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Sample records for salmonella infection prevents

  1. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Salmonella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Salmonella Infections Print A ... Last? Can Salmonella Infections Be Prevented? What Is Salmonella ? Salmonella is a kind of bacteria , with many ...

  2. Characterization and specificity of probiotics to prevent salmonella infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Andino

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotic strains of bacteria can prevent Salmonella from causing disease by preventing the pathogen from colonizing the intestines. Two strains of probiotics, Lactobacillus acidophilius and Pediococcus spp, that were obtained from poultry fecal samples have been shown to be efficacious in poultry. The objective of this study was to determine if these strains of probiotics could prevent salmonellosis in a mouse model. Methods: First, both strains of probiotics were evaluated for in vitro efficacy to inhibit the growth of and interfere with virulence gene regulation in Salmonella enterica. For in vivo efficacy, mice was used which models Typhoid illness. Mice were divided into 2 groups: Control and treatment, Lactobacillus and Pediococcus (LP; 108 Log CFU. Two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, the mice were treated with LP in water for the first two days of the experiment and challenged with Salmonella at day three. In the second experiment, the LP treatment was given in the water for 10 days and challenge was performed on day 11. In both experiments, at day 20 post-challenge, all mice were sacrificed, intestinal tracts and organs removed and cultured for Salmonella. Results: The probiotic strains inhibited the growth of Salmonella and down-regulation of virulence genes was noted, but dependent on the strain of Salmonella being evaluated. For the in vivo experiment, the probiotics did not afford the mice protection from infection and increasing the length of time the probiotics were administered did not improve the efficacy of the probiotics. Conclusions: It appears that these strains of probiotic bacteria are effective against Salmonella in vitro. However, these isolates did not afford protection from Salmonella infection to mice which may be due to host specifity as these isolates were obtained from poultry

  3. Salmonella Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know - 한국어 (Korean) PDF Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Spanish (español) Expand Section Salmonella Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Infecciones por salmonela: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español ( ...

  4. Salmonella Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indirect contact between reptiles (turtles, iguanas, other lizards, snakes) and infants or immunocompromised persons. Don't work ... help prevent salmonellosis caused by contaminated foods. Better education of food industry workers in basic food safety ...

  5. Application of Scutellariae radix, Gardeniae fructus, and Probiotics to Prevent Salmonella enterica Serovar Choleraesuis Infection in Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Hung; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Su, Chiu-Hsian; Chen, Daniel S; Tsai, Chin-En; Yu, Bi; Hsu, Yuan-Man

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis, a host-adapted pathogen of swine, usually causes septicemia. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains have been widely studied in recent years for their probiotic properties. In this study, a mouse infection model first screened for potential agents against infection, then a pig infection model evaluated effects of LAB strains and herbal plants against infection. Scutellariae radix (SR) and Gardeniae fructus (GF) showed abilities to reduce bacteria shedding and suppressing serum level of TNF- α induced by infection in swine. Bioactivities of SR and GF were enhanced by combining with LAB strains, which alone could speed up the bacteria elimination time in feces and boost immunity of infected pigs. Baicalein and genipin exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than baicalin and geniposide did, as well as prevent Salmonella from invading macrophages. Our study suggests LAB strains as exhibiting multiple functions: preventing infection, enhancing immunity to prepare host defenses against further infection, and adjusting intestinal microbes' enzymatic activity in order to convert herbal compounds to active compounds. The SR/GF-LAB strain mixture holds potential infection-prevention agents supplied as feed additives.

  6. Application of Scutellariae radix, Gardeniae fructus, and Probiotics to Prevent Salmonella enterica Serovar Choleraesuis Infection in Swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Hung Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis, a host-adapted pathogen of swine, usually causes septicemia. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains have been widely studied in recent years for their probiotic properties. In this study, a mouse infection model first screened for potential agents against infection, then a pig infection model evaluated effects of LAB strains and herbal plants against infection. Scutellariae radix (SR and Gardeniae fructus (GF showed abilities to reduce bacteria shedding and suppressing serum level of TNF-α induced by infection in swine. Bioactivities of SR and GF were enhanced by combining with LAB strains, which alone could speed up the bacteria elimination time in feces and boost immunity of infected pigs. Baicalein and genipin exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than baicalin and geniposide did, as well as prevent Salmonella from invading macrophages. Our study suggests LAB strains as exhibiting multiple functions: preventing infection, enhancing immunity to prepare host defenses against further infection, and adjusting intestinal microbes’ enzymatic activity in order to convert herbal compounds to active compounds. The SR/GF-LAB strain mixture holds potential infection-prevention agents supplied as feed additives.

  7. Safety and efficacy of a salmonella gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA strain with potential to prevent chicken infections by salmonella gallinarum and salmonella enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JB Paiva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available New vaccine design techniques have allowed the development of effective vaccine strains against Salmonella infections inwhich the risks of reversion to the wild type and virulence is null. The mutant strain Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA was previously shown to be avirulent in chickens. In this study, this strain was tested as a vaccine against Salmonella Gallinarum (SG and S. Enteritidis (SE infections, and its protection levels, safety and possible risks of reversion to virulence after vaccination of layers were evaluated. Birds were vaccinated at five days of age or at five and 25 days of age. At 45 days of age, brown and white layers were challenged with SG and SE wild strains, respectively. Two assays to test the possibility of reversion to virulence were performed. Five successive bacterial passages in brown layers were carried out in the first assay. In the second assay, brown layers received a ten-fold concentrated inoculum of the SGΔcobSΔcbiA strain and were evaluated for clinical signs and mortality. In both experiments, no birds that received the inoculation of the attenuated strain died. Additionally, the use of the mutant strain as a vaccine provided good protection levels against both challenge strains.

  8. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  9. Proteins from latex of Calotropis procera prevent septic shock due to lethal infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Filho, José V; Patriota, Joyce M; Silva, Ayrles F B; Filho, Nicodemos T; Oliveira, Raquel S B; Alencar, Nylane M N; Ramos, Márcio V

    2010-06-16

    The latex of Calotropis procera has been used in traditional medicine to treat different inflammatory diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of latex proteins (LP) has been well documented using different inflammatory models. In this work the anti-inflammatory protein fraction was evaluated in a true inflammatory process by inducing a lethal experimental infection in the murine model caused by Salmonella enterica Subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Experimental Swiss mice were given 0.2 ml of LP (30 or 60 mg/kg) by the intraperitoneal route 24 h before or after lethal challenge (0.2 ml) containing 10(6) CFU/ml of Salmonella Typhimurium using the same route of administration. All the control animals succumbed to infection within 6 days. When given before bacterial inoculums LP prevented the death of mice, which remained in observation until day 28. Even, LP-treated animals exhibited only discrete signs of infection which disappeared latter. LP fraction was also protective when given orally or by subcutaneous route. Histopathological examination revealed that necrosis and inflammatory infiltrates were similar in both the experimental and control groups on days 1 and 5 after infection. LP activity did not clear Salmonella Typhimurium, which was still present in the spleen at approximately 10(4) cells/g of organ 28 days after challenge. However, no bacteria were detected in the liver at this stage. LP did not inhibit bacterial growth in culture medium at all. In the early stages of infection bacteria population was similar in organs and in the peritoneal fluid but drastically reduced in blood. Titration of TNF-alpha in serum revealed no differences between experimental and control groups on days 1 and 5 days after infection while IL-12 was only discretely diminished in serum of experimental animals on day 5. Moreover, cultured macrophages treated with LP and stimulated by LPS released significantly less IL-1beta. LP-treated mice did not succumb to septic shock when

  10. Application of Scutellariae radix, Gardeniae fructus, and Probiotics to Prevent Salmonella enterica Serovar Choleraesuis Infection in Swine

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chiung-Hung; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Su, Chiu-Hsian; Chen, Daniel S.; Tsai, Chin-En; Yu, Bi; Hsu, Yuan-Man

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis, a host-adapted pathogen of swine, usually causes septicemia. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains have been widely studied in recent years for their probiotic properties. In this study, a mouse infection model first screened for potential agents against infection, then a pig infection model evaluated effects of LAB strains and herbal plants against infection. Scutellariae radix (SR) and Gardeniae fructus (GF) showed abilities to reduce bacteria shedding...

  11. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate-chelated calcium and iron feed additives maintains egg production and prevents Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Kim, HeeKyong; Heo, Su Jeong; Cho, Hyang Hyun; Koh, Hong Bum

    2017-09-30

    We evaluated the effects of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP)-chelated calcium and iron (CaFe-GMP) on health and egg quality in layers experimentally infected with Salmonella Gallinarum. In this study, a CaFe-GMP feed additive was added to a commercial layer feed and fed to layers over a four-week period. All were inoculated with Salmonella Gallinarum. Body weight, mortality, clinical symptoms, and poultry production including feed intake, egg production, egg loss, and feed conversion rate were observed, and Salmonella Gallinarum was re-isolated from the liver, spleen, and cecum of the layers. All tested internal organs for the CaFe-GMP additive group exhibited significantly lower re-isolation numbers of Salmonella Gallinarum and less severe pathological changes than those in the control group, indicating that the CaFe-GMP feed supplement induced bacterial clearance and increased resistance to Salmonella Gallinarum. Additionally, due to the inhibitory action of CaFe-GMP on the growth of Salmonella Gallinarum, the CaFe-GMP additive group exhibited better egg production, including a higher laying rate and fewer broken eggs. The results suggest that a 0.16% CaFe-GMP additive may help prevent salmonellosis in the poultry industry.

  12. Guanosine 5′-monophosphate-chelated calcium and iron feed additives maintains egg production and prevents Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Kim, HeeKyong; Heo, Su Jeong; Cho, Hyang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of guanosine 5′-monophosphate (GMP)-chelated calcium and iron (CaFe-GMP) on health and egg quality in layers experimentally infected with Salmonella Gallinarum. In this study, a CaFe-GMP feed additive was added to a commercial layer feed and fed to layers over a four-week period. All were inoculated with Salmonella Gallinarum. Body weight, mortality, clinical symptoms, and poultry production including feed intake, egg production, egg loss, and feed conversion rate were observed, and Salmonella Gallinarum was re-isolated from the liver, spleen, and cecum of the layers. All tested internal organs for the CaFe-GMP additive group exhibited significantly lower re-isolation numbers of Salmonella Gallinarum and less severe pathological changes than those in the control group, indicating that the CaFe-GMP feed supplement induced bacterial clearance and increased resistance to Salmonella Gallinarum. Additionally, due to the inhibitory action of CaFe-GMP on the growth of Salmonella Gallinarum, the CaFe-GMP additive group exhibited better egg production, including a higher laying rate and fewer broken eggs. The results suggest that a 0.16% CaFe-GMP additive may help prevent salmonellosis in the poultry industry. PMID:28057911

  13. Reiter's syndrome after salmonella infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čanović Predrag S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Two patients with Reiter's syndrome, after Salmonella infection were treated on the Infections disease ward at Clinical hospital center in Kragujevac. In the first patient, ten days after the onset of Salmonella infection, signs of edema and pain in the right ankle occurred, accompanied by expressed conjunctivitis. Within next two months consecutive metatarsophalanges changes joint of the right foot have appeared. In the second patient, two weeks after the onset of Salmonella infection, edema of the left hand joints and a week later edema of the right hand and right ankle joints appeared. In both patients inflammatory syndrome was expressed (high erythrocyte sedimentation rates, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein along with negative rheumatoid factors and positive antigen HLA-B27. Outcome of the disease in both cases was favorable upon receiving nonsteroid antirheumatic therapy. Signs of arthritis disappeared after three months. No signs of recurrent arthritis have been seen during the next four years in the first and next two years in the second patient.

  14. 75 FR 48973 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella... availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During... ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation'' (the...

  15. O-Serotype Conversion in Salmonella Typhimurium Induces Protective Immune Responses against Invasive Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Pei; Liu, Qing; Luo, Hongyan; Liang, Kang; Yi, Jie; Luo, Ying; Hu, Yunlong; Han, Yue; Kong, Qingke

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella infections remain a big problem worldwide, causing enteric fever by Salmonella Typhi (or Paratyphi) or self-limiting gastroenteritis by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in healthy individuals. NTS may become invasive and cause septicemia in elderly or immuno-compromised individuals, leading to high mortality and morbidity. No vaccines are currently available for preventing NTS infection in human. As these invasive NTS are restricted to several O-antigen serogroups including B1, D1, C...

  16. Salmonella Typhimurium infection in the porcine intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The normal intestinal epithelium is renewed with a turnover rate of 3-5 days. During Salmonella infection increased cell loss is observed, possibly as a result of programmed cell death (PCD). We have, therefore, studied the effects of Salmonella Typhimurium infection on three elements involved...... in scattered epithelial cells and the number of positive cells increased with increasing times of exposure to Salmonella (P

  17. Seroprevalence of Salmonella Gallinarum Infection in Chicken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    ABSTRACT. Ethiopia owns a large poultry population whose growth is highly constrained by diseases. Fowl typhoid is a serious concern in growing and adult poultry and results from infection by. Salmonella Gallinarum (Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar. Gallinarum). Knowledge of the ...

  18. Conservation of Salmonella infection mechanisms in plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Adam; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Bueso, Eduardo; Garcia, Ana V; Nilau, Theodora; Charrier, Amélie; Pelletier, Sandra; Menanteau, Pierrette; Baccarini, Manuela; Velge, Philippe; Hirt, Heribert

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella virulence in animals depends on effectors injected by Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs). In this report we demonstrate that Salmonella mutants that are unable to deliver effectors are also compromised in infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Transcriptome analysis revealed that in contrast to wild type bacteria, T3SS mutants of Salmonella are compromised in suppressing highly conserved Arabidopsis genes that play a prominent role during Salmonella infection of animals. We also found that Salmonella originating from infected plants are equally virulent for human cells and mice. These results indicate a high degree of conservation in the defense and infection mechanism of animal and plant hosts during Salmonella infection.

  19. 76 FR 81513 - Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis... availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During... with certain provisions contained in FDA's final rule ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell...

  20. Guanosine 5′-monophosphate-chelated calcium and iron feed additives maintains egg production and prevents Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected layers

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Kim, Heekyong; Heo, Su Jeong; Cho, Hyang Hyun; Koh, Hong Bum

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of guanosine 5′-monophosphate (GMP)-chelated calcium and iron (CaFe-GMP) on health and egg quality in layers experimentally infected with Salmonella Gallinarum. In this study, a CaFe-GMP feed additive was added to a commercial layer feed and fed to layers over a four-week period. All were inoculated with Salmonella Gallinarum. Body weight, mortality, clinical symptoms, and poultry production including feed intake, egg production, egg loss, and feed conversion rate wer...

  1. Outbreak of Salmonella napoli infection caused by contaminated chocolate bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, O N; Sockett, P N; Bartlett, C L; Vaile, M S; Rowe, B; Gilbert, R J; Dulake, C; Murrell, H C; Salmaso, S

    1983-03-12

    An outbreak of Salmonella napoli infection in England and Wales in 1982 was detected by the surveillance of routine reports of salmonella infections from hospital and public-health laboratories. Epidemiological investigation quickly identified two types of small chocolate-covered bars, imported from Italy, as the vehicles of infection, and subsequently both were found to be contaminated with the organism. The prompt recognition of this outbreak and rapid identification of the vehicle of infection enabled four-fifths of the consignment of contaminated chocolate to be withdrawn from the market. The 245 reported cases resulted from the sale of 600 000 bars; as these were presumably only a small fraction of the total number of cases, it is likely that many thousands of infections were prevented.

  2. Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... year homemade ice cream causes several outbreaks of Salmonella infection with up to several hundred victims at ...

  3. Salmonella Infection and Water Frogs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-01-12

    This podcast, featuring lead investigator Shauna Mettee, discusses the first known outbreak of Salmonella in people due to contact with water frogs.  Created: 1/12/2010 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 1/12/2010.

  4. Invasive Infections with Nontyphoidal Salmonella in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Barbara E; Fields, Patricia I

    2016-06-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections in Africa cause an enormous burden of illness. These infections are often devastating, with mortality estimated at 20%, even with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Two major groups-young children and HIV-infected adults-suffer the great majority of these infections. In children, younger age itself, as well as malaria, malnutrition, and HIV infection, are prominent risk factors. In adults, HIV infection is by far the most important risk factor. The most common serotypes in invasive infections are Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium and Enteritidis. In recent years, a specific strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, multilocus sequence type 313, has caused epidemics of invasive disease. Little is known about risk factors for exposure to NTS, making the design of rational interventions to decrease exposure difficult. Antimicrobial therapy is critically important for treatment of invasive NTS infections. Thus, the emergence and spread of resistance to agents commonly used for treatment of invasive NTS infection, now including third-generation cephalosporins, is an ominous development. Already, many invasive NTS infections are essentially untreatable in many health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Several candidate vaccines are in early development and, if safe and effective, could be promising. Interventions to prevent exposure to NTS (e.g., improved sanitation), to prevent the occurrence of disease if exposure does occur (e.g., vaccination, malaria control), and to prevent severe disease and death in those who become ill (e.g., preserving antimicrobial effectiveness) are all important in reducing the toll of invasive NTS disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

  5. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1989-01-01

    The course of experimentally induced Salmonella typhimurium infection was studied in three groups of inbred LEW rats: homozygous +/+, athymic rnu/rnu and isogeneic thymus-grafted rnu/rnu rats. In the first experiment the animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(8) bacteria and all animals...

  6. Effect of Salmonella thyphymurium Infection on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Danfodiyo University Sokoto. They were fed on wheat bran, bean offal, cowpea hay, while water was provided ad libitum. Before the commencement of the experiment, .... Agerso H., Friis C., and Nielsen J.P. (2000). Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of amoxicillin in healthy and salmonella typhimurium infected pigs.

  7. Resistance of broiler outbred lines to infection with Salmonella enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, N.M.; Janss, L.L.G.; Putirulan, F.F.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Salmonella infections originating from poultry are one of the major causes of food-borne disease. For the control of salmonella in poultry a multifactorial approach is more likely to be effective, and the genetic resistance of poultry breeds to salmonella infections may be a valuable contribution.

  8. The Epidemiology of Childhood Salmonella Infections in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulder, Kate E; Simmonds, Kimberley; Robinson, Joan L

    2017-06-01

    The objectives were to describe the incidence, demographics, laboratory findings, and suspected sources of childhood Salmonella infections in Alberta, Canada, with a focus on preventable cases. Data from Notifiable Disease Reports for children with nontyphoidal salmonellosis (NTS) or typhoid/paratyphoid fever from 2007 through 2015 were analyzed. NTS was detected from 2285 children. Bacteremia was documented in 55 cases (2.4%), whereas a single infant had NTS meningitis. The suspected source was food (N = 577; 25.3%) followed by animal or animal manure contact (N = 426; 18.6%), of which a reptile was the suspected source in 264 cases (11.5%). There were 44 outbreaks with none sharing the same food source. Ninety-five children were diagnosed with typhoid/paratyphoid fever, of which 48 cases (51%) were typhoid cases in unimmunized children 2 years or older. There are still ∼275 pediatric cases of Salmonella infection in Alberta annually, the bulk of which are preventable. Public education about reptile exposure, food safety, and pretravel immunizations could potentially prevent many cases of Salmonella infection.

  9. A safe vaccine (DV-STM-07) against Salmonella infection prevents abortion and confers protective immunity to the pregnant and new born mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Vidya Devi; Nagarajan, Arvindhan G; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2010-02-10

    Pregnancy is a transient immuno-compromised condition which has evolved to avoid the immune rejection of the fetus by the maternal immune system. The altered immune response of the pregnant female leads to increased susceptibility to invading pathogens, resulting in abortion and congenital defects of the fetus and a subnormal response to vaccination. Active vaccination during pregnancy may lead to abortion induced by heightened cell mediated immune response. In this study, we have administered the highly attenuated vaccine strain DeltapmrG-HM-D (DV-STM-07) in female mice before the onset of pregnancy and followed the immune reaction against challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium in pregnant mice. Here we demonstrate that DV-STM-07 vaccine gives protection against Salmonella in pregnant mice and also prevents Salmonella induced abortion. This protection is conferred by directing the immune response towards Th2 activation and Th1 suppression. The low Th1 response prevents abortion. The use of live attenuated vaccine just before pregnancy carries the risk of transmission to the fetus. We have shown that this vaccine is safe as the vaccine strain is quickly eliminated from the mother and is not transmitted to the fetus. This vaccine also confers immunity to the new born mice of vaccinated mothers. Since there is no evidence of the vaccine candidate reaching the new born mice, we hypothesize that it may be due to trans-colostral transfer of protective anti-Salmonella antibodies. These results suggest that our vaccine DV-STM-07 can be very useful in preventing abortion in the pregnant individuals and confer immunity to the new born. Since there are no such vaccine candidates which can be given to the new born and to the pregnant women, this vaccine holds a very bright future to combat Salmonella induced pregnancy loss.

  10. A safe vaccine (DV-STM-07 against Salmonella infection prevents abortion and confers protective immunity to the pregnant and new born mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Devi Negi

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a transient immuno-compromised condition which has evolved to avoid the immune rejection of the fetus by the maternal immune system. The altered immune response of the pregnant female leads to increased susceptibility to invading pathogens, resulting in abortion and congenital defects of the fetus and a subnormal response to vaccination. Active vaccination during pregnancy may lead to abortion induced by heightened cell mediated immune response. In this study, we have administered the highly attenuated vaccine strain DeltapmrG-HM-D (DV-STM-07 in female mice before the onset of pregnancy and followed the immune reaction against challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium in pregnant mice. Here we demonstrate that DV-STM-07 vaccine gives protection against Salmonella in pregnant mice and also prevents Salmonella induced abortion. This protection is conferred by directing the immune response towards Th2 activation and Th1 suppression. The low Th1 response prevents abortion. The use of live attenuated vaccine just before pregnancy carries the risk of transmission to the fetus. We have shown that this vaccine is safe as the vaccine strain is quickly eliminated from the mother and is not transmitted to the fetus. This vaccine also confers immunity to the new born mice of vaccinated mothers. Since there is no evidence of the vaccine candidate reaching the new born mice, we hypothesize that it may be due to trans-colostral transfer of protective anti-Salmonella antibodies. These results suggest that our vaccine DV-STM-07 can be very useful in preventing abortion in the pregnant individuals and confer immunity to the new born. Since there are no such vaccine candidates which can be given to the new born and to the pregnant women, this vaccine holds a very bright future to combat Salmonella induced pregnancy loss.

  11. Prevention of Salmonella infection by contact using intestinal flora of adult birds and/or a mixture of organic acids Controle da transmissão de Salmonella por contato entre aves de exploração comercial pelo uso de flora intestinal de aves adultas e/ou uma mistura de ácidos orgânicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Helaine de Oliveira

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to assess the ability of competitive exclusion and a mixture of organic acids to prevent Salmonella infection by contact between newly hatched chicks. A bird infected with Salmonella was placed in a box containing non-infected birds, previously treated with a broth culture of faeces of adult birds (CE and/or a mixture of organic acids. The number of Salmonella organisms in the caeca of the contact birds was estimated at 4 and 8 days post-challenge. The birds were infected with Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis (both repeated 5 times, Salmonella Agona and Salmonella Infantis (3 repetitions. The same approach was used to test the mixture of organic acids alone. In this case the birds received feed containing 0.8% of a mixture of formic acid (70% and propionic acid (30%. Also, a third trial was carried out with birds inoculated with the broth culture of faeces and fed with feed containing the mixture of organic acids. Appropriate controls were included. Whereas the birds from the control groups and the groups treated with the mixture of organic acids were heavily infected with Salmonella, those pre-treated with CE or CE plus the mixture of organic acids had no viable cells per gram of caecal contents.O presente trabalho avaliou a prevenção da disseminação de quatro sorotipos de Salmonella, de interesse em avicultura e saúde pública (Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Infantis e Salmonella Enteritidis, entre aves recém-nascidas, com o intuito de diminuir a disseminação de salmonelas em rebanhos avícolas por aves que contraíram a infecção pela via vertical. Analisou-se experimentalmente a administração de microbiota intestinal de aves adultas em aves recém-nascidas, a incorporação de uma mistura de ácidos orgânicos na ração e a associação desses dois tratamentos, em grupos onde colocou-se uma ave infectada, para provocar a transmissão por contato. A microbiota

  12. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. 118.4 Section 118.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures set...

  13. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse...

  14. Conservation of Salmonella infection mechanisms in plants and animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Schikora

    Full Text Available Salmonella virulence in animals depends on effectors injected by Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs. In this report we demonstrate that Salmonella mutants that are unable to deliver effectors are also compromised in infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Transcriptome analysis revealed that in contrast to wild type bacteria, T3SS mutants of Salmonella are compromised in suppressing highly conserved Arabidopsis genes that play a prominent role during Salmonella infection of animals. We also found that Salmonella originating from infected plants are equally virulent for human cells and mice. These results indicate a high degree of conservation in the defense and infection mechanism of animal and plant hosts during Salmonella infection.

  15. Nontyphoid Salmonella Infection: Microbiology, Clinical Features, and Antimicrobial Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Ming Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nontyphoid Salmonella is the most common bacterial pathogen causing gastrointestinal infection worldwide. Most nontyphoid Salmonella infection is limited to uncomplicated gastroenteritis that seldom requires antimicrobial treatment. Nevertheless, invasive infections, such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis, and meningitis, may occur and require antimicrobial therapy. Continuous genetic and genomic evolution in Salmonella leading to increased virulence and resistance to multiple drugs are of significant public health concern. Two major changes in the epidemiology of nontyphoid salmonellosis in Europe and in the USA occurred in the second half of the 20th century: the emergence of foodborne human infections caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteriditis and by multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium. In the 21st century, a worsening situation is the increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in nontyphoid Salmonella. Clinical isolates showing carbapenem resistance also have been identified. Although antimicrobial therapy is usually not indicated for uncomplicated Salmonella gastroenteritis, recent studies indicated that a short-course ceftriaxone therapy (3–5 days for patients with severe gastroenteritis would lead to a faster clinical recovery. Continuous surveillance of Salmonella in both humans and animals is mandatory. A better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella may help in the devising of better interventional strategies to reduce the spread of resistant Salmonella between humans and reservoirs along the food chain.

  16. 76 FR 41157 - Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding the Final Rule, Prevention of Salmonella...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Answers Regarding the Final Rule, Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production... Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation'' (the draft guidance... rule entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and...

  17. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  18. Vaccination against Salmonella Infection: the Mucosal Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, Rémi; Bioley, Gilles; Rochereau, Nicolas; Paul, Stéphane; Corthésy, Blaise

    2017-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica includes several serovars infecting both humans and other animals and leading to typhoid fever or gastroenteritis. The high prevalence of associated morbidity and mortality, together with an increased emergence of multidrug-resistant strains, is a current global health issue that has prompted the development of vaccination strategies that confer protection against most serovars. Currently available systemic vaccine approaches have major limitations, including a reduced effectiveness in young children and a lack of cross-protection among different strains. Having studied host-pathogen interactions, microbiologists and immunologists argue in favor of topical gastrointestinal administration for improvement in vaccine efficacy. Here, recent advances in this field are summarized, including mechanisms of bacterial uptake at the intestinal epithelium, the assessment of protective host immunity, and improved animal models that closely mimic infection in humans. The pros and cons of existing vaccines are presented, along with recent progress made with novel formulations. Finally, new candidate antigens and their relevance in the refined design of anti-Salmonella vaccines are discussed, along with antigen vectorization strategies such as nanoparticles or secretory immunoglobulins, with a focus on potentiating mucosal vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil eChousalkar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonise reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonise the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% Typhimurium, 14.1% Mbandaka compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66% however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of

  20. Meta-analysis of Chicken – Salmonella infection experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    te Pas Marinus FW

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chicken meat and eggs can be a source of human zoonotic pathogens, especially Salmonella species. These food items contain a potential hazard for humans. Chickens lines differ in susceptibility for Salmonella and can harbor Salmonella pathogens without showing clinical signs of illness. Many investigations including genomic studies have examined the mechanisms how chickens react to infection. Apart from the innate immune response, many physiological mechanisms and pathways are reported to be involved in the chicken host response to Salmonella infection. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of diverse experiments to identify general and host specific mechanisms to the Salmonella challenge. Results Diverse chicken lines differing in susceptibility to Salmonella infection were challenged with different Salmonella serovars at several time points. Various tissues were sampled at different time points post-infection, and resulting host transcriptional differences investigated using different microarray platforms. The meta-analysis was performed with the R-package metaMA to create lists of differentially regulated genes. These gene lists showed many similarities for different chicken breeds and tissues, and also for different Salmonella serovars measured at different times post infection. Functional biological analysis of these differentially expressed gene lists revealed several common mechanisms for the chicken host response to Salmonella infection. The meta-analysis-specific genes (i.e. genes found differentially expressed only in the meta-analysis confirmed and expanded the biological functional mechanisms. Conclusions The meta-analysis combination of heterogeneous expression profiling data provided useful insights into the common metabolic pathways and functions of different chicken lines infected with different Salmonella serovars.

  1. Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens: Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a food borne pathogen of humans causing food-poisoning and sometimes deaths. In order to control egg-borne transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to humans, prompt and accurate detection of infected poultry flocks is essential. This paper examined the effects of challenge dose ...

  2. Salmonella, a cross-kingdom pathogen infecting humans and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schikora, Adam

    2013-06-01

    Infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella strains are constant and are a non-negligible threat to the human population. In the last two decades, salmonellosis outbreaks have increasingly been associated with infected fruits and vegetables. For a long time, Salmonellae were assumed to survive on plants after a more or less accidental infection. However, this notion has recently been challenged. Studies on the infection mechanism in vegetal hosts, as well as on plant immune systems, revealed an active infection process resembling in certain features the infection in animals. On one hand, Salmonella requires the type III secretion systems to effectively infect plants and to suppress their resistance mechanisms. On the other hand, plants recognize these bacteria and react to the infection with an induced defense mechanism similar to the reaction to other plant pathogens. In this review, we present the newest reports on the interaction between Salmonellae and plants. We discuss the possible ways used by these bacteria to infect plants as well as the plant responses to the infection. The recent findings indicate that plants play a central role in the dissemination of Salmonella within the ecosystem. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Innate secretory antibodies protect against natural Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijburg, Odilia L C; Uren, Tania K; Simpfendorfer, Kim; Johansen, Finn-Eirik; Brandtzaeg, Per; Strugnell, Richard A

    2006-01-23

    The production of IgA is induced in an antigen-unspecific manner by commensal flora. These secretory antibodies (SAbs) may bind multiple antigens and are thought to eliminate commensal bacteria and self-antigens to avoid systemic recognition. In this study, we addressed the role of "innate" SAbs, i.e., those that are continuously produced in normal individuals, in protection against infection of the gastrointestinal tract. We used polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR-/-) knock-out mice, which are unable to bind and actively transport dimeric IgA and pentameric IgM to the mucosae, and examined the role of innate SAbs in protection against the invasive pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. In vitro experiments suggested that innate IgA in pIgR-/- serum bound S. typhimurium in a cross-reactive manner which inhibited epithelial cell invasion. Using a "natural" infection model, we demonstrated that pIgR-/- mice are profoundly sensitive to infection with S. typhimurium via the fecal-oral route and, moreover, shed more bacteria that readily infected other animals. These results imply an important evolutionary role for innate SAbs in protecting both the individual and the herd against infections, and suggest that the major role of SAbs may be to prevent the spread of microbial pathogens throughout the population, rather than protection of local mucosal surfaces.

  4. Case Report: Salmonella lung infection | Ohanu | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of an 84 year old man admitted because of fever, abdominal discomfort, weakness, past history of cough wheezing and abuse of prednisolone and Erythromycin. He had Bronchopneumonia and diabetes. Salmonella typhimurium was isolated from both his sputum and blood while stool was negative for salmonella.

  5. Prevent Infections in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnant Avoiding Pregnancy Zika and Pregnancy Articles 10 Tips for Preventing Infections Before and During Pregnancy Language: ... file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer ...

  6. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  7. Division of the Salmonella-Containing Vacuole and Depletion of Acidic Lysosomes in Salmonella-Infected Host Cells Are Novel Strategies of Salmonella enterica To Avoid Lysosomes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M.; Negi, Vidya Devi; Chakraborty, Sangeeta; Chandrasekhar Sagar, B. K.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella has evolved several strategies to counteract intracellular microbicidal agents like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. However, it is not yet clear how Salmonella escapes lysosomal degradation. Some studies have demonstrated that Salmonella can inhibit phagolysosomal fusion, whereas other reports have shown that the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) fuses/interacts with lysosomes. Here, we have addressed this issue from a different perspective by investigating if the infected ...

  8. O-Serotype Conversion in Salmonella Typhimurium Induces Protective Immune Responses against Invasive Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Liu, Qing; Luo, Hongyan; Liang, Kang; Yi, Jie; Luo, Ying; Hu, Yunlong; Han, Yue; Kong, Qingke

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella infections remain a big problem worldwide, causing enteric fever by Salmonella Typhi (or Paratyphi) or self-limiting gastroenteritis by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in healthy individuals. NTS may become invasive and cause septicemia in elderly or immuno-compromised individuals, leading to high mortality and morbidity. No vaccines are currently available for preventing NTS infection in human. As these invasive NTS are restricted to several O-antigen serogroups including B1, D1, C1, and C2, O-antigen polysaccharide is believed to be a good target for vaccine development. In this study, a strategy of O-serotype conversion was investigated to develop live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against the major serovars of NTS infections. The immunodominant O4 serotype of S. Typhimurium was converted into O9, O7, and O8 serotypes through unmarked chromosomal deletion-insertion mutations. O-serotype conversion was confirmed by LPS silver staining and western blotting. All O-serotype conversion mutations were successfully introduced into the live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccine S738 (Δcrp Δcya) to evaluate their immunogenicity in mice model. The vaccine candidates induced high amounts of heterologous O-polysaccharide-specific functional IgG responses. Vaccinated mice survived a challenge of 100 times the 50% lethality dose (LD50) of wild-type S. Typhimurium. Protective efficacy against heterologous virulent Salmonella challenges was highly O-serotype related. Furthermore, broad-spectrum protection against S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, and S. Choleraesuis was observed by co-vaccination of O9 and O7 O-serotype-converted vaccine candidates. This study highlights the strategy of expressing heterologous O-polysaccharides via genetic engineering in developing live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against NTS infections.

  9. O-Serotype Conversion in Salmonella Typhimurium Induces Protective Immune Responses against Invasive Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella infections remain a big problem worldwide, causing enteric fever by Salmonella Typhi (or Paratyphi or self-limiting gastroenteritis by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS in healthy individuals. NTS may become invasive and cause septicemia in elderly or immuno-compromised individuals, leading to high mortality and morbidity. No vaccines are currently available for preventing NTS infection in human. As these invasive NTS are restricted to several O-antigen serogroups including B1, D1, C1, and C2, O-antigen polysaccharide is believed to be a good target for vaccine development. In this study, a strategy of O-serotype conversion was investigated to develop live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against the major serovars of NTS infections. The immunodominant O4 serotype of S. Typhimurium was converted into O9, O7, and O8 serotypes through unmarked chromosomal deletion–insertion mutations. O-serotype conversion was confirmed by LPS silver staining and western blotting. All O-serotype conversion mutations were successfully introduced into the live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccine S738 (Δcrp Δcya to evaluate their immunogenicity in mice model. The vaccine candidates induced high amounts of heterologous O-polysaccharide-specific functional IgG responses. Vaccinated mice survived a challenge of 100 times the 50% lethality dose (LD50 of wild-type S. Typhimurium. Protective efficacy against heterologous virulent Salmonella challenges was highly O-serotype related. Furthermore, broad-spectrum protection against S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, and S. Choleraesuis was observed by co-vaccination of O9 and O7 O-serotype-converted vaccine candidates. This study highlights the strategy of expressing heterologous O-polysaccharides via genetic engineering in developing live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against NTS infections.

  10. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Braukmann

    Full Text Available Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2 for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S. Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, interleukin (IL-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages.

  11. 75 FR 18849 - Small Entity Compliance Guide: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Small Entity Compliance Guide: Prevention of Salmonella... availability of a guidance entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production... producers to implement measures to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) from contaminating eggs on the farm...

  12. Concomitant Rotavirus and Salmonella Infections in Children with Acute Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tzong Lan

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: Concomitant rotavirus and Salmonella infections accounted for 3.7% of cases in this study. Patients in group C (30.0% had a significantly higher incidence of hypokalemia than group R (7.3% or S (8.8%. Group C consisted of 33 cases of the 895 reviewed cases (3.7%. In a child with rotavirus gastroenteritis, concomitant infection with Salmonella should be considered if the child has sustained a high fever (≥ 39°C for over 4 days and a green stool with mucus and blood.

  13. Evaluation of mice infected to Salmonella Spp in Poultry farms of Tehran Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hadadian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this survey, 290 mice and rats fecal samples from commercial layer and broiler poultry houses were tested for Salmonella sp. presence. All samples were cultured on Selenite F broth media and passaged on SS agar and McConkey agar. The suspected colonies were cultured on Urea and TSI agars to be confirmed as Salmonella sp.. Finally, Salmonella isolates were identified genetically and biochemically by PCR and conventional methods, respectively. Serogrouping and Antibiotic resistance profiling were done for further differentiation of isolates. Twenty eight (9.65% Salmonellas were isolated from (out of 290 samples. Eight (28.6%, seven (25%, four (14.3%, and two (7.2% isolates were located in serogroups C, D, B and E, respectively. Seven isolates (25% belonged to Arizona subspecies and just one non-motile serogroup D Salmonella was isolated. All isolates were sensitive to enrofloxacin, difloxacin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol and florfenicol, but they were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and neomycin in decreasing order. In addition to former surveys, this study confirmed the role of mice and rats in spreading of Salmonella spp. in poultry farms. In conclusion it is essential to take appropriate measurements (measures for pest management in poultry houses to approach the prevention of some bacterial infection like  (such as salmonellosis.

  14. Multiple host kinases contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Roppenser

    Full Text Available SopB is a type 3 secreted effector with phosphatase activity that Salmonella employs to manipulate host cellular processes, allowing the bacteria to establish their intracellular niche. One important function of SopB is activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt/protein kinase B in the infected host cell. Here, we examine the mechanism of Akt activation by SopB during Salmonella infection. We show that SopB-mediated Akt activation is only partially sensitive to PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin in HeLa cells, suggesting that Class I PI3-kinases play only a minor role in this process. However, depletion of PI(3,4 P2/PI(3-5 P3 by expression of the phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase PTEN inhibits Akt activation during Salmonella invasion. Therefore, production of PI(3,4 P2/PI(3-5 P3 appears to be a necessary event for Akt activation by SopB and suggests that non-canonical kinases mediate production of these phosphoinositides during Salmonella infection. We report that Class II PI3-kinase beta isoform, IPMK and other kinases identified from a kinase screen all contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection. In addition, the kinases required for SopB-mediated activation of Akt vary depending on the type of infected host cell. Together, our data suggest that Salmonella has evolved to use a single effector, SopB, to manipulate a remarkably large repertoire of host kinases to activate Akt for the purpose of optimizing bacterial replication in its host.

