the decrease was more pronounced in CaCO3-treated than in CaCl2-treated soils. Ca-ion activity in the liquid phase is the main factor responsible for the insolubilization of MPR and the formation of insoluble Ca-P phases (HCl P. The formation of Ca-P solid phases increased with the concentration of Ca-ions, and was governed by the pH and nature of the accompanying anion. For soils with low levels of exchangeable cations and where liming is a recommended intervention measure, Ca from lime will form insoluble P phases and reduce the dissolution of PR and P availability to plants.

  1. Biomass production in agroforestry and forestry systems on salt-affected soils in South Asia: Exploration of the GHG balance and economic performance of three case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicke, B.; Smeets, E.M.W.; Razzaque, A.; Stille, L.; Singh, R.K.; Awan, A.R.; Mahmoodi, K.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the greenhouse gas balance and the economic performance (i.e. net present value (NPV) and production costs) of agroforestry and forestry systems on salt-affected soils (biosaline (agro) forestry) based on three case studies in South Asia. The economic impact of trading carbon

  2. Physico-Chemical Properties of Three Salt-Affected Soils in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    The climate in the study area is semi-arid tropical with average daily temperatures ranging 27–28 °C with no pronounced variation during the ..... Yellowish brown and olive brown mottles, common, ..... Soils can change when there is rapid change in their environment, which also influences their surface chemistry (Schofield ...

  3. Habitat management affects soil chemistry and allochthonous organic inputs mediating microbial structure and exo-enzyme activity in Wadden Sea salt-marsh soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter; Granse, Dirk; Thi Do, Hai; Weingartner, Magdalena; Nolte, Stefanie; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The Wadden Sea (WS) region is Europe's largest wetland and home to approximately 20% of its salt marsh area. Mainland salt marshes of the WS are anthropogenically influenced systems and have traditionally been used for livestock grazing in wide parts. After foundation of WS National Parks in the late 1980s and early 1990s, artificial drainage has been abandoned; however, livestock grazing is still common in many areas of the National Parks and is under ongoing discussion as a habitat-management practice. While studies so far focused on effects of livestock grazing on biodiversity, little is known about how biogeochemical processes, element cycling, and particularly carbon sequestration are affected. Here, we present data from a recent field study focusing on grazing effects on soil properties, microbial exo-enzyme activity, microbial abundance and structure. Exo-enzyme activity was studied conducting digestive enzyme assays for various enzymes involved in C- and N cycling. Microbial abundance and structure was assessed measuring specific gene abundance of fungi and bacteria using quantitative PCR. Soil compaction induced by grazing led to higher bulk density and decreases in soil redox (Δ >100 mV). Soil pH was significantly lower in grazed parts. Further, the proportion of allochthonous organic matter (marine input) was significantly smaller in grazed vs. ungrazed sites, likely caused by a higher sediment trapping capacity of the taller vegetation in the ungrazed sites. Grazing induced changes in bulk density, pH and redox resulted in reduced activity of enzymes involved in microbial C acquisition; however, there was no grazing effect on enzymes involved in N acquisition. While changes in pH, bulk density or redox did not affect microbial abundance and structure, the relative amount of marine organic matter significantly reduced the relative abundance of fungi (F:B ratio). We conclude that livestock grazing directly affects microbial exo-enzyme activity, thus

  4. A natural saline soil as a model for understanding to what extent the concentration of salt affects the distribution of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfora, Loredana; Pinzari, Flavia; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Vittori Antisari, Livia; Vendramin, Elisa; Salvati, Luca; Dazzi, Carmelo; Benedetti, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Soils preserve and sustain life. Their health and functioning are crucial for crop production and for the maintenance of major ecosystem services. Human induced salinity is one of the main soil threats that reduces soil fertility and affect crop yields. In recent times, great attention has been paid to the general shortage of arable land and to the increasing demand for ecological restoration of areas affected by salinization processes. Despite the diffuse interest on the effects of salinization on plants' growth, and all the derived socioeconomic issues, very few studies analyzed the ecology of the microbial species in naturally saline soils and the resilience of biological fertility in these extreme habitats. Microorganisms inhabiting such environments may share a strategy, may have developed multiple adaptations for maintaining their populations, and cope eventually to extreme conditions by altruistic or cooperative behaviors for maintaining their metabolism active. The understanding and the knowledge of the composition and distribution of microbial communities in natural hypersaline soils can be interesting for ecological reasons but also to develop new restoration strategy where soil fertility was compromised by natural accidents or human mismanagement. The aim of this research was to provide specific information on saline soils in Italy, stressing mainly their distribution, the socioeconomic issues and the understanding of the characterizing ecological processes. Moreover, natural saline soils were used as a model for understanding to what extent the concentration of salt can affect some basic microbial processes. In the present study, physical, chemical and microbiological soil properties were investigated in the shallower horizons of natural salt affected soils in Sicily (Italy), where some ecological contrasting variables acted as strong drivers in fungal and bacterial spatial distribution. Furthermore, the interface between biological and geochemical

  5. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-14

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  6. Biomass production in agroforestry and forestry systems on salt-affected soils in South Asia: exploration of the GHG balance and economic performance of three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicke, Birka; Smeets, Edward M W; Akanda, Razzaque; Stille, Leon; Singh, Ranjay K; Awan, Abdul Rasul; Mahmood, Khalid; Faaij, Andre P C

    2013-09-30

    This study explores the greenhouse gas balance and the economic performance (i.e. net present value (NPV) and production costs) of agroforestry and forestry systems on salt-affected soils (biosaline (agro)forestry) based on three case studies in South Asia. The economic impact of trading carbon credits generated by biosaline (agro)forestry is also assessed as a potential additional source of income. The greenhouse gas balance shows carbon sequestration over the plantation lifetime of 24 Mg CO2-eq. ha(-1) in a rice-Eucalyptus camaldulensis agroforestry system on moderately saline soils in coastal Bangladesh (case study 1), 6 Mg CO2-eq. ha(-1) in the rice-wheat- Eucalyptus tereticornis agroforestry system on sodic/saline-sodic soils in Haryana state, India (case study 2), and 96 Mg CO2-eq. ha(-1) in the compact tree (Acacia nilotica) plantation on saline-sodic soils in Punjab province of Pakistan. The NPV at a discount rate of 10% is 1.1 k€ ha(-1) for case study 1, 4.8 k€ ha(-1) for case study 2, and 2.8 k€ ha(-1) for case study 3. Carbon sequestration translates into economic values that increase the NPV by 1-12% in case study 1, 0.1-1% in case study 2, and 2-24% in case study 3 depending on the carbon credit price (1-15 € Mg(-1) CO2-eq.). The analysis of the three cases indicates that the economic performance strongly depends on the type and severity of salt-affectedness (which affect the type and setup of the agroforestry system, the tree species and the biomass yield), markets for wood products, possibility of trading carbon credits, and discount rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Top-down control of carbon sequestration: grazing affects microbial structure and function in salt marsh soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter; Granse, Dirk; Nolte, Stefanie; Do, Hai Thi; Weingartner, Magdalena; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2017-07-01

    Tidal wetlands have been increasingly recognized as long-term carbon sinks in recent years. Work on carbon sequestration and decomposition processes in tidal wetlands focused so far mainly on effects of global-change factors such as sea-level rise and increasing temperatures. However, little is known about effects of land use, such as livestock grazing, on organic matter decomposition and ultimately carbon sequestration. The present work aims at understanding the mechanisms by which large herbivores can affect organic matter decomposition in tidal wetlands. This was achieved by studying both direct animal-microbe interactions and indirect animal-plant-microbe interactions in grazed and ungrazed areas of two long-term experimental field sites at the German North Sea coast. We assessed bacterial and fungal gene abundance using quantitative PCR, as well as the activity of microbial exo-enzymes by conducting fluorometric assays. We demonstrate that grazing can have a profound impact on the microbial community structure of tidal wetland soils, by consistently increasing the fungi-to-bacteria ratio by 38-42%, and therefore potentially exerts important control over carbon turnover and sequestration. The observed shift in the microbial community was primarily driven by organic matter source, with higher contributions of recalcitrant autochthonous (terrestrial) vs. easily degradable allochthonous (marine) sources in grazed areas favoring relative fungal abundance. We propose a novel and indirect form of animal-plant-microbe interaction: top-down control of aboveground vegetation structure determines the capacity of allochthonous organic matter trapping during flooding and thus the structure of the microbial community. Furthermore, our data provide the first evidence that grazing slows down microbial exo-enzyme activity and thus decomposition through changes in soil redox chemistry. Activities of enzymes involved in C cycling were reduced by 28-40%, while activities of

  8. Factors affecting soil cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erodibility is a measure of a soil’s resistance against erosive forces and is affected by both intrinsic (or inherent) soil property and the extrinsic condition at the time erodibility measurement is made. Since soil erodibility is usually calculated from results obtained from erosion experimen...

  9. Factors Affecting Soil Quality Maintenance In Northern Katsina State

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    encouraged among farmers to check salt accumulation. Keywords: Soil quality; soil quality maintenance; factors affecting soil quality. INTRODUCTION. Research on soil quality has advanced to the degree that the potential exists for the creation of a framework that allows growers, regulators, and researchers to monitor and ...

  10. Phosphorus availability in a low pH highly weathered soil as affected by added salts Disponibilidade de fósforo num solo ácido afetada pela aplicação de sais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Ernani

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentration and identity of cations and anions in the soil solution may affect soil P reactions and thus P availability. The magnitude of these reactions was evaluated in this research after application of various salts to a highly weathered low pH soil. Chloride, nitrate, and sulfate salts of Na, NH4, K, Ca, Mg, Sr, or Cu were added to the soil after addition of 360mg P/kg trying to simulate ion concentrations around granules of fertilizers in the soil. Thirty days later, P was determined in the soil solution (Pli and on the solid phase (Psi. The soil samples of some treatments were leached with water and three days later a new soil solution was displaced. Separate addition of all salts increased Pli, except NaCl at the lowest rate. The increase of Pli was highly associatcd with amount of native cations displaced to the soil solution by the applied salts. Salt solubility, concentration, and sometimes identity of cation and anion also influenced Pli. Some salts decreased Psi, but this was not correlated with any soil property measured. The effects caused by salts on Pli and Psi disappeared after leaching the soil samples.A concentração eletrolítica e o tipo de cations e anions da solução do solo podem afetar as reações do fósforo com possíveis reflexos na disponibilidade de P aos vegetais. Nessa pesquisa quantificou-se o efeito de vários sais nos valores das determinações analíticas que afetam a disponibilidade de fósforo. Sais de nitrato, cloreto e sulfato foram aplicados a amostras de um alfisol ácido após a aplicação de 360mg P/kg, simulando concentrações que ocorrem no solo ao redor de grânulos de fertilizantes. Fósforo lábil (Psi e P na solução do solo (Pli foram determinados após 30 dias de incubação, antes e depois de percolar água pelo solo. Todos os sais aumentaram a concentração de P na solução do solo, exceto a menor dose de NaCl. O aumento do Pli foi correlacionado com a quantidade de cations

  11. Restoration of Degraded Salt Affected Lands to Productive Forest Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yash; Singh, Gurbachan; Singh, Bajrang; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Soil system determines the fluxes of energy and matter in the Earth and is the source of goods, services and resources to the humankind (Keesstra et al., 2012; Brevik et al., 2015; Keesstra et al., 2016). To restore and rehabilitate the soil system is a key strategy to recover the services the soils offers (Celentano et al., 2016; Galati et al., 2016; Parras-Alcantara et al., 2016). Transformation of degraded sodic lands in biodiversity rich productive forest ecosystem is a challenging task before the researchers all over the world. The soils of the degraded sites remain almost unfavorable for the normal growth, development and multiplication of organisms; all our attempts tend to alleviate the soil constraints. Land degradation due to presence of salts in the soil is an alarming threat to agricultural productivity and sustainability, particularly in arid and semiarid regions of the world (Tanji, 1990; Qadir et al., 2006). According to the FAO Land and Nutrition Management Service (2008), over 6% of the world's lands are affected by salinity, which accounts for more than 800 million ha in 100 countries. This is due to natural causes, extensive utilization of land (Egamberdieva et al., 2008), poor drainage systems and limited availability of irrigation water which causes salinization in many irrigated soils (Town et al., 2008).In India, about 6.73 million ha are salt affected which spread in 194 districts out of 584 districts in India and represents 2.1% of the geographical area of the country (Mandal et al., 2009).Out of these, 2.8 million ha are sodic in nature and primarily occurring in the Indo-Gangetic alluvial plains. These lands are degraded in structural, chemical, nutritional, hydrological and microbiological characteristics. The reclamation of salt affected soils with chemical amendments like gypsum and phospho-gypsum are in practice for the cultivation field crops under agricultural production. Forest development on such lands although takes considerable

  12. Biochar soil amendment on alleviation of drought and salt stress in plants: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq; Ok, Yong Sik; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Riaz, Muhammad; Arif, Muhammad Saleem; Hafeez, Farhan; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Shahzad, Ahmad Naeem

    2017-05-01

    Drought and salt stress negatively affect soil fertility and plant growth. Application of biochar, carbon-rich material developed from combustion of biomass under no or limited oxygen supply, ameliorates the negative effects of drought and salt stress on plants. The biochar application increased the plant growth, biomass, and yield under either drought and/or salt stress and also increased photosynthesis, nutrient uptake, and modified gas exchange characteristics in drought and salt-stressed plants. Under drought stress, biochar increased the water holding capacity of soil and improved the physical and biological properties of soils. Under salt stress, biochar decreased Na+ uptake, while increased K+ uptake by plants. Biochar-mediated increase in salt tolerance of plants is primarily associated with improvement in soil properties, thus increasing plant water status, reduction of Na+ uptake, increasing uptake of minerals, and regulation of stomatal conductance and phytohormones. This review highlights both the potential of biochar in alleviating drought and salt stress in plants and future prospect of the role of biochar under drought and salt stress in plants.

  13. Physiological and biochemical perspectives of non-salt tolerant plants during bacterial interaction against soil salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Baek, Kwang Hyun

    2017-07-01

    Climatic changes on earth affect the soil quality of agricultural lands, especially by increasing salt deposition in soil, which results in soil salinity. Soil salinity is a major challenge to growth and reproduction among glycophytes (including all crop plants). Soil bacteria present in the rhizosphere and/or roots naturally protect plants from the adverse effects of soil salinity by reprogramming the stress-induced physiological changes in plants. Bacteria can enrich the soil with major nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) in a form easily available to plants and prevent the transport of excess sodium to roots (exopolysaccharides secreted by bacteria bind with sodium ions) for maintaining ionic balance and water potential in cells. Salinity also affects plant growth regulators and suppresses seed germination and root and shoot growth. Bacterial secretion of indole-3-acetic acid and gibberellins compensates for the salt-induced hormonal decrease in plants, and bacterial 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase synthesis decreases ethylene production to stimulate plant growth. Furthermore, bacteria modulate the redox state of salinity-affected plants by enhancing antioxidants and polyamines, which leads to increased photosynthetic efficiency. Bacteria-induced accumulation of compatible solutes in stressed plants regulates plant cellular activities and prevents salt stress damage. Plant-bacterial interaction reprograms the expression of salt stress-responsive genes and proteins in salinity-affected plants, resulting in a precise stress mitigation metabolism as a defense mechanism. Soil bacteria increase the fertility of soil and regulate the plant functions to prevent the salinity effects in glycophytes. This review explains the current understanding about the physiological changes induced in glycophytes during bacterial interaction to alleviate the adverse effects of soil salinity stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  14. Irrigation management in Mediterranean salt affected agriculture: how leaching operates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Libutti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of a crop rotation currently applied in a farm of the Apulian Tavoliere (Southern Italy, this paper reports the effect of brackish water irrigation on soil, outlines the corresponding salinity balance, formulates quantitative relations to model salt outflow below the soil root-layer and defines operational criteria to optimize irrigation management at farm level in order to control soil salinity through leaching. The general aim is to contribute to a sustainable use of the available water resources and a proper soil fertility conservation. A three-year trial (2007-2010 was carried out on a farm located close to the coast of the Manfredonia gulf (Mediterranean - Adriatic sea, where irrigation with brackish water is frequently practiced due to seawater intrusion into the groundwater. An especially designed experimental field-unit was set-up: the bottom of three hydraulically insulated plots was covered with a plastic sheet to intercept the percolating water and collect it into tanks by means of drain tubes. Each year a double crop cycle was applied to the soil; a spring-summer crop (tomato, zucchini and pepper, respectively was followed by a fall-winter crop (spinach, broccoli and wheat. Short “fallow” periods (completely bare soil were inserted between two crop cycles. Irrigation or rain completely restored crop water consumptions (with the exception of wheat, considered a rainfed crop and leaching was performed both unintentionally (by rainfalls or intentionally (supplying higher irrigation volumes whenever the soil electrical conductivity exceeded a fixed threshold. The soil electrical conductivity was periodically measured together with volume and electrical conductivity of irrigation and drainage water. All these measures allowed to draw-up the salt-balance of the soil, respectively at the beginning and the end of each crop cycle. Absolute and relative variations in soil salt content were interpreted with respect to absolute

  15. Biotoxicity of Mars Analog Soils: Microbial, Dispersal into Desiccated Soils Versus Emplacement in Salt or Ice Inclusions Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Ming, Doutlas W.; Golden, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence from the Opportunity and Spirit rovers and the Mars Express mission suggests that the soils on Mars might be very high in biotoxic materials including sulfate salts, chlorides, and acidifying agents. Yet, very little is known about how the chemistries of Mars soils might affect the survival and growth of terrestrial microorganisms. The primary objectives of the research included: (1) prepare and characterize Mars analog soils amended with potential biotoxic levels of sulfates, chlorides, and acidifying minerals; and (2) use the simulants to conduct a series of toxicology assays to determine if terrestrial microorganisms from spacecraft can survive direct exposure to the biotoxic soils.

  16. Designing viable cropping options for salt-affected lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabala, Sergey; Meinke, Holger

    2017-04-01

    Salinity cost agricultural sector over 27Bln pa in lost opportunities and is an issue that crosses all spatial and temporal scales - from individual fields, farms, catchments, landscapes to national and global levels. Salinity manifests itself in many forms and often leads to further soil degradation such as erosion, nutrient and soil organic matter depletion, and a loss of (soil) biodiversity. Salinity may also cause major disturbance to ecosystems due to its impact on resources (e.g. pollution of aquifers). In extreme cases it can turn previously highly productive areas into wastelands. An increasing global population and unprecedented urban sprawls are now putting additional pressures on our soil and water resources, particularly in regions where urbanisation directly competes with agriculture for access to land and water. And although everyone agrees that avoiding soil salinity in the first instance would be the most effective way of combating it, reality is that the amount of saline land and water resources is rapidly increasing, and will continue to increase, especially in developing countries. Purposefully designing our cropping systems that can cope with various levels of salinity could be one answer to this increasing problem. In this work we review some of the key cropping options that can be deployed to either avoid, reduce or remediate salt-affected lands. We argue that for these measures to be most effective an ongoing science - policy - society dialogue is required to ensure that policy frameworks that govern land and water management are conducive to reducing salinity or even assist in restoring affected areas. We first consider several case studies highlighting the extent of the problem using ongoing salinity hotspots around the globe. We then look at halophytes as a possible biological tools to remediate already saline sols, and discuss prospects of mixed (halophytes and glycophytes) cropping solutions for various agricultural systems at different

  17. Prediction of Soil Moisture Content and Soil Salt Concentration from Hyperspectral Laboratory and Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the simultaneous retrieval of surface soil moisture and salt concentrations using hyperspectral reflectance data in an arid environment. We conducted laboratory and outdoor field experiments in which we examined three key soil variables: soil moisture, salt and texture (silty loam, clay and silty clay. The soil moisture content models for multiple textures (M_SMC models were based on selected hyperspectral reflectance data located around 1460, 1900 and 2010 nm and resulted in R2 values higher than 0.933. Meanwhile, the soil salt concentrations were also accurately (R2 > 0.748 modeled (M_SSC models based on wavebands located at 540, 1740, 2010 and 2350 nm. When the different texture samples were mixed (SL + C + SC models, soil moisture was still accurately retrieved (R2 = 0.937 but the soil salt not as well (R2 = 0.47. After stratifying the samples by retrieved soil moisture levels, the R2 of calibrated M_SSCSMC models for soil salt concentrations improved to 0.951. This two-step method also showed applicability for analyzing soil-salt samples in the field. The M_SSCSMC models resulted in R2 values equal to 0.912 when moisture is lower than 0.15, and R2 values equal to 0.481 when soil moisture is between 0.15 and 0.2.

  18. Numerical study of evaporation-induced salt accumulation and precipitation in bare saline soils: Mechanism and feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2014-10-01

    Evaporation from bare saline soils in coastal wetlands causes salt precipitation in the form of efflorescence and subflorescence. However, it is not clear how much the precipitated salt in turn affects the water transport in the soil and hence the evaporation rate. We hypothesized that efflorescence exerts a mulching resistance to evaporation, while subflorescence reduces the pore space for water vapor to move through the soil. A numerical model is developed to simulate the transport of water, solute, and heat in the soil, and resulting evaporation and salt precipitation with the hypothesized feedback mechanism incorporated. The model was applied to simulate four evaporation experiments in soil columns with and without a fixed shallow water table, and was found to replicate well the experimental observations. The simulated results indicated that as long as the hydraulic connection between the near surface soil layer and the water source in the interior soil layer exists, vaporization occurs near the surface, and salt precipitates exclusively as efflorescence. When such hydraulic connection is absent, the vaporization plane develops downward and salt precipitates as subflorescence. Being more substantial in quantity, efflorescent affects more significantly evaporation than subflorescence during the soil-drying process. Different evaporation stages based on the location of the vaporization plane and the state of salt accumulation can be identified for characterizing the process of evaporation from bare saline soils with or without a fixed shallow water table.

  19. Raingarden Soil Bacteria Community Response to Lab Simulated Salt-Enriched Artificial Stormwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endreny, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cold climate cities with green infrastructure depend on soil bacteria to remove nutrients from road salt-enriched stormwater. Our research examined how bacterial communities in laboratory columns containing bioretention media responded to varying concentrations of salt exposure from artificial stormwater and the effect of bacteria and salt on column effluent concentrations. We used a factorial design with two bacteria treatments (sterile, nonsterile) and three salt concentrations (935, 315, and 80 ppm), including a deionized water control. Columns were repeatedly saturated with stormwater or deionized and then drained throughout 5 wk, with the last week of effluent analyzed for water chemistry. To examine bacterial communities, we extracted DNA from column bioretention media at time 0 and at week 5 and used molecular profiling techniques to examine bacterial community changes. We found that bacterial community taxa changed between time 0 and week 5 and that there was significant separation between taxa among salt treatments. Bacteria evenness was significantly affected by stormwater treatment, but there were no differences in bacterial richness or diversity. Soil bacteria and salt treatments had a significant effect on the effluent concentration of NO3, PO4, Cu, Pb, and Zn based on ANOVA tests. The presence of bacteria reduced effluent NO3 and Zn concentrations by as much as 150 and 25%, respectively, while having a mixed effect on effluent PO4 concentrations. Our results demonstrate how stormwater can affect bacterial communities and how the presence of soil bacteria improves pollutant removal by green infrastructure.

  20. Screening and Isolation of Salt Tolerant Bacteria from Tidal Floodplain Soils of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    D. Mondal

    2016-01-01

    Use of eco-friendly area specific salt tolerant bio-inoculants is better alternatives to chemical fertilizer for sustainable agriculture in the coastal saline soils. The study was conducted to isolate and characterize salinity tolerant bacteria like Rhizobium sp. which can be used as biofertilizer. Soil samples were collected from two salinity affected districts namely Khulna and Patuakhali situated in the southern part of Bangladesh. Nine colonies were isolated from pore-plate containing yea...

  1. Zooming in and out: Scale dependence of extrinsic and intrinsic factors affecting salt marsh erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; van der Wal, Daphne; Li, Xiangyu; van Belzen, Jim; Herman, Peter M. J.; Hu, Zhan; Ge, Zhenming; Zhang, Liquan; Bouma, Tjeerd J.

    2017-07-01

    Salt marshes are valuable ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services. Given the global scale of marsh loss due to climate change and coastal squeeze, there is a pressing need to identify the critical extrinsic (wind exposure and foreshore morphology) and intrinsic factors (soil and vegetation properties) affecting the erosion of salt marsh edges. In this study, we quantified rates of cliff lateral retreat (i.e., the eroding edge of a salt marsh plateau) using a time series of aerial photographs taken over four salt marsh sites in the Westerschelde estuary, the Netherlands. In addition, we experimentally quantified the erodibility of sediment cores collected from the marsh edge of these four marshes using wave tanks. Our results revealed the following: (i) at the large scale, wind exposure and the presence of pioneer vegetation in front of the cliff were the key factors governing cliff retreat rates; (ii) at the intermediate scale, foreshore morphology was partially related to cliff retreat; (iii) at the local scale, the erodibility of the sediment itself at the marsh edge played a large role in determining the cliff retreat rate; and (iv) at the mesocosm scale, cliff erodibility was determined by soil properties and belowground root biomass. Thus, both extrinsic and intrinsic factors determined the fate of the salt marsh but at different scales. Our study highlights the importance of understanding the scale dependence of the factors driving the evolution of salt marsh landscapes.

  2. Leptochloa Fusca Cultivation for Utilization of Saltaffected Soil and Water Resources in Cholistan Desert / Cultivo de Leptochloa Fusca para a utilização de solos afetados por sais e recursos hídricos no Deserto de Cholistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Ahmad

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Cholistan Desert, 0.44 million hectares are saltaffected low lying and clayey in nature locally known as ‘dhars’, where rainwater as well as saline groundwater could be utilized for growing salt tolerant grasses like Leptochloa fusca as forage during summer. L. fusca is a promising candidate grass for economic utilization and better management of sodic, high pH, saline soil and saline water resources of the Cholistan desert. L. fusca is known to be a versatile, halophytic, primary colonizer, easily propagatable, perennial, nutritive and palatable forage plant species. The grass has the good biomass producing potential and can grow equally well both under upland and submerged saline soil environment

  3. Salt and N leaching and soil accumulation due to cover cropping practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, J. L.; Quemada, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrate leaching beyond the root zone can increase water contamination hazards and decrease crop available N. Cover crops used in spite of fallow are an alternative to reduce nitrate contamination in the vadose zone, because reducing drainage and soil mineral N accumulation. Cover crops can improve important characteristics in irrigated land as water retention capacity or soil aggregate stability. However, increasing evapotranspiration and consequent drainage below the root system reduction, could lead to soil salt accumulation. Salinity affects more than 80 million ha of arable land in many areas of the world, and one of the principal causes for yield reduction and even land degradation in the Mediterranean region. Few studies dealt with both problems at the same time. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term evaluation of the potential effect on soil salinity and nitrate leaching, in order to ensure that potential disadvantages that could originate from soil salt accumulation are compensated with all advantages of cover cropping. A study of the soil salinity and nitrate leaching was conducted during 4 years in a semiarid irrigated agricultural area of Central Spain. Three treatments were studied during the intercropping period of maize (Zea mays L.): barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), vetch (Vicia villosa L.) and fallow. Cover crops were killed in March allowing seeding of maize of the entire trial in April, and all treatments were irrigated and fertilised following the same procedure. Before sowing, and after harvesting maize and cover crops, soil salt and nitrate accumulation was determined along the soil profile. Soil analysis was conducted at six depths every 0.20 m in each plot in samples from four 0 to 1.2-m depth holes dug. The electrical conductivity of the saturated paste extract and soil mineral nitrogen was measured in each soil sample. A numerical model based on the Richards water balance equation was applied in order to calculate drainage at 1.2 m depth

  4. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension.

  5. Trend Analysis of Soil Salinity in Different Land Cover Types Using Landsat Time Series Data (case Study Bakhtegan Salt Lake)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghadosi, M. M.; Hasanlou, M.

    2017-09-01

    Soil salinity is one of the main causes of desertification and land degradation which has negative impacts on soil fertility and crop productivity. Monitoring salt affected areas and assessing land cover changes, which caused by salinization, can be an effective approach to rehabilitate saline soils and prevent further salinization of agricultural fields. Using potential of satellite imagery taken over time along with remote sensing techniques, makes it possible to determine salinity changes at regional scales. This study deals with monitoring salinity changes and trend of the expansion in different land cover types of Bakhtegan Salt Lake district during the last two decades using multi-temporal Landsat images. For this purpose, per-pixel trend analysis of soil salinity during years 2000 to 2016 was performed and slope index maps of the best salinity indicators were generated for each pixel in the scene. The results of this study revealed that vegetation indices (GDVI and EVI) and also salinity indices (SI-1 and SI-3) have great potential to assess soil salinity trends in vegetation and bare soil lands respectively due to more sensitivity to salt features over years of study. In addition, images of May had the best performance to highlight changes in pixels among different months of the year. A comparative analysis of different slope index maps shows that more than 76% of vegetated areas have experienced negative trends during 17 years, of which about 34% are moderately and highly saline. This percent is increased to 92% for bare soil lands and 29% of salt affected soils had severe salinization. It can be concluded that the areas, which are close to the lake, are more affected by salinity and salts from the lake were brought into the soil which will lead to loss of soil productivity ultimately.

  6. Jerusalem artichoke decreased salt content and increased diversity of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere soil in the coastal saline zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Tianyun; Li, Niu; Cheng, Yongwen; Long, Xiaohua; Shao, Hongbo; Zed, Rengel

    2017-04-01

    Soil salinity is one of the main environmental constraints that restrict plant growth and agricultural productivity; however, utilization of salt-affected land can bring substantial benefits. This study used an in-situ remediation method by planting Jerusalem artichoke in naturally occurring saline alkali soils with different salinity (high salinity (H, >4.0 g•salt kg-1 soil), moderate salinity (M, 2.0-4.0 g•salt kg-1 soil) and low salinity (L, 1.0-2.0 g•salt kg-1 soil) in the coastal saline zone in southeast China in comparison with the respective controls without Jerusalem artichoke planting (undisturbed soil). Soil pH and salinity increased sequentially from the rhizosphere to the bulk soil and the unplanted controls. The activity of neutral phosphatase and invertase decreased in the order L > M > H, whereas that of catalase was reverse. The minimum content of calcite, muscovite and quartz, and maximum content of chlorite and albite, were found in the control soils. Planting of Jerusalem artichoke enhanced bacterial microflora in saline alkali soil. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla in all samples, accounting for more than 80% of the reads. The number of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) in the rhizosphere soil was, respectively, 1.27, 1.02 and 1.25 times higher compared with the bulk soil, suggesting that Jerusalem artichoke played a significant role in increasing abundance and diversity of soil microbial populations. The study showed that Jerusalem artichoke could be used to improve saline alkali soil by enriching bacterial communities, enhancing the activity of phosphatase and invertase, and decreasing soil salinity.

  7. Salt stress affects the redox status of Arabidopsis root meristems

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    Keni eJiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the redox status (profiles for specific populations of cells that comprise the Arabidopsis root tip. For recently germinated, 3-5-day-old seedlings we show that the region of the root tip with the most reduced redox status includes the root cap initials, the quiescent center and the most distal portion of the proximal meristem, and coincides with (overlays the region of the auxin maximum. As one moves basally, further into the proximal meristem, and depending on the growth conditions, the redox status becomes more oxidized, with a 5-10 mV difference in redox potential between the two borders delimiting the proximal meristem. At the point on the root axis at which cells of the proximal meristem cease division and enter the transition zone, the redox potential levels off and remains more or less unchanged throughout the transition zone. As cells leave the transition zone and enter the zone of elongation the redox potentials become more oxidized. Treating roots with salt (50, 100 and 150 mM NaCl results in marked changes in root meristem structure and development, and is preceded by changes in the redox profile, which flattens, and initially becomes more oxidized, with pronounced changes in the redox potentials of the root cap, the root cap initials and the quiescent center. Roots exposed to relatively mild levels of salt (< 100 mM are able to re-establish a normal, pre-salt treatment redox profile 3-6 days after exposure to salt. Coincident with the salt-associated changes in redox profiles are changes in the distribution of auxin transporters (AUX1, PIN1/2, which become more diffuse in their localization. We conclude that salt stress affects root meristem maintenance, in part, through changes in redox and auxin transport.

  8. Influences of Different Halophyte Vegetation on Soil Microbial Community at Temperate Salt Marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Doongar R; Kim, Jinhyun; Kang, Hojeong

    2017-10-06

    Salt marshes are transitional zone between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, occupied mainly by halophytic vegetation which provides numerous ecological services to coastal ecosystem. Halophyte-associated microbial community plays an important role in the adaptation of plants to adverse condition and also affected habitat characteristics. To explore the relationship between halophytes and soil microbial community, we studied the soil enzyme activities, soil microbial community structure, and functional gene abundance in halophytes- (Carex scabrifolia, Phragmites australis, and Suaeda japonica) covered and un-vegetated (mud flat) soils at Suncheon Bay, South Korea. Higher concentrations of total, Gram-positive, Gram-negative, total bacterial, and actinomycetes PLFAs (phospholipid fatty acids) were observed in the soil underneath the halophytes compared with mud flat soil and were highest in Carex soil. Halophyte-covered soils had different microbial community composition due to higher abundance of Gram-negative bacteria than mud flat soil. Similar to PLFA concentrations, the increased activities of β-glucosidase, cellulase, phosphatase, and sulfatase enzymes were observed under halophyte soil compared to mud flat soil and Carex exhibited highest activities. The abundance of archaeal 16S rRNA, fungal ITS, and denitrifying genes (nirK, nirS, and nosZ) were not influenced by the halophytes. Abundance bacterial 16S rRNA and dissimilatory (bi)sulfite (dsrA) genes were highest in Carex-covered soil. The abundance of functional genes involved in methane cycle (mcrA and pmoA) was not affected by the halophytes. However, the ratios of mcrA/pmoA and mcrA/dsrA increased in halophyte-covered soils which indicate higher methanogenesis activities. The finding of the study also suggests that halophytes had increased the microbial and enzyme activities, and played a pivotal role in shaping microbial community structure.

  9. Brachiaria species affecting soil nitrification

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    Adalton Mazetti Fernandes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification can lead to substantial losses of the applied N through nitrate leaching and N2O emission. The regulation of nitrification may be a strategy to improve fertilizer N recovery and increase its agronomic efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibiting capacity of nitrification in soil by Brachiaria species. The greenhouse experiment was conducted using pots with 10 dm³ of a Red Latosol sample. The treatments consisted of the cultivation of three forage species (Brachiaria brizantha, B. ruziziensis and B. decumbens and four n rates (0, 100, 200, and 300 mg/pot, and the control (without plants. In the absence of the forage plants, all N fertilization levels raised the N-NO3- soil levels, as a result of nitrification. The mineralization of organic matter supplied much of the N requirement of the forage plants and nitrification was influenced in the rhizosphere of B. brizantha; however, this effect was not high enough to alter the N-NH4+ level in the total soil volume of the pot.

  10. Actividad biológica y enzimática en suelos afectados por sales del Alto Valle de Río Negro y Neuquén Biological and enzymatic activities in salts affected soils from Alto Valle de Río Negro and Neuquén

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    P. Gili

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se estudiaron los cambios que provocó el lavado de cinco suelos afectados por sales sobre la actividad biológica (número de bacterias g-1y producción de CO2 y enzimática (catalasa, deshidrogenasa, ureasa y fosfotriesterasa de los mismos. El lavado disminuyó la conductividad eléctrica (CE y modificó el tipo de sales dominantes en los suelos. La producción de CO2 y la actividad de la fosfotriesterasa fue significativamente mayor (pChanges in the biological activity (number of bacteria g-1and CO2 production and in the enzymatic activity (catalase, deshidrogenase, urease and phosphotriesterase caused by the leaching of five soils affected by salts have been studied. The leaching decreased the electric conductivity (CE and modified the type of dominant salts in the soils. Production of CO2and the activity of the phosphotriesterase was significantly higher (p<0,05 in a leached soil (Torrifluventes Typical Centennial; the increment were 88% and 71%, respectively. The results showed that the decrease of the salinity by leaching did not produce significantly different results in most of the biotic parameters analised.

  11. Irrigation Practice Affects Soil Phosphorus Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, J.; Bjorneberg, D.

    2011-12-01

    It is expected, given the same water source applied to the same soil, that changes in soil chemistry would be subtle when comparing furrow and sprinkler irrigation practices. From four paired fields, we collected soil (after similar crops were harvested in September) from the 0-5 cm depth. Samples were analyzed for changes in soil P chemistry due to sprinkler or furrow irrigation using: 1) the Olsen soil test P extraction; 2) the alkaline phosphatase enzyme assay; 3) a sequential extraction technique which fractionated inorganic and organic soil P pools; and 4) a measure of the amorphous soil Al and Fe mineral phases. Olsen-extractable soil P was lower under sprinkler irrigation; however, this was not due to a reduction in microbial phosphatase activity. Soils under sprinkler irrigation contained lower inorganic P concentrations in soluble/Al-bound/Fe-bound and in the occluded phases, lesser amounts of organic P present in the moderately labile and non-labile fractions, and contained lower amorphous Fe concentrations. These results indicate that the method of water application affects soil chemistry and nutrient cycling.

  12. [Effects of non-sufficient irrigation with saline water on soil water-salt distribution and spring corn yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Feng, Shao-yuan; Sun, Zhen-hua; Huo, Zai-lin

    2008-12-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of sufficient and non-sufficient irrigation with saline water on the soil water-salt distribution and spring corn yield in the middle reach of Shiyanghe River Basin. The results showed that under both sufficient and non-sufficient irrigation, the peak value of soil water content all appeared during irrigation period, and the variation range of the water content was higher under sufficient than under non-sufficient irrigation. Soil salinity was positively correlated with the salinity of irrigation water. At the same salinity of irrigation water, the soil salinity under non-sufficient irrigation was lower than that under sufficient irrigation. Under non-sufficient irrigation, the soil layer with salt accumulation was moved up, but the water and salt contents in 80-100 cm soil layer were less affected by the amount and salinity of irrigation water. Comparing with that under fresh water irrigation, the spring corn yield under saline water irrigation was decreased by 15%-22%. Under non-sufficient irrigation with 9 g x L(-1), 6 g x L(-1), and 3 g x L(-1) of saline water, the average salt content in 1 m soil layer after harvest was decreased by 8.1%, 12.4%, and 18.4%, and the corn yield was only decreased by 3.4%, 6.8%, and 3.0%, respectively, compared with those under sufficient irrigation.

  13. Salt loading affects cortisol metabolism in normotensive subjects : Relationships with salt sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, MN; van der Kleij, FGH; Boonstra, AH; Sluiter, WJ; Koerts, J; Navis, G; Dullaart, RPF

    We studied cortisol metabolism together with insulin sensitivity [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)] and renal hemodynamics in 19 salt-resistant (sr) and nine salt-sensitive ( ss) normotensive subjects after a low-and high-salt diet. Results are described as high- vs. low-salt diet. Sum of urinary

  14. Influence of Inorganic Salts on Soils Liquid and Plastic Limits

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    Ayininuola, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the influence of inorganic salts on soil liquid limit (LL and plastic limit (PL. Sodium chloride, NaCl, potassium nitrate KNO3 and calcium sulphate, CaSO4 of various concentrations were added to two subsoils. Their liquid and plastic limits before and after contamination were monitored. Soil cation exchange capacity (CEC, exchangeable cations (sodium, Na+, potassium, K+, and calcium, Ca2+ and exchangeable anions (chloride, Cl-, nitrate, NO3, and sulphate, SO42- were determined. A set of equations for predicting LL and PL, (with R2 = 0.908 to 0.990 at different levels of chemical interaction with time was developed using multiple regression analysis model. The results showed that both NaCl and KNO3 brought about reduction in LL and PL while CaSO4 addition led to increment in LL and PL. The predictive equations revealed that there is high tendency for the contaminated soils to regain their uncontaminated LL and PL values with time.

  15. Salt works and their impact on soil and groundwater. The cases of Anghelohori and Kitros, Greece

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    Christodoulos Angelopoulos

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of soil and groundwater caused to salt works occurs due to infiltration of a part of seawater from the lakes of salt works through the soil and into phreatic aquifers and from there percolating to artesian aquifers. In the same time, while salt remaining in place is washed out by rain, contaminating soil and both phreatic and artesian aquifers. In the areas of Angelohori and Kitros this contamination of soil has been detected through chemical analysis while groundwater contamination has been suggested through pressure level contours.

  16. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

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    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  17. Gibberellins Producing Endophytic Fungus Porostereum spadiceum AGH786 Rescues Growth of Salt Affected Soybean

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    Muhammad Hamayun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the pursuit of sustainable agriculture through environment and human health friendly practices, we evaluated the potential of a novel gibberellins (GAs producing basidiomycetous endophytic fungus Porostereum spadiceum AGH786, for alleviating salt stress and promoting health benefits of soybean. Soybean seedlings exposed to different levels of NaCl stress (70 and 140 mM under greenhouse conditions, were inoculated with the AGH786 strain. Levels of phytohormones including GAs, JA and ABA, and isoflavones were compared in control and the inoculated seedlings to understand the mechanism through which the stress is alleviated. Gibberellins producing endophytic fungi have been vital for promoting plant growth under normal and stress conditions. We report P. spadiceum AGH786 as the ever first GAs producing basidiomycetous fungus capable of producing six types of GAs. In comparison to the so for most efficient GAs producing Gibberella fujikuroi, AGH786 produced significantly higher amount of the bioactive GA3. Salt-stressed phenotype of soybean seedlings was characterized by low content of GAs and high amount of ABA and JA with reduced shoot length, biomass, leaf area, chlorophyll contents, and rate of photosynthesis. Mitigation of salt stress by AGH786 was always accompanied by high GAs, and low ABA and JA, suggesting that this endophytic fungus reduces the effect of salinity by modulating endogenous phytohormones of the seedlings. Additionally, this strain also enhanced the endogenous level of two isoflavones including daidzen and genistein in soybean seedlings under normal as well as salt stress conditions as compared to their respective controls. P. spadiceum AGH786 boosted the NaCl stress tolerance and growth in soybean, by modulating seedlings endogenous phytohormones and isoflavones suggesting a valuable contribution of this potent fungal biofertilizer in sustainable agriculture in salt affected soils.

  18. [Effects of spent mushroom compost on greenhouse cabbage growth under soil salt stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu-Ling; Wu, Liang-Huan; Dong, Lan-Xue; Chen, Zai-Ming; Wang, Zhong-Qiang

    2011-05-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of spent mushroom compost (SMC) in alleviating greenhouse soil secondary salinization and cabbage salt stress. With the amendment of SMC, the salinized soil after 60 day cabbage cultivation had a pH value close to 7.0, its organic matter and available phosphorous contents increased significantly, and the increment of total water-soluble salt content reduced, compared with the control. When the amendment amount of SMC was 10 g x kg(-1), the increment of soil water soluble salt content was the least, suggesting that appropriate amendment with SMC could reduce the salt accumulation in greenhouse soil. Amendment with SMC increased the cabbage seed germination rate, plant height, plant fresh mass, chlorophyll SPAD value, and vitamin C content, and decreased the proline content significantly. All the results indicated that SMC could improve the growth environment of greenhouse cabbage, and effectively alleviate the detrimental effect of salt stress.

  19. Estimating soil salt components and salinity using hyperspectral remote sensing data in an arid area of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongnan; Shu, Hong; Lei, Lei; Xu, Jianhui

    2017-01-01

    HJ-1A hyperspectral data were used to distinguish topsoil salt components and estimate soil salinity, and the relationship between soil salt chemical components and sensitive bands of soil reflectance spectra was analyzed. The correlation between the soil salt content and the soil spectra obtained from the hyperspectral data was analyzed, proving that topsoil salinity has a very significant correlation with soil reflectance spectra. The relationship between soil reflectance spectra and salt chemical ions was investigated. The soil spectral reflectance at wavelength 510.975 nm and a difference vegetation index were selected to estimate soil salinity and the dominant salt chemical ion concentrations at a depth of 0 to 10 cm using a partial least squares regression model. It was found that the bands sensitive to various levels of chemical components of soil salt were shown to differ, controlled by the dominant component of the soil salt. The sensitive bands in the soil salinity estimation will change with differences in salt components. Estimating the dominant salt in the soil using soil reflectance spectra will lead to greater prediction accuracy. This study provided a possible method for the estimation of salinity and chemical component levels in topsoil, using the hyperspectral data to estimate topsoil salt components.

  20. The Impact of magnetic water treatment on salt distribution in a large unsaturated soil column

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    Vladimir Zlotopolski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of saline water for crop production leads to soil salinization. Magnetically-treated water (MTW has been used for many years and has shown promise in leaching some ions from soil. At the same time, results have been inconsistent and somewhat controversial. In this study, we used large unsaturated columns (diameter 15 cm and length 90 cm to determine: 1 salt distributions at depths of up to 90 cm after adding magnetically-treated, saline water to soil; 2 whether MTW could reduce the rate of accumulation of salts (measured by EC in soil, and; 3 whether MTW could increase the leaching effect of soluble salts below root zones compared to control. The soil tested had a lower salt content compared to the water, a real-world scenario often faced when farmers elect to switch from higher-cost municipal water sources to ground water sources that have a higher saline content. Results indicated that the rate of salt accumulation was greater in the control group at the 30–60 cm depth. At the same time, the salt content at the 90 cm depth was greater in the MTW column. The results have shown that MTW changes the distribution of salts between soil layers reducing their content in the upper layers which are more important for agriculture. Keywords: Magnetic water treatment, Agriculture, Soil, Irrigation water

  1. Soil Resources Area Affects Herbivore Health

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    Chad M. Dacus

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil productivity effects nutritive quality of food plants, growth of humans and animals, and reproductive health of domestic animals. Game-range surveys sometimes poorly explained variations in wildlife populations, but classification of survey data by major soil types improved effectiveness. Our study evaluates possible health effects of lower condition and reproductive rates for wild populations of Odocoileus virginianus Zimmerman (white-tailed deer in some physiographic regions of Mississippi. We analyzed condition and reproductive data for 2400 female deer from the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks herd health evaluations from 1991–1998. We evaluated age, body mass (Mass, kidney mass, kidney fat mass, number of corpora lutea (CL and fetuses, as well as fetal ages. Region affected kidney fat index (KFI, which is a body condition index, and numbers of fetuses of adults (P ≤ 0.001. Region affected numbers of CL of adults (P ≤ 0.002. Mass and conception date (CD were affected (P ≤ 0.001 by region which interacted significantly with age for Mass (P ≤ 0.001 and CD (P < 0.04. Soil region appears to be a major factor influencing physical characteristics of female deer.

  2. Tillage system affects microbiological properties of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, A.; de Santiago, A.; Avilés, M.; Perea, F.

    2012-04-01

    Soil tillage significantly affects organic carbon accumulation, microbial biomass, and subsequently enzymatic activity in surface soil. Microbial activity in soil is a crucial parameter contributing to soil functioning, and thus a basic quality factor for soil. Since enzymes remain soil after excretion by living or disintegrating cells, shifts in their activities reflect long-term fluctuations in microbial biomass. In order to study the effects of no-till on biochemical and microbiological properties in comparison to conventional tillage in a representative soil from South Spain, an experiment was conducted since 1982 on the experimental farm of the Institute of Agriculture and Fisheries Research of Andalusia (IFAPA) in Carmona, SW Spain (37o24'07''N, 5o35'10''W). The soil at the experimental site was a very fine, montomorillonitic, thermic Chromic Haploxerert (Soil Survey Staff, 2010). A randomized complete block design involving three replications and the following two tillage treatments was performed: (i) Conventional tillage, which involved mouldboard plowing to a depth of 50 cm in the summer (once every three years), followed by field cultivation to a depth of 15 cm before sowing; crop residues being burnt, (ii) No tillage, which involved controlling weeds before sowing by spraying glyphosate and sowing directly into the crop residue from the previous year by using a planter with double-disk openers. For all tillage treatments, the crop rotation (annual crops) consisted of winter wheat, sunflower, and legumes (pea, chickpea, or faba bean, depending on the year), which were grown under rainfed conditions. Enzymatic activities (ß-glucosidase, dehydrogenase, aryl-sulphatase, acid phosphatase, and urease), soil microbial biomass by total viable cells number by acridine orange direct count, the density of cultivable groups of bacteria and fungi by dilution plating on semi-selective media, the physiological profiles of the microbial communities by BiologR, and the

  3. Recuperação de solos afetados por sais pela aplicação de gesso de jazida e calcário no Nordeste do Brasil Reclamation of salt-affected soils in Northeast Brazil with application of mined gypsum and limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de F. C. Barros

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivando-se avaliar o efeito da aplicação de corretivos químicos sobre as propriedades físicas e químicas, bem como na recuperação de solos afetados por sais do Perímetro Irrigado de Custódia, no Estado de Pernambuco, Brasil, realizou-se um experimento em colunas de solo, instaladas no Laboratório de Salinidade do Solo da Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco. Os tratamentos foram dispostos em um delineamento em blocos casualizados, com arranjamento fatorial de quatro solos, dois métodos de aplicação de gesso e gesso + calcário (aplicados na superfície e incorporados nos primeiros 5 cm da coluna de solo, duas combinações dos corretivos (100% de gesso + 0% de calcário e 80% de gesso + 20% de calcário, calculados com base na necessidade de gesso dos solos, e quatro faixas de granulometria de gesso (2,0 - 1,0, 1,0 -0,5, 0,5 - 0,3 e With the objective of evaluating the effect of the application of chemical amendments on the physical and chemical properties as well as on reclamation of the salt-affected soils in the "Perímetro Irrigado de Custódia", in Pernambuco state, Brazil, an experiment was carried out in soil columns installed at the Soil Salinity Laboratory of the Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco. The treatments were arranged in a randomized block design in a factorial scheme consisting of four soils, two methods of applications of gypsum and gypsum + limestone (applied on the surface and incorporated into the first 5 cm of the soil column, two combinations of the chemical amendments (100% gypsum and 80% gypsum + 20% limestone, calculated on the basis of gypsum requirement of soils and four granulometry gypsum fractions (2.0 - 1.0; 1.0 - 0.5; 0.5 - 0.3 and < 0.3 mm with three replications. In the saturation extract the electrical conductivity and the soluble cations were determined. The application of gypsum and the mixture of gypsum + limestone showed to be efficient for correction of soil sodicity, which

  4. Is soil microbial diversity affected by soil and groundwater salinity? Evidences from a coastal system in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfora, Loredana; Salvati, Luca; Benedetti, Anna; Francaviglia, Rosa

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about composition, diversity, and abundance of microbial communities in environments affected by primary soil salinization, such as coastal lagoon systems. The main objective of this study was to investigate the impact of lagoon salinity, soil type, and land-use on inland soil and groundwater quality, and soil microbial community structure, diversity, and gene abundance, as evaluated by T-RFLP (terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism) and qPCR (quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction). For this purpose, four sites oriented along a groundwater salinity gradient (Fogliano lagoon, central Italy) were studied under different recreational, grazing, and land-use conditions. Spatial variability in groundwater attributes was observed depending on salinity and soil electrical conductivity, both influenced by salt intrusion. A comparison of community abundance and number of phylotypes of bacteria, archaea, and fungi across varying soil depths pointed out marked differences across soils characterized by different soil type, land-use, and salinity. The latter significantly affected the microbial population richness and diversity and showed a dominance in terms of bacteria species. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatial relationship between soil microbial community and soil degradation processes along a relatively underexplored environmental gradient in a coastal system, coming to the conclusion that salinity acts differently as a driver of microbial community structure in comparison with other saline environments.

  5. The morphology of salt crystals affects the perception of saltiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilaqueo, Marcela; Duizer, Lisa; Aguilera, José Miguel

    2015-10-01

    High intake of salt (NaCl) has been associated with risk of non-communicable diseases, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Several strategies for reducing salt in foods are under study, including the relation of crystal morphology on dissolution properties of salt in the mouth. The aim of this paper was to study the dissolution of salt crystals with different morphologies in artificial saliva and to correlate the findings with the perception of saltiness over time. The morphology of five commercial salts was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy and micro-CT studies. Shape parameters of crystals were determined using images from an optical microscope. Crystal dissolution in artificial saliva was evaluated using video-microscopy and the perception of saltiness was evaluated using sensorial test of time-intensity at standardized sodium content. Salt morphology was correlated well with dissolution rate and certain time-intensity parameters (time to maximum intensity, intensity at maximum and increase angle). Non-cubic and agglomerated crystals, such as Kosher and Maldon salts, were dissolved faster (dissolution rate up to 3.8 times higher) and experienced maximum saltiness (up to 17% more) at shorter times (up to 40% less). Crystal morphology may be a variable to consider to achieve sodium reduction while maintaining salt intensity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intra-arterial infusion of leptin does not affect blood pressure in salt-loaded rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mukhallad A; Talafih, Khalid; Mohamad, Mohamad M J; Khabaz, Mohammad Nidal

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this research is to see the effect of intra-arterial infusion of leptin on blood pressure of salt loaded rabbits in vivo. Increased blood pressure was produced in rabbits by giving diets containing 8% sodium chloride for 5 weeks. Leptin in different concentrations was infused intra-arterially into rabbits fed on high salt diets and the response was compared in rabbits fed with low salt diets. High salt diets produced significant increase in blood pressure. In rabbits fed with low salt diet, leptin infused intra-arterially caused an increase in blood pressure while infusion of leptin into rabbits fed with high salt diets does not affect the blood pressure. In conclusion, salt loading to rabbits abolishes the effect ofleptin on cardiovascular system. This may indicate that leptin effect on sympathetic activity is altered by high salt diets in these animals.

  7. Impacts of road salts on leaching behavior of lead contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjing; Kim, Hwidong

    2017-02-15

    Research was conducted to explore the effects of road salts on lead leaching from lead contaminated soil samples that were collected in an old residence area in Erie, PA. The synthetic precipitate leaching procedure (SPLP) test was employed to evaluate lead leaching from one of the lead contaminated soils in the presence of various levels of road salts (5%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%). The results of the leaching test showed that lead leaching dramatically increased as the road salt content increased as a result of the formation of lead-chloride complexes, but different lead leaching patterns were observed in the presence of NaCl- and CaCl2-based road salts at a high content of road salts (>20%). Additional leaching tests that include 30% road salts and different soil samples showed a variety of leaching patterns by soil samples. The sequential extraction of each soil sample showed that a high fraction of organic matter bound lead was associated with lead contamination. The higher the fraction of organic matter bound lead contained in soil, the greater the effects of calcium on reducing lead leaching, observations showed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Study on the Coupled Model of Hydrothermal-Salt for Saturated Freezing Salinized Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water and heat interact in the process of freezing for the saturated soil. And for the salinized soil, water, heat, and salt interact in the freezing process, because salinized soil has soluble salt. In this paper, a one-dimensional mathematical coupled model of hydraulic-thermal-salt is established. In the model, Darcy’s law, law of conservation of energy, and law of conservation of mass are applied to derive the equations. Consider that a saturated salinized soil column is subjected to the condition of freezing to model the moisture migration and salt transport. Both experiment and numerical simulation under the same condition are developed in the soil column. Then the moisture content and salt content between simulation and experiment are compared. The result indicates that simulation matches well with the experiment data, and after 96 hours, the temperature distribution becomes stable, freezing front reaches a stable position, and a lot of unfrozen water has time to migrate. Besides, the excess salt precipitates when the concentration is greater than the solubility, and the precipitation is distributed discontinuously. These results can provide reference for engineering geology and environmental engineering in cold region and saline soil area.

  9. Ectomycorrhizal activity as affected by soil liming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Solbritt

    1996-05-01

    Acidification of the forest soils in southern Sweden due to atmospheric deposition has become evident during recent decades. To counteract further acidification, liming of forests in the most affected areas has been proposed. Most forest trees in the temperate and boreal forest ecosystems live in symbiosis with ectomycorrhizal fungi, and their uptake of mineral nutrients from the soil is greatly influenced by the symbiosis. In this thesis effects of liming on ectomycorrhiza have been studied in relation to effects on root colonization, fungal growth and nitrogen uptake. In field experiments the effects of liming on ectomycorrhizal colonization of root tips were variable, possibly due to different soil types and climatic variations. However, a changed mycorrhizal community structure could be detected. Laboratory studies also showed that the substrate may influence the outcome of lime applications; the nutrient status of the substrate had a marked effect on how mycelial growth was affected by liming. Under the experimental conditions used in the studies presented in this thesis, liming reduced the uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus by both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. The amount of extractable nitrogen and phosphorus in the peat was also reduced by liming. The latter could be due to either microbial or chemical immobilization. The lime induced decrease in nitrogen uptake was stronger in non-mycorrhizal plants than in mycorrhizal plants. Thus, the mycorrhizal plants had a higher ability to deal with the negative effects of liming on nitrogen availability. This was not the case for phosphorus. The lime induced decrease in phosphorus uptake was stronger for mycorrhizal plants, and in the highest lime treatment there was no significant difference between the mycorrhizal and the non-mycorrhizal spruce plants. 76 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  10. Hydrogeology of salt karst under different cap soils and climates (Persian Gulf and Zagros Mts., Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Bruthans

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Southern Iran hosts abundant salt karst phenomena in numerous salt diapirs. This paper provides a new insight into the relationships among climate, cap soil and salt karst hydrogeology. Cave systems were documented and mapped. Soil, drip, stream, and flood waters from different environments were studied at several diapirs. It was revealed that the soil water chemistry depends on both the climate and cap soil thickness. In semi-arid climates, a thick cap soil forms (>3 m and water has very low TDS values (0.15 g/l. In arid climates, a shallow cap soil forms, and soil water is gypsum-saturated with low dissolved halite contents. In both environments, drip waters from salt caves and springs displayed high TDS values (255 to 347 g/l. This is explained by the dissolution of halite and minor anhydrite/gypsum, a K-Mg sulfate and sylvite. Spring water plots on a local meteoric water line, whereas drips in caves have an evaporative signature. The flash flood runoff is dominated by event rain water based on isotopic data, while springs are dominantly supplied by a base flow component. The mean residence time of water on the diapirs is controlled by the cap soil thickness. Water residence times may reach several hundreds of years on a thick cap soil based on an exponential model butsoil.

  11. Factors Affecting Soil Quality Maintenance in Northern Katsina State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting soil quality maintenance in the area according to the findings are natural and man-induced, including agricultural practices in general and deforestation, soil degradation and erosion, as well as biodiversity loss in particular. The results also indicated that values of the selected elements affecting soil quality ...

  12. Premixed Digestion Salts for Kjeldahl Determination of Total Nitrogen in Selected Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. G. Blackmon

    1971-01-01

    Estimates of total soil nitrogen by a standard Kjeldahl procedure and a modified procedure employing packets of premixed digestion salts were closely correlated. (r2 = 0.983). The modified procedure appears to be as reliable all the standard method for determining total nitrogen in southern alluvial forest soils.

  13. Responses of Water and Salt Parameters to Groundwater Levels for Soil Columns Planted with Tamarix chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhao, Ximei; Chen, Yinping; Fang, Ying; Zhao, Ziguo

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is the main water resource for plant growth and development in the saline soil of the Yellow River Delta in China. To investigate the variabilities and distributions of soil water and salt contents at various groundwater level (GL), soil columns with planting Tamarix chinensis Lour were established at six different GL. The results demonstrated the following: With increasing GL, the relative soil water content (RWC) declined significantly, whereas the salt content (SC) and absolute soil solution concentration (CS) decreased after the initial increase in the different soil profiles. A GL of 1.2 m was the turning point for variations in the soil water and salt contents, and it represented the highest GL that could maintain the soil surface moist within the soil columns. Both the SC and CS reached the maximum levels in these different soil profiles at a GL of 1.2 m. With the raise of soil depth, the RWC increased significantly, whereas the SC increased after an initial decrease. The mean SC values reached 0.96% in the top soil layer; however, the rates at which the CS and RWC decreased with the GL were significantly reduced. The RWC and SC presented the greatest variations at the medium (0.9–1.2 m) and shallow water levels (0.6 m) respectively, whereas the CS presented the greatest variation at the deep water level (1.5–1.8 m).The RWC, SC and CS in the soil columns were all closely related to the GL. However, the correlations among the parameters varied greatly within different soil profiles, and the most accurate predictions of the GL were derived from the RWC in the shallow soil layer or the SC in the top soil layer. A GL at 1.5–1.8 m was moderate for planting T. chinensis seedlings under saline groundwater conditions. PMID:26730602

  14. Microarray analysis of genes affected by salt stress in tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LANDA

    drop spectrometer (Nanodrop Technologies, USA). The DNA free. RNA samples were used for further analysis. Microarray hybridization, data acquisition and analysis .... General features of the salt regulated gene expres- ..... 2CVO Chain D, Crystal Structure Of Putative N-Acetyl-Gamma-Glutamyl- Phosphate Reductase.