  15. Cytotoxic mechanism of cytolethal distending toxin in nontyphoidal Salmonella serovar (Salmonella Javiana) during macrophage infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Katherine; Gokulan, Kuppan; Shelman, Diamond; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khan, Ashraf; Khare, Sangeeta

    2015-02-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin B (cdtB) is a conserved virulence factor in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Here we report the presence and functionality of cdtB in some nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars, including Salmonella Javiana (cdtB+wt S. Javiana), isolated from imported food. To understand the role of cdtB in NTS serovars, a deletion mutant (cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana) was constructed. Macrophages were infected with cdtB+wt S. Javiana (wild type), cdtB(-)Δ S. Javiana (mutant), and cdtB-negative NTS serovar (S. Typhimurium). Cytotoxic activity and transcription level of genes involved in cell death (apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis) were assessed in infected macrophages. The cdtB+wt S. Javiana caused cellular distension as well as high degree of vacuolization and presence of the autophagosome marker LC3 in infected macrophages as compared with cdtB(-)ΔS. Javiana. The mRNA expression of genes involved in the induction of autophagy in response to toxin (Esr1 and Pik3C3) and coregulators of autophagy and apoptosis (Bax and Cyld) were significantly upregulated in cdtB(+)wt S. Javiana-infected macrophages. As autophagy destroys internalized pathogens in addition to the infected cell, it may reduce the spread of infection.

  16. 77 FR 50372 - Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding the Final Rule, Prevention of Salmonella...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... Answers Regarding the Final Rule, Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production... Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation.'' The guidance contains... prevent Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) from contaminating eggs on the farm and from further growth during...

  17. Emergence of new Salmonella Enteritidis phage types in Europe? Surveillance of infections in returning travellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Yvonne

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among human Salmonella Enteritidis infections, phage type 4 has been the dominant phage type in most countries in Western Europe during the last years. This is reflected in Salmonella infections among Swedish travellers returning from abroad. However, there are differences in phage type distribution between the countries, and this has also changed over time. Methods We used data from the Swedish infectious disease register and the national reference laboratory to describe phage type distribution of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in Swedish travellers from 1997 to 2002, and have compared this with national studies conducted in the countries visited. Results Infections among Swedish travellers correlate well with national studies conducted in the countries visited. In 2001 a change in phage type distribution in S. Enteritidis infections among Swedish travellers returning from some countries in southern Europe was observed, and a previously rare phage type (PT 14b became one of the most commonly diagnosed that year, continuing into 2002 and 2003. Conclusions Surveillance of infections among returning travellers can be helpful in detecting emerging infections and outbreaks in tourist destinations. The information needs to be communicated rapidly to all affected countries in order to expedite the implementation of appropriate investigations and preventive measures.

  18. Effect of garlic ( Allium sativum ) on Salmonella typhi infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of consumption of garlic (Allium sativum) in treating Salmonella typhi infection and on the gastrointestinal flora and hematological parameters of rats was investigated. Crude garlic extract inhibited the growth of S. typhi on agar plate with a zone of inhibition averaging 23.8 mm in diameter using the agar diffusion ...

  19. Salmonella Infections Caused by Reptiles and Amphibians in Childcare Centers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-07

    Dr. Neil Vora, an EIS Officer at CDC, discusses his article about Salmonella infections in childcare centers caused by reptiles and amphibians.  Created: 2/7/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/7/2013.

  20. A retrospective study on salmonella infection in Danish broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angen, Øystein; Skov, M. N.; Chriél, Mariann

    1996-01-01

    -year period from 1992 to 1993 in Denmark. The AM database contains information collected by the ante-mortem veterinarians, from the slaughterhouses, and from the salmonella examinations carried out at the National Veterinary Laboratory. The epidemiological unit was the individual broiler flock......A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with Salmonella enterica infection in Danish broiler production. The study was based on information in the antemortem database (AM database) where data were available for all broiler Becks slaughtered over the 2...

  1. Functional and phenotypic profiling of innate immunity during Salmonella infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Brandt; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    Salmonellae are food borne pathogens, typically acquired by the oral ingestion of contaminated food or water, causing disease in both healthy and immunocompromised individuals. To gain insight into early immune regulation events caused by Salmonella as well as inflammatory signatures induced...... subsets, two of which following infection, accumulated in Peyer’s patches and lamina propria, respectively. Generally, we tend to set apart pathogenic bacteria from opportunistic pathogens and commensal bacteria based on their abilities to induce disease in different hosts, however, the nature...... to treatment regimes, as targeted modulation of DC profiles for instance by probiotics, could lead to improved therapy for a number of gut related diseases....

  2. Seroincidence of non-typhoid Salmonella infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emborg, H-D; Simonsen, J; Jørgensen, C S

    2016-01-01

    that enabled a back-calculation of the annual seroincidence of Salmonella based on measurements of specific antibodies. The aim of the present study was to determine the seroincidence in two convenience samples from 2012 (Danish blood donors, n = 500, and pregnant women, n = 637) and a community-based sample...... of healthy individuals from 2006 to 2007 (n = 1780). The lowest antibody levels were measured in the samples from the community cohort and the highest in pregnant women. The annual Salmonella seroincidences were 319 infections/1000 pregnant women [90% credibility interval (CrI) 210-441], 182/1000 in blood...

  3. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancel Submit Search The CDC Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... this page: About CDC.gov . Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients Patients and Caregivers Prepare: Watch Out for Fever ...

  4. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vink Carolien

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion or cystine (glutathione maintenance. Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls, Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione.

  5. Public knowledge and Preventive Behavior During a Large-Scale Salmonella Outbreak: Results from an Online Survey in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velsen, Lex Stefan; Beaujean, Desirée; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; van Steenbergen, Jim; Timen, aura

    2014-01-01

    Background Food-borne Salmonella infections are a worldwide concern. During a large-scale outbreak, it is important that the public follows preventive advice. To increase compliance, insight in how the public gathers its knowledge and which factors determine whether or not an individual complies

  6. Salmonella infection upregulates the leaky protein claudin-2 in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-guo Zhang

    Full Text Available Tight junctions seal the space between adjacent epithelial cells. Mounting evidence suggests that tight junction proteins play a key role in the pathogenesis of human disease. Claudin is a member of the tight junction protein family, which has 24 members in humans. To regulate cellular function, claudins interact structurally and functionally with membrane and scaffolding proteins via their cytoplasmic domain. In particular, claudin-2 is known to be a leaky protein that contributes to inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. However, the involvement of claudin-2 in bacterial infection in the intestine remains unknown.We hypothesized that Salmonella elevates the leaky protein claudin-2 for its own benefit to facilitate bacterial invasion in the colon. Using a Salmonella-colitis mouse model and cultured colonic epithelial cells, we found that pathogenic Salmonella colonization significantly increases the levels of claudin-2 protein and mRNA in the intestine, but not that of claudin-3 or claudin-7 in the colon, in a time-dependent manner. Immunostaining studies showed that the claudin-2 expression along the crypt-villous axis postinfection. In vitro, Salmonella stimulated claudin-2 expression in the human intestinal epithelial cell lines SKCO15 and HT29C19A. Further analysis by siRNA knockdown revealed that claudin-2 is associated with the Salmonella-induced elevation of cell permeability. Epithelial cells with claudin-2 knockdown had significantly less internalized Salmonella than control cells with normal claudin-2 expression. Inhibitor assays demonstrated that this regulation is mediated through activation of the EGFR pathway and the downstream protein JNK.We have shown that Salmonella targets the tight junction protein claudin-2 to facilitate bacterial invasion. We speculate that this disruption of barrier function contributes to a new mechanism by which bacteria interact with their host cells and suggests the possibility of blocking

  7. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M

    2015-07-15

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines.

  8. Outbreak of Salmonella Thompson infections linked to imported rucola lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Karin; Lassen, Jørgen; Vold, Line; Andersson, Yvonne; Fisher, Ian; Löfdahl, Sven; Threlfall, John; Luzzi, Ida; Peters, Tansy; Hampton, Michael; Torpdahl, Mia; Kapperud, Georg; Aavitsland, Preben

    2008-04-01

    On November 15, 2004, a cluster of three cases of Salmonella Thompson infection was registered by the Norwegian reference laboratory. In the following days further cases occurred, prompting a case-control study among the first 13 cases and 26 matched controls. By December 31, 21 cases had been reported, with the first onset on October 24. Consumption of rucola lettuce (Eruca sativa, also known as rocket salad or arugula) (OR 8,8 [1,2-infinity]) and mixed salad (OR 5,0 [1,0-infinity]) was associated with illness. On November 26, Swedish authorities notified the finding of Salmonella Thompson in rucola lettuce through the EU Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed. Later, several countries reported finding this and other Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter in rucola produced in Italy. In response to our alert through the international Enter-net surveillance network, Sweden and England also reported an increase of cases. Salmonella Thompson isolates from products and patients from several countries showed high similarity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, but some isolates showed significant differences. We think that the outbreak in Norway reflected a larger international outbreak caused by rucola imported from one Italian producer. Findings of other pathogens indicate a massive contamination, possibly caused by irrigation with nonpotable water. Rapid international information exchange is invaluable when investigating outbreaks caused by internationally marketed products.

  9. On Fractional SIRC Model with Salmonella Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathalla A. Rihan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fractional order SIRC epidemic model to describe the dynamics of Salmonella bacterial infection in animal herds. The infection-free and endemic steady sates, of such model, are asymptotically stable under some conditions. The basic reproduction number ℛ0 is calculated, using next-generation matrix method, in terms of contact rate, recovery rate, and other parameters in the model. The numerical simulations of the fractional order SIRC model are performed by Caputo’s derivative and using unconditionally stable implicit scheme. The obtained results give insight to the modelers and infectious disease specialists.

  10. Human infections due to Salmonella Blockley, a rare serotype in South Africa: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonose Thandubuhle

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections due to nontyphoidal Salmonella have increased worldwide over the last couple of decades. Salmonella enterica serotype Blockley (Salmonella Blockley infections is associated with chickens and is a rarely isolated serotype in human infections in most countries. Case presentation We report a case of human infections due to Salmonella Blockley in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa in 2011. Three African males (aged 4, 14 and 16 presented to a clinic with diarrhoea, stomach cramps and headache. They started experiencing signs of illness a day after they consumed a common meal, consisting of meat, rice and potatoes. Stool specimens from the patients cultured Salmonella Blockley. The strains showed an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. Conclusion This is the first recorded case of human infections due to Salmonella Blockley in South Africa.

  11. Hemophagocytic macrophages harbor Salmonella enterica during persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca N Nix

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subspecies can establish persistent, systemic infections in mammals, including human typhoid fever. Persistent S. enterica disease is characterized by an initial acute infection that develops into an asymptomatic chronic infection. During both the acute and persistent stages, the bacteria generally reside within professional phagocytes, usually macrophages. It is unclear how salmonellae can survive within macrophages, cells that evolved, in part, to destroy pathogens. Evidence is presented that during the establishment of persistent murine infection, macrophages that contain S. enterica serotype Typhimurium are hemophagocytic. Hemophagocytic macrophages are characterized by the ingestion of non-apoptotic cells of the hematopoietic lineage and are a clinical marker of typhoid fever as well as certain other infectious and genetic diseases. Cell culture assays were developed to evaluate bacterial survival in hemophagocytic macrophages. S. Typhimurium preferentially replicated in macrophages that pre-phagocytosed viable cells, but the bacteria were killed in macrophages that pre-phagocytosed beads or dead cells. These data suggest that during persistent infection hemophagocytic macrophages may provide S. Typhimurium with a survival niche.

  12. Geographical distribution of salmonella infected pig, cattle and sheep herds in Sweden 1993-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skog Lars

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Swedish salmonella control programme covers the entire production chain, from feed to food. All salmonella serotypes are notifiable. On average, less than 20 cases of salmonella in food-producing animals are reported every year. In some situations, the cases would be expected to cluster geographically. The aim of this study was to illustrate the geographic distribution of the salmonella cases detected in pigs, cattle and sheep. Methods Data on all herds with pigs, cattle and sheep found to be infected with salmonella during the time period from 1993 to 2010 were obtained from the Swedish Board of Agriculture. Using the ArcGIS software, various maps were produced of infected herds, stratified on animal species as well as salmonella serotype. Based on ocular inspection of all maps, some were collapsed and some used separately. Data were also examined for temporal trends. Results No geographical clustering was observed for ovine or porcine cases. Cattle herds infected with Salmonella Dublin were mainly located in the southeast region and cattle herds infected with Salmonella Typhimurium in the most southern part of the country. Some seasonal variation was seen in cattle, but available data was not sufficient for further analyses. Conclusions Analyses of data on salmonella infected herds revealed some spatial and temporal patterns for salmonella in cattle. However, despite using 18 years' of data, the number of infected herds was too low for any useful statistical analyses.

  13. Geographical distribution of salmonella infected pig, cattle and sheep herds in Sweden 1993-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewerin, Susanna Sternberg; Skog, Lars; Frössling, Jenny; Wahlström, Helene

    2011-10-05

    The Swedish salmonella control programme covers the entire production chain, from feed to food. All salmonella serotypes are notifiable. On average, less than 20 cases of salmonella in food-producing animals are reported every year. In some situations, the cases would be expected to cluster geographically. The aim of this study was to illustrate the geographic distribution of the salmonella cases detected in pigs, cattle and sheep. Data on all herds with pigs, cattle and sheep found to be infected with salmonella during the time period from 1993 to 2010 were obtained from the Swedish Board of Agriculture. Using the ArcGIS software, various maps were produced of infected herds, stratified on animal species as well as salmonella serotype. Based on ocular inspection of all maps, some were collapsed and some used separately. Data were also examined for temporal trends. No geographical clustering was observed for ovine or porcine cases. Cattle herds infected with Salmonella Dublin were mainly located in the southeast region and cattle herds infected with Salmonella Typhimurium in the most southern part of the country. Some seasonal variation was seen in cattle, but available data was not sufficient for further analyses. Analyses of data on salmonella infected herds revealed some spatial and temporal patterns for salmonella in cattle. However, despite using 18 years' of data, the number of infected herds was too low for any useful statistical analyses.

  14. Genetic surveillance of endemic bovine Salmonella Infantis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelkonen Sinikka

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella serovar Infantis is endemic in Finnish food-producing animals since the 1970s. The purpose of this study was to describe the molecular epidemiology of the infection in cattle during 1985–2005, to follow the persistence of the feed-related outbreak strain from 1995 in the cattle population, and to analyse the stability of XbaI-banding patterns in individual herds during long-lasting infections. Methods Salmonella Infantis isolates from 478 cattle herds (n = 588, covering 73% of the subclinically or clinically infected herds, were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE using XbaI. DNA fragments larger than 125 kb were counted in PFGE types because of high plasmid background. Ribotyping and IS200-typing with BanI-digested DNA were done on 57 selected isolates. Results The isolates associated with the infection consisted of 51 PFGE types with genetic similarity (F value between 0.58 and 0.95. From 1985 to 2003, the major type appeared on 68% of the farms. The three most common types, with F values of 0.90 to 0.95, accounted for 80% of the isolates. Only 17% of the isolates had F values below 0.80, and 1% below 0.70. Ribotyping and IS200-typing classified 89% of the analysed isolates into the major ribotype and IS200 type combination, and the rest fell into closely related types. Analysis of successive isolates from 142 herds revealed changes in XbaI-banding patterns in 21% of the herds with two analysed isolates and in 38% of the herds from which three or more isolates were analysed. The feed-related S. Infantis genotype from the 1995 outbreak had disappeared by 1999, at the time when the incidence of bovine salmonella, and S. Infantis in particular, strongly decreased. Conclusion The study showed how genetic surveillance, as part of salmonella control, provides tools to follow the persistence of particular infections, and to assess the efficacy of control measures. Testing of several isolates from a herd in

  15. 21 CFR 118.9 - Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.9 Section 118.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... EGGS § 118.9 Administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. You must have one or...

  16. 21 CFR 118.10 - Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention plan. 118.10 Section 118.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... TRANSPORTATION OF SHELL EGGS § 118.10 Recordkeeping requirements for the Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention...

  17. International outbreak of Salmonella Eastbourne infection traced to contaminated chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, P C; Mackel, D C; Baine, W B; Barker, W H; Gangarosa, E J

    1975-04-05

    Between Dec. 4, 1973, and Feb. 15, 1974, 80 cases of infection due to Salmonella eastbourne, previously a rare isolated serotype in the United States, were reported from twenty-three States. An additional 39 cases were reported from seven Provinces in Canada during a similar period. A telephone case-control study implicated Christmas-wrapped chocolate balls manufactured by a Canadian company as the vehicle of transmission. S. eastbourne was subsequently isolated from several samples of leftover chocolate balls obtained from homes where cases occurred. Investigation of the factory revealed that the contaminated Christmas and Easter chocolates, and a few chocolate items for year-round sale, had been produced between May and October, 1973. Bacteriological testing of samples taken at the plant implicated cocoa beans as the probable source of the salmonella organisms which, in the low-moisture chocolate, were able to survive heating during production. This outbreak and the finding of salmonella of other serotypes in chocolates produced by another manufacturer suggest that chocolate-related salmonellosis may be a significant public-health problem.

  18. Latest opportunistic infection prevention guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, R

    1998-01-01

    Although people with HIV are living longer than ever before, they continue to suffer from infections that are associated with low T4-cell counts. The U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) have updated the guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections, including their positions on when prophylaxis is indicated. Summaries are given for preventing the following infections: cytomegalovirus (CMV), cryptosporidiosis, fungal infections, human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes-related infections, mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), streptococcal pneumonia, toxoplasmosis, and tuberculosis.

  19. Upsurge of infections caused by Salmonella Concord among Ethiopian adoptees in Denmark, 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Kjelsø, C; Torpdahl, M

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Concord has been associated with adoptees from Ethiopia. In 2009, Denmark saw an increase in MDR S. Concord infections among Ethiopian adoptees.......Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Concord has been associated with adoptees from Ethiopia. In 2009, Denmark saw an increase in MDR S. Concord infections among Ethiopian adoptees....

  20. Epidemic increase in Salmonella bloodstream infection in children, Bwamanda, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoba, M-F; De Boeck, H; Ifeka, B B; Dawili, J; Lunguya, O; Vanhoof, R; Muyembe, J-J; Van Geet, C; Bertrand, S; Jacobs, J

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of bloodstream infection in children in sub-Saharan Africa, but few data are available from Central-Africa. We documented during the period November 2011 to May 2012 an epidemic increase in invasive Salmonella bloodstream infections in HGR Bwamanda, a referral hospital in Equateur Province, DR Congo. Salmonella spp. represented 90.4 % (103 out of 114) of clinically significant blood culture isolates and comprised Salmonella Typhimurium (54.4 %, 56 out of 103), Salmonella Enteritidis (28.2 %, 29 out of 103) and Salmonella Typhi (17.5 %, 18 out of 103), with Salmonella Enteritidis accounting for most of the increase. Most (82 out of 103, 79.6 %) isolates were obtained from children Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis were 14 months (14 days to 64 years) and 19 months (3 months to 8 years) respectively. Clinical presentation was non-specific; the in-hospital case fatality rate was 11.1 %. More than two thirds (69.7 %, 53 out of 76) of children Salmonella isolates as well as 6/18 (33.3 %) Salmonella Typhi isolates were multidrug resistant (i.e. resistant to the first-line oral antibiotics amoxicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol), one (1.0 %) Salmonella Typhimurium had decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility owing to a point mutation in the gyrA gene (Gly81Cys). Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (MLVA) analysis of the Salmonella Enteritidis isolates revealed closely related patterns comprising three major and four minor profiles, with differences limited to one out of five loci. These data show an epidemic increase in clonally related multidrug-resistant Salmonella bloodstream infection in children in DR Congo.

  1. Selective Infection of Antigen-Specific B Lymphocytes by Salmonella Mediates Bacterial Survival and Systemic Spreading of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Jelle; Martinoli, Chiara; Zagato, Elena; Janssen, Hans; Jorritsma, Tineke; Bar-Ephraïm, Yotam E.; Rescigno, Maria; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2012-01-01

    Background The bacterial pathogen Salmonella causes worldwide disease. A major route of intestinal entry involves M cells, providing access to B cell-rich Peyer’s Patches. Primary human B cells phagocytose Salmonella typhimurium upon recognition by the specific surface Ig receptor (BCR). As it is unclear how Salmonella disseminates systemically, we studied whether Salmonella can use B cells as a transport device for spreading. Methodology/Principal Findings Human primary B cells or Ramos cell line were incubated with GFP-expressing Salmonella. Intracellular survival and escape was studied in vitro by live cell imaging, flow cytometry and flow imaging. HEL-specific B cells were transferred into C57BL/6 mice and HEL-expressing Salmonella spreading in vivo was analyzed investigating mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and blood. After phagocytosis by B cells, Salmonella survives intracellularly in a non-replicative state which is actively maintained by the B cell. Salmonella is later excreted followed by reproductive infection of other cell types. Salmonella-specific B cells thus act both as a survival niche and a reservoir for reinfection. Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific B cells before oral infection of mice showed that these B cells mediate in vivo systemic spreading of Salmonella to spleen and blood. Conclusions/Significance This is a first example of a pathogenic bacterium that abuses the antigen-specific cells of the adaptive immune system for systemic spreading for dissemination of infection. PMID:23209805

  2. Microencapsulated sorbic acid and nature-identical compounds reduced Salmonella Hadar and Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in experimentally infected chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, E; Tugnoli, B; Formigoni, A; Massi, P; Fantinati, P; Tosi, G; Piva, A

    2011-08-01

    The reduction of Salmonella prevalence in broilers is a priority in European Union agricultural policies because treatment with antibiotics is forbidden by Regulation (EC) 2160/2003. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a microencapsulated blend of sorbic acid and nature-identical compounds (i.e., chemically synthesized botanicals; SAB) on the reduction of the cecal prevalence and contents of Salmonella enterica serovars Hadar and Enteritidis in experimentally infected chickens. In the first trial, 125 one-day-old Lohmann specific-pathogen-free chickens were assigned to one of the following treatments: negative control (not challenged and not treated), positive control (challenged and not treated), SAB0.3, SAB1, or SAB5 (challenged and treated with the microencapsulated blend included in the feed at 0.03, 0.1, or 0.5%, respectively). At 30 d of age, birds were infected with 10(6) cfu of Salmonella Hadar, and after 5, 10, or 20 d postinfection, 5, 10, and 10 birds per treatment, respectively, were killed and the cecal contents and liver and spleen samples were analyzed for Salmonella Hadar. In the second trial, 100 one-day-old Ross 708 chickens were assigned to 1 of 5 treatments: control (not treated), SAB0.3, SAB1, SAB2, or SAB5 (treated with the blend included in the feed at 0.03, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.5%, respectively). At 7 d of age, the birds were challenged with 10(5) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis, and after 7, 14, or 24 d after challenge, 5, 5, and 10 birds per treatment, respectively, were killed and cecal contents were analyzed for Salmonella Enteritidis. Results showed that in the early stage of infection Salmonella prevalence was high in both studies, whereas at the end of the observation periods, the blends at 0.03, 0.1, and 0.5 in the challenge with Salmonella Hadar and at 0.2 and 0.5% in the challenge with Salmonella Enteritidis significantly reduced (by 2 log(10) cfu) the cecal content of Salmonella. This study showed that intestinal

  3. Studies on the pathogenesis of Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella choleraesuis var kunzendorf infection in weanling pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W M; Olander, H J; Thacker, H L

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-six 4-week-old pigs were randomly allotted to 4 groups: group 1--orally inoculated with Salmonella typhimurium; group 2--orally dosed with S choleraesuis; and groups 3 and 4, with surgically constructed intestinal loops--loops inoculated with either S typhimurium or S choleraesuis. One pig each from groups 1 and 2 was killed at 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after inoculation. One pig each from groups 3 and 4 was killed at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hours after intestinal loop inoculation. Inoculation of S typhimurium resulted in acute enterocolitis of variable severity, whereas inoculation of S choleraesuis resulted initially in septicemia followed by formation of large necrotic and ulcerative lesions in the colonic mucosa. The most consistent systemic lesion of S choleraesuis infection was interstitial pneumonia and multifocal hepatic necrosis. Salmonella typhimurium and S choleraesuis were ultrastructurally within enterocytes of ligated ileal loops. Intracellular bacteria were morphologically intact, occurred free in the cytoplasm and membrane bound, and caused no detectable cytotoxic effect to the cell. Both S typhimurium and S choleraesuis penetrated the intestinal mucosa and were isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes at 2 hours after inoculation.

  4. Laboratory, Environmental, and Epidemiologic Investigation and Regulatory Enforcement Actions in Response to an Outbreak of Salmonella Bredeney Infections Linked to Peanut Butter

    OpenAIRE

    Viazis, Stelios; Beal, Jennifer K.; Monahan, Caitlin; Lanier, William A.; Kreil, Katherine R.; Melka, David C.; Boden, William D.; Dion, Jamie L.; Miller, Zachary A.; Nguyen, Thai-An; Gieraltowski, Laura B.; Zink, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background.  In September 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and state and local partners investigated an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Bredeney linked to peanut butter (PB). Methods.  A case was defined as infection with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Bredeney between June 1, 2012 and October 31, 2012. Food exposure questionnaires were analyzed by the CDC to determine the food vehicle. The FDA reviewed production ...

  5. Prevention of Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Ledger

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe the prevention of infection-related adverse pregnancy outcome is the most important focus for obstetricians today. An emphasis upon immunization of susceptible women, prevention of transmissible disease by modification of patient behavior, and identification and treatment of silent infections should become standards of practice. This will require educational initiatives for physicians and their patients as well as continued clinical trials to determine costs and effectiveness.

  6. Enteritis due to Salmonella panama from infected ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, G K; Fraser, P K; Ward, C P; Bouttell, G; Kinnear, E

    1972-03-01

    After the appearance of sporadic cases of enteritis due to Salmonella panama, baked ham from one supplier was implicated as the source of infection. No pathogenic organisms were isolated from the working surfaces of the factory involved or from samples of a day's bacon output, but S. panama was isolated from the factory sewers. Stool examinations of the 500 employees showed one man in the baked ham section to be excreting S. panama. He was removed from work and no further infections were reported from the district. The organism could no longer be found in the sewers.Some weeks later, further infections were reported in the London and Southend areas, which could be traced to ham from the original source. Sewer swabs at the factory were again positive. A further examination of all the employees revealed three cases and 82 symptomless excretors. Eight of 192 family contacts were also found to be excretors. Trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole appeared to have no effect on the carrier state.Examination of the hams in cold store showed some to be infected with S. panama, and a number of these had been consumed in the canteen.Subsequent examination of pigs at slaughter and pig food prepared locally failed to isolate S. panama. The source of infection at the factory is unknown.

  7. Multistate outbreaks of Salmonella infections associated with raw tomatoes eaten in restaurants--United States, 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-07

    During 2005-2006, four large multistate outbreaks of Salmonella infections associated with eating raw tomatoes at restaurants occurred in the United States. The four outbreaks resulted in 459 culture-confirmed cases of salmonellosis in 21 states. This report describes the epidemiologic, environmental, and laboratory investigations into these four outbreaks by state and local health departments, national food safety agencies, and CDC. The results of these investigations determined that the tomatoes had been supplied to restaurants either whole or precut from tomato fields in Florida, Ohio, and Virginia. These recurrent, large, multistate outbreaks emphasize the need to prevent Salmonella contamination of tomatoes early in the production and packing process. Current knowledge of mechanisms for tomato contamination and methods of eradication of Salmonella in tomatoes is incomplete; the agricultural industry, food safety agencies, and public health agencies should make tomato-safety research a priority.

  8. Dissemination of Salmonella enteritidis by experimentally-infected pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÁH Albuquerque

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Two groups of domestic pigeons (Columba livia were experimentally infected orally with doses of 9.5 x10(7 and 9.5 x10(9 CFU/mL (group A and B, respectively of a Salmonella Enteritidis (SE strain isolated from chickens. None of the used doses caused mortality of the inoculated birds; however, the pathogen was successfully recovered from the liver and spleen of group B birds on day 7 post-inoculation (dpi. Pathogen shedding, as evaluated through cloacal swabs, occurred in both groups until the 14th day of observation (p <0.05. Among all fecal samples collected from group B (n=4, three different birds shed the pathogen in their feces, out of which two were positive on 3 dpi and one on 7 dpi. The same number of fecal samples was evaluated in group A and only one bird shed the pathogen, on 7 and 14 dpi. The concentration of the microorganism in the feces was lower in group A than any sample from Group B. Salmonella Enteritidis isolated from chickens, when inoculated in pigeons, may be recovered from feces, cloacal swabs and organs, and these birds may contaminate poultry causing economic losses as well as posing a risk to the public health.

  9. Calcium in milk and fermentation by yoghurt bacteria increase the resistance of rats to Salmonella infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Bovee-Oudenhoven, I; Termont, D; Dekker, R. (Rudolf); Van der Meer, R

    1996-01-01

    Calcium in milk products stimulates gastric acid secretion and inhibits the cytolytic activity of intestinal contents. Based on these effects, it was hypothesised that calcium might lessen the severity of food borne intestinal infections. The possible differential effects of a low calcium milk and normal milk products (milk, acidified milk, and pasteurised yoghurt) on the resistance of rats to a salmonella infection was therefore studied. Rats were infected orally with Salmonella enteritidis ...

  10. Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens: Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    USDA), Athens, USA. Accepted 6 ... Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a food borne pathogen of humans causing food-poisoning .... Comparison of percent sero-positive hens per group and means of Salmonella.

  11. Effect of acidified feed on suscebtibility of broiler chickens to intestinal infection by Campylobacter and Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heres, L.; Engel, B.; Urlings, H.A.P.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Knapen, van F.

    2004-01-01

    Consumption of poultry meat is associated with human Campylobacter and Salmonella infections. One way to control the presence of these bacteria in broiler flocks is to make chickens less susceptible for colonisation. Acidification of feed may be a tool to reduce the Campylobacter and Salmonella

  12. Within-herd prevalence of Salmonella Dublin in endemically infected dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In this study within-herd prevalence of Salmonella Dublin was investigated in three age groups (calves, young stock, adult cows) during five herd visits at 3-month intervals of 14 endemically infected dairy herds. A total of 10162 paired faecal cultures and antibody measurements were used...... control programmes for Salmonella Dublin in dairy herds....

  13. A Descriptive Study of Human Salmonella Serotype Typhimurium Infections Reported in Ontario from 1990 to 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Ford

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella infections cause gastrointestinal and systemic diseases worldwide and are the leading causes of food-borne illnesses in North America (1-4. Salmonella serotype typhimurium (ST, in particular, is increasingly becoming a major public health concern because of its ability to acquire multiple resistant genes (5,6.

  14. Case-control study of disease determinants for non-typhoidal Salmonella infections among Michigan children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Herbert D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with Salmonella serotypes continue to be a significant global public health problem. In addition to contaminated foods, several other sources contribute to infections with Salmonella serotypes. We have assessed the role of socioeconomic factors, exposure to food, and environmental sources in the etiology of non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Michigan children. Findings A case-control study among Michigan children aged ≤ 10 years was conducted. A total of 123 cases of children with laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections and 139 control children, who had not experienced symptoms of gastrointestinal illness during the month prior to the interviews, were enrolled. The cases and controls were matched on age-category (Salmonella infections were significantly associated with attendance of a daycare center (adjusted matched odds ratio = 5.00, 95% CI: 1.51 - 16.58, contact with cats (MOR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.14 - 5.88, and contact with reptiles (MOR = 7.90, 95% CI: 1.52 - 41.01, during the 3 days prior to the onset of child's illness. Conclusions Study results suggest that exposure to environmental sources may play an important role in sporadic infections with Salmonella serotypes in children. Additional efforts are needed to educate parents and caretakers about the risk of Salmonella transmission to children from these sources.

  15. Iron- and Hepcidin-Independent Downregulation of the Iron Exporter Ferroportin in Macrophages during Salmonella Infection

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    François Canonne-Hergaux

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Retention of iron in tissue macrophages via upregulation of hepcidin (HAMP and downregulation of the iron exporter ferroportin (FPN is thought to participate in the establishment of anemia of inflammation after infection. However, an upregulation of FPN has been proposed to limit macrophages iron access to intracellular pathogens. Therefore, we studied the iron homeostasis and in particular the regulation of FPN after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice presenting tissue macrophages with high iron (AcB61, basal iron (A/J and wild-type mice, or low iron (Hamp knock out, Hamp−/− levels. The presence of iron in AcB61 macrophages due to extravascular hemolysis and strong erythrophagocytosis activity favored the proliferation of Salmonella in the spleen and liver with a concomitant decrease of FPN protein expression. Despite systemic iron overload, no or slight increase in Salmonella burden was observed in Hamp−/− mice compared to controls. Importantly, FPN expression at both mRNA and protein levels was strongly decreased during Salmonella infection in Hamp−/− mice. The repression of Fpn mRNA was also observed in Salmonella-infected cultured macrophages. In addition, the downregulation of FPN was associated with decreased iron stores in both the liver and spleen in infected mice. Our findings show that during Salmonella infection, FPN is repressed through an iron and hepcidin-independent mechanism. Such regulation likely provides the cellular iron indispensable for the growth of Salmonella inside the macrophages.

  16. Prevalence and Spatial Distribution of Salmonella Infections in the Pennsylvania Raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Very, K J; Kirchner, M K; Shariat, N; Cottrell, W; Sandt, C H; Dudley, E G; Kariyawasam, S; Jayarao, B M

    2016-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence and spatial distribution of Salmonella infection in Pennsylvania raccoons (Procyon lotor), common wildlife mammals known to occupy overlapping habitats with humans and domestic food animals. The Pennsylvania Game Commission provided a total of 371 raccoon intestinal samples from trapped and road-killed raccoons collected between May and November 2011. Salmonella was isolated from the faeces of 56 (15.1%) of 371 raccoons in 35 (54%) of 65 counties across Pennsylvania. The five most frequently isolated serotypes were Newport (28.6%), Enteritidis (19.6%), Typhimurium (10.7%), Braenderup (8.9%) and Bareilly (7.1%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the Salmonella isolates and subsequent comparison to the Pennsylvania Department of Health human Salmonella PFGE database revealed 16 different pulsetypes in Salmonella isolates recovered from raccoons that were indistinguishable from pulsetypes of Salmonella collected from clinically ill humans during the study period. The pulsetypes of seven raccoon Salmonella isolates matched those of 56 human Salmonella isolates by month and geographical region of sample collection. Results from Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and Multi-Virulence Locus Sequence Typing (CRISPR-MVLST) analysis corroborated the PFGE and serotyping data. The findings of this study show that several PFGE pulsetypes of Salmonella were shared between humans and raccoons in Pennsylvania, indicating that raccoons and humans might share the same source of Salmonella. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Some putative prebiotics increase the severity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice

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    Lahtinen Sampo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients believed to beneficially affect host health by selectively stimulating the growth of the beneficial bacteria residing in the gut. Such beneficial bacteria have been reported to protect against pathogenic infections. However, contradicting results on prevention of Salmonella infections with prebiotics have been published. The aim of the present study was to examine whether S. Typhimurium SL1344 infection in mice could be prevented by administration of dietary carbohydrates with different structures and digestibility profiles. BALB/c mice were fed a diet containing 10% of either of the following carbohydrates: inulin, fructo-oligosaccharide, xylo-oligosaccharide, galacto-oligosaccharide, apple pectin, polydextrose or beta-glucan for three weeks prior to oral Salmonella challenge (107 CFU and compared to mice fed a cornstarch-based control diet. Results The mice fed with diets containing fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS or xylo-oligosaccharide (XOS had significantly higher (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 numbers of S. Typhimurium SL1344 in liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes when compared to the mice fed with the cornstarch-based control diet. Significantly increased amounts (P < 0.01 of Salmonella were detected in ileal and fecal contents of mice fed with diets supplemented with apple pectin, however these mice did not show significantly higher numbers of S. Typhimyrium in liver, spleen and lymph nodes than animals from the control group (P < 0.20. The acute-phase protein haptoglobin was a good marker for translocation of S. Typhimurium in mice. In accordance with the increased counts of Salmonella in the organs, serum concentrations of haptoglobin were significantly increased in the mice fed with FOS or XOS (P < 0.001. Caecum weight was increased in the mice fed with FOS (P < 0.01, XOS (P < 0.01, or polydextrose (P < 0.001, and caecal pH was reduced in the mice fed with polydextrose (P < 0

  18. Prevention of Salmonella contamination of finished soybean meal used for animal feed by a Norwegian production plant despite frequent Salmonella contamination of raw soy beans, 1994–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonella contaminated animal feed is a major source for introducing Salmonella into the animal derived food chain. Because soybeans frequently are contaminated with Salmonella, soybean meal used as animal feed material, a by-product of a “crushing plant” which produces oil from soybeans, can be important source of Salmonella in the animal feed. We report the successful control of Salmonella from 1994 to 2012 in a Norwegian crushing plant producing soybean meal from imported soy beans. The results are based on an officially supervised HACCP based program including annual testing of around 4000 samples. Results During the 19-year period, 34% of samples collected during unloading of ships delivering soybeans yielded Salmonella; the proportion of samples from ships that yielded Salmonella varied from 12-62% each year. Dust samples from all shiploads from South America yielded Salmonella. In total 94 serovars of Salmonella were isolated, including nine (90%) of the EU 2012 top ten serovars isolated from clinical cases of salmonellosis in humans, including major animal pathogenic serovars like Spp. Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The effectiveness of the HACCP based control was indicated by a low prevalence of Salmonella contamination in the clean area of the plant, which is considered to be the main reason for the successful prevention of Salmonella in the end product. Despite extensive testing, no sample from the finished soybean meal product was found to be Salmonella contaminated. Conclusions This study shows that a HAACP-based control program in a soybean crushing plant can produce Salmonella free soybean meal despite frequent Salmonella contamination of raw soybeans. That approach is suggested as an effective way to minimize the risk of Salmonella exposure of the animal feed mills and contamination of the subsequent animal feed chain. PMID:25011553

  19. Herd prevalence of Salmonella enterica infections in Danish slaughter pigs determined by microbiological testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Bager, Flemming

    1996-01-01

    As a part of a nationwide programme to survey and control salmonella in pig herds, a microbiological survey of 1363 pig herds was performed in Denmark. A total of 13 468 slaughter pigs were examined at slaughter by culture of 5 g of caecal contents. Overall, 30 different serotypes of Salmonella...... the most frequent (49.1%). Salmonella enterica was found in 302 herds (22.2%), S. Typhimurium was found in 61.1% of these. 279 (23.1%) large herds (producing more than 2600 slaughter pigs per year) were found to be salmonella positive compared with 23 (14.7 %) small herds (annual production of 500 to 550...... slaughter pigs). Practical constraints in the study design did not allow for a firm conclusion on the interplay among herd size, geographical location and occurrence of salmonella. In 284 of 302 infected herds (94.0%) only one serotype was detected, Infections with two different serovars were seen in 18...

  20. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection. PMID:22044420

  1. Salmonella enterica serotype Oranienburg infections associated with consumption of locally produced Tyrolean cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerberger, F; Kreidl, P; Dierich, M.P.; Klingsbichel, E; Jenewein, D; Mader, C; Khaschabi, D; Schonbauer, M; Berghold, C

    2000-11-01

    Sixteen culture confirmed cases of enteric infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Oranienburg were detected between August 10 and September 29 1999 in Tyrol (Austria). Ten of them suffered bloody diarrhoea and six were asymptomatic carriers. Intervie

  2. Experimental infection of one-day-old chicks with Salmonella Serotypes Previously isolated from poultry facilities, wild birds, and swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E de Sousa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to maintain the high production and export rates achieved by the Brazilian poultry industry, it is necessary to prevent and control certain disease agents, such as Salmonella spp. Using bacterial cultures, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in specimens collected from broiler facilities. Local wild birds were also sampled, as well as the feces of swine housed on the poultry farm. After sample collection, the isolated serotypes were subsequently inoculated into broiler chicks to determine their effects. Positive samples were collected from the following locations in the poultry facilities: poultry litter (S. serotype 4,5,12:R:-; S. Heidelberg; S. Infantis, broiler feces (S. Heidelberg; S. serotype 6,7:R:-; S. serotype 4,5,12:R:-; S. Tennessee, water (S. Glostrup; S. serotype 6,8:d:-;, and lesser mealworms (Alphitobius diaperinus found in the litter (S. Tennessee. Among the 36 wild birds captured, S. Heidelberg was isolated from one bird's organs and intestinal contents (Colaptes campestris, and S. Enteritidis was isolated from another bird's intestinal contents (Zenaida auriculata. Salmonella Panama and Salmonella Typhimurium were isolated from swine feces. One-day-old chicks (150 were divided into 10 groups of 15 animals each. Each group was orally inoculated with a previously isolated serotype of Salmonella. Soft stools were observed on the cage floor and around the birds' cloaca between 3 and 12 days post-infection (dpi. The different serotypes of Salmonella used to inoculate the chicks were re-isolated from the spleen, liver, and cecal content samples of the infected birds on 15 and 21 dpi.

  3. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella serotype Bovismorbificans infections associated with hummus and tahini--United States, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    On September 27, 2011, three clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Bovismorbificans with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were identified by the District of Columbia Public Health Laboratory (PHL). Human infection with S. Bovismorbificans is rare in the United States. Through query of PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance, six additional cases with indistinguishable PFGE patterns were identified in three states (Maryland, Michigan, and Virginia) during the prior 60 days. All nine patients had eaten at restaurants in the District of Columbia (DC) or northern Virginia tahini (sesame seed paste) used in hummus prepared at a Mediterranean-style restaurant in DC was a plausible source of Salmonella infections. DOH restricted the sale of hummus and prohibited the use of hummus ingredients in other food items at implicated restaurants to prevent further illness. This investigation also illustrates challenges associated with ingredient-driven outbreaks and the value of PulseNet for identifying clusters of cases that are geographically dispersed.

  4. Efficacy and immunogenicity of a Vi-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in the prevention of typhoid fever using a controlled human infection model of Salmonella Typhi: a randomised controlled, phase 2b trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Celina; Gibani, Malick M; Moore, Maria; Juel, Helene B; Jones, Elizabeth; Meiring, James; Harris, Victoria; Gardner, Jonathan; Nebykova, Anna; Kerridge, Simon A; Hill, Jennifer; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Blohmke, Christoph J; Yu, Ly-Mee; Angus, Brian; Pollard, Andrew J

    2017-12-02

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) is responsible for an estimated 20 million infections and 200 000 deaths each year in resource poor regions of the world. Capsular Vi-polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (Vi-conjugate vaccines) are immunogenic and can be used from infancy but there are no efficacy data for the leading candidate vaccine being considered for widespread use. To address this knowledge gap, we assessed the efficacy of a Vi-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine using an established human infection model of S Typhi. In this single-centre, randomised controlled, phase 2b study, using an established outpatient-based human typhoid infection model, we recruited healthy adult volunteers aged between 18 and 60 years, with no previous history of typhoid vaccination, infection, or prolonged residency in a typhoid-endemic region. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive a single dose of Vi-conjugate (Vi-TT), Vi-polysaccharide (Vi-PS), or control meningococcal vaccine with a computer-generated randomisation schedule (block size 6). Investigators and participants were masked to treatment allocation, and an unmasked team of nurses administered the vaccines. Following oral ingestion of S Typhi, participants were assessed with daily blood culture over a 2-week period and diagnosed with typhoid infection when meeting pre-defined criteria. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants diagnosed with typhoid infection (ie, attack rate), defined as persistent fever of 38°C or higher for 12 h or longer or S Typhi bacteraemia, following oral challenge administered 1 month after Vi-vaccination (Vi-TT or Vi-PS) compared with control vaccination. Analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02324751, and is ongoing. Between Aug 18, 2015, and Nov 4, 2016, 112 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned; 34 to the control group, 37 to the Vi-PS group, and 41 to the Vi-TT group. 103 participants

  5. Reptiles, amphibians, and human Salmonella infection: a population-based, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermin, Jonathan; Hutwagner, Lori; Vugia, Duc; Shallow, Sue; Daily, Pamela; Bender, Jeffrey; Koehler, Jane; Marcus, Ruthanne; Angulo, Frederick J

    2004-04-15

    To estimate the burden of reptile- and amphibian-associated Salmonella infections, we conducted 2 case-control studies of human salmonellosis occurring during 1996-1997. The studies took place at 5 Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) surveillance areas: all of Minnesota and Oregon and selected counties in California, Connecticut, and Georgia. The first study included 463 patients with serogroup B or D Salmonella infection and 7618 population-based controls. The second study involved 38 patients with non-serogroup B or D Salmonella infection and 1429 controls from California only. Patients and controls were interviewed about contact with reptiles and amphibians. Reptile and amphibian contact was associated both with infection with serogroup B or D Salmonella (multivariable odds ratio [OR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.2; Preptile or amphibian contact was 6% for all sporadic Salmonella infections and 11% among persons reptile and amphibian exposure is associated with approximately 74,000 Salmonella infections annually in the United States.

  6. A comparative study on invasion, survival, modulation of oxidative burst, and nitric oxide responses of macrophages (HD11), and systemic infection in chickens by prevalent poultry Salmonella serovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Swaggerty, Christina L; Nisbet, David J; Kogut, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    Poultry is a major reservoir for foodborne Salmonella serovars. Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg are the most prevalent serovars in U.S. poultry. Information concerning the interactions between different Salmonella species and host cells in poultry is lacking. In the present study, the above mentioned Salmonella serovars were examined for invasion, intracellular survival, and their ability to modulate oxidative burst and nitric oxide (NO) responses in chicken macrophage HD11 cells. All Salmonella serovars demonstrated similar capacity to invade HD11 cells. At 24 h post-infection, a 36-43% reduction of intracellular bacteria, in log(10)(CFU), was observed for Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg, whereas a significantly lower reduction (16%) was observed for Salmonella Enteritidis, indicating its higher resistance to the killing by HD11 cells. Production of NO was completely diminished in HD11 cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis, but remained intact when infected with Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Kentucky, and Salmonella Senftenberg. Phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated oxidative burst in HD11 cells was greatly impaired after infection by each of the five serovars. When newly hatched chickens were challenged orally, a high rate (86-98%) of systemic infection (Salmonella positive in liver/spleen) was observed in birds challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg, and Salmonella Kentucky, while only 14% of the birds were Salmonella Senftenberg positive. However, there was no direct correlation between systemic infection and in vitro differential intracellular survival and modulation of NO response among the tested serovars.

  7. Identification by PCR of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars associated with invasive infections among febrile patients in Mali.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Tennant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients.We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali.We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2 strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:- strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains.We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries.

  8. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-), Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. Principal Findings We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2) strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:-) strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. Conclusion We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries. PMID:20231882

  9. The anti-infective activity of punicalagin against Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghui; Feng, Yuqing; Xu, Yunfeng; Wu, Qian; Han, Qi'an; Liang, Xiujun; Yang, Baowei; Wang, Xin; Xia, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Punicalagin, a major bioactive component of pomegranate peel, has been proven to have antioxidant, antiviral, anti-apoptosis, and hepatoprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-infective activity of punicalagin in a mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were initially challenged with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and then treated with punicalagin. Food and water consumption and body weight were recorded daily. On day 8 post infection, the mice were sacrificed to examine pathogen counts in tissues, hematological parameters, cytokine levels, and histological changes. Compared to mice only infected with S. typhimurium, punicalagin-treated mice had more food consumption and less weight loss. A higher survival rate and lower counts of viable S. typhimurium in feces, liver, spleen, and kidney were found in the punicalagin-treated mice. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-γ in serum and the spleen and TNF-α in serum, the spleen and the liver were reduced by punicalagin. Moreover, more neutrophils and higher neutrophil-to-mononuclear cell ratios in the punicalagin-treated mice were observed. Histological examination showed that punicalagin protected cells in the liver and spleen from hemorrhagic necrosis. It is concluded that punicalagin has a beneficial effect against S. typhimurium infection in mice. The anti-infective properties, together with other nutritionally beneficial effects, make punicalagin a promising supplement in human food or animal feeds to prevent disease associated with S. typhimurium.

  10. Age-structured dynamic, stochastic and mechanistic simulation model of Salmonella Dublin infection within dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Kudahl, Anne Braad; Østergaard, Søren

    2012-06-01

    In the demand for a decision support tool to guide farmers wanting to control Salmonella Dublin (S. Dublin) in Danish dairy herds, we developed an age-structured stochastic, mechanistic and dynamic simulation model of S. Dublin in dairy herds, which incorporated six age groups (neonatal, preweaned calves, weaned calves, growing heifers, breeding heifers and cows) and five infection states (susceptible, acutely infected, carrier, super shedder and resistant). The model simulated population and infection dynamics over a period of 10 years in weekly time steps as: 1) population sizes of each of the six age-groups; 2) S. Dublin incidence and number of animals in each infection state; and 3) S. Dublin related morbidity and mortality in the acutely infected animals. The effects of introducing one infectious heifer on the risk of spread of S. Dublin within the herd and on the duration of infection were estimated through 1000 simulation iterations for 48 scenarios. The scenarios covered all combinations of three herd sizes (70, 200 and 400 cows), four hygiene levels indicating infectious contact parameters, and four herd susceptibility levels indicating different susceptibility parameters for the individual animals in each of the six age groups in the herd. The hygiene level was highly influential on the probability that the infection spread within the herd, duration of infection and epidemic size. The herd susceptibility level was also influential, but not likely to provide sufficient prevention and control of infection on its own. Herd size did not affect the probability of infection spread upon exposure, but the larger the herd the more important were management and housing practices that improve hygiene and reduce susceptibility to shorten durations of infection in the herd and to increase the probability of extinction. In general, disease and mortality patterns followed epidemic waves in the herds. However, an interesting pattern was seen for acute infections and

  11. Mortality and translocation assay to study the protective capacity of Bifidobacterium lactis INL1 against Salmonella Typhimurium infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacarías, M F; Reinheimer, J; Forzani, L; Grangette, C; Vinderola, G

    2014-12-01

    The mouse has been largely used for the study of the protective capacity of probiotics against intestinal infections caused by Salmonella. In this work we aimed at comparing the mortality and translocation assay for the study of the protective capacity of the human breast milk-derived strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis INL1 on a model of gut infection by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Different doses of S. Typhimurium FUNED and B. animalis subsp. lactis INL 1 were administered to Balb/c mice in a mortality or a translocation assay. The survival of the control group in the mortality assay resulted to be variable along experiments, and then we preferred to use a translocation assay where the preventive administration of 109 cfu of bifidobacteria/mouse for 10 consecutive days significantly reduced the number of infected animals and the levels of translocation to liver and spleen, with enhanced secretory immunoglobulin A and interleukin 10 production in the small and large intestine, respectively. Ten days of B. animalis subsp. lactis strain INL1 administration to mice significantly reduced both the incidence and the severity of Salmonella infection in a mouse model of translocation. This work provided the first evidence that a translocation assay, compared to a mortality assay, could be more useful to study the protective capacity of probiotics against Salmonella infection, as more information can be obtained from mice and less suffering is conferred to animals due to the fact that the mortality assay is shorter than the latter. These facts are in line with the guidelines of animal research recently established by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement & Reduction of Animals in Research.

  12. Outbreak of Salmonella Wandsworth and Typhimurium infections in infants and toddlers traced to a commercial vegetable-coated snack food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotir, Mark J; Ewald, Gwen; Kimura, Akiko C; Higa, Jeffrey I; Sheth, Anandi; Troppy, Scott; Meyer, Stephanie; Hoekstra, R Michael; Austin, Jana; Archer, John; Spayne, Mary; Daly, Elizabeth R; Griffin, Patricia M

    2009-12-01

    Human outbreaks of Salmonella infection have been attributed to a variety of food vehicles. Processed snack foods are increasingly consumed by children. In May 2007, state and local health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated human infections from Salmonella Wandsworth, an extremely rare serotype. Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used to identify outbreak-associated illnesses. Food history questionnaires and open-ended interviews were used to generate exposure hypotheses. A nationwide case-control study was conducted to epidemiologically implicate a source. Public health laboratories cultured implicated product from patient homes and retail stores. Sixty-nine patients from 23 states were identified; 93% were aged 10 months to 3 years. Eighty-one percent of child patients had bloody diarrhea; 6 were hospitalized. No deaths were reported. The case-control study strongly associated illness with a commercial puffed vegetable-coated ready-to-eat snack food (mOR = 23.3, P = 0.0001), leading to a nationwide recall. Parents of 92% of interviewed case-children reported that children consumed the food during the week before their illness began; 43% reported daily consumption. Salmonella Wandsworth, 3 additional Salmonella serotypes and Chronobacter (formerly Enterobacter) sakazaki were all cultured from this product, leading to the identification of 18 human outbreak-related Salmonella Typhimurium illnesses. This report documents a nationwide outbreak associated with a commercial processed ready-to-eat snack food. Cases occurred primarily in infants and toddlers, many of whom frequently consumed the food. Measures are needed to ensure that ingredients added to ready-to-eat foods after the final lethal processing step are free of pathogens.

  13. Epidemiology of Salmonella typhimurium O:4-12 infection in Norway: evidence of transmission from an avian wildlife reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapperud, G; Stenwig, H; Lassen, J

    1998-04-15

    In 1987, a nationwide outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium O:4-12 infection traced to contaminated chocolate bars occurred in Norway. In the 5 years after the outbreak, elevated numbers of sporadic cases caused by the epidemic strain of Salmonella were detected, followed by a decline in subsequent years. To characterize the epidemiology of this infection, the authors analyzed information concerning all sporadic cases reported in Norway from 1966 to 1996. Of the 153 patients infected by the outbreak strain, 43% were less than 5 years of age, and only three persons had acquired the infection abroad. In contrast, 46% of the cases attributable to other S. typhimurium O:4-12 variants and 90% of the total number of Salmonella infections were related to foreign travel. A distinct seasonality was observed: 76% of the cases appeared between January and April. At the same time of year, the epidemic strain was regularly encountered as the etiologic agent of fatal salmonellosis among wild passerine birds, suggesting an epidemiologic link between the avian and human cases. The strain was rarely isolated from other sources. From 1990 to 1992, the authors conducted a prospective case-control study of sporadic indigenous infections to identify risk factors and obtain guidance for preventive efforts. Forty-one case-patients, each matched by age, sex, and geographic area with two population controls, were enrolled. In conditional logistic regression analysis, the following environmental factors were independently related to an increased risk of infection: drinking untreated water, having direct contact with wild birds or their droppings, and eating snow, sand, or soil. Cases were also more likely than controls to report having antecedent or concurrent medical disorders. Forty-six percent of the study patients were hospitalized for their salmonellosis.

  14. Standard principles for preventing and controlling infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, C; Straub, M

    Infection control is a priority for all nurses and healthcare staff. This article examines factors contributing to current healthcare-associated infection rates and outlines the main strategies for infection prevention, management and control.

  15. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Results. Between 1998 and 2014, 167 028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10 139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Conclusions. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. PMID:26449953

  16. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Nicholas A; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Melita A

    2015-11-01

    The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Between 1998 and 2014, 167,028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10,139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  17. Salmonella typhimurium Infection Reduces Schistosoma japonicum Worm Burden in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyang Zhu; Lu Chen; Junfang Wu; Huiru Tang; Yulan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Coinfection of microorganisms is a common phenomenon in humans and animals. In order to further our understanding of the progress of coinfection and the possible interaction between different pathogens, we have built a coinfection mouse model with Schistosoma japonicum and Salmonella typhimurium, and used this model to investigate the systemic metabolic and immune responses using NMR-based metabonomics and immunological techniques. Our results show that Salmonella typhimurium (ATCC14028) infe...

  18. Virulence of invasive Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 in animal models of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Ramachandran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium sequence type (ST 313 produces septicemia in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Although there are known genetic and phenotypic differences between ST313 strains and gastroenteritis-associated ST19 strains, conflicting data about the in vivo virulence of ST313 strains have been reported. To resolve these differences, we tested clinical Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 and ST19 strains in murine and rhesus macaque infection models. The 50% lethal dose (LD50 was determined for three Salmonella Typhimurium ST19 and ST313 strains in mice. For dissemination studies, bacterial burden in organs was determined at various time-points post-challenge. Indian rhesus macaques were infected with one ST19 and one ST313 strain. Animals were monitored for clinical signs and bacterial burden and pathology were determined. The LD50 values for ST19 and ST313 infected mice were not significantly different. However, ST313-infected BALB/c mice had significantly higher bacterial numbers in blood at 24 h than ST19-infected mice. ST19-infected rhesus macaques exhibited moderate-to-severe diarrhea while ST313-infected monkeys showed no-to-mild diarrhea. ST19-infected monkeys had higher bacterial burden and increased inflammation in tissues. Our data suggest that Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 invasiveness may be investigated using mice. The non-human primate results are consistent with clinical data, suggesting that ST313 strains do not cause diarrhea.

  19. Intraspecies Competition for Niches in the Distal Gut Dictate Transmission during Persistent Salmonella Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Lilian H.; Monack, Denise M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to be transmitted, a pathogen must first successfully colonize and multiply within a host. Ecological principles can be applied to study host-pathogen interactions to predict transmission dynamics. Little is known about the population biology of Salmonella during persistent infection. To define Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium population structure in this context, 129SvJ mice were oral gavaged with a mixture of eight wild-type isogenic tagged Salmonella (WITS) strains. Distinct subpopulations arose within intestinal and systemic tissues after 35 days, and clonal expansion of the cecal and colonic subpopulation was responsible for increases in Salmonella fecal shedding. A co-infection system utilizing differentially marked isogenic strains was developed in which each mouse received one strain orally and the other systemically by intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Co-infections demonstrated that the intestinal subpopulation exerted intraspecies priority effects by excluding systemic S. Typhimurium from colonizing an extracellular niche within the cecum and colon. Importantly, the systemic strain was excluded from these distal gut sites and was not transmitted to naïve hosts. In addition, S. Typhimurium required hydrogenase, an enzyme that mediates acquisition of hydrogen from the gut microbiota, during the first week of infection to exert priority effects in the gut. Thus, early inhibitory priority effects are facilitated by the acquisition of nutrients, which allow S. Typhimurium to successfully compete for a nutritional niche in the distal gut. We also show that intraspecies colonization resistance is maintained by Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands SPI1 and SPI2 during persistent distal gut infection. Thus, important virulence effectors not only modulate interactions with host cells, but are crucial for Salmonella colonization of an extracellular intestinal niche and thereby also shape intraspecies dynamics. We conclude that priority effects and

  20. Human Salmonella infections linked to contaminated dry dog and cat food, 2006-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, Casey Barton; Ferraro, Aimee; Deasy, Marshall; Dato, Virginia; Moll, Mària; Sandt, Carol; Rea, Nancy K; Rickert, Regan; Marriott, Chandra; Warren, Kimberly; Urdaneta, Veronica; Salehi, Ellen; Villamil, Elizabeth; Ayers, Tracy; Hoekstra, R M; Austin, Jana L; Ostroff, Stephen; Williams, Ian T

    2010-09-01

    Human Salmonella infections associated with dry pet food have not been previously reported. We investigated such an outbreak of Salmonella Schwarzengrund and primarily affecting young children. Two multistate case-control studies were conducted to determine the source and mode of infections among case-patients with the outbreak strain. Study 1 evaluated household exposures to animals and pet foods, and study 2 examined risk factors for transmission among infant case-patients. Environmental investigations were conducted. Seventy-nine case-patients in 21 states were identified; 48% were children aged 2 years or younger. Case-households were significantly more likely than control households to report dog contact (matched odds ratio [mOR]: 3.6) and to have recently purchased manufacturer X brands of dry pet food (mOR: 6.9). Illness among infant case-patients was significantly associated with feeding pets in the kitchen (OR: 4.4). The outbreak strain was isolated from opened bags of dry dog food produced at plant X, fecal specimens from dogs that ate manufacturer X dry dog food, and an environmental sample and unopened bags of dog and cat foods from plant X. More than 23 000 tons of pet foods were recalled. After additional outbreak-linked illnesses were identified during 2008, the company recalled 105 brands of dry pet food and permanently closed plant X. Dry dog and cat foods manufactured at plant X were linked to human illness for a 3-year period. This outbreak highlights the importance of proper handling and storage of pet foods in the home to prevent human illness, especially among young children.

  1. Salmonella typhimurium infection in total knee arthroplasty: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeesh Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is a rare cause of prosthetic joint infection (PJI. The recognized predisposing risk factors for Salmonella septic arthritis include diabetes mellitus, renal failure, human immunodeficiency virus infection and chronic corticosteroid use. We describe a case of PJI of the knee in a 74-year-old lady who was on antitubercular treatment. The patient presented with discharging sinus and raised inflammatory markers. She was successfully treated by the removal of prosthesis and debridement followed by ciprofloxacin therapy for 6 weeks. This case report highlights the potential virulence of Salmonella in immunocompromised patient with a joint prosthesis. Continuous monitoring and close collaboration of microbiologists and orthopedicians helped obtain the resolution of infection in our patient.

  2. Salmonella Dublin faecal excretion probabilities in cattle with different temporal antibody profiles in 14 endemically infected dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This longitudinal field study investigated the hypothesis that persistently high antibody levels indicate a high risk of Salmonella Dublin shedding in animals in 14 endemically infected dairy herds. A hierarchical multivariable logistic regression was used to analyse 6614 paired faecal...... testing is not likely to be a plausible control option in most Salmonella Dublin-infected dairy herds....

  3. Comparison Study on Colonization of hilA Mutant and Parent Strains of Salmonella enteritidis in Vertically Infected Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadSadegh Madadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella actively stimulates its own uptake into the epithelial cells by inducing cytoskeleton rearrangements and membrane ruffling triggered by some proteins secreted by Salmonella into the cytosol of the epithelial cells via a type III secretion system (TTSS encoded bygenes of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1. hilA is a transcriptional activator encoded on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1 genes.Methods: To assess the importance of hilA in a simulation modeling of vertical infection and shedding of S. enteritidis in broiler chickens a long-term experiment was designed. Two groups of 200 fertile eggs were inoculated with 20 colony forming units (CFU of hilA mutant of S. enteritidis or its parent strain just prior to incubation. Thirty five birds of each group were housed in separate rooms. On days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 of age, cloacal swabs from live birds as well as samples from internal organs (intestinal tract, liver and spleen were evaluated by bacteriological or molecular methods.Results: In most of sampling days colonization and invasion of parent strain S. enteritidis in intestine (especially ceaca and internal organs of chickens were higher with compared to its hilA mutant but this mutant strain could still colonize in intestinal tract and even invade liver or spleen.Conclusion: Colonization of hilA mutant of S. enteritidis indicated that hilA gene is only one part of the modulators in Salmonella invasion mechanism. The ability of hilA mutant to multiply and persist in host internal organs including ceaca may promise further research for potential of hilA mutant to prevent the initial colonization of the intestinal tract by a virulent S. enteritidis strain

  4. Cattle drive Salmonella infection in the wildlife-livestock interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentaberre, G; Porrero, M C; Navarro-Gonzalez, N; Serrano, E; Domínguez, L; Lavín, S

    2013-11-01

    The genus Salmonella is found throughout the world and is a potential pathogen for most vertebrates. It is also the most common cause of food-borne illness in humans, and wildlife is an emerging source of food-borne disease in humans due to the consumption of game meat. Wild boar is one of the most abundant European game species and these wild swine are known to be carriers of zoonotic and food-borne pathogens such as Salmonella. Isolation of the pathogen, serotyping and molecular biology are necessary for elucidating epidemiological connections in multi-host populations. Although disease management at population level can be addressed using a number of different strategies, such management is difficult in free-living wildlife populations due to the lack of experience with the wildlife-livestock interface. Herein, we provide the results of a 4-year Salmonella survey in sympatric populations of wild boar and cattle in the Ports de Tortosa i Beseit National Game Reserve (NE Spain). We also evaluated the effects of two management strategies, cattle removal and increased wild boar harvesting (i.e. by hunting and trapping), on the prevalence of the Salmonella serovar community. The serovars Meleagridis and Anatum were found to be shared by cattle and wild boar, a finding that was confirmed by 100% DNA similarity patterns using pulse field gel electrophoresis. Cattle removal was more efficient than the culling of wild boar as a means of reducing the prevalence of shared serotypes, which underlines the role of cattle as a reservoir of Salmonella for wild boar. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to manage Salmonella in the wild, and the results have implications for management. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Assessment of Meat and Poultry Product Recalls Due to Salmonella Contamination: Product Recovery and Illness Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Scott A; Sampedro, Fernando; Hedberg, Craig W

    2017-08-01

    Data from the recalls of meat and poultry products from 2000 through 2012 due to Salmonella contamination were used to assess the factors associated with the recovery of the recalled product and to develop quantitative models to estimate the number of illnesses prevented by recalls. The percentage of product recovered following a recall action was not dependent on establishment size, recall expansions, complexity of the distribution chain, type of distribution, amount of time between the production and recall dates, or number of pounds of product recalled. However, illness-related recalls were associated with larger amounts of recalled product, smaller percentages of recalled product recovered, a greater number of days between the production date and recall date, and nationwide distribution than were recalls that were not illness related. In addition, the detection of recall-associated illnesses appeared to be enhanced in states with strong foodborne illness investigation systems. The number of Salmonella illnesses prevented by recalls was based on the number of illnesses occurring relative to the number of pounds consumed, which was then extrapolated to the number of pounds of recalled product recovered. A simulation using a program evaluation and review technique probability distribution with illness-related recalls from 2003 through 2012 estimated that there were 19,000 prevented Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Recalls not associated with illnesses from 2000 through 2012 prevented an estimated additional 8,300 Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Although further improvements to ensure accurate and complete reporting should be undertaken, our study demonstrates that recalls are an important tool for preventing additional Salmonella illnesses. Moreover, additional training resources dedicated to public health agencies for enhancing foodborne illness detection, investigations, and rapid response and reporting would

  6. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Antimicrobial Management of Invasive Salmonella Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Gordon, Melita A.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica infections are common causes of bloodstream infection in low-resource areas, where they may be difficult to distinguish from other febrile illnesses and may be associated with a high case fatality ratio. Microbiologic culture of blood or bone marrow remains the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in Salmonella enterica, initially to the traditional first-line drugs chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility and then fluoroquinolone resistance have developed in association with chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and also by plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has occurred more often in nontyphoidal than in typhoidal Salmonella strains. Azithromycin is effective for the management of uncomplicated typhoid fever and may serve as an alternative oral drug in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is common. In 2013, CLSI lowered the ciprofloxacin susceptibility breakpoints to account for accumulating clinical, microbiologic, and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data suggesting that revision was needed for contemporary invasive Salmonella infections. Newly established CLSI guidelines for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published in CLSI document M100 in 2015. PMID:26180063

  7. Oral administration of a probiotic Lactobacillus modulates cytokine production and TLR expression improving the immune response against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perdigón Gabriela

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrheal infections caused by Salmonella, are one of the major causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Salmonella causes various diseases that range from mild gastroenteritis to enteric fever, depending on the serovar involved, infective dose, species, age and immune status of the host. Probiotics are proposed as an attractive alternative possibility in the prevention against this pathogen infection. Previously we demonstrated that continuous Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 administration to BALB/c mice before and after challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium decreased the severity of Salmonella infection. The aim of the present work was to deep into the knowledge about how this probiotic bacterium exerts its effect, by assessing its impact on the expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IFNγ and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 cytokines in the inductor and effector sites of the gut immune response, and analyzing toll-like receptor (TLR2, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR9 expressions in both healthy and infected mice. Results Probiotic administration to healthy mice increased the expression of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 and improved the production and secretion of TNFα, IFNγ and IL-10 in the inductor sites of the gut immune response (Peyer's patches. Post infection, the continuous probiotic administration, before and after Salmonella challenge, protected the host by modulating the inflammatory response, mainly in the immune effector site of the gut, decreasing TNFα and increasing IFNγ, IL-6 and IL-10 production in the lamina propria of the small intestine. Conclusions The oral administration of L. casei CRL 431 induces variations in the cytokine profile and in the TLRs expression previous and also after the challenge with S. Typhimurium. These changes show some of the immune mechanisms implicated in the protective effect of this probiotic strain against S. Typhimurium, providing

  8. Large outbreaks of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in Denmark in 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethelberg, S.; Wingstrand, Anne; Jensen, T.

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium phage type U292 has been ongoing in Denmark since 1 April, with 1,054 cases registered until 23 October 2008. Extensive investigations including hypothesis-generating interviews, matched case-control studies, cohort studies in embedded outbreaks, shopping list...

  9. Diagnosis of Salmonella Enteritidis Infection in Broiler Chickens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The program for the eradication of Salmonella Enteritidis from chickens was based on bacteriological examination of breeding flocks. There is a great need for a specific and sensitive serological screening test. For that purpose, four different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed. These included ...

  10. Prevalence of Salmonella Infection in Intensive Poultry Farms in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bacteriological study of Salmonella Gallinarum/Pullorum was conducted in intensively managed chickens in Hawassa, Ethiopia between November 2008 and May 2009. The objectives of the study were to estimate the bacteriological prevalence of S. Gallinarum/Pullorum in apparently healthy chickens and to assess the ...

  11. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. III. Transfer of immunity with primed lymphocyte subpopulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T

    1990-01-01

    The protective effect of primed lymphocytes against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and euthymic LEW rats. Primed lymphocytes were obtained by inoculating euthymic and thymus-grafted animals with a non-lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium. Four weeks after...... as low as 10(4) cells from both euthymic or thymus-grafted animals were effective, and athymic and euthymic recipients survived equally well. Four weeks after the infection both athymic and euthymic animals housed very few bacteria and had high antibacterial antibody titres. The percentages of splenic...... and lymph node CD4+ cells in the athymic rats were comparable to those found in the euthymic animals. The study shows that primed CD4+ lymphocytes even in very low doses are able to induce immunity against a Salmonella typhimurium infection....

  12. Rectal stenosis in pigs associated with Salmonella Typhimurium and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Terumi Negrão Watanabe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rectal stricture is an acquired annular fibrous constriction of the rectum that results from a variety of chronic necrotizing enteric diseases. In pigs, it is in most cases a sequel of Salmonella infection. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 is a known pathogen causing immunosuppression in pigs worldwide. PCV2 infected pigs may be predisposed to salmonellosis. In this report, rectal stenosis was observed in 160 pigs from a herd that experienced an outbreak of enteric salmonellosis over a 4-month period. Distension of the abdominal wall and diarrhea were the main clinical signs observed. Five animals were analyzed showing annular cicatrization of the rectal wall 5.0-7.0 cm anterior to the anorectal junction and Salmonella-positive immunostaining in the large intestine. Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from fragments of the large intestine. Porcine circovirus type 2 antigen was observed in the mesenteric lymph-node in 4 pigs and in the large intestine in 3 pigs.

  13. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Isolates Isolated in the United States from a Multistate Outbreak of Human Salmonella Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Maria; Luo, Yan; Lafon, Patricia C; Timme, Ruth; Allard, Marc W; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Zhao, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is recognized as one of the most common bacterial agents of foodborne illness. We report draft genomes of four Salmonella serovar Heidelberg isolates associated with the recent multistate outbreak of human Salmonella Heidelberg infections linked to kosher broiled chicken livers in the United States in 2011. Isolates 2011K-1259 and 2011K-1232 were recovered from humans, whereas 2011K-1724 and 2011K-1726 were isolated from chicken liver. Whole genome sequence analysis of these isolates provides a tool for studying the short-term evolution of these epidemic clones and can be used for characterizing potentially new virulence factors.

  14. Innate Immune Detection of Flagellin Positively and Negatively Regulates Salmonella Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Marvin A.; Quarles, Ellen K.; López-Yglesias, Américo H.; Zhao, Xiaodan; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a flagellated bacterium and one of the leading causes of gastroenteritis in humans. Bacterial flagellin is required for motility and also a prime target of the innate immune system. Innate immune recognition of flagellin is mediated by at least two independent pathways, TLR5 and Naip5-Naip6/NlrC4/Caspase-1. The functional significance of each of the two independent flagellin recognition systems for host defense against wild type Salmonella infection is complex, and innate immune detection of flagellin contributes to both protection and susceptibility. We hypothesized that efficient modulation of flagellin expression in vivo permits Salmonella to evade innate immune detection and limit the functional role of flagellin-specific host innate defenses. To test this hypothesis, we used Salmonella deficient in the anti-sigma factor flgM, which overproduce flagella and are attenuated in vivo. In this study we demonstrate that flagellin recognition by the innate immune system is responsible for the attenuation of flgM− S. Typhimurium, and dissect the contribution of each flagellin recognition pathway to bacterial clearance and inflammation. We demonstrate that caspase-1 controls mucosal and systemic infection of flgM− S. Typhimurium, and also limits intestinal inflammation and injury. In contrast, TLR5 paradoxically promotes bacterial colonization in the cecum and systemic infection, but attenuates intestinal inflammation. Our results indicate that Salmonella evasion of caspase-1 dependent flagellin recognition is critical for establishing infection and that evasion of TLR5 and caspase-1 dependent flagellin recognition helps Salmonella induce intestinal inflammation and establish a niche in the inflamed gut. PMID:23977202

  15. Fucoidan coated ciprofloxacin loaded chitosan nanoparticles for the treatment of intracellular and biofilm infections of Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Elbi; T R, Nimal; V K, Rajan; Baranwal, Gaurav; Biswas, Raja; R, Jayakumar; S, Sathianarayanan

    2017-12-01

    Salmonella infections and their gallstone associated biofilm infections are difficult to treat due to poor penetration of antibiotics into the intracellular compartments of macrophages and within biofilms. Here we developed ciprofloxacin loaded chitosan nanoparticles (cCNPs) and fucoidan (Fu) coated cCNPs (Fu-cCNPs). Characterizations of these nanoparticles were carried out using Dynamic Light Scattering‎, Transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The prepared cCNPs and Fu-cCNPs have the size range of 124±7nm and 320±18nm, respectively. Both nanoparticles were found to be non-hemolytic and cytocompatible. In vitro sustained release of ciprofloxacin was observed from both cCNPs and Fu-cCNPs over a period of 2 weeks. The antimicrobial activity of cCNPs and Fu-cCNPs was tested under in vitro and in vivo conditions. The intracellular anti-Salmonella activity of Fu-cCNPs was 2 fold higher than cCNPs and 6 fold higher than ciprofloxacin alone. Fluorescence microscopic images confirmed enhanced delivery of Fu-cCNPs than the cCNPs within the intracellular compartment of macrophages. Both cCNPs and Fu-cCNPs are found to be equally effective in dispersing Salmonella Paratyphi A gallstone biofilms. The in vivo antibacterial activities of Fu-cCNPs were superior to cCNPs which we have validated using Salmonella Paratyphi A infected Drosophila melanogaster fly model. Our overall results showed that (1) Fu-cCNPs are more effective in eradicating Salmonella infections than cCNPs; (2) both cCNPs and Fu-cCNPs were equally effective in dispersing Salmonella gallstone biofilms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Survey of co-infection by Salmonella and oxyurids in tortoises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipineto Ludovico

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella spp. and oxyurids are among the most prevalent bacterial and parasitic agents in reptiles. These organisms are routinely isolated in healthy tortoises, although heavy infections may cause significant pathology. Tortoises are considered a common source of reptile-associated salmonellosis, an important zoonosis reported worldwide. A survey of the prevalence of Salmonella spp. and oxyurids in 53 tortoises was conducted in southern Italy and a possible correlation between the two pathogens was therefore investigated. Results Salmonella spp. and oxyurids were detected with a prevalence of 49.1 and 81.1%, respectively. A significant positive correlation between Salmonella spp. and oxyurids was demonstrated. However, confounding factors related to husbandry could have been involved in determining this correlation. Conclusions Our results suggest that caution should be exercised in translocation, husbandry, and human contact with tortoises and other exotic pets. Further studies on the epidemiology, molecular characterization and pathogenesis of Salmonella and oxyurids are needed to assess the actual impact of these organisms, as single or associated infections, on tortoises and on other exotic pets.

  17. Tissue dyslipidemia in salmonella-infected rats treated with amoxillin and pefloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotimi Solomon O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated the effects of salmonella infection and its chemotherapy on lipid metabolism in tissues of rats infected orally with Salmonella typhimurium and treated intraperitoneally with pefloxacin and amoxillin. Methods Animals were infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain TA 98. After salmonellosis was confirmed, they were divided into 7 groups of 5 animals each. While one group served as infected control group, three groups were treated with amoxillin (7.14 mg/kg body weight, 8 hourly and the remaining three groups with pefloxacin (5.71mg/kg body weight, 12 hourly for 5 and 10 days respectively. Uninfected control animals received 0.1ml of vehicle. Rats were sacrificed 24h after 5 and 10 days of antibiotic treatment and 5 days after discontinuation of antibiotic treatment. Their corresponding controls were also sacrificed at the same time point. Blood and tissue lipids were then evaluated. Results Salmonella infection resulted in dyslipidemia characterised by increased concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA in plasma and erythrocyte, as well as enhanced cholesterogenesis, hypertriglyceridemia and phospholipidosis in plasma, low density lipoprotein-very low density lipoprotein (LDL-VLDL, erythrocytes, erythrocyte ghost and the organs. The antibiotics reversed the dyslipidemia but not totally. A significant correlation was observed between fecal bacterial load and plasma cholesterol (r=0.456, p Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that salmonella infection in rats and its therapy with pefloxacin and amoxillin perturb lipid metabolism and this perturbation is characterised by cholesterogenesis.

  18. Gene expression response of the rat small intestine following oral salmonella infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, G.C.H.; Bovee-Oudenhoven, I.M.J.; Kramer, E.H.M.; Meer, van der R.; Keijer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Data on the molecular response of the intestine to the food-borne pathogen Salmonella are derived from in vitro studies, whereas in vivo data are lacking. We performed an oral S. enteritidis infection study in Wistar rats to obtain insight in the in vivo response in time. Expression profiles of

  19. Nontyphoidal salmonella infection in children with acute gastroenteritis: prevalence, serotypes, and antimicrobial resistance in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuefang; Xie, Xinbao; Xu, Xuebing; Wang, Xiangshi; Chang, Hailing; Wang, Chuanqing; Wang, Aiming; He, Yanlei; Yu, Hui; Wang, Xiaohong; Zeng, Mei

    2014-03-01

    Information about nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection in children is limited in mainland China. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence, serotypes, and antibiotic resistance patterns of NTS infection in children in Shanghai. All cases with probable bacterial diarrhea were enrolled from the enteric clinic of a tertiary pediatric hospital between July 2010 and December 2011. Salmonella isolation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were conducted by the microbiological laboratory. NTS were recovered from 316 (17.2%) of 1833 cases with isolation rate exceeding Campylobacter (7.1%) and Shigella (5.7%). NTS infection was prevalent year-round with a seasonal peak during summer and autumn. The median age of children with NTS gastroenteritis was 18 months. Fever and blood-in-stool were reported in 52.5% and 42.7% of cases, respectively. Salmonella Enteritidis (38.9%) and Salmonella Typhimurium (29.7%) were the most common serovars. Antimicrobial susceptibility showed 60.5% of isolates resistant to ≥1 clinically important antibiotics. Resistance to ciprofloxacin and the third-generation cephalosporins was detected in 5.5% and 7.1%-11.7% of isolates, respectively. NTS is a major enteropathogen responsible for bacterial gastroenteritis in children in Shanghai. Resistance to the current first-line antibiotics is of concern. Ongoing surveillance for NTS infection and antibiotic resistance is needed to control this pathogen in Shanghai.

  20. Associations between vaccinations against protozoal and viral infections and Salmonella in broiler flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing the burden of Salmonella in broiler flocks presents a challenge for public health and for sustainability of the industry. A number of other infections are simultaneously controlled in grow-out broilers world-wide by vaccination. The purpose of this exploratory analysis was to test, in a f...