  15. First results on enzymatic activities in two salt marsh soils under different hydromorphic level and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Trasar-Cepeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Salt-marsh soils are soils characterized by non-permanent hydric saturation that, depending on factors like duration of submersion periods, are dominated by different salt-tolerant plant species. The composition of microbial communities is an essential component in trophic dynamics and biogeochemical processes in salt marshes, and determines the level of enzymatic activities, which catalyze the conversion of complex molecules into simpler ones. Despite of this, the enzymatic activities in marsh-soils has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the enzymatic activities in two soil profiles of marsh-soils under different water saturation level and dominated by different plant species [Juncus maritimus Lam and Spartina maritima (Curtis Fernald (Sp]. In both soils, the enzymatic activities were much lower than the levels typically found in terrestrial ecosystems. The enzymatic activities were measured both in air-dried and in re-moistened and incubated soil samples. In air-dried samples, the enzymatic activities were higher in Juncus than in Spartina soil and tended to decrease with depth, being sharper the decrease in Juncus than in Spartina soil. Re-moistened and pre-incubated soils showed a general increase in all the enzymatic activities and throughout the whole soil profile, especially in Spartina soils. Hydrolase activities showed a strong and positive relationship with organic matter content both in air-dried and in re-moistened soil samples, higher in these latter. In general, oxidoreductase activities only showed this relationship in re-moistened soil samples. More studies, preferably using freshly collected soil samples, are needed to understand the relationship between enzymatic activities and these environmental conditions.

  16. Salinity management in river basins : modelling and management of the salt-affected Jarreh Reservoir (Iran)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiati, K.

    1991-01-01

    The sources and origin of salts in the basin of the two salt- affected Shapur and Dalaki rivers (Southern Iran) and the processes involved in salinization have been studied. The extent of water deterioration have been identified by examining spatial changes in the rivers water

  17. Microbial community composition affects soil fungistasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Verheggen, P.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Most soils inhibit fungal germination and growth to a certain extent, a phenomenon known as soil fungistasis. Previous observations have implicated microorganisms as the causal agents of fungistasis, with their action mediated either by available carbon limitation (nutrient deprivation hypothesis)

  18. Modeling of Soil Water and Salt Dynamics and Its Effects on Root Water Uptake in Heihe Arid Wetland, Gansu, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Heihe River basin, China, increased salinity and water shortages present serious threats to the sustainability of arid wetlands. It is critical to understand the interactions between soil water and salts (from saline shallow groundwater and the river and their effects on plant growth under the influence of shallow groundwater and irrigation. In this study, the Hydrus-1D model was used in an arid wetland of the Middle Heihe River to investigate the effects of the dynamics of soil water, soil salinization, and depth to water table (DWT as well as groundwater salinity on Chinese tamarisk root water uptake. The modeled soil water and electrical conductivity of soil solution (ECsw are in good agreement with the observations, as indicated by RMSE values (0.031 and 0.046 cm3·cm−3 for soil water content, 0.037 and 0.035 dS·m−1 for ECsw, during the model calibration and validation periods, respectively. The calibrated model was used in scenario analyses considering different DWTs, salinity levels and the introduction of preseason irrigation. The results showed that (I Chinese tamarisk root distribution was greatly affected by soil water and salt distribution in the soil profile, with about 73.8% of the roots being distributed in the 20–60 cm layer; (II root water uptake accounted for 91.0% of the potential maximal value when water stress was considered, and for 41.6% when both water and salt stress were considered; (III root water uptake was very sensitive to fluctuations of the water table, and was greatly reduced when the DWT was either dropped or raised 60% of the 2012 reference depth; (IV arid wetland vegetation exhibited a high level of groundwater dependence even though shallow groundwater resulted in increased soil salinization and (V preseason irrigation could effectively increase root water uptake by leaching salts from the root zone. We concluded that a suitable water table and groundwater salinity coupled with proper irrigation

  19. Agroforestry-based management of salt-affected croplands in irrigated agricultural landscape in Uzbekistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamzina, Asia; Kumar, Navneet; Heng, Lee

    2017-04-01

    In the lower Amu Darya River Basin, the decades of intensive irrigation led to elevated groundwater tables, resulting in ubiquitous soil salinization and adverse impact on crop production. Field-scale afforestation trials and farm-scale economic analyses in the Khorezm region have determined that afforestation can be an environmentally and financially attractive land-use option for degraded croplands because it combines a diversified agricultural production, carbon sequestration, an improved soil health and minimizes the use of irrigation water. We examined prospects for upscaling afforestation activity for regional land-use planning considering prevailing constraints in irrigated agriculture landscape. Assessment of salinity-induced cropland productivity decline using satellite imagery of multiple spatial and temporal resolution revealed that 18-38% of the marginally productive or abandoned cropland might be considered for conversion to agroforestry. Furthermore, a regional-scale water balance suggests that most of these marginal croplands are characterized by sufficient surface water supplies for irrigating the newly planted saplings, before they are able to rely on the groundwater alone. However, the 10-year monitoring of soil salt dynamics in the afforestation trials reveals increasing salinity levels due to the salt exclusion from the root water uptake by the trees. Further study focuses on enhancing long-term sustainability of afforestation as a management option for highly saline lands by examining salt tolerance of candidate species using 13C isotopic signature as the indicator of water and salt stress, salt leaching needs and implications for regional scale planning.

  20. Denitrification of soil nitrogen in coastal and inland salt marshes with different flooding frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Wang, Xin; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Guangliang; Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-02-01

    Denitrification is an important process for removing nitrogen in wetlands, and it is influenced by many environmental factors. However, little information is available on the relationship between hydrologic conditions and denitrification. In this study three typical sampling sites with different flooding frequencies, including short-term flooding wetlands (STFW), seasonal-flooding wetlands (SFW) and tidal flooding wetlands (TFW) were chosen as the study sites in the Yellow River Delta. In contrast, five typical sampling sites with different flooding frequencies, including 100-year floodplain (H), 10-year floodplain (T), 5-year floodplain (F), 1-year floodplain (O) and permanently flooded floodplain (B) were chosen as the study sites in Xianghai wetlands. This study reflected that the denitrification rates decreased with depth along soil profiles in both inland and coastal salt marsh soils. Flooding periods, soil depth and their interaction showed significant effects on the denitrification processes. Generally, higher flooding frequencies will cause higher denitrification rates in salt marshes. Moreover, the denitrification rates were significantly positively correlated with soil moisture content in both wetlands. Additionally, the denitrification rates were significantly positively correlated with organic matter and NO3-_N content while negatively correlated with soil pH and salinity in inland salt marshes. Therefore, the changes in soil properties (e.g. SOM, TN, pH and salinity) can become an important way to control NO3- levels in inland salt marshes.

  1. Zooming in and out: scale dependence of extrinsic and intrinsic factors affecting salt marsh erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; van der Wal, D.; Li, X.; van Belzen, J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Hu, Z.; Ge, Z.; Zhang, L.; Bouma, T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Salt marshes are valuable ecosystems that provide important ecosystem services. Given the global scale of marsh loss due to climate change and coastal squeeze, there is a pressing need to identify the critical extrinsic (wind exposure and foreshore morphology) and intrinsic factors (soil and

  2. Interpretation of in situ tests as affected by soil suction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Soil moisture conditions are subject to change depending on the season in which they are tested. In : unsaturated soils the moisture at which a soil is tested can directly affect strength and stiffness of the : material. In situ testing is commonly u...

  3. Productivity of sodic soils can be enhanced through the use of salt tolerant rice varieties and proper agronomic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Y P; Mishra, V K; Singh, Sudhanshu; Sharma, D K; Singh, D; Singh, U S; Singh, R K; Haefele, S M; Ismail, A M

    2016-04-01

    Regaining the agricultural potential of sodic soils in the Indo-Gangetic plains necessitates the development of suitable salt tolerant rice varieties to provide an entry for other affordable agronomic and soil manipulation measures. Thus selection of high yielding rice varieties across a range of sodic soils is central. Evaluation of breeding lines through on-station and on-farm farmers' participatory varietal selection (FPVS) resulted in the identification of a short duration (110-115 days), high yielding and disease resistant salt-tolerant rice genotype 'CSR-89IR-8', which was later released as 'CSR43' in 2011. Several agronomic traits coupled with good grain quality and market value contributed to commercialization and quick adoption of this variety in the sodic areas of the Indo-Gangetic plains of eastern India. Management practices required for rice production in salt affected soils are evidently different from those in normal soils and practices for a short duration salt tolerant variety differ from those for medium to long duration varieties. Experiments were conducted at the Indian Council of Agricultural Research-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute (ICAR-CSSRI), Regional Research Station, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India during 2011 and 2013 wet seasons, to test the hypothesis that combining matching management practices (Mmp) with an improved genotype would enhance productivity and profitability of rice in sodic soils. Mmp were developed on-station by optimizing existing best management practices (Bmp) recommended for the region to match the requirements of CSR43. The results revealed that transplanting 4 seedlings hill-1 at a spacing of 15 × 20 cm produced significantly higher yield over other treatments. The highest additional net gain was US$ 3.3 at 90 kg ha-1 N, and the lowest was US$ 0.4 at 150 kg ha-1 N. Above 150 kg ha-1, the additional net gain became negative, indicating decreasing returns from additional N. Hence, 150 kg N ha-1

  4. Aggregate Stability and Erodibility of Purple Soil on Sloping Farmland as affected by different Soil Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinjun; Zhang, Qingwen; Chen, Shanghong; Dong, Yuequn; Xiao, Meijia; Hamed, Lamy Mamdoh Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Soil thickness is basic limiting condition for purple soil, not only due to its effect on crop production, but also its effect on soil structure. Steady-state of soil thickness will be achieved over time, as result the soil aggregate which the key factor of soil erodibility can be enhanced as well. However, the effect of soil thickness on aggregates stability and the characteristics of soil erodibility in sloping land have not yet fully understood.A field survey was conducted in hilly area of Sichuan region located in southeast China to study the relationship between soil aggregate stability and soil erodibility on sloping farmland under different four thickness (100cm, 80cm, 60cm, 30cm) of purple soil. Based on two different sieving methods (Dry and Wet sieving), we analyzed soil aggregate stability and its effect on soil erodibility within depth of 0-30cm soil layers. The results indicated that: Water stable aggregate on sloping farmland was ranged between 37.9% to 58.6%, where it increased with increasing the soil thickness. Moreover, fractal dimension calculated from dry-sieving and wet-sieving was 2.06-2.49 and 2.70-2.85 respectively, where it decreased with decreasing the soil thickness. The overall soil erodibility was 0.05-1.00 and a negative significant correlation was found between soil aggregate stability and erodibility(Psoil profile tended to be high in soil erodibility within the top soil layer (0-30cm). The results reveal that soil thickness can affect soil aggregate stability as well as erodibility. As soil thickness increased, the top soil became more stable and less erodible. Keywords:purple soil; soil thickness; soil aggregate;soil erodibility

  5. Preceding crop affects grain cadmium and zinc of wheat grown in saline soils of central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshgoftarmanesh, Amir H; Chaney, Rufus L

    2007-01-01

    Enhanced Cd concentrations in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain produced on saline soils of central Iran have been recently reported. Because wheat bread is a major dietary component for the Iranian people, practical approaches to decrease Cd concentration in wheat grain were investigated. This study investigated the influence of sunflower-wheat vs. cotton-wheat rotations on extractable Cd and on Cd uptake by wheat in these salt-affected soils. Two fields with different levels of Cd contamination (1.5 and 3.2 mg total Cd kg(-1) dry soil) were cropped with different rotations (cotton-wheat and sunflower-wheat) in Qom province, central Iran. Seeds of cotton (Gossypium L.) or sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Record) were planted in plots. After harvesting of the plants and removal of crop residues, wheat (cv. Rushan) was seeded in all plots. For both studied soils, the concentrations of Cd extracted by 0.04 M EDTA and 1 M CaCl(2) were significantly (P sunflower. Accordingly, the total amount of Cd in sunflower shoot was significantly (P sunflower were significantly different; wheat shoots after cotton accumulated more Cd (two to four times) than after sunflower. Wheat grain Cd concentration after sunflower was much lower (more than seven times) than after cotton. The results of this study showed that sunflower in rotation with wheat in salt-affected soils of central Iran significantly reduced the risk of Cd transfer to wheat grain.

  6. Can transgenic maize affect soil microbial communities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mulder

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experiment was to determine if temporal variations of belowground activity reflect the influence of the Cry1Ab protein from transgenic maize on soil bacteria and, hence, on a regulatory change of the microbial community (ability to metabolize sources belonging to different chemical guilds and/or a change in numerical abundance of their cells. Litter placement is known for its strong influence on the soil decomposer communities. The effects of the addition of crop residues on respiration and catabolic activities of the bacterial community were examined in microcosm experiments. Four cultivars of Zea mays L. of two different isolines (each one including the conventional crop and its Bacillus thuringiensis cultivar and one control of bulk soil were included in the experimental design. The growth models suggest a dichotomy between soils amended with either conventional or transgenic maize residues. The Cry1Ab protein appeared to influence the composition of the microbial community. The highly enhanced soil respiration observed during the first 72 h after the addition of Bt-maize residues can be interpreted as being related to the presence of the transgenic crop residues. This result was confirmed by agar plate counting, as the averages of the colony-forming units of soils in conventional treatments were about one-third of those treated with transgenic straw. Furthermore, the addition of Bt-maize appeared to induce increased microbial consumption of carbohydrates in BIOLOG EcoPlates. Three weeks after the addition of maize residues to the soils, no differences between the consumption rate of specific chemical guilds by bacteria in soils amended with transgenic maize and bacteria in soils amended with conventional maize were detectable. Reaped crop residues, comparable to post-harvest maize straw (a common practice in current agriculture, rapidly influence the soil bacterial cells at a functional level. Overall, these data support the

  7. Response of Soil Fungi Community Structure to Salt Vegetation Succession in the Yellow River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yun; Guo, Du-Fa

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology was used to reveal the composition and distribution of fungal community structure in the Yellow River Delta under bare land and four kinds of halophyte vegetation (saline seepweed, Angiospermae, Imperata and Apocynum venetum [A. venetum]). The results showed that the soil quality continuously improved with the succession of salt vegetation types. The soil fungi richness of mild-salt communities (Imperata and A. venetum) was relatively higher, with Shannon index values of 5.21 and 5.84, respectively. The soil fungi richness of severe-salt-tolerant communities (saline seepweed, Angiospermae) was relatively lower, with Shannon index values of 4.64 and 4.66, respectively. The UniFrac metric values ranged from 0.48 to 0.67 when the vegetation was in different succession stages. A total of 60,174 valid sequences were obtained for the five vegetation types, and they were classified into Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina. Ascomycota had the greatest advantage among plant communities of Imperata and A. venetum, as indicated by relative abundances of 2.69 and 69.97 %, respectively. Basidiomycota had the greatest advantage among mild-salt communities of saline seepweed and Angiospermae, with relative abundances of 9.43 and 6.64 %, respectively. Soil physical and chemical properties were correlated with the distribution of the fungi, and Mucor was significantly correlated with soil moisture (r = 0.985; P Soil quality, salt vegetation and soil fungi were influenced by each other.

  8. Ruzigrass affecting soil-phosphorus availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Merlin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ruzigrass (Urochloaruziziensis in enhancing soil-P availability in areas fertilized with soluble or reactive rock phosphates. The area had been cropped for five years under no-till, in a system involving soybean, triticale/black-oat, and pearl millet. Previously to the five-year cultivation period, corrective phosphorus fertilization was applied once on soil surface, at 0.0 and 80 kg ha-1 P2O5, as triple superphosphate or Arad rock phosphate. After this five-year period, plots received the same corrective P fertilization as before and ruzigrass was introduced to the cropping system in the stead of the other cover crops. Soil samples were taken (0-10 cm after ruzigrass cultivation and subjected to soil-P fractionation. Soybean was grown thereafter without P application to seed furrow. Phosphorus availability in plots with ruzigrass was compared to the ones with spontaneous vegetation for two years. Ruzigrass cultivation increased inorganic (resin-extracted and organic (NaHCO3 soil P, as well as P concentration in soybean leaves, regardless of the P source. However, soybean yield did not increase significantly due to ruzigrass introduction to the cropping system. Soil-P availability did not differ between soluble and reactive P sources. Ruzigrass increases soil-P availability, especially where corrective P fertilization is performed.

  9. High salt and high pH tolerance of new isolated Rhizobium etli strains from Egyptian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseldin, Abdelaal; Werner, Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    Saline and alkaline soils are major problems contributing to the low productivity of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in arid and semi-arid regions such as Egypt. Therefore our study was directed toward selecting strains more tolerant to these environmental stresses. Among seven Rhizobium etli strains isolated from Egyptian soils, we found a high degree of diversity. Strains EBRI 21 and EBRI 26 are highly tolerant to a salt concentration up to 4% NaCl. A positive correlation was found between the salt tolerance and the adaptation to alkaline pH (9). Strains EBRI 2 and EBRI 26 were adapted to elevated temperatures (42 degrees C). The minimum level of low pH for the majority of Rhizobium etli strains from Egypt was pH 4.7 while the Colombian strain Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 survived well at pH 4. At 0.4% NaCl, the symbiotic efficiency of the salt-tolerant strain EBRI 26 was superior in cultivar Giza 6 compared with the salt-sensitive strain EBRI 2 (18.2 compared with 13.9 nM: C2H4 h(-1) mg(-1) nodule fresh weight). In the bean cultivar Saxa, nitrogen fixation was much more affected by high salt concentration (0.4% NaCl) than in the cultivar Giza 6 with both strains (3.9 and 3.8 nM: C2H4 h(-1) mg(-1) nodule fresh weight, respectively). In general, stress of alkalinity had a less detrimental effect on nodulation and N2 fixation than stress of salinity.

  10. Soil invertebrate fauna affect N2 O emissions from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Imke; de Deyn, Gerlinde B; Thakur, Madhav P; van Groenigen, Jan Willem

    2013-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions from soils contribute significantly to global warming. Mitigation of N2 O emissions is severely hampered by a lack of understanding of its main controls. Fluxes can only partly be predicted from soil abiotic factors and microbial analyses - a possible role for soil fauna has until now largely been overlooked. We studied the effect of six groups of soil invertebrate fauna and tested the hypothesis that all of them increase N2 O emissions, although to different extents. We conducted three microcosm experiments with sandy soil and hay residue. Faunal groups included in our experiments were as follows: fungal-feeding nematodes, mites, springtails, potworms, earthworms and isopods. In experiment I, involving all six faunal groups, N2 O emissions declined with earthworms and potworms from 78.4 (control) to 37.0 (earthworms) or 53.5 (potworms) mg N2 O-N m(-2) . In experiment II, with a higher soil-to-hay ratio and mites, springtails and potworms as faunal treatments, N2 O emissions increased with potworms from 51.9 (control) to 123.5 mg N2 O-N m(-2) . Experiment III studied the effect of potworm density; we found that higher densities of potworms accelerated the peak of the N2 O emissions by 5 days (P fauna reduced N2 O emissions in experiment I, whereas in experiment II N2 O emissions were driven by increased nitrogen and carbon availability. In experiment III, higher densities of potworms accelerated nitrogen and carbon availability and N2 O emissions, but did not increase them. Overall, our data show that soil fauna can suppress, increase, delay or accelerate N2 O emissions from soil and should therefore be an integral part of future N2 O studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of Byproducts of Flue Gas Desulfurization on the Soluble Salts Composition and Chemical Properties of Sodic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2013-01-01

    The byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) are a useful external source of Ca2+ for the reclamation of sodic soils because they are comparatively cheap, generally available and have high gypsum content. The ion solution composition of sodic soils also plays an important role in the reclamation process. The effect of BFGD on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils were studied in a soil column experiment. The experiment consisted of four treatments using two different sodic soils (sodic soil I and sodic soil II) and two BFGD rates. After the application of BFGD and leaching, the soil soluble salts were transformed from sodic salts containing Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 to neutral salts containing NaCl and Na2SO4. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), pH and electrical conductivity (EC) decreased at all soil depths, and more significantly in the top soil depth. At a depth of 0–40 cm in both sodic soil I and sodic soil II, the SAR, EC and pH were less than 13, 4 dS m−1 and 8.5, respectively. The changes in the chemical properties of the sodic soils reflected the changes in the ion composition of soluble salts. Leaching played a key role in the reclamation process and the reclamation effect was positively associated with the amount of leaching. The soil salts did not accumulate in the top soil layer, but there was a slight increase in the middle and bottom soil depths. The results demonstrate that the reclamation of sodic soils using BFGD is promising. PMID:23936481

  12. Effect of byproducts of flue gas desulfurization on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2013-01-01

    The byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) are a useful external source of Ca(2+) for the reclamation of sodic soils because they are comparatively cheap, generally available and have high gypsum content. The ion solution composition of sodic soils also plays an important role in the reclamation process. The effect of BFGD on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils were studied in a soil column experiment. The experiment consisted of four treatments using two different sodic soils (sodic soil I and sodic soil II) and two BFGD rates. After the application of BFGD and leaching, the soil soluble salts were transformed from sodic salts containing Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 to neutral salts containing NaCl and Na2SO4. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), pH and electrical conductivity (EC) decreased at all soil depths, and more significantly in the top soil depth. At a depth of 0-40 cm in both sodic soil I and sodic soil II, the SAR, EC and pH were less than 13, 4 dS m(-1) and 8.5, respectively. The changes in the chemical properties of the sodic soils reflected the changes in the ion composition of soluble salts. Leaching played a key role in the reclamation process and the reclamation effect was positively associated with the amount of leaching. The soil salts did not accumulate in the top soil layer, but there was a slight increase in the middle and bottom soil depths. The results demonstrate that the reclamation of sodic soils using BFGD is promising.

  13. Effect of byproducts of flue gas desulfurization on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinman Wang

    Full Text Available The byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD are a useful external source of Ca(2+ for the reclamation of sodic soils because they are comparatively cheap, generally available and have high gypsum content. The ion solution composition of sodic soils also plays an important role in the reclamation process. The effect of BFGD on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils were studied in a soil column experiment. The experiment consisted of four treatments using two different sodic soils (sodic soil I and sodic soil II and two BFGD rates. After the application of BFGD and leaching, the soil soluble salts were transformed from sodic salts containing Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 to neutral salts containing NaCl and Na2SO4. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, pH and electrical conductivity (EC decreased at all soil depths, and more significantly in the top soil depth. At a depth of 0-40 cm in both sodic soil I and sodic soil II, the SAR, EC and pH were less than 13, 4 dS m(-1 and 8.5, respectively. The changes in the chemical properties of the sodic soils reflected the changes in the ion composition of soluble salts. Leaching played a key role in the reclamation process and the reclamation effect was positively associated with the amount of leaching. The soil salts did not accumulate in the top soil layer, but there was a slight increase in the middle and bottom soil depths. The results demonstrate that the reclamation of sodic soils using BFGD is promising.

  14. Quantitative Estimating Salt Content of Saline Soil Using Laboratory Hyperspectral Data Treated by Fractional Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most present researches on estimation of soil salinity by hyperspectral data have focused on the spectral reflectance or their integer derivatives but ignored the fractional derivative information of hyperspectral data. Motivated by this situation, the selected study area is the Ebinur Lake basin located in the southwest border in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China, with severe salinization. The field work was conducted from 15 to 25 October, 2014, and a total of 180 soil samples were collected from 45 sampling sites; after measuring the soil salt content and spectral reflectance in the laboratory, the range from 0 to 2 was divided into 11 orders (interval 0.2 and then the hyperspectral data were treated by 4 kinds of mathematical transformations and 11 orders of fractional derivatives. Combined with the soil salt content, partial least square regression method was applied for model calibrations and predictions and some indexes were used to evaluate the performance of models. The results showed that the retrieval model built up by 250 bands based on 1.2-order derivative of 1/lg⁡R had excellent capacity of estimating soil salt content in the study area (RMSEC=14.685 g/kg, RMSEP=14.713 g/kg, R2C=0.782, R2P=0.768, and RPD = 2.080. This study provides an application reference for quantitative estimations of other land surface parameters and some other applications on hyperspectral technology.

  15. Soil salinity study in Northern Great Plains sodium affected soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharel, Tulsi P.

    Climate and land-use changes when combined with the marine sediments that underlay portions of the Northern Great Plains have increased the salinization and sodification risks. The objectives of this dissertation were to compare three chemical amendments (calcium chloride, sulfuric acid and gypsum) remediation strategies on water permeability and sodium (Na) transport in undisturbed soil columns and to develop a remote sensing technique to characterize salinization in South Dakota soils. Forty-eight undisturbed soil columns (30 cm x 15 cm) collected from White Lake, Redfield, and Pierpont were used to assess the chemical remediation strategies. In this study the experimental design was a completely randomized design and each treatment was replicated four times. Following the application of chemical remediation strategies, 45.2 cm of water was leached through these columns. The leachate was separated into 120- ml increments and analyzed for Na and electrical conductivity (EC). Sulfuric acid increased Na leaching, whereas gypsum and CaCl2 increased water permeability. Our results further indicate that to maintain effective water permeability, ratio between soil EC and sodium absorption ratio (SAR) should be considered. In the second study, soil samples from 0-15 cm depth in 62 x 62 m grid spacing were taken from the South Dakota Pierpont (65 ha) and Redfield (17 ha) sites. Saturated paste EC was measured on each soil sample. At each sampling points reflectance and derived indices (Landsat 5, 7, 8 images), elevation, slope and aspect (LiDAR) were extracted. Regression models based on multiple linear regression, classification and regression tree, cubist, and random forest techniques were developed and their ability to predict soil EC were compared. Results showed that: 1) Random forest method was found to be the most effective method because of its ability to capture spatially correlated variation, 2) the short wave infrared (1.5 -2.29 mum) and near infrared (0

  16. Remediation of salt impacted fine-grained soil and groundwater at a former battery site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, B.; Michailuck, T. [Pioneer Professional Services Group, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    A sustainable remedial process that used electrokinetics to remediate salt contaminated sites was presented. Various technologies for remediating salt-impacted fine-grained soils and groundwater were also discussed. The potential impacts of electrokinetics on soil condition and groundwater were also evaluated. The process used 3 different technologies: (1) geophysics and electromagnetic and resistivity imaging; (2) electrokinetic soil and groundwater remediation; and (3) electrodialysis and leachate desalination. The effect of electrokinetics on soil microbes and the electro-migration of dissolved metals was also examined. Field tests were then conducted at a former tank farm and spill area. Baseline soil and groundwater testing was followed by a bench-scale study, remedial system installation, and groundwater and system monitoring. Post soil and groundwater testing was then conducted to analyze results. Results of the study showed that groundwater levels increased during the trial in background and pilot area wells. Electrokinetics had no apparent effect on microbe populations or on pH. Negligible metal changes were observed in the soils. An overall decrease in salinity was observed. It was concluded that pre-treatment is required to remove multi-component impurities in effluent water before using the electrokinetics process. tabs., figs.

  17. Can Transgenic Maize Affect Soil Microbial Communities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Christian; Wouterse, Marja; Raubuch, Markus; Roelofs, Willem; Rutgers, Michiel

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the experiment was to determine if temporal variations of belowground activity reflect the influence of the Cry1Ab protein from transgenic maize on soil bacteria and, hence, on a regulatory change of the microbial community (ability to metabolize sources belonging to different chemical

  18. Phenotypic and genetic diversity in Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae from drought and salt affected regions of Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udupa Sripada M

    2010-01-01

    . meliloti and S. medicae populations from marginal soils affected by salt and drought, in arid and semi-arid regions of Morocco. Some of the tolerant strains have a potential for exploitation in salt and drought affected areas for biological nitrogen fixation in alfalfa.

  19. Effects of bile salts and divalent cations on the adsorption of norfloxacin by agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xuesong; Feng, Shixiang; Zhang, Xu; Li, Yan

    2014-04-01

    The effects of bile salts (sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate, 0-20 mmol/L), divalent cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), 0-20 mmol/L) or pH (3.0-10.0) on the adsorption of norfloxacin by three selected soils (Paddy_H, Paddy_G and Red_J) were systematically studied. Soil adsorption of norfloxacin follows a pseudo second-order kinetics model, and the maximum adsorption capacity has been determined from the nonlinear fit of the Langmuir isotherm model to be 88.8, 88.1 and 63.0 μmol/g for the adsorption onto Paddy_H, Paddy_G and Red_J, respectively. The results indicate that norfloxacin has a high adsorption affinity for the agricultural soils tested and that the organic content of these soils have at least a slight influence on this adsorption. The adsorption of norfloxacin to soils was strongly dependent on pH and exhibited a maximum at approximately pH 6. The presence of divalent cations prominently suppressed the adsorption of norfloxacin by paddy soils, which followed an order of Cu(2+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+) > Zn(2+), and by red soil, which followed an order of Cu(2+) > Zn(2+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+). The adsorption of norfloxacin (by the soils studied) sharply decreased as the amount of bile salts was increased. For uncharged norfloxacin at environmentally relevant pH values, such factors as soil type, exogenous divalent cations and macromolecules significantly altered the environmental fate and transport of norfloxacin between aquatic and soil interfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Landform affects on profile distribution of soil properties in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Landform affects on profile distribution of soil properties in black locust ( Robinia pseudoacacia ) land in loessial gully region of the Chinese Loess Plateau and its implications for vegetation restoration.

  1. Factors affecting the degradation of pharmaceuticals in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Sara C; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2009-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals may be released to the soil environment through the application of biosolids to land. To understand those factors affecting the persistence of pharmaceuticals in the soil environment, the present study was performed to assess the effects of soil type, the presence of biosolids, and the impact of chemical mixture interactions on the degradation of three pharmaceuticals: naproxen, carbamazepine, and fluoxetine. Single-compound studies showed that naproxen degraded in a range of soils with half-lives ranging from 3.1 to 6.9 d and in biosolids with a half-life of 10.2 d. No relationships were observed between degradation rate and soil physicochemical properties and soil bioactivity. For naproxen, addition of biosolids to soils reduced the degradation rate observed in the soil-only studies, with half-lives in the soil-biosolid systems ranging from 3.9 to 15.1 d. Carbamazepine and fluoxetine were found to be persistent in soils, biosolids, and soil-biosolid mixtures. When degradation was assessed using a mixture of the three study compounds and the sulfonamide antibiotic sulfamethazine, the degradation behavior of fluoxetine and carbamazepine was similar to that observed in the single compound studies (i.e., no degradation). However, the degradation rate of naproxen in soils, biosolids, and soil-biosolid systems spiked with the mixture was significantly slower than in the single-compound studies. As degradation studies for risk assessment purposes are performed using single substances in soil-only studies, it is possible that current risk assessment procedures will underestimate environmental impacts. Further work is therefore warranted on a larger range of substances, soils, biosolid types, and chemical mixtures to better understand the fate of pharmaceuticals in terrestrial systems.

  2. The structure of salt marsh soil mesofauna food webs - The prevalence of disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynert, Kristin; Kiggen, Mirijam; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Mesofauna taxa fill key trophic positions in soil food webs, even in terrestrial-marine boundary habitats characterized by frequent natural disturbances. Salt marshes represent such boundary habitats, characterized by frequent inundations increasing from the terrestrial upper to the marine pioneer zone. Despite the high abundance of soil mesofauna in salt marshes and their important function by facilitating energy and carbon flows, the structure, trophic ecology and habitat-related diet shifts of mesofauna species in natural salt marsh habitats is virtually unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of natural disturbance (inundation frequency) on community structure, food web complexity and resource use of soil mesofauna using stable isotope analysis (15N, 13C) in three salt marsh zones. In this intertidal habitat, the pioneer zone is exposed to inundations twice a day, but lower and upper salt marshes are less frequently inundated based on shore height. The mesofauna comprised 86 species / taxa dominated by Collembola, Oribatida and Mesostigmata. Shifts in environmental disturbances influenced the structure of food webs, diversity and density declined strongly from the land to the sea pointing to the importance of increasing levels of inundation frequency. Accordingly, the reduced diversity and density was associated by a simplification of the food web in the pioneer zone as compared to the less inundated lower and upper salt marsh with a higher number of trophic levels. Strong variations in δ15N signatures demonstrated that mesofauna species are feeding at multiple trophic levels. Primary decomposers were low and most mesofauna species functioned as secondary decomposers or predators including second order predators or scavengers. The results document that major decomposer taxa, such as Collembola and Oribatida, are more diverse than previously assumed and predominantly dwell on autochthonous resources of the respective salt marsh zone. The results further

  3. The structure of salt marsh soil mesofauna food webs - The prevalence of disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Haynert

    Full Text Available Mesofauna taxa fill key trophic positions in soil food webs, even in terrestrial-marine boundary habitats characterized by frequent natural disturbances. Salt marshes represent such boundary habitats, characterized by frequent inundations increasing from the terrestrial upper to the marine pioneer zone. Despite the high abundance of soil mesofauna in salt marshes and their important function by facilitating energy and carbon flows, the structure, trophic ecology and habitat-related diet shifts of mesofauna species in natural salt marsh habitats is virtually unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of natural disturbance (inundation frequency on community structure, food web complexity and resource use of soil mesofauna using stable isotope analysis (15N, 13C in three salt marsh zones. In this intertidal habitat, the pioneer zone is exposed to inundations twice a day, but lower and upper salt marshes are less frequently inundated based on shore height. The mesofauna comprised 86 species / taxa dominated by Collembola, Oribatida and Mesostigmata. Shifts in environmental disturbances influenced the structure of food webs, diversity and density declined strongly from the land to the sea pointing to the importance of increasing levels of inundation frequency. Accordingly, the reduced diversity and density was associated by a simplification of the food web in the pioneer zone as compared to the less inundated lower and upper salt marsh with a higher number of trophic levels. Strong variations in δ15N signatures demonstrated that mesofauna species are feeding at multiple trophic levels. Primary decomposers were low and most mesofauna species functioned as secondary decomposers or predators including second order predators or scavengers. The results document that major decomposer taxa, such as Collembola and Oribatida, are more diverse than previously assumed and predominantly dwell on autochthonous resources of the respective salt marsh zone

  4. Insitu remediation of salt impacted fine-grained soil and groundwater at a former battery site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailuck, T.; Sallomy, J.; Swift, B. [Pioneer Professional Services Group, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-04-01

    This article described a project in which the performance of EK3 electrokinetics and Volker electrodialysis systems was assessed. Both systems were designed for the in situ remediation of salt-impacted soil and groundwater at a battery site in Alberta. The soils consisted of fine-grained clays with sand and gravel lenses. The assessment was part of a multi-stakeholder project to develop sustainable remediation processes for salt-impacted sites. The project assessed the impact of the electrokinetic process on microbial activity and metals and pH in the soils and groundwaters as well as its ability to eliminate target salt ions. Results of the study, which was conducted over a 2-month period, showed that the positive salinity ions moved towards the negative electrodes emitted by the system, while negatively charged salinity ions moved towards the positively charged electrodes. Concentrations of barium, manganese, and sulphur decreased. A set of electromagnetic (EM) surveys demonstrated that the conductivity of the soil had decreased beyond the location of the electrodes. It was concluded that the electrokinetics system will be used as part of a full-scale remediation project. 4 figs.

  5. Key soil functional properties affected by soil organic matter - evidence from published literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian

    2015-07-01

    The effect of varying the amount of soil organic matter on a range of individual soil properties was investigated using a literature search of published information largely from Australia, but also included relevant information from overseas. Based on published pedotransfer functions, soil organic matter was shown to increase plant available water by 2 to 3 mm per 10 cm for each 1% increase in soil organic carbon, with the largest increases being associated with sandy soils. Aggregate stability increased with increasing soil organic carbon, with aggregate stability decreasing rapidly when soil organic carbon fell below 1.2 to 1.5 5%. Soil compactibility, friability and soil erodibility were favourably improved by increasing the levels of soil organic carbon. Nutrient cycling was a major function of soil organic matter. Substantial amounts of N, P and S become available to plants when the soil organic matter is mineralised. Soil organic matter also provides a food source for the microorganisms involved in the nutrient cycling of N, P, S and K. In soils with lower clay contents, and less active clays such as kaolinites, soil organic matter can supply a significant amount of the cation exchange capacity and buffering capacity against acidification. Soil organic matter can have a cation exchange capacity of 172 to 297 cmol(+)/kg. As the cation exchange capacity of soil organic matter varies with pH, the effectiveness of soil organic matter to contribute to cation exchange capacity below pH 5.5 is often minimal. Overall soil organic matter has the potential to affect a range of functional soil properties.

  6. Salt tolerant plants increase nitrogen removal from biofiltration systems affected by saline stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szota, Christopher; Farrell, Claire; Livesley, Stephen J; Fletcher, Tim D

    2015-10-15

    Biofiltration systems are used in urban areas to reduce the concentration and load of nutrient pollutants and heavy metals entering waterways through stormwater runoff. Biofilters can, however be exposed to salt water, through intrusion of seawater in coastal areas which could decrease their ability to intercept and retain pollutants. We measured the effect of adding saline stormwater on pollutant removal by six monocotyledonous species with different levels of salt-tolerance. Carex appressa, Carex bichenoviana, Ficinia nodosa, Gahnia filum, Juncus kraussii and Juncus usitatus were exposed to six concentrations of saline stormwater, equivalent to electrical conductivity readings of: 0.09, 2.3, 5.5, 10.4, 20.0 and 37.6 mS cm(-1). Salt-sensitive species: C. appressa, C. bichenoviana and J. usitatus did not survive ≥10.4 mS cm(-1), removing their ability to take up nitrogen (N). Salt-tolerant species, such as F. nodosa and J. kraussii, maintained N-removal even at the highest salt concentration. However, their levels of water stress and stomatal conductance suggest that N-removal would not be sustained at concentrations ≥10.4 mS cm(-1). Increasing salt concentration indirectly increased phosphorus (P) removal, by converting dissolved forms of P to particulate forms which were retained by filter media. Salt concentrations ≥10 mS cm(-1) also reduced removal efficiency of zinc, manganese and cadmium, but increased removal of iron and lead, regardless of plant species. Our results suggest that biofiltration systems exposed to saline stormwater ≤10 mS cm(-1) can only maintain N-removal when planted with salt-tolerant species, while P removal and immobilisation of heavy metals is less affected by species selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxicity in lead salt spiked soils to plants, invertebrates and microbial processes: Unraveling effects of acidification, salt stress and ageing reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, Erik; Oorts, Koen; Peeters, Sofie; Lanno, Roman; Cheyns, Karlien

    2015-12-01

    The fate and effects of toxic trace metals in soil freshly spiked soluble metal salts do not mimic those of metals in the field. This study was set up to test the magnitude of effects of salinity, acidification, and ageing on toxicity of lead (Pb) to plants, invertebrates and soil microbial processes. Three soils were spiked with Pb2+ salts up to a concentration of 8000 mg Pb/kg and were tested either after spiking, after soil leaching followed by pH correction, or after a 5-year outdoor ageing period with free drainage followed by pH correction. Soil solution ionic strength exceeded 150 mmol/L in soils tested directly after spiking and this decreased partially after leaching and returned back to background values after 5-year outdoor equilibration. Chronic toxicity to two plants, two invertebrates, and three microbial endpoints was consistently found in all spiked soils that were not leached. This toxicity significantly decreased or became absent after 5 years of ageing in 19 of the 20 toxicity tests by a factor 8 (median factor; range: 1.4->50), measured by the factor increase of total soil Pb dose required to induce 10% inhibition. The toxicity of Pb in leached soils was intermediate between the other two treatments. The lowest detectable chronic thresholds (EC10) in aged soils ranged 350-5300 mg Pb/kg. Correlation analysis, including data of Pb2+ speciation in soil solution, suggests that reduced ionic strength rather than acidification or true ageing is the main factor explaining the soil treatment effects after spiking. It is suggested that future toxicity studies should test fine PbO powder as a relevant source for Pb in soils to exclude the confounding salt effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Microarray analysis of genes affected by salt stress in tomato | Zhou ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, different isoforms of cytochrome P450, genes for polyamine biosynthesis (putrescine and proline) and detoxification compounds (glutathione and thioredoxin), several key enzyme genes in the metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, amino acids, and fatty acids, were also affected by salt treatment. This study has ...

  9. The nature and classification of Australian soils affected by sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian; Greene, Richard; Harms, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Large areas of Australia are affected by the processes of salinity and sodicity and they are important processes to understand as they can result in the degradation of agricultural lands used for both intensive cropping and extensive grazing practices. Sodic soils are defined as those having ESP of at least 6% in Australia. Northcote and Skene (1972) estimated that of Australia's total area of 770 M ha, 39 M ha was affected by salinity and 193-257 M ha by sodicity. However, in a more recent publication, Rengasamy (2006), quoted the areas of saline and sodic soils as 66 M ha and 340 M ha respectively. The soils affected by sodium in Australia include a large group of contrasting soils (Northcote and Skene 1972). Based on the Australian soil classification, included are: • Alkaline strongly sodic to sodic clay soils with uniform texture profiles - largely Vertosols 666 400 km2 • Alkaline strongly sodic to sodic coarse and medium textured soils with uniform and gradational texture profiles - largely Calcarosols 600 700 km2 • Alkaline strongly sodic to sodic texture contrast soils - largely Sodosols 454 400 km2 • Non-alkaline sodic and strongly sodic neutral texture contrast soils - largely Sodosols 134 700 km2 • Non-alkaline sodic acid texture contrast soils - Sodosols and Kurosols 140 700 km2 Many Australian sodic soils have not developed by the traditional solonetz process of leaching of a solonchak, but rather have developed by the accumulation of sodium on the cation exchange complex in preference to the other exchangeable cations without any recognisable intermediate saline phase occurring. This is especially the case for the sodic, non-alkaline texture contrast soils or Sodosols. The major sodic soil group in WRB is the Solonetz soils. These require the presence of a Natric horizon which has to contain illuviated clay and at least 15% ESP. However, there is provision for Sodic qualifiers with at least 6% ESP for many other reference Soil Groups

  10. Short-Term Exposure of Paddy Soil Microbial Communities to Salt Stress Triggers Different Transcriptional Responses of Key Taxonomic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jingjing; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Liesack, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Soil salinization due to seawater intrusion along coastal areas is an increasing threat to rice cultivation worldwide. While the detrimental impact on rice growth and yield has been thoroughly studied, little is known about how severe salinity affects structure and function of paddy soil microbial communities. Here, we examined their short-term responses to half- and full-strength seawater salinity in controlled laboratory experiments. Slurry microcosms were incubated under anoxic conditions, with rice straw added as carbon source. Stress exposure time was for 2 days after a pre-incubation period of 7 days. Relative to the control, moderate (300 mM NaCl) and high (600 mM NaCl) salt stress suppressed both net consumption of acetate and methane production by 50% and 70%, respectively. Correspondingly, community-wide mRNA expression decreased by 50-65%, with significant changes in relative transcript abundance of family-level groups. mRNA turnover was clearly more responsive to salt stress than rRNA dynamics. Among bacteria, Clostridiaceae were most abundant and the only group whose transcriptional activity was strongly stimulated at 600 mM NaCl. In particular, clostridial mRNA involved in transcription/translation, fermentation, uptake and biosynthesis of compatible solutes, and flagellar motility was significantly enriched in response salt stress. None of the other bacterial groups were able to compete at 600 mM NaCl. Their responses to 300 mM NaCl were more diverse. Lachnospiraceae increased, Ruminococcaceae maintained, and Peptococcaceae, Veillonellaceae, and Syntrophomonadaceae decreased in relative mRNA abundance. Among methanogens, Methanosarcinaceae were most dominant. Relative to other family-level groups, salt stress induced a significant enrichment of transcripts related to the CO dehydrogenase/acetyl-coenzyme A synthase complex, methanogenesis, heat shock, ammonium uptake, and thermosomes, but the absolute abundance of methanosarcinal mRNA decreased. Most

  11. [Simulation of effects of soil properties and plants on soil water-salt movement with reclaimed water irrigation by ENVIRO-GRO model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Si-Dan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    In order to promote safe irrigation with reclaimed water and prevent soil salinisation, the dynamic transport of salts in urban soils of Beijing under irrigation of reclaimed water was simulated by ENVIRO-GRO model in this study. The accumulation trends and profile distribution of soil salinity were predicted. Simultaneously, the effects of different soil properties and plants on soil water-salt movement and salt accumulation were investigated. Results indicated that soil salinity in the profiles reached uniform equilibrium conditions by repeated simulation, with different initial soil salinity. Under the conditions of loam and clay loam soil, salinity in the profiles increased over time until reaching equilibrium conditions, while under the condition of sandy loam soil, salinity in the profiles decreased over time until reaching equilibrium conditions. The saturated soil salinity (EC(e)) under equilibrium conditions followed an order of sandy loam soil salinity were also different in these three types of plants. In addition, the growth of the plants was not influenced by soil salinity (except clay loam), but mild soil salinization occurred under all conditions (except sandy loam).

  12. Metals affect soil bacterial and fungal functional diversity differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanowicz, Anna M; Niklińska, Maria; Laskowski, Ryszard

    2008-03-01

    Heavy metals can cause a decrease in the taxonomic diversity of soil communities. Because of functional redundancy, it remains unclear to what extent different functions performed by the soil microbial communities may be affected by pollution. We studied the impact of metal contamination on soil bacterial and fungal functional diversity, active microbial biomass, and soil respiration rate. Soil samples were collected from 39 sites along three forest and five meadow pollution transects near an abandoned Pb/Zn smelter in Avonmouth (UK) and Ni smelter in Clydach (UK), in a Cu mining and smelting region near Glogów (Poland), and in a Zn/Pb mining and smelting region near Olkusz (Poland). Biolog GN2 and SFN2 plates were used to study the bacterial and fungal functional diversity, which subsequently was expressed as Shannon's diversity index (H'). The active microbial biomass was measured as substrate-induced respiration. We found that the bacterial functional diversity significantly decreased, whereas the fungal functional diversity slightly increased, with increasing metal concentration. We also observed a slight negative effect of metal pollution on the active microbial biomass. No relationship was found between metal contamination and total soil respiration rate. This suggests a higher sensitivity of bacterial functional diversity as an indicator for the effects of metal pollution compared with overall soil respiration. All microbial parameters were affected by nutrient concentrations and/or soil pH.

  13. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?: e0144111

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James S White; Sarah E Null; David G Tarboton

    2015-01-01

      Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake...

  14. Alteration of soil carbon and nitrogen pools and enzyme activities as affected by increased soil coarseness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhen; Lü, Linyou; Creamer, Courtney A.; Dijkstra, Feike A.; Liu, Heyong; Feng, Xue; Yu, Guoqing; Han, Xingguo; Jiang, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Soil coarseness decreases ecosystem productivity, ecosystem carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks, and soil nutrient contents in sandy grasslands subjected to desertification. To gain insight into changes in soil C and N pools, microbial biomass, and enzyme activities in response to soil coarseness, a field experiment was conducted by mixing native soil with river sand in different mass proportions: 0, 10, 30, 50, and 70 % sand addition. Four years after establishing plots and 2 years after transplanting, soil organic C and total N concentrations decreased with increased soil coarseness down to 32.2 and 53.7 % of concentrations in control plots, respectively. Soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN) declined with soil coarseness down to 44.1 and 51.9 %, respectively, while microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP) increased by as much as 73.9 %. Soil coarseness significantly decreased the enzyme activities of β-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, and acid phosphomonoesterase by 20.2-57.5 %, 24.5-53.0 %, and 22.2-88.7 %, used for C, N and P cycling, respectively. However, observed values of soil organic C, dissolved organic C, total dissolved N, available P, MBC, MBN, and MBP were often significantly higher than would be predicted from dilution effects caused by the sand addition. Soil coarseness enhanced microbial C and N limitation relative to P, as indicated by the ratios of β-glucosidase and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase to acid phosphomonoesterase (and MBC : MBP and MBN : MBP ratios). Enhanced microbial recycling of P might alleviate plant P limitation in nutrient-poor grassland ecosystems that are affected by soil coarseness. Soil coarseness is a critical parameter affecting soil C and N storage and increases in soil coarseness can enhance microbial C and N limitation relative to P, potentially posing a threat to plant productivity in sandy grasslands suffering from desertification.

  15. Sodic soil properties and sunflower growth as affected by byproducts of flue gas desulfurization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinman Wang

    Full Text Available The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD is CaSO(4, which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha(-1 and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m(3 ha(-1. The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP, pH and total dissolved salts (TDS in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha(-1 and water was supplied at 1200 m(3·ha(-1. Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage.

  16. Sodic Soil Properties and Sunflower Growth as Affected by Byproducts of Flue Gas Desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2012-01-01

    The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) is CaSO4, which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha−1) and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m3 ha−1). The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), pH and total dissolved salts (TDS) in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha−1 and water was supplied at 1200 m3·ha−1. Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage. PMID:23285042

  17. Sodic soil properties and sunflower growth as affected by byproducts of flue gas desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2012-01-01

    The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) is CaSO(4), which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha(-1)) and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m(3) ha(-1)). The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), pH and total dissolved salts (TDS) in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha(-1) and water was supplied at 1200 m(3)·ha(-1). Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage.

  18. Assimilation and Translocation of Dry Matter and Phosphorus in Rice Genotypes Affected by Salt-Alkaline Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Salt-alkaline stress generally leads to soil compaction and fertility decline. It also restricts rice growth and phosphorus acquisition. In this pot experiment, two relatively salt-alkaline tolerant (Dongdao-4 and Changbai-9 and sensitive (Changbai-25 and Tongyu-315 rice genotypes were planted in sandy (control and salt-alkaline soil to evaluate the characteristics of dry matter and phosphorus assimilation and translocation in rice. The results showed that dry matter and phosphorus assimilation in rice greatly decreased under salt-alkaline stress as the plants grew. The translocation and contribution of dry matter and phosphorus to the grains also increased markedly; different performances were observed between genotypes under salt-alkaline stress. D4 and C9 showed higher dry matter translocation, translocation efficiency and contribution of dry matter assimilation to panicles than those of C25 and T315. These changes in D4 and C9 indexes occurred at low levels of salt-alkaline treatment. Higher phosphorus acquisition efficiency of D4 and C9 were also found under salt-alkaline conditions. Additionally, the phosphorus translocation significantly decreased in C25 and T315 in the stress treatment. In conclusion, the results indicated that salt-alkaline-tolerant rice genotypes may have stronger abilities to assimilate and transfer biomass and phosphorus than sensitive genotypes, especially in salt-alkaline conditions.

  19. Effect of Byproducts of Flue Gas Desulfurization on the Soluble Salts Composition and Chemical Properties of Sodic Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Jinman Wang; Zhongke Bai; Peiling Yang

    2013-01-01

    The byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) are a useful external source of Ca(2+) for the reclamation of sodic soils because they are comparatively cheap, generally available and have high gypsum content. The ion solution composition of sodic soils also plays an important role in the reclamation process. The effect of BFGD on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils were studied in a soil column experiment. The experiment consisted of four treatments using t...

  20. Detection of fallout 241Am in U.S. Atlantic salt marsh soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, B. M.; Sommerfield, C. K.

    2017-09-01

    We report the presence of the fallout radionuclide 241Am (t1/2 = 433 years) in salt marsh soils from two U.S. Atlantic estuaries and discuss its utility as a particle tracer and geochronometer. This work is motivated by the knowledge that 137Cs, the most widely used geochronometer in environmental studies, will decay to extinction during the next century. At the same time, levels of 241Am, produced by radioactive decay of fallout 241Pu, will continue to increase on Earth's surface as they have since the height of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the 1960s. Measurements of 241Am in soils at eighteen salt marsh locations were made by non-destructive gamma spectrometry and compared to activities of 137Cs in the same samples. Results indicate that decay of fallout 241Pu can explain the presence of 241Am in the soils, and that the activities are sufficiently high to provide meaningful chronological information with acceptable confidence limits. We achieved a detection limit of 0.28-1.47 Bq kg-1 using low-energy, planar germanium detectors and 11-55 g powderized samples. Activities of 241Am (0.08-6.44 Bq kg-1) were similar in mineral- and organic-rich marsh soils indicating that soil composition does not appear to influence the initial capture of 241Pu and retention of its 241Am progeny. Given its high affinity for fine particles, long half-life, and ease of measurement by non-destructive gamma spectrometry, 241Am has potential to serve as an alternative to 137Cs geochronometry in salt marshes and perhaps other estuarine and coastal environments.

  1. Effects of lead mineralogy on soil washing enhanced by ferric salts as extracting and oxidizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jong-Chan; Park, Sang-Min; Yoon, Geun-Seok; Tsang, Daniel C W; Baek, Kitae

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using ferric salts including FeCl3 and Fe(NO3)3 as extracting and oxidizing agents for a soil washing process to remediate Pb-contaminated soils. We treated various Pb minerals including PbO, PbCO3, Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2, PbSO4, PbS, and Pb5(PO4)3(OH) using ferric salts, and compared our results with those obtained using common washing agents of HCl, HNO3, disodium-ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (Na2-EDTA), and citric acid. The use of 50 mM Fe(NO3)3 extracted significantly more Pb (above 96% extraction) from Pb minerals except PbSO4 (below 55% extraction) compared to the other washing agents. In contrast, washing processes using FeCl3 and HCl were not effective for extraction from Pb minerals because of PbCl2 precipitation. Yet, the newly formed PbCl2 could be dissolved by subsequent wash with distilled water under acidic conditions. When applying our washing method to remediate field-contaminated soil from a shooting range that had high concentrations of Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2 and PbCO3, we extracted more Pb (approximately 99% extraction) from the soil using 100 mM Fe(NO3)3 than other washing agents at the same process conditions. Our results show that ferric salts can be alternative washing agents for Pb-contaminated soils in view of their extracting and oxidizing abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of soil-hydraulic properties and infiltration timescales in wildfire-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Brian A.; Moody, John A.

    2017-01-01

    We collected soil-hydraulic property data from the literature for wildfire-affected soils, ash, and unburned soils. These data were used to calculate metrics and timescales of hydrologic response related to infiltration and surface runoff generation. Sorptivity (S) and wetting front potential (Ψf) were significantly different (lower) in burned soils compared with unburned soils, whereas field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) was not significantly different. The magnitude and duration of the influence of capillarity during infiltration was greatly reduced in burned soils, causing faster ponding times in response to rainfall. Ash had large values of S and Kfs but moderate values of Ψf, compared with unburned and burned soils, indicating ash has long ponding times in response to rainfall. The ratio of S2/Kfs was nearly constant (~100 mm) for unburned soils but more variable in burned soils, suggesting that unburned soils have a balance between gravity and capillarity contributions to infiltration that may depend on soil organic matter, whereas in burned soils the gravity contribution to infiltration is greater. Changes in S and Kfs in burned soils act synergistically to reduce infiltration and accelerate and amplify surface runoff generation. Synthesis of these findings identifies three key areas for future research. First, short timescales of capillary influences on infiltration indicate the need for better measurements of infiltration at times less than 1 min to accurately characterize S in burned soils. Second, using parameter values, such as Ψf, from unburned areas could produce substantial errors in hydrologic modeling when used without adjustment for wildfire effects, causing parameter compensation and resulting underestimation of Kfs. Third, more thorough measurement campaigns that capture soil-structural changes, organic matter impacts, quantitative water repellency trends, and soil-water content along with soil-hydraulic properties could drive the

  3. Diachronic analysis of salt-affected areas using remote sensing techniques: the case study of Biskra area, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrasinei, Gabriela M.; Melis, Maria T.; Buttau, Cristina; Bradd, John M.; Arras, Claudio; Ghiglieri, Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    In the Wadi Biskra arid and semi-arid area, sustainable development is limited by land degradation, such as secondary salinization of soils. As an important high quality date production region of Algeria, it needs continuous monitoring of desertification indicators, since the bio-physical setting defines it as highly exposed to climate-related risks. For this particular study, for which little ground truth data was possible to acquire, we set up an assessment of appropriate methods for the identification and change detection of salt-affected areas, involving image interpretation and processing techniques employing Landsat imagery. After a first phase consisting of a visual interpretation study of the land cover types, two automated classification approaches were proposed and applied for this specific study: decision tree classification and principal components analysis (PCA) of Knepper ratios. Five of the indices employed in the Decision Tree construction were set up within the current study, among which we propose a salinity index (SMI) for the extraction of highly saline areas. The results of the 1984 to 2014 diachronic analysis of salt - affected areas variation were supported by the interpreted land cover map for accuracy estimation. Connecting the outputs with auxiliary bio-physical and socio-economic data, comprehensive results are discussed, which were indispensable for the understanding of land degradation dynamics and vulnerability to desertification. One aspect that emerged was the fact that the expansion of agricultural land in the last three decades may have led and continue to contribute to a secondary salinization of soils. This study is part of the WADIS-MAR Demonstration Project, funded by the European Commission through the Sustainable Water Integrated Management (SWIM) Program (www.wadismar.eu).

  4. The toxicity of different lead salts to Enchytraeus crypticus in relation to bioavailability in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lulu; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to assess the bioavailability and toxicity of lead nitrate and lead chloride to Enchytraeus crypticus in a natural standard soil. Worms were exposed to Pb-spiked soil for 21 d, and survival and reproduction were related to total, 0.01 M CaCl 2 -extractable, and porewater Pb concentrations in the soil and internal concentrations in the surviving animals. The Pb availability for Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and PbCl 2 was similar, as confirmed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The Pb concentrations in surviving worms increased with increasing Pb concentrations in the soil and did not differ for the 2 Pb salts. Lead was toxic to E. crypticus at median lethal concentrations (LC50s) of 543 and 779 mg Pb/kg dry soil and median effect concentrations (EC50s) of 189 and 134 mg Pb/kg dry soil, for Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and PbCl 2 , respectively. Mortality of E. crypticus was related to internal Pb concentrations in the worms rather than to total or available Pb concentrations in the soil, whereas reproduction toxicity was better explained from Pb concentrations in 0.01 M CaCl 2 extracts or porewater of the test soil than from total Pb concentrations in the soil or Pb concentrations in the worms. Overall, the bioavailability and toxicity of Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and PbCl 2 to E. crypticus in LUFA 2.2 soil did not differ. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2083-2091. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  5. Atrazine and its metabolites degradation in mineral salts medium and soil using an enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anup; Singh, Neera

    2016-03-01

    An atrazine-degrading enrichment culture was used to study degradation of atrazine metabolites viz. hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine in mineral salts medium. Results suggested that the enrichment culture was able to degrade only hydroxyatrazine, and it was used as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Hydroxyatrazine degradation slowed down when sucrose and/or ammonium hydrogen phosphate were supplemented as the additional sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The enrichment culture could degrade high concentrations of atrazine (up to 110 μg/mL) in mineral salts medium, and neutral pH was optimum for atrazine degradation. Further, except in an acidic soil, enrichment culture was able to degrade atrazine in three soil types having different physico-chemical properties. Raising the pH of acidic soil to neutral or alkaline enabled the enrichment culture to degrade atrazine suggesting that acidic pH inhibited atrazine-degrading ability. The study suggested that the enrichment culture can be successfully utilized to achieve complete degradation of atrazine and its persistent metabolite hydroxyatrazine in the contaminated soil and water.