  1. Risk factors for sporadic infection with Salmonella Enteritidis, Denmark, 1997-1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, Kåre; Neimann, Jacob

    2002-01-01

    In a prospective case-control study of sporadic Salmonella Enteritidis infection in Denmark (1997-1999), foreign travel was reported by 25% of 455 case patients and 8% of 507 controls (odds ratio (OR) = 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.4, 5.5). Among nontravelers, 80% of 335 cases and 81...

  2. Risk factors for clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on Dutch dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Wilpshaar, H.; Frankena, K.; Bartels, C.; Barkema, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for outbreaks in 1999 of clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on dairy farms were studied in a matched case–control study with 47 case farms and 47 control farms. All 47 case farms experienced a clinical outbreak of salmonellosis which was confirmed

  3. Herd-level diagnosis for Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar Dublin infection in bovine dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Barkema, H.W.; Schans, van de J.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Verhoeff, J.

    2002-01-01

    Herd-level sensitivities of bacteriological and serological methods were compared in 79 bovine dairy herds, recently infected with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin. All farms experienced clinical signs of salmonellosis for the first time and had no history of vaccination against

  4. Heat-killed Lactobacillus spp. cells enhance survivals of Caenorhabditis elegans against Salmonella and Yersinia infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Choe, J; Kim, J; Oh, S; Park, S; Kim, S; Kim, Y

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the effect of feeding heat-killed Lactobacillus cells on the survival of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes after Salmonella Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica infection. The feeding of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum 133 (LP133) and Lactobacillus fermentum 21 (LP21) cells to nematodes was shown to significantly increase the survival rate as well as stimulate the expression of pmk-1 gene that key factor for C. elegans immunity upon infection compared with control nematodes that were only fed Escherichia coli OP50 (OP50) cells. These results suggest that heat-killed LP133 and LF21 cells exert preventive or protective effects against the Gram-negative bacteria Salm. Typhimurium and Y. enterocolitica. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the LF21-mediated and LP133-mediated protection against bacterial infection in nematodes, transcriptional profiling was performed for each experimental group. These experiments showed that genes related to energy generation and ageing, regulators of insulin/IGF-1-like signalling, DAF genes, oxidation and reduction processes, the defence response and/or the innate immune response, and neurological processes were upregulated in nematodes that had been fed heat-killed Lactobacillus cells compared with nematodes that had been fed E. coli cells. In this study, the feeding of heat-killed Lactobacillus bacteria to Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes was shown to decrease infection by Gram-negative bacteria and increase the host lifespan. C. elegans has a small, well-organized genome and is an excellent in vivo model organism; thus, these results will potentially shed light on important Lactobacillus-host interactions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Estimation of the rate of egg contamination from Salmonella-infected chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, M E; Martelli, F; McLaren, I; Davies, R H

    2014-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the most prevalent causes for human gastroenteritis and is by far the predominant Salmonella serovar among human cases, followed by Salmonella Typhimurium. Contaminated eggs produced by infected laying hens are thought to be the main source of human infection with S. Enteritidis throughout the world. Although previous studies have looked at the proportion of infected eggs from infected flocks, there is still uncertainty over the rate at which infected birds produce contaminated eggs. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate at which infected birds produce contaminated egg shells and egg contents. Data were collected from two studies, consisting of 15 and 20 flocks, respectively. Faecal and environmental sampling and testing of ovaries/caeca from laying hens were carried out in parallel with (i) for the first study, testing 300 individual eggs, contents and shells together and (ii) for the second study, testing 4000 eggs in pools of six, with shells and contents tested separately. Bayesian methods were used to estimate the within-flock prevalence of infection from the faecal and hen post-mortem data, and this was related to the proportion of positive eggs. Results indicated a linear relationship between the rate of contamination of egg contents and the prevalence of infected chickens, but a nonlinear (quadratic) relationship between infection prevalence and the rate of egg shell contamination, with egg shell contamination occurring at a much higher rate than that of egg contents. There was also a significant difference in the rate of egg contamination between serovars, with S. Enteritidis causing a higher rate of contamination of egg contents and a lower rate of contamination of egg shells compared to non-S. Enteritidis serovars. These results will be useful for risk assessments of human exposure to Salmonella-contaminated eggs. © 2013 Crown copyright. This article is published with the

  6. Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked to Raw Meal Organic Shake and Meal Products Recall & Advice to Consumers Case Count Maps Epi Curves ... Infections Associated with a Raw Scraped Ground Tuna Product Recall & Advice to Consumers Case Count Maps Epi Curves ...

  7. [Multifocal osteoarticular infection caused by Salmonella non typhi in a child with sickle cell disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaret, B; Couëc, M-L; Lorrot, M; Launay, E; Gras-Le Guen, C

    2013-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is the most common monogenic hereditary hemoglobinopathy. Its course is marked by vaso-occlusive crises (VOC), episodes of acute hemolytic anemia on a background of chronic hemolytic anemia, and severe infections. A 2-year-old child with sickle cell disease presented with severe sepsis caused by Salmonella non typhi. Control of the sepsis was difficult, with multifocal osteomyelitis and arthritis, which required prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy. Prolonged treatment was complicated by cardiorespiratory arrest and severe neurological damage, as well as nosocomial infections. Osseous articular infections caused by Salmonella non typhi are a common complication in children with sickle cell disease, which need to be promptly recognized. Management remains a great concern. The clinical case reported herein is original in its multifocal evolution. It illustrates the vulnerability of patients with sickle cell disease and the need for urgent and intensive care in the case of infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of in vivo-induced genes during infection of chickens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Zhicheng; Lin, Zhijie; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-06-01

    Chickens are an important source of food worldwide and are often infected with food-poisoning serovars of Salmonella enterica, frequently Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), without exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Ivi (in vivo induced) genes identified using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) are expressed only during bacterial infection and have the potential value of identifying epidemic strains and antigens which can form the basis for sub-unit vaccine development. We applied IVIAT to SE strain 50041 and identified 42 ivi genes. Eight representative ivi genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR as being expressed only in vivo within 48 h of infection compared with that of in vitro-cultured. Although our results indicated that the identified ivi genes are expressed only in vivo, further research is needed to elucidate the exact roles of these genes during infection and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thioridazine protects the mouse from a virulent infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Asish; Mukherjee, Sayanti; Chaki, Shaswati

    2010-01-01

    When administered to mice at doses of 100microg/mouse and 200microg/mouse, thioridazine (TDZ) significantly protected animals from the lethality produced by a virulent strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and reduced the number of bacteria retrieved from the spleen, liver and heart...... blood. The protection conferred by TDZ against a virulent Salmonella infection is hypothesised to be due to a reduction in the 55kDa virulence protein of the outer membrane of the organism, as this protein is almost totally absent when the organism is exposed to the phenothiazine. It is further...

  10. Mutant prevention concentration (MPC) of ciprofloxacin against Salmonella enterica of epidemic and poultry origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rafaela; Magnani, Marciane; Souza, Roberta Barreiros; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo; Oliveira, Tereza Cristina Rocha Moreira

    2011-02-01

    Salmonella isolates resistant or with reduced susceptibility to quinolones increased in recent years. The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is a new alternative that can prevent the selection and multiplication of resistant Salmonella spp. strains. The MPC of ciprofloxacin (CipMPC) was evaluated for 312 Salmonella enterica strains of epidemic and poultry origin susceptible and resistant to nalidixic acid (NAL). The CipMPC for NAL-susceptible strains were in the range from 0.002 to 4 μg/ml and for NAL-resistant strains, it ranged from 0.004 to 16 μg/ml. The average MPC/MIC ratio for NAL-resistant strains was higher than NAL susceptible. S. Enteritidis showed the highest CipMPC and the highest MPC/MIC ratio also for NAL-resistant strains and with mutations in gyrA. Serovar Corvallis, a NAL-resistant strain without mutations, and of poultry origin showed the highest CipMPC value. The lowest value was observed for epidemic NAL-susceptible strains serovars Typhimurium and London. The average MPC/MIC ratio for strains with mutations in Aspartate 87 was higher than that mutated in Serine 83. The results show the importance of MPC in determining the correct dosage of Cip for treatment of Salmonella spp.

  11. The role of innate Immunity and host specificity in Salmonella infection in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Walk, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are important zoonotic pathogens, and can cause severe infections in both humans and animals. In the study presented here, comparative in vitro infection studies were performed in two, established cell types (epithelia and macrophage) derived from three different host species origins (porcine, murine and human). Both host-adapted and broad host-range S. enterica spp. enterica serovars (S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesius, S. Dublin und S. Enteritidis) were used for the infecti...

  12. Lessons in implementing infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Alison; Ahmad, Raheelah; Kiernan, Martin

    2016-03-01

    This paper has been developed from a conference presentation given by Professor Alison Holmes at the IPS Learning Labs launch event (2015). In it the implementation of research into clinical practice is discussed with reference to the upcoming Health Foundation Spotlight Report. The difficulties of engaging those in clinical practice are discussed with the importance of involvement of clinical leaders being highlighted. The importance of recognising that implementation science as a social process to bring credibility and legitimacy is also stressed. Following this, the Spotlight Report that is focused on strengthening implementation in the UK is discussed. There remains considerable scope for improvement and the impact of surveillance, targets and fatigue are considered. The tension between top-down and bottom-up approaches to implementation are discussed and a recommendation for a blended approach when implementing measures that are the components of an organisational infection prevention and control strategy is proposed. There also needs to be more scrutiny of the reasons for the failure of research implementation through an examination of the 'soft periphery' that comprises the organisational structure, systems and people that will be responsible for implementing and sustaining an intervention.

  13. Physiological and Immunological Regulations in Caenorhabditis elegans Infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Studies pertaining to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by utilizing model systems failed to mimic the essential aspects of immunity induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, as the determinants of innate immunity are distinct. The present study investigated the physiological and innate immune responses of S. Typhi infected Caenorhabditis elegans and also explored the Ty21a mediated immune enhancement in C. elegans. Ty21a is a known live vaccine for typhoidal infection in human beings. Physiological responses of C. elegans infected with S. Typhi assessed by survival and behavioral assays revealed that S. Typhi caused host mortality by persistent infection. However, Ty21a exposure to C. elegans was not harmful. Ty21a pre-exposed C. elegans, exhibited significant resistance against S. Typhi infection. Elevated accumulation of S. Typhi inside the infected host was observed when compared to Ty21a exposures. Transcript analysis of candidate innate immune gene (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7, ilys-3, scl-2, cpr-2, F08G5.6, atf-7, age-1, bec-1 and daf-16) regulations in the host during S. Typhi infection have been assessed through qPCR analysis to understand the activation of immune signaling pathways during S. Typhi infections. Gene silencing approaches confirmed that clec-60 and clec-87 has a major role in the defense system of C. elegans during S. Typhi infection. In conclusion, the study revealed that preconditioning of host with Ty21a protects against subsequent S. Typhi infection.

  14. Ekstrak Pegagan Meningkatkan Titer Antibodi Mencit Setelah Diinfeksi Salmonella typhi (CENTELLA ASIATICA EXTRACT INCREASE ANTIBODY TITER IN MICE AFTER SALMONELLA TYPHI INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nengah Kerta Besung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to find out the ability of Centella asiatica (C. asiatica in enhancing antibodyresponse of C. asiatica treated mice following Salmonella typhi (S. typhi infections. It is therefore expectedthat herbal drug such as  C. asiatica  can be used as an alternative medicine to prevent and to curesalmonellosis both in animals and human. Experimental laboratory studies were conducted usingCompletely Factorial Randomized Design. Mice were divided into four groups and they were treatedrespectively with destilated water (negative control, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg BW/day of  C. asiaticaextract. The treatment was conducted daily for two weeks  and the mice were inoculated with 105 cells/mlof  S. typhi. The antibody response were examined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAon first day, second week and fourth week  after S. typhi infections.  The result showed that treatment ofmice with C. asiatica extract significantly (p<0,05 enhanced antibody titer of Balb/c mice after S. typhiinfections. The highest antibody titer was observed at four weeks after S. typhi infections with 500 mg/kgBW/day (94,0370 ± 1,69 IU.

  15. Bactericidal Immunity to Salmonella in Africans and Mechanisms Causing Its Failure in HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yun Shan; Necchi, Francesca; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Young, Stephen P.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Mandala, Wilson L.; Gordon, Melita A.; Saul, Allan J.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella are a leading cause of death among HIV-infected Africans. Antibody-induced complement-mediated killing protects healthy Africans against Salmonella, but increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in some HIV-infected African adults block this killing. The objective was to understand how these high levels of anti-LPS antibodies interfere with the killing of Salmonella. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera and affinity-purified antibodies from African HIV-infected adults that failed to kill invasive S. Typhimurium D23580 were compared to sera from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects with bactericidal activity. The failure of sera from certain HIV-infected subjects to kill Salmonella was found to be due to an inherent inhibitory effect of anti-LPS antibodies. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and strongly associated with IgA and IgG2 anti-LPS antibodies (p<0.0001 for both). IgG anti-LPS antibodies, from sera of HIV-infected individuals that inhibit killing at high concentration, induced killing when diluted. Conversely, IgG, from sera of HIV-uninfected adults that induce killing, inhibited killing when concentrated. IgM anti-LPS antibodies from all subjects also induced Salmonella killing. Finally, the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of anti-LPS antibodies is seen with IgM as well as IgG and IgA. No correlation was found between affinity or avidity, or complement deposition or consumption, and inhibition of killing. Conclusion/Significance IgG and IgM classes of anti-S. Typhimurium LPS antibodies from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are bactericidal, while at very high concentrations, anti-LPS antibodies of all classes inhibit in vitro killing of Salmonella. This could be due to a variety of mechanisms relating to the poor ability of IgA and IgG2 to activate complement, and deposition of complement at sites where it cannot insert in the bacterial membrane. Vaccine trials

  16. Bactericidal Immunity to Salmonella in Africans and Mechanisms Causing Its Failure in HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Shan Goh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella are a leading cause of death among HIV-infected Africans. Antibody-induced complement-mediated killing protects healthy Africans against Salmonella, but increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS antibodies in some HIV-infected African adults block this killing. The objective was to understand how these high levels of anti-LPS antibodies interfere with the killing of Salmonella.Sera and affinity-purified antibodies from African HIV-infected adults that failed to kill invasive S. Typhimurium D23580 were compared to sera from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects with bactericidal activity. The failure of sera from certain HIV-infected subjects to kill Salmonella was found to be due to an inherent inhibitory effect of anti-LPS antibodies. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and strongly associated with IgA and IgG2 anti-LPS antibodies (p<0.0001 for both. IgG anti-LPS antibodies, from sera of HIV-infected individuals that inhibit killing at high concentration, induced killing when diluted. Conversely, IgG, from sera of HIV-uninfected adults that induce killing, inhibited killing when concentrated. IgM anti-LPS antibodies from all subjects also induced Salmonella killing. Finally, the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of anti-LPS antibodies is seen with IgM as well as IgG and IgA. No correlation was found between affinity or avidity, or complement deposition or consumption, and inhibition of killing.IgG and IgM classes of anti-S. Typhimurium LPS antibodies from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are bactericidal, while at very high concentrations, anti-LPS antibodies of all classes inhibit in vitro killing of Salmonella. This could be due to a variety of mechanisms relating to the poor ability of IgA and IgG2 to activate complement, and deposition of complement at sites where it cannot insert in the bacterial membrane. Vaccine trials are required to understand the significance of

  17. Using next generation sequencing to tackle non-typhoidal Salmonella infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wain, John; Keddy, Karen H.; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2013-01-01

    The publication of studies using next generation sequencing to analyse large numbers of bacterial isolates from global epidemics is transforming microbiology, epidemiology and public health. The emergence of multidrug resistant Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 is one example. While the epidemiology...... in Africa appears to be human-to-human spread and the association with invasive disease almost absolute, more needs to be done to exclude the possibility of animal reservoirs and to transfer the ability to track all Salmonella infections to the laboratories in the front line. In this mini-review we...... summarise what is currently known about non-typhoidal Salmonella in sub-Saharan Africa and discuss some of the issues which remain....

  18. Using next generation sequencing to tackle non-typhoidal Salmonella infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, John; Keddy, Karen H; Hendriksen, Rene S; Rubino, Salvatore

    2013-01-15

    The publication of studies using next generation sequencing to analyse large numbers of bacterial isolates from global epidemics is transforming microbiology, epidemiology and public health. The emergence of multidrug resistant Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 is one example. While the epidemiology in Africa appears to be human-to-human spread and the association with invasive disease almost absolute, more needs to be done to exclude the possibility of animal reservoirs and to transfer the ability to track all Salmonella infections to the laboratories in the front line. In this mini-review we summarise what is currently known about non-typhoidal Salmonella in sub-Saharan Africa and discuss some of the issues which remain.

  19. Infection Prevention in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Stephen Y; Theodoro, Daniel L.; Jeremiah D. Schuur; Marschall, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Infection prevention remains a major challenge in emergency care. Acutely ill and injured patients seeking evaluation and treatment in the emergency department (ED) not only have the potential to spread communicable infectious diseases to healthcare personnel and other patients, but are vulnerable to acquiring new infections associated with the care they receive. This article will evaluate these risks and review the existing literature for infection prevention practices in the ED, ranging fro...

  20. Unusually high illness severity and short incubation periods in two foodborne outbreaks of Salmonella Heidelberg infections with potential coincident Staphylococcus aureus intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, J H; Talkington, D; Bopp, C A; Besser, J; Sanchez, M L; Guarisco, J; Davidson, S L; Warner, C; McINTYRE, M G; Group, J P; Comstock, N; Xavier, K; Pinsent, T S; Brown, J; Douglas, J M; Gomez, G A; Garrett, N M; Carleton, H A; Tolar, B; Wise, M E

    2018-01-01

    We describe the investigation of two temporally coincident illness clusters involving salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus in two states. Cases were defined as gastrointestinal illness following two meal events. Investigators interviewed ill persons. Stool, food and environmental samples underwent pathogen testing. Alabama: Eighty cases were identified. Median time from meal to illness was 5·8 h. Salmonella Heidelberg was identified from 27 of 28 stool specimens tested, and coagulase-positive S. aureus was isolated from three of 16 ill persons. Environmental investigation indicated that food handling deficiencies occurred. Colorado: Seven cases were identified. Median time from meal to illness was 4·5 h. Five persons were hospitalised, four of whom were admitted to the intensive care unit. Salmonella Heidelberg was identified in six of seven stool specimens and coagulase-positive S. aureus in three of six tested. No single food item was implicated in either outbreak. These two outbreaks were linked to infection with Salmonella Heidelberg, but additional factors, such as dual aetiology that included S. aureus or the dose of salmonella ingested may have contributed to the short incubation periods and high illness severity. The outbreaks underscore the importance of measures to prevent foodborne illness through appropriate washing, handling, preparation and storage of food.

  1. A Multistate Investigation of Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- Infections as Part of an International Outbreak Associated with Frozen Feeder Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, E J; Nguyen, T; Melluso, C; Ayers, T; Lane, C; Hodges, A; Li, X; Quammen, J; Yendell, S J; Adams, J; Mitchell, J; Rickert, R; Klos, R; Williams, I T; Barton Behravesh, C; Wright, J

    2016-02-01

    While most human Salmonella infections result from exposure to contaminated foods, an estimated 11% of all Salmonella infections are attributed to animal exposures, including both direct animal handling and indirect exposures such as cleaning cages and handling contaminated pet food. This report describes the epidemiologic, environmental and laboratory investigations conducted in the United States as part of the response to an international outbreak of tetracycline-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- infections with over 500 illnesses occurring from 2008 to 2010. This investigation found that illness due to the outbreak strain was significantly associated with exposure to pet reptiles and frozen feeder rodents used as food for pet reptiles. Salmonella isolates indistinguishable from the outbreak strain were isolated from a frozen feeder mice-fed reptile owned by a case patient, as well as from frozen feeder mice and environmental samples collected from a rodent producing facility (Company A). An international voluntary recall of all Company A produced frozen feeder animals sold between May 2009 and July 2010 occurred. Only 13% of cases in our investigation were aware of the association between Salmonella infection and mice or rats. Consumers, the pet industry, healthcare providers and veterinarians need to be aware of the potential health risk posed by feeder rodents, whether live or frozen. Frozen feeder rodent producers, suppliers and distributors should follow the animal food labelling requirements as described in 21 CFR §501.5, and all packages of frozen feeder rodents should include safe handling instructions. Persons should wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water after handling live or frozen feeder rodents, as well as reptiles or anything in the area where the animals live. Continued opportunities exist for public health officials, the pet industry, veterinarians and consumers to work together to prevent salmonellosis associated

  2. Prevalence, risk factors and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella diarrhoeal infection among children in Thi-Qar Governorate, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, A; O'Dea, M; Hanan, Z K; Abraham, S; Habib, I

    2017-12-01

    We conducted a hospital-based cross-sectional study among children aged Salmonella infection. From 320 diarrhoea cases enrolled between March and August 2016, 33 (10·3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8·4-12·4) cases were stool culture-positive for non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica. The most commonly identified serovar was Typhimurium (54%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that the odds of Salmonella infection in children from households supplied by pipe water was 4·7 (95% CI 1·6-13·9) times higher compared with those supplied with reverse osmosis treated water. Similarly, children from households with domestic animals were found to have a higher odds (OR 10·5; 95% CI 3·8-28·4) of being Salmonella stool culture-positive. The likelihood of Salmonella infection was higher (OR 3·9; 95% CI 1·0-6·4) among children belonging to caregiver with primary vs. tertiary education levels. Lower odds (OR 0·4; 95% CI 0·1-0·9) of Salmonella infection were associated with children exclusively breast fed as compared with those exclusively bottle fed. Salmonella infection was three times lower (95% CI 0·1-0·7) in children belonging to caregiver who reported always washing hands after cleaning children following defecation, vs. those belonging to caregivers who did not wash hands. The antimicrobial resistance profile by disc diffusion revealed that non-susceptibility to tetracycline (78·8%), azithromycin (66·7%) and ciprofloxacin (57·6%) were the most commonly seen, and 84·9% of Salmonella isolates were classified as multi-drug resistant. This is the first study on prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella infection among children in this setting. This work provides specific epidemiological data which are crucial to understand and combat paediatric diarrhoea in Iraq.

  3. Coordinated Regulation of Virulence during Systemic Infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyunjin; McDermott, Jason E.; Porwollik, Steffen; Mcclelland, Michael; Heffron, Fred

    2009-02-20

    Salmonella must respond to a myriad of environmental cues during infection of a mouse and express specific subsets of genes in a temporal and spatial manner to subvert the host defense mechanisms but these regulatory pathways are poorly established. To unravel how micro-environmental signals are processed and integrated into coordinated action, we constructed in-frame non-polar deletions of 84 regulators inferred to play a role in Salmonella typhimurium virulence and tested them in three virulence assays (intraperitoneal (i.p.), and intragastric (i.g.) infection in BALB/c mice, and persistence in SvJ129 mice). Overall 36 regulators were identified that were less virulent in at least one assay, and of those, 15 regulators were required for systemic mouse infection in an acute infection model. As a first step towards understanding the interplay between a pathogen and its host from a systems biology standpoint we focused on these 15 genes. Transcriptional profiles were obtained for each of these 15 regulators from strains grown under four different environmental conditions. These results as well as publicly available transcriptional profiles were analyzed using both network inference and cluster analysis algorithms. The analysis predicts a regulatory network in which all 15 regulators control a specific set of genes necessary for Salmonella to cause systemic infection. We tested the regulatory model by expressing a subset of the regulators in trans and monitoring transcription of 7 known virulence factors located within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). These experiments validated the regulatory model and showed that, for these 7 genes, the response regulator SsrB and the marR type regulator SlyA co-regulate in a regulatory cascade by integrating multiple signals.

  4. Multistate Outbreak of Human Salmonella Typhimurium Infections Linked to Pet Hedgehogs - United States, 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T C; Marsden-Haug, N; Morris, J F; Culpepper, W; Bessette, N; Adams, J K; Bidol, S; Meyer, S; Schmitz, J; Erdman, M M; Gomez, T M; Barton Behravesh, C

    2017-06-01

    Zoonotic Salmonella infections cause approximately 130 000 illnesses annually in the United States. Of 72.9 million US households owning at least one pet, five million own small mammals; 3000 hedgehogs were documented by USDA in USDA-licensed breeding facilities and pet stores in 2012. State health department collaborators and PulseNet, the national bacterial subtyping network, identified human infections of a Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak strain, which were investigated by CDC, USDA-APHIS and state public and animal health officials. A case was defined as an illness in a person infected with the outbreak strain identified between 1 December 2011 and 3 June 2013. Investigators collected information on patient exposures, cultured animal and environmental specimens for Salmonella, and conducted traceback investigations of USDA-licensed hedgehog facilities. There were 26 cases in 12 states. Illness onset dates ranged from 26 December 2011 to 8 April 2013. The median patient age was 15 years (range = pet hedgehog contact in the week before illness onset. The outbreak strain was isolated from animal and environmental samples collected from three ill persons' homes in three states. Hedgehogs were purchased in geographically distant states from USDA-licensed breeders (10/17, 59%); a USDA-licensed pet store (1/17, 6%); unlicensed or unknown status breeders (3/17, 18%); and private individuals (3/17, 18%). Traceback investigations of USDA-licensed facilities did not reveal a single source of infection. Public and animal health collaboration linked pet hedgehog contact to human infections of Salmonella Typhimurium, highlighting the importance of a One Health investigative approach to zoonotic salmonellosis outbreaks. More efforts are needed to increase awareness among multiple stakeholders on the risk of illness associated with pet hedgehogs. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Coordinated regulation of virulence during systemic infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjin Yoon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available To cause a systemic infection, Salmonella must respond to many environmental cues during mouse infection and express specific subsets of genes in a temporal and spatial manner, but the regulatory pathways are poorly established. To unravel how micro-environmental signals are processed and integrated into coordinated action, we constructed in-frame non-polar deletions of 83 regulators inferred to play a role in Salmonella enteriditis Typhimurium (STM virulence and tested them in three virulence assays (intraperitoneal [i.p.], and intragastric [i.g.] infection in BALB/c mice, and persistence in 129X1/SvJ mice. Overall, 35 regulators were identified whose absence attenuated virulence in at least one assay, and of those, 14 regulators were required for systemic mouse infection, the most stringent virulence assay. As a first step towards understanding the interplay between a pathogen and its host from a systems biology standpoint, we focused on these 14 genes. Transcriptional profiles were obtained for deletions of each of these 14 regulators grown under four different environmental conditions. These results, as well as publicly available transcriptional profiles, were analyzed using both network inference and cluster analysis algorithms. The analysis predicts a regulatory network in which all 14 regulators control the same set of genes necessary for Salmonella to cause systemic infection. We tested the regulatory model by expressing a subset of the regulators in trans and monitoring transcription of 7 known virulence factors located within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2. These experiments validated the regulatory model and showed that the response regulator SsrB and the MarR type regulator, SlyA, are the terminal regulators in a cascade that integrates multiple signals. Furthermore, experiments to demonstrate epistatic relationships showed that SsrB can replace SlyA and, in some cases, SlyA can replace SsrB for expression of SPI-2 encoded

  6. Evaluation of Anti-SE Bacteriophage as Feed Additives to Prevent Salmonella enteritidis (SE) in Broiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K H; Lee, G Y; Jang, J C; Kim, J E; Kim, Y Y

    2013-03-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate anti-Salmonella enteritidis (anti-SE) bacteriophage as feed additives to prevent Salmonella enteritidis in broilers. The experimental diets were formulated for 2 phases feeding trial, and 3 different levels (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2%) of anti-SE bacteriophage were supplemented in basal diet. The basal diet was regarded as the control treatment. A total of 320 1-d-old male broilers (Ross 308) were allotted by randomized complete block (RCB) design in 8 replicates with 10 chicks per pen. All birds were raised on rice hull bedding in ambient controlled environment and free access to feed and water. There were no significant differences in body weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio (FCR) at terminal period among treatments (p>0.05). Relative weights of liver, spleen, abdominal fat and tissue muscle of breast obtained from each anti-SE bacteriophage treatment were similar to control, with a slightly higher value in anti-SE bacteriophage 0.2%. In addition, a numerical difference of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and LDL cholesterol level was observed in the 0.2% anti-SE bacteriophage application even though blood profiles were not significantly affected by supplemented levels of anti-SE bacteriophage (p>0.05). In the result of a 14 d record after Salmonella enteritidis challenge of 160 birds from 4 previous treatments, mortality was linearly decreased with increasing anti-SE bacteriophage level (pSalmonella enteritidis concentration in the cecum was decreased with increasing levels of anti-SE bacteriophage (pSalmonella enteritidis challenge. These results imply to a possible use of anti-SE bacteriophage as an alternative feed additive instead of antibiotics in broilers diet.

  7. Enterobacteriaceae infection – diagnosis, antibiotic resistance and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jarząb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal infections caused by rod-shaped bacteria of the [i]Enterobacteriaceae[/i] genus are one of the major health hazards in countries where sanitation standards are low. [i]Strains[/i] of [i]Shigella,[/i] [i]Salmonella, Escherichia[/i] and [i]Yersinia [/i]are responsible for diarrhea, severe bacillary dysentery, typhoid, other intestinal diseases, as well as genitourinary tract and blood infections. According to the WHO there are 4.5 billion cases every year, of which 1.9 million end in death. This makes intestinal infections third in terms of human disease mortality. In this work we discuss methods of pathogen identification, the mechanism of host-pathogen interaction, and the nature of the ¬host’s immunological response. Due to rising drug resistance we discuss the importance of better pathogen detection, vaccine design and the use of vaccines as a preventive measure against intestinal infections. Special attention is paid to OMP38, a protein isolated from [i]S. flexneri[/i] 3a outer membrane. Since it is known that this protein has good immunogenic properties, it can be used as an antigen or carrier for conjugate vaccines.

  8. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter ...

  9. Local transfer of delayed-type hypersensitivity after Salmonella infection in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Attridge, S R; Kotlarski, I

    1985-01-01

    An adoptive local transfer system has been used to study the mediators of delayed-type hypersensitivity induced in mice by infection with Salmonella enteritidis 11RX. The cells which transfer this state of hypersensitivity to untreated recipients are nonadherent T lymphocytes with the surface phenotype Lyt 1+2-, and successful transfer requires compatibility at the I-A subregion of the H-2 complex. In these and other respects these cells are indistinguishable from those previously found to be...

  10. An Outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, T; Sørensen, Gitte; Forshell, L P

    2009-01-01

    In November-December 2008, Norway and Denmark independently identified outbreaks of Salmonella Typhimurium infections characterised in the multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) by a distinct profile. Outbreak investigations were initiated independently in the two countr......-border outbreaks. Differences in legal requirements for food safety in neighbouring countries may be a challenge in terms of communication with consumers in areas where cross-border shopping is common....

  11. Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Getting a Salmonella Infection from Dry Pet Food

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-24

    Salmonella is a germ, or type of bacteria, that's commonly spread through contaminated food, water, or contact with infected animals. This includes pets like dogs and cats who can appear healthy, even when carrying these germs.  Created: 8/24/2010 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) and the Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases (DFWED).   Date Released: 8/24/2010.

  12. Hemorrhagic cystitis with massive bleeding from nontyphoidal Salmonella infection: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Sun-Kyung; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Young Shin; Yun, Hye-Won; Chung, Jung-Wha; Jung, Ka-Young; Shim, Ki-Nam; Jung, Sung-Ae

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is defined by lower urinary tract symptoms that include dysuria, hematuria, and hemorrhage and is caused by viral or bacterial infection or chemotherapeutic agents. Reports of hemorrhagic cystitis caused by non-typhoidal salmonella (NTS) are extremely rare. We report a case of a 41-year-old man with hemorrhagic cystitis from NTS that caused massive bleeding and shock. The patient was hospitalized for uncontrolled diabetes and obstructive uropathy related to severe cystiti...

  13. Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis for Salmonella Infection Surveillance, Texas, USA, 2007

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-06-14

    This podcast describes monitoring of the use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for Salmonella surveillance in Houston, Texas. CDC microbiologist Peter Gerner-Smidt discusses the importance of the PulseNet national database in surveillance of food-borne infections.  Created: 6/14/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/14/2010.

  14. Creating student sleuths: how a team of graduate students helped solve an outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg infections associated with kosher broiled chicken livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Heather; Hancock, W Thane; Harrison, Cassandra; Kornstein, Laura; Waechter, HaeNa; Reddy, Vasudha; Luker, John; Malavet, Michelle; Huth, Paula; Gieraltowski, Laura; Balter, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Since 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) has received FoodCORE funding to hire graduate students to conduct in-depth food exposure interviews of salmonellosis case patients. In 2011, an increase in the number of Salmonella Heidelberg infections with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis Xba I pattern JF6X01.0022 among observant Jewish communities in New York and New Jersey was investigated. As this pattern is common nationwide, some cases identified were not associated with the outbreak. To reduce the number of background cases, DOHMH focused on the community initially identified in the outbreak and defined a case as a person infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg with illness onset from 1 April to 17 November 2011 and who consumed a kosher diet, spoke Yiddish, or self-identified as Jewish. Nationally, 190 individuals were infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg; 63 New York City residents met the DOHMH case definition. In October 2011, the graduate students (Team Salmonella) interviewed three case patients who reported eating broiled chicken livers. Laboratory testing of chicken liver samples revealed the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg. Although they were only partially cooked, the livers appeared fully cooked, and consumers and retail establishment food handlers did not cook them thoroughly before eating or using them in a ready-to-eat spread. This investigation highlighted the need to prevent further illnesses from partially cooked chicken products. Removing background cases helped to focus the investigation. Training graduate students to collect exposure information can be a highly effective model for conducting foodborne disease surveillance and outbreak investigations for local and state departments of public health.

  15. Cattle-derived Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin Infections in Red Foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) in Tyrol, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glawischnig, Walter; Lazar, Judit; Wallner, Alice; Kornschober, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin is endemic in the cattle population in some areas of the Austrian province Tyrol, and each year single dairy farms have experienced clinical infections. To ascertain if Tyrolean red foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) act as a reservoir for Salmonella spp., we tested hepatic tissue and intestinal content from foxes hunted in the years 2015-16 by using microbiological methods. In addition, we included several fox fecal samples collected on a mountain pasture near chamois carcasses in the investigation. Of 434 foxes tested, nine animals (2.1%) were positive for Salmonella spp. Serotyping revealed five foxes positive with S. Dublin, demonstrating that this serovar exists in the Tyrolean fox population. The fecal samples collected in the area surrounding skeletonized chamois ( Rupicapra rupicapra ) also tested positive for S. Dublin. These chamois were probably victims of a waterborne outbreak caused by S. Dublin-shedding cattle. Our results indicate that the S. Dublin infections in red foxes were primarily acquired through ingestion of infected cattle material such as abortion tissues, but also by feeding on dead chamois. The findings underline the importance of interspecies transmission in this domestic/wildlife interface.

  16. How costs change with infection prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Nicholas

    2014-08-01

    To describe articles since January 2013 that include information on how costs change with infection prevention efforts. Three articles described only the costs imposed by nosocomial infection and so provided limited information about whether or not infection prevention efforts should be changed. One article was found that described the costs of supplying alcohol-based hand run in low-income countries. Eight articles showed the extra costs and cost savings from changing infection prevention programmes and discussed the health benefits. All concluded that the changes are economically worthwhile. There was a systematic review of the costs of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus control programmes and a methods article for how to make cost estimates for infection prevention programmes. The balance has shifted away from studies that report the high cost of nosocomial infections toward articles that address the value for money of infection prevention. This is good as simply showing a disease is high cost does not inform decisions to reduce it. More research, done well, on the costs of implementation, cost savings and change to health benefits in this area needs to be done as many gaps exist in our knowledge.

  17. Prevention of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis after oral vaccination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-08-12

    Vaccination of laying hens has been successfully used to reduce egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis, decreasing human salmonellosis cases worldwide. Currently used vaccines for layers are either inactivated vaccines or live attenuated strains produced by mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletion mutants hold promise for future vaccines, because specific bacterial functions can be removed that may improve safety and allow differentiation from field strains. In this study, the efficacy of Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains in laying hens as live vaccines was evaluated. The mutants are deficient in either the membrane channel TolC (ΔtolC) or the multi-drug efflux systems acrAB, acrEF and mdtABC (ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC). These strains have a decreased ability for gut and tissue colonization and are unable to survive in egg white, the latter preventing transmission of the vaccine strains to humans. Two groups of 30 laying hens were orally inoculated at day 1, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with 10(8) cfu of either vaccine strain, while a third group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 5 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The vaccine strains were not shed or detected in the gut, internal organs or eggs, 2 weeks after the third vaccination. The strains significantly protected against gut and internal organ colonization, and completely prevented egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis under the conditions of this study. This indicates that Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains might be valuable strains for vaccination of layers against Salmonella Enteritidis.

  18. Packed with Salmonella--investigation of an international outbreak of Salmonella Senftenberg infection linked to contamination of prepacked basil in 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Elson, Richard; Little, Christine L; Yip, Hopi; Fisher, Ian; Yishai, Ruth; Anis, Emilia; Valinsky, Lea; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Patel, Nehal; Mather, Henry; Brown, Derek J; Coia, John E; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Nielsen, Eva M; Ethelberg, Steen; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Hampton, Michael D; Peters, Tansy; Threlfall, John

    2008-10-01

    Salmonella Senftenberg is uncommon in the United Kingdom. In January-June 2007, the Health Protection Agency reported on 55 primary human cases of Salmonella Senftenberg in England and Wales. In May 2007, fresh basil sold in the United Kingdom was found to be contaminated with Salmonella Senftenberg. We launched an investigation to elucidate the cause of this outbreak. Isolates were examined using plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and the outbreak strain (SSFTXB.0014) was identified. We enquired via Enter-net whether other countries had isolated the outbreak strain, analyzed samples of fresh herbs from U.K. retailers, and interviewed patients on food history. Thirty-two patient-cases were referred to this outbreak in England and Wales. Onsets of illness occurred between 5 March and 6 June 2007. Fifty-six percent of patient-cases were females and 90% adults (>20 years old); three were admitted to hospital as a result of Salmonella infection. Scotland, Denmark, the Netherlands, and the United States reported on 19 cases of Salmonella Senftenberg infection presenting with the outbreak strain since January 2007. Eight samples of prepacked fresh basil imported from Israel tested positive with the same strain. A minority of patients could recall the consumption of basil before illness, and some reported consumption of products where basil was a likely ingredient. Environmental investigations in Israel did not identify the contamination source. Microbiological evidence suggested an association between contamination of fresh basil and the cases of Salmonella Senftenberg infection, leading to withdrawal of basil from all potentially affected batches from the U.K. market.

  19. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Hisano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials.

  20. Nosocomial Fungal Infections: Epidemiology, Infection Control, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleyman, Geehan; Alangaden, George J

    2016-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients and in the immunocompromised population. This article reviews the current epidemiology of nosocomial fungal infections in adult patients, with an emphasis on invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis. Recently published recommendations and guidelines for the control and prevention of these nosocomial fungal infections are summarized in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gene Expression Profiles of Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts in Response to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ama Szmolka

    Full Text Available The response of chicken to non-typhoidal Salmonella infection is becoming well characterised but the role of particular cell types in this response is still far from being understood. Therefore, in this study we characterised the response of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs to infection with two different S. Enteritidis strains by microarray analysis. The expression of chicken genes identified as significantly up- or down-regulated (≥3-fold by microarray analysis was verified by real-time PCR followed by functional classification of the genes and prediction of interactions between the proteins using Gene Ontology and STRING Database. Finally the expression of the newly identified genes was tested in HD11 macrophages and in vivo in chickens. Altogether 19 genes were induced in CEFs after S. Enteritidis infection. Twelve of them were also induced in HD11 macrophages and thirteen in the caecum of orally infected chickens. The majority of these genes were assigned different functions in the immune response, however five of them (LOC101750351, K123, BU460569, MOBKL2C and G0S2 have not been associated with the response of chicken to Salmonella infection so far. K123 and G0S2 were the only 'non-immune' genes inducible by S. Enteritidis in fibroblasts, HD11 macrophages and in the caecum after oral infection. The function of K123 is unknown but G0S2 is involved in lipid metabolism and in β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria.

  2. Prevention of Primary Cytomegalovirus Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Revello

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation: This controlled study provides evidence that an intervention based on the identification and hygiene counseling of CMV-seronegative pregnant women significantly prevents maternal infection. While waiting for CMV vaccine to become available, the intervention described may represent a responsible and acceptable primary prevention strategy to reduce congenital CMV.

  3. Infection prevention and control practitioners: improving engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    Every healthcare worker plays a vital part in minimising the risk of cross infection. Infection prevention and control (IPC) practitioners have the skills and competencies to assist organisations in improving engagement among staff and play a vital part in achieving this. IPC practitioners have skills in clinical practice, education, research and leadership, and these skills ensure high-quality care for patients and support strategies for engaging staff. This article highlights how IPC practitioners' skills and competencies are required for preventing infection and improving staff engagement. Engaged staff generate positive outcomes for both patients and staff, which is a welcome result for all healthcare organisations.

  4. PREVALENCE OF SALMONELLA IN CAPTIVE REPTILES FROM CROATIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Maja; Pedersen, Karl; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella

    2015-06-01

    Salmonellosis transmitted by pet reptiles is an increasing public health issue worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella strains from captive reptiles in Croatia. From November 2009 to November 2011 a total of 292 skin, pharyngeal, cloacal, and fecal samples from 200 apparently healthy reptiles were tested for Salmonella excretions by bacteriologic culture and serotyping. These 200 individual reptiles included 31 lizards, 79 chelonians, and 90 snakes belonging to private owners or housed at the Zagreb Zoo, Croatia. Salmonella was detected in a total of 13% of the animals, among them 48.4% lizards, 8.9% snakes, and 3.8% turtles. Representatives of five of the six Salmonella enterica subspecies were identified with the following proportions in the total number of isolates: Salmonella enterica enterica 34.6%, Salmonella enterica houtenae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica arizonae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica diarizonae 15.4%, and Salmonella enterica salamae 3.8%. The 14 different serovars isolated included several rarely occurring serovars such as Salmonella Apapa, Salmonella Halle, Salmonella Kisarawe, and Salmonella Potengi. These findings confirm that the prevalence of Salmonella is considerable in captive reptiles in Croatia, indicating that these animals may harbor serovars not commonly seen in veterinary or human microbiologic practice. This should be addressed in the prevention and diagnostics of human reptile-transmitted infections.

  5. US outbreak of human Salmonella infections associated with aquatic frogs, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettee Zarecki, Shauna L; Bennett, Sarah D; Hall, Julia; Yaeger, Jill; Lujan, Kate; Adams-Cameron, Marguerite; Winpisinger Quinn, Kim; Brenden, Rita; Biggerstaff, Gwen; Hill, Vincent R; Sholtes, Kari; Garrett, Nancy Marie; Lafon, Patti C; Barton Behravesh, Casey; Sodha, Samir V

    2013-04-01

    Although amphibians are known Salmonella carriers, no such outbreaks have been reported. We investigated a nationwide outbreak of human Salmonella Typhimurium infections occurring predominantly among children from 2008 to 2011. We conducted a matched case-control study. Cases were defined as persons with Salmonella Typhimurium infection yielding an isolate indistinguishable from the outbreak strain. Controls were persons with recent infection with Salmonella strains other than the outbreak strain and matched to cases by age and geography. Environmental samples were obtained from patients' homes; traceback investigations were conducted. We identified 376 cases from 44 states from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2011; 29% (56/193) of patients were hospitalized and none died. Median patient age was 5 years (range <1-86 years); 69% were children <10 years old (253/367). Among 114 patients interviewed, 69 (61%) reported frog exposure. Of patients who knew frog type, 79% (44/56) reported African dwarf frogs (ADF), a type of aquatic frog. Among 18 cases and 29 controls, illness was significantly associated with frog exposure (67% cases versus 3% controls, matched odds ratio 12.4, 95% confidence interval 1.9-infinity). Environmental samples from aquariums containing ADFs in 8 patients' homes, 2 ADF distributors, and a day care center yielded isolates indistinguishable from the outbreak strain. Traceback investigations of ADFs from patient purchases converged to a common ADF breeding facility. Environmental samples from the breeding facility yielded the outbreak strain. ADFs were the source of this nationwide pediatric predominant outbreak. Pediatricians should routinely inquire about pet ownership and advise families about illness risks associated with animals.

  6. Rice hull smoke extract inactivates Salmonella Typhimurium in laboratory media and protects infected mice against mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Phil; Kang, Mi Young; Park, Jun Cheol; Nam, Seok Hyun; Friedman, Mendel

    2012-01-01

    A previously characterized rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) was tested for bactericidal activity against Salmonella Typhimurium using the disc-diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of RHSE was 0.822% (v/v). The in vivo antibacterial activity of RHSE (1.0%, v/v) was also examined in a Salmonella-infected Balb/c mouse model. Mice infected with a sublethal dose of the pathogens were administered intraperitoneally a 1.0% solution of RHSE at four 12-h intervals during the 48-h experimental period. The results showed that RHSE inhibited bacterial growth by 59.4%, 51.4%, 39.6%, and 28.3% compared to 78.7%, 64.6%, 59.2%, and 43.2% inhibition with the medicinal antibiotic vancomycin (20 mg/mL). By contrast, 4 consecutive administrations at 12-h intervals elicited the most effective antibacterial effect of 75.0% and 85.5% growth reduction of the bacteria by RHSE and vancomycin, respectively. The combination of RHSE and vancomycin acted synergistically against the pathogen. The inclusion of RHSE (1.0% v/w) as part of a standard mouse diet fed for 2 wk decreased mortality of 10 mice infected with lethal doses of the Salmonella. Photomicrographs of histological changes in liver tissues show that RHSE also protected the liver against Salmonella-induced pathological necrosis lesions. These beneficial results suggest that the RHSE has the potential to complement wood-derived smokes as antimicrobial flavor formulations for application to human foods and animal feeds. The new antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory rice hull derived liquid smoke has the potential to complement widely used wood-derived liquid smokes as an antimicrobial flavor and health-promoting formulation for application to foods. Journal of Food Science © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists® No claim to US original government works.

  7. Sensitivity analysis to identify key parameters influencing Salmonella infection dynamics in a pig batch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurette, Amandine; Touzeau, Suzanne; Lamboni, Matieyendou; Monod, Hervé

    2009-05-07

    In the context of managed herds, epidemiological models usually take into account relatively complex interactions involving a high number of parameters. Some parameters may be uncertain and/or highly variable, especially epidemiological parameters. Their impact on the model outputs must then be assessed by a sensitivity analysis, allowing to identify key parameters. The prevalence over time is an output of particular interest in epidemiological models, so sensitivity analysis methods adapted to such dynamic output are needed. In this paper, such a sensitivity analysis method, based on a principal component analysis and on analysis of variance, is presented. It allows to compute a generalised sensitivity index for each parameter of a model representing Salmonella spread within a pig batch. The model is a stochastic discrete-time model describing the batch dynamics and movements between rearing rooms, from birth to slaughterhouse delivery. Four health states were introduced: Salmonella-free, seronegative shedder, seropositive shedder and seropositive carrier. The indirect transmission was modelled via an infection probability function depending on the quantity of Salmonella in the rearing room. Simulations were run according to a fractional factorial design enabling the estimation of main effects and two-factor interactions. For each of the 18 epidemiological parameters, four values were chosen, leading to 4096 scenarios. For each scenario, 15 replications were performed, leading to 61440 simulations. The sensitivity analysis was then conducted on the seroprevalence output. The parameters governing the infection probability function and residual room contaminations were identified as key parameters. To control the Salmonella seroprevalence, efficient measures should therefore aim at these parameters. Moreover, the shedding rate and maternal protective factor also had a major impact. Therefore, further investigation on the protective effect of maternal or post-infection

  8. Infection prevention in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Stephen Y; Theodoro, Daniel L; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Marschall, Jonas

    2014-09-01

    Infection prevention remains a major challenge in emergency care. Acutely ill and injured patients seeking evaluation and treatment in the emergency department (ED) not only have the potential to spread communicable infectious diseases to health care personnel and other patients, but are vulnerable to acquiring new infections associated with the care they receive. This article will evaluate these risks and review the existing literature for infection prevention practices in the ED, ranging from hand hygiene, standard and transmission-based precautions, health care personnel vaccination, and environmental controls to strategies for preventing health care-associated infections. We will conclude by examining what can be done to optimize infection prevention in the ED and identify gaps in knowledge where further research is needed. Successful implementation of evidence-based practices coupled with innovation of novel approaches and technologies tailored specifically to the complex and dynamic environment of the ED are the keys to raising the standard for infection prevention and patient safety in emergency care. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the intestinal microbiota of oligo-saccharide fed mice exhibiting reduced resistance to Salmonella infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne; Bergström, Anders; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2010-01-01

    Certain indigestible carbohydrates, known as prebiotics, are claimed to be beneficial for gut health through a selective stimulation of certain gut microbes including bifidobacteria. However, stimulation of such microbes does not necessarily imply a preventive effect against pathogen infection. We...... the observed effects on the pathogenesis of Salmonella. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the microbiota in faecal samples from mice fed FOS or XOS were different from faecal samples collected before the feeding trial as well as from faecal profiles generated from control animals...... of short-chain fatty acids was recorded. In conclusion, diets supplemented with FOS or XOS induced a number of microbial changes in the faecal microbiota of mice. The observed effects of XOS were qualitatively similar to those of FOS, but the most prominent bifidogenic effect was seen for XOS. An increased...

  10. Gross margin losses due to Salmonella Dublin infection in Danish dairy cattle herds estimated by simulation modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Dahl; Kudahl, Anne Braad; Østergaard, S.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Dublin affects production and animal health in cattle herds. The objective of this study was to quantify the gross margin (GM) losses following introduction and spread of S. Dublin within dairy herds. The GM losses were estimated using an age-structured stochastic, mechanistic...... losses. This was more influential in the poorer management scenarios due to increased number of infected cows. The results can be used to inform dairy farmers of the benefits of preventing introduction and controlling spread of S. Dublin. Furthermore, they can be used in cost-benefit analyses of control...... heifer were estimated through 1000 simulation iterations for 12 scenarios. These 12 scenarios were combinations of three herd sizes (85, 200 and 400 cows) and four management levels (very good, good, poor and very poor). Input parameters for effects of S. Dublin on production and animal health were based...

  11. Expression of antimicrobial peptides in cecal tonsils of chickens treated with probiotics and infected with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Haghighi, Hamid Reza; Chambers, James R; Brisbin, Jennifer; Read, Leah R; Sharif, Shayan

    2008-11-01

    Several strategies currently exist for control of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in the chicken intestine, among which the use of probiotics is of note. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of probiotic-mediated reduction of Salmonella colonization. In this study, we asked whether the effect of probiotics is mediated by antimicrobial peptides, including avian beta-defensins (also called gallinacins) and cathelicidins. Four treatment groups were included in this study: a negative-control group, a probiotic-treated group, a Salmonella-infected group, and a probiotic-treated and Salmonella-infected group. On days 1, 3, and 5 postinfection (p.i.), the cecal tonsils were removed, and RNA was extracted and used for measurement of avian beta-defensin 1 (AvBD1), AvBD2, AvBD4, AvBD6, and cathelicidin gene expression by real-time PCR. The expressions of all avian beta-defensins and cathelicidin were detectable in all groups, irrespective of treatment and time point. Probiotic treatment and Salmonella infection did not affect the expression of any of the investigated genes on day 1 p.i. Furthermore, probiotic treatment had no significant effect on the expression of the genes at either 3 or 5 days p.i. However, the expression levels of all five genes were significantly increased (P probiotics eliminated the effect of Salmonella infection on the expression of antimicrobial genes. These findings indicate that the expression of antimicrobial peptides may be repressed by probiotics in combination with Salmonella infection or, alternatively, point to the possibility that, due to a reduction in Salmonella load in the intestine, these genes may not be induced.

  12. Tuberculosis Vaccines and Prevention of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Tracey A.; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem A.; Evans, Thomas G.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Kublin, James G.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Self, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death worldwide despite the availability of effective chemotherapy for over 60 years. Although Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination protects against active TB disease in some populations, its efficacy is suboptimal. Development of an effective TB vaccine is a top global priority that has been hampered by an incomplete understanding of protective immunity to TB. Thus far, preventing TB disease, rather than infection, has been the primary target for vaccine development. Several areas of research highlight the importance of including preinfection vaccines in the development pipeline. First, epidemiology and mathematical modeling studies indicate that a preinfection vaccine would have a high population-level impact for control of TB disease. Second, immunology studies support the rationale for targeting prevention of infection, with evidence that host responses may be more effective during acute infection than during chronic infection. Third, natural history studies indicate that resistance to TB infection occurs in a small percentage of the population. Fourth, case-control studies of BCG indicate that it may provide protection from infection. Fifth, prevention-of-infection trials would have smaller sample sizes and a shorter duration than disease prevention trials and would enable opportunities to search for correlates of immunity as well as serve as a criterion for selecting a vaccine product for testing in a larger TB disease prevention trial. Together, these points support expanding the focus of TB vaccine development efforts to include prevention of infection as a primary goal along with vaccines or other interventions that reduce the rate of transmission and reactivation. PMID:25428938

  13. Influence of antibiotic-supplemented feed on occurrence and persistence of Salmonella typhimurium in experimentally infected swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzmann, F; Layton, H; Simkins, K; Jarolmen, H

    1976-06-01

    The effect of chlortetracycline given at a concentration of 220.5 g/metric ton of feed and of a combination product which supplies chlortetracycline (110.2 g/metric ton), sulfamethazine (110.2 g/metric ton), and penicilin G (55.1 g/metric ton) on the occurrence and persistence of Salmonella typhimurium in experimentally infected swine was studied. Weanling pigs (av weight, 8.2 kg) were inoculated via the feed with 10(11) colony-forming units of S typhimurium 298-1NA. An equal number of nonexposed swine given identical treatment were used as controls. Infected pigs had increased temperatures (maximal av, 41 C) for the first 4 days after infection and severe diarrhea during the first 21 days. The use of chlortetracycline and a combination product at subtherapeutic concentrations in feed did not increase the Salmonella pool or prolong the carrier state in swine. A decrease in number of Salmonella shed from swine given chlortetracycline at the concentration of 220.5 g/metric ton was observed. Significant differences did not occur in Salmonella-related deaths or in emergence of multiple antibiotic-resistant Salmonella by antibiotic selection or R factor transfer. Zoonotic transmission of the infecting Salmonella to animal caretakers was not detected.

  14. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-Infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosab Ahmadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic and route (oral gavage or vent lip of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration.

  15. Monitoring the efficacy of steam and formaldehyde treatment of naturally Salmonella-infected layer houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, K.O.; Jørgensen, J.C.; Andersen, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    steam treated in a download period, aiming at greater than or equal to60degreesC and 100% relative humidity (RH) during a 24-h period, with or without the addition of 30 ppm formaldehyde. In addition, two control layer houses were disinfected chemically. Salmonella samples taken from predetermined sites...... (where the temperature was logged at 5-min intervals) and tested for surviving bacteria. Generally, the field test results confirmed the results of laboratory tests, especially when 30 ppm formaldehyde was added to the steam. In well-sealed houses, the recommended temperature-humidity-time scheme...... was accomplished at a minimum of 10 cm above floor level within 1 h. Conclusions: A steam treatment of greater than or equal to60degreesC and 100% RH during a 24-h period with the addition of 30 ppm formaldehyde at the beginning of the process is recommended for eliminating Salmonella from naturally infected...

  16. Salmonella Enteritidis infection in young broiler chickens from breeding farm: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Poernomo

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available old from a breeding farm not far from Bogor. Samples were examined pathologic anatomically (PA and bacteriologically to isolate the causative agents . The sensitivity of the main causative agents isolated from the samples was tested with some drugs, while its pathogenicity was tested in 3 days old chickens intramuscularly, subcutaneously, intraperitoneally and orally, three chickens per inoculations . Exudative and caseous omphalitis, pericarditis, hepatitis, sirsacculitis, and coxofemoral and knee joints were observed in PA examinations, while on bacteriological examination the main cusative agent, ie. Salmonella Enteritidis was isolated successfully . Drug sensitivity test showed that the pathogen was sensitive to chloramphenicol, baytril, gentamisin, and sulphametoxazole-trimethoprim, and resistant to erythromycin, colistin, streptomycin and kanamycin . On the other hand, pathogenicity test of the isolate showed that all but two chickens which were inoculated orally, were died 24 hours post-inoculation . It was concluded that young broiler chickens of the farm were infected by Salmonella Enteritidis.

  17. Detection of Salmonella spp, Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium in naturally infected broiler chickens by a multiplex PCR-based assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. Paião

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Salmonella in the intestinal tract, on the chickens skin and among their feathers, may cause carcasses contamination during slaughtering and processing and possibly it is responsible by the introduction of this microorganism in the slaughterhouses. A rapid method to identify and monitor Salmonella and their sorovars in farm is becoming necessary. A pre-enriched multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR assay employing specific primers was developed and used to detect Salmonella at the genus level and to identify the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium in broiler chicken swab samples. The method was validated by testing DNA extract from 90 fresh culture cloacal swab samples from poultry chicken cultured in phosphate buffer peptone water at 37 ºC for 18 h. The final results showed the presence of Salmonella spp. in 25% of samples, S. Enteritidis was present in 12% of the Salmonella-positive samples and S. Typhimurium in 3% of the samples. The m-PCR assay developed in this study is a specific and rapid alternative method for the identification of Salmonella spp. and allowed the observation of specific serovar contamination in the field conditions within the locations where these chickens are typically raised.

  18. Detection of Salmonella spp, Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium in naturally infected broiler chickens by a multiplex PCR-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paião, F G; Arisitides, L G A; Murate, L S; Vilas-Bôas, G T; Vilas-Boas, L A; Shimokomaki, M

    2013-01-01

    The presence of Salmonella in the intestinal tract, on the chickens skin and among their feathers, may cause carcasses contamination during slaughtering and processing and possibly it is responsible by the introduction of this microorganism in the slaughterhouses. A rapid method to identify and monitor Salmonella and their sorovars in farm is becoming necessary. A pre-enriched multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) assay employing specific primers was developed and used to detect Salmonella at the genus level and to identify the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in broiler chicken swab samples. The method was validated by testing DNA extract from 90 fresh culture cloacal swab samples from poultry chicken cultured in phosphate buffer peptone water at 37 °C for 18 h. The final results showed the presence of Salmonella spp. in 25% of samples, S. Enteritidis was present in 12% of the Salmonella-positive samples and S. Typhimurium in 3% of the samples. The m-PCR assay developed in this study is a specific and rapid alternative method for the identification of Salmonella spp. and allowed the observation of specific serovar contamination in the field conditions within the locations where these chickens are typically raised.

  19. A mixture containing galactooligosaccharide, produced by the enzymic activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum, reduces Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Laura E J; Best, Angus; Nunez, Alejandro; Salguero, Francisco J; Johnson, Linda; Weyer, Ute; Dugdale, Alexandra H; Cooley, William A; Carter, Ben; Jones, Gareth; Tzortzis, George; Woodward, Martin J; La Ragione, Roberto M

    2009-01-01

    The prebiotic Bimuno is a mixture containing galactooligosaccharide, produced by the galactosyltransferase activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum NCIMB 41171 in the presence of lactose. Previous studies have implicated prebiotics in reducing infections by enteric pathogens, thus it was hypothesized that Bimuno may confer some protection in the murine host from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) infection. In this study, infection caused by S. Typhimurium SL1344nal(r) in the presence or absence of Bimuno was assessed using tissue culture assays, a murine ligated ileal gut loop model and a murine oral challenge model. In tissue culture adherence and invasion assays with HT-29-16E cells, the presence of approximately 2 mM Bimuno significantly reduced the invasion of S. Typhimurium SL1344nal(r) (PBimuno prevented colonization and the associated pathology of S. Typhimurium. In the BALB/c mouse model, the oral delivery of Bimuno prior to challenge with S. Typhimurium resulted in significant reductions in colonization in the five organs sampled, with highly significant reductions being observed in the spleen at 72 and 96 h post-challenge (P=0.0002, Bimuno significantly reduced the colonization and pathology associated with S. Typhimurium infection in a murine model system, possibly by reducing the invasion of the pathogen into host cells.

  20. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis infection associated with pet guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Michael L; Heffernan, Richard T; Wright, Jennifer G; Klos, Rachel F; Monson, Timothy; Khan, Sofiya; Trees, Eija; Sabol, Ashley; Willems, Robert A; Flynn, Raymond; Deasy, Marshall P; Jones, Benjamen; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella causes about one million illnesses annually in the United States. Although most infections result from foodborne exposures, animal contact is an important mode of transmission. We investigated a case of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) sternal osteomyelitis in a previously healthy child who cared for two recently deceased guinea pigs (GPs). A case was defined as SE pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) XbaI pattern JEGX01.0021, BlnI pattern JEGA26.0002 (outbreak strain) infection occurring during 2010 in a patient who reported GP exposure. To locate outbreak strain isolates, PulseNet and the US Department of Agriculture National Veterinary Service Laboratories (NVSL) databases were queried. Outbreak strain isolates underwent multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Traceback and environmental investigations were conducted at homes, stores, and breeder or broker facilities. We detected 10 cases among residents of eight states and four NVSL GP outbreak strain isolates. One patient was hospitalized; none died. The median patient age was 9.5 (range, 1-61) years. Among 10 patients, two purchased GPs at independent stores, and three purchased GPs at different national retail chain (chain A) store locations; three were chain A employees and two reported GP exposures of unknown characterization. MLVA revealed four related patterns. Tracebacks identified four distributors and 92 sources supplying GPs to chain A, including one breeder potentially supplying GPs to all case-associated chain A stores. All environmental samples were Salmonella culture-negative. A definitive SE-contaminated environmental source was not identified. Because GPs can harbor Salmonella, consumers and pet industry personnel should be educated regarding risks.

  1. [Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection presenting as a retrocecal mass in an 8-year-old child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle Mbou, V; Vu Thien, H; Thuilleux, G; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Grand d'Esnon, A; Coulomb, A

    2010-11-01

    Minor salmonellosis is due to Gram-negative bacilli, which usually cause enterocolitis with potentially severe complications. We report on a case of a clinically uncommon presentation of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection in an 8-year-old child who presented with acute abdominal pain. We discuss clinically uncommon presentations of salmonella disease in children, as well as its pathology and radiology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis infection alters the indigenous microbiota diversity in young layer chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khin Khine Zar Mon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Avian gastrointestinal tracts are highly populated with a diverse array of microorganisms that share a symbiotic relationship with their hosts and contribute to the overall health and disease state of the intestinal tract. The microbiome of the young chick is easily prone to alteration in its composition by both exogenous and endogenous factors especially during the early post-hatch period. The genetic background of the host and exposure to pathogens can impact the diversity of the microbial profile that consequently contributes to the disease progression in the host. The objective of this study was to profile the composition and structure of the gut microbiota in young chickens from two genetically distinct highly inbred lines. Furthermore, the effect of the Salmonella Enteritidis infection on altering the composition makeup of the chicken microbiome was evaluated through the 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. One-day-old layer chicks were challenged with S. Enteritidis and the host cecal microbiota profile as well as the degree of susceptibility to Salmonella infection was examined at 2 and 7 days post-infection. Our result indicated that host genotype had a limited effect on resistance to S. Enteritidis infection. Alpha diversity, beta diversity, and overall microbiota composition were analyzed for four factors: host genotype, age, treatment, and post-infection time-points. S. Enteritidis infection in young chicks was found to significantly reduce the overall diversity of the microbiota population with expansion of Enterobacteriaceae family. These changes indicated that Salmonella colonization in the gastrointestinal tract of the chickens has a direct effect on altering the natural development of the gastrointestinal microbiota. The impact of S. Enteritidis infection on microbial communities was also more substantial in late stage of infection. Significant inverse correlation between Enterobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae family in both non-infected

  3. Protective effect of probiotics on Salmonella infectivity assessed with combined in vitro gut fermentation-cellular models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihler Annina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate assessment of probiotics with targeted anti-Salmonella activity requires suitable models accounting for both, microbe-microbe and host-microbe interactions in gut environments. Here we report the combination of two original in vitro intestinal models closely mimicking the complex in vivo conditions of the large intestine. Effluents from continuous in vitro three-stage fermentation colonic models of Salmonella Typhimurium infection inoculated with immobilized child microbiota and Salmonella were directly applied to confluent mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cell layers. The effects of Salmonella, addition of two bacteriocinogenic strains, Bifidobacterium thermophilum RBL67 (thermophilicin B67 and Escherichia coli L1000 (microcin B17, and inulin were tested on Salmonella growth and interactions with epithelial cell layers. Salmonella adhesion and invasion were investigated and epithelial integrity assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER measurements and confocal microscopy observation. Data from complex effluents were compared with pure Salmonella cultures. Results Salmonella in effluents of all reactors of the colonic fermentation model stabilized at mean values of 5.3 ± 0.8 log10 cfu/ml effluent. Invasion of cell-associated Salmonella was up to 50-fold lower in complex reactor samples compared to pure Salmonella cultures. It further depended on environmental factors, with 0.2 ± 0.1% being measured with proximal, 0.6 ± 0.2% with transverse and 1.3 ± 0.7% with distal reactor effluents, accompanied by a similar high decrease of TER across cell monolayers (minus 45% and disruption of tight junctions. Subsequent addition of E. coli L1000 stimulated Salmonella growth (6.4 ± 0.6 log10 cfu/ml effluent of all 3 reactors and further decreased TER, but led to 10-fold decreased invasion efficiency when tested with distal reactor samples. In contrast, presence of B. thermophilum RBL67 revealed a protective effect on

  4. A retrospective study of community-acquired Salmonella infections in patients attending public hospitals in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Kabiru Olusegun; Oshundare, Yetunde O; Oyeyinka, Oladeji G; Coker, Akitoye Olusegun

    2012-05-14

    A retrospective cohort study on Salmonella-associated diseases (SADs) was conducted in 14 public hospitals across Lagos State, Nigeria, between 1999 and 2008. Medical records of clinically diagnosed patients with confirmed Salmonella infections were reviewed for the 10-year period. Laboratory diagnosis of typhoid fever cases in all the hospitals were first based on Widal agglutination tests then followed by culture, while non-typhoidal Salmonella infections were based on culture technique. A total of 85,187 confirmed cases of SADs were found, of which 880 deaths were recorded (case-fatality rate = 1.03% / 10 years). The mean incidence of SADs in Lagos State for the 10-year period was estimated at 45 cases per 100,000 persons/year, while that of typhoid fever alone was 16 cases per 100,000 persons/year. During the studied period, the number of deaths due to typhoid fever was significantly (P Salmonella-associated diseases were most prevalent in adults 21 to 30 years of age (49.49%). Cases of patients with invasive Salmonella-associated gastroenteritis were observed mainly in children under five years of age. The current surveillance data indicated high incidence of SADs in areas exposed to environmental contaminations. This study revealed that infections caused by Salmonella enterica serovars are endemic in our environment thus poses a serious threat to public health. Constant public health education is essential to avert undue epidemics.

  5. Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens: Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... chickens: Effects of challenge dose on serum immunoglobulin G antibody response. Ishola, Olayinka Olabisi1* and Holt, Peter.S.2. 1Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. 2Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit, United States Department of ...

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strains Implicated in Infections of Avian and Human Hosts

    KAUST Repository

    An, Ran

    2018-01-24

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a wide-host-range pathogen. Occasionally, it is involved in invasive infections, leading to a high mortality rate. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of four S Enteritidis strains obtained from human and avian hosts that had been involved in bacteremia, gastroenteritis, and primary infections.

  7. Investigating Salmonella Eko from Various Sources in Nigeria by Whole Genome Sequencing to Identify the Source of Human Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimlapas Leekitcharoenphon

    Full Text Available Twenty-six Salmonella enterica serovar Eko isolated from various sources in Nigeria were investigated by whole genome sequencing to identify the source of human infections. Diversity among the isolates was observed and camel and cattle were identified as the primary reservoirs and the most likely source of the human infections.

  8. Preventing the spread of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Nicky

    Approximately 96,000 people are living with HIV in the UK, a quarter of whom are unaware they are infected. While in some parts of the world the number of people newly infected with HIV has fallen, in the UK in 2011 there was a rise in the number of men who have sex with men being diagnosed. HIV prevention strategies are a public health priority, while ongoing research into HIV testing in all clinical settings remains a priority. This article explores preventive measures that can be used to reduce the spread of HIV and offers advice on how nurses can contribute to these.

  9. IMPACT OF FOOD AND FOLATE SUPPLEMENTATION DURING Salmonella TYPHI INFECTION IN Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagavathi Sundaram Sivamaruthi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is an instructive and suitable model for studying pathogenesis of almost all human pathogens. Salmonella Typhi is gram-negative facultative intracellular anaerobe that causes several pathetic infections. Necessary enriched nutrient ingestion during pathological conditions may reduce the harshness of the infection. We investigated the impact of folate and food supplementation during S. Typhi infection on the model system, C. elegans. Our data indicated that folate supplementation (10 µg increases the lifespan of S. Typhi infected C. elegans up to 20%. In combination with laboratory food source E. coli OP50, folate increases the infected the worm’s lifespan to 40%. The wild type C. elegans infected by S. Typhi died with the LT50 of 60 ± 12 h. The LT50 of S. Typhi infected folt-1 mutant strain VC959 was 96 ± 6 h. However, the folate supplemented mutant worms exhibited an extended life with LT50 of 120 ± 6 h. The short time exposure and pharyngeal pumping studies confirmed that folt-1 mutant worm exhibited increased survival rate during pathogenic course at significant level when compared to wild-type. Our data revealed that folt-1 plays a significant role in host defense system against S. Typhi infection and the folate supplementation in combination with food increases the host survival during S. Typhi infection.

  10. Interleukin-10 Production by T and B Cells Is a Key Factor to Promote Systemic Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infection in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldyne A. Salazar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a Gram-negative bacterium that produces disease in numerous hosts. In mice, oral inoculation is followed by intestinal colonization and subsequent systemic dissemination, which leads to severe pathogenesis without the activation of an efficient anti-Salmonella immune response. This feature suggests that the infection caused by S. Typhimurium may promote the production of anti-inflammatory molecules by the host that prevent efficient T cell activation and bacterial clearance. In this study, we describe the contribution of immune cells producing the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 to the systemic infection caused by S. Typhimurium in mice. We observed that the production of IL-10 was required by S. Typhimurium to cause a systemic disease, since mice lacking IL-10 (IL-10−/− were significantly more resistant to die after an infection as compared to wild-type (WT mice. IL-10−/− mice had reduced bacterial loads in internal organs and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum at 5 days of infection. Importantly, WT mice showed high bacterial loads in tissues and no increase of cytokines in serum after 5 days of S. Typhimurium infection, except for IL-10. In WT mice, we observed a peak of il-10 messenger RNA production in ileum, spleen, and liver after 5 days of infection. Importantly, the adoptive transfer of T or B cells from WT mice restored the susceptibility of IL-10−/− mice to systemic S. Typhimurium infection, suggesting that the generation of regulatory cells in vivo is required to sustain a systemic infection by S. Typhimurium. These findings support the notion that IL-10 production from lymphoid cells is a key process in the infective cycle of S. Typhimurium in mice due to generation of a tolerogenic immune response that prevents bacterial clearance and supports systemic dissemination.

  11. Effects of sexual maturation and Salmonella infection on the expression of Toll-like receptors in the chicken vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidis, G; Theodoridis, A; Avdi, M

    2011-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a critical component of the innate immune response in many vertebrates, including avian species. The recent findings of chicken TLRs (cTLRs) expression in ovarian follicles and in the chicken ovary in vivo, as well as the changes in their expression in response to lipopolysaccharide or Salmonella enteritidis (SE) infection, have broad implications for reproductive physiology and for the prevention of transmission of zoonotic diseases to humans through the consumption of contaminated poultry eggs. Because the main route of egg contamination is from infection of the oviduct and mainly from the vagina, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the ten cTLRs identified to date in the chicken oviduct in vivo, to determine whether sexual maturation affects their mRNA abundance and to investigate whether SE infection alters the expression of TLRs in the chicken vagina. RNA was extracted from the vagina of healthy prepubertal, sexually mature and aged birds, and from sexually mature and aged SE infected birds. RT-PCR analysis revealed that all types of cTLRs apart from TLR1-1 were expressed in the vagina of sexually mature birds. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA abundance of TLR2-1, 2-2 and 4 differ with respect to sexual maturation in the chicken vagina. SE infection resulted in a significant induction of TLR5 and 15 in the vagina of sexually mature birds, and in a significant induction of TLR2-1, 4 and 15 in the vagina of aged birds, while a significant down-regulation was observed for TLR7 in the vagina of sexually mature birds. These findings suggest that a TLR mediated immune response mechanism exists in the chicken vagina, playing a crucial role in preventing microbial pathogens from being incorporated into newly forming eggs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A recurrent, multistate outbreak of salmonella serotype agona infections associated with dry, unsweetened cereal consumption, United States, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Elizabeth T; Biggerstaff, Gwen; Hoekstra, R Michael; Meyer, Stephanie; Patel, Nehal; Miller, Benjamin; Quick, Rob

    2013-02-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Agona infections associated with nationwide distribution of cereal from Company X was identified in April 2008. This outbreak was detected using PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance, which coincided with Company X's voluntary recall of unsweetened puffed rice and wheat cereals after routine product sampling yielded Salmonella Agona. A case patient was defined as being infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agona, with illness onset from 1 January through 1 July 2008. Case patients were interviewed using a standard questionnaire, and the proportion of ill persons who reported eating Company X puffed rice cereal was compared with Company X's market share data using binomial testing. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture inspected the cereal production facility and collected both product and environmental swab samples. Routine surveillance identified 33 case patients in 17 states. Of 32 patients interviewed, 24 (83%) reported eating Company X puffed rice cereal. Company X puffed rice cereal represented 0.063% of the total ready-to-eat dry cereal market share in the United States at the time of the investigation. Binomial testing suggested that the proportion of exposed case patients would not likely occur by chance (P < 0.0001). Of 17 cereal samples collected from case patient homes for laboratory testing, 2 (12%) yielded Salmonella Agona indistinguishable from the outbreak strain. Twelve environmental swabs and nine product samples from the cereal plant yielded the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agona. Company X cereal was implicated in a similar outbreak of Salmonella Agona infection in 1998 with the same outbreak strain linked to the same production facility. We hypothesize that a recent construction project at this facility created an open wall near the cereal production area allowing reintroduction of Salmonella Agona into the product, highlighting the

  13. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 infection in experimentally challenged weaned pigs fed a lactobacillus-fermented feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fugui; Farzan, Abdolvahab; Wang, Qi Chuck; Yu, Hai; Yin, Yulong; Hou, Yongqing; Friendship, Robert; Gong, Joshua

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen and commonly present on pig farms. Probiotics have shown potential as a means of reducing Salmonella shedding in pigs. Three experimental challenge trials were conducted to investigate the potential application of newly isolated Lactobacillus isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in pigs. In each trial, 16 Yorkshire piglets (28-d old) were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 dietary treatments: (1) basal diet (BD), (2) naturally fermented (NF) feed, (3) Lactobacillus zeae-fermented (LZ-F) feed, and 4) Lactobacillus casei-fermented (LC-F) feed. All pigs consumed their assigned diets for 3 d prior to the challenge of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (approximately 6 log colony-forming units/pig) through gavage. Pediococcus pentosaceus, L. zeae, and L. casei were most abundant in NF, LZ-F, and LC-F feed, respectively. After the challenge, pigs on fermented feed had lower rectal temperature, diarrhea scores, serum haptoglobin concentrations, and intestinal Salmonella counts than the control group (BD) (p ≤ 0.01). Salmonella spp. were detected in both ileocecal lymph nodes (ICLN) and spleens from all pigs on BD, NF, and LC-F, but only 50% of spleens from pigs on LZ-F. Pigs had a dynamic spatial and temporal immune response to Salmonella infection and dietary treatments, as indicated by up- and downregulation in gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor) in the ileum, ICLN, and spleen. The alternation in cytokine expression by fermented feed, particularly LZ-F, appeared to benefit pigs in combating Salmonella infection.

  14. Hatchery-borne Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee infections in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J.P.; Brown, D.J.; Madsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    of S. enterica serovar Tennessee isolates from Danish broilers (1992 to 1995), the suspected hatchery and strains from various other sources included for comparison was initiated in order to trace the source of infection of the broilers. In general, strains of S. enterica ser. Tennessee showed only...... minor genotypic variation. Three different ribotypes were demonstrated when EcoRI was used for digestion of DNA. Two types were obtained by the use of HindIII. Nine different plasmids and seven different plasmid profiles were demonstrated. A 180 kb plasmid was, however, only demonstrated in isolates...

  15. A Multistate Investigation of Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- Infections as Part of an International Outbreak Associated with Frozen Feeder Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Cartwright, E. J.; Nguyen, T.; Melluso, C.; Ayers, T.; Lane, C.; Hodges, A.; Li, X.; Quammen, J.; Yendell, S. J.; Adams, J.; Mitchell, J.; Rickert, R.; Klos, R.; Williams, I. T.; Behravesh, C. Barton

    2015-01-01

    While most human Salmonella infections result from exposure to contaminated foods, an estimated 11% of all Salmonella infections are attributed to animal exposures, including both direct animal handling and indirect exposures such as cleaning cages and handling contaminated pet food. This report describes the epidemiologic, environmental and laboratory investigations conducted in the United States as part of the response to an international outbreak of tetracycline-resistant Salmonella enteri...