  6. Microbial biodiversity in arable soils is affected by agricultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolińska, Agnieszka; Górniak, Dorota; Zielenkiewicz, Urszula; Goryluk-Salmonowicz, Agata; Kuźniar, Agnieszka; Stępniewska, Zofia; Błaszczyk, Mieczysław

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the differences in microbial community structure as a result of agricultural practices. Sixteen samples of cultivated and the same number of non-cultivated soils were selected. Gel bands were identified using the GelCompar software to create the presence-absence matrix, where each band represented a bacterial operational taxonomic unit. The data were used for principal-component analysis and additionally, the Shannon- Weaver index of general diversity, Simpson index of dominance and Simpson index of diversity were calculated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles clearly indicated differentiation of tested samples into two clusters: cultivated and non-cultivated soils. Greater numbers of dominant operational taxonomic units (65) in non-cultivated soils were noted compared to cultivated soils (47 operational taxonomic units). This implies that there was a reduction of dominant bacterial operational taxonomic units by nearly 30% in cultivated soils. Simpson dominance index expressing the number of species weighted by their abundance amounted to 1.22 in cultivated soils, whereas a 3-fold higher value (3.38) was observed in non-cultivated soils. Land-use practices seemed to be a important factors affected on biodiversity, because more than soil type determined the clustering into groups.

  7. Fluensulfone sorption and mobility as affected by soil type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kelly A; Li, Xiao; Langston, David B; Davis, Richard F; Timper, Patricia; Grey, Timothy L

    2017-09-04

    Fluensulfone is a fluoroalkenyl chemical with activity against multiple genera of plant-parasitic nematodes. The adsorption, desorption, and mobility of fluensulfone were evaluated on multiple soils from the USA in laboratory and column experiments. Adsorption data regressed to the logarithmic Freundlich equation resulted in isotherm values of 1.24 to 3.28. Soil adsorption of fluensulfone correlated positively with organic matter (0.67) and clay (0.34), but negatively with sand (-0.54). Fluensulfone soil desorption correlated to pH (0.38) and cation exchange capacity (0.44). Fluensulfone desorption from Arredondo sand soil was 26%, and from other soils ranged from 43 to 70%. In mobility experiments, fluensulfone in the leachate peaked at 3 h, gradually declining and becoming undetectable after 9 h. Recovery from leachate was 45% of the initial fluensulfone applied to the soil surface. In separate experiments, 30-cm-long soil columns were saturated with 1 L of water, and then segregated into three 10-cm sections. Fluensulfone recovery was 41, 34, 29, and 13% in Chualar sandy loam, Arredondo sand, Greenville sandy clay loam, and Tifton loamy sand, respectively, in the top 10-cm section. Data indicated that soil organic matter and clay contents will affect sorption, mobility, and dissipation of fluensulfone. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Plant species diversity affects infiltration capacity in an experimental grassland through changes in soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C.; Tischer, J.; Roscher, C.; Eisenhauer, N.; Ravenek, J.; Gleixner, G.; Attinger, S.; Jensen, B.; Kroon, de H.; Mommer, L.; Scheu, S.; Hildebrandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Soil hydraulic properties drive water distribution and availability in soil. There exists limited knowledge of how plant species diversity might influence soil hydraulic properties. Methods We quantified the change in infiltration capacity affected by soil structural variables

  9. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist. PMID:26503629

  10. Effect of long-term changes in soil chemistry induced by road salt applications on N-transformations in roadside soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sophie M; Machin, Robert; Cresser, Malcolm S

    2008-03-01

    Of several impacts of road salting on roadside soils, the potential disruption of the nitrogen cycle has been largely ignored. Therefore the fates of low-level ammonium-N and nitrate-N inputs to roadside soils impacted by salting over an extended period (decades) in the field have been studied. The use of road salts disrupts the proportional contributions of nitrate-N and ammonium-N to the mineral inorganic fraction of roadside soils. It is highly probable that the degree of salt exposure of the soil, in the longer term, controls the rates of key microbial N transformation processes, primarily by increasing soil pH. Additional influxes of ammonium-N to salt-impacted soils are rapidly nitrified therefore and, thereafter, increased leaching of nitrate-N to the local waterways occurs, which has particular relevance to the Water Framework Directive. The results reported are important when assessing the fate of inputs of ammonia to soils from atmospheric pollution.

  11. Pore size distribution of soil near saturation as affected by soil type, land use, and soil amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, A. I.; Wagner, L. E.; Levy, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    Storage and flow of water in soil voids, which are related to the size and geometry of the voids and flow rate are usually controlled by the void of the smallest size. Another reason for the complexity of water flow in soils is the intricate nature and change of the soil pores due to the modification of soil structure under different agricultural management and climatic conditions. Shrinking and swelling stresses enhance breakdown of aggregates and to subsequent collapse of pores, thus adversely affecting the movement of water and solutes in the soil. Our objective was to study the role of soil type, nature of cultivation, waste and soil stabilizers application, and soil condition on disturbed soil pore-size distribution, drainable porosity and water holding capacity at near saturation (infiltration porosity) using the high energy moisture characteristic method. In this method, the wetting process of the aggregates is accurately controlled, and the energy of hydration and entrapped air are the main forces responsible for aggregate breakdown. We studied a large number (> 300) of soil samples from different climatic regions varying (i) in their inherent properties (clay mineralogy, dispersion potential, texture, organic matter, Fe and Al oxides content), and; (ii) the conditions prevailing in the soil (water quality, salinity, sodicity, redox potential, type of tillage); and finally that were subjected to the addition of different soil amendments (polymers, gypsum, manure, sludge). The results showed that structural stability and pore size distribution strongly depended on soil type, conditions prevailing in the soil and the type of amendment used. Detailed analyses of the results provided valuable information on inter- and intra- aggregate porosities that may have vital bearing on the understanding of (i) solution transport processes in different soil types under different treatments or with different solute concentration, and (ii) down-profile transport of soil

  12. Climate change affects carbon allocation to the soil in shrublands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorissen, A.; Tietema, A.; Joosten, N.N.

    2004-01-01

    , resulting from imposed manipulations, on carbon dynamics in shrubland ecosystems was examined. We performed a C-14-labeling experiment to probe changes in net carbon uptake and allocation to the roots and soil compartments as affected by a higher temperature during, the year and a drought period...... of drought- or temperature-initiated changes in these shrubland ecosystems. The reduced supply of substrate to the soil and the response of the soil microbial biomass may help to explain the observed acclimation of CO2 exchange in other ecosystems.......Climate change may affect ecosystem functioning through increased temperatures or changes in precipitation patterns. Temperature and water availability are important drivers for ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis, carbon translocation, and organic matter decomposition. These climate changes...

  13. Estimativa da composição iônica da solução do solo a partir da lâmina de água em solo afetado por sais sob cultivo de arroz irrigado Estimating the ionic composition of soil solution from water table in salt-affected soils growing irrigated rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Campos Carmona

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivos avaliar a relação entre a condutividade elétrica e os teores de Na+ na lâmina de água e na solução de solos com diferentes níveis de sais, sob o cultivo de arroz irrigado. Foram selecionados solos para o cultivo de arroz com percentagens de sódio trocável de 5,6%; 9,0%; 21,2% e 32,7%. Previamente à entrada de água nas parcelas, foram instalados coletores de solução do solo nas profundidades de 5, 10, 20 e 40cm. Após o alagamento, foram realizadas coletas semanais, até 91 dias após o início da irrigação, da solução do solo e da lâmina de água, para a análise da condutividade elétrica e dos teores de Na+ e K+. Os valores dos atributos da lâmina de água correlacionaram-se positiva e significativamente aos valores da solução do solo, em cada profundidade. A melhor correlação média foi obtida para a condutividade elétrica, portanto, sua estimação na solução do solo pode ser obtida a partir da análise da lâmina de água, com o uso de condutivímetros portáteis.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between electrical conductivity and Na+, and K+ in the water table and in the solution of soils with different levels of salinity under flooded rice. For rice cultivation, soils with exchangeable sodium percentages of 5.6% 9.0% 21.2% and 32.7% were selected. Prior to flooding, soil solution collectors were installed at depths of 5, 10, 20 and 40cm. After flooding, soil solution and water layer samples were collected weekly until 91 days after onset of irrigation, for the analysis of electrical conductivity and Na+. The content of these attributes in the water table were related to the values at each depth, and there was a significant positive association for all attributes at all depths. The highest average correlation was obtained for the electrical conductivity, so its estimation in the soil solution can be obtained easily through the water table, using a portable

  14. Rheological Parameters as Affected by Water Tension in Subtropical Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pértile

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Rheological parameters have been used to study the interaction between particles and the structural strength of soils subjected to mechanical stresses, in which soil composition and water content most strongly affect soil resistance to deformation. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of water tension on rheological parameters of soils with different mineralogical, physical, and chemical composition. Surface and subsurface horizons of four Oxisols, two Ultisols, one Alfisol, and one Vertisol were physically and chemically characterized; their rheological parameters were obtained from amplitude sweep tests under oscillatory shear on disturbed soil samples that were saturated and subjected to water tension of 1, 3, 6, and 10 kPa. In these samples, the rheological parameters linear viscoelastic deformation limit (γL, maximum shear stress (τmax, and integral z were determined. By simple regression analysis of the rheological parameters as a function of soil water tension, we observed increased mechanical strength with increasing water tension up to at least 6 kPa, primarily due to increased capillary forces in the soil. However, increased elasticity assessed by γL was not as expressive as the increase in structural rigidity assessed by τmax and integral z. Elastic deformation of the soil (γL increases with the increase in the number of bonds among particles, which depend on the clay, total carbon, expansive clay mineral, and cation contents; however, maximum shear resistance (τmax and structural stiffness (integral z mainly increase with clay, kaolinite, and oxide content by increasing the strength of interparticle bonds. A decrease in mechanical strength occurs for water tension of 10 kPa (the lowest water content evaluated in sandy horizons or in horizons with a high proportion of resistant microaggregates (pseudosand, when associated with low bulk density, due to fewer points of contact between soil particles and therefore

  15. Renal sodium handling and haemodynamics are equally affected by hyperinsulinaemia in salt-sensitive and salt-resistant hypertensives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; Bakker, SJL; Serne, EH; Donker, AJM; Gans, ROB

    Objective It is well-known that insulin induces renal sodium retention. It is not yet known whether insulin's renal effects are involved in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. We assessed the effects of insulin on renal sodium handling and haemodynamics in 10 salt-sensitive (SS) and 10

  16. Water and salt dynamics and the hydraulic conductivity feedback: irreversible soil degradation and reclamation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Yair; Porporato, Amilcare

    2017-04-01

    We present a model for the dynamics of soil water, salt concentration and exchangeable sodium fraction in the root zone, driven by irrigation water of various qualities and stochastic rainfall. The main nonlinear feedback is the decrease in hydraulic conductivity for low salinity and/or high sodicity levels. The three variables have quite disparate characteristic time scales: soil water can vary two or three orders of magnitude faster than the exchangeable sodium fraction. In certain limiting cases in which the input of water is constant, the system can be simplified by eliminating the equation for soil water, allowing a full description of the dynamics in the two-dimensional salinity-sodicity phase space. We estimate soil structure degradation time scales for high sodium-adsorption-ratio irrigation water, and delineate the regions in the salinity-sodicity phase space where sodium-induced degradation is effectively irreversible. This apparent irreversibility is the result of relatively long evolution time scales with respect to human activity. When we take into account stochastic rainfall—and the accompanying wetting and drying cycles—the system produces a myriad of statistical steady states. This means that equal environmental conditions can produce different outcomes, accessible to each other only by large interventions, such as temporary changes in the quality of irrigation water or one-time amendment use. Our characterization of the dynamics of water and salt in the root zone, and how it depends on environmental parameters, offers us opportunities to control and reclaim degraded states making optimal resource use. We show an example of sodic soil reclamation through calcium-based fertigation, with minimal time (and applied water) expenditure.

  17. Effects of Amendment of Biochar and Pyroligneous Solution from wheat straw pyrolysis on Yield and soil and crop salinity in a Salt stressed cropland from Central China Great Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y.; Pan, W.; Pan, G.; Zheng, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, X.

    2012-04-01

    Crop production has been subject to salt stress in large areas of world croplands. Organic and/or bio-fertilizers have been applied as soil amendments for alleviating salt stress and enhancing crop productivity in these salt-stressed croplands. While biochar production systems using pyrolysis of crop straw materials have been well developed in the world, there would be a potential measure to use materials from crop straw pyrolysis as organic amendments in depressing salt stress in agriculture. In this paper, a field experiment was conducted on the effect of biochar and pyroligneous solution from cropstraw pyrolysis on soil and crop salinity, and wheat yield in a moderately salt stressed Entisol from the Central Great Plain of North China. Results indicated that: biochar and pyroligneous solution increased soil SOC, total nitrogen, available potassium and phosphorous by 43.77%, 6.50%, 45.54% and 108.01%, respectively. While Soil bulk density was decreased from 1.30 to 1.21g cm-3; soil pH (H2O) was decreased from 8.23 to 7.94 with a decrease in soluble salt content by 38.87%. Wheat yield was doubled over the control without amendment. In addition, sodium content was sharply declined by 78.80% in grains, and by 70.20% and 67.00% in shoot and root, respectively. Meanwhile, contents of potassium and phosphorus in plant tissue were seen also increased despite of no change in N content. Therefore, the combined amendment of biochar with pyroligneous solution would offer an effective measure to alleviate the salt stress and improving crop productivity in world croplands. Keywords: biochar, salt affected soils, wheat, crop productivity, salinity

  18. Effect of Fertilization on Yield and Quality of Oil Sunflower in Salted Soil of Ningxia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIAN Yin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining field trial with test analysis, a nitrogen(N, phosphorus(P2O5 and potassium(K2O fertilizer experiment of oil sunflowers was set to explore the influence of different ratio of N, P, K fertilizer on dry matter accumulation of oil sunflowers, nutrient absorption and accumulation, the yield and quality, etc in salted soil of the northern Ningxia, in order to provide scientific evidence for regulating and controlling of fertilization in the salted soil and enhancing the yields and quality of oil sunflowers. The results showed that: in the salted soil, the plant which had been disposed by N, P, K fertilizer had more advantages, the 1 000-grain weight, fruit quantity of each oil sunflower and yield per plant and hectare all increased significantly. Treatment of adding the organic fertilizer on the basis of N, P, K fertilizer could also increase the amount of N, P, K absorption significantly. At the same time, the application of N, P, K fertilizer would increase the fat content and reduce the protein, increase the oleic acid and stearic acid, reduce the content of linoleic acid and palmitic acid. The needs of nitrogen (N, phosphorus(P2O5 and potassium(K2O absorption of oil sunflower seeds were averagely 6.1~9.6, 3.2~3.8 kg and 12.3~13.7 kg, about 1:0.40~0.55:1.43~2.09 in ratio, 1:0.49:1.79 averagely in ratio.

  19. Assessment of remote sensing-based classification methods for change detection of salt-affected areas (Biskra area, Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrasinei, Gabriela M.; Melis, Maria T.; Buttau, Cristina; Bradd, John M.; Arras, Claudio; Ghiglieri, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    In the Wadi Biskra arid and semiarid areas, sustainable development is restricted by land degradation processes such as secondary salinization of soils. Being an important high-quality date production region of Algeria, this area needs continuous monitoring of desertification indicators, hence highly exposed to climate-related risks. Given the limited access to field data, appropriate methods were assessed for the identification and change detection of salt-affected areas, involving image interpretation and automated classifications employing Landsat imagery, ancillary and multisource ground truth data. First, a visual photointerpretation study of the land cover and land use classes was undergone according to acknowledged methodologies. Second, two automated classification approaches were developed: a customized decision tree classification (DTC) and an unsupervised one applied to the principal components of Knepper ratios composite. Five indices were employed in the DTC construction, among which also is a salinity index. The diachronic analysis was undergone for the 1984 to 2015 images (including seasonal approach), being supported by the interpreted land cover/land use map for error estimation. Considering also biophysical and socioeconomic data, comprehensive results are discussed. One of the most important aspects that emerged was that the accelerated expansion of agricultural land in the last three decades has led and continues to contribute to a secondary salinization of soils.

  20. Does overhead irrigation with salt affect growth, yield, and phenolic content of lentil plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakoula Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Overhead irrigation of lentil plants with salt (100 mM NaCl did not have any significant impact on plant growth, while chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm were affected. Under such poor irrigation water quality, the malondialdehyde content in leaves was increased due to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. In seeds, the total phenolic content (TPC was correlated to their total antioxidant capacity (TAC. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS detection showed that flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, rutin, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid and resveratrol appear to be the compounds with the greatest influence on the TAC values. Catechin is the most abundant phenolic compound in lentil seeds. Overhead irrigation with salt reduced the concentration of almost all phenolic compounds analyzed from lentil seed extracts.

  1. Response of salt marshes to oiling from the Deepwater Horizon spill: Implications for plant growth, soil surface-erosion, and shoreline stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qianxin; Mendelssohn, Irving A; Graham, Sean A; Hou, Aixin; Fleeger, John W; Deis, Donald R

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the initial impacts and post spill recovery of salt marshes over a 3.5-year period along northern Barataria Bay, LA, USA exposed to varying degrees of Deepwater Horizon oiling to determine the effects on shoreline-stabilizing vegetation and soil processes. In moderately oiled marshes, surface soil total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations were ~70mgg(-1) nine months after the spill. Though initial impacts of moderate oiling were evident, Spartina alterniflora and Juncus roemerianus aboveground biomass and total live belowground biomass were equivalent to reference marshes within 24-30months post spill. In contrast, heavily oiled marsh plants did not fully recover from oiling with surface soil total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations that exceeded 500mgg(-1) nine months after oiling. Initially, heavy oiling resulted in near complete plant mortality, and subsequent recovery of live aboveground biomass was only 50% of reference marshes 42months after the spill. Heavy oiling also changed the vegetation structure of shoreline marshes from a mixed Spartina-Juncus community to predominantly Spartina; live Spartina aboveground biomass recovered within 2-3years, however, Juncus showed no recovery. In addition, live belowground biomass (0-12cm) in heavily oiled marshes was reduced by 76% three and a half years after the spill. Detrimental effects of heavy oiling on marsh plants also corresponded with significantly lower soil shear strength, lower sedimentation rates, and higher vertical soil-surface erosion rates, thus potentially affecting shoreline salt marsh stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Georelational analysis of soil type, soil salt content, landform, and land use in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongliang; Liu, Gaohuan; Kearney, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Yellow River Delta, one of China's three major river deltas, is becoming a major region for the development of agriculture and fisheries. Protecting the delicate ecology of newly formed aquatic systems as well as the evolution of soils, natural vegetation, and fauna on older upland environments in the delta is a priority in planning for the wise use of the delta's resources for future agricultural development. In this article, we use a Geographic Information System (GIS) to analyze relationships between land-use/ land-cover characteristics in the Dongying municipality, one of the most intensely developed areas of the delta, and spatial variations in soil salinity and landforms. This analysis reveals that soil salt content decreases from regionally high values in isolated depressions to relatively moderate values in embanked former back swamps, with the lowest values occurring in abandoned river courses. Comparing the present land use on this soil salinity-landform pattern shows that it is basically at odds with general concepts of land suitability for agricultural utilization of saline soils. Crop-based agriculture in the region is probably overdeveloped, whereas more appropriate agricultural development, like cattle and forest production, is underrepresented. Future development should focus on converting farmland in embanked former back swamps and abandoned river courses into grasslands and forests. Crop-based agriculture (up to 151,000 ha) could be planned at the low-salinity terrace uplands and flood plains. The article provides guidelines for decision-makers regarding agricultural land use and wetland protection in the Yellow River Delta.

  3. Infiltration and runoff generation processes in fire-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John A.; Ebel, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Post-wildfire runoff was investigated by combining field measurements and modelling of infiltration into fire-affected soils to predict time-to-start of runoff and peak runoff rate at the plot scale (1 m2). Time series of soil-water content, rainfall and runoff were measured on a hillslope burned by the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire west of Boulder, Colorado during cyclonic and convective rainstorms in the spring and summer of 2011. Some of the field measurements and measured soil physical properties were used to calibrate a one-dimensional post-wildfire numerical model, which was then used as a ‘virtual instrument’ to provide estimates of the saturated hydraulic conductivity and high-resolution (1 mm) estimates of the soil-water profile and water fluxes within the unsaturated zone.Field and model estimates of the wetting-front depth indicated that post-wildfire infiltration was on average confined to shallow depths less than 30 mm. Model estimates of the effective saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, near the soil surface ranged from 0.1 to 5.2 mm h−1. Because of the relatively small values of Ks, the time-to-start of runoff (measured from the start of rainfall),  tp, was found to depend only on the initial soil-water saturation deficit (predicted by the model) and a measured characteristic of the rainfall profile (referred to as the average rainfall acceleration, equal to the initial rate of change in rainfall intensity). An analytical model was developed from the combined results and explained 92–97% of the variance of  tp, and the numerical infiltration model explained 74–91% of the variance of the peak runoff rates. These results are from one burned site, but they strongly suggest that  tp in fire-affected soils (which often have low values of Ks) is probably controlled more by the storm profile and the initial soil-water saturation deficit than by soil hydraulic properties.

  4. Antioxidant enzyme and osmotic adjustment changes in bean seedlings as affected by biochar under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangi-Abriz, Salar; Torabian, Shahram

    2017-03-01

    Salinity damaged cellular membranes through overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while osmolytes and antioxidant capacities play a vital role in protecting plants from salinity caused oxidative damages. Biochar also could alleviate the negative impacts of salt stress in crops. The pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of biochar on some antioxidant enzyme activities and osmolyte adjustments of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Derakhshan) under salinity stress. Bean plants were subjected to three salinity levels (non-saline, 6 and 12 dSm-1 of NaCl) and biochar treatments (non-biochar, 10% and 20% total pot mass). Shoot and root dry weights of bean were decreased at two salt stress treatments. Salinity increased the activity of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA), oxygen radicals (O2•-), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in leaf and root compared to control. Additionally, increased magnitudes of proline, glycine betaine, soluble sugar and soluble protein contents were more pronounced under 12 dSm-1 NaCl than those under 6 dSm-1 NaCl. In contrast, biochar applied to soil enhanced the shoot and root dry weight in comparison with the non-biochar treatment. Furthermore, all of the antioxidant activities of seedlings in soil treated with biochar, particularly at 20% biochar, declined. With the addition of biochar, the contents of MDA, O2•- and H2O2 displayed remarkable decrease, and the osmotic substances accumulation in leaves and roots also reduced. The presented results supported the view that biochar can contribute to protect common bean seedlings against NaCl stress by alleviating the oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Numerical simulations of Holocene salt-marsh dynamics under the hypothesis of large soil deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccarato, C.; Teatini, P.

    2017-12-01

    Salt marshes are vulnerable environments hosting complex interactions between physical and biological processes. The prediction of the elevation dynamics of a salt-marsh platform is crucial to forecast its future behavior under potential changing scenarios. An original finite-element (FE) numerical model accounting for the long-term marsh accretion and compaction linked to relative sea level rise is proposed. The accretion term considers the material sedimentation over the marsh surface, whereas the compaction reflects the progressive consolidation of the porous medium under the increasing load of the overlying younger deposits. The modeling approach is based on a 2D groundwater flow simulator coupled to a 1D vertical geomechanical module, where the soil properties may vary with the effective intergranular stress. The model takes also into account the geometric non-linearity arising from the consideration of large solid grain movements by using a Lagrangian approach with an adaptive FE mesh. The numerical experiments show the potentiality of the proposed 2D model, which consistently integrates in modeling framework the behavior of spatially distributed model parameters. High sedimentation rates and low permeabilities largely impact on the mechanism of soil compaction following the overpressure dissipation.

  6. Successful full-scale deployments of advanced PGPR enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) for decontamination of petroleum and salt impacted soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.; Huang, X.D.; Gerhardt, K.; Yu, X.M.; Liddycoat, S.; Lu, X.; Nykamp, J.; McCallum, B.; MacNeill, G.; Mosley, P.; Gurska, J.; Knezevich, N.; Zhong, H.; Gerwing, P. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described a phytoremediation system designed to remediate salt and petroleum contaminated sites. Phytoremediation techniques are cheaper than traditional methods of remediating soils. The phytoremediation process is comprised of volatilization, phytodegradation, and chelation processes. Plants uptake contaminants via a rhizodegradation process. The plants provide biomass for rapid remediation with a restoration time frame of between 2 to 3 years. PGPR enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) have been studied over a 10 year period and successfully applied at polycyclic hydrocarbon (PHC) contaminated sites, gas stations, and salt-contaminated sites throughout Canada. Soils are tilled in order to expose contaminants to sunlight. hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are then applied, followed by the application of a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) phytoremediation system that is typically applied to grass species prior to planting. Case studies of full-scale sites used to prove the concept for both salt and hydrocarbon contaminated soils were presented. tabs., figs.

  7. Environmental assessment of water-salt regime of irrigated soils in the Central-Chernozem Region of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeva, Liliia; Negrobova, Elena; Jablonskikh, Lidiia; Rumyantseva, Irina

    2016-04-01

    A large part of Central Chernozem Region is located in the zone of risky agriculture. This led to intensive use of soil in the irrigation system. Therefore, a detailed analysis of water-salt regime of irrigated soils required for ecological state assessment of soils for irrigation. In the investigated area the fone component of the soil cover on the levelled plateau are chernozems. On the slopes formed a meadow-chernozem soils. Parent material is a cover loess-like calcareous non-saline clay. In these soils, our studies found component-quantitative composition of the aqueous extract, the chemism of salinity, which allowed us to make conclusions about the direction of the salinisation process in soils when used in the system of irrigated agriculture. By quantity water extract chernozems are non-saline, the ratio of anions and cations are chloride-sulphate magnesium-calcium salinization. In the composition of easily soluble salts dominated by Ca(HCO3)2. On sum of toxic salts in the soils are non-saline. This type and chemism of salinity deep brackish groundwater (more than 5 m) can be actively used in the system of rational irrigation. The meadow-chernozem soils formed under conditions of increased surface and soil moisture in the shallow brackish water at a depth of 3-5 m. These soils by quantity water extract are non-saline, anionic-cationic ratio - chloride-sulphate magnesium-calcium salinization. Permanent components of salt associations are Ca(HCO3)2, MgCl2, Na2SO4. On sum of toxic salts in the soil is not saline throughout the profile. The chemism of salinity and the proximity of groundwater at irregular watering can lead to the rise of groundwater level, the development of gleyed and sodium alkalinization. Thus, the introduction of intensive irrigated agriculture on chernozems and hydromorphic analogues may lead to the development in them of negative consequences. The most dynamic indicator is the water-salt regime, the systematic monitoring and control which

  8. High dietary salt does not significantly affect plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of Sprague Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayorh Mohamed A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dahl salt-sensitive rat, but not the Dahl salt-resistant rat, develops hypertension and hypovitaminosis D when fed a high salt diet. Since the salt-sensitive rat and salt-resistant rat were bred from the Sprague Dawley rat, the aim of this research was to test the hypothesis that salt-resistant and Sprague Dawley rats would be similar in their vitamin D endocrine system response to high salt intake. Findings Sprague Dawley, salt-sensitive, and salt-resistant rats were fed high (80 g/kg, 8% or low (3 g/kg, 3% salt diets for three weeks. The blood pressure of Sprague Dawley rats increased from baseline to week 3 during both high and low salt intake and the mean blood pressure at week 3 of high salt intake was higher than that at week 3 of low salt intake (P Conclusions These data indicate that the effect of high salt intake on the vitamin D endocrine system of Sprague Dawley rats at week 3 was similar to that of salt-resistant rats. The salt-sensitive rat, thus, appears to be a more appropriate model than the Sprague Dawley rat for assessing possible effects of salt-sensitivity on vitamin D status of humans.

  9. Genomic and metagenomic analysis of microbes in a soil environment affected by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Satoshi; Machiyama, Asako; Ijichi, Minoru; Inoue, Kentaro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Kogure, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-01-14

    The Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011 triggered large tsunami waves, which flooded broad areas of land along the Pacific coast of eastern Japan and changed the soil environment drastically. However, the microbial characteristics of tsunami-affected soil at the genomic level remain largely unknown. In this study, we isolated microbes from a soil sample using general low-nutrient and seawater-based media to investigate microbial characteristics in tsunami-affected soil. As expected, a greater proportion of strains isolated from the tsunami-affected soil than the unaffected soil grew in the seawater-based medium. Cultivable strains in both the general low-nutrient and seawater-based media were distributed in the genus Arthrobacter. Most importantly, whole-genome sequencing of four of the isolated Arthrobacter strains revealed independent losses of siderophore-synthesis genes from their genomes. Siderophores are low-molecular-weight, iron-chelating compounds that are secreted for iron uptake; thus, the loss of siderophore-synthesis genes indicates that these strains have adapted to environments with high-iron concentrations. Indeed, chemical analysis confirmed the investigated soil samples to be rich in iron, and culture experiments confirmed weak cultivability of some of these strains in iron-limited media. Furthermore, metagenomic analyses demonstrated over-representation of denitrification-related genes in the tsunami-affected soil sample, as well as the presence of pathogenic and marine-living genera and genes related to salt-tolerance. Collectively, the present results would provide an example of microbial characteristics of soil disturbed by the tsunami, which may give an insight into microbial adaptation to drastic environmental changes. Further analyses on microbial ecology after a tsunami are envisioned to develop a deeper understanding of the recovery processes of terrestrial microbial ecosystems.

  10. Column Experiments on the Salt Accumulation in Adjoining Different-Textured Soil Profiles with a Shallow Water Table

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Daisuke; Ebohara, Kenji; Sonoda, Yasutaka; Sakata, Yoshinobu; Urayama, Kazuki; Cho, Hiroyuki; Yoshikoshi, Hisashi; Kitano, Masaharu

    2008-01-01

    Two column experiments on the relation between soil texture and salinization in soil profiles with a shallow water table were conducted under rainless conditions using the concept of ECSAT. The buildup of salts due to evaporation from bare soil was confined within the superficial layer and its amount during a period could be assumed to equal the product of the total of evaporation during the period and the salinity of water supplied into the soil profile, such as irrigation water and/or groun...

  11. Soil properties affecting wheat yields following drilling-fluid application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, T A; Barbarick, K A; Ippolito, J A; Shanahan, J F; Ayers, P D

    2005-01-01

    Oil and gas drilling operations use drilling fluids (mud) to lubricate the drill bit and stem, transport formation cuttings to the surface, and seal off porous geologic formations. Following completion of the well, waste drilling fluid is often applied to cropland. We studied potential changes in soil compaction as indicated by cone penetration resistance, pH, electrical conductivity (EC(e)), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), extractable soil and total straw and grain trace metal and nutrient concentrations, and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. 'TAM 107') grain yield following water-based, bentonitic drilling-fluid application (0-94 Mg ha(-1)) to field test plots. Three methods of application (normal, splash-plate, and spreader-bar) were used to study compaction effects. We measured increasing SAR, EC(e), and pH with drilling-fluid rates, but not to levels detrimental to crop production. Field measurements revealed significantly higher compaction within areas affected by truck travel, but also not enough to affect crop yield. In three of four site years, neither drilling-fluid rate nor application method affected grain yield. Extractions representing plant availability and plant analyses results indicated that drilling fluid did not significantly increase most trace elements or nutrient concentrations. These results support land application of water-based bentonitic drilling fluids as an acceptable practice on well-drained soils using controlled rates.

  12. Accumulation of de-icing salts and its short-term effect on metal mobility in urban roadside soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fayun; Zhang, Ying; Fan, Zhiping; Oh, Kokyo

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a field investigation combined with a laboratory column leaching experiment were carried out to assess the effects of de-icing salts application on the heavy metal mobilization in roadside soils in an old and large industrial zone in Northeastern China. In the field investigation, 41 roadside soils were collected from the industrial zone, and the results showed a strong rise in deicing salts related concentrations of Na (352-513 mg/kg) and Cl (577-2,353 mg/kg) and high values of Cd (1.2-7.6 mg/kg) and Pb (28.7-101.6 mg/kg). The most serious contaminated roadside soil was used for column leaching experiment alternately with de-icing salts solution and deionized water to simulate the runoff of de-icing salts into roadside soils followed by snowmelt or rainwater. The results showed that an extensive mobilization of Cd (20.90 % of the total Cd in the soil) occurred in the salt leachate, and a high correlation with Cl were found, indicating that Cl complexes are important for the mobilization. Conversely, only 2.34 % of the total amount of Pb in the soil was leached, confirming the usual hypotheses about the high immobility of Pb in soils. However, it was found that high Pb concentration coincided with peaks in Fe and TOC concentrations, and the proportion of Pb in the >0.45 µm phase was much low, which implied an extensive Pb mobilization with small-sized colloids.

  13. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S White

    Full Text Available Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake. In 1959, Union Pacific Railroad constructed a rock-filled causeway across the Great Salt Lake, separating the lake into a north and south arm. Flow between the two arms was limited to two 4.6 meter wide rectangular culverts installed during construction, an 88 meter opening (referred to locally as a breach installed in 1984, and the semi porous material of the causeway. A salinity gradient developed between the two arms of the lake over time because the south arm receives approximately 95% of the incoming streamflow entering Great Salt Lake. The north arm is often at, or near, salinity saturation, averaging 317 g/L since 1966, while the south is considerably less saline, averaging 142 g/L since 1966. Ecological and industrial uses of the lake are dependent on long-term salinity remaining within physiological and economic thresholds, although optimal salinity varies for the ecosystem and between diverse stakeholders. In 2013, Union Pacific Railroad closed causeway culverts amid structural safety concerns and proposed to replace them with a bridge, offering four different bridge designs. As of summer 2015, no bridge design has been decided upon. We investigated the effect that each of the proposed bridge designs would have on north and south arm Great Salt Lake elevation and salinity by updating and applying US Geological Survey's Great Salt Lake Fortran Model. Overall, we found that salinity is sensitive to bridge size and depth, with larger designs increasing salinity in the south arm and decreasing salinity in the north arm. This research illustrates that flow modifications within terminal lakes cannot be separated from lake salinity, ecology, management, and economic uses.

  14. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James S; Null, Sarah E; Tarboton, David G

    2015-01-01

    Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake. In 1959, Union Pacific Railroad constructed a rock-filled causeway across the Great Salt Lake, separating the lake into a north and south arm. Flow between the two arms was limited to two 4.6 meter wide rectangular culverts installed during construction, an 88 meter opening (referred to locally as a breach) installed in 1984, and the semi porous material of the causeway. A salinity gradient developed between the two arms of the lake over time because the south arm receives approximately 95% of the incoming streamflow entering Great Salt Lake. The north arm is often at, or near, salinity saturation, averaging 317 g/L since 1966, while the south is considerably less saline, averaging 142 g/L since 1966. Ecological and industrial uses of the lake are dependent on long-term salinity remaining within physiological and economic thresholds, although optimal salinity varies for the ecosystem and between diverse stakeholders. In 2013, Union Pacific Railroad closed causeway culverts amid structural safety concerns and proposed to replace them with a bridge, offering four different bridge designs. As of summer 2015, no bridge design has been decided upon. We investigated the effect that each of the proposed bridge designs would have on north and south arm Great Salt Lake elevation and salinity by updating and applying US Geological Survey's Great Salt Lake Fortran Model. Overall, we found that salinity is sensitive to bridge size and depth, with larger designs increasing salinity in the south arm and decreasing salinity in the north arm. This research illustrates that flow modifications within terminal lakes cannot be separated from lake salinity, ecology, management, and economic uses.

  15. Metribuzin mobility in soil columns as affected by urea fertiliser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neera

    2006-05-01

    Application of urea fertilisers to soils influences the soil solution characteristics and thus may affect the sorption of soil-applied herbicides. The present investigation reports the influence of urea co-application on sorption and leaching of metribuzin, a triazine herbicide. Urea application at 60 and 120 kg N ha(-1) increased metribuzin sorption in soils over that in untreated natural soil. The Kf (Freundlich adsorption coefficient) values of metribuzin for natural, 60 and 120 kg N ha(-1) treatments were 0.43, 0.46 and 0.84 microg(1 - 1/n) g(-1) ml1/n respectively. Downward mobility of metribuzin was studied in packed soil columns (300 mm length x 59 mm i.d.) at two irrigation intensities, 720 m3 ha(-1) (72 mm) and 3600 m3 ha(-1) (360 mm). After 720 m3 ha(-1) irrigation, metribuzin did not leach out of any column and was not detected in the leachate. Urea amendment slowed the leaching of metribuzin by 20 and 40% in 60 and 120 kg N ha(-1) urea-treated columns respectively. Also, following urea application, greater amounts of metribuzin were retained in the application zone. Upon increasing the irrigation intensity fivefold, urea application did not have any effect on metribuzin mobility, and its breakthrough from both natural and urea-amended columns occurred after 126 mm irrigation. However, there was a marked difference in the maximum concentration of metribuzin in the breakthrough curves obtained from natural and urea-amended columns. The study indicated that co-application of metribuzin and urea fertiliser is a safe practice as far as leaching of herbicide is concerned. Copyright 2006 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Assessment of soil electromagnetic parameters and their variation with soil water, salts: a comparison among EMI and TDR measuring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaali, Nesrine; Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    Numerous studies have analyzed the possibility of the extension of Electromagnetic Induction EMI calibration coefficients determined at field scale, to predict the depth distribution of bulk electrical conductivity ECb within unmonitored sites and/or times, in order to appraise the effect of salts dynamics on soils and plants. However, in the literature, it has been determined that the extension of those EMI calibration coefficients can be awkward since the calibration parameters are highly site-specific because of changes in water content, temperature, root development, soil physical properties, etc... So they can only be used in sites having similar characteristics in terms of EMI. Furthermore there is a difference in the observation windows of EMI sensors and of sensors (Time Domain Reflectometry TDR, Electrical Resistance Tomography ERT, ect...) used for measuring the ECb to be then used for the calibration and validation of the EMI. By consequence the actual variability of the soil salinity will be hidden due to the fact that data coming from EMI and other sensors have different variability patterns and structure, and are then influenced by different noises. The main objectives of this work were: 1) develop a practical and cost-effective technique that uses TDR data as ground-truth data for calibrating and validating of the EMI larger scale sensor, 2) using a Fourier transform FT analysis by applying a specific noise filter to the original data, to find the correlations between the TDR and the EMI data. An experiment was designed by irrigating three transects of green beans, 30 m long each, with three irrigation salinity inputs (1dSm-1, 3dSm-1, 6dSm-1). The irrigation volumes were estimated by measuring soil water content at different depths by using a Diviner 2000. During the experiment, the EM in both the vertical (EMV) and horizontal (EMH) configurations were regularly measured by a Geonics EM38 device. TDR probes were inserted vertically at the soil

  17. Metabolic variation in rice cultivars of contrasting salt tolerance and its improvement by zinc in sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H P; Singh, T N

    2006-07-01

    The severity of Zn deficiency increased with increase in soil exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) with salt sensitive variety M1-48 scoring 6 at ESP 62 as against only score 3 by salt tolerant variety Pokkali under similar soil conditions. Strikingly, zinc contents were much higher in salt tolerant variety than in salt sensitive one. Zinc application increased zinc concentration in the roots by a factor of 2.85 to 3.87 in Pokkali whereas it rose from 2.37 to 4.35 times in M1-48 depending upon ESP but in the leaves it registered increase of 1.5 to 1.8 times only. In general, the concentrations of reducing sugar were less (about 2.2%) than that of non-reducing (about 3.8%) in both the varieties under normal soil conditions. However, the concentration of reducing sugar doubled (4.2-4.4%) at the highest ESP 62, whereas the concentration of non-reducing sugar though increased (4.1 to 5.1%) but not as vigorously as reducing one. Zinc application reduced the concentration of reducing sugar but not that of non-reducing at similar ESP values. In Pokkali, the concentrations of total sugar increased from 6% at ESP 20 to 9.34% at ESP 62, whereas it registered enhancements of 5.98 to 8.6% in M1-48 under similar conditions. The nitrate reductase (NR) activity decreased with increase in soil sodicity however, the varietal differences in NR activity were wider under Zn-stress than under conditions of applied zinc with Pokkali registering higher NR activities. Carbonic anhydrase activities were higher in salt tolerant variety. Inhibition in carbonic anhydrase activity amounted to 23 and 45% in salt-sensitive variely M1-48 whereas only 19 and 33% in salt-tolerant variety Pokkali at ESP 41 and 62, respectively. The effects of zinc application at higher soil sodicity were more obvious in salt-sensitive variety than in salt-tolerant one. The findings suggest that the tolerance to Zn stress runs parallel to salt tolerance abilities of rice varieties.

  18. 5C.01: LITTLE DIFFERENCE IN SALT INTAKE CRUCIALLY AFFECTS FUTURE BLOOD PRESSURE LEVELS IN THE GENERAL POPULATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, S; Takase, H; Sugiura, T; Yamashita, S; Ohte, N; Dohi, Y

    2015-06-01

    A causal relationship between salt and hypertension has been argued for a long time. Epidemiological cross-sectional studies demonstrated higher incidence of hypertension in populations with higher dietary salt than in those with lower dietary salt and interventional studies investigated the effects of drastic changes in dietary salt in individuals. However, there is not sufficient evidence proving that individuals with relatively high salt intakes show an accelerated increase in blood pressure compared to those with a relatively low salt intakes over a long period of observation. Thus, the present observational study was designed to investigate whether individual levels of dietary salt affect future increases in blood pressure in the general population. Individual salt intake was estimated by calculating 24-hour urinary salt excretion using a spot urine in normotensive 6,249 participants in our physical check-up program (53.3 ± 11.4 year-old). After baseline examination, they were followed up for the median of 1,089 days with the endpoint being the development of hypertension. During the follow-up period, hypertension developed in 1,027 participants (73.0 per 1,000 person-years) with the incidence being more frequent in male than female participants. After adjustment for possible risk factors, the hazard ratio of incident hypertension in participants with salt intake higher than the target recommended by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (male, <9.0 g/day; female, <7.5 g/day) was 1.25 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.50). In multivariate Cox hazards regression analysis, baseline salt intake and the yearly change in salt intake during the follow-up period (as continuous variables) correlated with the incidence of hypertension. Furthermore, both the yearly increase in salt intake and baseline salt intake showed significant correlations with the yearly increase in systolic blood pressure in multivariate regression analysis after

  19. A comparison of hydroponic and soil-based screening methods to identify salt tolerance in the field in barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Fatehi, Foad; Rengasamy, Pichu; McDonald, Glenn K.

    2012-01-01

    Success in breeding crops for yield and other quantitative traits depends on the use of methods to evaluate genotypes accurately under field conditions. Although many screening criteria have been suggested to distinguish between genotypes for their salt tolerance under controlled environmental conditions, there is a need to test these criteria in the field. In this study, the salt tolerance, ion concentrations, and accumulation of compatible solutes of genotypes of barley with a range of putative salt tolerance were investigated using three growing conditions (hydroponics, soil in pots, and natural saline field). Initially, 60 genotypes of barley were screened for their salt tolerance and uptake of Na+, Cl–, and K+ at 150 mM NaCl and, based on this, a subset of 15 genotypes was selected for testing in pots and in the field. Expression of salt tolerance in saline solution culture was not a reliable indicator of the differences in salt tolerance between barley plants that were evident in saline soil-based comparisons. Significant correlations were observed in the rankings of genotypes on the basis of their grain yield production at a moderately saline field site and their relative shoot growth in pots at ECe 7.2 [Spearman’s rank correlation (rs)=0.79] and ECe 15.3 (rs=0.82) and the crucial parameter of leaf Na+ (rs=0.72) and Cl– (rs=0.82) concentrations at ECe 7.2 dS m−1. This work has established screening procedures that correlated well with grain yield at sites with moderate levels of soil salinity. This study also showed that both salt exclusion and osmotic tolerance are involved in salt tolerance and that the relative importance of these traits may differ with the severity of the salt stress. In soil, ion exclusion tended to be more important at low to moderate levels of stress but osmotic stress became more important at higher stress levels. Salt exclusion coupled with a synthesis of organic solutes were shown to be important components of salt

  20. A comparison of hydroponic and soil-based screening methods to identify salt tolerance in the field in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Fatehi, Foad; Rengasamy, Pichu; McDonald, Glenn K

    2012-06-01

    Success in breeding crops for yield and other quantitative traits depends on the use of methods to evaluate genotypes accurately under field conditions. Although many screening criteria have been suggested to distinguish between genotypes for their salt tolerance under controlled environmental conditions, there is a need to test these criteria in the field. In this study, the salt tolerance, ion concentrations, and accumulation of compatible solutes of genotypes of barley with a range of putative salt tolerance were investigated using three growing conditions (hydroponics, soil in pots, and natural saline field). Initially, 60 genotypes of barley were screened for their salt tolerance and uptake of Na(+), Cl(-), and K(+) at 150 mM NaCl and, based on this, a subset of 15 genotypes was selected for testing in pots and in the field. Expression of salt tolerance in saline solution culture was not a reliable indicator of the differences in salt tolerance between barley plants that were evident in saline soil-based comparisons. Significant correlations were observed in the rankings of genotypes on the basis of their grain yield production at a moderately saline field site and their relative shoot growth in pots at EC(e) 7.2 [Spearman's rank correlation (rs)=0.79] and EC(e) 15.3 (rs=0.82) and the crucial parameter of leaf Na(+) (rs=0.72) and Cl(-) (rs=0.82) concentrations at EC(e) 7.2 dS m(-1). This work has established screening procedures that correlated well with grain yield at sites with moderate levels of soil salinity. This study also showed that both salt exclusion and osmotic tolerance are involved in salt tolerance and that the relative importance of these traits may differ with the severity of the salt stress. In soil, ion exclusion tended to be more important at low to moderate levels of stress but osmotic stress became more important at higher stress levels. Salt exclusion coupled with a synthesis of organic solutes were shown to be important components of

  1. Loss in microbial diversity affects nitrogen cycling in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippot, Laurent; Spor, Aymé; Hénault, Catherine; Bru, David; Bizouard, Florian; Jones, Christopher M; Sarr, Amadou; Maron, Pierre-Alain

    2013-08-01

    Microbial communities have a central role in ecosystem processes by driving the Earth's biogeochemical cycles. However, the importance of microbial diversity for ecosystem functioning is still debated. Here, we experimentally manipulated the soil microbial community using a dilution approach to analyze the functional consequences of diversity loss. A trait-centered approach was embraced using the denitrifiers as model guild due to their role in nitrogen cycling, a major ecosystem service. How various diversity metrics related to richness, eveness and phylogenetic diversity of the soil denitrifier community were affected by the removal experiment was assessed by 454 sequencing. As expected, the diversity metrics indicated a decrease in diversity in the 1/10(3) and 1/10(5) dilution treatments compared with the undiluted one. However, the extent of dilution and the corresponding reduction in diversity were not commensurate, as a dilution of five orders of magnitude resulted in a 75% decrease in estimated richness. This reduction in denitrifier diversity resulted in a significantly lower potential denitrification activity in soil of up to 4-5 folds. Addition of wheat residues significantly increased differences in potential denitrification between diversity levels, indicating that the resource level can influence the shape of the microbial diversity-functioning relationship. This study shows that microbial diversity loss can alter terrestrial ecosystem processes, which suggests that the importance of functional redundancy in soil microbial communities has been overstated.

  2. Influence of calcium and magnesium salts on acid soil chemistry and calcium nutrition of apple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavan, M.A.; Bingham, F.T.; Peryea, F.J.

    Field experiments were conducted in two Brazilian orchards to examine the effects of soil applications of calcitic lime (Ca-lime), phosphogypsum, CaCl/sub 2/, and magnesite (Mg-lime) on soil chemistry and Ca nutrition of apple (Malus domestica Borkh, cv. Gala/MM 106). One orchard was on a low Ca, high Al Inceptisol; the second orchard was on a low Ca, low Al Oxisol. The resulting soil chemical changes were strongly influenced by the initial soil chemistry and the composition of the soil amendments. The effects of Ca-lime, added at a rate calculated to neutralize the topsoil exchange acidity, were restricted primarily to the upper 20 cm of the soil, where it increased pH, increased total dissolved and exchangeable Ca, eliminated dissolved Al, and reduced exchangeable Al. Phosphogypsum, added at Ca rates equivalent to the Ca-lime treatment, slightly reduced soil pH in the Inceptisol and slightly increased soil pH in the Oxisol. Phosphogypsum did not appreciably affect dissolved Al in the topsoil; however, it did reduce exchangeable Al but to a lesser degree than did Ca-lime or Mg-lime. Phosphogypsum increased exchangeable Ca and decreased exchangeable Al in the subsoil to a depth of 40 to 60 cm. Calcium chloride, added at Ca rates equivalent to the Ca-lime treatment, produced dissolved and exchangeable Ca increases similar to the phosphogypsum treatment; however, soluble and exchangeable Al were increased and pH slightly decreased through out the soil profiles.

  3. Soil Properties Affecting the Reductive Capacity of Volcanic Ash Soils in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, C.; Ahn, J.; Kim, K.; Park, K.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanic ash soils or Andisols have distinct chemical and mineralogical properties. The unique chemical properties of Andisols are due to their Al-rich elemental composition, the highly reactive nature of their colloidal fractions, and their large surface area. The soils that developed from volcanic ash on Jeju Island, Korea, were classified as typical Andisols. The soils had an acidic pH, high water content, high organic matter, and clay-silty texture. The crystalline minerals in the samples were mainly ferromagnesian minerals, such as olivine and pyroxene, and iron oxides, such as magnetite and hematite derived from basaltic materials. A large amount of gibbsite was found in the subsurface horizon as a secondary product of the migration of excess Al. In addition, we found that considerable amounts of poorly ordered minerals like allophane and ferrihydrite were present in the Jeju soils. The SiO2 contents were lower than those of other soil orders, while the Al2O3 and Fe2O3 contents were higher. These results reflect some of the important chemical properties of Andisols. The chromium (VI/III) redox couple was used in the reductive capacity measurement. The mean reductive capacity of the Jeju soils was 6.53 mg/L reduced Cr(VI), which is 5.1 times higher than that of non-volcanic ash soils from inland Korea. The reductive capacity of the inland soils was correlated with the total carbon content. Such a high capacity for the reduction of soluble Cr(VI) must also be due to the relatively high carbon contents of the Jeju soils. Nevertheless, despite having 20 times higher total carbon contents, there was no correlation between the reductive capacity of the Jeju soils and the carbon content. These results imply that the reductive capacity of Jeju soils is not only controlled by the carbon content, but is also affected by other soil properties. Correlations of the reductive capacity with major elements showed that Al and Fe were closely connected to the reductive

  4. Modeling of Soil Water and Salt Dynamics and Its Effects on Root Water Uptake in Heihe Arid Wetland, Gansu, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huijie; Yi, Jun; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhao, Ying; Si, Bingcheng; Hill, Robert; Cui, Lele; Liu, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-01

    In the Heihe River basin, China, increased salinity and water shortages present serious threats to the sustainability of arid wetlands. It is critical to understand the interactions between soil water and salts (from saline shallow groundwater and the river) and their effects on plant growth under the influence of shallow groundwater and irrigation. In this study, the Hydrus-1D model was used in an arid wetland of the Middle Heihe River to investigate the effects of the dynamics of soil water...

  5. Influences of nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate on nitrogen and soil salt-ion leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaogang; Ye, Xuezhu; Chen, Yingxu; Zhang, Zhijian; Tian, Guangming

    2008-01-01

    An undisturbed heavy clay soil column experiment was conducted to examine the influence of the new nitrification inhibitor, 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), on nitrogen and soil salt-ion leaching. Regular urea was selected as the nitrogen source in the soil. The results showed that the cumulative leaching losses of soil nitrate-N under the treatment of urea with DMPP were from 57.5% to 63.3% lower than those of the treatment of urea without DMPP. The use of nitrification inhibitors as nitrate leaching retardants may be a proposal in regulations to prevent groundwater contaminant. However, there were no great difference between urea and urea with DMPP treatments on ammonium-N leaching. Moreover, the soil salt-ion leaching losses of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and Na+ were reduced from 26.6% to 28.8%, 21.3% to 27.8%, 33.3% to 35.5%, and 21.7% to 32.1%, respectively. So, the leaching losses of soil salt-ion were declined for nitrification inhibitor DMPP addition, being beneficial to shallow groundwater protection and growth of crop. These results indicated the possibility of ammonium or ammonium producing compounds using nitrification inhibitor DMPP to control the nitrate and nutrient cation leaching losses, minimizing the risk of nitrate pollution in shallow groundwater.

  6. Thallium isotope variations in anthropogenically-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Ales; Chrastny, Vladislav; Penizek, Vit; Mihaljevic, Martin; Komarek, Michael; Cabala, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    Our preliminary data from soils impacted by long-term Tl deposition in the vicinity of a primary/secondary Zn smelter at Olkusz (Poland) indicate apparent variability of ɛ205Tl within soil profiles. The identified ɛ205Tl values presented for the forest soil profile reached -1.7 in the surface/organic horizon, +1.9 in the organo-mineral horizon (Ap), and +1.0 in the mineral horizon (C). This finding suggests both the enrichment of 203Tl isotope in the topsoil, as well as its preferential release during smelting operations, as "lighter" Tl tends to enter the emissions during a high-temperature process. The maximum ɛ205Tl value in the subsurface horizon Ap is in accordance with the concentration peak of oxalate-extractable Mn, indicating the presence of amorphous/poorly-crystalline Mn oxides with a potential to isotopically fractionate Tl toward the "heavier" fraction. The Tl isotope signature in the bottom horizon probably reflects the composition of a local geochemical anomaly of Tl. However, a portion of mobile (anthropogenic) Tl with negative ɛ205Tl moving downwards in the soil profile cannot be neglected. In general, there is no detailed information about the biogeochemical cycling and variations of Tl isotopes in areas affected by significant anthropogenic inputs of the metal (e.g., coal burning and primary metallurgy); the questions of the degree to which the factors such as soil (and sediment) chemistry, mineralogy, local biota, and pollution source control Tl isotope fractionation remain unresolved. Therefore, further research on the topic is needed before any principal conclusions will be made.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Halotolerant Soil Fungi from the Great Salt Plains of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVANS, Sarah; HANSEN, Ryan W.; SCHNEEGURT, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The Great Salt Plains (GSP) of Oklahoma is an inland terrestrial hypersaline environment where saturated brines leave evaporite crusts of NaCl. The current report examines the fungal community, complementing earlier reports on the bacterial and archaeal communities. Twenty-five fungal isolates from GSP soils were obtained on medium containing 10% NaCl and characterized. Based on 18S rRNA gene sequence analysis, all of the isolates fall within the Ascomycetes, with a predominance of Trichocomaceae, represented by Aspergillus, Eurotium, and Penicillium species. Representatives of Anthrinium, Cladosporium, Debaryomyces, Fusarium, and Ulocladium also were isolated. Overall the isolates were widely halotolerant, with best growth observed at lower salinities and no halophilism. The fungal genera observed were all cosmopolitan, without strong specialization. Taken together, these results support the conclusion that hypersaline environments do not have a characteristic community, in contrast to what was observed at the GSP for bacteria and archaea. PMID:25249710

  8. Conductivity gradients as inferred by electromagnetic-induction meter (EM38) readings within a salt-affected wetland in Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirck, Jaconette; Schroeder, William

    2018-01-01

    The change from deep-rooted grass and shrub vegetation to annual-cropping dryland farming has contributed to serious soil salinization challenges on the semi-arid North American Great Plains. In some cases, cultivation of the Great Plains has increased the availability of water, causing dominant sulfate salts to travel from the uphill areas to depressions where it will surface when water evaporates at the soil surface. A potential solution could include the replanting of the native deep-rooted vegetation, which requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of soil salinity. This study tested the soil factors influencing electromagnetic-induction meter (EM38) readings of soil salinity distribution around wetlands. The objectives were to: (1) predict growth and survival of Salix dasyclados Wimm. (cv. `India') along a salinity gradient in a small wetland, and (2) investigate whether newly established willows affected water-table fluctuations, which would indicate their phreatophytic nature or their ability to obtain their water supply from the zone of saturation. Results indicated significantly lower salinity values for sampling points with EM38 readings above 175 and 250 mS m-1 for height and survival, respectively. In addition, diurnal fluxes of the water table in areas of good willow growth and lower salinity indicated that cultivar `India' was phreatophytic in these areas and therefore has great potential for being used to combat saline seeps.

  9. Aerosol Particles from Dried Salt-Lakes and Saline Soils Carried on Dust Storms over Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingying Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of individual particles from a super dust storm (DS on 20 March 2002, and those of non dust storm aero sols for Beijing (NDS and Duolun (DL (a desert area are determined using a variety of methods. In China, typically the source of aero sols in dust storms is thought to be deserts with alumino silicates being the main constituent particles; how ever, this does not reflect a complete analysis with our evidence indicating potential alternate dust sources along the storm's trans port path. Individual particle anal y sis of aero sols collected from a super dust storm on 20 March 2002 in Beijing shows that among all the 14 elements measured, only S and Cl have re mark able positive correlation. 82.5% of all particles measured contained both S and Cl, and the relative mass per cent age of S and Cl in these particles is much higher than the average of all particles. 62.0% of all particles contained S, Cl, and Na, in which the concentration of Na is 1.4 times higher than average. PMF (Positive Matrix Factorization anal y sis indicates that NaCl and Na2SO4 are major components of these particles with S and Cl showing significant positive correlation. More over, SO4 2- and Cl- also show significant positive correlation in bulk aero sol analysis. XPS (X-ray Pho to electron Spectros copy analysis of the surface of aero sols demonstrates that concentrations of Na and S on particles from the dust storm are higher than those from non-dust storm particles in Beijing and also for particles from. It is very likely that particles enriched with S, Cl, and Na is from the surface soils of dried salt-lakes and saline soils enriched with chloride and sulfate. This evidence demonstrates that be sides deserts, surface soils from dry salt-lakes and saline soils of arid and semi-arid areas are also sources of particulates in dust storms over Beijing.

  10. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of soil organic matter extracted from a Brazilian mangrove and Spanish salt marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perobelli Ferreira, F.; Buurman, P.; Macias, F.; Otero, X.L.; Boluda, R.

    2009-01-01

    The soil organic matter (SOM) extracted under different vegetation types from a Brazilian mangrove (Pai Matos Island, São Paulo State) and from three Spanish salt marshes (Betanzos Ría and Corrubedo Natural Parks, Galícia, and the Albufera Natural Park, Valencia) was investigated by pyrolysis-gas

  11. Large-scale downy brome treatments alter plant-soil relationships and promote perennial grasses in salt desert shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interrelationship between invasive annual grass abundance and soil resource availability varies spatially and temporally within ecosystems and may be altered by land treatments. We evaluated these relationships in two salt desert landscapes where the local abundance of Bromus tectorum L. (downy...

  12. Environmental factors affecting larval fish community in the salt marsh area of Guadiana estuary (Algarve, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Gonçalves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salt marsh areas in the Guadiana estuary are important nursery sites for many fish species of commercial and recreational value. More effective protection measures should be adopted as the area is highly affected by anthropogenic and natural threats. Studying larval fish communities in these impacted nursery areas will be relevant to the management of local ecosystems and to larval fish ecology in general. Spatial and seasonal distribution and the effect of environmental factors on the larval fish community of this ecosystem were studied for one year (April 2010 to March 2011. Larvae were sampled monthly in parallel with phytoplankton and zooplankton. Hydrological data and physical parameters were monitored. A decision tree model was used to assess the influence of environmental factors on the larval fish community. A total of 130 larvae and 1171 eggs were caught. Diplodus sargus, Sardina pilchardus, and Pomatoschistus microps were the most abundant larval fish species. The peaks of fish larvae abundance occurred in March and April. The output of the model demonstrates that the abundance of larval fish is determined by the abundance of eggs, zooplanktonic food, and water flood and flow. This study shows the importance of the Guadiana salt marsh as an area for fish nursery and highlights the need for conservation of this area.

  13. Water management can reinforce plant competition in salt-affected semi-arid wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, Janaine Z.; Vogwill, Ryan; Hipsey, Matthew R.

    2017-09-01

    The diversity of vegetation in semi-arid, ephemeral wetlands is determined by niche availability and species competition, both of which are influenced by changes in water availability and salinity. Here, we hypothesise that ignoring physiological differences and competition between species when managing wetland hydrologic regimes can lead to a decrease in vegetation diversity, even when the overall wetland carrying capacity is improved. Using an ecohydrological model capable of resolving water-vegetation-salt feedbacks, we investigate why water surface and groundwater management interventions to combat vegetation decline have been more beneficial to Casuarina obesa than to Melaleuca strobophylla, the co-dominant tree species in Lake Toolibin, a salt-affected wetland in Western Australia. The simulations reveal that in trying to reduce the negative effect of salinity, the management interventions have created an environment favouring C. obesa by intensifying the climate-induced trend that the wetland has been experiencing of lower water availability and higher root-zone salinity. By testing alternative scenarios, we show that interventions that improve M. strobophylla biomass are possible by promoting hydrologic conditions that are less specific to the niche requirements of C. obesa. Modelling uncertainties were explored via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. Overall, the study demonstrates the importance of including species differentiation and competition in ecohydrological models that form the basis for wetland management.