  16. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids. Part I: effects on growth performance, microbial populations, and immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M C; Rostagno, M H; Gardiner, G E; Sutton, A L; Richert, B T; Radcliffe, J S

    2012-01-01

    Pigs (n = 88) weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age were used in a 14-d study to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on growth, immune status, Salmonella infection and shedding, and intestinal microbial populations after intranasal inoculation of Salmonella Typhimurium (10(10) cfu/pig). Pigs were challenged with Salmonella 6 d after commencement of water treatments. Treatments were 1) control diet; 2) control diet + DFM (Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus licheniformis) in drinking water at 10(9) cfu/L for each strain of bacteria; 3) control diet + an organic acid-based blend (predominantly propionic, acetic, and benzoic acid) in drinking water at 2.58 mL/L; and 4) control diet + 55 mg/kg of carbadox. Serum samples were taken on d 6, 8, 10, and 14 for determination of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) concentrations. Fecal samples were taken on d 0, 5, 7, and 11 for determination of Salmonella shedding and enumeration of coliforms. Pigs were euthanized on d 6, 8, 10, and 14. Intestinal and cecal tissue and digesta and mesenteric lymph nodes were sampled and analyzed for Salmonella. Duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosal scrapings were sampled for measurement of mucosal TNFα concentrations. Water delivery of DFM prevented a decline in ADG on d 2 to 6 postchallenge compared with the negative control (P prevalence in the feces, gastrointestinal tract, or lymph nodes was not affected by water delivery of acids or DFM. Serum and mucosal TNFα concentrations were not affected by treatment throughout the study with the exception of ileal concentrations on d 4 postchallenge, which were greater in the negative control group compared with all other treatments (P antibiotic was the only treatment that reduced Salmonella prevalence and this was localized to the cecum on d 8 postinfection. In conclusion, the DFM and organic acid treatments used in this study offered little or no benefits to pigs infected with Salmonella and

  17. Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis infection of the porcine jejunal Peyer's patch rapidly induces IL-1beta and IL-8 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Kendra A; Brown, David R; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2006-01-15

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is an enteric pathogen of swine, producing septicemia, enterocolitis, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The initial molecular events at the site of Salmonella infection are hypothesized to be critical in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses; however, the acute immune response elicited by porcine intestinal tissues is not well understood. To address this need, we employed explants of jejunal Peyer's patch (JPP) mucosa from pigs to examine Salmonella-induced immune responses under controlled conditions as well as to overcome limitations of whole animal approaches. JPP explants mounted in Ussing chambers maintained normal histological structure for 2 h and stable short-circuit current and electrical conductance for 2.5 h. After ex vivo luminal exposure to Salmonella serovar Choleraesuis, JPP responded with an increase in mRNA expression of IL-1beta and IL-8, but not TNFalpha. Increased IL-1beta and IL-8 expression were dependent on efficient Salmonella adhesion and internalization, whereas mutant Salmonella did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. Commensal enteric bacteria, present in some experiments, also did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicate that Salmonella uptake by Peyer's patch is important in the induction of an innate response involving expression of IL-1beta and IL-8, and that ex vivo intestinal immune tissue explants provide an intact tissue model that will facilitate investigation of mucosal immunity in swine.

  18. Preconception care: preventing and treating infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imam, Ayesha M; Dean, Sohni V; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-09-26

    Infections can impact the reproductive health of women and hence may influence pregnancy related outcomes for both the mother and the child. These infections range from sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to TORCHS infections to periodontal disease to systemic infections and may be transmitted to the fetus during pregnancy, labor, delivery or breastfeeding. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconception care for adolescents, women and couples of reproductive age on MNCH outcomes. A comprehensive strategy was used to search electronic reference libraries, and both observational and clinical controlled trials were included. Cross-referencing and a separate search strategy for each preconception risk and intervention ensured wider study capture. Preconception behavioral interventions significantly declines re-infection or new STI rates by 35% (95% CI: 20-47%). Further, condom use has been shown to be the most effective way to prevent HIV infection (85% protection in prospective studies) through sexual intercourse. Intervention trials showed that preconception vaccination against tetanus averted a significant number of neonatal deaths (including those specifically due to tetanus) when compared to placebo in women receiving more than 1 dose of the vaccine (OR 0.28; 95% CI: 0.15-0.52); (OR 0.02; 95% CI: 0.00-0.28) respectively. Preconception counseling should be offered to women of reproductive age as soon as they test HIV-positive, and conversely women of reproductive age should be screened with their partners before pregnancy. Risk assessment, screening, and treatment for specific infections should be a component of preconception care because there is convincing evidence that treatment of these infections before pregnancy prevents neonatal infections.

  19. The type VI secretion system encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 19 is required for Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum survival within infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Carlos J; Jiménez, Juan C; Leiva, Lorenzo E; Alvarez, Sergio A; Pinto, Bernardo I; Contreras, Francisca; Pezoa, David; Santiviago, Carlos A; Contreras, Inés

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum is the causative agent of fowl typhoid, a disease characterized by high morbidity and mortality that causes major economic losses in poultry production. We have reported that S. Gallinarum harbors a type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 19 (SPI-19) that is required for efficient colonization of chicks. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the SPI-19 T6SS functionality and to investigate the mechanisms behind the phenotypes previously observed in vivo. Expression analyses revealed that SPI-19 T6SS core components are expressed and produced under in vitro bacterial growth conditions. However, secretion of the structural/secreted components Hcp1, Hcp2, and VgrG to the culture medium could not be determined, suggesting that additional signals are required for T6SS-dependent secretion of these proteins. In vitro bacterial competition assays failed to demonstrate a role for SPI-19 T6SS in interbacterial killing. In contrast, cell culture experiments with murine and avian macrophages (RAW264.7 and HD11, respectively) revealed production of a green fluorescent protein-tagged version of VgrG soon after Salmonella uptake. Furthermore, infection of RAW264.7 and HD11 macrophages with deletion mutants of SPI-19 or strains with genes encoding specific T6SS core components (clpV and vgrG) revealed that SPI-19 T6SS contributes to S. Gallinarum survival within macrophages at 20 h postuptake. SPI-19 T6SS function was not linked to Salmonella-induced cytotoxicity or cell death of infected macrophages, as has been described for other T6SS. Our data indicate that SPI-19 T6SS corresponds to a novel tool used by Salmonella to survive within host cells.

  20. A study of the dynamics of Salmonella infection in turkey breeding, rearing and finishing houses with special reference to elimination, persistence and introduction of Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Doblies, Doris; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Davies, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    In this descriptive study, the dynamics of Salmonella infection of turkey flocks were investigated by repeated sampling of houses where Salmonella had been identified. The aim of the study was to identify the most common scenarios involved in elimination, persistence and introduction of Salmonella in the different branches of the turkey industry. Sixty-two houses on 34 turkey farms (comprising breeding, rearing and finishing farms) were sampled longitudinally, starting with the identification of a positive flock. A total of 117 follow-on flocks were tested and cleaning and disinfection (C&D) was assessed during 66 post-C&D visits. A total of 155 incidents (clearance, persistence or introduction of Salmonella) were recorded. Persistence was seen in 35.5% of incidents and was seen more frequently in breeding and rearing houses compared with finishing houses. Most persistence incidents were the result of insufficient C&D. Clearance was seen in 40% of incidents and was more often observed in finishing houses than in breeding or rearing houses. Introduction was seen in 24.5% of incidents and was more common in breeding and finishing flocks than in rearing flocks. Contamination of a house with Salmonella Typhimurium was more likely to be cleared compared with other serovars. The total number of positive samples found at a post-C&D visit was correlated with the probability of carry-over of infection, whereas the location of the positive samples seemed to be less important. Our highly sensitive post-C&D sampling method allowed us to predict a negative follow-on flock in most cases.

  1. Guidelines for prevention of hospital acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yatin; Gupta, Abhinav; Todi, Subhash; Myatra, Sn; Samaddar, D P; Patil, Vijaya; Bhattacharya, Pradip Kumar; Ramasubban, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    These guidelines, written for clinicians, contains evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of hospital acquired infections Hospital acquired infections are a major cause of mortality and morbidity and provide challenge to clinicians. Measures of infection control include identifying patients at risk of nosocomial infections, observing hand hygiene, following standard precautions to reduce transmission and strategies to reduce VAP, CR-BSI, CAUTI. Environmental factors and architectural lay out also need to be emphasized upon. Infection prevention in special subsets of patients - burns patients, include identifying sources of organism, identification of organisms, isolation if required, antibiotic prophylaxis to be used selectively, early removal of necrotic tissue, prevention of tetanus, early nutrition and surveillance. Immunodeficient and Transplant recipients are at a higher risk of opportunistic infections. The post tranplant timetable is divided into three time periods for determining risk of infections. Room ventilation, cleaning and decontamination, protective clothing with care regarding food requires special consideration. Monitoring and Surveillance are prioritized depending upon the needs. Designated infection control teams should supervise the process and help in collection and compilation of data. Antibiotic Stewardship Recommendations include constituting a team, close coordination between teams, audit, formulary restriction, de-escalation, optimizing dosing, active use of information technology among other measure. The recommendations in these guidelines are intended to support, and not replace, good clinical judgment. The recommendations are rated by a letter that indicates the strength of the recommendation and a Roman numeral that indicates the quality of evidence supporting the recommendation, so that readers can ascertain how best to apply the recommendations in their practice environments.

  2. Reduction of risk of Salmonella infection from kitchen cleaning clothes by use of sodium hypochlorite disinfectant cleaner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaidez, C; Soto-Beltran, M; Gerba, C P; Tamimi, A H

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the reduction of infection risk due to exposure to Salmonella sp. in kitchen cleaning clothes by the use of a bleach (sodium hypochlorite) cleaner utilizing a continuous-time dynamic exposure model. The only route of exposure considered was hand contamination during cloth use. The occurrence and numbers of Salmonella was studied in 60 homes over a 6-week period in which half disinfected kitchen cleaning clothes with a sodium hypochlorite based disinfectant cleaner. This study demonstrated that a significant risk exists for Salmonella infection from kitchen cleaning clothes in Mexican homes and that this risk can be reduced by almost 100-fold by soaking cleaning clothes in a bleach product. The risks of infection and illness could likely be further reduced by developing a more effective procedure for reducing Salmonella in cleaning clothes treated twice a day with a sodium hypochlorite disinfectant (i.e. longer soaking time) or using a greater concentration of the disinfectant. Hygiene intervention is a key strategy to reduce the potential risk of disease-causing micro-organisms in households. There is a lack of understanding of the human health risk associated with the use of contaminated kitchen cleaning cloths. The study used a quantitative microbial risk assessment to estimate the risk associated with the use of kitchen cleaning clothes by using disinfectant products. The results showed that the use of prescribe protocols can reduce the risk of Salmonella infections in household kitchens. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Hepcidin-(In)dependent Mechanisms of Iron Metabolism Regulation during Infection by Listeria and Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana C; Neves, João V; Silva, Tânia; Oliveira, Patrícia; Gomes, Maria S; Rodrigues, Pedro N

    2017-09-01

    During bacterial infection, the pathogenic agent and the host battle for iron, due to its importance for fundamental cellular processes. However, iron redistribution and sequestration during infection can culminate in anemia. Although hepcidin has been recognized as the key regulator of iron metabolism, in some infections its levels remain unaffected, suggesting the involvement of other players in iron metabolism deregulation. In this work, we use a mouse model to elucidate the main cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to iron redistribution during infection with two different pathogens: Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both infections clearly impacted iron metabolism, causing iron redistribution, decreasing serum iron levels, decreasing the saturation of transferrin, and increasing iron accumulation in the liver. Both infections were accompanied by the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, when analyzing iron-related gene expression in the liver, we observed that hepcidin was induced by S Typhimurium but not by L. monocytogenes In the latter model, the downregulation of hepatic ferroportin mRNA and protein levels suggested that ferroportin plays a major role in iron redistribution. On the other hand, S Typhimurium infection induced the expression of hepcidin mRNA, and we show here, for the first time in vivo, that this induction is Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) dependent. In this work, we compare several aspects of iron metabolism alterations induced by two different pathogens and suggest that hepcidin-(in)dependent mechanisms contribute to iron redistribution upon infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Detection of Salmonella spp, Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium in naturally infected broiler chickens by a multiplex PCR-based assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paião, F G; Arisitides, L G A; Murate, L S; Vilas-Bôas, G T; Vilas-Boas, L A; Shimokomaki, M

    2013-01-01

    The presence of Salmonella in the intestinal tract, on the chickens skin and among their feathers, may cause carcasses contamination during slaughtering and processing and possibly it is responsible...

  5. [83-year-old patient with salmonella bacteremia and infection-associated Sweet's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budniak, L; Schmiegel, W; Pox, C

    2013-01-01

    An 83 year-old man presented with watery diarrhea and a rash. He was hypotensive, febrile and dehydrated. The rash was maculopapular and most pronounced on the dorsal trunk. The lab tests showed an acute renal failure with hypokalemia and hyponatremia. Salmonella typhimurium was isolated from the aerobic blood culture, stool cultures were negative. The rash was consistent with an infection-associated Sweet's syndrome. THERAPY AND COURSE OF DISEASE: The patient was admitted and received iv fluids and potassium. An empiric antibiotic treatment with i. v. ciprofloxacin was started and changed to p. o. after 8 days. Antibiotic therapy was given 11 days total. After the administration of steroids the skin rash resolved. It is important to draw blood cultures in patients presenting with diarrhea if fever is present. Complications associated with non-typhoidal salmonella bacteremia occur most frequently in elderly patients and include pneumonia, infected aneurysms and bone/soft part infections. In rare cases patients can also present with a skin rash. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Laboratory, Environmental, and Epidemiologic Investigation and Regulatory Enforcement Actions in Response to an Outbreak of Salmonella Bredeney Infections Linked to Peanut Butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viazis, Stelios; Beal, Jennifer K; Monahan, Caitlin; Lanier, William A; Kreil, Katherine R; Melka, David C; Boden, William D; Dion, Jamie L; Miller, Zachary A; Nguyen, Thai-An; Gieraltowski, Laura B; Zink, Donald L

    2015-09-01

    Background.  In September 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and state and local partners investigated an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Bredeney linked to peanut butter (PB). Methods.  A case was defined as infection with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Bredeney between June 1, 2012 and October 31, 2012. Food exposure questionnaires were analyzed by the CDC to determine the food vehicle. The FDA reviewed production information from Retail Chain A's sole supplier of PB, Company A. The PB samples collected from case-patients and Company A were tested for Salmonella. Results.  Forty-two case-patients from 20 states were identified. Of 33 case-patients from whom food exposure information was obtained, 25 (76%) shopped at Retail Chain A and 25 (100%) purchased Company A PB. Three state health departments isolated the outbreak strain from opened jars of PB collected from case-patients. The FDA investigators identified multiple deficiencies in current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) in Company A's manufacturing facility and determined that internal controls were insufficient to prevent shipment of contaminated product. The FDA isolated the outbreak strain of Salmonella Bredeney from implicated product collected at the firm and the environment of the firm's food production facility. Conclusions.  Timely laboratory, investigational, and epidemiologic data led to the voluntary recall of PB by Company A. The FDA suspended Company A's food facility registration, prohibiting the firm from introducing food into interstate commerce. This outbreak underscores the need for effective preventive controls, including robust internal environmental monitoring programs, appropriate action in response to contamination findings, and an improved understanding of food safety at the managerial and corporate levels.

  7. Protective Effect of Moderate Exercise for BALB/c Mice with Salmonella Typhimurium Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, R; Godínez-Victoria, M; Arciniega-Martínez, I M; Reséndiz-Albor, A A; Reyna-Garfias, H; Cruz-Hernández, T R; Drago-Serrano, M E

    2016-01-01

    Moderate exercise enhances resistance to pathogen-associated infections. However, its influence on intestinal IgA levels and resistance to Salmonella typhimurium in mice has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of moderate exercise on bacterial resistance and the intestinal-IgA response in a murine typhoid model. Sedentary and exercised (under a protocol of moderate swimming) BALB/c mice were orally infected with Salmonella typhimurium and sacrificed on days 7 or 14 post-infection (n=5 per group). Compared with infected sedentary mice, infected exercised animals had i) lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads; ii) higher total and specific intestinal-IgA levels, iii) a higher percentage of IgA plasma cells in lamina propria; iv) a higher level on day 7 and lower level on day 14 of intestinal α- and J-chain mRNA and plasma corticosterone, v) unchanged mRNA expression of intestinal pIgR, and vi) a higher mRNA expression of liver pIgR, α-chain and J-chain on day 7. Hence, it is likely that an increase in corticosterone levels (stress response) induced by moderate exercise increased intestinal IgA levels by enabling greater liver expression of pIgR mRNA, leading to a rise in IgA transcytosis from the liver to intestine. The overall effect of these changes is an enhanced resistance to infection. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Salmonella infects B cells by macropinocytosis and formation of spacious phagosomes but does not induce pyroptosis in favor of its survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reyes, Roberto; Pérez-López, Araceli; Sánchez-Gómez, Concepción; Hernández-Mote, Rosaura Ruth; Castro-Eguiluz, Denisse; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia Mercedes

    2012-06-01

    We have previously reported that Salmonella infects B cells and survives within endosomal-lysosomal compartments. However, the mechanisms used by Salmonella to enter B cells remain unknown. In this study, we have shown that Salmonella induces its own entry by the induction of localized ruffling, macropinocytosis, and spacious phagosome formation. These events were associated with the rearrangement of actin and microtubule networks. The Salmonella pathogenesis island 1 (SPI-1) was necessary to invade B cells. In contrast to macrophages, B cells were highly resistant to cell death induced by Salmonella. These data demonstrate the ability of Salmonella to infect these non-professional phagocytic cells, where the bacterium can find an ideal intracellular niche to support persistence and the possible dissemination of infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A biologically conjugated polysaccharide vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium provides protection against challenge of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli O1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yue; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Wei, Yunan; Kong, Qingke

    2017-11-30

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) causes avian airsacculitis and colibacillosis, resulting in significant economic loss to the poultry industry. O1, O2 and O78 are the three predominant serotypes. O-antigen of lipopolysaccharide is serotype determinant and highly immunogenic, and O-antigen polysaccharide-based vaccines have great potential for preventing bacterial infections. In this study, we utilized a novel yeast/bacterial shuttle vector pSS26 to clone the 10.8 kb operon synthesizing APEC O1 O-antigen polysaccharide. The resulting plasmid was introduced into attenuated Salmonella vaccines to deliver this O-antigen polysaccharide. O1 O-antigen was stably synthesized in attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium, demonstrated by slide agglutination, silver staining and western blot. Our results also showed that APEC O1 O-antigen produced in the Salmonella vaccines was attached to bacterial cell surfaces, and the presence of heterologous O-antigen did not alter the resistance to surface-acting agents. Furthermore, birds immunized orally or intramuscularly provided protection against the virulent O1 APEC challenge. Salmonella vaccines carrying APEC O1 O-antigen gene cluster also induced high IgG and IgA immune responses against lipopolysaccharide from the APEC O1 strain. The use of our novel shuttle vector facilitates cloning of large DNA fragments, and this strategy could pave the way for production of Salmonella-vectored vaccines against prevalent APEC serotypes. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Inflammation drives thrombosis after Salmonella infection via CLEC-2 on platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Jessica R; Cook, Charlotte N; Bobat, Saeeda; Ross, Ewan A; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Lowe, Kate L; Khan, Mahmood; Dominguez-Medina, C Coral; Lax, Sian; Carvalho-Gaspar, Manuela; Hubscher, Stefan; Rainger, G Ed; Cobbold, Mark; Buckley, Christopher D; Mitchell, Tim J; Mitchell, Andrea; Jones, Nick D; Van Rooijen, N; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Henderson, Ian R; Adams, David H; Watson, Steve P; Cunningham, Adam F

    2015-12-01

    Thrombosis is a common, life-threatening consequence of systemic infection; however, the underlying mechanisms that drive the formation of infection-associated thrombi are poorly understood. Here, using a mouse model of systemic Salmonella Typhimurium infection, we determined that inflammation in tissues triggers thrombosis within vessels via ligation of C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) on platelets by podoplanin exposed to the vasculature following breaching of the vessel wall. During infection, mice developed thrombi that persisted for weeks within the liver. Bacteria triggered but did not maintain this process, as thrombosis peaked at times when bacteremia was absent and bacteria in tissues were reduced by more than 90% from their peak levels. Thrombus development was triggered by an innate, TLR4-dependent inflammatory cascade that was independent of classical glycoprotein VI-mediated (GPVI-mediated) platelet activation. After infection, IFN-γ release enhanced the number of podoplanin-expressing monocytes and Kupffer cells in the hepatic parenchyma and perivascular sites and absence of TLR4, IFN-γ, or depletion of monocytic-lineage cells or CLEC-2 on platelets markedly inhibited the process. Together, our data indicate that infection-driven thrombosis follows local inflammation and upregulation of podoplanin and platelet activation. The identification of this pathway offers potential therapeutic opportunities to control the devastating consequences of infection-driven thrombosis without increasing the risk of bleeding.

  11. Global Monitoring of Salmonella Serovar Distribution from the World Health Organization Global Foodborne Infections Network Country Data Bank: Results of Quality Assured Laboratories from 2001 to 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Vieira, Antonio; Karlsmose, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    most frequently identified serovars of Salmonella isolated from humans from 2001 to 2007 in laboratories from 37 countries that participated in World Health Organization Global Foodborne Infections Network and demonstrated serotyping proficiency in the Global Foodborne Infections Network External...

  12. Prevention and management of neonatal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, D A

    1989-12-01

    The risk of nosocomial infection in full term neonates cared for in well-baby nurseries can be minimized if personnel adhere to fundamental infection control principles. Neonates who require intensive care face a much greater risk of infection, particularly if they have very low birthweights. Such babies have seriously impaired host defenses, require prolonged hospital stays, and are exposed to a variety of invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. They are extremely vulnerable to a wide range of nosocomial pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses, many of which are frank opportunists. Although it may not be possible to prevent all, or even most of these infections, careful attention to barrier precautions, adequate staffing, sound NICU design, and prompt case identification and cohorting can reduce the risk substantially.

  13. National Outbreak of Multidrug Resistant Salmonella Heidelberg Infections Linked to a Single Poultry Company.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gieraltowski

    Full Text Available This large outbreak of foodborne salmonellosis demonstrated the complexity of investigating outbreaks linked to poultry products. The outbreak also highlighted the importance of efforts to strengthen food safety policies related to Salmonella in chicken parts and has implications for future changes within the poultry industry.To investigate a large multistate outbreak of multidrug resistant Salmonella Heidelberg infections.Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of patients infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Heidelberg and traceback of possible food exposures.United States. Outbreak period was March 1, 2013 through July 11, 2014.A case was defined as illness in a person infected with a laboratory-confirmed Salmonella Heidelberg with 1 of 7 outbreak pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE XbaI patterns with illness onset from March 1, 2013 through July 11, 2014. A total of 634 case-patients were identified through passive surveillance; 200/528 (38% were hospitalized, none died.Interviews were conducted with 435 case-patients: 371 (85% reported eating any chicken in the 7 days before becoming ill. Of 273 case-patients interviewed with a focused questionnaire, 201 (74% reported eating chicken prepared at home. Among case-patients with available brand information, 152 (87% of 175 patients reported consuming Company A brand chicken. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was completed on 69 clinical isolates collected from case-patients; 67% were drug resistant, including 24 isolates (35% that were multidrug resistant. The source of Company A brand chicken consumed by case-patients was traced back to 3 California production establishments from which 6 of 7 outbreak strains were isolated.Epidemiologic, laboratory, traceback, and environmental investigations conducted by local, state, and federal public health and regulatory officials indicated that consumption of Company A chicken was the cause of this outbreak. The outbreak involved

  14. National Outbreak of Multidrug Resistant Salmonella Heidelberg Infections Linked to a Single Poultry Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieraltowski, Laura; Higa, Jeffrey; Peralta, Vi; Green, Alice; Schwensohn, Colin; Rosen, Hilary; Libby, Tanya; Kissler, Bonnie; Marsden-Haug, Nicola; Booth, Hillary; Kimura, Akiko; Grass, Julian; Bicknese, Amelia; Tolar, Beth; Defibaugh-Chávez, Stephanie; Williams, Ian; Wise, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This large outbreak of foodborne salmonellosis demonstrated the complexity of investigating outbreaks linked to poultry products. The outbreak also highlighted the importance of efforts to strengthen food safety policies related to Salmonella in chicken parts and has implications for future changes within the poultry industry. To investigate a large multistate outbreak of multidrug resistant Salmonella Heidelberg infections. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of patients infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Heidelberg and traceback of possible food exposures. United States. Outbreak period was March 1, 2013 through July 11, 2014. A case was defined as illness in a person infected with a laboratory-confirmed Salmonella Heidelberg with 1 of 7 outbreak pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) XbaI patterns with illness onset from March 1, 2013 through July 11, 2014. A total of 634 case-patients were identified through passive surveillance; 200/528 (38%) were hospitalized, none died. Interviews were conducted with 435 case-patients: 371 (85%) reported eating any chicken in the 7 days before becoming ill. Of 273 case-patients interviewed with a focused questionnaire, 201 (74%) reported eating chicken prepared at home. Among case-patients with available brand information, 152 (87%) of 175 patients reported consuming Company A brand chicken. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was completed on 69 clinical isolates collected from case-patients; 67% were drug resistant, including 24 isolates (35%) that were multidrug resistant. The source of Company A brand chicken consumed by case-patients was traced back to 3 California production establishments from which 6 of 7 outbreak strains were isolated. Epidemiologic, laboratory, traceback, and environmental investigations conducted by local, state, and federal public health and regulatory officials indicated that consumption of Company A chicken was the cause of this outbreak. The outbreak involved multiple

  15. Generation of influenza virus from avian cells infected by Salmonella carrying the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Kong, Wei; Wanda, Soo-Young; Xin, Wei; Alamuri, Praveen; Curtiss, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Domestic poultry serve as intermediates for transmission of influenza A virus from the wild aquatic bird reservoir to humans, resulting in influenza outbreaks in poultry and potential epidemics/pandemics among human beings. To combat emerging avian influenza virus, an inexpensive, heat-stable, and orally administered influenza vaccine would be useful to vaccinate large commercial poultry flocks and even migratory birds. Our hypothesized vaccine is a recombinant attenuated bacterial strain able to mediate production of attenuated influenza virus in vivo to induce protective immunity against influenza. Here we report the feasibility and technical limitations toward such an ideal vaccine based on our exploratory study. Five 8-unit plasmids carrying a chloramphenicol resistance gene or free of an antibiotic resistance marker were constructed. Influenza virus was successfully generated in avian cells transfected by each of the plasmids. The Salmonella carrier was engineered to allow stable maintenance and conditional release of the 8-unit plasmid into the avian cells for recovery of influenza virus. Influenza A virus up to 10⁷ 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50)/ml were recovered from 11 out of 26 co-cultures of chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells upon infection by the recombinant Salmonella carrying the 8-unit plasmid. Our data prove that a bacterial carrier can mediate generation of influenza virus by delivering its DNA cargoes into permissive host cells. Although we have made progress in developing this Salmonella influenza virus vaccine delivery system, further improvements are necessary to achieve efficient virus production, especially in vivo.

  16. Generation of influenza virus from avian cells infected by Salmonella carrying the viral genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangmin Zhang

    Full Text Available Domestic poultry serve as intermediates for transmission of influenza A virus from the wild aquatic bird reservoir to humans, resulting in influenza outbreaks in poultry and potential epidemics/pandemics among human beings. To combat emerging avian influenza virus, an inexpensive, heat-stable, and orally administered influenza vaccine would be useful to vaccinate large commercial poultry flocks and even migratory birds. Our hypothesized vaccine is a recombinant attenuated bacterial strain able to mediate production of attenuated influenza virus in vivo to induce protective immunity against influenza. Here we report the feasibility and technical limitations toward such an ideal vaccine based on our exploratory study. Five 8-unit plasmids carrying a chloramphenicol resistance gene or free of an antibiotic resistance marker were constructed. Influenza virus was successfully generated in avian cells transfected by each of the plasmids. The Salmonella carrier was engineered to allow stable maintenance and conditional release of the 8-unit plasmid into the avian cells for recovery of influenza virus. Influenza A virus up to 10⁷ 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50/ml were recovered from 11 out of 26 co-cultures of chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells upon infection by the recombinant Salmonella carrying the 8-unit plasmid. Our data prove that a bacterial carrier can mediate generation of influenza virus by delivering its DNA cargoes into permissive host cells. Although we have made progress in developing this Salmonella influenza virus vaccine delivery system, further improvements are necessary to achieve efficient virus production, especially in vivo.

  17. Impact of phytopathogen infection and extreme weather stress on internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chongtao; Lee, Cheonghoon; Nangle, Ed; Li, Jianrong; Gardner, David; Kleinhenz, Matthew; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-01-03

    Internalization of human pathogens, common in many types of fresh produce, is a threat to human health since the internalized pathogens cannot be fully inactivated/removed by washing with water or sanitizers. Given that pathogen internalization can be affected by many environmental factors, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of two types of plant stress on the internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in iceberg lettuce during pre-harvest. The stresses were: abiotic (water stress induced by extreme weather events) and biotic (phytopathogen infection by lettuce mosaic virus [LMV]). Lettuce with and without LMV infection were purposefully contaminated with green fluorescence protein-labeled S. Typhimurium on the leaf surfaces. Lettuce was also subjected to water stress conditions (drought and storm) which were simulated by irrigating with different amounts of water. The internalized S. Typhimurium in the different parts of the lettuce were quantified by plate count and real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Salmonella internalization occurred under the conditions outlined above; however internalization levels were not significantly affected by water stress alone. In contrast, the extent of culturable S. Typhimurium internalized in the leafy part of the lettuce decreased when infected with LMV under water stress conditions and contaminated with high levels of S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, LMV-infected lettuce showed a significant increase in the levels of culturable bacteria in the roots. In conclusion, internalization was observed under all experimental conditions when the lettuce surface was contaminated with S. Typhimurium. However, the extent of internalization was only affected by water stress when lettuce was infected with LMV. © 2013.

  18. Diverse secreted effectors are required for Salmonella persistence in a mouse infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshan S Kidwai

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes typhoid-like disease in mice and is a model of typhoid fever in humans. One of the hallmarks of typhoid is persistence, the ability of the bacteria to survive in the host weeks after infection. Virulence factors called effectors facilitate this process by direct transfer to the cytoplasm of infected cells thereby subverting cellular processes. Secretion of effectors to the cell cytoplasm takes place through multiple routes, including two separate type III secretion (T3SS apparati as well as outer membrane vesicles. The two T3SS are encoded on separate pathogenicity islands, SPI-1 and -2, with SPI-1 more strongly associated with the intestinal phase of infection, and SPI-2 with the systemic phase. Both T3SS are required for persistence, but the effectors required have not been systematically evaluated. In this study, mutations in 48 described effectors were tested for persistence. We replaced each effector with a specific DNA barcode sequence by allelic exchange and co-infected with a wild-type reference to calculate the ratio of wild-type parent to mutant at different times after infection. The competitive index (CI was determined by quantitative PCR in which primers that correspond to the barcode were used for amplification. Mutations in all but seven effectors reduced persistence demonstrating that most effectors were required. One exception was CigR, a recently discovered effector that is widely conserved throughout enteric bacteria. Deletion of cigR increased lethality, suggesting that it may be an anti-virulence factor. The fact that almost all Salmonella effectors are required for persistence argues against redundant functions. This is different from effector repertoires in other intracellular pathogens such as Legionella.

  19. Diverse Secreted Effectors Are Required for Salmonella Persistence in a Mouse Infection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidwai, Afshan S.; Mushamiri, Ivy T.; Niemann, George; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-08-12

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes typhoid-like disease in mice and is a model of typhoid fever in humans. One of the hallmarks of typhoid is persistence, the ability of the bacteria to survive in the host weeks after infection. Virulence factors called effectors facilitate this process by direct transfer to the cytoplasm of infected cells thereby subverting cellular processes. Secretion of effectors to the cell cytoplasm takes place through multiple routes, including two separate type III secretion (T3SS) apparati as well as outer membrane vesicles. The two T3SS are encoded on separate pathogenicity islands, SPI-1 and -2, with SPI-1 more strongly associated with the intestinal phase of infection, and SPI-2 with the systemic phase. Both T3SS are required for persistence, but the effectors required have not been systematically evaluated. In this study, mutations in 48 described effectors were tested for persistence. We replaced each effector with a specific DNA barcode sequence by allelic exchange and co-infected with a wild-type reference to calculate the ratio of wild-type parent to mutant at different times after infection. The competitive index (CI) was determined by quantitative PCR in which primers that correspond to the barcode were used for amplification. Mutations in all but seven effectors reduced persistence demonstrating that most effectors were required. One exception was CigR, a recently discovered effector that is widely conserved throughout enteric bacteria. Deletion of cigR increased lethality, suggesting that it may be an anti-virulence factor. The fact that almost all Salmonella effectors are required for persistence argues against redundant functions. This is different from effector repertoires in other intracellular pathogens such as Legionella.

  20. Sub-clinical infection with Salmonella in chickens differentially affects behaviour and welfare in three inbred strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, M J; Sait, L; Jørgensen, F; Nicol, C J; Powers, C; Smith, A L; Bailey, M; Humphrey, T J

    2010-12-01

    1. Much evidence exists detailing how animals respond to pathogen challenge, yet information explaining how the various behavioural, immunological, and physiological systems in chickens interplay during such challenges remains limited. 2. To gain an understanding of this interplay while controlling for genetic variation, the current study collected a variety of behavioural, physiological and immunological measures from three inbred lines (P, O and N) of laying hens before and after a sub-clinical infection with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium at 56 d of age. For comparison, an equal number of control birds were inoculated with a Salmonella-free broth. To identify an underlying profile, which might result in reduced susceptibility to infection, data were also collected in the pre-infection period. Post-infection blood and faeces were collected at 1-d post infection (dpi) and faeces again at 8 dpi. Animals were killed 15 d after infection and faeces, caecal contents, and spleen were examined for the presence of Salmonella. 3. Statistical analysis was performed to identify pre- and post-infection differences between genetic lines, changes in bird behavioural patterns between the two periods, and associations between a positive test for Salmonella and the various response measures. 4. Tissues from Line P birds were more often negative for Salmonella than those from birds of other lines, though this was inconsistent and tissue-dependent. The P line was also characterised by relatively greater serum concentrations of immunoglobulins at 1 dpi and α(1)-acid glycoprotein at 15 dpi. In addition, P line birds were more timid and their growth was reduced during the pre-infection period suggesting the possibility of a profile with reduced susceptibility to the bacterial challenge. 5. The current work has identified correlations between attributes of chicken strains and improved clearance. Future work using hypothesis-based testing will be required to determine whether the

  1. Relationship of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response with hematological and serum biochemical values in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Mario Alberto; Bonnet, María Agustina; Bueno, Dante Javier

    2015-06-15

    There are few studies about the blood serum of laying hens infected with Salmonella. The differential leukocyte count and blood chemistry values are an important aid in the diagnosis of human diseases, but blood parameters in the avian species are not well known. On the other hand, invasive forms of bacterial gastroenteritis, like Salmonella, often cause intestinal inflammation so this study was undertaken to find a biomarker of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response in the hematological or serum biochemical parameters in laying hens. Furthermore, we evaluated the association of some farm characteristics with Salmonella infection and fecal leukocytes (FL). A fecal sample with at least one fecal leukocyte per field was considered positive for inflammatory intestinal response. False positive serum reactions for Salmonella infection, by serum plate agglutination (SPA) test, were reduced by heating the sample to 56°C for 30 min and then diluting it 5-fold. The range of hematological and biochemical parameter values was very wide, in addition, there was a poor agreement between the SPA and FL results. Comparison of the positive and negative samples in SPA and FL showed that 1.3% and 79.8% of the laying hens were positive and negative in both tests, respectively. Hens with a positive SPA result showed a higher percentage of monocytes than those with a negative SPA result. Hens with a positive FL test had a higher percentage of heterophils, ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes and aspartate aminotransferase values, while the percentage of lymphocytes was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those with a negative FL test. The risk of Salmonella infection increased when the age of laying hens and the number of hens per poultry house was greater than or equal to 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, compared to less than 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, respectively. On the other hand, the risk of inflammatory intestinal response was higher in laying

  2. Salmonella infection in healthy pet reptiles: Bacteriological isolation and study of some pathogenic characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelloni, Fabrizio; Chemaly, Marianne; Cerri, Domenico; Gall, Françoise Le; Ebani, Valentina Virginia

    2016-06-01

    The fecal samples from 213 captive reptiles were examined, and 29 (13.61%) Salmonella enterica isolates were detected: 14/62 (22.58%) from chelonians, 14/135 (10.37%) from saurians, and 1/16 (6.25%) from ophidians. The isolates were distributed among 14 different serotypes: Miami, Ebrie, Hermannsweder, Tiergarten, Tornov, Pomona, Poona, Goteborg, Abaetetube, Nyanza, Kumasi, Typhimurium, 50:b:z6, 9,12:z29:1,5, and a non-motile serotype with antigenic formula 1,4,[5],12:-:-. Salmonella typhimurium and 50:b:z6 isolates showed the spv plasmid virulence genes, responsible of the capability to induce extra-intestinal infections. In some cases, pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed different profiles for the strains of the same serotypes, showing different origins, whereas a common source of infection was supposed when one pulsotype had been observed for isolates of a serovar. Twenty-seven (93.10%) isolates showed resistance to one or more antibiotics. Ceftazidime was active to all the tested isolates, whereas the highest percentages of strains were no susceptible to tigecycline (93.10%), streptomycin (89.66%), and sulfonamide (86.21%).

  3. Non-Hematopoietic MLKL Protects Against Salmonella Mucosal Infection by Enhancing Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Xing Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosal barrier is critical for host defense against pathogens infection. Here, we demonstrate that the mixed lineage kinase-like protein (MLKL, a necroptosis effector, promotes intestinal epithelial barrier function by enhancing inflammasome activation. MLKL−/− mice were more susceptible to Salmonella infection compared with wild-type counterparts, with higher mortality rates, increased body weight loss, exacerbated intestinal inflammation, more bacterial colonization, and severe epithelial barrier disruption. MLKL deficiency promoted early epithelial colonization of Salmonella prior to developing apparent intestinal pathology. Active MLKL was predominantly expressed in crypt epithelial cells, and experiments using bone marrow chimeras found that the protective effects of MLKL were dependent on its expression in non-hematopoietic cells. Intestinal mucosa of MLKL−/− mice had impaired caspase-1 and gasdermin D cleavages and decreased interleukin (IL-18 release. Moreover, administration of exogenous recombinant IL-18 rescued the phenotype of increased bacterial colonization in MLKL−/− mice. Thus, our results uncover the role of MLKL in enhancing inflammasome activation in intestinal epithelial cells to inhibit early bacterial colonization.

  4. Understanding the dynamics of Salmonella infections in dairy herds: a modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanni; Bowers, Roger G; Clancy, Damian; French, Nigel P

    2005-03-21

    There is evidence of variation in the infection dynamics of different Salmonella serotypes in cattle--ranging from transient epidemics to long term persistence and recurrence. We seek to identify possible causes of these differences. In this study we present mathematical models which describe both managed population dynamics and epidemiology and use these to investigate the effects of demographic and epidemiological factors on epidemic behaviour and threshold for invasion. In particular, when the system is perturbed by higher culling or pathogen-induced mortality we incorporate mechanisms to constrain the lactating herd size to remain constant in the absence of pathogen or to lie within a fairly small interval in the presence of pathogen. A combination of numerical and analytical techniques is used to analyse the models. We find that the epidemiologically dominating management group can change from the dry/lactating cycle to the weaned group with increasing culling rate. Pseudovertical transmission is found to have little effect on the invasion criteria, while indirect transmission has significant influence. Pathogen-induced mortality, recovery, immune response and pathogen removal are found to be factors inducing damped oscillations; variation in these factors between Salmonella serotypes may be responsible for some of the observed differences in within herd dynamics. Specifically, higher pathogen-induced mortality, shorter infectious period, more persistent immune response and more rapid removal of faeces result in a lower number of infectives and smaller epidemics but a greater tendency for damped oscillations.

  5. Regulatory T cell suppressive potency dictates the balance between bacterial proliferation and clearance during persistent Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner M Johanns

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of persistent infection is dictated by the balance between opposing immune activation and suppression signals. Herein, virulent Salmonella was used to explore the role and potential importance of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells in dictating the natural progression of persistent bacterial infection. Two distinct phases of persistent Salmonella infection are identified. In the first 3-4 weeks after infection, progressively increasing bacterial burden was associated with delayed effector T cell activation. Reciprocally, at later time points after infection, reductions in bacterial burden were associated with robust effector T cell activation. Using Foxp3(GFP reporter mice for ex vivo isolation of regulatory T cells, we demonstrate that the dichotomy in infection tempo between early and late time points is directly paralleled by drastic changes in Foxp3(+ Treg suppressive potency. In complementary experiments using Foxp3(DTR mice, the significance of these shifts in Treg suppressive potency on infection outcome was verified by enumerating the relative impacts of regulatory T cell ablation on bacterial burden and effector T cell activation at early and late time points during persistent Salmonella infection. Moreover, Treg expression of CTLA-4 directly paralleled changes in suppressive potency, and the relative effects of Treg ablation could be largely recapitulated by CTLA-4 in vivo blockade. Together, these results demonstrate that dynamic regulation of Treg suppressive potency dictates the course of persistent bacterial infection.