  14. Soil organic carbon pools and stocks in permafrost-affected soils on the tibetan plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörfer, Corina; Kühn, Peter; Baumann, Frank; He, Jin-Sheng; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau reacts particularly sensitively to possible effects of climate change. Approximately two thirds of the total area is affected by permafrost. To get a better understanding of the role of permafrost on soil organic carbon pools and stocks, investigations were carried out including both discontinuous (site Huashixia, HUA) and continuous permafrost (site Wudaoliang, WUD). Three organic carbon fractions were isolated using density separation combined with ultrasonic dispersion: the light fractions (1.6 g cm(-3)) of mineral associated organic matter (MOM). The fractions were analyzed for C, N, and their portion of organic C. FPOM contained an average SOC content of 252 g kg(-1). Higher SOC contents (320 g kg(-1)) were found in OPOM while MOM had the lowest SOC contents (29 g kg(-1)). Due to their lower density the easily decomposable fractions FPOM and OPOM contribute 27% (HUA) and 22% (WUD) to the total SOC stocks. In HUA mean SOC stocks (0-30 cm depth) account for 10.4 kg m(-2), compared to 3.4 kg m(-2) in WUD. 53% of the SOC is stored in the upper 10 cm in WUD, in HUA only 39%. Highest POM values of 36% occurred in profiles with high soil moisture content. SOC stocks, soil moisture and active layer thickness correlated strongly in discontinuous permafrost while no correlation between SOC stocks and active layer thickness and only a weak relation between soil moisture and SOC stocks could be found in continuous permafrost. Consequently, permafrost-affected soils in discontinuous permafrost environments are susceptible to soil moisture changes due to alterations in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, increasing temperature and therefore evaporation.

  15. Soil organic carbon pools and stocks in permafrost-affected soils on the tibetan plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Dörfer

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau reacts particularly sensitively to possible effects of climate change. Approximately two thirds of the total area is affected by permafrost. To get a better understanding of the role of permafrost on soil organic carbon pools and stocks, investigations were carried out including both discontinuous (site Huashixia, HUA and continuous permafrost (site Wudaoliang, WUD. Three organic carbon fractions were isolated using density separation combined with ultrasonic dispersion: the light fractions (1.6 g cm(-3 of mineral associated organic matter (MOM. The fractions were analyzed for C, N, and their portion of organic C. FPOM contained an average SOC content of 252 g kg(-1. Higher SOC contents (320 g kg(-1 were found in OPOM while MOM had the lowest SOC contents (29 g kg(-1. Due to their lower density the easily decomposable fractions FPOM and OPOM contribute 27% (HUA and 22% (WUD to the total SOC stocks. In HUA mean SOC stocks (0-30 cm depth account for 10.4 kg m(-2, compared to 3.4 kg m(-2 in WUD. 53% of the SOC is stored in the upper 10 cm in WUD, in HUA only 39%. Highest POM values of 36% occurred in profiles with high soil moisture content. SOC stocks, soil moisture and active layer thickness correlated strongly in discontinuous permafrost while no correlation between SOC stocks and active layer thickness and only a weak relation between soil moisture and SOC stocks could be found in continuous permafrost. Consequently, permafrost-affected soils in discontinuous permafrost environments are susceptible to soil moisture changes due to alterations in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, increasing temperature and therefore evaporation.

  16. Formation of Microbial Mats and Salt in Radioactive Paddy Soils in Fukushima, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Tazaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas in Minami-soma City, Fukushima, Japan, were seriously damaged by radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP accident that caused multiple pollution by tsunami and radionuclide exposure, after the Great East Japan Earthquake, on 11 March 2011. Some areas will remain no-go zones because radiation levels remain high. In Minami-soma, only 26 percent of decontamination work had been finished by the end of July in 2015. Here, we report the characterization of microbial mats and salt found on flooded paddy fields at Karasuzaki, Minami-soma City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan which have been heavily contaminated by radionuclides, especially by Cs (134Cs, 137Cs, 40K, Sr (89Sr, 90Sr, and 91 or 95Zr even though it is more than 30 km north of the FDNPP. We document the mineralogy, the chemistry, and the micro-morphology, using a combination of micro techniques. The microbial mats were found to consist of diatoms with mineralized halite and gypsum by using X-ray diffraction (XRD. Particular elements concentrated in microbial mats were detected using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS and X-ray fluorescence (XRF. The objective of this contribution is to illustrate the ability of various diatoms associated with minerals and microorganisms which are capable of absorbing both radionuclides and stable isotopes from polluted paddy soils in extreme conditions. Ge semiconductor analysis of the microbial mats detected 134Cs, 137Cs, and 40K without 131I in 2012 and in 2013. Quantitative analysis associated with the elemental content maps by SEM-EDS indicated the possibility of absorption of radionuclide and stable isotope elements from polluted paddy soils in Fukushima Prefecture. In addition, radionuclides were detected in solar salts made of contaminated sea water collected from the Karasuzaki ocean bath, Minami-soma, Fukushima in 2015, showing high Zr content associated

  17. Litter decay controlled by temperature, not soil properties, affecting future soil carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorich, Edward G; Janzen, Henry; Ellert, Benjamin H; Helgason, Bobbi L; Qian, Budong; Zebarth, Bernie J; Angers, Denis A; Beyaert, Ronald P; Drury, Craig F; Duguid, Scott D; May, William E; McConkey, Brian G; Dyck, Miles F

    2017-04-01

    Widespread global changes, including rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, climate warming and loss of biodiversity, are predicted for this century; all of these will affect terrestrial ecosystem processes like plant litter decomposition. Conversely, increased plant litter decomposition can have potential carbon-cycle feedbacks on atmospheric CO2 levels, climate warming and biodiversity. But predicting litter decomposition is difficult because of many interacting factors related to the chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, as well as to climate and agricultural management practices. We applied (13) C-labelled plant litter to soil at ten sites spanning a 3500-km transect across the agricultural regions of Canada and measured its decomposition over five years. Despite large differences in soil type and climatic conditions, we found that the kinetics of litter decomposition were similar once the effect of temperature had been removed, indicating no measurable effect of soil properties. A two-pool exponential decay model expressing undecomposed carbon simply as a function of thermal time accurately described kinetics of decomposition. (R(2)  = 0.94; RMSE = 0.0508). Soil properties such as texture, cation exchange capacity, pH and moisture, although very different among sites, had minimal discernible influence on decomposition kinetics. Using this kinetic model under different climate change scenarios, we projected that the time required to decompose 50% of the litter (i.e. the labile fractions) would be reduced by 1-4 months, whereas time required to decompose 90% of the litter (including recalcitrant fractions) would be reduced by 1 year in cooler sites to as much as 2 years in warmer sites. These findings confirm quantitatively the sensitivity of litter decomposition to temperature increases and demonstrate how climate change may constrain future soil carbon storage, an effect apparently not influenced by soil properties. © 2016 Her Majesty

  18. Arsenic, boron and salt resistant Bacillus safensis MS11 isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. safensis MS11 was also associated with resistance to multiple heavy metals such as Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. Hence, this bacterium could be useful in the remediation of salt affected soils and biogeochemical cycles of arsenic pollution. Key words: Desert soil, toxic metals, Bacillus, salt tolerant, bioremediation.

  19. Landscape controls and vertical variability of soil organic carbon storage in permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewert, Matthias Benjamin; Hugelius, Gustaf; Heim, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    results show that the geomorphological setting explains more soil variability than soil taxonomy classes or vegetation cover. The soils from the oldest, Pleistocene aged, unit of the delta store the highest amount of SOC per m2 followed by the Holocene river terrace. The Pleistocene terrace affected...

  20. Validation and application of a two-dimensional model to simulate soil salt transport under mulched drip irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Huiqing; Zhao, Chengyi; Sheng, Yu; Chen, Yan; Shi, Jianchu; Li, Baoguo

    2017-04-01

    Water shortage and soil salinization increasingly become the main constraints for sustainable development of agriculture in Southern Xinjiang, China. Mulched drip irrigation, as a high-efficient water-saving irrigation method, has been widely applied in Southern Xinjiang for cotton production. In order to analyze the reasonability of describing the three-dimensional soil water and salt transport processes under mulched drip irrigation with a relatively simple two-dimensional model, a field experiment was conducted from 2007 to 2015 at Aksu of Southern Xinjiang, and soil water and salt transport processes were simulated through the three-dimensional and two-dimensional models based on COMSOL. Obvious differences were found between three-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations for soil water flow within the early 12 h of irrigation event and for soil salt transport in the area within 15 cm away from drip tubes during the whole irrigation event. The soil water and salt contents simulated by the two-dimensional model, however, agreed well with the mean values between two adjacent emitters simulated by the three-dimensional model, and also coincided with the measurements as corresponding RMSE less than 0.037 cm3 cm-3 and 1.80 g kg-1, indicating that the two-dimensional model was reliable for field irrigation management. Subsequently, the two-dimensional model was applied to simulate the dynamics of soil salinity for five numerical situations and for a widely adopted irrigation pattern in Southern Xinjiang (about 350 mm through mulched drip irrigation during growing season of cotton and total 400 mm through flooding irrigations before sowing and after harvesting). The simulation results indicated that the contribution of transpiration to salt accumulation in root layer was about 75% under mulched drip irrigation. Moreover, flooding irrigations before sowing and after harvesting were of great importance for salt leaching of arable layer, especially in bare strip where

  1. Effect of Treated MSWC Leachate with Different Salts on Growth Parameters, Chemical Composition of Barley Plant and Soil Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Astaraei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural organic wastes contain considerable amounts of nutritional elements. The availability and uptake of nutrient elements in soil especially in alkali and calcareous soils increase due to high content of organic matter, and reduce the micro-elements deficiencies. Organic wastes have pathogenic contaminations that come from waste type and transmitted by microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, etc. This research was conducted to study the effect of MSWC leachate treated with three salts, 1 cupper sulphate, 2 iron chloride and 3 sodium benzoate each with two levels of 40 and 80 mg.l-1 on growth parameters of barley and soil properties in a completely randomized design (factorial with three replications under laboratory and pot conditions in college of agriculture, Ferdowsi university of Mashhad during 2009-2010 cropping season. Results showed that plant total dry weight in three different salts were not significant. Maximum N and K concentrations in plant were observed in cupper sulphate treated MSWC leachate and plant P concentration in cupper sulphate and iron chloride treated MSWC leachate treatments. The effect of sodium benzoate, due to its positive impact and benzoic acid produced, as plant metabolite was superior to iron chloride. Increasing amount of salt from 40 to 80 mg.l-1, increased soil ECe, reduced plant height and total dry weight, N and P concentrations. Plant height, total dry weight, plant P and K concentrations were maximum and N concentration ranked second in 40 mg.l-1 cupper sulphate salt. Maximum reduction in plant height and total dry weight was noted in iron chloride with increasing salt amount, and minimum N concentration was noted in this treatment. Soil ECe in cupper sulphate ranked third and soil total N in sodium benzoate 80 and cupper sulphate 40 mg.l-1 treatments ranked first and soil available K in cupper sulphate 40 mg.l-1 ranked second. Our results showed that cupper sulphate 40 mg.l-1 treatment is suitable

  2. [Inhibitory effect of DMPP on soil nitrification as affected by soil moisture content, pH and organic matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yan; Wu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Li-Li; Gong, Ping; Dong, Xin-Xin; Nie, Yan-Xia

    2012-10-01

    A laboratory incubation test with meadow brown soil was conducted to study the inhibitory effect of 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on soil nitrification as affected by soil moisture content (40%, 60% and 80% of the maximum field capacity), pH (4, 7 and 10), and organic matter (retained and removal). With the decrease of soil moisture content, the degradation of DMPP in soil tended to slow down, and the oxidation of soil NH4+ was more inhibited. At pH 10, more DMPP was remained in soil, and had the greatest inhibitory effect; at pH 7 and pH 4, the DMPP was lesser remained, with a smaller inhibitory effect. The removal of organic matter prolonged the remaining time of DMPP in soil, and decreased the apparent soil nitrification rate significantly.

  3. The combined use of liming and Sarcocornia fruticosa development for phytomanagement of salt marsh soils polluted by mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alcaraz, María Nazaret; Conesa, Héctor Miguel; Tercero, María del Carmen; Schulin, Rainer; Alvarez-Rogel, José; Egea, Consuelo

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of liming and behaviour of Sarcocornia fruticosa as a strategy of phytomanagement of metal polluted salt marsh soils. Soils were taken from two polluted salt marshes (one with fine texture and pH∼6.4 and the other one with sandy texture and pH∼3.1). A lime amendment derived from the marble industry was added to each soil at a rate of 20 g kg(-1), giving four treatments: neutral soil with/without liming and acidic soil with/without liming. Cuttings of S. fruticosa were planted in pots filled with these substrates and grown for 10 months. The pots were irrigated with eutrophicated water. As expected, lime amendment decreased the soluble metal concentrations. In both soils, liming favoured the growth of S. fruticosa and enhanced the capacity of the plants to phytostabilise metals in roots. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples, and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children in four municipalities of the department of Huila (Colombia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignon, Stefania; Opazo-Gutiérrez, Mario Omar; Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Orjuela-Osorio, Iván Rodrigo; Avila, Viviana; Martinez-Mier, Esperanza Angeles; González-Carrera, María Clara; Ruiz-Carrizosa, Jaime Alberto; Silva-Hermida, Blanca Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride is an element that affects teeth and bone formation in animals and humans. Though the use of systemic fluoride is an evidence-based caries preventive measure, excessive ingestion can impair tooth development, mainly the mineralization of tooth enamel, leading to a condition known as enamel fluorosis. In this study, we investigated the geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples in four endemic enamel fluorosis sentinel municipalities of the department of Huila, Colombia (Pitalito, Altamira, El Agrado and Rivera), and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children. The concentration of fluoride in drinking water, table salt, active sediment, rock, and soil was evaluated by means of an ion selective electrode and the geochemical analyses were performed using X-ray fluorescence. Geochemical analysis revealed fluoride concentrations under 15 mg/kg in active sediment, rock and soil samples, not indicative of a significant delivery to the watersheds studied. The concentration of fluoride in table salt was found to be under the inferior limit (less than 180 μg/g) established by the Colombian regulations. Likewise, exposure doses for fluoride water intake did not exceed the recommended total dose for all ages from 6 months. Although the evidence does not point out at rocks, soils, fluoride-bearing minerals, fluoridated salt and water, the hypothesis of these elements as responsible of the current prevalence of enamel fluorosis cannot be discarded since, aqueducts might have undergone significant changes overtime.

  5. Soil solid materials affect the kinetics of extracellular enzymatic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammirato, C.; Miltner, A.; Kästner, M.

    2009-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Soil solid materials affect the degradation processes of many organic compounds by decreasing the bioavailability of substrates and by interacting with degraders. The magnitude of this effect in the environment is shown by the fact that xenobiotics which are readily metabolized in aquatic environments can have long residence times in soil. Extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose (enzyme: beta-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger) was chosen as model degradation process since it is easier to control and more reproducible than a whole cell processes. Furthermore extracellular enzymes play an important role in the environment since they are responsible for the first steps in the degradation of organic macromolecules; beta-glucosidase is key enzyme in the degradation of cellulose and therefore it is fundamental in the carbon cycle and for soil in general. The aims of the project are: 1) quantification of solid material effect on degradation, 2) separation of the effects of minerals on enzyme (adsorption →change in activity) and substrate (adsorption →change in bioavailability). Our hypothesis is that a rate reduction in the enzymatic reaction in the presence of a solid phase results from the sum of decreased bioavailability of the substrate and decreased activity of enzyme molecules. The relative contribution of the two terms to the overall effect can vary widely depending on the chemical nature of the substrate, the properties of the enzyme and on the surface properties of the solid materials. Furthermore we hypothesize that by immobilizing the enzyme in an appropriate carrier the adsorption of enzymes to soil materials can be eliminated and that therefore immobilization can increase the overall reaction rate (activity loss caused by immobilization standard experimental conditions: 66 mM phosphate buffer, pH 5, 25°C, 20 mg solid/ml buffer). The enzyme in an immobilized form (covalent bonding to oxirane groups on the surfaces of macroporous

  6. Comparison between an anionic exchanger of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt and a commercial exchanger in the extraction of available phosphorus in soils; Comparacao entre um trocador anionico de sal de amonio quaternario de quitosana e um trocador comercial na extracao de fosforo disponivel em solos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves Junior, Affonso Celso; Nacke, Herbert, E-mail: herbertnacke@hotmail.co [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, Marechal Rondon, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Agrarias; Favere, Valfredo Tadeu de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (DQ/UFSC), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Gomes, Gilmar Divino [Faculdade de Tecnologia Internacional, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The present work aimed modify chemically the chitosan (QTS) surface to obtain a reticulate chitosan quaternary ammonium salt (SAQQR), and compare this anionic exchanger with an commercial ion exchanger in the extraction of available phosphorus in soils. The results showed that the two exchangers are identical, extracting similar and proportional quantities of available phosphorus in the studied soils, and the anionic exchanger of SAQQR provides a high chemical stability, not affected by the pH difference of soils. (author)

  7. Salt minerals and waters from soils in Konya [Turkey] and Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouwen, L.

    1981-01-01

    This study deals with the relation between the mineralogical composition of salt assemblages and the composition of groundwaters from which these salts precipitated. A comparison was made between salts and waters sampled in the Konya Basin in Turkey and waters sampled in three different regions in

  8. Natural polymeric 3-alkylpyridinium salt affects vertebrate skeletal muscle contractility by preferentially blocking neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žužek, Monika Cecilija; Grandič, Marjana; Benoit, Evelyne; Frangež, Robert

    2017-11-05

    The effects of natural polymeric alkylpyridinium salt (nPoly-3-APS), a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor isolated from the marine sponge Reniera sarai, were studied on isolated mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm muscle preparations using electrophysiological approaches. nPoly-3-APS inhibited nerve-evoked isometric muscle twitch and tetanic contraction in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50=29.4μM and 18.5μM, respectively) and produced a 30-44% decrease of directly muscle-elicited twitch and tetanus amplitudes at 54.4μM. Additionally, nPoly-3-APS (9.1-27.2μM) markedly decreased the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials, while their frequency was only affected at the highest concentration used. Endplate potentials were also inhibited by nPoly-3-APS in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50=20.1μM), without significant change in the resting membrane potential of muscle fibers (up to 54.4μM). In conclusion, our results show, for the first time, that nPoly-3-APS preferentially blocks the neuromuscular transmission, in vitro, by a non-depolarizing mechanism. This strongly suggests that the in vivo toxicity of nPoly-3-APS mainly occurs through an antagonist action of the compound on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of skeletal muscles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of soil surface salt on the density and distribution of the snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in northeast Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiporn Suwannatrai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Opisthorchis viverrini infection is associated with human cholangiocarcinoma and northeast Thailand has the highest incidence of this disease in the world. Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos is the major freshwater snail intermediate host of O. viverrini in this area and an analysis based on geographical information systems was used to determine the effect of variation in soil surface salt on the density and distribution of this snail. A malacological survey was carried out in 56 water bodies in the Khorat basin, northeast Thailand at locations with various soil surface salt levels. Mollusk samples were collected from 10 ecologically representative water body sites with 10-20 sampling stations in each. The shoreline of clear, shallow water bodies was found to be the preferred B. s. goniomphalos habitat. The snails were exclusively found in water with salinity levels ranging between 0.05 and 22.11 parts per thousand (ppt, which supports the notion that B. s. goniomphalos prefers water with some saline content over pure, freshwater. The highest snail population densities were in rice fields, ponds, road-side ditches and canals within a water salinity range of 2.5-5.0 ppt. However, the presence of B. s. goniomphalos was negatively correlated with water salinity (P ≤0.05, both with regard to density and distribution. The areas with the highest density of B. s. goniomphalos were those with less than 1% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.314, while the lowest densities were found in areas exceeding 50% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.015.

  10. Successful field and laboratory tests of advanced phytoremediation systems for decontamination of petroleum and salt impacted soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.; Huang, X.D.; Gerhardt, K.; Gurska, J.; Yu, X.M.; MacNeill, G.; Lu, X.; Nykamp, J.; Glick, B.; Wang, W.; Wang, H.; Wu, S.; Knezevich, N.; Gerwing, P. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)]|[Earthmaster Environmental Strategies Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Waterloo Environmental Biotechnology Inc., Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation discussed the advantages of phytoremediation and provided an overview of a phytoremediation tests results for petroleum and salt remediation. Several examples of remediation methods were discussed, including the dig and dump method; soil incineration; chemical extraction; electrokinetic separation and land farming/natural attenuation. The advantages of phytoremediation include improved natural structure and texture of soil; suitability to most regions and climates because it is driven by solar energy; cost effectiveness and technically feasible; reasonable time frame for restoration; promotion of high rhizosphere activity by plants; and effective use at remote sites. The development and proof of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) was then addressed. A description of the PEPS was provided. This presentation also reviewed the interaction of a PGPR containing ACC deaminase with a plant seed or root; research and development of the PEPS for PHC remediation; the use of petroleum remediation on an Imperial Oil Sarnia land farm; proof of concept of the application of the PEPS for PHC remediation in Hinton, Alberta; and development of the PEPS for salt impacted sites. Field work and the characteristics of soils were also examined. It was concluded that the PEPS has great potential for efficient remediation of organic, salt and metal contaminated sites and that PGPR alleviates stress and promotes growth resulting in low ethylene and high auxin content. tabs., figs.

  11. Effects of freshwater input on trace element pollution in salt marsh soils of a typical coastal estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater input is an important pathway for the restoration of degraded coastal wetlands, however, little information is available on the negative effects of freshwater inputs on salt marsh soils in restored wetlands. Soil profile samples to a depth of 70 cm were collected in both degraded wetland (DW) and freshwater restored wetland (RW) in the Yellow River Delta of China to analyze the trace element pollution effects of freshwater input on coastal wetland soils. Heavy metals (i.e. Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) and arsenic (As) concentrations were determined using the inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate their distributions, sources and ecotoxicity in marsh soils from both wetlands. Our results showed that these trace elements had moderate spatial variability in both DW and RW soils. The concentrations of As, Cr, Pb and Cd in all soil layers were generally higher in RW soils than those in DW soils (p wetlands, however, As and Zn in DW or As, Zn and Ni in RW might have another similar origin. The enrichment factor (EF) values for Cu, Ni and Pb in both wetlands indicated minimal enrichment levels, whereas both As and Cd were significantly enriched with EF values 3 or 6 times greater than 1.5, implying a significant natural or anthropogenic origin. As and Ni exceeded the effect range low (ERL) and threshold effect level (TEL) in both wetlands, even As exceeded the probable effect level (PEL) in RW soils. Cr, Cu and Cd were grouped into TELs-PELs, moreover, Cr concentrations in RW soils exceeded the ERL. However, both Pb and Zn concentrations were below the TELs in both wetlands. Generally, The toxic unit in more than 85% of DW or RW soil samples showed low toxicity with higher contribution of As and Ni. It is necessary to monitor and control trace elements in the freshwater supplied to restored wetlands in coastal wetland restoration projects.

  12. Salinization of the soil solution decreases the further accumulation of salt in the root zone of the halophyte Atriplex nummularia Lindl. growing above shallow saline groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharby, Hesham F; Colmer, Timothy D; Barrett-Lennard, Edward G

    2018-01-01

    Water use by plants in landscapes with shallow saline groundwater may lead to the accumulation of salt in the root zone. We examined the accumulation of Na+ and Cl- around the roots of the halophyte Atriplex nummularia Lindl. and the impacts of this increasing salinity for stomatal conductance, water use and growth. Plants were grown in columns filled with a sand-clay mixture and connected at the bottom to reservoirs containing 20, 200 or 400 mM NaCl. At 21 d, Na+ and Cl- concentrations in the soil solution were affected by the salinity of the groundwater, height above the water table and the root fresh mass density at various soil depths (P groundwater salinity and height above the water table remained significant factors, but the root fresh mass density was no longer significant. Regression of data from the 200 and 400 mM NaCl treatments showed that the rate of Na+ accumulation in the soil increased until the Na+ concentration reached ~250 mM within the root zone; subsequent decreases in accumulation were associated with decreases in stomatal conductance. Salinization of the soil solution therefore had a feedback effect on further salinization within the root zone. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Salt stress is an environmental signal affecting degradative enzyme synthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, F; Rapoport, G

    1995-05-01

    Growth under conditions of salt stress has important effects on the synthesis of degradative enzymes in Bacillus subtilis. Salt stress strongly stimulates the expression of sacB, encoding levansucrase (about ninefold), and downregulates the expression of aprE, encoding alkaline protease (about sixfold). It is suggested that the DegS-DegU two-component system is involved in sensing salt stress. Moreover, it has been shown that the level of sacB expression strongly depends on the growth conditions; its expression level is about eightfold higher in cells grown on agar plates than in cells grown in liquid medium.

  14. The ash in forest fire affected soils control the soil losses. Part 1. The pioneer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo

    2013-04-01

    composition (Pereira and Úbeda, 2010) and Pereira et al., 2012). Some of the new research challenges related to ash impact in the fire affected soils are related to the ash redistribution after the fire, the impact of ash in soil and water chemistry, the temporal changes of soil erosion, the control ash exert on vegetation recovery and the role to be played by ash in the best management of fire affected land. Those topics needs new ideas and new scientists such as Paulo Pereira show in the Part II of this abstract. Acknowledgements, Lithuanian Research Council. Project LITFIRE, Fire effects on Lithuanian soils and ecosystems (MIP-48/2011) and the research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857. References Bodí, M., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S., and Cerdà, A. 2011b. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. Cerdà, A. 1998a. Postfire dynamics of erosional processes under mediterranean climatic conditions. Z. Geomorphol., 42 (3) 373-398. Cerdà, A. 1998b. Changes in overland flow and infiltration after a rangeland fire in a Mediterranean scrubland. Hydrological Processes, 12, 1031-1042. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S. H.2010. The effect of ant mounds on overland flow and soil erodibility following a wildfire in eastern Spain. Ecohydrology, 3, 392-401. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S.H. 2008. The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena, 74, 256-263. Pereira, P., and Úbeda, X. 2010. Spatial distribution of heavy metals released from ashes after a wildfire, Journal of Environment Engineering and Landscape Management, 18, 13-22. Pereira, P., Ubeda, X., Martin, D.A. 2012. Fire severity effects on ash chemical composition and extractable elements. Geoderma, 191, 105 - 114. Pérez-Cabello, F., Cerdà, A., de la Riva, J., Echeverría, M.T., García-Martín, A., Ibarra, P., Lasanta, T., Montorio

  15. Soil-Structural Stability as Affected by Clay Mineralogy, Soil Texture and Polyacrylamide Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil-structural stability (expressed in terms of aggregate stability and pore size distribution) depends on (i) soil inherent properties, (ii) extrinsic condition prevailing in the soil that may vary temporally and spatially, and (iii) addition of soil amendments. Different soil management practices...

  16. Soil Tillage Management Affects Maize Grain Yield by Regulating Spatial Distribution Coordination of Roots, Soil Moisture and Nitrogen Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinbing; Zhou, Baoyuan; Sun, Xuefang; Yue, Yang; Ma, Wei; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the root system through the soil profile has an impact on moisture and nutrient uptake by plants, affecting growth and productivity. The spatial distribution of the roots, soil moisture, and fertility are affected by tillage practices. The combination of high soil density and the presence of a soil plow pan typically impede the growth of maize (Zea mays L.).We investigated the spatial distribution coordination of the root system, soil moisture, and N status in response to different soil tillage treatments (NT: no-tillage, RT: rotary-tillage, SS: subsoiling) and the subsequent impact on maize yield, and identify yield-increasing mechanisms and optimal soil tillage management practices. Field experiments were conducted on the Huang-Huai-Hai plain in China during 2011 and 2012. The SS and RT treatments significantly reduced soil bulk density in the top 0-20 cm layer of the soil profile, while SS significantly decreased soil bulk density in the 20-30 cm layer. Soil moisture in the 20-50 cm profile layer was significantly higher for the SS treatment compared to the RT and NT treatment. In the 0-20 cm topsoil layer, the NT treatment had higher soil moisture than the SS and RT treatments. Root length density of the SS treatment was significantly greater than density of the RT and NT treatments, as soil depth increased. Soil moisture was reduced in the soil profile where root concentration was high. SS had greater soil moisture depletion and a more concentration root system than RT and NT in deep soil. Our results suggest that the SS treatment improved the spatial distribution of root density, soil moisture and N states, thereby promoting the absorption of soil moisture and reducing N leaching via the root system in the 20-50 cm layer of the profile. Within the context of the SS treatment, a root architecture densely distributed deep into the soil profile, played a pivotal role in plants' ability to access nutrients and water. An optimal

  17. Salt overload: How quickly does road salt move from road to groundwater to stream in Baltimore County, MD and what are the effects on soil, groundwater, and stream chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.; Sandosky, B.; McGuire, M.; Casey, R.; Snodgrass, J.; Lev, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    storm events. A persistent groundwater plume of water with high NaCl concentrations is present below the SMBs and downgradient in the shallow groundwater aquifer. Concentrations vary seasonally with the highest concentrations in the winter and early spring. Na+ clearly interacts with the cation exchange complex (CEC) along a flowpath between the SMB and the stream. As a result, the Na:Cl ratio falls from 1:1 in groundwater below the SMBs to as low as ~1:10 and also seems to vary seasonally along the flowpath. Preliminary measurements of the CEC show that the Ca:Na ratio decreases by a factor of 2 - 5 in soil and aquifer materials affected by road salt. Preliminary strontium (Sr) isotope data indicate that groundwater and CEC within the road salt plumes are similar to Sr isotope values for seawater and are isotopically distinct from the relatively radiogenic natural weathering Sr isotope signal. Our findings indicate that SMBs increase the residence time of road salt in groundwater and stream systems with potential negative implications for ecosystems downgradient of SMBs.

  18. Soil fauna and organic amendment interactions affect soil carbon and crop performance in semi-arid West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouédraogo, E.; Brussaard, L.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2007-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at Kaibo in southern Burkina Faso on an Eutric Cambisol during the 2000 rainy season to assess the interaction of organic amendment quality and soil fauna, affecting soil organic carbon and sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) performance. Plots were treated with the

  19. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoczky, E. [Pannon Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Keszthely (Hungary); Szabados, I.; Marth, P. [Plant Health and Soil Conservation Station, Higany (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Elucidating key factors affecting radionuclide aging in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roig, M. [Universitat Politecnica Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); Rigola, A.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G. [Barcelona Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanistic studies allow at present to describe the processes governing the short-term interaction of radiostrontium and radiocaesium in soils. The initial sorption step can be described through the estimation of the soil-soil solution distribution coefficient from soil parameters, as cationic exchange capacity, radiocaesium interception potential and concentration of competing ions in the soil solution. After the initial soil-radionuclide interaction, a fraction of radionuclide is no longer available for exchange with the solution, and it remains fixed in the solid fraction. At present, the initial fixed fraction of a radionuclide in a given soil cannot be predicted from soil properties. Besides, little is known about soil and environmental factors (e.g., temperature; hydric regime) provoking the increase in the fixed fraction with time, the so-called aging process. This process is considered to control the reduction of food contamination with time at contaminated scenarios. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to predict the radionuclide aging in the medium and long term for a better risk assessment, especially when a decision has to be made between relying on natural attenuation versus implementing intervention actions. Here we study radiostrontium and radiocaesium aging in a set of soils, covering a wide range of soil types of contrasting properties (e.g., loamy calcareous; podzol; chernozem, organic). Three factors are separately and simultaneously tested: time elapsed since contamination, temperature and hydric regime. Changes in the radionuclide fixed fraction are estimated with a leaching test based on the use of a mild extractant solution. In addition to this, secondary effects on the radiocaesium interception potential in various soils are also considered. (author)

  1. Effects of middle-term land reclamation on nickel soil-water interaction: a case study from reclaimed salt marshes of Po River Delta, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giuseppe, Dario; Melchiorre, Massimiliano; Faccini, Barbara; Ferretti, Giacomo; Coltorti, Massimo

    2017-09-26

    Reclaimed salt marshes are fragile environments where water salinization and accumulation of heavy metals can easily occur. This type of environment constitutes a large part of the Po River Delta (Italy), where intensive agricultural activities take place. Given the higher Ni background of Po River Delta soils and its water-soluble nature, the main aim of this contribution is to understand if reclamation can influence the Ni behavior over time. In this study, we investigated the geochemical features of 40 soils sampled in two different localities from the Po River Delta with different reclamation ages. Samples of salt marsh soils reclaimed in 1964 were taken from Valle del Mezzano while soils reclaimed in 1872 were taken nearby Codigoro town. Batch solubility tests and consecutive determination of Ni in pore-water were compared to bulk physicochemical compositions of soils. Bulk Ni content of the studied soils is naturally high, since these soils originated from Po River sediments derived from the erosion of ultramafic rocks. Moreover, it seems that Ni concentration increases during soil evolution, being probably related to the degradation of serpentine. Instead, the water-soluble Ni measured in the leaching tests is greater in soils recently reclaimed compared to the oldest soils. Soil properties of two soil profiles from a reclaimed wetland area were examined to determine soil evolution over one century. Following reclamation, pedogenic processes of the superficial horizons resulted in organic matter mineralization, pH buffer, and a decrease of Ni water solubility from recently to evolved reclaimed soil.

  2. How historical copper contamination affects soil structure and mobilization and transport of colloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo, Marcos; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin

    Copper is accumulated in soils due to human activities such as mining industry, agriculture practises, or waste deposals. High concentrations of copper can affect plants and soil organisms, and subsequently the soil structure and its inner space architecture. In this work we investigated the effect...... of copper concentration on the movement of an inert tracer, tritium, and the mobilization and transport of colloid particles in undisturbed soil cores (10 cm diameter and 8 cm height). The cores were sampled along a copper gradient of 21 to 3837 mg Cu kg-1 soil on an abandoned arable soil polluted by copper...... between 0.01 to 0.43 pore volumes, with longer times for the most contaminated point, likely related with its higher soil density and lower air permeability. The copper pollution affected colloid and tracer transport in the soil columns. The release of colloids especially in the most contaminated points...

  3. Microbial Community Analysis of a Coastal Salt Marsh Affected by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazley, Melanie J.; Martinez, Robert J.; Rajan, Suja; Powell, Jessica; Piceno, Yvette M.; Tom, Lauren M.; Andersen, Gary L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Mortazavi, Behzad; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes are highly sensitive wetland ecosystems that can sustain long-term impacts from anthropogenic events such as oil spills. In this study, we examined the microbial communities of a Gulf of Mexico coastal salt marsh during and after the influx of petroleum hydrocarbons following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Total hydrocarbon concentrations in salt marsh sediments were highest in June and July 2010 and decreased in September 2010. Coupled PhyloChip and GeoChip microarray analyses demonstrated that the microbial community structure and function of the extant salt marsh hydrocarbon-degrading microbial populations changed significantly during the study. The relative richness and abundance of phyla containing previously described hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria) increased in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments and then decreased once hydrocarbons were below detection. Firmicutes, however, continued to increase in relative richness and abundance after hydrocarbon concentrations were below detection. Functional genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation were enriched in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments then declined significantly (pmarsh grass sediments compared to inlet sediments (lacking marsh grass) suggests that the marsh rhizosphere microbial communities could also be contributing to hydrocarbon degradation. The results of this study provide a comprehensive view of microbial community structural and functional dynamics within perturbed salt marsh ecosystems. PMID:22815990

  4. Microbial community analysis of a coastal salt marsh affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazley, Melanie J; Martinez, Robert J; Rajan, Suja; Powell, Jessica; Piceno, Yvette M; Tom, Lauren M; Andersen, Gary L; Hazen, Terry C; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Mortazavi, Behzad; Sobecky, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes are highly sensitive wetland ecosystems that can sustain long-term impacts from anthropogenic events such as oil spills. In this study, we examined the microbial communities of a Gulf of Mexico coastal salt marsh during and after the influx of petroleum hydrocarbons following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Total hydrocarbon concentrations in salt marsh sediments were highest in June and July 2010 and decreased in September 2010. Coupled PhyloChip and GeoChip microarray analyses demonstrated that the microbial community structure and function of the extant salt marsh hydrocarbon-degrading microbial populations changed significantly during the study. The relative richness and abundance of phyla containing previously described hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria) increased in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments and then decreased once hydrocarbons were below detection. Firmicutes, however, continued to increase in relative richness and abundance after hydrocarbon concentrations were below detection. Functional genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation were enriched in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments then declined significantly (pmarsh grass sediments compared to inlet sediments (lacking marsh grass) suggests that the marsh rhizosphere microbial communities could also be contributing to hydrocarbon degradation. The results of this study provide a comprehensive view of microbial community structural and functional dynamics within perturbed salt marsh ecosystems.

  5. Microbial community analysis of a coastal salt marsh affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie J Beazley

    Full Text Available Coastal salt marshes are highly sensitive wetland ecosystems that can sustain long-term impacts from anthropogenic events such as oil spills. In this study, we examined the microbial communities of a Gulf of Mexico coastal salt marsh during and after the influx of petroleum hydrocarbons following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Total hydrocarbon concentrations in salt marsh sediments were highest in June and July 2010 and decreased in September 2010. Coupled PhyloChip and GeoChip microarray analyses demonstrated that the microbial community structure and function of the extant salt marsh hydrocarbon-degrading microbial populations changed significantly during the study. The relative richness and abundance of phyla containing previously described hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria increased in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments and then decreased once hydrocarbons were below detection. Firmicutes, however, continued to increase in relative richness and abundance after hydrocarbon concentrations were below detection. Functional genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation were enriched in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments then declined significantly (p<0.05 once hydrocarbon concentrations decreased. A greater decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations among marsh grass sediments compared to inlet sediments (lacking marsh grass suggests that the marsh rhizosphere microbial communities could also be contributing to hydrocarbon degradation. The results of this study provide a comprehensive view of microbial community structural and functional dynamics within perturbed salt marsh ecosystems.

  6. Aggregate breakdown mechanisms as affected by soil texture and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil samples with varying properties were collected from the surface 0–0.2 m from 14 ecotopes in Eastern Cape province. Aggregate stability was determined following the fast wetting (FW), slow wetting (SW) and wet stirring (WSt) methods. Soils with high quartz were the least stable due to its inability to bond with other clay ...

  7. Plant community development is affected by nutrients and soil biota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Deyn, G.B.; Raaijmakers, C.E.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    1 Plant community development depends to a great extent on the availability of soil nutrients, but recent studies underline the role of symbiotic, herbivorous and pathogenic soil biota. We tested for interactions between these biotic and abiotic factors by studying the effects of additional

  8. Factors affecting soil erosion in Beijing mountain forestlands | Zhang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of regions, vegetation types and forest stand density in controlling soil erosion were investigated in Beijing mountain forest, China. The main objective was to develop some models to estimate soil erosion under different forest conditions including regions, vegetation type, and stand density as influenced by artificial ...

  9. Mucuna pruriens differentially affect maize yields in three soils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize production in smallholder farming systems in Kenya is largely limited by low soil fertility. As mineral fertilizer is expensive, green manuring using leguminous cover crops could be an alternative strategy for farmers to enhance farm productivity. However, due to variability in soil type, the effects of green manure are ...

  10. Plant communtiy development is affected by nutrients and soil biota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deyn, de G.B.; Raaijmakers, C.E.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2004-01-01

    1 Plant community development depends to a great extent on the availability of soil nutrients, but recent studies underline the role of symbiotic, herbivorous and pathogenic soil biota. We tested for interactions between these biotic and abiotic factors by studying the effects of additional

  11. Varying termiticide application rate and volume affect initial soil penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Peterson

    2010-01-01

    The initial soil penetration of Premise 75 and Termidor SC, containing imidacloprid and fipronil, respectively, were tested in laboratory columns of five different soils. Three combinations of application concentration and volume were used: double the recommended active ingredient concentration at one half the recommended volume (DR), the full concentration and volume...

  12. Organic Residues Affect Soil P Availability, Cowpea Yield And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SH

    control treatment, and 3.37 mg kg soil-1 for maize stover, which rather immobilized P throughout the incubation ... materials and low rates of mineral fertilizer ..... residues with contrasting chemical compositions under humid tropical conditions -decomposition and and nutrient release. Soil Biol. Biochem. 24: 1051-1060.

  13. Cobalt in alluvial Egyptian soils as affected by industrial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohny, Ensegam A M

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-five surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from different locations in Egypt representing non-polluted, moderately and highly polluted soils. The aim of this study was to evaluate total Co content in alluvial soils of Delta in Egypt using the delayed neturen activation analysis technique (DNAA). The two prominent gamma ray lines at 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV was efficiently used for 60Co determination. Co content in non-polluted soil samples ranged between 13.12 to 23.20 ppm Co with an average of 18.16 +/- 4.38 ppm. Cobalt content in moderately polluted soils ranged between 26.5 to 30.00 ppm with an average of 28.3 +/- 1.3 ppm. The highest Co levels (ranged from 36 to 64.69 ppm with an average of 51.9 +/- 9.5); were observed in soil samples collected from, either highly polluted agricultural soils due to prolonged irrigation with industrial wastewater or surface soil samples from industrial sites.

  14. Fractal Scaling of Particle Size Distribution and Relationships with Topsoil Properties Affected by Biological Soil Crusts: e88559

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guang-Lei Gao; Guo-Dong Ding; Bin Wu; Yu-Qing Zhang; Shu-Gao Qin; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yan-Feng Bao; Yun-Dong Liu; Li Wan; Ji-Feng Deng

    2014-01-01

    .... Methodology/Principal Findings To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts...

  15. Bacteria and protozoa in soil microhabitats as affected by earthworms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winding, Anne; Rønn, Regin; Hendriksen, Niels B.

    1997-01-01

    , were compared. The total, viable, and culturable number of bacteria, the metabolic potentials of bacterial populations, and the number of protozoa and nematodes were determined in soil size fractions. Significant differences between soil fractions were shown by all assays. The highest number......-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolim chloride (CTC)-reducing bacteria explained a major part of the variation in the number of protozoa. High protozoan activity and predation thus coincided with high bacterial activity. In soil with elm leaves, fungal growth is assumed to inhibit bacterial and protozoan...... activity. In soil with elm leaves and earthworms, earthworm activity led to increased culturability of bacteria, activity of protozoa, number of nematodes, changed metabolic potentials of the bacteria, and decreased differences in metabolic potentials between bacterial populations in the soil fractions...

  16. Repeated application of organic waste affects soil organic matter composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltre, Clément; Gregorich, Edward G.; Bruun, Sander

    2017-01-01

    of household waste compost, cattle manure and sewage sludge, and was compared to a control treatment that had received NPK fertilisation. Soils were characterised using CO2-evolved gas analysis (CO2-EGA) during ramped thermal analysis, mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) and analysis of amino......-sugar and lignin phenols. SOM from the compost and cattle manure treatments had greater thermal stability than the sludge and NPK treatments, which was consistent with the thermal stability of the applied wastes. Compost-amended soils and manure-amended soils also had a greater lignin content with a lower degree...... of oxidation and a greater contribution of bacterial amino sugars relative to fungal amino sugars compared to soils from the NPK treatment. The high soil C accumulation rate combined with low amino sugar C in SOM from the compost treatment suggested less stimulation of microbial activity, while the cattle...

  17. Genes involved in vasoconstriction and vasodilation system affect salt-sensitive hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Citterio

    Full Text Available The importance of excess salt intake in the pathogenesis of hypertension is widely recognized. Blood pressure is controlled primarily by salt and water balance because of the infinite gain property of the kidney to rapidly eliminate excess fluid and salt. Up to fifty percent of patients with essential hypertension are salt-sensitive, as manifested by a rise in blood pressure with salt loading. We conducted a two-stage genetic analysis in hypertensive patients very accurately phenotyped for their salt-sensitivity. All newly discovered never treated before, essential hypertensives underwent an acute salt load to monitor the simultaneous changes in blood pressure and renal sodium excretion. The first stage consisted in an association analysis of genotyping data derived from genome-wide array on 329 subjects. Principal Component Analysis demonstrated that this population was homogenous. Among the strongest results, we detected a cluster of SNPs located in the first introns of PRKG1 gene (rs7897633, p = 2.34E-05 associated with variation in diastolic blood pressure after acute salt load. We further focused on two genetic loci, SLC24A3 and SLC8A1 (plasma membrane sodium/calcium exchange proteins, NCKX3 and NCX1, respectively with a functional relationship with the previous gene and associated to variations in systolic blood pressure (the imputed rs3790261, p = 4.55E-06; and rs434082, p = 4.7E-03. In stage 2, we characterized 159 more patients for the SNPs in PRKG1, SLC24A3 and SLC8A1. Combined analysis showed an epistatic interaction of SNPs in SLC24A3 and SLC8A1 on the pressure-natriuresis (p interaction = 1.55E-04, p model = 3.35E-05, supporting their pathophysiological link in cellular calcium homeostasis. In conclusions, these findings point to a clear association between body sodium-blood pressure relations and molecules modulating the contractile state of vascular cells through an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration.

  18. Influence of salinity on soil chemical properties and surrounding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akomolafe Gbenga

    2013-11-14

    Nov 14, 2013 ... samples were collected randomly from the salt mining site and 10 m away from the site (control) at 5, ... Salt-affected soils, as they are called, are either saline or sodic. Saline soils refer to soils with electrical conductivity above 4. dS/m and usually ... Brock, 2001; USDA, Natural Resources Conservation.

  19. Do genetic modifications in crops affect soil fungi? a review

    OpenAIRE

    Hannula, S.E.; De Boer, W.; van Veen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of genetically modified (GM) plants in agriculture has been a topic in public debate for over a decade. Despite their potential to increase yields, there may be unintended negative side-effects of GM plants on soil micro-organisms that are essential for functioning of agro-ecosystems. Fungi are important soil organisms and can have beneficial or harmful effects on plants. Their benefits to agro-ecosystems come from their activities as free-living saprobes breaking down soil organic ma...

  20. ESEM results and changes in wettability patterns within soil: three years irrigation with slightly-salted water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Abellan, Javier; Candela, Lucila; Medero, Gabriela; Buckman, Jim; Hasnayn, Mohammad M.

    2015-04-01

    Impacts on soil and aquifer media from the use of non-conventional water (treated wastewater-TWW, desalted) for irrigation have been widely studied in the last years . A number of contributions have focused on the impacts derived from the use of TWW (Assouline and Narkis, 2013; Lahav et al., 2010; Xu et al., 2010). Changes in soil hydraulic conductivity and clogging processes have been studied in laboratory experiments from soil columns (Lado and Ben-Hur, 2010) and at field scale (Costa, 1999; Minhas et al., 1994). Irrigation with non-conventional water may also lead to the occurrence of contaminants, a major current environmental concern (Valdes-Abellan et al., 2013). Previous studies have considered impacts in a uniform soil media pore structure; less attention has been paid at a microscopic scale and the influence that high-salinity water may have on wettability of soil. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) is a useful technique to be applied in soil science to analyse microscopic changes in soil structure or soil wetting patterns. Research applying this technology for wet systems (Donald, 1998) or porous media (Ali et al., 1995) is available, however as far as we know research on soil impacts due to long term irrigation with saline or non-conventional water are much less common. The dynamic mode of the ESEM allows changes of samples from wet to dry by modifying the water vapour pressure and to observe the wetting and drying patterns and interactions between the solid and liquid phase in the soil (Lourenço et al., 2008). Preliminary results of the study at a microscopic scale of soil samples collected before and after three year irrigation with slightly salted water in an experimental plot setup in semi-arid climatic conditions (Alicante, SE Spain) are presented. We will show the micro-structure of soil and undertake a preliminary investigation of wetting and drying of samples using ESEM techniques Differences in the water vapour pressure value at

  1. Chloride salt mixtures affect Gordal cv. green Spanish-style table olive fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista Gallego, J; Arroyo López, F N; Romero Gil, V; Rodríguez Gómez, F; García García, P; Garrido Fernández, A

    2011-10-01

    This work studies the effects of different sodium (in the range of 4-10%), potassium (0-4%) and calcium (0-6%) chloride salt mixtures on the fermentation profile of Gordal olives processed according to the Spanish style. For this purpose, response surface methodology based on a simplex centroid mixture design with constrain (sum of salt percentages = 10%) was used. All treatments reached appropriate titratable acidity levels, but this parameter could not be related to the initial chloride salt concentration. The presence of CaCl(2) led to lower initial and after-fermentation pHs, delayed sugar diffusion into the brine, its maximum concentration and titratable acidity formation. CaCl(2) also delayed Enterobacteriaceae and yeast sprang, decreasing their overall growth. This chloride salt also showed a tendency to reduce overall lactic acid bacteria growth. KCl had a similar behaviour to NaCl but, in general, increased overall microbial growth. Thus, a partial substitution of NaCl in Spanish-style green olives with KCl and CaCl(2) does not substantially modify the fermentation profile but does produce some changes, which, when properly managed, could help to improve product processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of potato and sweet potato starches affects white salted noodle quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Z.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Potato and sweet potato starches and derivatives thereof were used to substitute part of the wheat flour in white salted noodle (WSN) manufacture. The quality of the WSN obtained was compared with the quality of WSN made from wheat flour only. When up to 20% of wheat flour was replaced by acetylated

  3. Characteristics of chicken nuggets as affected by added fat and variable salt contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogesh, K; Ahmad, T; Manpreet, G; Mangesh, K; Das, P

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have been conducted in many countries on how to increase the per capita consumption of poultry meat. With the growing demand for poultry meat, the development of value added product, such as chicken nuggets has been identified as the best way to increase poultry meat consumption. Apart from this allowing for the flourishing growth of fast food industries; chicken nuggets needs to be produced in higher quantity and to reduce cost, there is increasing interest in using of various meat additives. Though, chicken fat are edible, it is important to evolve production processes for gainful utilization of this part. So the main objective of this work was to study the effect of the addition of chicken fat and various salt contents on the physicochemical, proximate composition and sensory characteristics of chicken nuggets. Based on the results it is concluded that, even up to 5% level of chicken fat with 1.5-2% added salt there is no adverse effect in terms of physico-chemical, proximate composition and sensory qualities of cooked chicken nuggets. Even, at this fat and salt level product was more preferred by panellist than no fat-no salt chicken nuggets.

  4. Land use type significantly affects microbial gene transcription in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacke, Heiko; Fischer, Christiane; Thürmer, Andrea; Meinicke, Peter; Daniel, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Soil microorganisms play an essential role in sustaining biogeochemical processes and cycling of nutrients across different land use types. To gain insights into microbial gene transcription in forest and grassland soil, we isolated mRNA from 32 sampling sites. After sequencing of generated complementary DNA (cDNA), a total of 5,824,229 sequences could be further analyzed. We were able to assign nonribosomal cDNA sequences to all three domains of life. A dominance of bacterial sequences, which were affiliated to 25 different phyla, was found. Bacterial groups capable of aromatic compound degradation such as Phenylobacterium and Burkholderia were detected in significantly higher relative abundance in forest soil than in grassland soil. Accordingly, KEGG pathway categories related to degradation of aromatic ring-containing molecules (e.g., benzoate degradation) were identified in high abundance within forest soil-derived metatranscriptomic datasets. The impact of land use type forest on community composition and activity is evidently to a high degree caused by the presence of wood breakdown products. Correspondingly, bacterial groups known to be involved in lignin degradation and containing ligninolytic genes such as Burkholderia, Bradyrhizobium, and Azospirillum exhibited increased transcriptional activity in forest soil. Higher solar radiation in grassland presumably induced increased transcription of photosynthesis-related genes within this land use type. This is in accordance with high abundance of photosynthetic organisms and plant-infecting viruses in grassland.

  5. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Lei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust, as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (P<0.05; and soil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R(2 = 0.494∼0.955, P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological soil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  6. Impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachshon, Uri

    2017-04-01

    Field measurements indicated on high variability in salt accumulation along natural and cultivated slopes, even for relatively homogeneous soil conditions. It was hypothesised that slope inclination has an impact on the location of salt accumulation along the slope. A set of laboratory experiments and numerical models were used to explore the impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation. It was shown, experimentally, that for conditions of saline water source at the lower boundary of the slope - salt accumulates in low concentrations and homogeneously along the entire slope, for moderate slopes. However, as inclination increases high salt concentrations were observed at the upper parts of the slope, leaving the lower parts of the slope relatively free of salt. The traditional flow and transport models did not predict the experimental observations as they indicated also for the moderate slopes on salt accumulation in the elevated parts of the slope, away of the saline water source. Consequently - a conceptual model was raised to explain the laboratory observations. It was suggested that the interactions between slope angle, evaporation rates, hydraulic conductivity of the medium and distribution of wetness along the slope affect the saline water flow path through the medium. This lead to preferential flow path close to the soil-atmosphere interface for the steep slopes, which leads to constant wash of the salts from the evaporation front upward towards the slope upper parts, whereas for the moderate slopes, flow path is below the soil-atmosphere interface, therefore salt that accumulates at the evaporation front is not being transported upward. Understanding of salt dynamics along slopes is important for agricultural and natural environments, as well as for civil engineering purposes. Better understanding of the salt transport processes along slopes will improve our ability to minimize and to cope with soil salinization processes. The laboratory experiments and

  7. Bioavailability assessment of thiacloprid in soil as affected by biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Zhu, Yulong; Liu, Xingang; Wu, Xiaohu; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Zheng, Yongquan

    2017-03-01

    Biochars can significantly sorb pesticides, and reduce their bioavailability in agricultural soils. In this study, the effects of a type of biochar (BC500) on the sorption, degradation, bioaccumulation and bioavailability of thiacloprid, which is a commonly used insecticide, were investigated. The thiacloprid sorption constant (Kf values) increased by 14 times after 2% BC500 application, and the degradation of the insecticide decreased with increasing amounts of the biochars in the soil. Coupled with the exhaustive extraction and single-point Tenax method, the bioavailability of thiacloprid was predicted in the presence of the biochar. In soils amended with BC500, the thiacloprid concentrations accumulated in Tenax correlated well with those observed in earthworms (R2 = 0.887), whereas the concentrations extracted by exhaustive method followed a less significant relationship with those in earthworms (R2 = 0.624). The results of Tenax extractions and earthworm bioassays indicate that biochar reduces the bioavailability of thiacloprid in soil, but the delayed degradation and increased earthworm accumulation in aged biochar-amended soil imply that the environmental risks of biochar application to earthworms remain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computed tomography scanning can monitor the effects of soil medium on root system development: An example of salt stress in corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmyalakshmi eSubramanian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds and young seedlings often encounter high soluble salt levels in the upmost soil layers, impeding vigorous growth by affecting root establishment. Computed tomography (CT scanning used at low X-ray doses can help study root development in such conditions non-destructively, because plants are allowed to grow throughout the experiment. Using a high-resolution Toshiba XVision CT scanner, we studied corn (Zea mays L. root growth under optimal and salt-stressed conditions in 3D and on a weekly basis over 3 weeks. Two groups of 3 corn plants were grown in the controlled environment of a growth chamber, in mid-sized plastic pots filled with sieved and autoclaved sand. Seedlings were subjected to first CT scanning one week after seed planting. Our main research objectives concerning root systems were: (i to quantify structural complexity from fractal dimensions estimated on skeletal 3-D images built from CT scanning data; (ii to measure growth from volumes and derived relative rates, after isolating primary and secondary roots from the soil medium in CT scanning data; and (iii to assess differences in complexity and growth per week and over Weeks 1–3 for groups of corn plants. Differences between groups were present from Week 1; starting in Week 2 secondary roots were present and could be isolated, which refined the complexity and growth analyses of root systems. Besides expected Week main effects (P < 0.01 or 0.05, Week x Group interaction (P < 0.05 or 0.10 and Group main effects were observed, which is remarkable given the small sample sizes. Graphical, quantitative and statistical analyses of CT scanning data were thus completed at an unprecedented level, and provided new and important insights regarding root system development. Repeated CT scanning is the key to a better understanding of the establishment in the soil medium of crop plants such as corn and the assessment of salt stress effects on developing root systems, in complexity and

  9. On aquifer thicknesses and geological complexity affecting fresh/salt groundwater distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamrsky, Daniel; Oude Essink, Gualbert; Bierkens, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Large coastal populations will face serious issues associated with global sea level rise in the near future. Among those are increased risk of coastal flooding and upconing of old saline groundwater caused by expected regional groundwater overexploitation initiated by growing urbanization. With predictions of rising sea level by 60-100cm by 2100 and a recent study suggesting even much larger changes than previously thought, it is essential to conduct a study to identify the most threatened coastal aquifers worldwide. Previous global studies dealing with salt water intrusion into coastal aquifers only considered homogenous geological conditions. However, literature and local data show a higher degree of heterogeneity. In our study, we consider possible geological scenarios and their impact on the fresh/salt groundwater distribution. The focus is on coastal aquifers that consist of unconsolidated sediments formed during the recent geological times and are underlain by a consolidated bedrock formation. Aquifer thickness and inland extent are the two most important parameters that determine the vulnerability of the coastal aquifer to salt water intrusion. To estimate these two parameters, a method using the latest global geological and elevation datasets is presented. By combining these inputs, we can estimate the slope of a bedrock formation that underlies a coastal aquifer consisting of unconsolidated sediments. Our estimated thicknesses are compared to a validation dataset of open source boreholes and literature information collected over numerous locations worldwide. While our results show that using our method to estimate coastal aquifer (made of unconsolidated sediments) thickness leads to satisfying results, it remains challenging to obtain information about the type of the sediments (gravel, sand, clay) themselves on such a scale. Therefore, we constructed a substantial set of 2D vertical variable-density groundwater flow models perpendicular to the shoreline

  10. Soil chemical properties affect the reaction of forest soil bacteria to drought and rewetting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodak, Marcin; Gołębiewski, Marcin; Morawska-Płoskonka, Justyna; Kuduk, Katarzyna; Niklińska, Maria

    Reaction of soil bacteria to drought and rewetting stress may depend on soil chemical properties. The objectives of this study were to test the reaction of different bacterial phyla to drought and rewetting stress and to assess the influence of different soil chemical properties on the reaction of soil bacteria to this kind of stress. The soil samples were taken at ten forest sites and measured for pH and the contents of organic C (Corg) and total N (Nt), Zn, Cu, and Pb. The samples were kept without water addition at 20 - 30 °C for 8 weeks and subsequently rewetted to achieve moisture equal to 50 - 60 % of their maximum water-holding capacity. Prior to the drought period and 24 h after the rewetting, the structure of soil bacterial communities was determined using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The drought and rewetting stress altered bacterial community structure. Gram-positive bacterial phyla, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, increased in relative proportion after the stress, whereas the Gram-negative bacteria in most cases decreased. The largest decrease in relative abundance was for Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. For several phyla the reaction to drought and rewetting stress depended on the chemical properties of soils. Soil pH was the most important soil property influencing the reaction of a number of soil bacterial groups (including all classes of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, and others) to drought and rewetting stress. For several bacterial phyla the reaction to the stress depended also on the contents of Nt and Corg in soil. The effect of heavy metal pollution was also noticeable, although weaker compared to other chemical soil properties. We conclude that soil chemical properties should be considered when assessing the effect of stressing factors on soil bacterial communities.

  11. Do genetic modifications in crops affect soil fungi? a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannula, S.E.; Boer, de W.; Veen, van J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of genetically modified (GM) plants in agriculture has been a topic in public debate for over a decade. Despite their potential to increase yields, there may be unintended negative side-effects of GM plants on soil micro-organisms that are essential for functioning of agro-ecosystems. Fungi

  12. Soil Carbon Characteristics of a Fluvisol Affected by Aggregates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated soil carbon characteristics of a Fluvisol as influenced by different ped sizes and crop types for a period of 10 years in Owerri, Southeastern Nigeria. The experimental design was a split-split plot arranged in a randomized complete block design, with tillage technique serving as main plot; crop regime was the ...

  13. Soil Carbon Characteristics of a Fluvisol Affected by Aggregates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Onweremadu, E. U. (2006). Assessment of mined soils in erosion – degraded farmlands in southeastern Nigeria. Estudio Biologia 28: 59 – 67. Onweremadu, E. U., Onyia, V. N.and Anikwe, M. A.. N. (2007a). Carbon and nitrogen distribution in water-stable aggregates under two tillage techniques in Fluvisols of Owerri area,.

  14. Inherent Soil Fertility as Affected by Rhizobium Inoculation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    else

    (282.00) and NDW (0.8182 g) were observed at Haramaya and Hirna sites, respectively, where the inherent soil fertility, .... oC, the count of the Rhizobium strain was 1 x 109 g–1 carrier material. The population of rhizobia in the ..... application rates, which could also favor high symbiotic N2 fixation (Rys and. Bonish 1981).

  15. Fractal scaling of particle size distribution and relationships with topsoil properties affected by biological soil crusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-Lei; Ding, Guo-Dong; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Qin, Shu-Gao; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Bao, Yan-Feng; Liu, Yun-Dong; Wan, Li; Deng, Ji-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust), as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (Pproperties (R(2) = 0.494∼0.955, Pproperties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions.

  16. Soil microbiome transfer method affects microbiome composition, including dominant microorganisms, in a novel environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Mia M; Bell, Terrence H; Kao-Kniffin, Jenny

    2017-06-15

    We show that choice of soil microbiome transfer method, i.e. direct soil transfers and a common soil wash procedure, dramatically influences the microbiome that develops in a new environment, using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. After 3 weeks of incubation in commercial potting mix, microbiomes were most similar to the source soil when a greater volume of initial soil was transferred (5% v/v transfer), and least similar when using a soil wash. Abundant operational taxonomic units were substantially affected by transfer method, suggesting that compounds transferred from the source soil, shifts in biotic interactions, or both, play an important role in their success. © FEMS 2017.

  17. Ecological soil quality affected by land use and management on semi-arid Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, J. P.; Moraetis, D.; Lair, G. J.; Bloem, J.; Nikolaidis, N. P.; Hemerik, L.; de Ruiter, P. C.

    2015-03-01

    Land use and soil management practice can have strong effects on soil quality, defined in terms of soil fertility, carbon sequestration and conservation of biodiversity. In this study, we investigate whether ecological soil quality parameters are adequate to assess soil quality under harsh conditions, and are able to reflect different land uses and intensities of soil management practices. We selected three sites as main representatives for the dominant types of land use in the region: an intensively cultivated olive orchard (annually tilled), an extensively used olive orchard (not tilled) and a heavily grazed pasture site in the Koiliaris catchment (Crete/Greece). Soil quality was analysed using an ecosystem approach, studying soil biological properties such as soil organism biomass and activity, and taxonomic diversity of soil microarthropods, in connection to abiotic soil parameters, including soil organic matter contents, and soil aggregate stability. The intensively cultivated olive orchard had a much lower aggregate water stability than the extensive olive orchard and the pasture. Contents of soil organic C and N were higher in the extensively used olive orchard than in the intensively cultivated orchard, with intermediate concentrations in the pasture. This was mainly caused by the highest input of organic matter, combined with the lowest organic matter decomposition rate. Soil organism biomasses in all sites were relatively low compared to values reported from less harsh systems, while microarthropod richness was highest in the pasture compared to both the intensive and extensive olive orchards. From the present results we conclude that microarthropod taxonomic richness is a very useful indicator for ecological soil quality, because it is not only able to separate harsh sites from other systems, but it is also sensitive enough to show differences between land management practices under harsh conditions. Microbial biomass and especially microarthropod

  18. Effects of Sea Level Rise and Coastal Marsh Transgression on Soil Organic Matter in a Chesapeake Bay Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, R.; Schreiner, K. M.; Guntenspergen, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marsh, mangrove swamp, and seagrass bed ecosystems comprise a global carbon stock known as "blue carbon." While vegetated coastal ecosystems have a small global areal extent, their total carbon burial rates are comparable to global marine carbon burial rates. Under global climate change-induced sea level rise, the role of these systems in the global carbon cycle could change significantly. This study aims to develop a more complete view of how coastal marsh transgression into terrestrial upland environments impacts soil organic matter characteristics. A US Geological Survey study site in Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on the eastern coast of Chesapeake Bay, Maryland was chosen for this study. This marsh has undergone transgression into adjacent upland forest as local relative sea level has risen, making it an ideal location to study the source and stability of organic matter underlying the shifting marsh-forest boundary. Peat cores and vegetation samples were collected from the study site in May 2015 and June 2016. Care was taken to sample marsh soils underlying a range of elevations and vegetation types from the intertidal zone through the transition to upland forest. Radiocarbon and lead-210 dating give age estimates for basal peat layers within the cores. Analysis of stable carbon isotopes in bulk soils in this site suggests a broad shift towards C4-dominated marsh vegetation. Finally, cupric oxide oxidation products of soil organic matter provide information about the changing molecular organic geochemistry of the marsh soils as sea level rises and the marsh transgresses. This represents a novel molecular-level study of the changing organic geochemistry of marsh soils with sea level rise and resulting vegetation changes.

  19. Soil residue analysis and degradation of saflufenacil as affected by moisture content and soil characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Edinalvo R; Senseman, Scott A; Haney, Richard L; Guice, John B; McCauley, Garry N

    2013-12-01

    Saflufenacil dissipation in soils under different moisture conditions is not available in the scientific literature. The objective of this study was to evaluate saflufenacil degradation and persistence in soils from rice regions under field capacity (non-flooded) and saturated (flooded) conditions. The accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) residue analytical method developed to conduct the study resulted in recovery greater than 80% for the combinations of soils and moisture conditions. Saflufenacil degradation was faster at field capacity for all soils, except for Morey soil. Herbicide half-life was 28.6, 15.0 and 23.1 days under field capacity treatments and 58.8, 36.9 and 79.7 under saturated conditions for Nada, Crowley and Gilbert soils respectively. A half-life no longer than 80 days was observed for the combination of soils and moisture treatments. An ASE method was developed and used to extract saflufenacil from soil samples. Half-life averaged among soils was 59 and 33 days for saturated and field capacity respectively. Saflufenacil persistence in the environment was 2-3 times longer under flooded conditions for most of the soils studied. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Dissipation of sulfamethoxazole in pasture soils as affected by soil and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Prakash; Sarmah, Ajit K

    2014-05-01

    The dissipation of sulfamethoxazole (SMO) antibiotic in three different soils was investigated through laboratory incubation studies. The experiments were conducted under different incubation conditions such as initial chemical concentration, soil depth, temperature, and with sterilisation. The results indicate that SMO dissipated rapidly in New Zealand pasture soils, and the 50% dissipation times (DT50) in Hamilton, Te Kowhai and Horotiu soils under non-sterile conditions were 9.24, 4.3 and 13.33 days respectively. During the incubation period for each sampling event the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and the variation in microbial community were monitored thorough phospholipid fatty acid extraction analysis (PLFA). The DHA data correlated well with the dissipation rate constants of SMO antibiotic, an increase in the DHA activity resulted in faster antibiotic dissipation. The PLFA analysis was indicative of higher bacterial presence as compared to fungal community, highlighting the type of microbial community responsible for dissipation. The results indicate that with increasing soil depth, SMO dissipation in soil was slower (except for Horotiu) while with increase in temperature the antibiotic loss was faster, and was noticeable in all the soils. Both the degree of biological activity and the temperature of the soil influenced overall SMO dissipation. SMO is not likely to persist more than 5-6 months in all three soils suggesting that natural biodegradation may be sufficient for the removal of these contaminants from the soil. Its dissipation in sterile soils indicated abiotic factors such as strong sorption onto soil components to play a role in the dissipation of SMO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Winter climate change affects growing-season soil microbial biomass and activity in northern hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge Durán; Jennifer L. Morse; Peter M. Groffman; John L. Campbell; Lynn M. Christenson; Charles T. Driscoll; Timothy J. Fahey; Melany C. Fisk; Myron J. Mitchell; Pamela H. Templer

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change remains a major challenge of ecological research. We exploited a natural elevation gradient in a northern hardwood forest to determine how reductions in snow accumulation, expected with climate change, directly affect dynamics of soil winter frost, and indirectly soil microbial biomass and activity...

  2. Soil properties and elements other than hydrogen that can affect the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A neutron water meter (NWM) operates on the principle that emitted high-energy neutrons are thermalised by elastic collisions with atomic nuclei present in soil, such as that of the hydrogen atom. Thermalised neutrons, however, are affected by other nuclear-matter interactions such as their capture by soil elements and ...

  3. Heat and water transfer at the bare soil surface : aspects affecting thermal imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berge, ten H.F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Surface temperature as assessed by means of thermal infra red remote sensing is affected by a number of soil properties. The sensitivity of surface temperature and surface energy fluxes to variations in physical soil properties is studied by means of a numerical simulation

  4. Soil water repellency of the artificial soil and natural soil in rocky slopes as affected by the drought stress and polyacrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang; Wang, Ruixin; Han, Pengyuan; Sun, Hailong; Sun, Haifeng; Li, Chengjun; Yang, Lixia

    2017-11-16

    Soil water repellency (SWR) causes reduced soil water storage, enhanced runoff and reduced ecosystem productivity. Therefore, characterization of SWR is a prerequisite for effective environmental management. SWR has been reported under different soils, land uses and regions of the world, particularly in forest land and after wildfires; however, the understanding of this variable in the artificial soil of rocky slope eco-engineering is still rather limited. This study presented the characterization of SWR in the artificial soil affected by the polyacrylamide (PAM) and drought stress. There were two molecular weights of PAM, and the CK was without PAM application. Three types of soil were studied: natural soil and two types of artificial soil which have been sprayed for 1y and 5y, respectively. The drought stress experiments had three drought gradients, lasted for three weeks. Water repellency index (WRI) and soil-water contact angle (β) were determined using intrinsic sorptivity method by measuring the water sorptivity (SW) and ethanol sorptivity (SE) in all soil samples. The results showed that (1) Polyacrylamide treatments significantly increased SW by 3% to 38%, and reduced SE by 1% to 15%, WRI by 6% to 38%, β by 3% to 23% compared to the control group. Polyacrylamide treatments also increased water-stable aggregates content and total porosity by 22% to 33%, 11% to 20% relative to the control, while PAM with a higher molecular weight performed best. (2) The interaction between PAM and drought stress had a significant effect on WRI and β for all soil types (Partificial soil (Partificial soil had a greater WRI and β than the natural soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-resolution mapping and spatial variability of soil organic carbon storage of permafrost-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Matthias; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2017-04-01

    Permafrost-affected soils store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). Mapping of this SOC provides a first order spatial input variable for research that relates carbon stored in permafrost regions to carbon cycle dynamics. High-resolution satellite imagery is becoming increasingly available even in circum-polar regions. The presented research highlights findings of high-resolution mapping efforts of SOC from five study areas in the northern circum-polar permafrost region. These study areas are located in Siberia (Kytalyk, Spasskaya Pad /Neleger, Lena delta), Northern Sweden (Abisko) and Northwestern Canada (Herschel Island). Our high spatial resolution analyses show how geomorphology has a strong influence on the distribution of SOC. This is organized at different spatial scales. Periglacial landforms and processes dictate local scale SOC distribution due to patterned ground. Such landforms are non-sorted circles and ice-wedge polygons of different age and scale. Palsas and peat plateaus are formed and can cover larger areas in Sub-Arctic environments. Study areas that have not been affected by Pleistocene glaciation feature ice-rich Yedoma sediments that dominate the local relief through thermokarst formation and create landscape scale macro environments that dictate the distribution of SOC. A general trend indicates higher SOC storage in Arctic tundra soils compared to forested Boreal or Sub-Arctic taiga soils. Yet, due to the shallower active layer depth in the Arctic, much of the SOC may be permanently frozen and thus not be available to ecosystem processes. Significantly more SOC is stored in soils compared to vegetation, indicating that vegetation growth and incorporation of the carbon into the plant phytomass alone will not be able to offset SOC released from permafrost. This contribution also addresses advances in thematic mapping methods and digital soil mapping of SOC in permafrost terrain. In particular machine-learning methods, such as support

  6. Earthworm species composition affects the soil bacterial community and net nitrogen mineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma-Blaauw, M.B.; Bloem, J.; Faber, J.H.; Groenigen, van J.W.; Goede, de R.G.M.; Brussaard, L.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effects of species diversity within taxonomic groups on nutrient cycling is important for understanding the role of soil biota in sustainable agriculture. We hypothesized that earthworm species specifically affect nitrogen mineralization, characteristically for their ecological

  7. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar; Ricart, Aurora M.; Lavery, Paul S.; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Masque, Pere; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Steven, Andy; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-08-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypothesis that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  8. Surface runoff, subsurface drainflow and soil erosion as affected by tillage in a clayey Finnish soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. TURTOLA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Conservation tillage practices were tested against autumn mouldboard ploughing for differences in physical properties of soil, surface runoff, subsurface drainflow and soil erosion. The study (1991 -2001 was performed on a gently (2% sloping clayey soil of southern Finland, with two replicates of the tillage treatments on 0.5 ha plots. The annual shares of surface runoff of the total flow (surface runoff + subsurface drainflow were 8–42% for ploughing (depth 20–23 cm, 36–66% for shallow autumn stubble cultivation (depth 5–8 cm and 36–82% for soil left untilled over winter. Surface runoff increased with decrease in the tillage intensity, and in line with the values of depressional water storage, macroporosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Erodibility of this gently sloping soil was at highest after autumn and spring tillage operations and decreased with time. Shallow autumn tillage produced erosion as high as mouldboard ploughing (407–1700 kg ha–1yr–1, but 48% and 12% lower erosion levels were measured from plots left untilled in autumn, covered by grass or barley residues, respectively. Eroded soil particles moved relatively freely to the subsurface drains, which carried 37–94% of the annual soil losses from the field. The study shows that even on the relatively flat clayey soils typical for southern Finland, tillage has a great influence on soil losses. The frequency of tillage needs to be reduced rather than the depth of tillage on clayey soils with poor water conductivity and structural stability if soil loss is to be diminished by conservation tillage.;

  9. Dynamics And Remediation Of Fine Textured Soils And Ground Water Contaminated With Salts And Chlorinated Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Alison; Naeth, M. Anne

    2017-04-01

    Soil and ground water are frequently contaminated by industrial activities, posing a potential risk to human and environmental health and limiting land use. Proper site management and remediation treatments can return contaminated areas to safe and useful states. Most remediation research focuses on single contaminants in coarse and medium textured soils. Contaminant mixtures are common and make remediation efforts complex due to differing chemical properties. Remediation in fine textured soils is difficult since their low hydraulic conductivities hinder addition of amendments into and removal of contaminated media out of the impacted zone. The objective of this research is to assess contaminant dynamics and potential remediation techniques for fine textured soil and ground water impacted by multiple contaminants in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The University of Alberta's Ellerslie Waste Management Facility was used to process liquid laboratory waste from 1972 to 2007. A waste water pond leak prior to 1984 resulted in salt and chlorinated organic compound contamination. An extensive annual ground water monitoring data set for the site is available since 1988. Analytical parameters include pH, electrical conductivity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, and metals. Data have been compared to Alberta Tier 1 Soil and Groundwater Remediation Guidelines to identify exceedances. The parameters of greatest concern, based on magnitude and frequency of detection, are electrical conductivity, sodium, chloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane. Spatial analyses of the data show that the contamination is focused in and down gradient of the former waste water pond. Temporal analyses show different trends depending on monitoring well location. Laboratory column experiments were used to assess leaching as a potential treatment for salt contamination in fine textured soils. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured for seven soils from two depth intervals with or without

  10. Impact of soil nematodes on salt-marsh plants : a pilot experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormann, CF; van der Wal, R

    2001-01-01

    We tested whether the removal of nematodes by means of nematicide application changed plant performance or influenced plant competition. The study involved the two common plant species Artemisia maritima and Festuca rubra growing in intact sods collected from a temperate salt marsh. Half of the sods

  11. Soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type affect pyrrolizidine alkaloids in Jacobaea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; Veen, van J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Secondary metabolites like pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) play a crucial part in plant defense. We studied the effects of soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type on pyrrolizidine alkaloids in roots and shoots of Jacobaea vulgaris. We used clones of two genotypes from a dune area (Meijendel),

  12. Arid soil microbial enzymatic activity profile as affected by geographical location and soil degradation status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluating soil health is critical for any successful remediation effort. Arid lands, with their minimal carbon and water contents, low nutritional status and restricted, seasonal microbial activity pose specific challenges to soil health restoration and by extension, restoration of ecosystem repr...

  13. Different methods of incorporating ciprofloxacin in soil affect microbiome and degradation of ciprofloxacin residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longyong; Mi, Jiandui; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yongde; Ma, Baohua; Liao, Xindi; Liang, Juan Boo; Wu, Yinbao

    2017-10-19

    Antibiotic residues in swine manure when entered the soil would most likely affect the complex composition and functions of the soil microbiome, which is also responsible for degrading these antibiotics. Three different methods of adding ciprofloxacin (CIP), a common antibiotic used in the swine industry, to the soil were used to investigate the effects of CIP on the soil microbiome and the degradation of CIP. Results of the study showed that the microbiome could promote the degradation of CIP in the soil when CIP was incorporated into the soil together with manure. However, the CIP degradation time was prolonged when adding the manure of swine fed with diet containing CIP in the soil. All treatments did not affect the copy number of the resistance genes, except for aac(6')-Ib-cr, as compared with the initial numbers of each treatment. MiSeq Illumina sequencing and Biolog-ECO microplates results showed that CIP had a significant effect on the abundance, structure, and function of the soil microbiome, but different addition methods resulted in distinct effects. Results of the present study demonstrated that the microbiome and fate of CIP responded differently to the different methods of adding CIP to the soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thallium occurrence and partitioning in soils and sediments affected by mining activities in Madrid province (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Garcia-Guinea, J. [National Museum of Natural Sciences, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Laborda, F. [Group of Analytical Spectroscopy and Sensors Group, Institute of Environmental Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Garrido, F., E-mail: fernando.garrido@mncn.csic.es [National Museum of Natural Sciences, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) and its compounds are toxic to biota even at low concentrations but little is known about Tl concentration and speciation in soils. An understanding of the source, mobility, and dispersion of Tl is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of Tl pollution cases. In this paper, we examine the Tl source and dispersion in two areas affected by abandoned mine facilities whose residues remain dumped on-site affecting to soils and sediments of natural water courses near Madrid city (Spain). Total Tl contents and partitioning in soil solid phases as determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure were also examined in soils along the riverbeds of an ephemeral and a permanent streams collecting water runoff and drainage from the mines wastes. Lastly, electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence probe are used as a suitable technique for Tl elemental detection on thallium-bearing phases. Tl was found mainly bound to quartz and alumino-phyllosilicates in both rocks and examined soils. Besides, Tl was also frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules in all samples from both mine scenarios. These biogenic silicates may regulate the transfer of Tl into the soil-water system. - Highlights: • Abandoned mine residues are Tl sources in soils of Madrid catchment area. • Tl was associated to quartz and aluminosilicates in both rocks and soils. • Tl was frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules. • Cathodoluminescence is a suitable technique for Tl detection on soils and rocks.

  15. Quantification of Heavy Metals in Mining Affected Soil and Their Bioaccumulation in Native Plant Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, Javed; Khan, Sardar; Shah, Mohammad Tahir; Khan, Kifayatullah; Huang, Qing; Ali, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    Several anthropogenic and natural sources are considered as the primary sources of toxic metals in the environment. The current study investigates the level of heavy metals contamination in the flora associated with serpentine soil along the Mafic and Ultramafic rocks northern-Pakistan. Soil and wild native plant species were collected from chromites mining affected areas and analyzed for heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Fe, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn) using atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS-PEA-700). The heavy metal concentrations were significantly (p Nepeta cataria, Impatiens bicolor royle, Tegetis minuta) growing on mining affected sites may be used for soil reclamation contaminated with heavy metals.

  16. Effect of salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria on wheat plants and soil health in a saline environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, S K; Singh, D P

    2015-01-01

    Salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (ST-PGPR) significantly influence the growth and yield of wheat crops in saline soil. Wheat growth improved in pots with inoculation of all nine ST-PGPR (ECe = 4.3 dS·m(-1) ; greenhouse experiment), while maximum growth and dry biomass was observed in isolate SU18 Arthrobacter sp.; simultaneously, all ST-PGPR improved soil health in treated pot soil over controls. In the field experiment, maximum wheat root dry weight and shoot biomass was observed after inoculation with SU44 B. aquimaris, and SU8 B. aquimaris, respectively, after 60 and 90 days. Isolate SU8 B. aquimaris, induced significantly higher proline and total soluble sugar accumulation in wheat, while isolate SU44 B. aquimaris, resulted in higher accumulation of reducing sugars after 60 days. Percentage nitrogen (N), potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) in leaves of wheat increased significantly after inoculation with ST-PGPR, as compared to un-inoculated plants. Isolate SU47 B. subtilis showed maximum reduction of sodium (Na) content in wheat leaves of about 23% at both 60 and 90 days after sowing, and produced the best yield of around 17.8% more than the control. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. Model of the biotic cycle "plants germs - microorganisms" by affect heavy metal salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisman, Tamara

    The growth of wheat germ roots exposed to heavy metal salts (ZnSO4) was studied experimentally and theoretically. During the experiment the plant seeds were preliminarily treated with an experimental microbial association. As a result, data were obtained about the decrease of the inhibiting effect of zinc on the growth of wheat germ roots where the seeds had been treated with the microbial association. To understand such effect, calculations were made to reveal the specific growth rate of a germ root depending on the inhibitor concentration with and without microorganism association treatment. It was shown that in case with the wheat germ roots the seeds of which had been treated with the microorganisms the inhibition constant (kI = 45 MPC (Maximum Permissible Concentration) was higher than in the case with the roots growing out of the seeds that hadn't been treated with the microorganisms (kI = 32 MPC). One of possible reasons for the decrease of growth inhibition of wheat germ roots by zinc salt is the protective function of microorganism's treatment of the seeds. To verify and confirm the experimental results, a mathematical model was created imitating the interaction between wheat germ roots and microbial association exposed to an inhibitor. Investigation of the model proved that the microbial association has a positive effect on the growth of wheat germ roots exposed to an inhibitor. The experimental and theoretical results agreed quantitatively. It was found out that the increase of the inhibitor concentration led to the effect of maximum relief of zinc inhibiting impact. The work is supported by grants Yenissei 07-04-96806.

  18. Salinity affects production and salt tolerance of dimorphic seeds of Suaeda salsa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengxia; Xu, Yan-Ge; Wang, Shuai; Shi, Weiwei; Liu, Ranran; Feng, Gu; Song, Jie

    2015-10-01

    The effect of salinity on brown seeds/black seeds ratio, seed weight, endogenous hormone concentrations, and germination of brown and black seeds in the euhalophyte Suaeda salsa was investigated. The brown seeds/black seeds ratio, seed weight of brown and black seeds and the content of protein increased at a concentration of 500 mM NaCl compared to low salt conditions (1 mM NaCl). The germination percentage and germination index of brown seeds from plants cultured in 500 mM NaCl were higher than those cultured in 1 mM NaCl, but it was not true for black seeds. The concentrations of IAA (indole-3-acetic acid), ZR (free zeatin riboside) and ABA (abscisic acid) in brown seeds were much greater than those in black seeds, but there were no differences in the level of GAs (gibberellic acid including GA1 and GA3) regardless of the degree of salinity. Salinity during plant culture increased the concentration of GAs, but salinity had no effect on the concentrations of the other three endogenous hormones in brown seeds. Salinity had no effect on the concentration of IAA but increased the concentrations of the other three endogenous hormones in black seeds. Accumulation of endogenous hormones at different concentrations of NaCl during plant growth may be related to seed development and to salt tolerance of brown and black S. salsa seeds. These characteristics may help the species to ensure seedling establishment and population succession in variable saline environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Leaching of soils during laboratory incubations does not affect soil organic carbon mineralisation but solubilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domínguez, Beatriz; Studer, Mirjam S; Hagedorn, Frank; Niklaus, Pascal A; Abiven, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory soil incubations provide controlled conditions to investigate carbon and nutrient dynamics; however, they are not free of artefacts. As carbon and nitrogen cycles are tightly linked, we aimed at investigating whether the incubation-induced accumulation of mineral nitrogen (Nmin) biases soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation. For this, we selected two soils representative of the C:N ratio values found in European temperate forests, and applied two incubation systems: 'closed' beakers and 'open' microlysimeters. The latter allowed leaching the soil samples during the incubation. By the end of the 121-day experiment, the low C:N soil significantly accumulated more Nmin in beakers (5.12 g kg-1 OC) than in microlysimeters (3.00 g kg-1 OC) but there was not a significant difference in SOC mineralisation at any point of the experiment. On the other hand, Nmin did not accumulate in the high C:N soil but, by the end of the experiment, leaching had promoted 33.9% more SOC solubilisation than beakers. Therefore, we did not find evidence that incubation experiments introduce a bias on SOC mineralisation. This outcome strengthens results from soil incubation studies.

  20. Climate change affects carbon allocation to the soil in shrublands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, A.; Tietema, A.; Joosten, N.N.; Estiarte, M.; Peñuelas, J.; Sowerby, A.; Emmett, B.; Beier, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Climate change may affect ecosystem functioning through increased temperatures or changes in precipitation patterns. Temperature and water availability are important drivers for ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis, carbon translocation, and organic matter decomposition. These climate changes

  1. Climate and soil salinity in the deserts of Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, E. I.; Konyushkova, M. V.

    2013-07-01

    A comparative analysis of climatic and soil salinity characteristics of the deserts of Central Asia, including deserts of the Turan Depression, the Gobi Desert, and deserts of the Dzungar and Tarim depressions was performed. The climatic characteristics—the degree of aridity, the degree of continentality, and the amount and regime of precipitation—are different in these deserts. No direct relationships between the areas occupied by the automorphic salt-affected soils and the aridity of the climate are observed in the studied regions. In the automorphic landscapes of Asian deserts, the degree and chemistry of the soil salinization and the distribution of salt-affected soils are controlled by the history of the particular territories rather than by their modern climatic conditions. The presence and properties of the salt-bearing rocks and the eolian migration of salts play the most significant role. The deficit of moisture in the modern climate favors the preservation of salt accumulations in places of their origin. The specific features of the climate, including the regime of precipitation, affect the redistribution of salts in the profiles of automorphic salt-affected soils. An increase in the degree of climatic continentality is accompanied by the decrease in the intensity of weathering and initial accumulation of salts. A different situation is observed in the soils of hydromorphic desert landscapes, in which the degree of salinity of the surface horizons and the area occupied by salt-affected soils are directly influenced by the modern climatic conditions.

  2. Microclimate affects soil chemical and mineralogical properties of cold-alpine soils of the Altai Mountains (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Markus; Lessovaia, Sofia; Chistyakov, Kirill; Inozemzev, Svyatoslav

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation and temperature particularly influence soil properties by affecting the type and rates of chemical, biological, and physical processes. To a great extent, element leaching and weathering rates are governed by these processes. Vegetation growth and decomposition, that depend on temperature and the other environmental factors, influence weathering reactions through the production of acidity and organic ligands that may promote chemical weathering and subsequent elemental leaching. The present work focuses on cold-alpine soils of the Altai Mountains (Siberia, Russia). The investigated field site (2380 m asl) is characterised by cold winters (with absolute minimum temperatures of -50°C; a mean temperature in January is -21°C) and cool summers (+8°C mean temperature in July). The mean annual temperature is -5.4°C. Annual precipitations are relatively low (500 mm with 20% of precipitation in July). Permafrost is widespread and occurs sometimes at a depth of 30 to 50 cm. Several studies have shown the influence of slope aspect and the resulting microclimate on soil weathering and development. There is however no unanimous agreement whether weathering is more intense on north- or south-facing slopes and whether small differences in thermal conditions may lead to detectable differences. Higher temperatures do not necessarily lead to higher weathering rates in cold alpine regions as shown by previous investigations in the European Alps. Water fluxes through the soils seemed to be more important. We consequently investigated soils in the cold-alpine environment of the Central Altai Mountains on a very small area close to a local glacier tongue. Half of the investigated soil profiles were south-facing (5) and the other half north-facing (5). The soils have the same parent material (mica-rich till), altitude, topography, and soil age. The vegetation is alpine grassland that is partially intersected with some juniper and mosses, which portion in the soil

  3. GIS and RS soil-vegetation correlations for continental salt-lands habitats in NE Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Laurenţiu Stoica

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Continental saltlands have a high degree of peculiarity amongst European primary habitats and a prominent insular character. The present scientific approach establishes the degree of soil-vegetation correlation in continental slatlands patches as a measure of habitat continuity/fragmentation and soil conservation/degradation. The use of hyperspectral imagery, soil types’ distribution and vegetal associations’ conservation status reveal disturbances in relation with human induced modifications in comparison with normal plant-soil interdependence. Supervised classifications of LANDSAT satellite imagery along with detailed soil maps, ground truth data provided by accurate GPS positioning and field based plants evaluation are used to perform landscape metrics analyses. The landscape metrics approach is meant to find the balance between extent and grain in the case of saltlands habitats analyses and the degree of patches and classes inhomogeneity. These also give an insight of habitats connectivity and/or isolation in relation with land use topology and soil multiplexing. The resulting training sets developed for a representative, protected area in the county of Iaşi enhance the creation of a comprehensive mask to be used for the evaluation of larger areas in the silvan-steppes of North-Eastern Romania. The model is statistically tested to depict the degree of correlation and confidence. The final goal resides in more proper measures elaboration for the mitigation of continental saltland preservation and natural resources exploitation via agricultural and the associated activities.

  4. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar

    2016-08-15

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (C-org) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher C-org stocks (averaging 6.3 kg C-org m(-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 gC(org) m(-2) yr(-1) ) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg C-org m(-2) and 3.6 g C-org m(-2) yr(-1) . In shallower meadows, C-org stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88% in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45% on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr(-1) and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr(-1) and 5 %, respectively). The C-org stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg C-org m(-2) and 1.2 g C-org m(-2) yr(-1)were 3- to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8- and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypothesis that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  5. Soil structure, colloids, and chemical transport as affected by short-term reducing conditions: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upland soils in the Midwestern US often undergo reducing conditions when soils are temporally flooded during the spring and remain water saturated for days or weeks. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and may affect soil structure and solution chemical transport. The eff...

  6. Permafrost-Affected Soils of the Russian Arctic and their Carbon Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, S.; Kutzbach, L.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2014-02-01

    Permafrost-affected soils have accumulated enormous pools of organic matter during the Quaternary Period. The area occupied by these soils amounts to more than 8.6 million km2, which is about 27% of all land areas north of 50° N. Therefore, permafrost-affected soils are considered to be one of the most important cryosphere elements within the climate system. Due to the cryopedogenic processes that form these particular soils and the overlying vegetation that is adapted to the arctic climate, organic matter has accumulated to the present extent of up to 1024 Pg (1 Pg = 1015 g = 1 Gt) of soil organic carbon stored within the uppermost three meters of ground. Considering the observed progressive climate change and the projected polar amplification, permafrost-affected soils will undergo fundamental property changes. Higher turnover and mineralization rates of the organic matter are consequences of these changes, which are expected to result in an increased release of climate-relevant trace gases into the atmosphere. As a result, permafrost regions with their distinctive soils are likely to trigger an important tipping point within the global climate system, with additional political and social implications. The controversy of whether permafrost regions continue accumulating carbon or already function as a carbon source remains open until today. An increased focus on this subject matter, especially in underrepresented Siberian regions, could contribute to a more robust estimation of the soil organic carbon pool of permafrost regions and at the same time improve the understanding of the carbon sink and source functions of permafrost-affected soils.

  7. Decreased summer drought affects plant productivity and soil carbon dynamics in Mediterranean woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrufo, M. F.; Alberti, G.; Inglima, I.; Marjanović, H.; Lecain, D.; Zaldei, A.; Peressotti, A.; Miglietta, F.

    2011-06-01

    Precipitation patterns are expected to change in the Mediterranean region within the next decades, with projected decreases in total rainfall and increases in extreme events. We manipulated precipitation patterns in a Mediterranean woodland, dominated by Arbutus unedo L., to study the effects of changing precipitation regimes on above-ground net primary production (ANPP) and soil C dynamics, specifically plant-derived C input to soil and soil respiration (SR). Experimental plots were exposed to either a 20 % reduction of throughfall or to water addition targeted at maintaining soil water content above a minimum of 10 % v/v. Treatments were compared to control plots which received ambient precipitation. The throughfall manipulation experiment started in 2004 and we report data up to the 2009 growing season. Enhanced soil moisture during summer months highly stimulated annual stem primary production, litter fall, SR and net annual plant-derived C input to soil which on average increased by 130 %, 26 %, 50 % and 220 %, respectively, as compared to control. In contrast, the 20 % reduction in throughfall (equivalent to 10 % reduction of precipitation) did not significantly change soil moisture at the site, and therefore did not significantly affect ANPP or SR. We conclude that minor changes (around 10 % reduction) in precipitation amount are not likely to significantly affect ANPP or soil C dynamics in Mediterranean woodland. However, if summer rain increases, C cycling will significantly accelerate but soil C stocks are not likely to be changed in the short-term. More studies involving modelling of long term C dynamics are needed to predict if the estimated increases in soil C input under wet conditions is going to be sustained and if labile C is being substituted to stable C, with a negative effect on long term soil C stocks.

  8. Decreased summer drought affects plant productivity and soil carbon dynamics in a Mediterranean woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrufo, M. F.; Alberti, G.; Inglima, I.; Marjanović, H.; Lecain, D.; Zaldei, A.; Peressotti, A.; Miglietta, F.

    2011-09-01

    Precipitation patterns are expected to change in the Mediterranean region within the next decades, with projected decreases in total rainfall and increases in extreme events. We manipulated precipitation patterns in a Mediterranean woodland, dominated by Arbutus unedo L., to study the effects of changing precipitation regimes on above-ground net primary production (ANPP) and soil C dynamics, specifically plant-derived C input to soil and soil respiration (SR). Experimental plots were exposed to either a 20 % reduction of throughfall or to water addition targeted at maintaining soil water content above a minimum of 10 % v/v. Treatments were compared to control plots which received ambient precipitation. Enhanced soil moisture during summer months highly stimulated annual stem primary production, litter fall, SR and net annual plant-derived C input to soil which on average increased by 130 %, 26 %, 58 % and 220 %, respectively, as compared to the control. In contrast, the 20 % reduction in throughfall (equivalent to 10 % reduction in precipitation) did not significantly change soil moisture at the site, and therefore did not significantly affect ANPP or SR. We conclude that minor changes (around 10 % reduction) in precipitation amount are not likely to significantly affect ANPP or soil C dynamics in Mediterranean woodlands. However, if summer rain increases, C cycling will significantly accelerate but soil C stocks are not likely to be changed in the short-term. More studies involving modelling of long-term C dynamics are needed to predict if the estimated increases in soil C input under wet conditions is going to be sustained and if labile C is being substituted to stable C, with a negative effect on long-term soil C stocks.

  9. Planting richness affects the recovery of vegetation and soil processes in constructed wetlands following disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Mary M.; Ahn, Changwoo; Noe, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    The resilience of constructed wetland ecosystems to severe disturbance, such as a mass herbivory eat-out or soil disturbance, remains poorly understood. In this study, we use a controlled mesocosm experiment to examine how original planting diversity affects the ability of constructed freshwater wetlands to recover structurally and functionally after a disturbance (i.e., aboveground harvesting and soil coring). We assessed if the planting richness of macrophyte species influences recovery of constructed wetlands one year after a disturbance. Mesocosms were planted in richness groups with various combinations of either 1, 2, 3, or 4 species (RG 1–4) to create a gradient of richness. Structural wetland traits measured include morphological regrowth of macrophytes, soil bulk density, soil moisture, soil %C, and soil %N. Functional wetland traits measured include above ground biomass production, soil potential denitrification, and soil potential microbial respiration. Total mesocosm cover increased along the gradient of plant richness (43.5% in RG 1 to 84.5% in RG 4) in the growing season after the disturbance, although not all planted individuals recovered. This was largely attributed to the dominance of the obligate annual species. The morphology of each species was affected negatively by the disturbance, producing shorter, and fewer stems than in the years prior to the disturbance, suggesting that the communities had not fully recovered one year after the disturbance. Soil characteristics were almost uniform across the planting richness gradient, but for a few exceptions (%C, C:N, and non-growing season soil moisture were higher slightly in RG 2). Denitrification potential (DEA) increased with increasing planting richness and was influenced by the abundance and quality of soil C. Increased open space in unplanted mesocosms and mesocosms with lower species richness increased labile C, leading to higher C mineralization rates.

  10. Modelling of the contribution of sea salt and soil dust to particulate matter; Modellering van de zeezout- en bodemstofbijdragen aan fijn stof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaap, M.; Denier van der Gon, H.; Hendriks, E.; Manders, A.; Keuken, M. [TNO Bouw en Ondergrond, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    Model calculations of particulate matter based on anthropogenic emissions underestimate the measured concentrations. This 'gap' can be explained by the existence of (semi)natural sources such as sea salt and soil dust. Preliminary results of the extended LOTOS-EUROS chemical transport model suggest a lower contribution from sea salt than with the deduction of seal salt that is currently being used. The contribution of soil dust to PM10 is also lower than anticipated and requires further analysis. [Dutch] Modelberekeningen van fijn stof op basis van antropogene emissies onderschatten de gemeten concentraties. Dit 'gat' wordt verklaard door de (semi)natuurlijke bronnen zoals zeezout en bodemstof. Eerste resultaten van de uitbreiding van het LOTOS-EUROS chemisch transportmodel suggereren een lagere zeezoutbijdrage dan bij de zeezoutaftrek nu in de praktijk gehanteerd wordt. Ook de bijdrage van bodemstof aan PM10 is lager dan eerder gedacht en nader onderzoek is hier noodzakelijk.

  11. Climate, soil texture, and soil types affect the contributions of fine-fraction-stabilized carbon to total soil organic carbon in different land uses across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Andong; Feng, Wenting; Zhang, Wenju; Xu, Minggang

    2016-05-01

    Mineral-associated organic carbon (MOC), that is stabilized by fine soil particles (i.e., silt plus clay, organic carbon (SOC) persistence and sequestration, due to its large contribution to total SOC (TSOC) and long turnover time. Our objectives were to investigate how climate, soil type, soil texture, and agricultural managements affect MOC contributions to TSOC in China. We created a dataset from 103 published papers, including 1106 data points pairing MOC and TSOC across three major land use types: cropland, grassland, and forest. Overall, the MOC/TSOC ratio ranged from 0.27 to 0.80 and varied significantly among soil groups in cropland, grassland, and forest. Croplands and forest exhibited significantly higher median MOC/TSOC ratios than in grassland. Moreover, forest and grassland soils in temperate regions had higher MOC/TSOC ratios than in subtropical regions. Furthermore, the MOC/TSOC ratio was much higher in ultisol, compared with the other soil types. Both the MOC content and MOC/TSOC ratio were positively correlated with the amount of fine fraction (silt plus clay) in soil, highlighting the importance of soil texture in stabilizing organic carbon across various climate zones. In cropland, different fertilization practices and land uses (e.g., upland, paddy, and upland-paddy rotation) significantly altered MOC/TSOC ratios, but not in cropping systems (e.g., mono- and double-cropping) characterized by climatic differences. This study demonstrates that the MOC/TSOC ratio is mainly driven by soil texture, soil types, and related climate and land uses, and thus the variations in MOC/TSOC ratios should be taken into account when quantitatively estimating soil C sequestration potential of silt plus clay particles on a large scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing Soil Quality in Areas Affected by Sulfide Mining. Application to Soils in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel González

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The characterization, evaluation and remediation of polluted soils is one of the present environmental challenges to be addressed in the coming years. The origin of trace elements in soils can be either geogenic or anthropogenic, but only the latter is interesting from a legal point of view. The hazard of the pollutants in the soils not only depends on their total concentration, but particularly on their availability. The mobility of the trace elements depends on their speciation, and it is also affected by several soil parameters. Mining activity is one of the most important anthropogenic causes of soil pollution. As a case study, this work is focused in the Riotinto mining area (Iberian Pyrite Belt, IPB, SW Spain. The IPB is one of the most important metallogenic provinces in the world and it has been exploited for thousands of years. The disposal of mining residues has produced important sources of contamination by trace elements and acidic waters affecting soils and rivers. In addition to these problems, the closure of mines in the Pyrite Belt at the end of the 20th Century has led to a great loss of employment, which has caused the development of an intensive agriculture of citrus fruits as a new source of income. The intensive growing of citrus fruits and the traditional subsistence agriculture have been developed surrounding the mining areas and on floodplains near to mining sites. The level of soil pollution has not been taken into account in these cases, nor has its impact on the health of the inhabitants of these areas. Therefore, it is of great interest to study the current state of the cultivated soils and the sources and types of contaminants derived from mining activity in order to program its decontamination, where appropriate, according to legislation. In order to know the present and future hazard posed by the soils chemical and mineralogical speciation has been carried out, given that the availability of a metal depends on the

  13. Seasonal exposure to drought and air warming affects soil Collembola and mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Liang Xu

    Full Text Available Global environmental changes affect not only the aboveground but also the belowground components of ecosystems. The effects of seasonal drought and air warming on the genus level richness of Collembola, and on the abundance and biomass of the community of Collembola and mites were studied in an acidic and a calcareous forest soil in a model oak-ecosystem experiment (the Querco experiment at the Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL in Birmensdorf. The experiment included four climate treatments: control, drought with a 60% reduction in rainfall, air warming with a seasonal temperature increase of 1.4 °C, and air warming + drought. Soil water content was greatly reduced by drought. Soil surface temperature was slightly increased by both the air warming and the drought treatment. Soil mesofauna samples were taken at the end of the first experimental year. Drought was found to increase the abundance of the microarthropod fauna, but reduce the biomass of the community. The percentage of small mites (body length ≤ 0.20 mm increased, but the percentage of large mites (body length >0.40 mm decreased under drought. Air warming had only minor effects on the fauna. All climate treatments significantly reduced the richness of Collembola and the biomass of Collembola and mites in acidic soil, but not in calcareous soil. Drought appeared to have a negative impact on soil microarthropod fauna, but the effects of climate change on soil fauna may vary with the soil type.

  14. Laboratory Assessment of Forest Soil Respiration Affected by Wildfires under Various Environments of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Abakumov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic carbon emission rates were estimated in the soils of three natural zones in Russia: forest-tundra, south-taiga, and forest-steppe. Postfire soils were found to be characterized by essential losses of soil C due to the combustion fire effect. Soils lost 3 or 5 parts of initial carbon content and showed an essential decrease in the C/N ratio during the fire effect. The pH values increased due to soil enrichment by ash during the fire events. CO2 emission rates were highest in natural soil samples, because the amount of organic matter affected by mineralization in those soils was higher than in natural ones. Simultaneously, the total values of mineralized carbon were higher in postfire soils because the SOM quality and composition were altered due to the fire effect. The only exception was in forest-tundra soils, where a high portion of dissolved organic compounds was released during the surface fire. The quality of initial SOM and intensity of the wildfire play the most important roles in the fate of SOM in postfire environments. Further study of CO2 emissions is needed to better characterize postfire SOM dynamics and develop an approach to model this process.

  15. BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF LIPID METABOLISM IN ANIMALS AFFECTED BY HEAVY METAL SALTS AND TREATED WITH CARNITINE CHLORIDE AND SODIUM ALGINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Bekus

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lipid metabolism disorders in the organism affected by environmental pollutants, including poisoning with cadmium and lead salts are of topical matter nowadays. Objective. The study was aimed to examine biochemical features of lipid metabolism in rats subjected to toxic damage by lead and cadmium salts and treated with carnitine chloride and Algigel. Methods. Experiments were carried out on white mature outbred male rats weighing 180-200 g. To cause the toxic damage the animals were administered with aqueous solution of cadmium chloride and lead acetate daily for the period of 30 days using intra-gastric lavage. The indices of lipid metabolism were detected by biochemical methods. Results. In animals treated with cadmium chloride and lead acetate the following changes were observed: HDL-cholesterol concentrations significantly decreased, resulting in 87% of the levels in the intact animals on the third day, 84% on the fifth and 80% on the seventh day. Conversely, concentrations of HDL-cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol significantly increased during the experiment. Respectively, the ratios for HDL-cholesterol are 240%, 352%, and 388%; and for VLDL-cholesterol 108%, 116%, and 132%. Conclusions. Lipids profile of the rats displayed changes in the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and lipoproteins of low, high and very low density.

  16. Soil biota can change after exotic plant invasion: Does this affect ecosystem processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Sherrod, S.K.; Moldenke, A.

    2005-01-01

    Invasion of the exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum into stands of the native perennial grass Hilaria jamesii significantly reduced the abundance of soil biota, especially microarthropods and nematodes. Effects of invasion on active and total bacterial and fungal biomass were variable, although populations generally increased after 50+ years of invasion. The invasion of Bromus also resulted in a decrease in richness and a species shift in plants, microarthropods, fungi, and nematodes. However, despite the depauperate soil fauna at the invaded sites, no effects were seen on cellulose decomposition rates, nitrogen mineralization rates, or vascular plant growth. When Hilaria was planted into soils from not-invaded, recently invaded, and historically invaded sites (all currently or once dominated by Hilaria), germination and survivorship were not affected. In contrast, aboveground Hilaria biomass was significantly greater in recently invaded soils than in the other two soils. We attributed the Hilaria response to differences in soil nutrients present before the invasion, especially soil nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, as these nutrients were elevated in the soils that produced the greatest Hilaria biomass. Our data suggest that it is not soil biotic richness per se that determines soil process rates or plant productivity, but instead that either (1) the presence of a few critical soil food web taxa can keep ecosystem function high, (2) nutrient loss is very slow in this ecosystem, and/or (3) these processes are microbially driven. However, the presence of Bromus may reduce key soil nutrients over time and thus may eventually suppress native plant success. ?? 2005 by the Ecological Society of America.

  17. Soil fauna and leaf species, but not species diversity, affect initial soil erosion in a subtropical forest plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Steffen; Goebes, Philipp; Assmann, Thorsten; Schuldt, Andreas; Scholten, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In subtropical parts of China, high rainfall intensities cause continuous soil losses and thereby provoke severe harms to ecosystems. In woodlands, it is not the tree canopy, but mostly an intact forest floor that provides protection from soil erosion. Although the protective role of leaf litter covers against soil losses is known for a long time, little research has been conducted on the processes involved. For instance, the role of different leaf species and leaf species diversity has been widely disregarded. Furthermore, the impact of soil meso- and macrofauna within the litter layer on soil losses remains unclear. To investigate how leaf litter species and diversity as well as soil meso- and macrofauna affect sediment discharge in a subtropical forest ecosystem, a field experiment was carried out in Xingangshan, Jiangxi Province, PR China (BEF China). A full-factorial random design with 96 micro-scale runoff plots and seven domestic leaf species in three diversity levels and a bare ground feature were established. Erosion was initiated with a rainfall simulator. This study confirms that leaf litter cover generally protects forest soils from water erosion (-82 % sediment discharge on leaf covered plots compared to bare plots) and this protection is gradually removed as the litter layer decomposes. Different leaf species showed variable impacts on sediment discharge and thus erosion control. This effect can be related to different leaf habitus, leaf decomposition rates and food preferences of litter decomposing meso- and macrofauna. In our experiment, runoff plots with leaf litter from Machilus thunbergii in monoculture showed the highest sediment discharge (68.0 g m-2), whereas plots with Cyclobalanopsis glauca in monoculture showed the smallest rates (7.9 g m-2). At the same time, neither leaf species diversity, nor functional diversity showed any significant influence, only a negative trend could be observed. Nevertheless, the protective effect of the leaf

  18. Structurization of the Aral region soil by polycomplexes of humic acids salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tazhibaeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Structuring action of a sodium humate, polyethyleneimine and them complexes on the Aral region soil is investigated. It is shown that a sodium humate possess the big structuring action, rather than polyethyleneimine, however the effect of structurization increases at use of complexes a sodium humate – polyethyleneimine. Increase in structuring ability at introduction in soil of a mix the sodium-polymer humate is proved by occurrence of electrostatic contacts between amino groups of polyethyleneimine and carboxyl groups of a humate of sodium.

  19. Sewage sludge as an initial fertility driver for rapid improvement of mudflat salt-soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanchao; Zang, Caiyun; Gu, Minjing; Gu, Chuanhui; Shao, Hongbo; Guan, Yongxiang; Wang, Xukui; Zhou, Xiaojian; Shan, Yuhua; Feng, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Sewage sludge is by-product in the process of centralized wastewater treatment. Land application of sewage sludge is one of the important disposal alternatives. Mudflats in the interaction zone between land and sea can be important alternative sources for arable lands if amended by large amount of organic fertilizers. Rich in organic matter and other nutrients, sewage sludge has been considered as the economic choice for an initial fertility driver. However, sewage sludge amendment has been greatly hampered due to availability of potential toxic metals. Using sewage sludge in compliance with the national standards for agricultural usage could avoid the accumulation of heavy metals. Nevertheless, it is not clear whether massive input of sewage sludge would increase heavy metals concentration in crops. The objective of this study was to investigate impact of sewage sludge amendment (SSA) as an initial fertility driver by one-time input, with the rates of 0, 30, 75, 150, and 300tha -1 , on biomass of green manures, soil chemical properties, and growth and heavy metals uptake of maize (Zea mays L.) grown in mudflat soil. Results showed that one-time sewage sludge amendment promoted an initial fertility for infertile mudflat soil, supported growth of ryegrass as the first season green manure. By tilled ryegrass, it modified the chemical properties of mudflat soil by increasing soil organic carbon, total and available N and P, and decreasing soil salinity and pH, which promoted subsequent growth of two green manures for sesbania and ryegrass. The sewage sludge as an initial fertility driver combined with planting and tilling green manures, increased dry matter of the aerial part and grain yield of maize grown in mudflat soil. Cd and Ni concentrations in grain of maize were positively correlated with sewage sludge amendment rates. Importantly, heavy metal concentrations in grain of maize at all SSA rates did not exceed the safety standard for food in China (GB 2762

  20. Drainage and reclamation of salt-affected soils in the Bardenas area, Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez Beltran, J.

    1978-01-01

    Chapter 1

    The Ebro basin is situated in north-eastern Spain and forms a geographic unit bounded by high mountains. The Bardenas area lies in the Ebro basin and forms part of the Bardenas Alto - Aragón irrigation scheme, which was designed to make use of the surface water resources from the

  1. Do soil organic carbon levels affect potential yields and nitrogen use efficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oelofse, Myles; Markussen, Bo; Knudsen, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is broadly recognised as an important parameter affecting soil quality, and can therefore contribute to improving a number of soil properties that influence crop yield. Previous research generally indicates that soil organic carbon has positive effects on crop yields...... draws on historical data sets from the Danish national field trials consisting of 560 winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) trials and 309 spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) trials conducted over the past 20 and 17 years, respectively. We hypothesised that for these two crops, the potential grain yield...... and aimed to elucidate the sole effect of SOC by controlling for potential confounding variables. No significant effect of SOC on potential winter wheat was found, whilst for spring barley, only for the course sandy loam soil type was a borderline significantly positive effect of SOC on potential yields...

  2. Mineralization and carbon turnover in subarctic heath soil as affected by warming and additional litter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Baath, Erland

    2007-01-01

    Arctic soil carbon (C) stocks are threatened by the rapidly advancing global warming. In addition to temperature, increasing amounts of leaf litter fall following from the expansion of deciduous shrubs and trees in northern ecosystems may alter biogeochemical cycling of C and nutrients. Our aim...... was to assess how factorial warming and litter addition in a long-term field experiment on a subarctic heath affect resource limitation of soil microbial communities (measured by thymidine and leucine incorporation techniques), net growing-season mineralization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), and carbon...... the field incubation. The added litter did not affect the carbon content, but it was a source of nutrients to the soil, and it also tended to increase bacterial growth rate and net mineralization of P. The inorganic N pool decreased during the field incubation of soil cores, especially in the separate...

  3. Microwave irradiation affects ion pairing in aqueous solutions of alkali halide salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Bren, Urban

    2017-01-01

    Using the molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for translational and rotational degrees of freedom, we investigate the effects of water's rotational motion on the ion pairing of ionic solutes in aqueous solutions. The situation with rotational temperature higher than the translational one, Trot>Ttrs , is mimicking the non-equilibrium effects of microwaves on model solutions of alkali halide salts. The simulations reveal that an increase in the rotational temperature at constant translational temperature exerts significant changes in the structure of the solution. The latter are reflected in increased pairing of the oppositely charged ions, which can be explained by the weaker ability of rotationally excited water to screen and separate the opposite charges. It seems that Collins' law of matching water affinities retains its validity also in the non-equilibrium situation where the rotational temperature exceeds the translational one. On the other hand, the equilibrium effect (i.e., an increase in the solution's overall temperature T ≡Trot = Ttrs) favors the formation of small-small (NaCl), while it has a little effect on large-large (CsI) ion pairs. This is in accordance with water becoming less polar solvent upon a temperature increase. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of excited translational motion of water (and ions) on the ion pairing by increasing the translational temperature, while keeping the rotational one unchanged (i.e., Ttrs>Trot ). Interestingly, in certain cases the faster translational motion causes an increase in correlations. The temperature variations in the like-ion association constants, Kas++ and Kas-, are also examined. Here the situation is more complex but, in most cases, a decrease in the ion pairing is observed.

  4. Salt marsh dieback in coastal Louisiana: survey of plant and soil conditions in Barataria and Terrebonne basins, June 2000-September 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen L.; Mendelssohn, Irving A.; Materne, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Sudden and extensive dieback of the perennial marsh grass, Spartina alterniflora Loisel (smooth cordgrass), which dominates regularly flooded salt marshes along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines, occurred in the coastal zone of Louisiana. The objectives of this study were to assess soil and plant conditions in dieback areas of the Barataria-Terrebonne estuarine system as well as vegetative recovery during and after this dieback event. Multiple dieback sites were examined along 100 km of shoreline from the Atchafalaya River to the Mississippi River during the period from June 2000 through September 2001. The species primarily affected was S. alterniflora; sympatric species such as Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn (black mangrove) and Juncus roemerianus Scheele (needlegrass rush) showed no visible signs of stress. The pattern of marsh dieback was distinctive with greatest mortality in the marsh interior, suggesting a correlation with local patterns of soil chemistry and/or hydrology. Little or no expansion of dieback occurred subsequent to the initial event, and areas with 50 percent or less mortality in the fall of 2000 had completely recovered by April 2001. Recovery was slower in interior marshes with 90 percent or greater mortality initially. However, regenerating plants in dieback areas showing some recovery were robust, and reproductive output was high, indicating that the causative agent was no longer present and that post-dieback soil conditions were actually promoting plant growth. Stands of other species within or near some dieback sites remained largely unchanged or expanded (A. germinans) into the dead salt marsh. The cause of the dieback is currently unknown. Biotic agents and excessive soil waterlogging/high sulfide were ruled out as primary causes of this acute event, although they could have contributed to overall plant stress and/or interacted with the primary agent to cause plant mortality. Our observations over the 15 month study

  5. Soil composition and nutritional status of apple as affected by long-term application of gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Nava

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gypsum does not affect the soil negative charges and maintains sulfate in the soil solution, making it one of the cheapest products to increase Ca activity in soil solution, especially in the deeper soil layers. Higher Ca levels in the soil solution can increase the uptake of this nutrient by apple trees, reducing the risk of physiological disorders caused by Ca deficiency. This study assessed the effect of long-term gypsum application on some soil properties and on the chemical composition of leaves and fruits of an apple cultivar susceptible to fruit disorders associated with low Ca. The experiment was conducted in São Joaquim, in the South of Brazil, from 2001 to 2009. Gypsum rates of 0, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 t ha-1 were annually broadcast over the soil surface, without incorporation, in an apple orchard with cultivar ´Catarina´, planted in 1997. Gypsum application over eight consecutive years had no effect on soil exchangeable K and Al to a depth of 80 cm, but increased exchangeable Ca in the sampled layers (0-10, 10-20, 40-60 and 60-80 cm, while exchangeable Mg decreased only in the surface layer (0-20 cm. Gypsum did not affect the concentration of any nutrient in the fruits, including Ca. The same was verified in the leaves, except for Mg which decreased with increased gypsum rate. Despite increasing the availability of Ca in the soil profile to a depth of 80 cm, gypsum was not effective to increase the Ca content in leaves and fruits of an apple cultivar susceptible to Ca deficiency grown in an appropriately limed soil.

  6. Biochar pyrolyzed at two temperatures affects Escherichia coli transport through a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Carl H; Abit, Sergio M

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of biochar into soils has been proposed as a means to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. An added environmental benefit is that biochar has also been shown to increase soil retention of nutrients, heavy metals, and pesticides. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether biochar amendments affect the transport of Escherichia coli through a water-saturated soil. We looked at the transport of three E. coli isolates through 10-cm columns packed with a fine sandy soil amended with 2 or 10% (w/w) poultry litter biochar pyrolyzed at 350 or 700°C. For all three isolates, mixing the high-temperature biochar at a rate of 2% into the soil had no impact on transport behavior. When added at a rate of 10%, a reduction of five orders of magnitude in the amount of E. coli transported through the soil was observed for two of the isolates, and a 60% reduction was observed for the third isolate. Mixing the low-temperature biochar into the soil resulted in enhanced transport through the soil for two of the isolates, whereas no significant differences in transport behavior were observed between the low-temperature and high-temperature biochar amendments for one isolate. Our results show that the addition of biochar can affect the retention and transport behavior of E. coli and that biochar application rate, biochar pyrolysis temperature, and bacterial surface characteristics were important factors determining the transport of E. coli through our test soil. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Endogeic earthworms shape bacterial functional communities and affect organic matter mineralization in a tropical soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Laetitia; Chapuis-Lardy, Lydie; Razafimbelo, Tantely; Razafindrakoto, Malalatiana; Pablo, Anne-Laure; Legname, Elvire; Poulain, Julie; Brüls, Thomas; O'Donohue, Michael; Brauman, Alain; Chotte, Jean-Luc; Blanchart, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Priming effect (PE) is defined as a stimulation of the mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) following a supply of fresh organic matter. This process can have important consequences on the fate of SOM and on the management of residues in agricultural soils, especially in tropical regions where soil fertility is essentially based on the management of organic matter. Earthworms are ecosystem engineers known to affect the dynamics of SOM. Endogeic earthworms ingest large amounts of soil and assimilate a part of organic matter it contains. During gut transit, microorganisms are transported to new substrates and their activity is stimulated by (i) the production of readily assimilable organic matter (mucus) and (ii) the possible presence of fresh organic residues in the ingested soil. The objective of our study was to see (i) whether earthworms impact the PE intensity when a fresh residue is added to a tropical soil and (ii) whether this impact is linked to a stimulation/inhibition of bacterial taxa, and which taxa are affected. A tropical soil from Madagascar was incubated in the laboratory, with a 13C wheat straw residue, in the presence or absence of a peregrine endogeic tropical earthworm, Pontoscolex corethrurus. Emissions of 12CO2 and 13CO2 were followed during 16 days. The coupling between DNA-SIP (stable isotope probing) and pyrosequencing showed that stimulation of both the mineralization of wheat residues and the PE can be linked to the stimulation of several groups especially belonging to the Bacteroidetes phylum. PMID:21753801

  8. Sulfur-accumulating plants convert sulfate salts from soils into environmentally resilient biominerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Thomas; Reid, Nathan; Stevens, Jason; Dixon, Kingsley

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur-accumulator plants (thiophores), which accumulate atypically high sulfur and calcium concentrations in their aerial biomass, may be suitable for revegetating and phytostabilising reactive sulfur-enriched substrates such as mine tailings, acid-sulfate soils and polluted soils. We present biogeochemical insights on thiophores from the Australian Great Sandy Desert, which accumulate up to 40 times as much sulfur (2-5 %S) versus comparator species. X-ray microanalyses revealed this accumulation relates to peculiar gypsum-like mineralisation throughout their foliage, illustrating a mechanism for sulfate removal from soils and sequestration as sparingly soluble biominerals. However, we did not know whether these species treat the excess Ca/S as a waste to be shed with senescent litter and, if so, how resilient these 'biominerals' are to photo-biodegradation once shed and so to what extent the accumulated elements are recycled back into the reactive/bioavailable sulfate reservoir. To address these questions, we sampled four foliage (phyllode) fractions from ten individuals of the thiophore, Acacia bivenosa: healthy mature phyllodes, senescent phyllodes on the branch, recently shed and older, more degraded ground litter. We selected two thiophores (A. bivenosa and A. robeorum) and a non-thiophore (A. ancistrocarpa) for detailed soil/regolith studies. Samples were collected from trenches bisected by each tree, taken from varying depth (20-500 mm) and distance from the stem (0.1-5 m). Dried foliage was cleaned, sectioned for SEM-EDXS examination and elemental compositions of foliage and soils were determined (microwave-assisted acid digestion + ICP-OES/MS). Each species generated a 'halo' of elevated S/Ca in the soil immediately beneath their crowns, although that of A. ancistrocarpa was of minor magnitude. These anomalies were confined to shallow soil (20-50 mm i.e. influenced by litter), suggesting limited S/Ca re-mobilisation from the litter. Foliar elemental

  9. Interactions between soil organic matter dynamics and soil structure as affected by farm management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulleman, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the last century, agriculture has focussed primarily on attaining maximum yields of crop production with the use of large amounts of fertilizers, biocides and pesticides. Growing public awareness of the detrimental effects of modern agriculture on soil productivity,

  10. Grain Yield, Dry Weight and Phosphorus Accumulation and Translocation in Two Rice (Oryza sativa L. Varieties as Affected by Salt-Alkali and Phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Tian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salt-alkali is the main threat to global crop production. The functioning of phosphorus (P in alleviating damage to crops from saline-alkaline stress may be dependent on the variety of crop but there is little published research on the topic. This pot experiment was conducted to study if P has any effect on rice (Oryza sativa L. yield, dry matter and P accumulation and translocation in salt-alkaline soils. Plant dry weight and P content at heading and harvest stages of two contrasting saline-alkaline tolerant (Dongdao-4 and sensitive (Tongyu-315 rice varieties were examined under two saline-alkaline (light versus severe soils and five P supplements (P0, P50, P100, P150 and P200 kg ha−1. The results were: in light saline-alkaline soil, the optimal P levels were found for P150 for Dongdao-4 and for P100 for Tongyu-315 with the greatest grain dry weight and P content. Two rice varieties obtained relatively higher dry weight and P accumulation and translocation in P0. In severe saline-alkaline soil, however, dry weight and P accumulation and translocation, 1000-grain weight, seed-setting rate and grain yield significantly decreased, but effectively increased with P application for Dongdao-4. Tongyu-315 showed lower sensitivity to P nutrition. Thus, a more tolerant variety could have a stronger capacity to absorb and translocate P for grain filling, especially in severe salt-alkaline soils. This should be helpful for consideration in rice breeding and deciding a reasonable P application in saline-alkaline soil.