  6. Infection Dynamics and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Salmonella Paratyphi B d-tartrate Positive (Java) in a Persistently Infected Broiler Barn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloska, Franziska; Beyerbach, Martin; Klein, Günter

    2017-01-21

    The infection dynamics of S. Java were examined in three consecutive rearing periods on a broiler farm in Northwestern Germany which had been persistently infected with S. Java for more than five years. The barn was investigated for Salmonella occurrence after cleaning and disinfection to verify the persistent contamination of the broiler house with S. Java before the start of the first rearing cycle. Confirmation of Salmonella absence in day-old chicks (time-point 1) as well as early establishment of infection between days 5-7 (time-point 2) were confirmed by caecal swabs prepared for qPCR and classical microbiological methods. At three time-periods (between days 11-15 (time-point 3), days 25-28 (time-point 4), and days 38-40 (time-point 5)) caecal content was examined for colony forming units (CFU) Salmonella/g. In general, there was an increase in Salmonella Java load at time-point 4 compared to time-points 3 and 5. Therefore, we observed a bell-shaped course of infection resulting in higher rates of Salmonella CFU/g prior to prethinning than at final slaughter. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed resistance to tetracycline, fluorquinolones, trimethoprim, and cefoxitin.

  7. Infection Dynamics and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Salmonella Paratyphi B d-tartrate Positive (Java in a Persistently Infected Broiler Barn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Kloska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The infection dynamics of S. Java were examined in three consecutive rearing periods on a broiler farm in Northwestern Germany which had been persistently infected with S. Java for more than five years. The barn was investigated for Salmonella occurrence after cleaning and disinfection to verify the persistent contamination of the broiler house with S. Java before the start of the first rearing cycle. Confirmation of Salmonella absence in day-old chicks (time-point 1 as well as early establishment of infection between days 5–7 (time-point 2 were confirmed by caecal swabs prepared for qPCR and classical microbiological methods. At three time-periods (between days 11–15 (time-point 3, days 25–28 (time-point 4, and days 38–40 (time-point 5 caecal content was examined for colony forming units (CFU Salmonella/g. In general, there was an increase in Salmonella Java load at time-point 4 compared to time-points 3 and 5. Therefore, we observed a bell-shaped course of infection resulting in higher rates of Salmonella CFU/g prior to prethinning than at final slaughter. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed resistance to tetracycline, fluorquinolones, trimethoprim, and cefoxitin.

  8. Reorganization of the Endosomal System in Salmonella-Infected Cells: The Ultrastructure of Salmonella-Induced Tubular Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Viktoria; Liebl, David; Zhang, Yuying; Rajashekar, Roopa; Chlanda, Petr; Giesker, Katrin; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Hensel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the intracellular life of Salmonella enterica, a unique membrane-bound compartment termed Salmonella-containing vacuole, or SCV, is formed. By means of translocated effector proteins, intracellular Salmonella also induce the formation of extensive, highly dynamic membrane tubules termed Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. Here we report the first detailed ultrastructural analyses of the SCV and SIF by electron microscopy (EM), EM tomography and live cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We found that a subset of SIF is composed of double membranes that enclose portions of host cell cytosol and cytoskeletal filaments within its inner lumen. Despite some morphological similarities, we found that the formation of SIF double membranes is independent from autophagy and requires the function of the effector proteins SseF and SseG. The lumen of SIF network is accessible to various types of endocytosed material and our CLEM analysis of double membrane SIF demonstrated that fluid phase markers accumulate only between the inner and outer membrane of these structures, a space continual with endosomal lumen. Our work reveals how manipulation of the endosomal membrane system by an intracellular pathogen results in a unique tubular membrane compartmentalization of the host cell, generating a shielded niche permissive for intracellular proliferation of Salmonella. PMID:25254663

  9. Is neonatal group B streptococcal infection preventable?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Azam, M

    2011-05-01

    Early onset group B streptococcal (EOGBS) infection causes significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. We determined the incidence of EOGBS at Galway University Hospital (GUH) and examined any "missed opportunities" for preventing neonatal infection between 2004 and 2009. Our obstetric approach is risk-based. The incidence was 0.45\\/1,000 live-births; one death and one with neurological sequelae. A single mother received IAP; however we could not determine any potential for reducing cases of EOGBS by improving current IAP usage.

  10. Prebiotics for Prevention of Gut Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Ebersbach, Tine; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    It is our postulate that the field of prebiotic research has until now been characterized by a one-view-fits-all approach, implicating that if a putatively prebiotic compound is good for something, it is good for everything. One area where this implication has been proved insufficient regards...... the putative preventive effect of prebiotics against intestinal pathogenic bacteria. Although indeed most evidence on effects of prebiotics against infections is positive, some studies indicate that prebiotic carbohydrates cause increased susceptibility to specific gastrointestinal infections. Here, we review...

  11. Oral delivery of the Sj23LHD-GST antigen by Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system protects against Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease and oral vaccine delivery system would be benefit for prevention of this disease. Although attenuated salmonella has been used as an antigen expression vector for oral vaccine development, the membrane-bound vacuoles in which bacteria reside hinders the presentation of expressed heterologous antigens to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. The present work used an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain VNP20009 to secretory expression of Sj23LHDGST bivalent antigen from Schistosoma japonicum and tested the protective efficacy against S. japonicum infection in orally immunized mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Promoters (nirB or pagC were used to express the antigen (Sj23LHDGST and the Salmonella type III or α-hemolysin secretion system was employed to secrete it. The immunoblotting analysis and fluorescent microscopy revealed that the antigen was effectively expressed and delivered to the cytosol of macrophages in vitro. Among recombinant vaccine strains, an engineered VNP20009 which expressed the antigen by nirB promoter and secreted it through type III secretion system (nirB-sopE(1-104-Sj23LHD-GST efficiently protected against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. This strain elicited a predominantly IgG(2a antibody response and a markedly increase in the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that this strain caused T cell activation as evidenced by significantly increased expression of CD44 and CD69. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral delivery of antigen by nirB-driven Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system is a novel, safe, inexpensive, efficient and convenient approach for schistosome vaccine development.

  12. Babies and bearded dragons: sudden increase in reptile-associated Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee infections, Germany 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Bettina; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Prager, Rita; Tietze, Erhard; Koch, Judith; Mutschmann, Frank; Roggentin, Peter; Frank, Christina

    2011-09-01

    In 2008 a marked increase in Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee infections in infants occurred in Germany. In March and April 2008, eight cases were notified compared to a median of 0-1 cases in 2001-2006. We carried out an investigation including a case-control study to identify the source of infection. A patient was a child reptiles kept in case households were investigated. We identified 18 cases reptiles were kept. Direct contact between child and reptile was denied. Other forms of reptile contact were reported in four of the remaining eight households. Ten case- and 21 control-patients were included in the study. Only keeping of a reptile and "any reptile contact" were associated with Salmonella Tennessee infection (mOR 29.0; 95% CI 3.1 ± ∞ and mOR 119.5; 95% CI 11.7 - ∞). Identical Salmonella Tennessee strains of child and reptile kept in the same household could be shown in 2 cases. Reptiles were the apparent source of Salmonella Tennessee infection in these infants. Indirect contact between infants and reptiles seems to be sufficient to cause infection and should therefore be avoided.

  13. Inflammation induced by phytomodulatory proteins from the latex of Calotropis procera (Asclepiadaceae) protects against Salmonella infection in a murine model of typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Raquel S B; Figueiredo, Ingrid S T; Freitas, Lyara B N; Pinheiro, Rachel S P; Brito, Gerly Anne C; Alencar, Nylane M N; Ramos, Márcio V; Ralph, Maria T; Lima-Filho, José V

    2012-07-01

    Laticifer proteins (LP) of Calotropis procera were fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography, and the influence of a sub-fraction (LP(PI)) on the inflammatory response of Swiss mice challenged by Salmonella enterica Ser. Typhimurium was investigated. Mice (n = 10) received LP(PI) (30 or 60 mg/kg) in a single inoculum by the intraperitoneal route 24 h before infection. To investigate the relevance of the proteolytic activity, three additional groups were included: the first one received heat-treated LP (30 mg/kg-30 min at 100 °C), the second received LP (30 mg/kg) inactivated by iodoacetamide, and a control group received only phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The survival rate reached 100 % in mice treated with LP(PI) and was also observed with the other treatment, whereas the PBS group died 1-3 days after infection. The neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity of pretreated mice was enhanced and accompanied by high bacterial clearance from the bloodstream. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA transcripts, but not interferon-gamma, were detected early in spleen cells of pretreated mice after infection; however, the nitric oxide contents in the bloodstream were decreased in comparison to the PBS group. The inflammatory stimulus of C. procera proteins increased phagocytosis and balanced the nitric oxide release in the bloodstream, preventing septic shock induced by Salmonella infection.

  14. Salmonella Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FDA) USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Follow Salmonella RSS Diagnosis and Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How Can Salmonella Infections Be Diagnosed? Diagnosing salmonellosis requires testing a ...

  15. National outbreaks of Salmonella infection in the UK, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, K S; Lane, C; Gormley, F J; Adak, G K

    2014-03-01

    Over a 12-year period, the Health Protection Agency's (now Public Health England's) Department of Gastrointestinal and Emerging Infections (GEZI) investigated over 100 potential national outbreaks of Salmonella enterica. These ranged from a cluster of cases requiring data interrogation and monitoring of the situation, to full blown case-control studies involving hundreds of interviews, many staff, multi-agency collaboration and the media. Vehicles of infection ranged from the usual suspects of chicken and eggs, to the less frequently implicated snake feed and chocolate. This has forced us to alter our preconceptions of disease transmission. The way in which GEZI investigate outbreaks and conduct case-control studies is constantly evolving as we learn and adapt to the changing aetiology of S. enterica. We present the findings and lessons learned during the last 12 years of investigating S. enterica outbreaks in England and Wales.

  16. Testing of bulk tank milk for Salmonella Dublin infection in Danish dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedderkopp, A.; Stroger, U.; Bitsch, V.

    2001-01-01

    of being test-negative in the third test round was 0.926 for a herd with 2 previous test-negative results. It was concluded that the investigated ELISA method was in general accordance with the cases of clinical S. Dublin infection recorded. and that the method has a potential for national screening......The usefulness of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was investigated as a simple method to screen for Salmonella Dublin infection in dairy herds, examining bulk tank milk samples for lipopolysaccharide (O:1,9,12) antibodies. The cut-off value for the ELISA on bulk tank milk was established...... based on individual milk samples (n = 2887) and bulk tank milk from 52 herds. Bulk tank milk samples (n = 5108) were collected from 1464 dairy herds located in 19 different areas. About 10% of the dairy herds in Denmark participated in the study. The percentage of herds changing from test...

  17. Prevention and treatment of neonatal nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasethu, Jayashree

    2017-01-01

    Nosocomial or hospital acquired infections threaten the survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes of infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, and increase cost of care. Premature infants are particularly vulnerable since they often undergo invasive procedures and are dependent on central catheters to deliver nutrition and on ventilators for respiratory support. Prevention of nosocomial infection is a critical patient safety imperative, and invariably requires a multidisciplinary approach. There are no short cuts. Hand hygiene before and after patient contact is the most important measure, and yet, compliance with this simple measure can be unsatisfactory. Alcohol based hand sanitizer is effective against many microorganisms and is efficient, compared to plain or antiseptic containing soaps. The use of maternal breast milk is another inexpensive and simple measure to reduce infection rates. Efforts to replicate the anti-infectious properties of maternal breast milk by the use of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics have met with variable success, and there are ongoing trials of lactoferrin, an iron binding whey protein present in large quantities in colostrum. Attempts to boost the immunoglobulin levels of preterm infants with exogenous immunoglobulins have not been shown to reduce nosocomial infections significantly. Over the last decade, improvements in the incidence of catheter-related infections have been achieved, with meticulous attention to every detail from insertion to maintenance, with some centers reporting zero rates for such infections. Other nosocomial infections like ventilator acquired pneumonia and staphylococcus aureus infection remain problematic, and outbreaks with multidrug resistant organisms continue to have disastrous consequences. Management of infections is based on the profile of microorganisms in the neonatal unit and community and targeted therapy is required to control the disease without leading to the development of more

  18. Frequency and Duration of Fecal Shedding of Salmonella Serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium by Experimentally Infected Laying Hens Housed in Enriched Colony Cages at Different Stocking Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Guard, Jean; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2017-09-01

    Eggs contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis are leading sources of human salmonellosis, but Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium are also egg-associated pathogens. The management practices and housing facilities characterizing different systems for housing commercial egg flocks can influence Salmonella persistence and transmission. Animal welfare aspects of poultry housing have been widely debated, but their food safety ramifications are not thoroughly understood. The present study assessed the effects of two different bird stocking densities on the frequency and duration of fecal shedding of strains of Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. In separate trials, laying hens were distributed into two groups housed in enriched colony cages at stocking densities of 648 and 973 cm(2)/bird, and a third group was housed in conventional cages at 648 cm(2)/bird. All hens were orally inoculated with doses of 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) of either Salmonella Heidelberg or Salmonella Typhimurium. At eight weekly postinoculation intervals, samples of voided feces were collected from beneath each cage and cultured to detect Salmonella. Fecal shedding of Salmonella Heidelberg continued for 8 wk in all housing groups, but Salmonella Typhimurium shedding ceased after as little as 5 wk in enriched colony cages at low stocking density. After Salmonella Heidelberg infection, the overall frequency of positive fecal cultures for all sampling dates combined was significantly (P < 0.05) greater from either conventional cages (51.0%) or enriched colony cages (46.5%) at high stocking density than from enriched colony cages at low stocking density (33.3%). No significant differences in Salmonella Typhimurium fecal isolation were identified between housing groups. These results demonstrate that stocking density can affect intestinal colonization and

  19. Modification of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharides Prevents the Outer Membrane Penetration of Novobiocin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobre, Thatyane M.; Martynowycz, Michael W.; Andreev, Konstantin; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Gidalevitz, David

    2015-12-01

    Small hydrophilic antibiotics traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels. Large lipophilic agents traverse the outer membrane through its bilayer, containing a majority of lipopolysaccharides in its outer leaflet. Genes controlled by the two-component regulatory system PhoPQ modify lipopolysaccharides. We isolate lipopolysaccharides from isogenic mutants of Salmonella sp., one lacking the modification, the other fully modified. These lipopolysaccharides were reconstituted asmonolayers at the air-water interface, and their properties, aswell as their interaction with a large lipophilic drug, novobiocin, was studied. X-ray reflectivity showed that the drug penetrated the monolayer of the unmodified lipopolysaccharides reaching the hydrophobic region,butwas prevented fromthis penetration intothemodified lipopolysaccharides.Results correlatewith behavior of bacterial cells, which become resistant to antibiotics after PhoPQ-regulated modifications. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction showed that novobiocin produced a striking increase in crystalline coherence length, and the size of the near-crystalline domains.

  20. Reduction of subclinical Salmonella infection in fattening pigs after dietary supplementation with a ß-galactomannan oligosaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Barranco, S; Vico, J P; Grilló, M J; Mainar-Jaime, R C

    2015-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of a β-galactomannan oligosaccharide (ß-GMOS) for the control of Salmonella infection in fattening pigs. Three different doses (0.5, 3 and 2 kg ß-GMOS per ton of feed) were used during the entire period of growing in three similar and independent field trials carried out in a small fattening unit (≈ 100 pigs). Treatment was randomly assigned to half of the pens. Individual serum samples (20-25 per group) were collected at different times during the fattening period and a similar number of faecal samples during the fattening period and at slaughter. In addition, mesenteric lymph nodes were collected at slaughter. Herdcheck(®) Swine Salmonella ELISA was used for serological analyses, the ISO 6579:2002/Amd 1 : 2007 for bacteriology and the PFGE for molecular characterization of Salmonella strains. The addition of ≥ 2 kg t(-1) of ß-GMOS to the pig diet during the entire fattening period was associated with a reduction in Salmonella prevalence, shedding and seroconversion. Feed supplementation with ß-GMOS may be a useful complementary tool for the control of salmonellosis in fattening pigs. ß-GMOS may be a complementary way of reducing Salmonella shedding and infection in fattening pigs. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Isolation and characterization of polyvalent bacteriophages infecting multi drug resistant Salmonella serovars isolated from broilers in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mayada; Askora, Ahmed; Barakat, Ahmed Barakat; Rabie, Omar El-Farouk; Hassan, Sayed Emam

    2018-02-02

    In this study, we isolated and characterized three phages named as Salmacey1, Salmacey2 and Salmacey3, infecting multi drug resistant Salmonella serovars isolated from broilers in Egypt. The most prevalent Salmonella serovars were S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, and S. kentucky. All these Salmonella serovars were found to be resistant to more than two of the ten antimicrobial agents tested. Only S. kentucky was found to be resistant to seven antimicrobial agents. Examination of these phage particles by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), demonstrated that two phages (Salmacey1, Salmacey2) were found to belong to family Siphoviridae, and Salmacey3 was assigned to the family Myoviridae. The results of host range assay revealed that these bacteriophages were polyvalent and thus capable of infecting four strains of Salmonella serovars and Citrobacter freundii. Moreover, the two phages (Salmacey1, Salmacey2) had a lytic effect on Enterobacter cloacae and Salmacey3 was able to infect E. coli. All phages could not infect S. para Typhi, Staphylococus aureus and Bacillus cereus. One-step growth curves of bacteriophages revealed that siphovirus phages (Salmacey1, Salmacey2) have burst size (80 and 90pfu per infected cell with latent period 35min and 40min respectively), and for the myovirus Salmacey3 had a burst size 110pfu per infected cell with latent period 60min. Molecular analyses indicated that these phages contained double-stranded DNA genomes. The lytic activity of the phages against the most multidrug resistant serovars S. kentucky as host strain was evaluated. The result showed that these bacteriophages were able to completely stop the growth of S. kentucky in vitro. These results suggest that phages have a high potential for phage application to control Salmonella serovars isolated from broilers in Egypt. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schulte

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strain SPE101, Isolated from a Chronic Human Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte, Andrés; Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Silva, Claudia; Betancor, Laura; Astocondor, Lizeth; Cestero, Juan J; Ochoa, Theresa; García, Coralith; Puente, José L; Chabalgoity, José A; García-Del Portillo, Francisco

    2017-07-20

    We report a 4.99-Mb draft genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis strain SPE101, isolated from feces of a 5-month-old breast-fed female showing diarrhea associated with severe dehydration and malnutrition. The infection prolonged for 6 months despite antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2017 Iriarte et al.

  4. Investigating Salmonella Eko from Various Sources in Nigeria by Whole Genome Sequencing to Identify the Source of Human Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Raufu, Ibrahim; Thorup Nielsen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-six Salmonella enterica serovar Eko isolated from various sources in Nigeria were investigated by whole genome sequencing to identify the source of human infections. Diversity among the isolates was observed and camel and cattle were identified as the primary reservoirs and the most likely...

  5. Effect of Enterococcus faecium EF 55 on morphometry and proliferative activity of intestinal mucosa in broilers infected with Salmonella Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ševčíková Zuzana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of Enterococcus faecium EF55 on chickens, as well as its influence on proliferative activity of epithelial intestinal cells after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 (SE PT4. Moreover, the length and area of duodenal and jejunal villi of the birds were examined.

  6. Acetalated dextran encapsulated AR-12 as a host-directed therapy to control Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ky V; Borteh, Hassan M; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Peine, Kevin J; Curry, Heather; Collier, Michael A; Homsy, Michael L; Bachelder, Eric M; Gunn, John S; Schlesinger, Larry S; Ainslie, Kristy M

    2014-12-30

    AR-12 has been evaluated in clinical trials as an anti-cancer agent but also has demonstrated host-directed, broad-spectrum clearance of bacteria. We have previously shown that AR-12 has activity in vitro against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Francisella species by inducing autophagy and other host immune pathways. AR-12 treatment of S. Typhimurium-infected mice resulted in a 10-fold reduction in bacterial load in the liver and spleen and an increased survival time. However, AR-12 treatment did not protect mice from death, likely due poor formulation. In the current study, AR-12 was encapsulated in a microparticulate carrier formulated from the novel degradable biopolymer acetalated dextran (Ace-DEX) and subsequently evaluated for its activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs). Our results show that hMDMs efficiently internalized Ace-DEX microparticles (MPs), and that encapsulation significantly reduced host cell cytotoxicity compared to unencapsulated AR-12. Efficient macrophage internalization of AR-12 loaded MPs (AR-12/MPs) was further demonstrated by autophagosome formation that was comparable to free AR-12 and resulted in enhanced clearance of intracellular Salmonella. Taken together, these studies provide support that Ace-DEX encapsulated AR-12 may be a promising new therapeutic agent to control intracellular bacterial pathogens of macrophages by targeting delivery and reducing drug toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Infection cycle of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in latent carrier mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Bianca Mendes; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Romano, Carla Cristina; dos Santos, Thalis Ferreira; Teixeira Dias, João Carlos; Gross, Eduardo; Rezende, Rachel Passos

    2012-12-01

    This work reports the distribution of an oral dose of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) in C57Bl/6-Bcgr mice, to study its pathogenesis in a latent carrier animal. Mice orally inoculated with a high dose of SE developed a latent infection characterized by the absence of clinical symptoms in which the cecum is functioning as a "strategic site" of SE proliferation, releasing bacteria into feces intermittently over the 4-week study. A sequence of disruptions occurred in the small intestine at 1 day postinculation (PI). The microvilli exhibited different degrees of degeneration, which were reversible as the cells became vacuolated. From 2 days PI, SE was detected in the mononuclear phagocytic system, and an exponential growth of the remaining bacteria in tissues was observed until 4 days PI. The production of interferon gamma from 3 days PI is restricting the SE growth, and a plateau phase was observed from 4 to 15 days PI. A recurrence of the bacterial growth in tissue occurred from 15 to 28 days PI, especially in the cecum. Increasing our knowledge about the host-pathogen interaction of adapted pathogens with the ability to develop latency is essential for the development of an efficient strategy for Salmonella control.

  8. Gross margin losses due to Salmonella Dublin infection in Danish dairy cattle herds estimated by simulation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T D; Kudahl, A B; Østergaard, S; Nielsen, L R

    2013-08-01

    Salmonella Dublin affects production and animal health in cattle herds. The objective of this study was to quantify the gross margin (GM) losses following introduction and spread of S. Dublin within dairy herds. The GM losses were estimated using an age-structured stochastic, mechanistic and dynamic simulation model. The model incorporated six age groups (neonatal, pre-weaned calves, weaned calves, growing heifers, breeding heifers and cows) and five infection stages (susceptible, acutely infected, carrier, super shedder and resistant). The effects of introducing one S. Dublin infectious heifer were estimated through 1000 simulation iterations for 12 scenarios. These 12 scenarios were combinations of three herd sizes (85, 200 and 400 cows) and four management levels (very good, good, poor and very poor). Input parameters for effects of S. Dublin on production and animal health were based on literature and calibrations to mimic real life observations. Mean annual GMs per cow stall were compared between herds experiencing within-herd spread of S. Dublin and non-infected reference herds over a 10-year period. The estimated GM losses were largest in the first year after infection, and increased with poorer management and herd size, e.g. average annual GM losses were estimated to 49 euros per stall for the first year after infection, and to 8 euros per stall annually averaged over the 10 years after herd infection for a 200 cow stall herd with very good management. In contrast, a 200 cow stall herd with very poor management lost on average 326 euros per stall during the first year, and 188 euros per stall annually averaged over the 10-year period following introduction of infection. The GM losses arose from both direct losses such as reduced milk yield, dead animals, treatment costs and abortions as well as indirect losses such as reduced income from sold heifers and calves, and lower milk yield of replacement animals. Through sensitivity analyses it was found that the

  9. Experimental infection of broiler chicks with Salmonella Typhimurium from pigeon (Columba livia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Átilla Holanda de Albuquerque

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Several cases of animal and human salmonellosis caused by the Salmonella serotype Typhimurium have been reported. In animals, subclinical infection favors pathogen dissemination through feces. In this context, the domestic pigeon (Columba livia with an asymptomatic condition may play an important role in the transmission of salmonellosis, through the elimination of contaminated feces in commercial aviaries or in poultry feed facilities, causing economic losses to the poultry industry and presenting a risk to public health. This study aimed to evaluate the mortality, clinical signs and the presence of Salmonella Typhimurium in the feces and organs of chicks previously inoculated with bacteria isolated from a pigeon. One-day-old chicks were distributed in two experimental groups (G1 and G2 of 32 birds each, and a control group of six birds. Two inocula of 0.4 and 0.7 mL with 105 and 106 colony forming units were used in G1 and G2 birds, respectively. At 1, 4, 7 and 14 days post-inoculation (dpi fecal samples were pooled from each cage and individual cloacal swabs were collected. At 14 dpi, all chicks were euthanized and samples were collected from the liver, spleen, lung, cecum and intestine for microbiological analysis. Mortality was only observed among G2 birds (6.25%. Most birds presented clinical signs of diarrhea at 4 dpi and no symptom as observed at 14 dpi. The results from cloacal swabs demonstrated bacterial elimination in 68.8% and 53.1% of G2 and G1 birds, respectively at 1 dpi. Additionally, fecal samples had elevated bacterial shedding in all four periods of observation , with a higher excretion at 4 dpi (62.5% for both groups. Among G2 birds, 74.2% were positive for the pathogen in the intestine; G1 birds presented the lowest rate of lung infection (29%, and both groups had more than 50% positivity for liver and caeca. The results revealed that infected chicks with a Salmonella Typhimurium strains isolated from pigeons may host the

  10. Evaluation of dna extraction methods of the Salmonella sp. bacterium in artificially infected chickens eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina dos Reis Ferreira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Ferreira A.C.dosR. & dos Santos B.M. [Evaluation of dna extraction methods of the Salmonella sp. bacterium in artificially infected chickens eggs.] Avaliação de três métodos de extração de DNA de Salmonella sp. em ovos de galinhas contaminados artificialmente. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(2:115-119, 2015. Departamento de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Campus Universitário, Av. Peter Henry Rolfs, s/n, Viçosa, MG 36571-000, Brasil. E-mail: bmsantos@ufv.br The present study evaluated the efficiency of different protocols for the genomic DNA extraction of Salmonella bacteria in chicken eggs free of specific pathogens – SPF. Seventy-five eggs were used and divided into five groups with fifteen eggs each. Three of the five groups of eggs were inoculated with enteric Salmonella cultures. One of the five groups was inoculated with Escherichia coli bacterium culture. And another group of eggs was the negative control that received saline solution 0.85% infertile. The eggs were incubated on a temperature that varied from 20 to 25°C during 24, 48 and 72 hours. Five yolks of each group were collected every 24 hours. These yolks were homogenized and centrifuged during 10 minutes. The supernatant was rejected. After the discard, PBS ph 7.2 was added and centrifuged again. The sediment obtained of each group was used for the extraction of bacterial genomic DNA. Silica particles and a commercial kit were utilized as the extraction methods. The extracted DNA was kept on a temperature of 20°C until the evaluation through PCR. The primers utilized were related with the invA gene and they were the following: 5’ GTA AAA TTA TCG CCA CGT TCG GGC AA 3’ and 5’ TCA TCG CAC CGT CAA AGG AAC C 3’. The amplification products were visualized in transilluminator with ultraviolet light. The obtained results through the bacterial DNA extractions demonstrated that the extraction method utilizing silica particles was

  11. 'One Health' investigation: outbreak of human Salmonella Braenderup infections traced to a mail-order hatchery - United States, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, J H; Pringle, J; Jones, R W; Nix, B E; Borders, J; Heseltine, G; Gomez, T M; McCLUSKEY, B; Roney, C S; Brinson, D; Erdman, M; McDANIEL, A; Behravesh, C Barton

    2015-07-01

    Human salmonellosis linked to contact with live poultry is an increasing public health concern. In 2012, eight unrelated outbreaks of human salmonellosis linked to live poultry contact resulted in 517 illnesses. In July 2012, PulseNet, a national molecular surveillance network, reported a multistate cluster of a rare strain of Salmonella Braenderup infections which we investigated. We defined a case as infection with the outbreak strain, determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, with illness onset from 25 July 2012-27 February 2013. Ill persons and mail-order hatchery (MOH) owners were interviewed using standardized questionnaires. Traceback and environmental investigations were conducted. We identified 48 cases in 24 states. Twenty-six (81%) of 32 ill persons reported live poultry contact in the week before illness; case-patients named 12 different MOHs from eight states. The investigation identified hatchery D as the ultimate poultry source. Sampling at hatchery D yielded the outbreak strain. Hatchery D improved sanitation procedures and pest control; subsequent sampling failed to yield Salmonella. This outbreak highlights the interconnectedness of humans, animals, and the environment and the importance of industry knowledge and involvement in solving complex outbreaks. Preventing these infections requires a 'One Health' approach that leverages expertise in human, animal, and environmental health.

  12. Eradication of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in a murine model of typhoid fever with the combination of probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum ME-3 and ofloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki Tõnis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to detect whether in experimental Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum ME-3 in combination with fluoroquinolone therapy would eradicate S. Typhimurium, prevent the development of liver and spleen granulomas and improve the indices of oxidative stress in the ileum mucosa. The selected bacteriological, histological and biochemical methods were applied. Results Combined treatment with L. fermentum ME-3 and ofloxacin eradicated Salmonella Typhimurium from blood, ileum and liver, decreased the number of animals with liver and spleen granulomas and reduced the value of lipid peroxides in the ileum mucosa. Higher total counts of intestinal lactobacilli in all experimental groups were associated with the absence of liver granulomas. Conclusion The antimicrobial and antioxidative probiotic L. fermentum ME-3 combined with ofloxacin enhances the eradication of experimental S. Typhimurium infection. These observations on probiotic and antimicrobial co-action may serve as basis to develop new strategies for treatment of invasive bacterial infections of the gut.

  13. Prevention of infection after knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenoi, Vitali; Schönermark, Matthias P; Hagen, Anja

    2010-07-15

    Man-made joints (joint endoprostheses), including knee endoprostheses, are used in some irreversible diseases of the human joints. The implantation of joint endoprostheses (arthroplasty) is associated with an increased risk for infection. To prevent infections, different interventions without and with the use of antibiotics (hygiene procedures and antibiotic prophylaxis) are used. The benefits of these interventions are not clear yet. The presented report addresses the questions regarding the medical effectiveness, the cost-effectiveness as well as the ethical, social and legal aspects related to the use of interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. A systematic literature search is conducted in the medical electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciSearch etc. in June 2009 and has been completed by a hand search. The analysis includes publications which describe and/or evaluate clinical data from randomized controlled trials (RCT), systematic reviews of RCT, registers of endoprostheses or databases concerning interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. The conducted literature search also aims to identify health-economic studies and publications dealing explicitly with ethical, social or legal aspects in the use of interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. The synthesis of information from different publications has been performed qualitatively. The systematic literature search yields 1,030 hits. Based on the predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria a total of ten publications is included in the analysis. The presented report does not find evidence of the effectiveness of different hygiene interventions with a high evidence level. Most of the unspecific interventions are recommended on the basis of results from non-RCT, from studies for other clinical indications and/or for clinically not relevant endpoints, as well as on the basis of expert opinions. The evidence of the effectiveness of intravenous

  14. Prevention of infection after knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Man-made joints (joint endoprostheses, including knee endoprostheses, are used in some irreversible diseases of the human joints. The implantation of joint endoprostheses (arthroplasty is associated with an increased risk for infection. To prevent infections, different interventions without and with the use of antibiotics (hygiene procedures and antibiotic prophylaxis are used. The benefits of these interventions are not clear yet. Research questions: The presented report addresses the questions regarding the medical effectiveness, the cost-effectiveness as well as the ethical, social and legal aspects related to the use of interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. Methods: A systematic literature search is conducted in the medical electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciSearch etc. in June 2009 and has been completed by a hand search. The analysis includes publications which describe and/or evaluate clinical data from randomized controlled trials (RCT, systematic reviews of RCT, registers of endoprostheses or databases concerning interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. The conducted literature search also aims to identify health-economic studies and publications dealing explicitly with ethical, social or legal aspects in the use of interventions to prevent infections after knee arthroplasty. The synthesis of information from different publications has been performed qualitatively. Results: The systematic literature search yields 1,030 hits. Based on the predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria a total of ten publications is included in the analysis. The presented report does not find evidence of the effectiveness of different hygiene interventions with a high evidence level. Most of the unspecific interventions are recommended on the basis of results from non-RCT, from studies for other clinical indications and/or for clinically not relevant endpoints, as well as on the basis of

  15. The attribution of human infections with antimicrobial resistant Salmonella bacteria in Denmark to sources of animal origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Lo Fo Wong, Danilo M. A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2007-01-01

    that of resistant isolates, which in turn was higher than that of susceptible isolates. This may be due to quinolone-resistant isolates having a higher ability to survive food processing and/or cause disease. This study showed domestic food to be the most important source of Salmonella infections in Denmark......Based on the Danish Salmonella surveillance in 2000-2001, we developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each major animal-food sources to human salmonellosis caused by antimicrobial resistant bacteria. Domestic food products accounted for 53.1% of all cases, mainly caused...

  16. Effect of Eimeria adenoeides Challenge upon the Course of an Experimental Salmonella Enteritidis Infection in Turkey Poults

    OpenAIRE

    KOINARSKI, Ventsislav; LYUTSKANOV, Mihni; URUMOVA, Valentina

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a controlled experiment in order to evaluate the predisposing role of Eimeria adenoeides invasion on the appearance, development and severity of a Salmonella Enteritidis infection, with both infectious agents being field isolates obtained from spontaneous cases of the disease. Furthermore, we aimed to examine the principal epidemiological parameters of the mixed infection. The effect of an experimental Eimeria adenoeides invasion upon an artificial...

  17. Outbreak of human Salmonella Typhimurium infections linked to contact with baby poultry from a single agricultural feed store chain and mail-order hatchery, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loharikar, Anagha; Vawter, Shannon; Warren, Kim; Deasy, Marshall; Moll, Maria; Sandt, Carol; Gilhousen, Renee; Villamil, Elizabeth; Rhorer, Andrew; Briere, Elizabeth; Schwensohn, Colin; Trees, Eija; Lafon, Patricia; Adams, Jennifer Kincaid; Le, Brenda; Behravesh, Casey Barton

    2013-01-01

    Over 30 outbreaks of human salmonellosis linked to contact with live poultry from mail-order hatcheries were reported to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1990 and 2010. In May 2009, we investigated an outbreak of human Salmonella Typhimurium infections, primarily affecting children. A case was defined as a person with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis, in a Pennsylvania or New York resident with illness onset between May 1 and September 1, 2009. We conducted a case-control study to examine the relationship between illness and live poultry contact. Controls were age-matched and geographically-matched. Traceback and environmental investigations were conducted. We identified 36 case-patients in Pennsylvania and New York; 36% were children aged ≤5 years. Case-patients were more likely than controls to report live baby poultry contact (matched odds ratio [mOR]: 17.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.7-710.5), contact with chicks (mOR: 14.0; 95% CI: 2.1-592.0), ducklings (mOR: 8.0; 95% CI: 1.1-355.0) and visiting agricultural feed stores (mOR: 6.0; 95% CI: 1.3-55.2). Most (83%) visited agricultural Feed Store Chain Y, a national agricultural feed store chain, which received poultry from Hatchery C, which is supplied by multiple egg sources. Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from a source duck flock, but had a different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern than the outbreak strain. Live baby poultry remain an important source of human salmonellosis, particularly among children. Preventing these infections requires comprehensive interventions at hatcheries and agricultural feed stores; pediatricians should inform patients of risks associated with live poultry contact.

  18. Prevention of Salmonella contamination of finished soybean meal used for animal feed by a Norwegian production plant despite frequent Salmonella contamination of raw soy beans, 1994–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Wierup, Martin; Kristoffersen, Thor

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonella contaminated animal feed is a major source for introducing Salmonella into the animal derived food chain. Because soybeans frequently are contaminated with Salmonella, soybean meal used as animal feed material, a by-product of a “crushing plant” which produces oil from soybeans, can be important source of Salmonella in the animal feed. We report the successful control of Salmonella from 1994 to 2012 in a Norwegian crushing plant producing soybean meal from imported soy b...

  19. A semi-stochastic model for Salmonella infection in a multi-group herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y; Clancy, D; French, N P; Bowers, R G

    2006-04-01

    A multi-group semi-stochastic model is formulated to identify possible causes of why different strains of Salmonella develop so much variation in their infection dynamics in UK dairy herds. The model includes demography (managed populations) and various types of transmission: direct, pseudovertical and indirect (via free-living infectious units in the environment). The effects of herd size and epidemiological parameters on mean prevalence of infection and mean time until fade out are investigated. Numerical simulation shows that higher pathogen-induced mortality, shorter infectious period, more persistent immune response and more rapid removal of faeces result in a lower mean prevalence of infection, a shorter mean time until fade out, and a greater probability of fade out of infection within 600 days. Combining these results and those for the deterministic counterpart could explain differences in observed epidemiological patterns and help to identify the factors inducing the decline in reported cases of epidemic strains such as DT104 in cattle. We further investigate the effect of group structure on the probability of a major outbreak by using the stochastic threshold theory in homogeneous populations and that in heterogeneous populations. Numerical studies suggest that group structure makes major outbreaks less likely than would be the case in a homogeneous population with the same basic reproduction number. Moreover, some control strategies are suggested by investigating the effect of epidemiological parameters on the probability of an epidemic.

  20. Geographical distribution of salmonella infected pig, cattle and sheep herds in Sweden 1993-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Skog Lars; Lewerin Susanna; Frössling Jenny; Wahlström Helene

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The Swedish salmonella control programme covers the entire production chain, from feed to food. All salmonella serotypes are notifiable. On average, less than 20 cases of salmonella in food-producing animals are reported every year. In some situations, the cases would be expected to cluster geographically. The aim of this study was to illustrate the geographic distribution of the salmonella cases detected in pigs, cattle and sheep. Methods Data on all herds with pigs, catt...

  1. Gamma irradiation or CD4+-T-cell depletion causes reactivation of latent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in C3H/HeN mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, A. van; Gevel, J.S. van de; Koudijs, M.; Ossendorp, F.; Beekhuizen, H.; Janssen, R.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2005-01-01

    Upon infection with Salmonella, a host develops an immune response to limit bacterial growth and kill and eliminate the pathogen. Salmonella has evolved mechanisms to remain dormant within the body, only to reappear (reactivate) at a later time when the immune system is abated. We have developed an

  2. Frequency and persistence of fecal shedding of Salmonella Enteritidis by experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Salmonella Enteritidis infections are often linked with consuming contaminated eggs, so the prevalence of this pathogen in egg-laying poultry is an important risk factor for public health. Salmonella persistence and transmission in commercial egg producing flocks are influenced by the complex ...