  11. Soil amendment affects Cd uptake by wheat — are we underestimating the risks from chloride inputs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, A. Sigrun, E-mail: Sigrun.Dahlin@slu.se [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Eriksson, Jan, E-mail: Jan.O.Eriksson@slu.se [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Campbell, Colin D., E-mail: Colin.Campbell@hutton.ac.uk [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Öborn, Ingrid, E-mail: Ingrid.Oborn@slu.se [Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7043, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), UN Avenue, P.O. Box 30677-00100, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2016-06-01

    Many parts of the world are investigating the efficacy of recycling nutrient resources to agriculture from different industry and domestic sectors as part of a more circular economy. The complex nature of recycled products as soil amendments coupled to the large diversity of soil types and their inherent properties make it difficult to optimize the benefits and minimize the risks from potentially toxic elements often present in recycled materials. Here we investigated how wheat grain cadmium (Cd) concentration was affected by soil amendments, namely human urine and biogas digestate compared to traditional farm manures and mineral fertilizers. We show that Cl{sup −} inadvertently added to soils with e.g. urine or biogas digestate strongly increased crop Cd concentrations, largely by mobilizing inherent soil Cd. This resulted in wheat grain Cd levels that could result in exceeding recommended WHO limits for dietary intake. This was evident even in soils with low inherent Cd content and when Cd inputs were low. The future of a circular economy that helps to underpin global food security needs to ensure that the effects of applying complex materials to different types of agricultural land are fully understood and do not jeopardize food safety. Modified from Wivstad et al. (2009) - Highlights: • High-Cl by-products used as soil amendments mobilize soil Cd. • Wheat grain Cd levels were found that could result in exceeding dietary intake limits. • Quality and risk assessment of by-products should include Cl effects.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of salt tolerant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under saline conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hiz, Mahmut Can; Canher, Balkan; Niron, Harun; Turet, Muge

    2014-01-01

    .... Common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., a major protein source in developing countries, is highly affected by soil salinity and the information on genes that play a role in salt tolerance is scarce...

  13. Halalophilc and halotolerant fungi in cultivated dessert and salt marsh soils from Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Moubasher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred halophilic and halotolerant species in addition to 3 varieties belonging to 27 genera were collccted from 25 samples of cultivated desert and saline soils from different habitats in Egypt on 5-25%. NaCl-Czapek's agar at 28°C(±2°C>. The results reveal that there were no chancteristic halophilic and halotolerant fungi of these various types of soils. The growth of all recovered fungi was tested in medi containing 5-25% sodium chloride. Almost all halophilic fungi (growing better on 5-25% than on O% sodium chloride were Aspergillus species. Most of the highly and fairly halotolerant fungi were Aspergillus and Penicillium species. All test fungi were halophilic or halotolerant.

  14. Effects of dispersant used for oil spill remediation on nitrogen cycling in Louisiana coastal salt marsh soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietroski, Jason P; White, John R; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2015-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) offshore oil platform experienced an explosion which triggered the largest marine oil spill in US history. Approximately 7.9 million liters of dispersant, Corexit EC9500A, was used during the spill between May 15th and July 12th. Marsh soil samples were collected from an unimpacted marsh site proximal to coastal areas that suffered light to heavy oiling for a laboratory evaluation to determine the effect of Corexit on the wetland soil microbial biomass as well as N-mineralization and denitrification rates. Microbial biomass nitrogen (N) values were below detection for the 1:10, 1:100 and 1:1000 Corexit:wet soil treatments. The potentially mineralizable N (PMN) rate correlated with microbial biomass with significantly lower rates for the 1:10 and 1:100 Corexit:wet soil additions. Potential denitrification rates for Corexit:wet soil ratios after immediate dispersant exposure were below detection for the 1:10 treatment, while the 1:100 was 7.6±2.7% of the control and the 1:1000 was 33±4.3% of the control. The 1:10000 treatment was not significantly different from the control. Denitrification rates measured after 2 weeks exposure to the surfactant found the 1:10 treatment still below detection limit and the 1:100 ratio was 12±2.6% of the control. Results from this lab study suggest that chemical dispersants have the potential to negatively affect the wetland soil microbial biomass and resultant microbial activity. Consequences of exposure led to reductions in several important microbial-regulated ecosystem services including water quality improvement (denitrification) and ecosystem primary productivity (N-mineralization). Future studies should investigate the longer-term impacts of dispersant exposure on the microbial consortia to determine if microbial activity recovers over time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors affecting metribuzin retention in Algerian soils and assessment of the risks of contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukali-Haouchine, Ouzna; Barriuso, Enrique; Mayata, Yamina; Moussaoui, Khadija M

    2013-05-01

    Metribuzin is a widely used herbicide around the world but it could lead to soil and water contamination. Metribuzin retention on a silty-clay agricultural soil of Algeria was studied in laboratory batch experiments to assess the contamination risk of the groundwater. Factors conditioning the fate of metribuzin were investigated: soil nature, metribuzin formulation, NPK fertilizer, and soil pH. Freundlich sorption isotherms gave the coefficients K F between 1.2 and 4.9 and 1/n a between 0.52 and 0.93. The adsorption is directly dependent on organic and clay soil contents. Formulated metribuzin (Metriphar) reduces the adsorption (K F = 1.25) compared to pure metribuzin (K F = 2.81). The addition of an NPK fertilizer decreases the soil pH (6.67 for the soil without fertilizer and 5.86 for 2 % of fertilizer) and increases metribuzin adsorption (K F is 4.83 for 2 % of fertilizer). The pH effect on the adsorption is corroborated in experiments changing the soil pH between 5 (K F is 4.17) and 8 (K F is 1.57) under controlled conditions. Desorption isotherms show a hysteresis and only 30 to 40 % of the initially adsorbed metribuzin is released. The estimated GUS index is ≥ 2.8 for a DT50 ≥ 30 days. K F values and the hysteresis show that metribuzin is little but strongly retained on the soil. Formulated metribuzin and addition of fertilizer affect the retention. However, the GUS index indicates a high mobility and a significant risk of leaching. The most appropriate risk management measure would be an important increase in organic matter content of the soil by addition of organic amendments.

  16. Do root traits affect a plant's ability to influence soil erosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Emma; Quinton, John; Dodd, Ian

    2017-04-01

    With the ever increasing global population the agricultural sector is put under increasing pressure. This pressure is imposed on the soil and results in wide spread degradation that ultimately decreases productivity. Soil erosion is one of the main features of this degradation. Much focus has been put on the ability of plant canopies to mitigate soil erosion but little research has assessed the impact of below ground biomass. It is understood that woody roots reinforce slopes and lateral roots are believed to support the soil surface but the impact of root hairs is completely unknown. This study used two root hairless mutants one of barley (brb) and one of maize (rth3) along with their wild types (WT) to assess the capacity of different root traits to bind soil particles to the root system, creating a physical coating called a rhizosheath. The two genotypes were grown in a clay loam and periodically harvested during vegetative development. Rhizosheath weight was used to measure the ability of the root system to effectively bind soil particles, while root length was measured to standardise the results between genotypes. Overall, rhizosheath weight increased linearly with root length. When compared to WT plants of the same age, the root length of brb was, on average, 37% greater, suggesting that they compensated for the absence of root hairs by proliferating lateral roots. However, WT plants were far superior at binding soil particles as the rhizosheath weights were 5 fold greater, when expressed per unit root length. Thus root hairs are more important in binding soil particles than lateral roots. Whether these genotypic differences in root traits affect soil erosion will be assessed using mesocosm and field trials. Keywords: Soil erosion, Roots, Barley, Rhizosheath

  17. Organic matter protection as affected by the mineral soil matrix: allophanic vs. non-allophanic volcanic ash soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierop, K. G. J.; Kaal, J.; Jansen, B.; Naafs, D. F. W.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic ash soils (Andosols) contain the largest amounts of organic carbon of all mineral soil types. Chemical (complexes of organic matter with allophane, Al/Fe) and physical (aggregation) mechanisms are protecting the carbon from decomposition. While allophanic Andosols are dominated by short range order minerals such as allophane, imogolite and ferrihydrite, organic matter-Al/Fe complexes dominate non-allophanic Andosols. Consequently, chemical interactions between the mineral soil matrix and organic matter differ between these two soil types. This difference could potentially lead to different organic matter compositions. In this study, the organic matter of Ah horizons of an allophanic Andosol with a non-allophanic Andosol from Madeira Island is compared using analytical pyrolysis. Both volcanic soil types showed a relative decrease of lignin-derived pyrolysis products with depth, but this decrease was more pronounced in the allophanic Andosol. Polysaccharides were more abundant in the allophanic Ah horizon, particularly at lower depth, and this was also the case for the non-plant-derived N-containing polysaccharide chitin. Most likely, these biopolymers are adsorbed onto short range order minerals such as allophane and therefore were better protected in the allophanic Andosol. In addition, the higher chitin contents combined with the more pronounced lignin degradation suggests a higher fungal activity. Aliphatic pyrolysis products (n-alkenes/n-alkanes, fatty acids) were relatively more enriched in the non-allophanic Andosol. Lower microbial activity caused by the more acidic pH and higher levels of (toxic) aluminium are the most plausible reasons for the accumulation of these compounds in the non-allophanic Andosol. Although the allophanic and non-allophanic Andosol resembled each other in containing biopolymer groups of the same orders of magnitudes, in particular the contents of chitin and aliphatic compounds were distinctly affected by the differences in

  18. Microbial community biomass and structure in saline and non-saline soils associated with salt, boron tolerant poplar clones grown for the phytoremediation of selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Sadikshya R; Bañuelos, Gary; Buyer, Jeffrey S; Hanson, Bradley; Gerik, James

    2017-07-05

    Poplar trees (Populus spp.) are often used in bioremediation strategies because of their ability to phytoextract potential toxic ions, e.g., selenium (Se) from poor quality soils. Soil microorganisms may play a vital role in sustaining health of soil and/or tolerance of these trees grown in poor quality soils by contributing to nutrient cycling, soil structure, overall soil quality and plant survival. The effect of naturally-occurring salts, boron (B) and Se on soil microbial community composition associated with poplar trees is not known for bioremediation strategies. In this study, three Populus clones: 13-366, 345-1, and 347-14 were grown in spring 2006 under highly saline, B and Se clay-like soils in the west side of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of CA, as well as in non-saline sandy loam soils located in the east side of the SJV. After 7 years of growing in the respective soils of different quality, soil samples were collected from poplar clones grown in saline and non-saline soils to examine and compare soil quality effects on soil microbial community biomass and composition. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used to characterize microbial community composition in soils from trees grown at both locations. This study showed that microbial biomass as well as the amount and proportion of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community were lower in all three poplar clones grown in saline soil compared to non-saline soil. Amounts of Gram + bacterial and actinomycetes PLFAs were significantly lower in poplar clone 13-366 grown in saline soil compared to non-saline soil; however, they did not differ significantly in poplar clones 347-14 and 345-1. Additionally, amounts of saprophytic fungal, Gram - bacterial and eukaryotic PLFA remained similar at saline and non-saline sites under poplar clones 347-14, 345-1 and 13-366. Therefore, this study suggested that salinity and B do have an impact on microbial biomass and AMF, however, these poplar clones still

  19. Forest Structure Affects Soil Mercury Losses in the Presence and Absence of Wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, Peter S; Darbyshire, Robyn L; Bormann, Bernard T; Morrissette, Brett A

    2015-11-03

    Soil is an important, dynamic component of regional and global mercury (Hg) cycles. This study evaluated how changes in forest soil Hg masses caused by atmospheric deposition and wildfire are affected by forest structure. Pre and postfire soil Hg measurements were made over two decades on replicate experimental units of three prefire forest structures (mature unthinned, mature thinned, clear-cut) in Douglas-fir dominated forest of southwestern Oregon. In the absence of wildfire, O-horizon Hg decreased by 60% during the 14 years after clearcutting, possibly the result of decreased atmospheric deposition due to the smaller-stature vegetative canopy; in contrast, no change was observed in mature unthinned and thinned forest. Wildfire decreased O-horizon Hg by >88% across all forest structures and decreased mineral-soil (0 to 66 mm depth) Hg by 50% in thinned forest and clear-cut. The wildfire-associated soil Hg loss was positively related to the amount of surface fine wood that burned during the fire, the proportion of area that burned at >700 °C, fire severity as indicated by tree mortality, and soil C loss. Loss of soil Hg due to the 200,000 ha wildfire was more than four times the annual atmospheric Hg emissions from human activities in Oregon.

  20. To Identify the Important Soil Properties Affecting Dinoseb Adsorption with Statistical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqing Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the influences of soil characteristic factors on dinoseb adsorption parameter with different statistical methods would be valuable to explicitly figure out the extent of these influences. The correlation coefficients and the direct, indirect effects of soil characteristic factors on dinoseb adsorption parameter were analyzed through bivariate correlation analysis, and path analysis. With stepwise regression analysis the factors which had little influence on the adsorption parameter were excluded. Results indicate that pH and CEC had moderate relationship and lower direct effect on dinoseb adsorption parameter due to the multicollinearity with other soil factors, and organic carbon and clay contents were found to be the most significant soil factors which affect the dinoseb adsorption process. A regression is thereby set up to explore the relationship between the dinoseb adsorption parameter and the two soil factors: the soil organic carbon and clay contents. A 92% of the variation of dinoseb sorption coefficient could be attributed to the variation of the soil organic carbon and clay contents.

  1. Carbon fractions and soil fertility affected by tillage and sugarcane residue management an Xanthic Udult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Maria Lopes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The gradual change in management practices in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. production from burning straw to a green harvesting system, as well as the use of minimum soil tillage during field renovation, may affect soil fertility and soil organic matter (SOM contents. The objectives of this work were to investigate the influence of sugar cane production systems on: (1 soil fertility parameters; (2 on physical carbon fractions; (3 and on humic substance fractions, in a long-term experiment, comparing two soil tillage and two residue management systems an Xanthic Udult, in the coastal tableland region of Espírito Santo State, Brazil. The treatments consisted of plots (conventional tillage (CT or minimum tillage (MT and subplots (residue burned or unburned at harvesting, with five replicates The highest values of Ca2+ + Mg2+ and total organic carbon (TOC were observed in the MT system in all soil layers, while high values of K+ were observed in the 0.1-0.2 m layer. The CT associated with the burned residue management negatively influenced the TOC values, especially in the 0.1-0.2 and 0.2-0.4 m layers. The carbon in the humin fraction and organic matter associated with minerals were significantly different among the tillage systems; the MT showed higher values than the CT. However, there were no significant differences between the sugarcane residue management treatments. Overall, fractioning the SOM allowed for a better understanding of tillage and residue management systems effects on the soil properties.

  2. Bacterial diversity in Greenlandic soils as affected by potato cropping and inorganic versus organic fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Charlotte Frydenlund; Pedas, Pai Rosager; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas

    2014-01-01

    research has been performed on the effects of these treatments on bacterial communities in Arctic and Subarctic agricultural soils. The major objective of this study was to investigate the short-term impact of conventional (NPK) and organic (sheep manure supplemented with nitrogen) fertilizer treatments...... with only limited pest management, despite the presence of plant pathogenic fungi. The microbial community composition in agricultural soils, which plays an important role for soil and plant health and for crop yield, may be affected by the use of different fertilizer treatments. Currently, only limited...... as a result of different fertilizer treatments, indicating a robust microbial community in these soils. In addition, differences in nutrient levels, crop yields and bacterial abundances were found between the two field sites and the two experimental growth seasons, which likely reflect differences in physical...

  3. Radioactive influence of some phosphogypsum piles located at the SW Spain in their surrounding soils and salt-marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolivar, J. P.; Mosqueda, F.; Vaca, F.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Martinez-Sanchez, M. J.; Perez-Sirvent, C.; Martinez-Lopez, S.

    2012-04-01

    In the SW of Spain, just in the confluence of the mouths of the Tinto and Odiel River and in the vicinity of Huelva town, there is a big industrial complex which includes between others an industry devoted during more than 40 years to the production of phosphoric acid, by treating sedimentary phosphate rock by the so-called "wet acid method". As a by-product of the mentioned process it have been produced historically huge amounts of a compound called phosphogypsum, which composition is mostly di-hydrate calcium sulphate containing some of the impurities of heavy metals and natural radionuclides originally present in the raw material. Due to the lack of market for this by-product, it has been mostly piled over some salt-marshes located in the vicinity of the industry, on the bank of the Tinto River. About 100 million tons of phosphogypsum have been piled in an area covering more than 1000 hectares, constituting a clear environmental and radiological anomaly in the zone. The phosphogypsum piles set do not conform obviously a close system. They are interacting with the nearby environment mostly by leaching waters releases from the waters accumulated in them either for its previous use in transporting in suspension the PG from the factory or by rainfall. These waters leaks contain in solution enhanced amounts of heavy metals and radionuclides that can provoke the chemical and radioactive contamination in surroundings soil and salt-marshes areas. In this communication the radioactive influence by the phosphogypsum piles in the surrounding terrestrial environment is evaluated. This contamination is mostly due to radionuclides belonging to the uranium series, which are present originally in the raw material treated in the industry, and afterwards in the generated phosphogypsum, in enhanced amounts in relation to typical soils. In addition, the different dynamics and behavior of different radionuclides will be discussed and analyzed. The gained information in this study

  4. Compost amendment of sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Cornelis, W.; Razzaghi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Sandy soils, with low productivity, could be improved by compost application to sustain crop production. This study aimed to examine the effect of three compost types (vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost, garden waste compost, and spent mushroom compost) on basic properties of a loamy sand...... and significantly decreased bulk density, with no effect on plant available water compared to the control. Fresh and dry fruit weights were significantly increased after compost addition. Plant height, leaf number, stem diameter, and total biomass did not significantly improve after compost addition. Spent mushroom...

  5. Soil Physical Quality and Soybean Yield as Affected by Chiseling and Subsoiling of a No-Till Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Lozano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The concept of soil physical quality (SPQ is currently under discussion, and an agreement about which soil physical properties should be included in the SPQ characterization has not been reached. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the ability of SPQ indicators based on static and dynamic soil properties to assess the effects of two loosening treatments (chisel plowing to 0.20 m [ChT] and subsoiling to 0.35 m [DL] on a soil under NT and to compare the performance of static- and dynamic-based SPQ indicators to define soil proper soil conditions for soybean yield. Soil sampling and field determinations were carried out after crop harvest. Soil water retention curve was determined using a tension table, and field infiltration was measured using a tension disc infiltrometer. Most dynamic SPQ indicators (field saturated hydraulic conductivity, K0, effective macroporosity, εma, total connectivity and macroporosity indexes [CwTP and Cwmac] were affected by the studied treatments, and were greater for DL compared to NT and ChT (K0 values were 2.17, 2.55, and 4.37 cm h-1 for NT, ChT, and DL, respectively. However, static SPQ indicators (calculated from the water retention curve were not capable of distinguishing effects among treatments. Crop yield was significantly lower for the DL treatment (NT: 2,400 kg ha-1; ChT: 2,358 kg ha-1; and DL: 2,105 kg ha1, in agreement with significantly higher values of the dynamic SPQ indicators, K0, εma, CwTP, and Cwmac, in this treatment. The results support the idea that SPQ indicators based on static properties are not capable of distinguishing tillage effects and predicting crop yield, whereas dynamic SPQ indicators are useful for distinguishing tillage effects and can explain differences in crop yield when used together with information on weather conditions. However, future studies, monitoring years with different weather conditions, would be useful for increasing knowledge on this topic.

  6. How mycorrhizal plant-soil interactions affect formation and degradation of soil organic matter in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Bartosz; Sietiö, Outi-Maaria; Ahvenainen, Anu; Strakova, Petra; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Forest soil organic matter (SOM) contains more carbon (C) than all the flora and atmosphere combined and that is why C release as CO2 from SOM may have drastic consequences for climate globally. SOM is enormous C sink which has the potential to become C source (IPCC 2013). To predict long-term soil C storage and climate feedbacks we need profound understanding of dynamics and drivers of SOM decomposition. Ecosystem processes associated with C cycle are constrained by C and N interactions. At the level of ecosystem boreal forest is N-limited, as most of soil N is stored in recalcitrant organic form bound or complexed with soil compounds such as polyphenols. To improve N uptake, also from less available pools, plant species form symbioses with mycorrhizal fungi able to degrade recalcitrant N and sharing it with plants. As a feedback, plants provide to fungal symbiont assimilated C. Climate change through elevated CO2 level led to increases in photosynthesis which enhance the C flow belowground accelerating N uptake by plants also from more recalcitrant N pools. Increased SOM decomposition would possibly result also in increase of CO2 production from soil. Our field experiment was conducted at Hyytiälä forestry field station (SMEAR II, University of Helsinki) located in southern Finland (61°84'N, 24°26'E). In this 3-year long experiment, we discriminated SOM decomposition with different mesh bags filled with humus. These mesh bags allowed for the entrance of mycorrhiza and fine roots (1mm mesh size), or only mycorrhiza (50µm), or both were excluded (1µm). We followed changes in SOM content, N pools and enzymatic activity. The results suggests that plant-mycorrhiza interactions increase recalcitrant pool of organic N in SOM due to root-derived tannins, but mycorrhizal plants have still access to this N. Although mycorrhizal plant-soil interaction seems to strongly affect the formation of recalcitrant SOM, the net decomposition is not hindered by these chemical

  7. Determining the Most Important Soil Properties Affecting the Yield of Saffron in the Ghayenat Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    amir ranjbar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Saffron is one of the most important economic plants in the Khorasan province. Awareness of soil quality in agricultural lands is essential for the best management of lands and for obtaining maximum economic benefit. In general, plant growth is a function of environmental factors especially chemical and physical properties of soil (20. It has been demonstrated that there was a positive and high correlation between soil organic matter and saffron yield. Increasing the yield of saffron due to organic matter is probably due to soil nutrient, especially phosphorous and nitrogen and also improvement of soil physical quality (6, 28, 29. The yield of saffron in soils with high nitrogen as a result of vegetative growth is high (8. Shahandeh (6 found that most of the variation of saffron yield depends on soil properties. Due to the economic importance of saffron and the role of soil properties on saffron yield, this research was conducted to find the relationship between saffron yield and some soil physical and chemical properties, and to determine the contribution of soil properties that have the greatest impact on saffron yield in the Ghayenat area. Materials and Methods: This research was performed in 30 saffron fields (30 soil samples of the Ghayenat area (longitude 59° 10΄ 10.37˝ - 59° 11΄ 38.41˝ and latitude 33° 43΄ 35.08˝ - 33΄ 44΄ 02.78˝, which is located in the Khrasan province of Iran. In this research, 21 soil properties were regarded as the total data set (TDS. Then the principal component analysis (PCA was used to determine the most important soil properties affecting saffron yield as a minimum data set (MDS and the stepwise regression to estimate saffron yield. To estimate the yield of saffron in stepwise regression method, saffron yield was considered as a dependent variable and soil physical and chemical properties were considered to be independent variables. Results and Discussion: According to the PCA method

  8. Influence of Irrigation Water Discharge Frequency on Soil Salt Removal and Rice Yield in a Semi-Arid and Saline-Sodic Area

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    Zhigang Huang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation practice for rice culture can be especially challenging in areas with limited water supply and soil salinization. In this study, we carried out a field experiment to assess the effects of different water discharge frequencies on soil salt content, rice yield and water use efficiency on a saline-sodic soil in a semi-arid region of Northeast China. The experiment comprised of three frequency levels of discharge [9-time (I-9-30, 6-time (I-6-30 and 3-time (I-3-30 discharge, all followed with a 30-mm irrigation] in comparison with the traditional irrigation practice of 2-time discharge followed with an 80-mm irrigation (I-2-80. Our initial hypothesis was that increasing discharge frequency would increase both salt reduction and rice yield. Daily precipitation was recorded by a nearby weather station, and evapotranspiration and soil water percolation rates were measured at experimental sites using soil pits. The measurements were used to establish a water balance for each treatment. Our results showed that soil salt reduction increased with the increasing discharge frequency at a 30-mm irrigation water depth. The 9-time discharge reduced a large amount of soil salt (995.0 kg ha−1 after five months of the study. Rice yield also increased with the increasing discharge frequency with a 30-mm irrigation water depth; however, when compared to the traditional 2-time discharge followed with an 80-mm irrigation, rice yield at the sites with more frequent discharge (i.e., I-9-30, I-6-30 and I-3-30 was 11%–18% lower. Because of this, rice yield and irrigation water use efficiency were significantly higher under the traditional practice of high-irrigation with low-frequency discharge (I-2-80 than under I-9-30, I-6-30 and I-3-30. These results indicate a need for a trade-off amongst salt reduction, rice yield and water use when considering selection of irrigation and discharge schedules.

  9. Soil and surface layer type affect non-rainfall water inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Nurit; Berliner, Pedro; Jiang, Anxia

    2017-04-01

    Non-rainfall water inputs (NRWIs), which include fog deposition, dew formation, and direct water vapor adsorption by the soil, play a vital role in arid and semiarid regions. Environmental conditions, namely radiation, air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, largely affect the water cycle driven by NRWIs. The substrate type (soil type and the existence/absence of a crust layer) may as well play a major role. Our objective was to quantify the effects of soil type (loess vs. sand) and surface layer (bare vs. crusted) on the gain and posterior evaporation of NRWIs in the Negev Highlands throughout the dry summer season. Four undisturbed soil samples (20 cm diameter and 50 cm depth) were excavated and simultaneously introduced into a PVC tube. Two samples were obtained in the Negev's Boker plain (loess soil) and two in the Nizzana sand dunes in the Western Negev. On one sample from each site the crust was removed while on the remaining one the natural crust was left in place. The samples were brought to the research site at the Jacob Bluestein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel (31˚08' N, 34˚53' E, 400 meter above the sea level) where they were exposed to the same environmental conditions. The four samples in their PVC tubes were placed on top of scales and the samples mass was continuously monitored. Soil temperatures were monitored at depths of 1, 2, 3, 5 and10 cm in each microlysimeter (ML) using Copper-Constantan thermocouples. The results of particle size distribution indicated that the crust of the loess soil is probably a physical crust, i.e., a crust that forms due to raindroplets impact; while the crust on the sand soil is biological. On most days, the loess soils adsorbed more water than their corresponding sand soil samples. For both soils, the samples for which the crust was removed adsorbed more water than the samples for which it was intact. The difference in daily water adsorption amount between crusted

  10. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  11. SOIL POLLUTION OF SELECTED PAHS AS A FACTOR AFFECTING THE PROPERTIES OF HUMIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Dębska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that the properties of humus soil substances (including humic acids are soil-type-specific. However, one shall consider the fact that properties of organic matter of soil can be modified by farming system (crop rotation, fertilisation as well as other external factors, including pollutants; PAHs. The objective of the paper is to determine the effect of a single-time pollution of soils with high rates of PAHs on the properties of humic acids. The research was performed with the samples of soils representative for the Kujawy and Pomorze Region (Phaeozems, Luvisol, Haplic Arenosols, Fluvisols. Soil samples were polluted with selected PAHs; fluorene, anthracene, pyrene and chrysene at the amount corresponding to 100 mg PAHs · kg-1. Treatments, i.e., soils + PAHs, were incubated for 180 and 360 days at the temperature of 20–25 ºC and at constant moisture of 50 % of field water capacity. Humic acids were extracted from the soil samples prior to and after 180 and 360 days of incubation. The following analyses were performed for separating humic acids: elemental composition, UV-VIS and IR spectrophotometric analyses, susceptibility to oxidation. Results demonstrated that a single introduction of fluorene, anthracene, pyrene and chrysene at very high rates into soils affects the properties of humic acids. There was mostly recorded a decrease in coefficients of absorbance A2/6 and A4/6, an increase in the parameter defining the susceptibility of humic acids to oxidation. There were also noted changes in the pattern of spectra in infrared and the values of the parameter defining the degree of internal oxidation of the humic acids molecules.

  12. Land-use systems affect Archaeal community structure and functional diversity in western Amazon soils

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    Acácio Aparecido Navarrete

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of the ecology of soil microbial communities at relevant spatial scales is primordial in the wide Amazon region due to the current land use changes. In this study, the diversity of the Archaea domain (community structure and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (richness and community composition were investigated using molecular biology-based techniques in different land-use systems in western Amazonia, Brazil. Soil samples were collected in two periods with high precipitation (March 2008 and January 2009 from Inceptisols under primary tropical rainforest, secondary forest (5-20 year old, agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA (PCR-DGGE using the 16S rRNA gene as a biomarker showed that archaeal community structures in crops and pasture soils are different from those in primary forest soil, which is more similar to the community structure in secondary forest soil. Sequence analysis of excised DGGE bands indicated the presence of crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal organisms. Based on clone library analysis of the gene coding the subunit of the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (amoA of Archaea (306 sequences, the Shannon-Wiener function and Simpson's index showed a greater ammonia-oxidizing archaeal diversity in primary forest soils (H' = 2.1486; D = 0.1366, followed by a lower diversity in soils under pasture (H' = 1.9629; D = 0.1715, crops (H' = 1.4613; D = 0.3309 and secondary forest (H' = 0.8633; D = 0.5405. All cloned inserts were similar to the Crenarchaeota amoA gene clones (identity > 95 % previously found in soils and sediments and distributed primarily in three major phylogenetic clusters. The findings indicate that agricultural systems of indigenous people and cattle pasture affect the archaeal community structure and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in western Amazon soils.

  13. Sitona lineatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Feeding on Pisum sativum L. Affects Soil and Plant Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo, Héctor A.; Herle, Carolyn E.; Lupwayi, Newton Z.

    2015-01-01

    Adults of Sitona lineatus (pea leaf weevil, PLW) feed on foliage of several Fabaceae species but larvae prefer to feed on nodules of Pisum sativum L. and Vicia faba L. Indirectly, through their feeding on rhizobia, weevils can reduce soil and plant available nitrogen (N). However, initial soil N can reduce nodulation and damage by the weevil and reduce control requirements. Understanding these interactions is necessary to make integrated pest management recommendations for PLW. We conducted a greenhouse study to quantify nodulation, soil and plant N content, and nodule damage by weevil larvae in relation to soil N amendment with urea, thiamethoxam insecticide seed coating and crop stage. PLWs reduced the number of older tumescent (multilobed) nodules and thiamethoxam addition increased them regardless of other factors. Nitrogen amendment significantly increased soil available N (>99% nitrate) as expected and PLW presence was associated with significantly lower levels of soil N. PLW decreased plant N content at early flower and thiamethoxam increased it, particularly at late flower. The study illustrated the complexity of interactions that determine insect herbivory effects on plant and soil nutrition for invertebrates that feed on N-fixing root nodules. We conclude that effects of PLW on nodulation and subsequent effects on plant nitrogen are more pronounced during the early growth stages of the plant. This suggests the importance of timing of PLW infestation and may explain the lack of yield depression in relation to this pest observed in many field studies. Also, pea crops in soils with high levels of soil N are unlikely to be affected by this herbivore and should not require insecticide inputs. PMID:26106086

  14. Effect of optimal daily fertigation on migration of water and salt in soil, root growth and fruit yield of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in solar-greenhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xinshu; Gao, Yinan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Tian, Yongqiang; Zhang, Zhenxian; Gao, Lihong

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate and excessive irrigation and fertilization have led to the predominant decline of crop yields, and water and fertilizer use efficiency in intensive vegetable production systems in China. For many vegetables, fertigation can be applied daily according to the actual water and nutrient requirement of crops. A greenhouse study was therefore conducted to investigate the effect of daily fertigation on migration of water and salt in soil, and root growth and fruit yield of cucumber. The treatments included conventional interval fertigation, optimal interval fertigation and optimal daily fertigation. Generally, although soil under the treatment optimal interval fertigation received much lower fertilizers than soil under conventional interval fertigation, the treatment optimal interval fertigation did not statistically decrease the economic yield and fruit nutrition quality of cucumber when compare to conventional interval fertigation. In addition, the treatment optimal interval fertigation effectively avoided inorganic nitrogen accumulation in soil and significantly (Pgreenhouse.

  15. Study of MCPA and MCPP herbicides mobility in soils from North-West Croatia as affected by presence of fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Alka J M; Kastelan-Macan, Marija; Petrović, Mira; Barbarić, Zeljka

    2003-05-01

    The mobility of acid herbicide (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid [MCPA] and 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propionic acid [MCPA] in soils of North-West Croatia has been studied by soil thin-layer chromatography (STLC). Mobility of MPCA and MCPP was influenced by the change in concentration of soluble salts and the effect of mineral composition of the system studied, i.e. content of kaolin and sand in soil thin layer. The objective of this work was also to investigate how the mobility of phenoxy herbicides MCPA and MCPP is altered by the presence of fertilizers when both coexist in soil as a result of human activity. It has been found that mobility of acidic herbicides increases with application of fertilizers especially on soil with low clay and low organic matter content.

  16. Soil Fertility and Electrical Conductivity Affected by Organic Waste Rates and Nutrient Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Lopes do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The composition of organic waste (OW and its effect on soil processes may change soil fertility and electrical conductivity (EC. The side effects of waste use in crop fertilization are poorly understood for Brazilian soils. This study examined the effect of the addition of 15 different organic wastes to Oxisols and a Neosol on pH, base saturation, EC, cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7, and the availability of Al, macro (P, K, Ca2+, Mg2+ and S and micronutrients (B, Fe2+, Mn2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. Soil samples (150 g were treated with chicken, pig, horse, cattle, and quail manures, sewage sludge 1 and 2, eucalyptus sawdust, plant substrate, coconut fiber, pine bark, coffee husk, peat, limed compost, and biochar. Wastes were added considering a fixed amount of C (2 g kg-1, which resulted in waste rates ranging from 2.5 to 25.6 Mg ha-1. The soil-waste mixtures were incubated for 330 days in laboratory conditions. The waste liming or acidification values were soil-dependent. The use of some manures and compost increased the pH to levels above of those considered adequate for plant growth. The soil EC was slightly increased in the Neosol and in the medium textured Oxisol, but it was sharply changed (from 195 to 394 µS cm-1 by the addition of organic wastes in the clayey Oxisol, although the EC values were below the range considered safe for plant growth. Changes in the soil availability of P, K+, Ca2+ and Zn2+ were highly related to the inputs of these nutrients by the wastes, and other factors in soil changed due to waste use. Organic waste use simultaneously affects different soil fertility attributes; thus, in addition to the target nutrient added to the soil, the soil acidity buffering capacity and the waste liming and agronomic value must be taken into account in the waste rate definition.

  17. Yungay Atacama, Chile, and University Valley, Antarctica, as Mars analogs, based on aridity as indicated by soil salt profiles and other characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Douglas, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Atacama desert in Chile and the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) in Antarctica are considered to be two of the most arid deserts on Earth and thus are often used as Mars analogs for a variety of studies and instrument testing. Two regions within each of these, the Yunguy (Atacama) and University Valley (MDV) have especially been the focus of recent analog investigations. Both regions are comprised of soils that have accumulated an influx of atmospheric and marine salts. Some of these salts are influenced by the local biogeochemical environment and often display lower solubility. Two anions however, nitrate and perchlorate, are highly soluble species that represent proxies for the movement of water through the soil column either in bulk or thin films. An examination of these salt profiles in the upper and lower MDVs, and Yunguy, in the first case a relatively continuous and smooth distribution, while in the latter cases more chaotic and heterogeneous, suggests that University Valley has been subjected to little if any aqueous activity compared to Yungay or lower elevation MDVs. Even though Atacama possess some desirable Mars analog properties, the salt-profile-based aridity, the presence of dry permafrost, diffusion-controlled ice-table, cryoturbation, and comparatively pristine environment, endows the high elevation MDVs with unique and most Mars-like properties of any terrestrial analog site available.

  18. Soil amendment affects Cd uptake by wheat - are we underestimating the risks from chloride inputs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, A Sigrun; Eriksson, Jan; Campbell, Colin D; Öborn, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    Many parts of the world are investigating the efficacy of recycling nutrient resources to agriculture from different industry and domestic sectors as part of a more circular economy. The complex nature of recycled products as soil amendments coupled to the large diversity of soil types and their inherent properties make it difficult to optimize the benefits and minimize the risks from potentially toxic elements often present in recycled materials. Here we investigated how wheat grain cadmium (Cd) concentration was affected by soil amendments, namely human urine and biogas digestate compared to traditional farm manures and mineral fertilizers. We show that Cl(-) inadvertently added to soils with e.g. urine or biogas digestate strongly increased crop Cd concentrations, largely by mobilizing inherent soil Cd. This resulted in wheat grain Cd levels that could result in exceeding recommended WHO limits for dietary intake. This was evident even in soils with low inherent Cd content and when Cd inputs were low. The future of a circular economy that helps to underpin global food security needs to ensure that the effects of applying complex materials to different types of agricultural land are fully understood and do not jeopardize food safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Soil water balance as affected by throughfall in gorse ( Ulex europaeus, L.) shrubland after burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Benedicto; Diaz-Fierros, Francisco

    1997-08-01

    The role of fire in the hydrological behaviour of gorse shrub is studied from the point of view of its effects on vegetation cover and throughfall. In the first year after fire, throughfall represents about 88% of gross rainfall, whereas in unburnt areas it is 58%. Four years after fire, the throughfall coefficients are similar in burnt and unburnt plots (about 6096). The throughfall is not linearly related to vegetation cover because an increase in cover does not involve a proportional reduction in throughfall. The throughfall predicted by the two-parameter exponential model of Calder (1986, J. Hydrol., 88: 201-211) provides a good fit with the observed throughfall and the y value of the model reflects the evolution of throughfall rate. The soil moisture distribution is modified by fire owing to the increase of evaporation in the surface soil and the decrease of transpiration from deep soil layers. Nevertheless, the use of the old root system by sprouting vegetation leads to a soil water profile in which 20 months after the fire the soil water is similar in burnt and unburnt areas. Overall, soil moisture is higher in burnt plots than in unburnt plots. Surface runoff increases after a fire but does not entirely account for the increase in throughfall. Therefore the removal of vegetation cover in gorse scrub by fire mainly affects the subsurface water flows.

  20. Tillage System Affects Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Quality in Central Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Moussadek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stabilizing or improving soil organic carbon content is essential for sustainable crop production under changing climate conditions. Therefore, soil organic carbon research is gaining momentum in the Mediterranean basin. Our objective is to quantify effects of no tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT on soil organic carbon stock (SOCs in three soil types (Vertisol, Cambisol, and Luvisol within Central Morocco. Chemical analyses were used to determine how tillage affected various humic substances. Our results showed that, after 5 years, surface horizon (0–30 cm SOC stocks varied between tillage systems and with soil type. The SOCs was significantly higher in NT compared to CT (10% more in Vertisol and 8% more in Cambisol, but no significant difference was observed in the Luvisol. Average SOCs within the 0–30 cm depth was 29.35 and 27.36 Mg ha−1 under NT and CT, respectively. The highest SOCs (31.89 Mg ha−1 was found in Vertisols under NT. A comparison of humic substances showed that humic acids and humin were significantly higher under NT compared to CT, but fulvic acid concentrations were significantly lower. These studies confirm that NT does have beneficial effects on SOCs and quality in these soils.

  1. Do soil fertilization and forest canopy foliage affect the growth and photosynthesis of Amazonian saplings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilvanda dos Santos Magalhães

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Most Amazonian soils are highly weathered and poor in nutrients. Therefore, photosynthesis and plant growth should positively respond to the addition of mineral nutrients. Surprisingly, no study has been carried out in situ in the central Amazon to address this issue for juvenile trees. The objective of this study was to determine how photosynthetic rates and growth of tree saplings respond to the addition of mineral nutrients, to the variation in leaf area index of the forest canopy, and to changes in soil water content associated with rainfall seasonality. We assessed the effect of adding a slow-release fertilizer. We determined plant growth from 2010 to 2012 and gas exchange in the wet and dry season of 2012. Rainfall seasonality led to variations in soil water content, but it did not affect sapling growth or leaf gas exchange parameters. Although soil amendment increased phosphorus content by 60 %, neither plant growth nor the photosynthetic parameters were influenced by the addition of mineral nutrients. However, photosynthetic rates and growth of saplings decreased as the forest canopy became denser. Even when Amazonian soils are poor in nutrients, photosynthesis and sapling growth are more responsive to slight variations in light availability in the forest understory than to the availability of nutrients. Therefore, the response of saplings to future increases in atmospheric [CO2] will not be limited by the availability of mineral nutrients in the soil.

  2. Vegetation change in a man-made salt marsh affected by a reduction in both grazing and drainage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, Peter; Fresco, LFM; Dijkema, KS

    In order to restore natural salt marsh in a 460-ha nature reserve established in man-made salt marsh in the Dollard estuary, The Netherlands, the artificial drainage system was neglected and cattle grazing reduced. Vegetation changes were traced through two vegetation surveys and monitoring of

  3. Phosphorus geochemistry in a Brazilian semiarid mangrove soil affected by shrimp farm effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, G N; Otero, X L; Macías, F; Ferreira, T O

    2014-09-01

    Wastewater discharge from shrimp farming is one of the main causes of eutrophication in mangrove ecosystems. We investigated the phosphorus (P) geochemistry in mangrove soils affected by shrimp farming effluents by carrying out a seasonal study of two mangrove forests (a control site (CS); a site affected by shrimp farm effluents (SF)). We determined the soil pH, redox potential (Eh), total organic carbon (TOC), total phosphorus (TP), and dissolved P. We also carried out sequential extraction of the P-solid phases. In SF, the effluents affected the soil physicochemical conditions, resulting in lower Eh and higher pH, as well as lower TOC and higher TP than in CS. Organic P forms were dominant in both sites and seasons, although to a lesser extent in SF. The lower TOC in SF was related to the increased microbial activity and organic matter decomposition caused by fertilization. The higher amounts of P oxides in SF suggest that the effluents alter the dominance of iron and sulfate reduction in mangrove soils, generating more reactive Fe that is available for bonding to phosphates. Strong TP losses were recorded in both sites during the dry season, in association with increased amounts of exchangeable and dissolved P. The higher bioavailability of P during the dry season may be attributed to increased mineralization of organic matter and dissolution of Ca-P in response to more oxidizing and acidic conditions. The P loss has significant environmental implications regarding eutrophication and marine productivity.

  4. Stochastic Modeling of Soil Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suweis, Samir; Rinaldo, Andrea; van der Zee, Sjoerd E. A. T. M.; Maritan, Amos; Porporato, Amilcare

    2010-05-01

    Large areas of cultivated land worldwide are affected by soil salinity. Estimates report that 10% of arable land in over 100 countries, and nine million km2 are salt affected, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. High salinity causes both ion specific and osmotic stress effects, with important consequences for plant production and quality. Salt accumulation in the root zone may be due to natural factors (primary salinization) or due to irrigation (secondary salinization). Simple (e.g., vertically averaged over the soil depth) coupled soil moisture and salt balance equations have been used in the past. Despite their approximations, these models have the advantage of parsimony, thus allowing a direct analysis of the interplay of the main processes. They also provide the ideal starting point to include external, random hydro-climatic fluctuations in the analysis of long-term salinization trends. We propose a minimalist stochastic model of primary soil salinity, in which the rate of soil salinization is determined by the balance between dry and wet salt deposition and the intermittent leaching events caused by rainfall events. The long term probability density functions of salt mass and concentration are found by reducing the coupled soil moisture and salt mass balance equation to a stochastic differential equation driven by multiplicative Poisson noise. The novel analytical solutions provide insight on the interplay of the main soil, plant and climate parameters responsible for long-term soil salinization. In fact, soil salinity statistics are obtained as a function of climate, soil and vegetation parameters. These, in turn, can be combined with soil moisture statistics to obtain a full characterization of soil salt concentrations and the ensuing risk of primary salinization. In particular, the solutions show the existence of two quite distinct regimes, the first one where the mean salt mass remains nearly constant with increasing rainfall frequency, and the

  5. Nitrogen additions affect litter quality and soil biochemical properties in a peatland of Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanyu; Song, Changchun; Meng, Henan; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Wang, Xianwei; Tan, Wenwen

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a limiting nutrient in many peatland ecosystems. Enhanced N deposition, a major component of global climate change, affects ecosystem carbon (C) balance and alters soil C storage by changing plant and soil properties. However, the effects of enhanced N deposition on peatland ecosystems are poorly understood. We conducted a two-year N additions field experiment in a peatland dominated by Eriophorum vaginatum in the Da Xing’an Mountains, Northeast China. Four levels of N treatments were applied: (1) CK (no N added), (2) N1 (6 g N m−2 yr−1), (3) N2 (12 g N m−2 yr−1), and (4) N3 (24 g N m−2  yr−1). Plant and soil material was harvested at the end of the second growing season. N additions increased litter N and phosphorus (P) content, as well as β-glucosidase, invertase, and acid-phosphatase activity, but decreased litter C:N and C:P ratios. Litter carbon content remained unchanged. N additions increased available NH4+–N and NO3−–N as well as total Gram-positive (Gram+), Gram-negative (Gram−), and total bacterial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in shallow soil (0–15 cm depth). An increase in these PLFAs was accompanied by a decrease in soil labile organic C (microbial biomass carbon and dissolved organic carbon), and appeared to accelerate decomposition and reduce the stability of the soil C pool. Invertase and urease activity in shallow soils and acid-phosphatase activity in deep soils (15–30 cm depth) was inhibited by N additions. Together, these findings suggest that an increase in N deposition in peatlands could accelerate litter decomposition and the loss of labile C, as well as alter microbial biomass and function.

  6. Can corn plants inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi affect soil clay assemblage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, P.; Cozzolino, V.; Di Meo, V.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Plants can extract K from exchangeable and non-exchangeable sites in the soil clay mineral structures. The latter, known as fixed K, is usually seen as an illite layer, i.e. an anhydrous K layer that forms a 1.0 nm structural layer unit as seen by X-ray diffraction. Nutrient availability can be enhanced in the root zone by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi. In this study, the effects of non-inoculated and Glomus intraradices inoculated corn plant growth under different experimental conditions on soil K-bearing clay minerals were identified. The soil, a Vertic Xerofluvent, was planted in corn in a 2008-2010 randomized field experiment. Bulk and rhizosphere soil sampling was carried out from May to September 2010 from fertilized plots (N200P90K160 and N200P0K160) with and without plants. According to XRD analysis, three major K-bearing minerals were present in soil: smectite-rich mixed layer mineral, illite-rich mixed layer mineral and illite. Results at 40DAS indicate extraction of K from clay minerals by plant uptake, whereas at 130DAS much of the nutrient seems to be returned to the soil. There is an apparent difference between bulk and rhizophere clays. The XRD patterns are not unequivocally affected by Glomus inoculation. There are observable changes in clay mineralogy in fallow unfertilized compared with fertilized soil. In the studied soil, the illite rich mixed-layer minerals seem to be the source of K absorbed by plants, while illite acts as sink of K released from the plant-microorganisms system at the end of the growing season and as source for the following crop.

  7. Short-term exposure to bisphenol A affects water and salt intakes differently in male and ovariectomised female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Paula; Arguelles, Juan; Perillan, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Thirst and sodium appetite are motivational states that lead to the search for and ingestion of water and sodium, thus contributing to maintenance of hydromineral balance. Oestrogens affect fluid intake and sodium preference. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental endocrine-disrupting substance with oestrogenic activity. Whether there are sex differences in the ingestive effects of BPA is unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to determine the effect of short-term treatment of low doses of BPA on thirst and sodium appetite in adult male and ovariectomised Wistar rats. Rats were subcutaneously injected with either vehicle or 10, 50, 100, or 500 μg/kg/day BPA for a week. Two-bottle tests (water and 2.7% NaCl solution) were conducted in the animals' home cages with and without 24 h water deprivation. BPA reduced water and 2.7% NaCl intakes in a sex-dependent-manner. Fluid intakes displayed inverted U-shaped dose-response curves, with different dose dependencies in spontaneously drinker rats than after 24 h water deprivation dehydration. Future studies on the role of BPA in sex-dependent body fluid homeostasis should elucidate the effects of BPA on the neuroendocrine controls of thirst and salt appetite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pontibacter aydingkolensis sp. nov., isolated from soil of a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ghenijan; Zhang, Tao; Lou, Kai; Gao, Yan; Chang, Wei; Lin, Qing; Yang, Hong-Mei; Huo, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, short rod-shaped and light-red-pigmented bacterium, designated XAAS-1T, was isolated from the soil of Aydingkol Lake near the Turpan City, Xinjiang, China. The isolate was positive for oxidase, catalase and hydrolysis of starch, casein, gelatin and aesculin. The sole respiratory quinone was MK-7 and the principal cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 and C15 : 0 3-OH. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified phospholipid and two unidentified polar lipids. The polyamine pattern was found to contain mainly sym-homospermidine. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain XAAS-1T belongs to the genus Pontibacter in the family Cytophagaceae, with sequence similarities ranging from 93.8 to 96.7 % with other type species of the genus Pontibacter. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, strain XAAS-1T represents a novel species of the genus Pontibacter, for which the name Pontibacter aydingkolensis sp. nov. (type strain XAAS-1T=CCTCC AB 2016134T=JCM 31442T) is proposed.

  9. Scaling preferential flow processes in agricultural soils affected by tillage and trafficking at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, Vilim; Coquet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    There is an accumulation of experimental evidences that agricultural soils, at least the top horizons affected by tillage practices, are not homogeneous and present a structure that is strongly dependent on farming practices like tillage and trafficking. Soil tillage and trafficking can create compacted zones in the soil with hydraulic properties and porosity which are different from those of the non-compacted zones. This spatial variability can strongly influence transport processes and initiate preferential flow. Two or three dimensional models can be used to account for spatial variability created by agricultural practices, but such models need a detailed assessment of spatial heterogeneity which can be rather impractical to provide. This logically raises the question whether and how one dimensional model may be designed and used to account for the within-field spatial variability in soil structure created by agricultural practices. Preferential flow (dual-permeability) modelling performed with HYDRUS-1D will be confronted to classical modelling based on the Richards and convection-dispersion equations using HYDRUS-2D taking into account the various soil heterogeneities created by agricultural practices. Our goal is to derive one set of equivalent 1D soil hydraulic parameters from 2D simulations which accounts for soil heterogeneities created by agricultural operations. A field experiment was carried out in two phases: infiltration and redistribution on a plot by uniform sprinkle irrigation with water or bromide solution. Prior to the field experiment the soil structure of the tilled layer was determined along the face of a large trench perpendicular to the tillage direction (0.7 m depth and 3.1 m wide). Thirty TDR probes and tensiometers were installed in different soil structural zones (Δ compacted soil and Γ macroporous soil) which ensured soil water monitoring throughout the experiment. A map of bromide was constructed from small core samples (4 cm diam

  10. Phosphate-dependent root system architecture responses to salt stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawa, D.; Julkowska, M.M.; Montero Sommerfeld, H.; ter Horst, A.; Haring, M.A.; Testerink, C.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient availability and salinity of the soil affect growth and development of plant roots. Here, we describe how phosphate availability affects root system architecture (RSA) of Arabidopsis and how phosphate levels modulate responses of the root to salt stress. Phosphate (Pi) starvation reduced

  11. Higher molecular weight dissolved organic nitrogen turnover as affected by soil management history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønne Enggrob, Kirsten

    High molecular weight dissolved organic nitrogen turnover as affected by soil management history *Kirsten Lønne Enggrob,1 Lars Elsgaard,1 and Jim Rasmussen1 1Aarhus University, Dept. of Agroecology, Foulum, Denmark 1. Introduction Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) play an important role in soil N...... cycling. DON, as a collective term, refers to a diversity of organic N compounds which can operationally be grouped into high molecular weight (Mw) DON (Mw > 1 kDa) and low Mw DON (... are presented for 14CO2 evolution during 14 days of incubation. 4. Results and conclusion Results showed that the turnover rate of high Mw DON was dependent on both the Mw size of DON and on the soil liming history. Evidence showing where in the DON Mw sizes the bottleneck lies will be presented....

  12. Simulating soybean canopy temperature as affected by weather variables and soil water potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Hourly weather data for several clear sky days during summer at Phoenix and Baltimore which covered a wide range of variables were used with a plant atmosphere model to simulate soybean (Glycine max L.) leaf water potential, stomatal resistance and canopy temperature at various soil water potentials. The air and dew point temperatures were found to be the significant weather variables affecting the canopy temperatures. Under identical weather conditions, the model gives a lower canopy temperature for a soybean crop with a higher rooting density. A knowledge of crop rooting density, in addition to air and dew point temperatures is needed in interpreting infrared radiometric observations for soil water status. The observed dependence of stomatal resistance on the vapor pressure deficit and soil water potential is fairly well represented. Analysis of the simulated leaf water potentials indicates overestimation, possibly due to differences in the cultivars.

  13. Effect of Protein-Lipid-Salt Interactions on Sodium Availability in the Mouth and Consequent Perception of Saltiness: As Affected by Hydration in Powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Umut; Peterson, Devin G

    2015-09-02

    There is a broad need to reformulate lower sodium food products without affecting their original taste. The present study focuses on characterizing the role of protein-salt interactions on the salt release in low-moisture systems and saltiness perception during hydration. Sodium release from freeze-dried protein powders and emulsion powders formulated at different protein/lipid ratios (5:0 to 1:4) were characterized using a chromatography column modified with a porcine tongue. Emulsion systems with protein structured at the interface were found to have faster initial sodium release rates and faster hydration and were perceived to have a higher initial salt intensity with a lower salty aftertaste. In summary, exposure of the hydrophilic segments of the interface-structured proteins in emulsions was suggested to facilitate hydration and release of sodium during dissolution of low-moisture powder samples.

  14. Soil physical and hydrological properties as affected by long-term addition of various organic amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Marie; Völkel, Jörg; Mercier, Vincent; Labat, Christophe; Houot, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    The use of organic residues as soil amendments in agriculture not only reduces the amount of waste needing to be disposed of; it may also lead to improvements in soil properties, including physical and hydrological ones. The present study examines a long-term experiment called "Qualiagro", run jointly by INRA and Veolia Environment in Feucherolles, France (near Paris). It was initiated in 1998 on a loess-derived silt loam (787 g/kg silt, 152 g/kg clay) and includes ten treatments: four types of organic amendments and a control (CNT) each at two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal (Nmin) and optimal (Nopt). The amendments include three types of compost and farmyard manure (FYM), which were applied every other year at a rate of ca. 4 t carbon ha-1. The composts include municipal solid waste compost (MSW), co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (GWS), and biowaste compost (BIO). The plots are arranged in a randomized block design and have a size of 450 m²; each treatment is replicated four times (total of 40 plots). Ca. 15 years after the start of the experiment soil organic carbon (OC) had continuously increased in the amended plots, while it remained stable or decreased in the control plots. This compost- or manure-induced increase in OC plays a key role, affecting numerous dependant soil properties like bulk density, porosity and water retention. The water holding capacity (WHC) of a soil is of particular interest to farmers in terms of water supply for plants, but also indicates soil quality and functionality. Addition of OC may affect WHC in different ways: carbon-induced aggregation may increase larger-pore volume and hence WHC at the wet end while increased surface areas may lead to an increased retention of water at the dry end. Consequently it is difficult to predict (e.g. with pedotransfer functions) the impact on the amount of water available for plants (PAW), which was experimentally determined for the soils, along with the entire range

  15. Does temperature of charcoal creation affect subsequent mineralization of soil carbon and nitrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier-Bergeron, S.; Bradley, R.; Munson, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fire is the most common form of natural disturbance of boreal forest ecosystems and has primordial influence on successional processes. This may be due in part to the pre-disturbance vegetation development stage and species composition, but these successional pathways could also vary with differences in fire behavior and consequently in fire intensity, defined as the energy released during various phases of a fire. Fire intensity may also affect soil C and N cycling by affecting the quality of the charcoal that is produced. For example, the porosity of coal tends to increase with increasing temperature at which it is produced Higher porosity would logically increase the surface area to which dissolved soil molecules, such as tannins and other phenolics, may be adsorbed. We report on a microcosm study in which mineral and organic soils were jointly incubated for eight weeks with a full factorial array of treatments that included the addition of Kalmia tannins, protein, and wood charcoal produced at five different temperatures. A fourth experimental factor comprised the physical arrangement of the material (stratified vs. mixed), designed to simulate the effect of soil scarification after fire and salvage harvest. We examined the effects of these treatments on soil C and N mineralisation and soil microbial biomass. The furnace temperature at which the charcoal was produced had a significant effect on its physico-chemical properties; increasing furnace temperatures corresponded to a significant increase in % C (Ppost incubation NH4+ concentrations. We discuss the results in relation to potential implications for changing fire regime and C and N cycles.

  16. Tillage system does not affect soil macro fauna in southeastern Buenos Aires province, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manetti, P. L.; Lopez, A. N.; Clemente, N. L.; Faberi, J.

    2010-07-01

    Soil degradation increased incessantly in the Pampas region of Argentina, due to the intensification of agricultural activities, when carried out with conventional tillage (CT) systems. No-tillage system was adopted as conservation practices by the farmers. The objectives of this study were: a) to determine the macro fauna taxa and their relative abundance under CT and NT in two different seasons; and b) to evaluate soil tillage and seasonal effects on the density of the main macro fauna taxa. The study was conducted from 2002 to 2004 in 46 production farms, in Balcarce, Argentina. Ten soil monoliths (25.2 cm side; 30 cm depth) randomly directed field at July-August; and at October- November to determine the number of individuals of macro fauna and Enchytraeidae. Soil macro fauna density did not differ between tillage systems. Oligochaeta Megadrilli density was generally not affected by the tillage system (P > 0.05) except in 2004 when it was greater under CT in July-August (P = 0.0002). Chilopoda density was greater in soils under NT, with significant differences in 2002 in October-November (P = 0.0070). In July-August of 2003 it was higher in CT (P = 0.0109). Diplopoda were more abundant only under NT in July-August 2004 (P = 0.0010). In July-August a significantly (P < 0.05) higher density of Enchytraeidae was found in CT than NT fields. No differences were observed in the taxonomic composition and the relative abundance of the macro fauna when comparing CT and NT. It can be then concluded that in the study region tillage systems affected slightly soil macro fauna and significantly Enchytraeidae. (Author)

  17. How do Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Addition Affect Functional Microbial Community Involved in Greenhouse Gas Flux in Salt Marsh System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Megonigal, Patrick J; Kang, Hojeong

    2017-10-01

    Salt marshes are unique ecosystem of which a microbial community is expected to be affected by global climate change. In this study, by using T-RFLP analysis, quantitative PCR, and pyrosequencing, we comprehensively analyzed the microbial community structure responding to elevated CO2 (eCO2) and N addition in a salt marsh ecosystem subjected to CO2 manipulation and N addition for about 3 years. We focused on the genes of microbes relevant to N-cycling (denitrification and nitrification), CH4-flux (methanogens and methanotrophs), and S-cycling (sulfate reduction) considering that they are key functional groups involved in the nutrient cycle of salt marsh system. Overall, this study suggests that (1) eCO2 and N addition affect functional microbial community involved in greenhouse gas flux in salt marsh system. Specifically, the denitrification process may be facilitated, while the methanogenesis may be impeded due to the outcompeting of sulfate reduction by eCO2 and N. This implies that future global change may cause a probable change in GHGs flux and positive feedback to global climate change in salt marsh; (2) the effect of eCO2 and N on functional group seems specific and to contrast with each other, but the effect of single factor would not be compromised but complemented by combination of two factors. (3) The response of functional groups to eCO2 and/or N may be directly or indirectly related to the plant community and its response to eCO2 and/or N. This study provides new insights into our understanding of functional microbial community responses to eCO2 and/or N addition in a C3/C4 plant mixed salt marsh system.

  18. Biochar affects soil organic matter cycling and microbial functions but does not alter microbial community structure in a paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Wang, Jingyuan; Dippold, Michaela; Gao, Yang; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-06-15

    The application of biochar (BC) in conjunction with mineral fertilizers is one of the most promising management practices recommended to improve soil quality. However, the interactive mechanisms of BC and mineral fertilizer addition affecting microbial communities and functions associated with soil organic matter (SOM) cycling are poorly understood. We investigated the SOM in physical and chemical fractions, microbial community structure (using phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and functions (by analyzing enzymes involved in C and N cycling and Biolog) in a 6-year field experiment with BC and NPK amendment. BC application increased total soil C and particulate organic C for 47.4-50.4% and 63.7-74.6%, respectively. The effects of BC on the microbial community and C-cycling enzymes were dependent on fertilization. Addition of BC alone did not change the microbial community compared with the control, but altered the microbial community structure in conjunction with NPK fertilization. SOM fractions accounted for 55% of the variance in the PLFA-related microbial community structure. The particulate organic N explained the largest variation in the microbial community structure. Microbial metabolic activity strongly increased after BC addition, particularly the utilization of amino acids and amines due to an increase in the activity of proteolytic (l-leucine aminopeptidase) enzymes. These results indicate that microorganisms start to mine N from the SOM to compensate for high C:N ratios after BC application, which consequently accelerate cycling of stable N. Concluding, BC in combination with NPK fertilizer application strongly affected microbial community composition and functions, which consequently influenced SOM cycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Liming effects on cadmium stabilization in upland soil affected by gold mining activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chang Oh; Lee, Do Kyoung; Chung, Doug Young; Kim, Pil Joo

    2007-05-01

    To reduce cadmium (Cd) uptake of plants cultivated in heavy metal-contaminated soil, the best liming material was selected in the incubation test. The effect of the selected material was evaluated in the field. In the incubation experimentation, CaCO(3), Ca(OH)(2), CaSO(4).2H(2)O, and oyster shell meal were mixed with soil at rates corresponding to 0, 400, 800, 1600, 3200 mg Ca kg(-1). The limed soil was moistened to 70% of field moisture capacity, and incubated at 25 degrees C for 4 weeks. Ca(OH)(2) was found to be more efficient on reducing soil NH(4)OAc extractable Cd concentration, due to pH increase induced net negative charge. The selected Ca(OH)(2) was applied at rates 0, 2, 4, 8 Mg ha(-1) and then cultivated radish (Raphanus sativa L.) in the field. NH(4)OAc extractable Cd concentration of soil and plant Cd concentration decreased significantly with increasing Ca(OH)(2) rate, since alkaline-liming material markedly increased net negative charge of soil induced by pH increase, and decreased bioavailable Cd fractions (exchangeable + acidic and reducible Cd fraction) during radish cultivation. Cadmium uptake of radish could be reduced by about 50% by amending with about 5 Mg ha(-1) Ca(OH)(2) without adverse effect on radish yield and growth. The increase of net negative charge of soil by Ca(OH)(2) application may suppress Cd uptake and the competition between Ca(2+) and Cd(2+) may additionally affect the suppression of Cd uptake.

  20. Geochemical composition of permafrost-affected soils around the town Tiksi, Northern Yakutia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antcibor, Iuliia; Eschenbach, Annette; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2014-05-01

    Northeastern Siberia represents an area remote from evident anthropogenic trace metal sources. However, a risk of airborne pollution by trace metals from anthropogenic sources connected to the settlements exists. The largest of these are the settlements Tiksi (71° 42' 55.6" N, 128° 48' 46.3" E) and Kyusyur (70° 45' 41.7" N, 127° 23' 04.7" E). The area of Tiksi is located between the Lena River and the Kharaulach River mouths. It covers parts of Primorsky Ridge and Kharaulach Mountains which are a part of the Verkhoyansk Range. The objective of this study was to investigate features of the spatial element distribution in representative landscape-geochemical units of the Tiksi area and to identify whether local pollution from the settlement takes place. The physical and chemical properties of soils were accessed at three sites located radially in the immediate vicinity to the town Tiksi and one control site remote 10 km south from the settlement. The elements measured were As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in soils. Differences in the element content were found for various relief forms (depressions, slopes, and elevations). The coefficient of soil buffer capacity (Bf) for the surface soil horizons in depressions was the highest (Bf > 40 %) for the majority of elements indicating their intensive accumulation there. In the surface soil horizons of elevated landscape forms the coefficient, by contrast showed low to very low soil buffer capacity to accumulate metals (0 % barriers. No significant difference in metal distribution among studied sites was revealed, except for the western site which was characterized by the highest median Ni concentration. The data suggest that ecological impacts at the studied sites were low except for one site north to Tiksi where signs of local pollution probably as a result of local emissions of fuel and mining operations were detected. Keywords: Trace metals; Russian Arctic; Northeastern Siberia; Permafrost-affected soils.

  1. Land use change affects biogenic silica pool distribution in a subtropical soil toposequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzué-Belmonte, Dácil; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Opfergelt, Sophie; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Barão, Lúcia; Minella, Jean; Meire, Patrick; Struyf, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Land use change (deforestation) has several negative consequences for the soil system. It is known to increase erosion rates, which affect the distribution of elements in soils. In this context, the crucial nutrient Si has received little attention, especially in a tropical context. Therefore, we studied the effect of land conversion and erosion intensity on the biogenic silica pools in a subtropical soil in the south of Brazil. Biogenic silica (BSi) was determined using a novel alkaline continuous extraction where Si / Al ratios of the fractions extracted are used to distinguish BSi and other soluble fractions: Si / Al > 5 for the biogenic AlkExSi (alkaline-extractable Si) and Si / Al deforestation can rapidly (< 50 years) deplete the biogenic AlkExSi pool in soils depending on the slope of the study site (10-53 %), with faster depletion in steeper sites. We show that higher erosion in steeper sites implies increased accumulation of biogenic Si in deposition zones near the bottom of the slope, where rapid burial can cause removal of BSi from biologically active zones. Our study highlights the interaction of erosion strength and land use for BSi redistribution and depletion in a soil toposequence, with implications for basin-scale Si cycling.

  2. Winter climate change affects growing-season soil microbial biomass and activity in northern hardwood forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Jorge; Morse, Jennifer L; Groffman, Peter M; Campbell, John L; Christenson, Lynn M; Driscoll, Charles T; Fahey, Timothy J; Fisk, Melany C; Mitchell, Myron J; Templer, Pamela H

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change remains a major challenge of ecological research. We exploited a natural elevation gradient in a northern hardwood forest to determine how reductions in snow accumulation, expected with climate change, directly affect dynamics of soil winter frost, and indirectly soil microbial biomass and activity during the growing season. Soils from lower elevation plots, which accumulated less snow and experienced more soil temperature variability during the winter (and likely more freeze/thaw events), had less extractable inorganic nitrogen (N), lower rates of microbial N production via potential net N mineralization and nitrification, and higher potential microbial respiration during the growing season. Potential nitrate production rates during the growing season were particularly sensitive to changes in winter snow pack accumulation and winter soil temperature variability, especially in spring. Effects of elevation and winter conditions on N transformation rates differed from those on potential microbial respiration, suggesting that N-related processes might respond differently to winter climate change in northern hardwood forests than C-related processes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Environmental parameters altered by climate change affect the activity of soil microorganisms involved in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Itziar; Epelde, Lur; Garbisu, Carlos

    2017-10-16

    Bioremediation, based on the use of microorganisms to break down pollutants, can be very effective at reducing soil pollution. But the climate change we are now experiencing is bound to have an impact on bioremediation performance, since the activity and degrading abilities of soil microorganisms are dependent on a series of environmental parameters that are themselves being altered by climate change, such as soil temperature, moisture, amount of root exudates, etc. Many climate-induced effects on soil microorganisms occur indirectly through changes in plant growth and physiology derived from increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperatures, the alteration of precipitation patterns, etc., with a concomitant effect on rhizoremediation performance (i.e. the plant-assisted microbial degradation of pollutants in the rhizosphere). But these effects are extremely complex and mediated by processes such as acclimation and adaptation. Besides, soil microorganisms form complex networks of interactions with a myriad of organisms from many taxonomic groups that will also be affected by climate change, further complicating data interpretation. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The Electrochemical Properties of Biochars and How They Affect Soil Redox Properties and Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biochars are complex heterogeneous materials that consist of mineral phases, amorphous C, graphitic C, and labile organic molecules, many of which can be either electron donors or acceptors when placed in soil. Biochar is a reductant, but its electrical and electrochemical properties are a function of both the temperature of production and the concentration and composition of the various redox active mineral and organic phases present. When biochars are added to soils, they interact with plant roots and root hairs, micro-organisms, soil organic matter, proteins and the nutrient-rich water to form complex organo-mineral-biochar complexes Redox reactions can play an important role in the development of these complexes, and can also result in significant changes in the original C matrix. This paper reviews the redox processes that take place in soil and how they may be affected by the addition of biochar. It reviews the available literature on the redox properties of different biochars. It also reviews how biochar redox properties have been measured and presents new methods and data for determining redox properties of fresh biochars and for biochar/soil systems.

  5. Microbial functional potential and community composition in permafrost-affected soils of the NW Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Fahle, Béatrice A; Yergeau, Etienne; Greer, Charles W; Lantuit, Hugues; Wagner, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost-affected soils are among the most obvious ecosystems in which current microbial controls on organic matter decomposition are changing as a result of global warming. Warmer conditions in polygonal tundra will lead to a deepening of the seasonal active layer, provoking changes in microbial processes and possibly resulting in exacerbated carbon degradation under increasing anoxic conditions. To identify current microbial assemblages in carbon rich, water saturated permafrost environments, four polygonal tundra sites were investigated on Herschel Island and the Yukon Coast, Western Canadian Arctic. Ion Torrent sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA amplicons revealed the presence of all major microbial soil groups and indicated a local, vertical heterogeneity of the polygonal tundra soil community with increasing depth. Microbial diversity was found to be highest in the surface layers, decreasing towards the permafrost table. Quantitative PCR analysis of functional genes involved in carbon and nitrogen-cycling revealed a high functional potential in the surface layers, decreasing with increasing active layer depth. We observed that soil properties driving microbial diversity and functional potential varied in each study site. These results highlight the small-scale heterogeneity of geomorphologically comparable sites, greatly restricting generalizations about the fate of permafrost-affected environments in a warming Arctic.

  6. Microbial functional potential and community composition in permafrost-affected soils of the NW Canadian Arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice A Frank-Fahle

    Full Text Available Permafrost-affected soils are among the most obvious ecosystems in which current microbial controls on organic matter decomposition are changing as a result of global warming. Warmer conditions in polygonal tundra will lead to a deepening of the seasonal active layer, provoking changes in microbial processes and possibly resulting in exacerbated carbon degradation under increasing anoxic conditions. To identify current microbial assemblages in carbon rich, water saturated permafrost environments, four polygonal tundra sites were investigated on Herschel Island and the Yukon Coast, Western Canadian Arctic. Ion Torrent sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA amplicons revealed the presence of all major microbial soil groups and indicated a local, vertical heterogeneity of the polygonal tundra soil community with increasing depth. Microbial diversity was found to be highest in the surface layers, decreasing towards the permafrost table. Quantitative PCR analysis of functional genes involved in carbon and nitrogen-cycling revealed a high functional potential in the surface layers, decreasing with increasing active layer depth. We observed that soil properties driving microbial diversity and functional potential varied in each study site. These results highlight the small-scale heterogeneity of geomorphologically comparable sites, greatly restricting generalizations about the fate of permafrost-affected environments in a warming Arctic.

  7. Evaluation of soil characteristics potentially affecting arsenic concentration in paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdan, Katja, E-mail: katja.bogdan@pflern.uni-hannover.d [Institute of Plant Nutrition, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str. 2, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Schenk, Manfred K., E-mail: schenk@pflern.uni-hannover.d [Institute of Plant Nutrition, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str. 2, 30419 Hannover (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Paddy rice may contribute considerably to the human intake of As. The knowledge of soil characteristics affecting the As content of the rice plant enables the development of agricultural measures for controlling As uptake. During field surveys in 2004 and 2006, plant samples from 68 fields (Italy, Po-area) revealed markedly differing As concentration in polished rice. The soil factors total As{sub (aquaregia)}, pH, grain size fractions, total C, plant available P{sub (CAL)}, poorly crystalline Fe{sub (oxal.)} and plant available Si{sub (Na-acetate)} content that potentially affect As content of rice were determined. A multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant positive influence of the total As{sub (aquaregia)} and plant available P{sub (CAL)} content and a negative influence of the poorly crystalline Fe{sub (oxal.)} content of the soil on the As content in polished rice and rice straw. Si concentration in rice straw varied widely and was negatively related to As content in straw and polished rice. - Field selection for total As, poorly crystalline Fe and plant available P in soil might contribute to control As content of paddy rice.

  8. Physicochemical Properties, Micromorphology and Clay Mineralogy of Soils Affected by Geological Formations, Geomorphology and Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bayat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil genesis and development in arid and semi-arid areas are strongly affected by geological formations and geomorphic surfaces. Various morphological, physical, and geochemical soil properties at different geomorphic positions are usually attributed to different soil forming factors including parent material and climate. Due to variations in climate, geological formations (Quaternary, Neogene and Cretaceous and geomorphology, the aim of the present research was the study of genesis, development, clay mineralogy, and micromorphology of soils affected by climate, geology and geomorphology in Bardsir area, Kerman Province. Materials and Methods: The study area, 25000 ha, starts from Bardsir and extends to Khanesorkh elevations close to Sirjan city. The climate of the area is warm and semi-arid with mean annual temperature and precipitation of 14.9 °C and 199 mm, respectively. Soil moisture and temperature regimes of the area are aridic and mesic due to 1:2500000 map, provided by Soil and Water Research Institute. Moving to west and southwest, soil moisture regime of the area changes to xeric with increasing elevation. Using topography and geology maps (1:100000 together with Google Earth images, geomorphic surfaces and geologic formations of the area were investigated. Mantled pediment (pedons 1, 3, 7, and 8, rock pediment (pedon 2, semi-stable alluvial plain (pedon 6, unstable alluvial plain (pedon 5, piedmont plain (pedons 9 and 11, intermediate surface of alluvial plain and pediment (pedon 4, and old river terrace (pedon 10 are among geomorphic surfaces investigated in the area. Mantled pediment is composed of young Quaternary sediments and Cretaceous marls. Rock pediments are mainly formed by Cretaceous marls. Quaternary formations are dominant in alluvial plains. Alluvial terraces and intermediate surface of alluvial plain and pediment are dominated by Neogene conglomerates. Siltstone, sandstone, and Neogene marls together with

  9. Salt reduction in vegetable soup does not affect saltiness intensity and liking in the elderly and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Carla; Monteiro, Sérgio; Padrão, Patrícia; Rocha, Ada; Abreu, Sandra; Pinho, Olívia; Moreira, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of added salt levels in soups is recommended. We evaluated the impact of a 30% reduction of usual added salt in vegetable soups on elderly and children's saltiness and liking evaluation. Subjects were elderly and recruited from two public nursing homes (29 older adults, 79.7±8.9 years), and preschool children recruited from a public preschool (49 children, 4.5±1.3 years). This study took place in institutional lunchrooms. Through randomization and crossover, the subjects participated in two sensory evaluation sessions, on consecutive days, to assess perceived saltiness intensity (elderly sample) and liking (elderly and children samples) of a vegetable soup with baseline salt content and with a 30% salt reduction. Elderly rated perceived liking through a 10 cm visual analogue scale ['like extremely' (1) to 'dislike extremely' (10)] and children through a five-point facial scale ['dislike very much' (1) to 'like very much' (5)]. After 30% added salt reduction in vegetable soup, there were no significant differences in saltiness noted by the elderly (p=0.150), and in perceived liking by children (p=0.160) and elderly (p=0.860). A 30% salt reduction in vegetable soup may be achieved without compromising perceived saltiness and liking in children and the elderly.

  10. Cadmium hampers salt tolerance of Sesuvium portulacastrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Mariem; Martos, Soledad; Pérez-Martín, Laura; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Gunsé, Benet

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that salinity reduces cadmium toxicity in halophytes. However, the possible interference of Cd with the mechanisms of salt tolerance is poorly explored. The aim of this study was to see whether Cd affects salt tolerance mechanisms in the halophyte Sesuvium portulacastrum. S. portulacastrum plants obtained from cuttings were grown in hydroponics for 3 weeks and then exposed to low (0.09 mM) or moderate (200 mM) NaCl concentrations, alone or in combination with 25 μM CdCl 2 . Microscopy observation revealed two strategies of salt tolerance: euhalophytism and secretion of salt by bladder cells. Cadmium exposure hardly influenced the total leaf Na + concentrations. However, Cd supply delayed the salt-induced upregulation of AHA1 (plasma membrane H + -ATPase 1) and SOS1 (plasma membrane Na + transporter "Salt Overly Sensitive 1"), genes that are essential for salt tolerance. Moreover, Cd induced the activation of BADH, coding for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, indicating enhanced osmotic stress due to Cd. Sodium-green fluorescence in protoplasts from plants grown with low or high NaCl, alone or in combination with Cd, revealed higher Na + concentrations in the cytoplasm of Cd-exposed plants. Taken together the results indicate interference of Cd with salt tolerance mechanisms in S. portulacastrum. This may have consequences for the efficient use of halophytes in phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated saline soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Defoliating Insect Mass Outbreak Affects Soil N Fluxes and Tree N Nutrition in Scots Pine Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren M. Grüning

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biotic stress by mass outbreaks of defoliating pest insects does not only affect tree performance by reducing its photosynthetic capacity, but also changes N cycling in the soil of forest ecosystems. However, how insect induced defoliation affects soil N fluxes and, in turn, tree N nutrition is not well-studied. In the present study, we quantified N input and output fluxes via dry matter input, throughfall, and soil leachates. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of mass insect herbivory on tree N acquisition (i.e., organic and inorganic 15N net uptake capacity of fine roots as well as N pools in fine roots and needles in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. forest over an entire vegetation period. Plots were either infested by the nun moth (Lymantria monacha L. or served as controls. Our results show an increased N input by insect feces, litter, and throughfall at the infested plots compared to controls, as well as increased leaching of nitrate. However, the additional N input into the soil did not increase, but reduce inorganic and organic net N uptake capacity of Scots pine roots. N pools in the fine roots and needles of infested trees showed an accumulation of total N, amino acid-N, protein-N, and structural N in the roots and the remaining needles as a compensatory response triggered by defoliation. Thus, although soil N availability was increased via surplus N input, trees did not respond with an increased N acquisition, but rather invested resources into defense by accumulation of amino acid-N and protein-N as a survival strategy.

  12. Nitrogen addition affects chemical compositions of plant tissues, litter and soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Nana; Wang, Hui; Sun, Jianfei; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2016-07-01

    Increasing nitrogen (N) deposition or fertilization has been found to significantly affect carbon (C) cycling. However, a comprehensive understanding of how different C chemical components of plant, litter, and soil would respond to external N addition is still lacking. We compiled data of 1,160 observations from 52 individual studies and conducted a meta-analysis of N addition effects on 18 variables related to C chemical compositions in terrestrial ecosystems. Results showed that plant lignin (+7.13%), plant protein (+25.94%), and soil lignin (+7.30%) were significantly increased by N addition, and plant hemicellulose (-4.39%) was significantly decreased, whereas plant fiber, plant cellulose, plant non-structural carbohydrate (NSC), litter lignin, and litter cellulose were not significantly changed. The effects of N addition on C chemical composition varied among different ecosystems/plant types and different forms of N addition. Increasing treatment duration did not significantly change the effects of N addition on the chemical composition of plant, litter, and soil C. With increasing N addition rate, the effect of N addition on plant lignin, plant fiber, plant cellulose, and plant protein increased, while the effect of N addition on plant hemicellulose, plant NSC, and litter cellulose became more negative. Our meta-analysis provided a systematic evaluation of the responses of different C chemical components to N addition in the plant-litter-soil continuum. Results suggest that the change of plant and soil C chemical composition under N addition may be beneficial for ecosystem C sequestration and could affect ecosystem structure and function in the future. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  13. Pyrene fate affected by humic acid amendment in soil slurry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanna; Sorensen, Darwin L; McLean, Joan E; Sims, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Background Humic acid (HA) has been found to affect the solubility, mineralization, and bound residue formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). However, most of the studies on the interaction between HA and PAH concentrated on one or two of the three phases. Few studies have provided a simple protocol to demonstrate the overall effects of HA on PAH distribution in soil systems for all three phases. Methods In this study, three doses of standard Elliott soil HA (ESHA), 15, 187.5, and 1,875 μg ESHA/g soil slurry, were amended to soil slurry systems. 14C-pyrene was added to the systems along with non-radiolabeled pyrene; 14C and 14CO2 were monitored for each system for a period of 120 days. Results The highest amendment dose significantly increased the 14C fraction in the aqueous phase within 24 h, but not after that time. Pyrene mineralization was significantly inhibited by the highest dose over the 120-day study. While organic solvent extractable 14C decreased with time in all systems, non-extractable or bound 14C was significantly enhanced with the highest dose of ESHA addition. Conclusion Amendment of the highest dose of ESHA to pyrene contaminated soil was observed to have two major functions. The first was to mitigate CO2 production significantly by reducing 14CO2 from 14C pyrene mineralization. The second was to significantly increase stable bound 14C formation, which may serve as a remediation end point. Overall, this study demonstrated a practical approach for decontamination of PAH contaminated soil. This approach may be applicable to other organic contaminated environments where active bioremediation is taking place. PMID:18783628

  14. Gelation of barramundi (Lates calcarifer) minced muscle as affected by pressure and thermal treatments at low salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Binh Q; Buckow, Roman; Nguyen, Minh H; Furst, John

    2017-08-01

    Barramundi minced muscle with salt 10 g kg-1 and 20 g kg-1 added is gelled by different combinations of pressurisation (300, 400 and 500 MPa at 4 °C for 10 min), cooking (0.1 MPa, 90 °C for 30 min) and setting (0.1 MPa, 50 °C for 2 h) to improve mechanical properties of barramundi gels and reduce salt added to barramundi gels. At the low salt concentration of 10 g kg-1 , pressurisation prior to cooking (P-C) treatment induced barramundi gels with comparable mechanical properties and water-holding capacity to those of conventional heat induced (HI) gels with 20 g kg-1 added salt. At salt concentration of 20 g kg-1 , pressurisation prior to setting (P-S) and P-C gels exhibited higher mechanical properties and water-holding capacity as compared to HI gels. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a smooth and dense microstructure of P-C and P-S gels whereas the microstructure of HI gels is rough and less compact. P-C treatment can reduce salt concentration added to barramundi gels to 10 g kg-1 . P-S and P-C treatment can result in higher mechanical and functional properties of barramundi gels at conventional salt concentration (20 g kg-1 ) as compared to HI gels. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Phosphate-dependent root system architecture responses to salt stress

    KAUST Repository

    Kawa, Dorota

    2016-05-20

    Nutrient availability and salinity of the soil affect growth and development of plant roots. Here, we describe how phosphate availability affects root system architecture (RSA) of Arabidopsis and how phosphate levels modulate responses of the root to salt stress. Phosphate (Pi) starvation reduced main root length and increased the number of lateral roots of Arabidopsis Col-0 seedlings. In combination with salt, low Pi dampened the inhibiting effect of mild salt stress (75mM) on all measured RSA components. At higher NaCl concentrations, the Pi deprivation response prevailed over the salt stress only for lateral root elongation. The Pi deprivation response of lateral roots appeared to be oppositely affected by abscisic acid (ABA) signaling compared to the salt stress response. Natural variation in the response to the combination treatment of salt and Pi starvation within 330 Arabidopsis accessions could be grouped into four response patterns. When exposed to double stress, in general lateral roots prioritized responses to salt, while the effect on main root traits was additive. Interestingly, these patterns were not identical for all accessions studied and multiple strategies to integrate the signals from Pi deprivation and salinity were identified. By Genome Wide Association Mapping (GWAS) 13 genomic loci were identified as putative factors integrating responses to salt stress and Pi starvation. From our experiments, we conclude that Pi starvation interferes with salt responses mainly at the level of lateral roots and that large natural variation exists in the available genetic repertoire of accessions to handle the combination of stresses.

  16. How clear-cutting affects fire severity and soil properties in a Mediterranean ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francos, Marcos; Pereira, Paulo; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Victoria; Alcañiz, Meritxell; Úbeda, Xavier

    2018-01-15

    Forest management practices in Mediterranean ecosystems are frequently employed to reduce both the risk and severity of wildfires. However, these pre-fire treatments may influence the effects of wildfire events on soil properties. The aim of this study is to examine the short-term effects of a wildfire that broke out in 2015 on the soil properties of three sites: two exposed to management practices in different years - 2005 (site M05B) and 2015 (site M15B) - and one that did not undergo any management (NMB) and to compare their properties with those recorded in a plot (Control) unaffected by the 2015 wildfire. We analyzed aggregate stability (AS), soil organic matter (SOM) content, total nitrogen (TN), carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N), inorganic carbon (IC), pH, electrical conductivity (EC), extractable calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and potassium (K), microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and basal soil respiration (BSR). In the managed plots, a clear-cutting operation was conducted, whereby part of the vegetation was cut and left covering the soil surface. The AS values recorded at the Control site were significantly higher than those recorded at M05B, whereas the TN and SOM values at NMB were significantly higher than those recorded at M05B. IC was significantly higher at M05B than at the other plots. There were no significant differences in C/N ratio between the analyzed sites. Soil pH at M05B was significantly higher than the value recorded at the Control plot. Extractable Ca was significantly higher at NMB than at both M05B and the Control, while extractable Mg was significantly lower at M05B than at NMB. Extractable K was significantly lower at the Control than at the three fire-affected plots. Cmic was significantly higher at NMB than at the Control. BSR, BSR/C and BSR/Cmic values at the fire-affected sites were significantly lower than those recorded at the Control. No significant differences were identified in Cmic/C. Overall, a comparison of the pre

  17. Biological soil crusts emit large amounts of NO and HONO affecting the nitrogen cycle in drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Alexandra; Wu, Dianming; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Dryland systems currently cover ˜40% of the world's land surface and are still expanding as a consequence of human impact and global change. In contrast to that, information on their role in global biochemical processes is limited, probably induced by the presumption that their sparse vegetation cover plays a negligible role in global balances. However, spaces between the sparse shrubs are not bare, but soils are mostly covered by biological soil crusts (biocrusts). These biocrust communities belong to the oldest life forms, resulting from an assembly between soil particles and cyanobacteria, lichens, bryophytes, and algae plus heterotrophic organisms in varying proportions. Depending on the dominating organism group, cyanobacteria-, lichen-, and bryophyte-dominated biocrusts are distinguished. Besides their ability to restrict soil erosion they fix atmospheric carbon and nitrogen, and by doing this they serve as a nutrient source in strongly depleted dryland ecosystems. In this study we show that a fraction of the nitrogen fixed by biocrusts is metabolized and subsequently returned to the atmosphere in the form of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO). These gases affect the radical formation and oxidizing capacity within the troposphere, thus being of particular interest to atmospheric chemistry. Laboratory measurements using dynamic chamber systems showed that dark cyanobacteria-dominated crusts emitted the largest amounts of NO and HONO, being ˜20 times higher than trace gas fluxes of nearby bare soil. We showed that these nitrogen emissions have a biogenic origin, as emissions of formerly strongly emitting samples almost completely ceased after sterilization. By combining laboratory, field, and satellite measurement data we made a best estimate of global annual emissions amounting to ˜1.1 Tg of NO-N and ˜0.6 Tg of HONO-N from biocrusts. This sum of 1.7 Tg of reactive nitrogen emissions equals ˜20% of the soil release under natural vegetation according

  18. Different farming and water regimes in Italian rice fields affect arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal soil communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumini, Erica; Vallino, Marta; Alguacil, Maria M; Romani, Marco; Bianciotto, Valeria

    2011-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) comprise one of the main components of soil microbiota in most agroecosystems. These obligate mutualistic symbionts colonize the roots of most plants, including crop plants. Many papers have indicated that different crop management practices could affect AMF communities and their root colonization. However, there is little knowledge available on the influence of conventional and low-input agriculture on root colonization and AMF molecular diversity in rice fields. Two different agroecosystems (continuous conventional high-input rice monocropping and organic farming with a five-year crop rotation) and two different water management regimes have been considered in this study. Both morphological and molecular analyses were performed. The soil mycorrhizal potential, estimated using clover trap cultures, was high and similar in the two agroecosystems. The diversity of the AMF community in the soil, calculated by means of PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) and 18S rDNA sequencing on clover trap cultures roots, was higher for the organic cultivation. The rice roots cultivated in the conventional agrosystem or under permanent flooding showed no AMF colonization, while the rice plants grown under the organic agriculture system showed typical mycorrhization patterns. Considered together, our data suggest that a high-input cropping system and conventional flooding depress AMF colonization in rice roots and that organic managements could help maintain a higher diversity of AMF communities in soil.

  19. How do long dry spells affect soil moisture in different forest stands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbüchel, Ingo; Güntner, Andreas; Blume, Theresa

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture conditions under forests are subject to numerous influences that are directly linked to the tree species composition and age. On the one hand, there are characteristic traits of individual tree species such as the way they funnel intercepted water towards their stems or the way they use water from the soil at different depths and times. On the other hand, there is also the influence of inter- and intra-species competition which may considerably affect the water use behavior of the involved tree species. In order to get insights into these complex relationships we studied spatial and temporal soil moisture patterns under pure and mixed forest stands of beech and pine of different ages in the TERENO observatory in northeastern Germany. We also specifically compared soil moisture conditions in the close vicinity of tree stems with conditions at greater distance from the trees (>1.5 m). The dataset used here derives from 450 sensors measuring soil moisture for 2.5 years at six different soil depths (from 10 cm down to 200 cm). Inspecting the entire time series we found considerable differences between many of the locations (young vs. mature, pine vs. beech, mixed vs. pure). These differences became more or less pronounced during certain weather periods. In particular, we studied the effect of dry spells of different preconditions and length during the three summers 2014, 2015 and 2016. While 2014 was a relatively wet summer, 2015 was dry and warm. Generally speaking, the dry spell in the summer of 2015 led to a decrease in soil moisture differences between locations that was still observable in the following winter and even in the following summer. For example, in the summer of 2014 volumetric water content close to the soil surface under mature pine trees was almost 8% higher compared to beech trees, however, in the dry summer of 2015 this difference disappeared. Contrary to this observation, volumetric water content differences between young stands of

  20. Bacterial diversity and composition in major fresh produce growing soils affected by physiochemical properties and geographic locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jincai [Key Laboratory of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); USDA-ARS U. S. Salinity Laboratory, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States); Ibekwe, A. Mark, E-mail: Mark.Ibekwe@ars.usda.gov [USDA-ARS U. S. Salinity Laboratory, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States); Yang, Ching-Hong [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Crowley, David E. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Microbial diversity of agricultural soils has been well documented, but information on leafy green producing soils is limited. In this study, we investigated microbial diversity and community structures in 32 (16 organic, 16 conventionally managed soils) from California (CA) and Arizona (AZ) using pyrosequencing, and identified factors affecting bacterial composition. Results of detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity analysis showed that bacterial community structures of conventionally managed soils were similar to that of organically managed soils; while the bacterial community structures in soils from Salinas, California were different (P < 0.05) from those in soils from Yuma, Arizona and Imperial Valley, California. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of bacterial community structures and soil variables showed that electrical conductivity (EC), clay content, water-holding capacity (WHC), pH, total nitrogen (TN), and organic carbon (OC) significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with microbial communities. CCA based variation partitioning analysis (VPA) showed that soil physical properties (clay, EC, and WHC), soil chemical variables (pH, TN, and OC) and sampling location explained 16.3%, 12.5%, and 50.9%, respectively, of total variations in bacterial community structure, leaving 13% of the total variation unexplained. Our current study showed that bacterial community composition and diversity in major fresh produce growing soils from California and Arizona is a function of soil physiochemical characteristics and geographic distances of sampling sites. - Highlights: • Geographic distance was the most significant factor affecting microbial composition. • Physical and chemical properties significantly impacted microbial communities. • Higher numbers of OTUs were observed in organic soils than in convention soils.

  1. Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Drought Affect Soil Microbial Community and Functional Diversity Associated with Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Under the background of climate change, the increase of atmospheric CO2 and drought frequency have been considered as significant influencers on the soil microbial communities and the yield and quality of crop. In this study, impacts of increased ambient CO2 and drought on soil microbial structure and functional diversity of a Stagnic Anthrosol were investigated in phytotron growth chambers, by testing two representative CO2 levels, three soil moisture levels, and two soil cover types (with or without Glycine max. The 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA fragments were amplified to analyze the functional diversity of fungi and bacteria. Results showed that rhizosphere microbial biomass and community structure were significantly affected by drought, but effects differed between fungi and bacteria. Drought adaptation of fungi was found to be easier than that of bacteria. The diversity of fungi was less affected by drought than that of bacteria, evidenced by their higher diversity. Severe drought reduced soil microbial functional diversity and restrained the metabolic activity. Elevated CO2 alone, in the absence of crops (bare soil, did not enhance the metabolic activity of soil microorganisms. Generally, due to the co-functioning of plant and soil microorganisms in water and nutrient use, plants have major impacts on the soil microbial community, leading to atmospheric CO2 enrichment, but cannot significantly reduce the impacts of drought on soil microorganisms.

  2. Carbon and nitrogen inputs affect soil microbial community structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. J. A.; Mau, R. L.; Hayer, M.; Finley, B. K.; Schwartz, E.; Dijkstra, P.; Hungate, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change has been projected to increase energy and nutrient inputs to soils, affecting soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition (priming effect) and microbial communities. However, many important questions remain: how do labile C and/or N inputs affect priming and microbial communities? What is the relationship between them? To address these questions, we applied N (NH4NO3 ; 100 µg N g-1 wk-1), C (13C glucose; 1000 µg C g-1 wk-1), C+N to four different soils for five weeks. We found: 1) N showed no effect, whereas C induced the greatest priming, and C+N had significantly lower priming than C. 2) C and C+N additions increased the relative abundance of actinobacteria, proteobacteria, and firmicutes, but reduced relative abundance of acidobacteria, chloroflexi, verrucomicrobia, planctomycetes, and gemmatimonadetes. 3) Actinobacteria and proteobacteria increased relative abundance over time, but most others decreased over time. 4) substrate additions (N, C, C+N) significantly reduced microbial alpha diversity, which also decreased over time. 5) For beta diversity, C and C+N formed significantly different communities compare to the control and N treatments. Overtime, microbial community structure significantly altered. Four soils have drastically different community structures. These results indicate amounts of substrate C were determinant factors in modulating the rate of SOM decomposition and microbial communities. Variable responses of different microbial communities to labile C and N inputs indicate that complex relationships between priming and microbial functions. In general, we demonstrate that energy inputs can quickly accelerate SOM decomposition whereas extra N input can slow this process, though both had similar microbial community responses.

  3. Soil pH and earthworms affect herbage nitrogen recovery from solid cattle manure in production grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, M.I.; Goede, de R.G.M.; Corral Nunez, G.A.; Brussaard, L.; Lantinga, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Long term use of inorganic fertilisers and reduced organic matter inputs have contributed to acidification of agricultural soils. This strongly affects the soil dwelling fauna and nutrient mineralisation. Organic fertilisers such as solid cattle manure (SCM) resurge as an option to overcome this

  4. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  5. Element interactions and soil properties affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, Paeivi; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, Kuopio (Finland)

    2012-03-15

    Cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), uranium (U), and zinc (Zn) are among the elements that have radioactive isotopes in radioactive waste. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for possible adverse effects if these radionuclides are accidentally released into the environment. The present study aimed at investigating factors affecting such transfer in boreal forest. The plant species studied were blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana), rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Regression analyses were carried out to investigate the effects of the chemical composition and physical properties of soil on the soil-to-leaf/needle concentration ratios of Co, Mo, Ni, Pb, U and Zn. Soil potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) concentrations were the most important factors affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of the elements studied. Soil clay and organic matter contents were found to significantly affect plant uptake of Mo, Pb and U. Knowledge of the effects of these factors is helpful for interpretation of the predictions of radioecological models describing soil-to-plant transfer and for improving such models. (orig.)

  6. Phosphate buffer and salt medium concentrations affect the inactivation of T4 phage by platinum(II) complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik B.; Josephsen, Jens; Kerszman, Gustaw

    1985-01-01

    -Tris) buffer and HEPES buffer. The phosphate abolishes the antiphage activity of the platinum complexes probably by some sort of complex formation. This together with dimerization reactions qualitatively explains the tailing off of the phage inactivation rate. High concentrations of NaNO3 as the salt medium...

  7. Land-use and soil depth affect resource and microbial stoichiometry in a tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Global change phenomena, such as forest disturbance and land-use change, significantly affect elemental balances as well as the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the importance of shifts in soil nutrient stoichiometry for the regulation of belowground biota and soil food webs have not been intensively studied for tropical ecosystems. In the present account, we examine the effects of land-use change and soil depth on soil and microbial stoichiometry along a land-use sequence (natural forest, pastures of different ages, secondary succession) in the tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador. Furthermore, we analyzed (PLFA-method) whether shifts in the microbial community structure were related to alterations in soil and microbial stoichiometry. Soil and microbial stoichiometry were affected by both land-use change and soil depth. After forest disturbance, significant decreases of soil C:N:P ratios at the pastures were followed by increases during secondary succession. Microbial C:N ratios varied slightly in response to land-use change, whereas no fixed microbial C:P and N:P ratios were observed. Shifts in microbial community composition were associated with soil and microbial stoichiometry. Strong positive relationships between PLFA-markers 18:2n6,9c (saprotrophic fungi) and 20:4 (animals) and negative associations between 20:4 and microbial N:P point to land-use change affecting the structure of soil food webs. Significant deviations from global soil and microbial C:N:P ratios indicated a major force of land-use change to alter stoichiometric relationships and to structure biological systems. Our results support the idea that soil biotic communities are stoichiometrically flexible in order to adapt to alterations in resource stoichiometry.

  8. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenyu, E-mail: wzy72609@163.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Zhao, Xiuyang, E-mail: xiuzh@psb.vib-ugent.be [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Wang, Bing, E-mail: wangbing@ibcas.ac.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Liu, Erlong, E-mail: liuel14@lzu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Chen, Ni, E-mail: 63710156@qq.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Zhang, Wei, E-mail: wzhang1216@yahoo.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Bio-Energy Crops, School of Life Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Heng, E-mail: hengliu@lzu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. - Highlights: • AtRNP1 is a widely expressed gene and its expression is slightly induced under abiotic stresses. • AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 affects plant growth. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. • AtRNP1 overexpression plants show decreased proline accumulation and stress-responsive gene expressions.

  9. Drought and salt stress in Chrysopogon zizanioides leads to common and specific transcriptomic responses and may affect essential oil composition and benzylisoquinoline alkaloids metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suja George

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses affect crop productivity worldwide. Understanding molecular mechanisms of plant abiotic stress tolerance is important for developing stress tolerant crop plants for sustaining crop productivity in future. Chrysopogon zizanioides (vetiver is a perennial C4 grass reported to be tolerant to water, salinity and submergence stress. Here, we subjected C. zizanioides seedlings to salt and drought stress and carried out whole transcriptome profiling of leaf and root tissues. Assessing the global transcriptome changes under drought and salt stress resulted in the identification of several genes contributing to stress response in this species. Overall, more transcriptomic changes were observed in leaf tissue compared to root tissue. The response to either stress manifested primarily as upregulation of gene expression in both leaf and root. The study identified stress responsive genes commonly and differently regulated under stress/tissue conditions. Several DEGs in our data were identified as enzymes involved in biosynthesis of essential oil components. The differential expression of these genes under drought and salt stress may affect the vetiver essential oil composition under these stresses. Similarly, several genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids including morphin were found to be differentially expressing in our data. Our data may facilitate further molecular studies on stress tolerance of C. zizanioides. The DEGs from our results are potential candidates for understanding and engineering abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

  10. Characterization on the rhizoremediation of petroleum contaminated soil as affected by different influencing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Wang, R.; Niu, X.; Wang, M.; Zhou, Q.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, pilot experiments were conducted to analyze the effect of different environmental factors on the rhizoremediation of petroleum contaminated soil. Different plant species (cotton, ryegrass, tall fescue, and alfalfa), addition of fertilizer, different concentration of TPH in soil, bioaugmentation with effective microbial agent (EMA) and PGPR, and remediation time were tested as influencing factors during bioremediation process of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH). The result shows that the remediation process can be enhanced by different plants species with the following order: tall fescue > ryegrass > alfalfa > cotton. The degradation rate of TPH increased with increased fertilizer addition and moderate level of 20 g/m2 urea is best for both plant growth and TPH remediation. High TPH content is toxic to plant growth and inhibits the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon with 5% TPH content showing the best degradation result in soil planted with ryegrass. Bioaugmentation with different bacteria and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) showed the following results for TPH degradation: cotton + EMA + PGPR > cotton + EMA > cotton + PGPR > cotton > control. Rapid degradation of TPH was found at the initial period of remediation caused by the activity of microorganisms, continuous increase was found from 30-90 d period and slow increase was found from 90 to 150 d. The result suggests that rhizoremediation can be enhanced with the proper control of different influencing factors that affect both plant growth and microbial activity in the rhizosphere environment.

  11. Biogas Digester Hydraulic Retention Time Affects Oxygen Consumption Patterns and Greenhouse Gas Emissions after Application of Digestate to Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nguyen, Quan; Jensen, Lars Stoumann; Bol, Roland; Wu, Di; Triolo, Jin Mi; Vazifehkhoran, Ali Heidarzadeh; Bruun, Sander

    2017-09-01

    Knowledge about environmental impacts associated with the application of anaerobic digestion residue to agricultural land is of interest owing to the rapid proliferation of biogas plants worldwide. However, virtually no information exists concerning how soil-emitted NO is affected by the feedstock hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the biogas digester. Here, the O planar optode technique was used to visualize soil O dynamics following the surface application of digestates of the codigestion of pig slurry and agro-industrial waste. We also used NO isotopomer analysis of soil-emitted NO to determine the NO production pathways, i.e., nitrification or denitrification. Two-dimensional images of soil O indicated that anoxic and hypoxic conditions developed at 2.0- and 1.5-cm soil depth for soil amended with the digestate produced with 15-d (PO15) and 30-d (PO30) retention time, respectively. Total NO emissions were significantly lower for PO15 than PO30 due to the greater expansion of the anoxic zone, which enhanced NO reduction via complete denitrification. However, cumulative CO emissions were not significantly different between PO15 and PO30 for the entire incubation period. During incubation, NO emissions came from both nitrification and denitrification in amended soils. Increasing the HRT of the biogas digester appears to induce significant NO emissions, but it is unlikely to affect the NO production pathways after application to soil. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Agricultural management and labile carbon additions affect soil microbial community structure and interact with carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthrong, Sean T; Buckley, Daniel H; Drinkwater, Laurie E

    2013-07-01

    We investigated how conversion from conventional agriculture to organic management affected the structure and biogeochemical function of soil microbial communities. We hypothesized the following. (1) Changing agricultural management practices will alter soil microbial community structure driven by increasing microbial diversity in organic management. (2) Organically managed soil microbial communities will mineralize more N and will also mineralize more N in response to substrate addition than conventionally managed soil communities. (3) Microbial communities under organic management will be more efficient and respire less added C. Soils from organically and conventionally managed agroecosystems were incubated with and without glucose ((13)C) additions at constant soil moisture. We extracted soil genomic DNA before and after incubation for TRFLP community fingerprinting of soil bacteria and fungi. We measured soil C and N pools before and after incubation, and we tracked total C respired and N mineralized at several points during the incubation. Twenty years of organic management altered soil bacterial and fungal community structure compared to continuous conventional management with the bacterial differences caused primarily by a large increase in diversity. Organically managed soils mineralized twice as much NO3 (-) as conventionally managed ones (44 vs. 23 μg N/g soil, respectively) and increased mineralization when labile C was added. There was no difference in respiration, but organically managed soils had larger pools of C suggesting greater efficiency in terms of respiration per unit soil C. These results indicate that the organic management induced a change in community composition resulting in a more diverse community with enhanced activity towards labile substrates and greater capacity to mineralize N.

  13. Does the increased air humidity affect soil respiration and carbon stocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukumägi, Mai; Celi, Luisella; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Kupper, Priit; Sõber, Jaak; Lõhmus, Krista; Kutti, Sander; Ostonen, Ivika

    2013-04-01

    contents of the more stable MOM. These results strongly suggest that, apart from the predicted increase in temperature and atmospheric carbon and nitrogen concentrations, an increase in free air humidity as a result of climate change may significantly influence the complex belowground carbon cycling by affecting biomass production, soil respiration and organic matter turnover.

  14. Factors affecting soil organic matter conservation in Mediterranean hillside winter cereals-legumes cropping systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Marraccini

    2012-09-01

    , for the same crop rotation length, livestock density did not affect the annual SOM balance. Due to the high variability in local cropping systems and soil characteristics, further surveys on a larger sample are needed to confirm these trends. However, our results shed light on the soil conservation effects of Mediterranean hillside cropping systems of winter cereals and legumes, and could support the local implementation of agro-environmental measures.

  15. Interactions between extracellular polymeric substances and clay minerals affect soil aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Cordula; Rehschuh, Stephanie; Kemi Olagoke, Folasade; Redmile Gordon, Marc; Kalbiltz, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    Soil aggregation is crucial for carbon (C) sequestration and microbial processes have been recognised as important control of aggregate turnover (formation, stability, and destruction). However, how microorganisms contribute to these processes is still a matter of debate. An enthralling mechanism determining aggregate turnover and therefore C sequestration may be the excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) as microbial glue, but effects of EPS on aggregation is largely unknown. Moreover, interdependencies between important aggregation factors like the amount of fine-sized particles (clay content), the decomposability of organic matter and the microbial community (size and composition, as well as the excretion of EPS) are still poorly understood. Therefore, we studied the complex interactions between these factors and their role in aggregate turnover. It was hypothesized that an increase in microbial activity, induced by the input of organic substrates, will stimulate EPS production and therefore the formation and stability of aggregates. To test this hypothesis, an incubation experiment has been conducted across a gradient of clay content (montmorillonite) and substrate decomposability (starch and glucose) as main drivers of the microbial activity. A combination of aggregate separation and stability tests were applied. This results will be examined with respect to the obtained microbial parameters (amount and composition of EPS, CO2 emission, microbial biomass, phospholipid fatty acid), to disentangle the mechanisms and factors controlling aggregate turnover affected by soil microorganisms. This study is expected to provide insights on the role of EPS in the stability of aggregates. Thus, the results of this study will provide an improved understanding of the underlying processes of aggregate turnover in soils, which is necessary to implement strategies for enhanced C sequestration in agricultural soils.

  16. Do glucosinolate hydrolysis products reduce nitrous oxide emissions from urine affected soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, S F; Luo, J; Schipper, L A

    2017-12-15

    New Zealand agriculture is predominantly comprised of pastoral grazing systems and deposition of animal excreta during grazing has been identified as a major source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Nitrification inhibitors have been shown to significantly reduce nitrous oxide emissions from grazing pastoral systems, and some plants have been identified as having nitrification inhibiting properties. Brassica crops are one such example as they contain the secondary metabolite glucosinolate (GLS) whose hydrolysis products are thought to slow soil nitrogen cycling. Forage brassicas have been increasingly used to supplement the diet of grazing animals. The aim of this study was to determine if GLS hydrolysis products (phenylethyl isothiocyanate, 4-pent-1-yl isothiocyanate, 2-propenyl nitrile, 2 propenyl isothiocyanate, 4-pentene nitrile) produced in brassica crops reduced N2O emissions from soil amended with urea or animal urine. In the laboratory, some GLS hydrolysis products added with urea to soil were found to decrease N2O emissions and the most effective product (phenylethyl isothiocyante) reduced N2O emissions by 51% during the study. There was some evidence that the reduction in N2O emissions found in the lab could be attributed to inhibition of nitrification. Results suggest that the inhibition by GLS hydrolysis products was short-lived and, if considered for use, multiple applications may be necessary to achieve effective inhibition of N2O emissions. This reduction, however, was not observed under field conditions. Further investigation is required to test more GLS hydrolysis products to fully understand their impact on N2O emissions from urine affected soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana VDAC2 involvement in salt stress response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil salinity seriously affects plants distribution and yield, while salt stress induces SOS genes, and voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) and a mitochondrial porin, are induced too. In this paper, phenotypes of AtVDAC2 transgenic lines and wild type (RLD) were analyzed. It was found that AtVDAC2 over-expressing ...

  18. Pesticide interactions with soil affected by olive mill wastewater (OMW): how strong and long-lasting is the OMW effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Yonatan; Borisover, Mikhail; Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Diehl, Dörte; Tamimi, Nisreen; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda

    2017-04-01

    Sorption interactions with soils are well known to control the environmental fate of multiple organic compounds including pesticides. Pesticide-soil interactions may be affected by organic amendments or organic matter (OM)-containing wastewater brought to the field. Specifically, land spreading of olive mill wastewater (OMW), occurring intentionally or not, may also influence pesticide-soil interactions. The effects of the OMW disposed in the field on soil properties, including their ability to interact with pesticides, become of great interest due to the increasing demand for olive oil and a constant growth of world oil production. This paper summarizes some recent findings related to the effect of prior OMW land application on the ability of soils to interact with the organic compounds including pesticides, diuron and simazine. The major findings are as following: (1) bringing OMW to the field increases the potential of soils to sorb non-ionized pesticides; (2) this sorption increase may not be related solely to the increase in soil organic carbon content but it can reflect also the changes in the soil sorption mechanisms; (3) increased pesticide interactions with OMW-affected soils may become irreversible, due, assumedly, to the swelling of some components of the OMW-treated soil; (4) enhanced pesticide-soil interactions mitigate with the time passed after the OMW application, however, in the case of diuron, the remaining effect could be envisioned at least 600 days after the normal OMW application; (5) the enhancement effect of OMW application on soil sorption may increase with soil depth, in the 0-10 cm interval; (6) at higher pesticide (diuron) concentrations, larger extents of sorption enhancement, following the prior OMW-soil interactions, may be expected; (7) disposal of OMW in the field may be seasonal-dependent, and, in the case studied, it led to more distinct impacts on sorption when carried out in spring and winter, as compared with summer. It appears

  19. The mitochondrial phosphate transporters modulate plant responses to salt stress via affecting ATP and gibberellin metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial phosphate transporter (MPT plays crucial roles in ATP production in plant cells. Three MPT genes have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we report that the mRNA accumulations of AtMPTs were up-regulated by high salinity stress in A. thaliana seedlings. And the transgenic lines overexpressing AtMPTs displayed increased sensitivity to salt stress compared with the wild-type plants during seed germination and seedling establishment stages. ATP content and energy charge was higher in overexpressing plants than those in wild-type A. thaliana under salt stress. Accordingly, the salt-sensitive phenotype of overexpressing plants was recovered after the exogenous application of atractyloside due to the change of ATP content. Interestingly, Genevestigator survey and qRT-PCR analysis indicated a large number of genes, including those related to gibberellin synthesis could be regulated by the energy availability change under stress conditions in A. thaliana. Moreover, the exogenous application of uniconazole to overexpressing lines showed that gibberellin homeostasis was disturbed in the overexpressors. Our studies reveal a possible link between the ATP content mediated by AtMPTs and gibberellin metabolism in responses to high salinity stress in A. thaliana.

  20. The Mitochondrial Phosphate Transporters Modulate Plant Responses to Salt Stress via Affecting ATP and Gibberellin Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guodong; Wu, Changai; Huang, Jinguang; Zheng, Chengchao

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial phosphate transporter (MPT) plays crucial roles in ATP production in plant cells. Three MPT genes have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we report that the mRNA accumulations of AtMPTs were up-regulated by high salinity stress in A. thaliana seedlings. And the transgenic lines overexpressing AtMPTs displayed increased sensitivity to salt stress compared with the wild-type plants during seed germination and seedling establishment stages. ATP content and energy charge was higher in overexpressing plants than those in wild-type A. thaliana under salt stress. Accordingly, the salt-sensitive phenotype of overexpressing plants was recovered after the exogenous application of atractyloside due to the change of ATP content. Interestingly, Genevestigator survey and qRT-PCR analysis indicated a large number of genes, including those related to gibberellin synthesis could be regulated by the energy availability change under stress conditions in A. thaliana. Moreover, the exogenous application of uniconazole to overexpressing lines showed that gibberellin homeostasis was disturbed in the overexpressors. Our studies reveal a possible link between the ATP content mediated by AtMPTs and gibberellin metabolism in responses to high salinity stress in A. thaliana. PMID:22937061

  1. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction and partial least squares regression to assay low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons leached from soils and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Lucas P.; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Schmidt, Marcella E. P.; Faccin, Henrique; de Machado, Leandro Carvalho; Bohrer, Denise

    2017-02-01

    A novel method was developed to determine low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous leachates from soils and sediments using a salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction, synchronous fluorescence spectrometry and a multivariate calibration technique. Several experimental parameters were controlled and the optimum conditions were: sodium carbonate as the salting-out agent at concentration of 2 mol L- 1, 3 mL of acetonitrile as extraction solvent, 6 mL of aqueous leachate, vortexing for 5 min and centrifuging at 4000 rpm for 5 min. The partial least squares calibration was optimized to the lowest values of root mean squared error and five latent variables were chosen for each of the targeted compounds. The regression coefficients for the true versus predicted concentrations were higher than 0.99. Figures of merit for the multivariate method were calculated, namely sensitivity, multivariate detection limit and multivariate quantification limit. The selectivity was also evaluated and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons did not interfere in the analysis. Likewise, high performance liquid chromatography was used as a comparative methodology, and the regression analysis between the methods showed no statistical difference (t-test). The proposed methodology was applied to soils and sediments of a Brazilian river and the recoveries ranged from 74.3% to 105.8%. Overall, the proposed methodology was suitable for the targeted compounds, showing that the extraction method can be applied to spectrofluorometric analysis and that the multivariate calibration is also suitable for these compounds in leachates from real samples.

  2. pH affects bacterial community composition in soils across the Huashan Watershed, China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Dayong; Huang, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Yu, Zhongbo; Wu, Qinglong L; Shen, Feng; Huang, Rui; Cao, Xinyi; Feng, Jingwei; Jiang, Cuiling

    2016-01-01

    To investigate soil bacterial richness and diversity and to determine the correlations between bacterial communities and soil properties, 8 soil samples were collected from the Huashan watershed in Anhui, China...

  3. Assessment and field-scale mapping of soil quality properties of a saline-sodic soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corwin, D.L.; Kaffka, S.R.; Hopmans, J.W.; Mori, Y.; Groenigen, van J.W.; Kessel, van C.; Lesch, S.M.; Oster, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Salt-affected soils could produce useful forages when irrigated with saline drainage water. To assess the productive potential and sustainability of using drainage water for forage production, a saline-sodic site (32.4 ha) in California's San Joaquin Valley was characterized for soil quality. The

  4. Salt Tolerance in Rice: Focus on Mechanisms and Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inja Naga Bheema Lingeswara Reddy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Salt tolerance is an important constrain for rice, which is generally categorized as a typical glycophyte. Soil salinity is one of the major constraints affecting rice production worldwide, especially in the coastal areas. Susceptibility or tolerance of rice plants to high salinity is a coordinated action of multiple stress responsive genes, which also interacts with other components of stress signal transduction pathways. Salt tolerant varieties can be produced by marker-assisted selection or genetic engineering by introducing salt-tolerance genes. In this review, we have updated on mechanisms and genes which can help in transferring of the salt tolerance into high-yielding rice varieties. We have focused on the need for integrating phenotyping, genomics, metabolic profiling and phenomics into transgenic and breeding approaches to develop high-yielding as well as salt tolerant rice varieties.

  5. Successive chlorothalonil applications inhibit soil nitrification and discrepantly affect abundances of functional genes in soil nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ying; Zhang, Manyun; Yang, Guangmei; Wang, Jun; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2017-02-01

    Broad-spectrum fungicide chlorothalonil (CTN) is successively applied into intensive agriculture soil. However, the impacts of successive CTN applications on soil nitrification and related microorganisms remain poorly understood. A microcosm study was conducted to reveal the effects of successive CTN applications on soil nitrification and functional genes involved in soil nitrogen (N) cycling. The CTN at the dosages of 5 mg kg-1 dry soil (RD) and 25 mg kg-1 dry soil (5RD) was successively applied into the test soil at 7-day intervals which resulted in the accumulations of CTN residues. After 28 days of incubation, CTN residues in the RD and 5RD treatments were 3.14 and 69.7 mg kg-1 dry soil respectively. Net nitrification rates in the RD and 5RD treatments were lower than that obtained from the blank control (CK). Real-time PCR analysis revealed that AOA and AOB amoA gene abundances were significantly decreased by CTN applications. Moreover, CTN applications also discrepantly decreased the abundances of functional genes involved in soil denitrification, with the exception of nosZ gene. Principal component analysis further supported the observation that successive CTN applications could result in enhanced ecological toxicity.

  6. Do Soils affect Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus abundance in agricultural habitats?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Santilli

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, much research on brown hare (Lepus europaeus, Pallas 1778 ecology has been conducted in Europe to identify habitat-species relationships and the reasons for the decline in hare populations that have occurred since the 1960s. However, very few studies have considered the influence of soil texture on the abundance of this species in agricultural habitats. In this paper we examine the relationship between winter brown hare density in protected areas (game refuges in four provinces of the Tuscany region (central Italy and soil texture. Results show that hares reach higher densities in areas characterized by "loam" soils compared to areas where soils are richer in clay. Although this relationship is probably complex, soil texture may indirectly affect brown hare populations by influencing the temperature and moisture of the ground and influencing the timing of farming operations (tillage. Riassunto Il suolo influenza l’abbondanza della lepre Lepus europaeus negli ambienti agricoli? Negli ultimi anni sono state effettuate numerose ricerche sull’ecologia della lepre europea Lepus europaeus, al fine di evidenziare le relazioni fra questa specie ed il tipo di habitat e di comprendere i motivi del declino avvenuto a partire dagli anni ’60. Ciononostante pochi studi hanno preso in considerazione l’influenza del tipo di suolo sulla consistenza di questo lagomorfo negli ambienti agricoli. Nel presente lavoro viene esaminata la relazione fra la densità invernale della lepre all’interno delle zone di ripopolamento e cattura di quattro province toscane e la tessitura del suolo di queste aree. E’ stato riscontrato che le lepri raggiungono densità più elevate in aree dove predominano i suoli franchi rispetto ad aree dove risultano più argillosi. Sebbene questa relazione sia probabilmente complessa, la tessitura del suolo potrebbe influenzare

  7. Root adaptation and ion selectivity affects the nutritional value of salt-stressed hidroponically grown baby-leaf Nasturtium officinale and Lactuca sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Juan A.; Diana, Niñirola; Jesús, Ochoa; Francesco, Orsini; Giuseppina, Pennisi; Giorgio, Gianquinto; Catalina, Egea-gilabert

    2016-01-01

    The response of watercress (Nasturtium officinale L.) to salinity has been scarcely addressed in literature despite its growing importance in the baby-leaf market and its wide cultivation in salt-affected agricultural regions. This work evaluates the effect of salinity (2.5, 5 and 10 dS m-1) on productive and quality features of watercress compared with another crop widely cultivated for the baby-leaf sector (lettuce, Lactuca sativa). In watercress, a linear relationship (R2=0.75) was observe...

  8. Repeated application of composted tannery sludge affects differently soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Lima, Luciano Moura; Santos, Vilma Maria; Schmidt, Radomir

    2016-10-01

    Repeated application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) changes the soil chemical properties and, consequently, can affect the soil microbial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responses of soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms to repeated application of CTS. CTS was applied repeatedly during 6 years, and, at the sixth year, the soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms were determined in the soil. The treatments consisted of 0 (without CTS application), 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 t ha(-1) of CTS (dry basis). Soil pH, EC, SOC, total N, and Cr concentration increased with the increase in CTS rate. Soil microbial biomass did not change significantly with the amendment of 2.5 Mg ha(-1), while it decreased at the higher rates. Total and specific enzymes activity responded differently after CTS application. The abundance of bacteria did not change with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment and decreased after this rate, while the abundance of archaea increased significantly with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment. Repeated application of different CTS rates for 6 years had different effects on the soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms as a response to changes in soil chemical properties.

  9. Evaluation of soil metal bioavailability estimates using two plant species (L. perenne and T. aestivum) grown in a range of agricultural soils treated with biosolids and metal salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Amanda, E-mail: amanda.black@lincoln.ac.nz [Department of Soil and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, PO Box 84, Lincoln 7647, Christchurch (New Zealand); McLaren, Ronald G. [Department of Soil and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, PO Box 84, Lincoln 7647, Christchurch (New Zealand); Reichman, Suzanne M. [School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Speir, Thomas W. [Institute of Environmental Science and Research Ltd (ESR), PO Box 50348, Porirua 5240 (New Zealand); Condron, Leo M. [Department of Soil and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, PO Box 84, Lincoln 7647, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2011-06-15

    Few studies have quantified the accuracy of soil metal bioavailability assays using large datasets. A meta-analysis from experiments spanning 6 months to 13 years on 12 soil types, compared bioavailability estimate efficiencies for wheat and ryegrass. Treatments included biosolids {+-} metals, comparing total metal, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, EDTA, soil solution, DGT and free ion activity. The best correlations between soil metal bioavailability and shoot concentrations were for Ni using Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (r{sup 2} = 0.72) which also provided the best estimate of Zn bioavailability (r{sup 2} = 0.64). DGT provided the best estimate of Cd bioavailability, accounting for 49% of shoot Cd concentrations. There was no reliable descriptor of Cu bioavailability, with less than 35% of shoot Cu concentrations defined. Thus interpretation of data obtained from many soil metal bioavailability assays is unreliable and probably flawed, and there is little justification to look beyond Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for Ni and Zn, and DGT for Cd. - Highlights: > A meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of soil metal bioavailability assays. > DGT could explain 49% of shoot Cd concentration. > There is little justification to look beyond Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for Ni and Zn. - A meta-analysis of soil metal bioavailability estimates for 12 soil types concluded that there is little justification to look beyond Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for Ni and Zn, and DGT for Cd.

  10. Examination of Below-Ground Structure and Soil Respiration Rates of Stable and Deteriorating Salt Marshes in Jamaica Bay (NY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan imaging is currently being used to examine below-ground peat and root structure in cores collected from salt marshes of Jamaica Bay, part of the Gateway National Recreation Area (NY). CAT scans or Computer-Aided Tomography scans use X-ray equipment to produce multiple i...

  11. Soil Respiration and Belowground Carbon Stores Among Salt Marshes Subjected to Increasing Watershed Nitrogen Loadings in Southern New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal salt marshes are ecosystems located between the uplands and sea, and because of their location are subject to increasing watershed nutrient loadings and rising sea levels. Residential development along the coast is intense, and there is a significant relationship between...

  12. Soil Conditions Rather Than Long-Term Exposure to Elevated CO2 Affect Soil Microbial Communities Associated with N-Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristof Brenzinger

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuously rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations may lead to an increased transfer of organic C from plants to the soil through rhizodeposition and may affect the interaction between the C- and N-cycle. For instance, fumigation of soils with elevated CO2 (eCO2 concentrations (20% higher compared to current atmospheric concentrations at the Giessen Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (GiFACE sites resulted in a more than 2-fold increase of long-term N2O emissions and an increase in dissimilatory reduction of nitrate compared to ambient CO2 (aCO2. We hypothesized that the observed differences in soil functioning were based on differences in the abundance and composition of microbial communities in general and especially of those which are responsible for N-transformations in soil. We also expected eCO2 effects on soil parameters, such as on nitrate as previously reported. To explore the impact of long-term eCO2 on soil microbial communities, we applied a molecular approach (qPCR, T-RFLP, and 454 pyrosequencing. Microbial groups were analyzed in soil of three sets of two FACE plots (three replicate samples from each plot, which were fumigated with eCO2 and aCO2, respectively. N-fixers, denitrifiers, archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers, and dissimilatory nitrate reducers producing ammonia were targeted by analysis of functional marker genes, and the overall archaeal community by 16S rRNA genes. Remarkably, soil parameters as well as the abundance and composition of microbial communities in the top soil under eCO2 differed only slightly from soil under aCO2. Wherever differences in microbial community abundance and composition were detected, they were not linked to CO2 level but rather determined by differences in soil parameters (e.g., soil moisture content due to the localization of the GiFACE sets in the experimental field. We concluded that +20% eCO2 had little to no effect on the overall microbial community involved in N-cycling in the

  13. Soil Conditions Rather Than Long-Term Exposure to Elevated CO2 Affect Soil Microbial Communities Associated with N-Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenzinger, Kristof; Kujala, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A; Moser, Gerald; Guillet, Cécile; Kammann, Claudia; Müller, Christoph; Braker, Gesche

    2017-01-01

    Continuously rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations may lead to an increased transfer of organic C from plants to the soil through rhizodeposition and may affect the interaction between the C- and N-cycle. For instance, fumigation of soils with elevated CO2 (eCO2) concentrations (20% higher compared to current atmospheric concentrations) at the Giessen Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (GiFACE) sites resulted in a more than 2-fold increase of long-term N2O emissions and an increase in dissimilatory reduction of nitrate compared to ambient CO2 (aCO2). We hypothesized that the observed differences in soil functioning were based on differences in the abundance and composition of microbial communities in general and especially of those which are responsible for N-transformations in soil. We also expected eCO2 effects on soil parameters, such as on nitrate as previously reported. To explore the impact of long-term eCO2 on soil microbial communities, we applied a molecular approach (qPCR, T-RFLP, and 454 pyrosequencing). Microbial groups were analyzed in soil of three sets of two FACE plots (three replicate samples from each plot), which were fumigated with eCO2 and aCO2, respectively. N-fixers, denitrifiers, archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers, and dissimilatory nitrate reducers producing ammonia were targeted by analysis of functional marker genes, and the overall archaeal community by 16S rRNA genes. Remarkably, soil parameters as well as the abundance and composition of microbial communities in the top soil under eCO2 differed only slightly from soil under aCO2. Wherever differences in microbial community abundance and composition were detected, they were not linked to CO2 level but rather determined by differences in soil parameters (e.g., soil moisture content) due to the localization of the GiFACE sets in the experimental field. We concluded that +20% eCO2 had little to no effect on the overall microbial community involved in N-cycling in the soil but that

  14. Wildfire mitigation strategies affect soil enzyme activity and soil organic carbon in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.E.J. Boerner; T.A. Waldrop; V.B. Shelburne

    2006-01-01

    We quantified the effects of three wildfire hazard reduction treatments (prescribed fire, thinning from below, and the combination of fire and thinning), and passive management (control) on mineral soil organic C, and enzyme activity in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forests on the Piedmont of South Carolina. Soil organic C was reduced by thinning,...

  15. Manure and soil properties affect survival and persistence of soyabean nodulating rhizobia in smallholder soils of Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zengeni, R.; Mpepereki, S.; Giller, K.E.

    2006-01-01

    Persistence of the soyabean rhizobial inoculant strain MAR 1491 was assessed in 52 soils from Guruve, Hurungwe and Goromonzi districts of Zimbabwe, which had been inoculated 1¿4 or 6 years previously. Most probable number estimates of rhizobia in the soils showed that population sizes decreased with

  16. Survival of genetically marked Escherichia coli O157 : H7 in soil as affected by soil microbial community shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Hill, Patrick; Chronakova, Alica; Grekova, Martyna; Topalova, Yana; Elhottova, Dana; Kristufek, Vaclav; Chroakova, A.; Kristfek, V.

    A loamy sand soil sampled from a species- rich permanent grassland at a long- term experimental site ( Wildekamp, Bennekom, The Netherlands) was used to construct soil microcosms in which the microbial community compositions had been modified by fumigation at different intensities ( depths). As

  17. Environmental changes affect the assembly of soil bacterial community primarily by mediating stochastic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ximei; Johnston, Eric R; Liu, Wei; Li, Linghao; Han, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Both 'species fitness difference'-based deterministic processes, such as competitive exclusion and environmental filtering, and 'species fitness difference'-independent stochastic processes, such as birth/death and dispersal/colonization, can influence the assembly of soil microbial communities. However, how both types of processes are mediated by anthropogenic environmental changes has rarely been explored. Here we report a novel and general pattern that almost all anthropogenic environmental changes that took place in a grassland ecosystem affected soil bacterial community assembly primarily through promoting or restraining stochastic processes. We performed four experiments mimicking 16 types of environmental changes and separated the compositional variation of soil bacterial communities caused by each environmental change into deterministic and stochastic components, with a recently developed method. Briefly, because the difference between control and treatment communities is primarily caused by deterministic processes, the deterministic change was quantified as (mean compositional variation between treatment and control) - (mean compositional variation within control). The difference among replicate treatment communities is primarily caused by stochastic processes, so the stochastic change was estimated as (mean compositional variation within treatment) - (mean compositional variation within control). The absolute of the stochastic change was greater than that of the deterministic change across almost all environmental changes, which was robust for both taxonomic and functional-based criterion. Although the deterministic change may become more important as environmental changes last longer, our findings showed that changes usually occurred through mediating stochastic processes over 5 years, challenging the traditional determinism-dominated view. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Soil management practice in Croatian vineyard affect CO2 fluxes and soil degradation in trafficking zones. First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunovic, Igor; Bilandzija, Darija; Andabaka, Zeljko; Stupic, Domagoj; Cacic, Marija; Brezinscak, Luka; Maletic, Edi; Pereira, Paulo; Kisic, Ivica

    2017-04-01

    Vineyards represent one of the most degradation prone types of intensively managed land on Earth. Steep slopes encourage grape producers to adopt environmental friendly soil management like mulching or continuous no-tillage. In this context, producers have concerns about efficient fertilisation practices and water competitions between vine and grasses in continuous no-tillage inter rows. Vineyards in semi-humid areas like Continental Croatia mostly not suffer from water deficit during growth. Nevertheless, lack of research of different soil management practices open dilemma about soil compaction concerns in intensively trafficked soils in vineyard of semi-humid areas. Soil compaction, determined by bulk density (BD), soil water content (SWC) and CO2 fluxes from trafficked inter row positions were recorded in 2016 in an experiment in which four different soil management systems were compared in a vineyard raised on a silty clay loam soil, near Zagreb, Croatia: No-tillage (NT) system, continuous tillage (CT) and yearly inversed grass covered (INV-GC) and tillage managed (INV-T) inter rows are subjected to intensive traffic. Grape yield and must quality of grape variety Chardonnay was also monitored. Tractor traffic increased the soil BD at 0-10 and 10-20 cm, but especially at the 0-10 cm depth. CT treatment record lowest compaction at 0-10 cm because of tillage. Soil water content showed better conservation possibilities of INV-GC in drier period. In wet period SWC possibilities are similar between treatments. The results of soil compaction under different management indicate that vineyard soil differently response to traffic intensity and impact on microfauna activity and CO2 emissions. INV-GC and NT managed soils record lower CO2 fluxes from vineyard soil compared to CT and INV-T treatments. Management treatments did not statistically influenced on grape yields. Several years of investigation is needed to confirm the overall impact of different management

  19. Soil aggregate stability as affected by clay mineralogy and polyacrylamide addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The addition of polyacrylamide (PAM) to soil leads to stabilization of existing aggregates and improved bonding between, and aggregation of adjacent soil particles However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent on soil-clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil sam...

  20. Soil-Site Factors Affecting Southern Upland Oak Managment and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    John K. Francis

    1980-01-01

    Soil supplies trees with physical support, moisture, oxygen, and nutrients. Amount of moisture most limits tree growth; and soil and topographic factors such as texture and aspect, which influence available soil moisture. are most useful in predicting growth. Equations that include soil and topographic variables can be used to predict site index. Foresters can also...

  1. Using (137)Cs to quantify the redistribution of soil organic carbon and total N affected by intensive soil erosion in the headwaters of the Yangtze River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoxiao, Wei; Yibo, Wang; Yan Lin, Wang

    2008-12-01

    Characteristics of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (total N) are important for determining the overall quality of soils. Studies on spatial and temporal variation in SOC and total N are of great importance because of global environmental concerns. Soil erosion is one of the major processes affecting the redistribution of SOC and total N in the test fields. To characterize the distribution and dynamics of SOC and N in the intensively eroded soil of the headwaters of the Yangtze River, China, we measured profiles of soil organic C, total N stocks, and (137)Cs in a control plot and a treatment plot. The amounts of SOC, (137)Cs of sampling soil profiles increased in the following order, lower>middle>upper portions on the control plot, and the amounts of total N of sampling soil profile increase in the following order: upper>middle>lower on the control plot. Intensive soil erosion resulted in a significant decrease of SOC amounts by 34.9%, 28.3% and 52.6% for 0-30cm soil layer at upper, middle and lower portions and (137)Cs inventory decreased by 68%, 11% and 85% at upper, middle and lower portions, respectively. On the treatment plot total N decreased by 50.2% and 14.6% at the upper and middle portions and increased by 48.9% at the lower portion. Coefficients of variation (CVs) of SOC decreased by 31%, 37% and 30% in the upper, middle and lower slope portions, respectively. Similar to the variational trend of SOC, CVs of (137)Cs decreased by 19.2%, 0.5% and 36.5%; and total N decreased by 45.7%, 65.1% and 19% in the upper, middle and lower slope portions, respectively. The results showed that (137)Cs, SOC and total N moved on the sloping land almost in the same physical mechanism during the soil erosion procedure, indicating that fallout of (137)Cs could be used directly for quantifying dynamic SOC and total N redistribution as the soil was affected by intensive soil erosion.

  2. Does Plant Biomass Manipulation in Static Chambers Affect Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Sarah M; Dean, Andrew P; Oates, Lawrence G; Ruark, Matthew D; Jackson, Randall D

    2016-03-01

    One of the most widespread approaches for measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from soils involves the use of static chambers. This method is relatively inexpensive, is easily replicated, and is ideally suited to plot-based experimental systems. Among its limitations is the loss of detection sensitivity with increasing chamber height, which creates challenges for deployment in systems including tall vegetation. It is not always possible to avoid inclusion of plants within chambers or to extend chamber height to fully accommodate plant growth. Thus, in many systems, such as perennial forages and biomass crops, plants growing within static chambers must either be trimmed or folded during lid closure. Currently, data on how different types of biomass manipulation affect measured results is limited. Here, we compare the effects of cutting vs. folding of biomass on nitrous oxide measurements in switchgrass ( L.) and alfalfa ( L.) systems. We report only limited evidence of treatment effects during discrete sampling events and little basis for concern that effects may intensify over time as biomass manipulation is repeatedly imposed. However, nonsignificant treatment effects that were consistently present amounted to significant overall trends in three out of the four systems studied. Such minor disparities in flux could amount to considerable quantities over time, suggesting that caution should be exercised when comparing cumulative emission values from studies using different biomass manipulation strategies. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Sonoran Desert winter annuals affected by density of red brome and soil nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, L.F.; McPherson, G.R.; Williams, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    Red brome [Bromus madritensis subsp. rubens (L.) Husn.] is a Mediterranean winter annual grass that has invaded Southwestern USA deserts. This study evaluated interactions among 13 Sonoran Desert annual species at four densities of red brome from 0 to the equivalent of 1200 plants ma??2. We examined these interactions at low (3 I?g) and high (537 I?g NO3a?? g soila??1) nitrogen (N) to evaluate the relative effects of soil N level on survival and growth of native annuals and red brome. Red brome did not affect emergence or survival of native annuals, but significantly reduced growth of natives, raising concerns about effects of this exotic grass on the fecundity of these species. Differences in growth of red brome and of the three dominant non nitrogen-fixing native annuals at the two levels of soil N were similar. Total species biomass of red brome was reduced by 83% at low, compared to high, N levels, whereas that of the three native species was reduced by from 42 to 95%. Mean individual biomass of red brome was reduced by 87% at low, compared to high, N levels, whereas that of the three native species was reduced by from 72 to 89%.

  4. Effect of agricultural activity in the salt content in soils of Murcia: comparison with other land uses; Efecto de la actividad agricola en los contenidos de sales en suelos de Murcia: comparacion con otros usos de suelo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Aviles, J. A.; Faz Cano, A.; Martinez-Martinez, S.

    2009-07-01

    Salinization is one of the main problems of soil degradation in arid and semiarid areas, causing a reduction of soil quality, declining yield and productivity, and even land abandonment. the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different land uses, particularly agricultural use in the salt content in soil. The study area is located in the surroundings of Murcia city (SE Spain), with an surface of 100 km{sup 2}, with high agricultural productivity. In order to determine salt content in soil, E. C. was measured in the 1:5 ratio. The results showed that the study area is saline, being the salinity higher when anthropogenic activity is more severe. Agricultural lands present the widest range of data, probably due to the application of poor quality irrigation water, fertilizers and livestock waste. (Author) 9 refs.

  5. Substrate Composition and Depth Affect Soil Moisture Behavior and Plant-Soil Relationship on Mediterranean Extensive Green Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Chenot

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean basin is extremely vulnerable to climate change, and one of the areas most impacted by human water demand. Yet the green roofs increasingly created both for aesthetic reasons and to limit pollution and urban runoff are themselves very water-demanding. Successful green roof installation depends on the establishment of the vegetation, and the substrate is the key element: it conserves water, and provides the nutrients and physical support indispensable for plant growth. Since typical Mediterranean plant communities require no maintenance, this study seeks to develop techniques for creating maintenance- and watering-free horizontal green roofs for public or private buildings in a Mediterranean context. The innovative aspect of this study lies in creating two soil mixes, fine elements (clay and silt and coarse elements (pebbles of all sizes, in two different thicknesses, to assess vegetation development. Monitoring of substrate moisture was carried out and coupled with local rainfall measurements during summer and autumn. As expected, substrate moisture is mainly influenced by substrate depth (the deeper, the moister and composition (the finer the particles (clays and silts, the higher the moisture content. Vegetation cover impacts moisture to a lesser extent but is itself affected by the composition and depth of the substrates. These results are subsequently discussed with relation to the issue of sustainable green roofs in Mediterranean climates. Considering applications of our results, for an optimal colonization of a Mediterranean vegetation, a substrate thickness of 15 cm composed mainly of fine elements (75% clay-silt and 25% pebble-sand would be recommended in green roofs.

  6. Plant growth-promoting bacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 modulates gene expression profile of leaf and rhizosphere community in rice during salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar; Srivastava, Suchi; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Seem, Karishma; Mishra, Aradhana; Sopory, Sudhir Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Growth and productivity of rice and soil inhabiting microbial population is negatively affected by soil salinity. However, some salt resistant, rhizosphere competent bacteria improve plant health in saline stress. Present study evaluated the effect of salt tolerant Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 (SN13) inoculation on rice plants in hydroponic and soil conditions exposed to salinity. SN13 increased plant growth and salt tolerance (NaCl 200 mM) and expression of at least 14 genes under hydroponic and soil conditions in rice. Among these 14 genes 4 (NADP-Me2, EREBP, SOSI, BADH and SERK1) were up-regulated and 2 (GIG and SAPK4) repressed under salt stress in hydroponic condition. In greenhouse experiment, salt stress resulted in accumulation of MAPK5 and down-regulation of the remaining 13 transcripts was observed. SN13 treatment, with or without salt gave similar expression for all tested genes as compared to control. Salt stress caused changes in the microbial diversity of the rice rhizosphere and stimulated population of betaine-, sucrose-, trehalose-, and glutamine-utilizing bacteria in salt-treated rice rhizosphere (SN13 + salt). The observations imply that SN13 confers salt tolerance in rice by modulating differential transcription in a set of at least 14 genes. Stimulation of osmoprotectant utilizing microbial population as a mechanism of inducing salt tolerance in rice is reported for the first time in this study to the best of our knowledge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Conventional and organic soil fertility management practices affect corn plant nutrition and Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larval performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Ebony G; Cullen, Eileen M

    2014-10-01

    Few studies compare how different soil fertilization practices affect plant mineral content and insect performance in organic systems. This study examined: 1) The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), larval response on corn (Zea mays L.) grown in field soils with different soil management histories; and 2) resilience of these plants to O. nubilalis herbivory. Treatments included: 1) standard organic--organically managed soil fertilized with dairy manure and 2 yr of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in the rotation; 2) basic cation saturation ratio--organically managed soil fertilized with dairy manure and alfalfa nitrogen credits, plus addition of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) according to the soil balance hypothesis; and 3) conventional--conventionally managed soil fertilized with synthetic fertilizers. Corn plants were reared to maturity in a greenhouse, and then infested with 0-40 O. nubilalis larvae for 17 d. O. nubilalis exhibited negative competitive response to increasing larval densities. Mean development time was significantly faster for larvae consuming basic cation saturation ratio plants than those on standard organic plants, with intermediate development time on conventional plants. Neither total yield (number of kernels) nor proportion kernels damaged differed among soil fertility treatments. Soil nutrients differed significantly in S and in Ca:Mg and Ca:K ratios, but principal components analysis of plant tissue samples taken before O. nubilalis infestation showed that S, Fe, and Cu contributed most to differences in plant nutrient profiles among soil fertility treatments. Results demonstrate that different fertilization regimens can significantly affect insect performance within the context of organic systems, but the effects in this study were relatively minor compared with effects of intraspecific competition.

  8. Effects, tolerance mechanisms and management of salt stress in grain legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Gogoi, Nirmali; Hussain, Mubshar; Barthakur, Sharmistha; Paul, Sreyashi; Bharadwaj, Nandita; Migdadi, Hussein M; Alghamdi, Salem S; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2017-09-01

    transgenics and crop management strategies may enhance salt tolerance and yield in grain legumes on salt-affected soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Reactive halogen species above salt lakes and salt pans

    OpenAIRE

    Holla, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Salt lakes can be found on all continents and saline soils cover 2.5% of the land surface of the earth (FAO, 2012). This thesis investigates the presence of reactive halogen species (RHS) above salt lakes and saline soils to evaluate their relevance for tropospheric chemistry of the planetary boundary layer. Ground-based MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS measurements were conducted at salt lakes and two other sites with high halogen content. Prior to this work, RHS were found at three salt ...

  10. [Profile distribution and storage of soil organic carbon in a black soil as affected by land use types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiang-xiang; Han, Xiao-zeng; Li, Lu-jun; Zou, Wen-xiu; Lu, Xin-chun; Qiao, Yun-fa

    2015-04-01

    Taking soils in a long-term experimental field over 29 years with different land uses types, including arable land, bare land, grassland and larch forest land as test materials, the distribution and storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the profile (0-200 cm) in typical black soil (Mollisol) region of China were investigated. The results showed that the most significant differences in SOC content occurred in the 0-10 cm surface soil layer among all soils with the order of grassland > arable land > larch forest land > bare land. SOC contents at 10-120 cm depth were lower in arable land as compared with the other land use types. Compared with arable land, grassland could improve SOC content obviously. SOC content down to a depth of 60 cm in grassland was significantly higher than that in arable land. The content of SOC at 0-10 cm in bare land was significantly lower than that in arable land. Although there were no significant differences in SOC content at 0-20 cm depth between larch forestland and arable land, the SOC contents at 20-140 cm depth were generally higher in larch forestland than that in arable land. In general, SOC content showed a significantly negative relationship with soil pH, bulk density, silt and clay content and an even stronger significantly positive relationship with soil total N content and sand content. The SOC storage in arable land at 0-200 cm depth was significantly lower than that in the other three land use types, which was 13.6%, 11.4% and 10.9% lower than in grassland, bare land and larch forest land, respectively. Therefore, the arable land of black soil has a great potential for sequestering C in soil and improving environmental quality.

  11. Evaluation of soil and water salinity for irrigation in North-eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREG

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... Poor irrigation agriculture in arid and semiarid regions results in land degradation through soil salinity and sodic soil developments in different parts of the world. Hence, the study of arid lands and salt affected soils has been an important topic for modern agricultural management and particularly for poor ...

  12. Stratification and Storage of Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as Affected by Tillage Practices in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Kong, Fan-Lei; Chen, Fu; Lal, Rattan; Zhang, Hai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tillage practices can redistribute the soil profiles, and thus affects soil organic carbon (SOC), and its storage. The stratification ratio (SR) can be an indicator of soil quality. This study was conducted to determine tillage effects on the profile distribution of certain soil properties in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and summer maize (Zea mays L.) systems in the North China Plain (NCP). Three tillage treatments, including no till (NT), rotary tillage (RT), and plow tillage (PT), were established in 2001 in Luancheng County, Hebei Province. The concentration, storage, and SR of SOC and soil total nitrogen (TN) were assessed in both the wheat and maize seasons. Compared with RT and PT, the mean SRs for all depth ratios of SOC under NT increased by 7.85% and 30.61% during the maize season, and by 14.67% and 30.91% during the wheat season, respectively. The SR of TN for 0–5:30–50 cm increased by 140%, 161%, and 161% in the maize season, and 266%, 154%, and 122% in the wheat season compared to the SR for 0–5:5–10 cm under NT, RT and PT, respectively. The data indicated that SOC and TN were both concentrated in the surface-soil layers (0–10 cm) under NT but were distributed relatively evenly through the soil profile under PT. Meanwhile, the storage of SOC and TN was higher under NT for the surface soil (0–10 cm) but was higher under PT for the deeper soil (30–50 cm). Furthermore, the storage of SOC and TN was significantly related to SR of SOC and TN along the whole soil profile (P<0.0001). Therefore, SR could be used to explain and indicate the changes in the storage of SOC and TN. Further, NT stratifies SOC and TN, enhances the topsoil SOC storage, and helps to improve SOC sequestration and soil quality. PMID:26075391

  13. Stratification and Storage of Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as Affected by Tillage Practices in the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Xue, Jian-Fu; Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Kong, Fan-Lei; Chen, Fu; Lal, Rattan; Zhang, Hai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tillage practices can redistribute the soil profiles, and thus affects soil organic carbon (SOC), and its storage. The stratification ratio (SR) can be an indicator of soil quality. This study was conducted to determine tillage effects on the profile distribution of certain soil properties in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and summer maize (Zea mays L.) systems in the North China Plain (NCP). Three tillage treatments, including no till (NT), rotary tillage (RT), and plow tillage (PT), were established in 2001 in Luancheng County, Hebei Province. The concentration, storage, and SR of SOC and soil total nitrogen (TN) were assessed in both the wheat and maize seasons. Compared with RT and PT, the mean SRs for all depth ratios of SOC under NT increased by 7.85% and 30.61% during the maize season, and by 14.67% and 30.91% during the wheat season, respectively. The SR of TN for 0-5:30-50 cm increased by 140%, 161%, and 161% in the maize season, and 266%, 154%, and 122% in the wheat season compared to the SR for 0-5:5-10 cm under NT, RT and PT, respectively. The data indicated that SOC and TN were both concentrated in the surface-soil layers (0-10 cm) under NT but were distributed relatively evenly through the soil profile under PT. Meanwhile, the storage of SOC and TN was higher under NT for the surface soil (0-10 cm) but was higher under PT for the deeper soil (30-50 cm). Furthermore, the storage of SOC and TN was significantly related to SR of SOC and TN along the whole soil profile (P<0.0001). Therefore, SR could be used to explain and indicate the changes in the storage of SOC and TN. Further, NT stratifies SOC and TN, enhances the topsoil SOC storage, and helps to improve SOC sequestration and soil quality.

  14. Availability of Phosphorous from Soil and Rock Phosphate as Affected byApplication of Different Organic Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyanto Sugiyanto

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is an important nutrient and often has problem both in its availability in soil and in its supply, therefore direct application of rock phosphate is a prospective alternative. The objective of this research is to study the effect of varied organic matter source on the availability of phosphate derived from soil and rock phosphate. The experiment was laid experimentally in splitplot design and environmentally in randomized complete block design. The main plot was source of P consisted of, control, SP-36 and rock phosphate in dosage of 200 mg P2O5 per kg of air dry soil. Source of organic matter as sub-plot consisted of control (no organic matter, cow dung, cocoa pod husk compost and sugar cane filter cake, each in dosage of 2.5 and 5.0%. Result of this experiment showed that both P and organic matter application affected soil P availability. Application of cow dung and filter cake increased the soil P availability but did not increase the rock phosphate solubility. On the other hand, application of cocoa pod husk did not increase neither soil P availability nor rock phosphate solubility. Filter cake produced higher soil P availability, whereas cocoa pod husk compost produced the lowest which was similar to control (no organic matter. Application of organic matter tended to increase soil pH, exchangeable Ca and available Fe. Changes of available Fe positively correlated with available P. Key words : availability of phosphorus, rock phosphate, organic matter

  15. Genes and Salt Tolerance: Bringing Them Together

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rana Munns

    2005-01-01

    Salinity tolerance comes from genes that limit the rate of salt uptake from the soil and the transport of salt throughout the plant, adjust the ionic and osmotic balance of cells in roots and shoots...

  16. [Factors affecting activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus and related analysis technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Liang, Xin-qiang; Fu, Chao-dong; Zhu, Si-rui; Zhang, Yi-xiang; Ji, Yuan-jing

    2015-04-01

    Colloids play a key role in the transference process of phosphorus (P) in soil. Activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus have great effect on soil P pool and the surrounding water quality. This paper summarized the current studies on soil colloidal P, discussing the effects of the various factors (e. g., soil physical and chemical properties, fertilization, rainfall and soil amendments) on the transference of soil colloidal P. Some advanced analysis technologies (e.g., flow field-flow fractionation, transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance) and methods of reducing soil colloidal P were also involved. This review would provide important information on the mechanism of soil colloidal P transference.

  17. Root adaptation and ion selectivity affects the nutritional value of salt-stressed hydroponically grown baby-leaf Nasturtium officinale and Lactuca sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Fernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The response of watercress (Nasturtium officinale L. to salinity has been scarcely addressed in literature despite its growing importance in the baby-leaf market and its wide cultivation in salt-affected agricultural regions. This work evaluates the effect of salinity (2.5, 5 and 10 dS m-1 on productive and quality features of watercress compared with another crop widely cultivated for the baby-leaf sector (lettuce, Lactuca sativa. In watercress, a linear relationship (R2=0.75 was observed between yield decrease and Cl– accumulation in leaves, whereas yield was not affected by salinity in lettuce. NaCl application increased Na+ accumulation at the expense of Ca2+ uptake in the leaf tissues of both crops, but also of K+ in watercress. Health-related features were improved by salinity (e.g. increased phenolics and reduced nitrates, especially in watercress, with limited sensorial quality evaluation effects.

  18. Marine ecoregion and Deepwater Horizon oil spill affect recruitment and population structure of a salt marsh snail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Steven C.; Zengel, Scott; Oehrig, Jacob; Alber, Merryl; Bishop, T. Dale; Deis, Donald R.; Devlin, Donna; Hughes, A. Randall; Hutchens, John J.; Kiehn, Whitney M.; McFarlin, Caroline R.; Montague, Clay L.; Powers, Sean P.; Proffitt, C. Edward; Rutherford, Nicolle; Stagg, Camille L.; Walters, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Marine species with planktonic larvae often have high spatial and temporal variation in recruitment that leads to subsequent variation in the ecology of benthic adults. Using a combination of published and unpublished data, we compared the population structure of the salt marsh snail, Littoraria irrorata, between the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf Coast of the United States to infer geographic differences in recruitment and to test the hypothesis that the Deepwater Horizon oil spill led to widespread recruitment failure of L. irrorata in Louisiana in 2010. Size-frequency distributions in both ecoregions were bimodal, with troughs in the distributions consistent with a transition from sub-adults to adults at ~13 mm in shell length as reported in the literature; however, adult snails reached larger sizes in the Gulf Coast. The ratio of sub-adults to adults was 1.5–2 times greater in the South Atlantic Bight than the Gulf Coast, consistent with higher recruitment rates in the South Atlantic Bight. Higher recruitment rates in the South Atlantic Bight could contribute to higher snail densities and reduced adult growth in this region. The ratio of sub-adults to adults in Louisiana was lower in 2011 than in previous years, and began to recover in 2012–2014, consistent with widespread recruitment failure in 2010, when large expanses of spilled oil were present in coastal waters. Our results reveal an important difference in the ecology of a key salt marsh invertebrate between the two ecoregions, and also suggest that the Deepwater Horizon oil spill may have caused widespread recruitment failure in this species and perhaps others with similar planktonic larval stages.

  19. Grazing by reindeer in subarctic coniferous forests - how it is affecting three main greenhouse gas emissions from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Kajar; Köster, Egle; Berninger, Frank; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2017-04-01

    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) are the most important large mammalian herbivores in the northern ecosystems, strongly affecting Arctic lichen dominated ecosystems. Changes caused by reindeer in vegetation have indirect effects on physical features of the soil e.g. soil microclimate, root biomass and also on soil carbon dynamics, and little is known about reindeer and their impact on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions between the soil and atmosphere. In a field experiment in northern boreal subarctic coniferous forests in Finnish Lapland, we investigated the influence of reindeer grazing on soil GHG (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes, ground vegetation coverage and biomass, soil temperature and water content. The study was carried out in the growing season of the year 2014. We established the experiment as a split plot experiment with 2 blocks and 5 sub-plots per treatment that were divided into grazed and non-grazed parts, separated with a fence. The sample plots are located along the borderline between Finland and Russia, where the non-grazed area was excluded from reindeer already in 1918, to prevent the Finnish reindeer from going to the Russian side and there are not many reindeer on Russian side of the area. Our study showed that grazing by reindeer significantly affected lichen and moss biomasses. Lichen biomass was significantly lower in the grazed. We also observed that when lichens were removed, mosses were quickly overtaking the areas and moss biomass was significantly higher in grazed areas compared to non-grazed areas. Our results indicated that grazing by reindeer in the northern boreal subarctic forests affects the GHG emissions from the forest floor and these emissions largely depend on changes in vegetation composition. Soil was always a source of CO2in our study, and soil CO2 emissions were significantly smaller in non-grazed areas compared to grazed areas. The soils in our study areas were CH4 sinks through entire measurement period, and grazed areas consumed

  20. Survival of Manure-borne and Fecal Coliforms in Soil: Temperature Dependence as Affected by Site-Specific Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongeun; Pachepsky, Yakov; Shelton, Daniel; Jeong, Jaehak; Whelan, Gene

    2016-05-01

    Understanding pathogenic and indicator bacteria survival in soils is essential for assessing the potential of microbial contamination of water and produce. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of soil properties, animal source, experimental conditions, and the application method on temperature dependencies of manure-borne generic , O157:H7, and fecal coliforms survival in soils. A literature search yielded 151 survival datasets from 70 publications. Either one-stage or two-stage kinetics was observed in the survival datasets. We used duration and rate of the logarithm of concentration change as parameters of the first stage in the two-stage kinetics data. The second stage of the two-stage kinetics and the one-stage kinetics were simulated with the model to find the dependence of the inactivation rate on temperature. Classification and regression trees and linear regressions were applied to parameterize the kinetics. Presence or absence of two-stage kinetics was controlled by temperature, soil texture, soil water content, and for fine-textured soils by setting experiments in the field or in the laboratory. The duration of the first stage was predominantly affected by soil water content and temperature. In the model dependencies of inactivation rates on temperature, parameter estimates were significantly affected by the laboratory versus field conditions and by the application method, whereas inactivation rates at 20°C were significantly affected by all survival and management factors. Results of this work can provide estimates of coliform survival parameters for models of microbial water quality. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Accumulation of nutrients in soils affected by perennial colonies of piscivorous birds with reference to biogeochemical cycles of elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, Slawomir; Smal, Halina

    2003-07-01

    The accumulation of selected N, K, and P forms in soils within three perennial colonies of black cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) and grey heron (Ardea cinerea) located in northern and eastern Poland were investigated. Soil samples were collected beneath the nests from the most representative for each colony plots. Control samples were taken outside the colonies within sites adjacent to the nesting areas but not affected by bird excrement. From each genetic horizon (20 horizons) in soil profiles, a cumulative sample of about 25-30 kg of soil was taken for analysis. Nitrogen by Kjeldahl, ammonium ions (N(NH(4))), nitrates (N(NO(3))), exchangeable potassium (K(ex)), available potassium (K(av)), and available phosphorus (P(av)) were determined. The soils affected by birds demonstrated a very strong enrichment with N, K, and P in comparison to the control sites, especially in the topsoil horizons. The content of N(NH(4)) in individual soil horizons from the colonies was from 1.7 to 10.1 times higher than the respective control, N(NO(3)) from 2.9 to 215.7, K(ex) from 2.0 to 35.1, K(av) from 1.1 to 48.1, and P(av) in the range from 2.4 to 53.0 times. The highest increment of chemical elements was noticeable in the soils of territories inhabited by cormorants and the least in forest occupied by herons. Some relationships between soil texture and accumulation of biogenic nutrients were determined. Clay loam soil showed the greatest enrichment with analysed forms of elements with the exception of N(NH(4)).

  2. Does S-metolachlor affect the performance of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP as bioaugmentation bacterium for atrazine-contaminated soils?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina A Viegas

    Full Text Available Atrazine (ATZ and S-metolachlor (S-MET are two herbicides widely used, often as mixtures. The present work examined whether the presence of S-MET affects the ATZ-biodegradation activity of the bioaugmentation bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP in a crop soil. S-MET concentrations were selected for their relevance in worst-case scenarios of soil contamination by a commercial formulation containing both herbicides. At concentrations representative of application of high doses of the formulation (up to 50 µg g(-1 of soil, corresponding to a dose approximately 50× higher than the recommended field dose (RD, the presence of pure S-MET significantly affected neither bacteria survival (~10(7 initial viable cells g(-1 of soil nor its ATZ-mineralization activity. Consistently, biodegradation experiments, in larger soil microcosms spiked with 20× or 50 × RD of the double formulation and inoculated with the bacterium, revealed ATZ to be rapidly (in up to 5 days and extensively (>96% removed from the soil. During the 5 days, concentration of S-MET decreased moderately to about 60% of the initial, both in inoculated and non-inoculated microcosms. Concomitantly, an accumulation of the two metabolites S-MET ethanesulfonic acid and S-MET oxanilic acid was found. Despite the dissipation of almost all the ATZ from the treated soils, the respective eluates were still highly toxic to an aquatic microalgae species, being as toxic as those from the untreated soil. We suggest that this high toxicity may be due to the S-MET and/or its metabolites remaining in the soil.

  3. Does S-Metolachlor Affect the Performance of Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP as Bioaugmentation Bacterium for Atrazine-Contaminated Soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Cristina A.; Costa, Catarina; André, Sandra; Viana, Paula; Ribeiro, Rui; Moreira-Santos, Matilde

    2012-01-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) and S-metolachlor (S-MET) are two herbicides widely used, often as mixtures. The present work examined whether the presence of S-MET affects the ATZ-biodegradation activity of the bioaugmentation bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP in a crop soil. S-MET concentrations were selected for their relevance in worst-case scenarios of soil contamination by a commercial formulation containing both herbicides. At concentrations representative of application of high doses of the formulation (up to 50 µg g−1 of soil, corresponding to a dose approximately 50× higher than the recommended field dose (RD)), the presence of pure S-MET significantly affected neither bacteria survival (∼107 initial viable cells g−1 of soil) nor its ATZ-mineralization activity. Consistently, biodegradation experiments, in larger soil microcosms spiked with 20× or 50×RD of the double formulation and inoculated with the bacterium, revealed ATZ to be rapidly (in up to 5 days) and extensively (>96%) removed from the soil. During the 5 days, concentration of S-MET decreased moderately to about 60% of the initial, both in inoculated and non-inoculated microcosms. Concomitantly, an accumulation of the two metabolites S-MET ethanesulfonic acid and S-MET oxanilic acid was found. Despite the dissipation of almost all the ATZ from the treated soils, the respective eluates were still highly toxic to an aquatic microalgae species, being as toxic as those from the untreated soil. We suggest that this high toxicity may be due to the S-MET and/or its metabolites remaining in the soil. PMID:22615921

  4. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  5. Modeling and assessing the function and sustainability of natural patches in salt-affected agro-ecosystems: Application to tamarisk (Tamarix chinensis Lour.) in Hetao, upper Yellow River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dongyang; Xu, Xu; Ramos, Tiago B.; Huang, Quanzhong; Huo, Zailin; Huang, Guanhua

    2017-09-01

    Relatively low-lying zones of natural vegetation within irrigated areas are not only carriers of biodiversity but also dry drainage areas of excess water and salts applied to nearby croplands. It is thus useful to have a correct understanding of the soil water-salt dynamics and plant water use for keeping the sustainability of those natural areas. The HYDRUS-dualKc model that couples the HYDRUS-1D model with the FAO-56 dualKc approach was extended to simulate the eco-hydrological processes in natural patches of Hetao Irrigation District (Hetao), upper Yellow River basin. Field experiments were conducted in a tamarisk (Tamarix chinensis Lour.) dominated area during the growing seasons of 2012 and 2013. The model was calibrated and validated using the two-year experimental data, and applied to analyze the water and salt dynamics and the tamarisk water consumption for the present situation. Then, various groundwater depth (i.e. the depth from groundwater surface to water table, GWD) scenarios were simulated while considering the fluctuating and constant regimes of GWD changes, as well as variations of the rooting depth. Results indicated that this natural land functioned efficiently as a drainage area for subsurface flow and excess salt from surrounding croplands. However, the present GWDs were too shallow leading to high soil evaporation and severe salt stress. The soil evaporation accounted for 50% of the total evapotranspiration (ETa) while root zone salt storage increased about 50% during growing seasons. On the basis of scenario analysis, an optimum groundwater depth of 140-200 cm with smaller fluctuation was suggested for the growing seasons of natural patches. In addition, tamarisk growth could be largely improved if the roots can grow deeper with water table decline in the future. We demonstrated that monitoring and modeling could be used to support the development of water management strategies in Hetao aimed at conserving water while sustaining local

  6. Drought induced changes of plant belowground carbon allocation affect soil microbial community function in a subalpine meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchslueger, L.; Bahn, M.; Fritz, K.; Hasibeder, R.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    There is growing evidence that climate extremes may affect ecosystem carbon dynamics more strongly than gradual changes in temperatures or precipitation. Climate projections suggest more frequent heat waves accompanied by extreme drought periods in many parts of Europe, including the Alps. Drought is considered to decrease plant C uptake and turnover, which may in turn decrease belowground C allocation and potentially has significant consequences for microbial community composition and functioning. However, information on effects of drought on C dynamics at the plant-soil interface in real ecosystems is still scarce. Our study aimed at understanding how summer drought affects soil microbial community composition and the uptake of recently assimilated plant C by different microbial groups in grassland. We hypothesized that under drought 1) the microbial community shifts, fungi being less affected than bacteria, 2) plants decrease belowground C allocation, which further reduces C transfer to soil microbes and 3) the combined effects of belowground C allocation, reduced soil C transport due to reduced soil moisture and shift in microbial communities cause an accumulation of extractable organic C in the soil. Our study was conducted as part of a rain-exclusion experiment in a subalpine meadow in the Austrian Central Alps. After eight weeks of rain exclusion we pulse labelled drought and control plots with 13CO2 and traced C in plant biomass, extractable organic C (EOC) and soil microbial communities using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). Drought induced a shift of the microbial community composition: gram-positive bacteria became more dominant, whereas gram-negative bacteria were not affected by drought. Also the relative abundance of fungal biomass was not affected by drought. While total microbial biomass (as estimated by total microbial PLFA content) increased during drought, less 13C was taken up. This reduction was pronounced for bacterial biomarkers. It reflects

  7. Dominant Tree Species and Soil Type Affect the Fungal Community Structure in a Boreal Peatland Forest

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Hui; Terhonen, Eeva; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Tuovila, Hanna; Chen, Hongxin; Oghenekaro, Abbot O; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Kohler, Annegret; Kasanen, Risto; Vasander, Harri; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2016-01-01

    .... In this study, we have investigated the fungal diversity and community structure of both the organic soil layer and buried wood in boreal forest soils using high-throughput sequencing of the internal...

  8. Arsenic and heavy metal pollution in wetland soils from tidal freshwater and salt marshes before and after the flow-sediment regulation regime in the Yellow River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhang, Kejiang; Gao, Haifeng

    2012-07-01

    SummarySoil samples were collected in tidal freshwater and salt marshes in the Yellow River Delta (YRD), northern China, before and after the flow-sediment regulation. Total concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate the characteristics of heavy metal pollution in tidal wetlands before and after the regulation regime. The results demonstrated that marsh soils in both marshes had higher silt and total P contents, higher bulk density and lower sand contents after the flow-sediment regulation; moreover, soil salinity was significantly decreased in the tidal salt marsh. As and Cd concentrations were significantly higher in both marsh soils after the regulation than before, and there were no significant differences in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn measured before and after the regulation. No significant differences in heavy metal concentrations were observed between freshwater and salt marsh soils, either before or after the regulation. Before the regulation regime, soil organic matter, pH and sulfer (S) were the main factors influencing heavy metal distribution in tidal freshwater marshes, whereas for tidal salt marshes, the main factors are soil salinity and moisture, pH and S. However, bulk density and total P became the main influencing factors after the regulation. The sediment quality guidelines and geoaccumulation indices showed moderately or strongly polluted levels of As and Cd and unpolluted or moderately polluted levels of Cu, Pb and Zn; As and Cd pollution became more serious after the regulation. Factor analysis indicated thatthese heavy metals including As were closely correlated and orginated from common pollution sources before the flow-sediment regulation; however, the sources of As and Cd separated from the sources of Cu, Pb and Zn after the regulation regime, implying that the flow-sediment regulation regime

  9. Wind sorting affects differently the organo-mineral composition of saltating and particulate materials in contrasting texture agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturri, Laura Antonela; Funk, Roger; Leue, Martin; Sommer, Michael; Buschiazzo, Daniel Eduardo

    2017-10-01

    There is little information about the mineral and organic composition of sediments eroded by wind at different heights. Because of that, wind tunnel simulations were performed on four agricultural loess soils of different granulometry and their saltating materials collected at different heights. The particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter mainly smaller than 10 μm (PM10) of these soils was obtained separately by a laboratory method. Results indicated that the granulometric composition of sediments collected at different heights was more homogeneous in fine- than in sandy-textured soils, which were more affected by sorting effects during wind erosion. This agrees with the preferential transport of quartz at low heights and of clay minerals at greater heights. SOC contents increased with height, but the composition of the organic materials was different: stable carboxylic acids, aldehydes, amides and aromatics were preferentially transported close to the ground because their were found in larger aggregates, while plant debris and polysaccharides, carbohydrates and derivatives of microbial origin from organic matter dominated at greater heights for all soil types. The amount of SOC in the PM10 fraction was higher when it was emitted from sandy than from fine textured soils. Because of the sorting process produced by wind erosion, the stable organic matter compounds will be transported at low heights and local scales, modifying soil fertility due to nutrient exportation, while less stable organic compounds will be part of the suspension losses, which are known to affect some processes at regional- or global scale.

  10. Soil sterilization affects aging-related sequestration and bioavailability of p,p'-DDE and anthracene to earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slizovskiy, Ilya B. [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States); Kelsey, Jason W., E-mail: Kelsey@muhlenberg.ed [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Laboratory experiments investigated the effects of soil sterilization and compound aging on the bioaccumulation of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene by Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris. Declines in bioavailability occurred as pollutant residence time in both sterile and non-sterile soils increased from 3 to 203 d. Accumulation was generally higher in sterile soils during initial periods of aging (from 3-103 d). By 203 d, however, bioavailability of the compounds was unaffected by sterilization. Gamma irradiation and autoclaving may have altered bioavailability by inducing changes in the chemistry of soil organic matter (SOM). The results support a dual-mode partitioning sorption model in which the SOM components associated with short-term sorption (the 'soft' or 'rubbery' phases) are more affected than are the components associated with long-term sorption (the 'glassy' or microcrystalline phases). Risk assessments based on data from experiments in which sterile soil was used could overestimate exposure and bioaccumulation of pollutants. - Soil sterilization affects aging-related sequestration of organic contaminants.

  11. Accuracy of soil stress measurements as affected by transducer dimensions and shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Keller, Thomas; Berisso, Feto Esimo

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurements of soil stress are needed to evaluate the impact of traffic on soil properties and prevent soil compaction. Four types of transducer commonly used to measure vertical stress were calibrated in realistic traffic conditions in the field. The four transducer types differed...

  12. Applications of Fertilizer Cations Affect Cadmium and Zinc Concentrations in Soil Solutions and Uptake by Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, S. E.; Hamon, R. E.; McGrath, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study changes over time of Cd and Zn in soil solution and in plants. Radish was grown in a soil which had been contaminated with heavy metals prior to 1961. Constant amounts of a fertilizer solution (NH4N03, KN03) were added daily. Soil solution was obtained...

  13. Wood Ash Induced pH Changes Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Numbers and Community Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Nielsen, Jeppe T.; Voriskova, Jana

    2017-01-01

    -neutralizing capabilities. However, wood ash has several ecosystem-perturbing effects like increased soil pH and pore water electrical conductivity both known to strongly impact soil bacterial numbers and community composition. Studies investigating soil bacterial community responses to wood ash application remain sparse...

  14. [Deposition and burial of organic carbon in coastal salt marsh: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Song, Jin-Ming; Li, Xue-Gang; Yuan, Hua-Mao; Li, Ning; Duan, Li-Qin

    2013-07-01

    Coastal salt marsh has higher potential of carbon sequestration, playing an important role in mitigating global warming, while coastal saline soil is the largest organic carbon pool in the coastal salt marsh carbon budget. To study the carbon deposition and burial in this soil is of significance for clearly understanding the carbon budget of coastal salt marsh. This paper summarized the research progress on the deposition and burial of organic carbon in coastal salt marsh from the aspects of the sources of coastal salt marsh soil organic carbon, soil organic carbon storage and deposition rate, burial mechanisms of soil organic carbon, and the relationships between the carbon sequestration in coastal salt marsh and the global climate change. Some suggestions for the future related researches were put forward: 1) to further study the underlying factors that control the variability of carbon storage in coastal salt marsh, 2) to standardize the methods for measuring the carbon storage and the deposition and burial rates of organic carbon in coastal salt marsh, 3) to quantify the lateral exchange of carbon flux between coastal salt marsh and adjacent ecosystems under the effects of tide, and 4) to approach whether the effects of global warming and the increased productivity could compensate for the increase of the organic carbon decomposition rate resulted from sediment respiration. To make clear the driving factors determining the variability of carbon sequestration rate and how the organic carbon storage is affected by climate change and anthropogenic activities would be helpful to improve the carbon sequestration capacity of coastal salt marshes in China.

  15. Application of fuzzy inference system by Sugeno method on estimating of salt production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, Tony; Komariyah, Siti; Ulfaniyah, Nurita

    2017-08-01

    Salt is one of the most important needs in everyday life. Making traditional salt largely is done by smallholder farmers in addition by manufacturers of industrial salt. factors that affect the production of salt include seawater, soil, water influence and weather conditions including rainfall wind speed and solar radiation or long dry erratic, these conditions obviously affect the salt farmers that will affect the production quantities of salt produced by salt farmers. In this study, the fuzzy logic method is applied to Sugeno fuzzy inference systems to estimate the production of salt by variables - variables that affect it. This study aims to estimate how much production by applying fuzzy inference systems zero-order Sugeno method based on the variable wind speed, solar radiation, rainfall and the amount of production. Retrieval of data obtained from the Air Quality Meteorology and Geophysics. salt farmers in Pamekasan District of Pademawu Village Majungan. Data taken within 2 years per week from June to December of 2014 and 2015. The Sugeno fuzzy logic model in this study using output (consequent) in the form of equation constants (Sugeno models Order zero). Apparently from the research results obtained by the error value most low at 0.0917, so it can be said to be close to zero.

  16. Structure stability and water retention near saturation characteristics as affected by soil texture, and polyacrylamide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Amrakh I.; Ekberli, Imanverdi A.; Ozturk, Hasan S.; Wagner, Larry E.; Norton, Darrell L.; Levy, Guy J.

    2017-04-01

    Studying the effects of soil properties and amendment application on soil structure stability is important for the development of effective soil management and conservation practices for sustaining semi-arid soil and water quality under climate change scenarios. Two sets of experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of soil texture and soil amendment polyacrylamide (PAM) rate on soil structural stability expressed in terms of near saturation soil water retention and aggregate stability using the high energy (0-5 J kg-1) moisture characteristic (HEMC) method. Contribution of (i) soil type were assessed using 30 soil samples varying in texture from sandy to clay taken from long term cultivated lands, covering a range of crop and land management practices, and (ii) anionic PAM concentration (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 & 200 mg l-1) were tested on selected loam and clay soils. The water retention curves of slow and fast wetted soil samples were characterized by a modified van Genuchten (1980) model that provides (i) model parameters α and n, which represent the location of the inflection point and the steepness of the S-shaped water retention curves, and (ii) a composite soil structure index (SI =VDP/MS; VDP-volume of drainable pores, MS-modal suction). The studied treatments had, generally, considerable effects on the shape of the water retention curves (α and n). Soil type, PAM concentration and their interaction had significantly effects on the stability indices (SI, VDP and MS) and the model parameters (α and n). The SI and α increased, and ndecreased exponentially with the increase in soil clay content and PAM concentration, but the shape of curves were soil texture and management dependent, since predominant changes were observed in the various range of studied macropores (pore size > 60 μm). An exponential type of relationship existed between SI and α and n. Effect of PAM contribution and wetting condition was more pronounced in the loam soil at low PAM

  17. Naphthalene Acetic Acid Potassium Salt (NAA-K+) Affects Conidial Germination, Sporulation, Mycelial Growth, Cell Surface Morphology, and Viability of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radici-lycopersici and F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo-Valencia, María Karina; Valdés-Santiago, Laura; Sánchez-Segura, Lino; Guzmán-de-Peña, Dora Linda

    2016-11-09

    The response to exogenous addition of naphthalene acetic acid potassium salt (NAA-K+) to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp radici-lycopersici ATCC 60095 and F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense isolated from Michoacan Mexico soil is reported. The in vitro study showed that NAA-K+ might be effective in the control of Fusarium oxysporum. Exogenous application of NAA-K+ affected both spores and mycelium stages of the fungi. Viability testing using acridine orange and propidium iodide showed that NAA-K+ possesses fungal killing properties, doing it effectively in the destruction of conidia of this phytopathogenic fungi. Analysis of treated spores by scanning electron microscopy showed changes in the shape factor and fractal dimension. Moreover, NAA-K+ repressed the expression of brlA and fluG genes. The results disclosed here give evidence of the use of this synthetic growth factor as a substance of biocontrol that presents advantages, and the methods of application in situ should be explored.

  18. Sterilization affects soil organic matter chemistry and bioaccumulation of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene by earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Jason W., E-mail: kelsey@muhlenberg.ed [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States); Slizovskiy, Ilya B.; Peters, Richard D.; Melnick, Adam M. [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the effects of soil sterilization on the bioavailability of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene to the earthworms Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris. Physical and chemical changes to soil organic matter (SOM) induced by sterilization were also studied. Uptake of both compounds added after soil was autoclaved or gamma irradiated increased for E. fetida. Sterilization had no effect on bioaccumulation of p,p'-DDE by L. terrestris, and anthracene uptake increased only in gamma-irradiated soils. Analyses by FT-IR and DSC indicate sterilization alters SOM chemistry and may reduce pollutant sorption. Chemical changes to SOM were tentatively linked to changes in bioaccumulation, although the effects were compound and species specific. Artifacts produced by sterilization could lead to inaccurate risk assessments of contaminated sites if assumptions derived from studies carried out in sterilized soil are used. Ultimately, knowledge of SOM chemistry could aid predictions of bioaccumulation of organic pollutants. - Soil sterilization affects soil organic matter chemistry and pollutant bioaccumulation.

  19. Fire severity, residuals and soil legacies affect regeneration of Scots pine in the Southern Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchiano, Giorgio; Stanchi, Silvia; Marinari, Giulia; Ascoli, Davide; Zanini, Ermanno; Motta, Renzo

    2014-02-15

    Regeneration of non fire-adapted conifers following crown fires on the European Alps is often delayed or unsuccessful. Fire may limit establishment by eliminating seed trees, altering soil properties, or modifying microsite and soil conditions via disturbance legacies. However, the effect of soil legacies on post-fire establishment has rarely been discussed. We analyzed the abundance of Scots pine regeneration in a 257 ha wildfire in an inner-alpine forest. Our aims were (1) to model fire intensity at the soil surface and topsoil heating along a gradient of increasing fire severities; (2) to assess the differences in soil properties along the fire severity gradient; (3) to model the effect of disturbance and soil legacies on the density of pine seedlings. We reconstructed fire behavior and soil heating with the First Order Fire Effects Model (FOFEM), tested the effect of fire severity on soils by nonparametric distributional tests, and modeled seedling density as a function of site, disturbance and soil legacies by fitting a GLM following a variable selection procedure. Topsoil heating differed markedly between the moderate and high severity fires, reaching temperatures high enough to strongly and permanently alter soil properties only in the latter. High fire severity resulted in decreased soil consistency and wet aggregate stability. Burned soils had lower organic matter and cations than those unburned. Pine seedlings favored low-fertility, eroded, and chemically poor sites. Establishment was facilitated by the presence of coarse woody debris, but hampered by increasing distance from the seed source. These results suggest that in dry, inner-alpine valleys, fire residuals and soil legacies interact in determining the success of Scots pine re-establishment. High severity fire can promote favorable soil conditions, but distance from the seed source and high evaporation rates of bare soils must be mitigated in order to ensure a successful restoration. Copyright

  20. Salvage logging effect o