  3. Abrogation of the Twin Arginine Transport System in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Leads to Colonization Defects during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, M. Megan; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Guo, Jinbai; Aldrich, Lindsay; Bokhari, Danial; Santiviago, Carlos A.; McClelland, Michael; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    2011-01-01

    TatC (STM3975) is a highly conserved component of the Twin Arginine Transport (Tat) systems that is required for transport of folded proteins across the inner membrane in gram-negative bacteria. We previously identified a ΔtatC mutant as defective in competitive infections with wild type ATCC14028 during systemic infection of Salmonella-susceptible BALB/c mice. Here we confirm these results and show that the ΔtatC mutant is internalized poorly by cultured J774-A.1 mouse macrophages a phenotype that may be related to the systemic infection defect. This mutant is also defective for short-term intestinal and systemic colonization after oral infection of BALB/c mice and is shed in reduced numbers in feces from orally infected Salmonella-resistant (CBA/J) mice. We show that the ΔtatC mutant is highly sensitive to bile acids perhaps resulting in the defect in intestinal infection that we observe. Finally, the ΔtatC mutant has an unusual combination of motility phenotypes in Salmonella; it is severely defective for swimming motility but is able to swarm well. The ΔtatC mutant has a lower amount of flagellin on the bacterial surface during swimming motility but normal levels under swarming conditions. PMID:21298091

  4. Abrogation of the twin arginine transport system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium leads to colonization defects during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Megan Reynolds

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available TatC (STM3975 is a highly conserved component of the Twin Arginine Transport (Tat systems that is required for transport of folded proteins across the inner membrane in gram-negative bacteria. We previously identified a ΔtatC mutant as defective in competitive infections with wild type ATCC14028 during systemic infection of Salmonella-susceptible BALB/c mice. Here we confirm these results and show that the ΔtatC mutant is internalized poorly by cultured J774-A.1 mouse macrophages a phenotype that may be related to the systemic infection defect. This mutant is also defective for short-term intestinal and systemic colonization after oral infection of BALB/c mice and is shed in reduced numbers in feces from orally infected Salmonella-resistant (CBA/J mice. We show that the ΔtatC mutant is highly sensitive to bile acids perhaps resulting in the defect in intestinal infection that we observe. Finally, the ΔtatC mutant has an unusual combination of motility phenotypes in Salmonella; it is severely defective for swimming motility but is able to swarm well. The ΔtatC mutant has a lower amount of flagellin on the bacterial surface during swimming motility but normal levels under swarming conditions.

  5. Seroreactivity of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen in comparison with lipopolysaccharide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Lind, Peter; Bell, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    The IgG seroreaction of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen (SEF14) was compared with that against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sera from 23 dairy herds (n = 205) from an island with no occurrence of salmonellosis, four herds (n = 303) with recent outbreaks of S....... dublin and four herds (n = 168) with recent outbreaks of S. typhimurium, were tested in a SEF14-ELISA, S. dublin LPS (0:1, 9, 12) ELISA and S. typhimurium LPS (0:1, 4, 5; 12) ELISA. At a cut-off OD of 0.5, only one of the animals tested from the salmonellosis-free island showed significant seroreaction...... of salmonellosis, increasing the predictive value of serology....

  6. Prevention of postoperative infections in ophthalmic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Jagat

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative endophthalmitis is a serious, vision-threatening complication of intraocular surgery. Better instrumentation, surgical techniques, prophylactic antibiotics and better understanding of asepsis have significantly reduced the incidence of this complication. Postoperative endophthalmitis may occur as an isolated event or as a cluster infection. Topical antibiotics, preoperative periocular preparation with povidone-iodine combined with a sterile operating room protocol significantly reduce the incidence of isolated postoperative endophthalmitis. The role of antibiotics in the irrigating fluid and subconjunctival antibiotics remains controversial. Cluster infections on the other hand are more likely to occur due to the use of contaminated fluids/viscoelastics or a breach in operating room asepsis. Prevention of postoperative endophthalmitis requires strict adherence to operating room norms, with all involved personnel discharging their assigned roles faithfully.

  7. Improved expression systems for regulated expression in Salmonella infecting eukaryotic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Medina

    Full Text Available In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the P(m promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/P(sal system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii the Type III Secretion System (TTSS signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies.

  8. Microbial Shifts in the Intestinal Microbiota of Salmonella Infected Chickens in Response to Enrofloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones (FQs are important antibiotics used for treatment of Salmonella infection in poultry in many countries. However, oral administration of fluoroquinolones may affect the composition and abundance of a number of bacterial taxa in the chicken intestine. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the microbial shifts in the gut of Salmonella infected chickens in response to enrofloxacin treatments at different dosages (0, 0.1, 4, and 100 mg/kg b.w. were quantitatively evaluated. The results showed that the shedding levels of Salmonella were significantly reduced in the high dosage group as demonstrated by both the culturing method and 16S rRNA sequencing method. The average values of diversity indices were higher in the control group than in the three medicated groups. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS analysis results showed that the microbial community of high dosage group was clearly separated from the other three groups. In total, 25 genera were significantly enriched (including 6 abundant genera: Lactococcus, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Acinetobacter and 23 genera were significantly reduced in the medicated groups than in the control group for the treatment period, but these bacterial taxa recovered to normal levels after therapy withdrawal. Additionally, 5 genera were significantly reduced in both treatment and withdrawal periods (e.g., Blautia and Anaerotruncus and 23 genera (e.g., Enterobacter and Clostridium were significantly decreased only in the withdrawal period, indicating that these genera might be the potential targets for the fluoroquinolones antimicrobial effects. Specially, Enterococcus was significantly reduced under high dosage of enrofloxacin treatment, while significantly enriched in the withdrawal period, which was presumably due to the resistance selection. Predicted microbial functions associated with genetic information processing were significantly decreased in the high dosage group

  9. LPS structure and PhoQ activity are important for Salmonella Typhimurium virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K Bender

    Full Text Available The larvae of the wax moth, Galleria mellonella, have been used experimentally to host a range of bacterial and fungal pathogens. In this study we evaluated the suitability of G. mellonella as an alternative animal model of Salmonella infection. Using a range of inoculum doses we established that the LD₅₀ of SalmonellaTyphimurium strain NCTC 12023 was 3.6 × 10³ bacteria per larva. Further, a set of isogenic mutant strains depleted of known virulence factors was tested to identify determinants essential for S. Typhimurium pathogenesis. Mutants depleted of one or both of the type III secretion systems encoded by Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 1 and 2 showed no virulence defect. In contrast, we observed reduced pathogenic potential of a phoQ mutant indicating an important role for the PhoPQ two-component signal transduction system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS structure was also shown to influence Salmonella virulence in G. mellonella. A waaL(rfaL mutant, which lacks the entire O-antigen (OAg, was virtually avirulent, while a wzz(ST/wzz(fepE double mutant expressing only a very short OAg was highly attenuated for virulence. Furthermore, shortly after infection both LPS mutant strains showed decreased replication when compared to the wild type in a flow cytometry-based competitive index assay. In this study we successfully established a G. mellonella model of S. Typhimurium infection. By identifying PhoQ and LPS OAg length as key determinants of virulence in the wax moth larvae we proved that there is an overlap between this and other animal model systems, thus confirming that the G. mellonella infection model is suitable for assessing aspects of Salmonella virulence function.

  10. LPS Structure and PhoQ Activity Are Important for Salmonella Typhimurium Virulence in the Gallleria mellonella Infection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Jennifer K.; Wille, Thorsten; Blank, Kathrin; Lange, Anna; Gerlach, Roman G.

    2013-01-01

    The larvae of the wax moth, Galleria mellonella, have been used experimentally to host a range of bacterial and fungal pathogens. In this study we evaluated the suitability of G. mellonella as an alternative animal model of Salmonella infection. Using a range of inoculum doses we established that the LD50 of Salmonella Typhimurium strain NCTC 12023 was 3.6 × 103 bacteria per larva. Further, a set of isogenic mutant strains depleted of known virulence factors was tested to identify determinants essential for S. Typhimurium pathogenesis. Mutants depleted of one or both of the type III secretion systems encoded by Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 1 and 2 showed no virulence defect. In contrast, we observed reduced pathogenic potential of a phoQ mutant indicating an important role for the PhoPQ two-component signal transduction system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure was also shown to influence Salmonella virulence in G. mellonella. A waaL (rfaL) mutant, which lacks the entire O-antigen (OAg), was virtually avirulent, while a wzzST/wzzfepE double mutant expressing only a very short OAg was highly attenuated for virulence. Furthermore, shortly after infection both LPS mutant strains showed decreased replication when compared to the wild type in a flow cytometry-based competitive index assay. In this study we successfully established a G. mellonella model of S. Typhimurium infection. By identifying PhoQ and LPS OAg length as key determinants of virulence in the wax moth larvae we proved that there is an overlap between this and other animal model systems, thus confirming that the G. mellonella infection model is suitable for assessing aspects of Salmonella virulence function. PMID:23951347

  11. Tiny Turtles Purchased at Pet Stores are a Potential High Risk for Salmonella Human Infection in the Valencian Region, Eastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Clara; Vega, Santiago; Marco-Jiménez, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Turtles may be considered unsafe pets, particularly in households with children. This study aimed to assess Salmonella carriage by turtles in pet stores and in private ownership to inform the public of the potential health risk, enabling informed choices around pet selection. During the period between September and October 2013, 24 pet stores and 96 private owners were sampled in the Valencian Region (Eastern Spain). Salmonella identification procedure was based on ISO 6579: 2002 recommendations (Annex D). Salmonella strains were serotyped in accordance with Kauffman-White-Le-Minor technique. The rate of isolation of Salmonella was very high from pet store samples (75.0% ± 8.8%) and moderate for private owners (29.0% ± 4.6%). Serotyping revealed 18 different serotypes among two Salmonella enterica subspecies: S. enterica subsp. enterica and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae. Most frequently isolated serotypes were Salmonella Typhimurium (39.5%, 17/43) and Salmonella Pomona (9.3%, 4/43). Serotypes identified have previously been reported in turtles, and child Salmonella infections associate with pet turtle exposure. The present study clearly demonstrates that turtles in pet stores, as well as in private owners, could be a direct or indirect source of a high risk of human Salmonella infections. In addition, pet stores should advise their customers of the potential risks associated with reptile ownership.

  12. Characterization of Chicken Spleen Transcriptome after Infection with Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulova, Marta; Rajova, Jana; Vlasatikova, Lenka; Volf, Jiri; Stepanova, Hana; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rychlik, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this study we were interested in identification of new markers of chicken response to Salmonella Enteritidis infection. To reach this aim, gene expression in the spleens of naive chickens and those intravenously infected with S. Enteritidis with or without previous oral vaccination was determined by 454 pyrosequencing of splenic mRNA/cDNA. Forty genes with increased expression at the level of transcription were identified. The most inducible genes encoded avidin (AVD), extracellular fatty acid binding protein (EXFABP), immune responsive gene 1 (IRG1), chemokine ah221 (AH221), trappin-6-like protein (TRAP6) and serum amyloid A (SAA). Using cDNA from sorted splenic B-lymphocytes, macrophages, CD4, CD8 and γδ T-lymphocytes, we found that the above mentioned genes were preferentially expressed in macrophages. AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6 and SAA were induced also in the cecum of chickens orally infected with S. Enteritidis on day 1 of life or day 42 of life. Unusual results were obtained for the immunoglobulin encoding transcripts. Prior to the infection, transcripts coding for the constant parts of IgM, IgY, IgA and Ig light chain were detected in B-lymphocytes. However, after the infection, immunoglobulin encoding transcripts were expressed also by T-lymphocytes and macrophages. Expression of AVD, EXFABP, IRG1, AH221, TRAP6, SAA and all immunoglobulin genes can be therefore used for the characterization of the course of S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. PMID:23094107

  13. Age-structured dynamic, stochastic and mechanistic simulation model of Salmonella Dublin infection within dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Kudahl, Anne Margrethe Braad; Østergaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    for the individual animals in each of the six age groups in the herd. The hygiene level was highly influential on the probability that the infection spread within the herd, duration of infection and epidemic size. The herd susceptibility level was also influential, but not likely to provide sufficient prevention...... the probability of extinction. In general, disease and mortality patterns followed epidemic waves in the herds. However, an interesting pattern was seen for acute infections and abortions in adult cattle after the first 2 years of infection in herds with poor hygiene and high susceptibility. Repeated infections...... in young stock lead to a high proportion of resistant adult cattle, which lead to a dampening effect on acute infections in adults and associated abortions. Sensitivity analyses of 24 alternative scenarios showed that a super shedder state was not essential to mimic the infection dynamics and persistence...

  14. Genome-wide screen for salmonella genes required for long-term systemic infection of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A microarray-based negative selection screen was performed to identify Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (serovar Typhimurium genes that contribute to long-term systemic infection in 129X1/SvJ (Nramp1(r mice. A high-complexity transposon-mutagenized library was used to infect mice intraperitoneally, and the selective disappearance of mutants was monitored after 7, 14, 21, and 28 d postinfection. One hundred and eighteen genes were identified to contribute to serovar Typhimurium infection of the spleens of mice by 28 d postinfection. The negatively selected mutants represent many known aspects of Salmonella physiology and pathogenesis, although the majority of the identified genes are of putative or unknown function. Approximately 30% of the negatively selected genes correspond to horizontally acquired regions such as those within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI 1-5, prophages (Gifsy-1 and -2 and remnant, and the pSLT virulence plasmid. In addition, mutations in genes responsible for outer membrane structure and remodeling, such as LPS- and PhoP-regulated and fimbrial genes, were also selected against. Competitive index experiments demonstrated that the secreted SPI2 effectors SseK2 and SseJ as well as the SPI4 locus are attenuated relative to wild-type bacteria during systemic infection. Interestingly, several SPI1-encoded type III secretion system effectors/translocases are required by serovar Typhimurium to establish and, unexpectedly, to persist systemically, challenging the present description of Salmonella pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed a progressive selection against serovar Typhimurium mutants based upon the duration of the infection, suggesting that different classes of genes may be required at distinct stages of infection. Overall, these data indicate that Salmonella long-term systemic infection in the mouse requires a diverse repertoire of virulence factors. This diversity of genes presumably reflects the fact that

  15. Cytokine activation during embryonic development and in hen ovary and vagina during reproductive age and Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, M; Michailidis, G

    2016-12-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases and is usually associated with consumption of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) contaminated poultry meat or eggs. Contamination with SE is usually the result of infection of the digestive tract, or reproductive organs, especially the ovary and vagina. Thus, knowledge of endogenous innate immune mechanisms operating in the ovary and vagina of hen is an emerging aspect of reproductive physiology. Cytokines are key factors for triggering the immune response and inflammation in chicken to Salmonella infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression profile of 11 proinflammatory cytokines in the chicken embryos during embryonic development, as well as in the hen ovary and vagina in vivo, to investigate whether sexual maturation affects their ovarian and vaginal mRNA abundance and to determine whether cytokine expression was constitutive or induced in the ovary and vagina as a response to SE infection. RT-PCR analysis revealed that several cytokines were expressed in the chicken embryos, and in the ovary and vagina of healthy birds. Expression of various cytokines during sexual maturation appeared to be developmentally regulated. In addition, a significant up-regulation of several cytokines in the ovary and vagina of sexually mature SE infected birds compared to healthy birds of the same age was observed. These results suggest a cytokine-mediated immune response mechanism against Salmonella infection in the hen reproductive organs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recurrent outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in a Texas restaurant: phage type 4 arrives in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, T G; Koo, D; Swerdlow, D L; Gomez, T M; Serrano, B; Nickey, L N; Hickman-Brenner, F W; Malcolm, G B; Griffin, P M

    1996-08-01

    In recent years infection caused by Salmonella serotype Enteritidis (SE) phage type 4 has spread through Europe but has been uncommon in the USA. The first recognized outbreak of this strain in the USA occurred in a Chinese restaurant in EI Paso, Texas, in April 1993; no source was identified. In September 1993, a second outbreak caused by SE phage type 4 was associated with the same restaurant. To determine the cause of the second outbreak, we compared food exposures of the 19 patients with that of two control groups. Egg rolls were the only item significantly associated with illness in both analyses (first control group: odds ratio [OR] 8.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3-31.6; second control group: OR 13.1, 95% CI 2.1-97.0). Retrospective analysis of the April outbreak also implicated egg rolls (OR 32.4, 95% CI 9.1-126.6). Egg roll batter was made from pooled shell eggs and was left at room temperature throughout the day. These two outbreaks of SE phage type 4 likely could have been prevented by using pasteurized eggs and safe food preparation practices.

  17. Global monitoring of Salmonella serovar distribution from the World Health Organization Global Foodborne Infections Network Country Data Bank: results of quality assured laboratories from 2001 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Rene S; Vieira, Antonio R; Karlsmose, Susanne; Lo Fo Wong, Danilo M A; Jensen, Arne B; Wegener, Henrik C; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella enterica is commonly acquired from contaminated food and is an important cause of illness worldwide. Interventions are needed to control Salmonella; subtyping Salmonella by serotyping is useful for targeting such interventions. We, therefore, analyzed the global distribution of the 15 most frequently identified serovars of Salmonella isolated from humans from 2001 to 2007 in laboratories from 37 countries that participated in World Health Organization Global Foodborne Infections Network and demonstrated serotyping proficiency in the Global Foodborne Infections Network External Quality Assurance System. In all regions throughout the study period, with the exception of the Oceania and North American regions, Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium ranked as the most common and second most common serovar, respectively. In the North American and Oceania (Australia and New Zealand) regions, Salmonella serovar Typhimurium was the most common serovar reported, and Salmonella serovar Enteritidis was the second most common serovar. During the study period, the proportion of Salmonella isolates reported from humans that were Salmonella serovar Enteritidis was 43.5% (range: 40.6% [2007] to 44.9% [2003]), and Salmonella serovar Typhimurium was 17.1% (range: 15% [2007] to 18.9% [2001]). Salmonella serovars Newport (mainly observed in Latin and North American and European countries), Infantis (dominating in all regions), Virchow (mainly observed in Asian, European, and Oceanic countries), Hadar (profound in European countries), and Agona (intense in Latin and North American and European countries) were also frequently isolated with an overall proportion of 3.5%, 1.8%, 1.5%, 1.5%, and 0.8%, respectively. There were large differences in the most commonly isolated serovars between regions, but lesser differences between countries within the same region. The results also highlight the complexity of the global epidemiology of Salmonella and the need and importance

  18. An evaluation of the effect of sodium bisulfate as a feed additive on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in experimentally infected broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, I I; Sanad, Y M; Stonerock, R; Rajashekara, G

    2012-04-01

    The colonization of broiler chickens with Salmonella can pose serious health and economic risks for both consumers and the poultry industry. Because colonization with Salmonella can lead to subsequent contamination of chicken carcasses during processing, preemptive control measures should include the reduction of this pathogen in chickens before slaughter. In this study, we evaluated the effect of sodium bisulfate, a potential antimicrobial feed additive, on Salmonella colonization of experimentally infected broiler chickens. Two hundred and forty 1-d-old chickens were infected orally with Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis and divided into 4 groups (each comprised of 60 chickens). Three groups received different concentrations of sodium bisulfate integrated into their feed, while the feed of the fourth group (positive control) was not treated. At time points before the broilers' slaughter age, different organs/tissues (liver, spleen, cecum, and bone marrow) and feces were aseptically collected and tested for the occurrence and density of Salmonella Enteritidis. Our results show that at 3 d postinfection, high colonization with Salmonella Enteritidis was detected and affected all tested tissues and fecal samples. Although colonization decreased across time, Salmonella Enteritidis persisted in the cecum, feces, spleen, and bone marrow, but not in the liver, until slaughter age. Furthermore, the addition of sodium bisulfate to the feed did not significantly reduce Salmonella Enteritidis numbers in infected chickens or affect the shedding of the pathogen.

  19. Prevention of soil-transmitted helminth infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Mascarini-Serra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs form one of the most important groups of infectious agents and are the cause of serious global health problems. The most important STHs are roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides, whipworms (Trichuris trichiura and hookworms (Necator americanus or Ancylostoma duodenale; on a global level, more than a billion people have been infected by at least one species of this group of pathogens. This review explores the general concepts of transmission dynamics and the environment and intensity of infection and morbidity of STHs. The global strategy for the control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis is based on (i regular anthelminthic treatment, (ii health education, (iii sanitation and personal hygiene and (iv other means of prevention with vaccines and remote sensoring. The reasons for the development of a control strategy based on population intervention rather than on individual treatment are discussed, as well as the costs of the prevention of STHs, although these cannot always be calculated because interventions in health education are difficult to measure. An efficient sanitation infrastructure can reduce the morbidity of STHs and eliminates the underlying cause of most poverty-related diseases and thus supports the economic development of a country.

  20. Infection of chickens with antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium-like variants: an emerging risk to the poultry industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, B N; Crayford, G; Humphrey, T J; Wigley, P

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica poses a particular risk to public health, and in particular isolates belonging to clonal lineages such as Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 cause epidemics across species including poultry. In recent years, antimicrobial-resistant S. Typhimurium DT193 and specifically the monophasic S. Typhimurium-like variants of this phage type, serotypes 4,12:i:- and 4,5,12:i:-, have become an increasing risk to public health in Europe and the USA and now account for nearly one-half of human S. Typhimurium infections in the UK. Unlike S. Typhimurium that possesses two forms of flagella which can vary between phase 1 and phase 2 during infection, monophasic variants possess only phase 1 flagella. These monophasic antimicrobial-resistant variants have become a major problem in pig production but human cases have also been associated with poultry consumption and have been found in UK flocks through surveillance schemes since 2010. In this study we determined the ability of antimicrobial-resistant DT193 serotype 4,12:i:- and 4,5,12:i:- isolates from pigs to infect chickens. All isolates were found to colonize the caeca and liver. All but one isolate of serotype 4,5,12:i:- also infected the spleen. Levels of infection and pathology were comparable with those found with the virulent S. Typhimurium isolate 4/74. These findings indicate that both S. Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic variants of this phage type usually associated with pigs are capable of colonizing the chicken. This shows that both S. Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic variants represent a significant and potential emerging threat to poultry production from "spill-over" of these isolates from the pig industry or other sources.

  1. Prevention of poxvirus infection by tetrapyrroles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzilli Luigi G

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of poxvirus infection is a topic of great current interest. We report inhibition of vaccinia virus in cell culture by porphyrins and phthalocyanines. Most previous work on the inhibition of viruses with tetrapyrroles has involved photodynamic mechanisms. The current study, however, investigates light-independent inhibition activity. Methods The Western Reserve (WR and International Health Department-J (IHD-J strains of vaccinia virus were used. Virucidal and antiviral activities as well as the cytotoxicity of test compounds were determined. Results Examples of active compounds include zinc protoporphyrin, copper hematoporphyrin, meso(2,6-dihydroxyphenylporphyrin, the sulfonated tetra-1-naphthyl and tetra-1-anthracenylporphyrins, selected sulfonated derivatives of halogenated tetraphenyl porphyrins and the copper chelate of tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine. EC50 values for the most active compounds are as low as 0.05 µg/mL (40 nM. One of the most active compounds was the neutral meso(2,6-dihydroxyphenylporphyrin, indicating that the compounds do not have to be negatively charged to be active. Conclusions Porphyrins and phthalocyanines have been found to be potent inhibitors of infection by vaccinia virus in cell culture. These tetrapyrroles were found to be active against two different virus strains, and against both enveloped and non-enveloped forms of the virus, indicating that these compounds may be broadly effective in their ability to inhibit poxvirus infection.

  2. Functional characteristics of the porcine colonic epithelium following transportation stress and Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbach, Jörg R; Ahrens, Frank; Schwelberger, Hubert G; Fürll, Brigitta; Roesler, Uwe; Hensel, Andreas; Gäbel, Gotthold

    2007-06-01

    Stressful life events and infections contribute to gut disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We used a pig model to analyse whether this could be linked to altered mediator sensitivity of the epithelial lining. Uninfected control pigs or pigs with subclinical Salmonella (S.) typhimurium DT 104 infection were killed either without (ConRest, InfRest) or with prior 8-h transportation (ConTrans, InfTrans). Short-circuit current (I(sc)), tissue conductance (G(t)) and release of mast cell mediators were monitored in isolated colonic epithelia mounted in Ussing chambers. Epithelia were exposed to histamine (100 microM, mucosally), substance P (SP; 1 microM, serosally), calcimycin A23187 (1 microM, serosally) and theophylline (10 mM, bilaterally). Transepithelial flux of histamine and colonic activities of histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT) and diamine oxidase (DAO) were determined. S. infection decreased baseline I(sc), G(t) and histamine fluxes, while transportation had no effect on these values. Mucosal histamine increased I(sc) only in ConTrans pigs. This was not associated with increased mucosal-to-serosal flux of histamine but with a 2-fold increased DAO activity. Serosal SP increased I(sc) only in transported animals, but the increase was six times higher in ConTrans versus InfTrans pigs. Effectiveness of SP was not dependent on the release of histamine or prostaglandin D2. A23187 and theophylline elicited increases in I(sc) that were not different between treatments. Transportation stress facilitates secretory responses of the colonic epithelium to SP and luminal histamine. This is suppressed by subclinical S. infection. Effects of S. infection on porcine colon resemble, in part, the known effects of an oral S. endotoxin application.

  3. The commercial impact of pig Salmonella spp. infections in border-free markets during an economic recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelopoulou, G.; Kritas, S.; Christodoulopoulos, G.; Burriel, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Salmonella, a group of important zoonotic pathogens, is having global economic and political importance. Its main political importance results from the pathogenicity of many of its serovars for man. Serovars Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium are currently the most frequently associated to foodborne infections, but they are not the only ones. Animal food products contaminated from subclinically infected animals are a risk to consumers. In border free markets, an example is the EU, these consumers at risk are international. This is why, economic competition could use the risk of consumer infection either to restrict or promote free border trade in animals and their products. Such use of public health threats increases during economic recessions in nations economically weak to effectively enforce surveillance. In free trade conditions, those unable to pay the costs of pathogen control are unable to effectively implement agreed regulations, centrally decided, but leaving their enforcement to individual states. Free trade of animal food products depends largely on the promotion of safety, included in “quality,” when traders target foreign markets. They will overtake eventually the markets of those ineffectively implementing agreed safety regulations, if their offered prices are also attractive for recession hit consumers. Nations unable to effectively enforce safety regulations become disadvantaged partners unequally competing with producers of economically robust states when it comes to public health. Thus, surveillance and control of pathogens like Salmonella are not only quantitative. They are also political issues upon which states base national trade decisions. Hence, the quantitative calculation of costs incurring from surveillance and control of animal salmonelloses, should not only include the cost for public health protection, but also the long term international economic and political costs for an individual state. These

  4. AMPK and mTOR: sensors and regulators of immunometabolic changes during Salmonella infection in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Michael H; Genovese, Kenneth J; He, Haiqi; Arsenault, Ryan J

    2016-02-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early pro-inflammatory response in chickens, but the response is short-lived, asymptomatic of clinical disease, results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and can transmit infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that facilitate this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are unknown. We have begun to concentrate on the convergence of metabolism and immune function as playing a major role in regulating the host responsiveness to infection. It is now recognized that the immune system monitors the metabolic state of tissues and responds by modulating metabolic function. The aim in this review is to summarize the literature that has defined a series of genotypic and phenotypic alterations in the regulatory host immune-metabolic signaling pathways in the local cecal microenvironment during the first 4 d following infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune-metabolism peptide arrays and quantitative real-time-PCR of cecal tissue during the early (4 to 48 h) and late stages (4 to 17 d) of a Salmonella infection in young broiler chickens, the local immunometabolic microenvironment has been ascertained. Distinct immune and metabolic pathways are altered between 2 to 4 d post-infection that dramatically changed the local immunometabolic environment. Thus, the tissue immunometabolic phenotype of the cecum plays a major role in the ability of the bacterium to establish a persistent cecal colonization. In general, our findings show that AMPK and mTOR are key players linking specific extracellular milieu and intracellular metabolism. Phenotypically, the early response (4 to 48 h) to Salmonella infection is pro-inflammatory, fueled by glycolysis and mTOR-mediated protein synthesis, whereas by the later phase (4 to 5 d), the local environment has undergone an immune-metabolic reprogramming to

  5. Salmonella Sepsis in African Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with both Salmonella typhiand non-typhi salmonella. (NTS) is common among children in many African countries. Salmonella typhi predominates among older children and adults with the typical localising features of enteric fever. Nontyphoid salmonellae species are more often reported among children under 5 ...

  6. Pathology Laboratories and Infection Prevention and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory health care workers are vulnerable to infection with the Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs while receiving, handling and disposing biological samples. Ideally the infrastructure of the lab should be according to the best practices like good ventilation, room pressure differential, lighting, space adequacy, hand hygiene facilities, personal protective equipments, biological safety cabinets etc. Disinfection of the environment, and specific precautions with sharps and microbial cultures should follow the protocols and policies of the Infection Prevention and Control Practices (IPAC. If Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Legionella pneumophila are expected, diagnostic tests should be performed in a bio-safety level 3 facilities (for agents which may cause serious or potentially lethal disease in healthy adults after inhalation. Laboratory access should be limited only to people working in it.Along with the advent of new technologies and advanced treatment we are now facing problems with the dreadful HAIs with Antimicrobial Resistant Organisms (AROs which is taking a pandemic form. According to WHO, hundreds of millions of patients develop HAI every year worldwide and as many as 1.4 million occur each day in hospitals alone. The principal goals for hospital IPAC programs are to protect the patient, protect the health care worker (HCW, visitors, and other persons in the health environment, and to accomplish the previous goals in a cost-effective manner like hand hygiene, surveillance, training of the HCWs, initiating awareness programs and making Best Practices and Guidelines to be followed by everyone in the hospital.The initiation for the best practices in the Pathology Laboratories can be either Sporadic or Organizational. Sporadic initiation is when the laboratories make their own IPAC policies. It has been seen that in few centres these policies have been conceptualized but not materialized. Organizational initiation is much more

  7. Protective effect of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota against lethal infection with multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, T; Shimizu, K; Takada, T; Kado, S; Yuki, N; Morotomi, M; Tanaka, R; Nomoto, K

    2011-01-01

    The anti-infectious activity of lactobacilli against multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (DT104) was examined in a murine model of an opportunistic antibiotic-induced infection. Explosive intestinal growth and subsequent lethal extra-intestinal translocation after oral infection with DT104 during fosfomycin (FOM) administration was significantly inhibited by continuous oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS), which is naturally resistant to FOM, at a dose of 10(8) colony-forming units per mouse daily to mice. Comparison of the anti-Salmonella activity of several Lactobacillus type strains with natural resistance to FOM revealed that Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 14869(T) , Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917(T) , Lactobacillus reuteri JCM 1112(T) , Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469(T) and Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741(T) conferred no activity even when they obtained the high population levels almost similar to those of the effective strains such as LcS, Lact. casei ATCC 334(T) and Lactobacillus zeae ATCC 15820(T) . The increase in concentration of organic acids and maintenance of the lower pH in the intestine because of Lactobacillus colonization were correlated with the anti-infectious activity. Moreover, heat-killed LcS was not protective against the infection, suggesting that the metabolic activity of lactobacilli is important for the anti-infectious activity. These results suggest that certain lactobacilli in combination with antibiotics may be useful for prophylaxis against opportunistic intestinal infections by multi-drug resistant pathogens, such as DT104. Antibiotics such as FOM disrupt the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota that produce organic acids, and that only probiotic strains that are metabolically active in vivo should be selected to prevent intestinal infection when used clinically in combination with certain antibiotics. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology

  8. A second wave of Salmonella T3SS1 activity prolongs the lifespan of infected epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Type III secretion system 1 (T3SS1) is used by the enteropathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to establish infection in the gut. Effector proteins translocated by this system across the plasma membrane facilitate invasion of intestinal epithelial cells. One such effector, the inositol phosphatase SopB, contributes to invasion and mediates activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt. Following internalization, some bacteria escape from the Salmonella-containing vacuole into the cytosol and there is evidence suggesting that T3SS1 is expressed in this subpopulation. Here, we investigated the post-invasion role of T3SS1, using SopB as a model effector. In cultured epithelial cells, SopB-dependent Akt phosphorylation was observed at two distinct stages of infection: during and immediately after invasion, and later during peak cytosolic replication. Single cell analysis revealed that cytosolic Salmonella deliver SopB via T3SS1. Although intracellular replication was unaffected in a SopB deletion mutant, cells infected with ΔsopB demonstrated a lack of Akt phosphorylation, earlier time to death, and increased lysis. When SopB expression was induced specifically in cytosolic Salmonella, these effects were restored to levels observed in WT infected cells, indicating that the second wave of SopB protects this infected population against cell death via Akt activation. Thus, T3SS1 has two, temporally distinct roles during epithelial cell colonization. Additionally, we found that delivery of SopB by cytosolic bacteria was translocon-independent, in contrast to canonical effector translocation across eukaryotic membranes, which requires formation of a translocon pore. This mechanism was also observed for another T3SS1 effector, SipA. These findings reveal the functional and mechanistic adaptability of a T3SS that can be harnessed in different microenvironments. PMID:28426838

  9. Infection of commercial laying hens with Salmonella Gallinarum: clinical, anatomopathological and haematological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OC Freitas Neto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the susceptibility of commercial laying hens to Salmonella Gallinarum (SG. Two experiments were carried using a mutant strain of Salmonella Gallinarum resistant to nalidix acid (SGNALr. In the first trial, the resistance of birds was evaluated based on clinical signs, faecal shedding, and mortality. It was carried out with six lines of commercial layers being three light white layers, considered to be resistant to SG (W1, W2, W3, and three semi-heavy brown varieties (B1, B2, B3, considered susceptible to SG. Each group contained 15 one-day-old birds. Hens were inoculated in the crop at 5 days of age with 0.2 mL of SGNALr neat culture. In addition, to each brown variety, a new group of 15 birds was challenged with 0.2mL of the same SGNALr culture diluted at 10-3. At the end of the first experiment, the surviving birds were sacrificed, and microbiological culture of liver and spleen was performed. In the second experiment, white and brown birds were inoculated with neat culture at five days of age. Samples were collected for evaluation of blood parameters and histopathology assessment at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 14 days post-infection. The results of the first experiment showed higher resistance of white birds (p<0.05, although there was no uniformity in the responses against fowl typhoid among the birds within these groups. In the second experiment, there were differences between white and brown birds both in blood parameters and in organ lesion intensity.

  10. Using In Vitro Immunomodulatory Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Selection of Probiotics against Salmonella Infection in Broiler Chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junchang; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Luoxiong; Yang, Xin; Zhao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Poultry is known to be a major reservoir of Salmonella. The use of lactic acid bacteria has become one of successful strategies to control Salmonella in poultry. The purpose of this study was to select lactic acid bacteria strains by their in vitro immunomodulatory properties for potential use as probiotics against Salmonella infection in broiler chicks. Among 101 isolated lactic acid bacteria strains, 13 strains effectively survived under acidic (pH 2.5) and bile salt (ranging from 0.1% to 1.0%) conditions, effectively inhibited growth of 6 pathogens, and adhered to Caco-2 cells. However, their in vitro immunomodulatory activities differed significantly. Finally, three strains with higher in vitro immunomodulatory properties (Lactobacillus plantarum PZ01, Lactobacillus salivarius JM32 and Pediococcus acidilactici JH231) and three strains with lower in vitro immunomodulatory activities (Enterococcus faecium JS11, Lactobacillus salivarius JK22 and Lactobacillus salivarius JM2A1) were compared for their inhibitory effects on Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro and their antimicrobial effects in vivo. The former three strains inhibited Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro, reduced the number of Salmonella in intestinal content, spleen and liver, reduced the levels of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF), IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 in serum and increased the level of IL-10 in serum during a challenge study in vivo more efficiently than the latter three strains. These results suggest that in vitro immunomodulatory activities could be used as additional parameters to select more effective probiotics as feed supplements for poultry.

  11. Using In Vitro Immunomodulatory Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Selection of Probiotics against Salmonella Infection in Broiler Chicks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchang Feng

    Full Text Available Poultry is known to be a major reservoir of Salmonella. The use of lactic acid bacteria has become one of successful strategies to control Salmonella in poultry. The purpose of this study was to select lactic acid bacteria strains by their in vitro immunomodulatory properties for potential use as probiotics against Salmonella infection in broiler chicks. Among 101 isolated lactic acid bacteria strains, 13 strains effectively survived under acidic (pH 2.5 and bile salt (ranging from 0.1% to 1.0% conditions, effectively inhibited growth of 6 pathogens, and adhered to Caco-2 cells. However, their in vitro immunomodulatory activities differed significantly. Finally, three strains with higher in vitro immunomodulatory properties (Lactobacillus plantarum PZ01, Lactobacillus salivarius JM32 and Pediococcus acidilactici JH231 and three strains with lower in vitro immunomodulatory activities (Enterococcus faecium JS11, Lactobacillus salivarius JK22 and Lactobacillus salivarius JM2A1 were compared for their inhibitory effects on Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro and their antimicrobial effects in vivo. The former three strains inhibited Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro, reduced the number of Salmonella in intestinal content, spleen and liver, reduced the levels of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 in serum and increased the level of IL-10 in serum during a challenge study in vivo more efficiently than the latter three strains. These results suggest that in vitro immunomodulatory activities could be used as additional parameters to select more effective probiotics as feed supplements for poultry.

  12. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections associated with frozen pot pies--United States, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-28

    On June 6, 2007, a cluster of four human Salmonella serotype I 4,5,12:i:-* infections sharing a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern was identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Health and reported to PulseNet. Initial investigations conducted during June--September 2007 by state and local health departments in collaboration with CDC did not identify a source of infection. This report summarizes the results of subsequent investigations of the outbreak, which determined that 401 cases of salmonellosis occurred in 41 states during 2007, with 32% of ill persons hospitalized. A multistate case-control study conducted during October 3-13 indicated that illness was associated with consumption of Banquet brand frozen, not-ready-to-eat pot pies (odds ratio = 23.6; pconfusion regarding microwaving instructions might have resulted in a failure to cook the product properly. A voluntary recall was issued by the manufacturer (ConAgra Foods Inc., Omaha, Nebraska) on October 11, 2007, for all nine brands of pot pies produced at the implicated plant (plant A). The outbreak strain was isolated from 13 samples of unopened Banquet pot pies collected from the homes of patients. This outbreak highlights the need to cook not-ready-to-eat frozen foods thoroughly; these products should be clearly labeled as requiring complete cooking, and cooking instructions should be validated to account for variability in microwave wattage and common misconceptions among consumers regarding the nature of not-ready-to-eat foods.

  13. Curcuma and Scutellaria plant extracts protect chickens against inflammation and Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmuzova, Karolina; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Gerzova, Lenka; Cejkova, Darina; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Panhéleux, Marina; Robert, Fabrice; Sisak, Frantisek; Havlickova, Hana; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    After a ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in farm animals in the European Union in 2006, an interest in alternative products with antibacterial or anti-inflammatory properties has increased. In this study, we therefore tested the effects of extracts from Curcuma longa and Scutellaria baicalensis used as feed additives against cecal inflammation induced by heat stress or Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infection in chickens. Curcuma extract alone was not enough to decrease gut inflammation induced by heat stress. However, a mixture of Curcuma and Scutellaria extracts used as feed additives decreased gut inflammation induced by heat or S. Enteritidis, decreased S. Enteritidis counts in the cecum but was of no negative effect on BW or humoral immune response. Using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA we found out that supplementation of feed with the 2 plant extracts had no effect on microbiota diversity. However, if the plant extract supplementation was provided to the chickens infected with S. Enteritidis, Faecalibacterium, and Lactobacillus, both bacterial genera with known positive effects on gut health were positively selected. The supplementation of chicken feed with extracts from Curcuma and Scutelleria thus may be used in poultry production to effectively decrease gut inflammation and increase chicken performance. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  14. Comprehensive identification of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium genes required for infection of BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy R Chaudhuri

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Genes required for infection of mice by Salmonella Typhimurium can be identified by the interrogation of random transposon mutant libraries for mutants that cannot survive in vivo. Inactivation of such genes produces attenuated S. Typhimurium strains that have potential for use as live attenuated vaccines. A quantitative screen, Transposon Mediated Differential Hybridisation (TMDH, has been developed that identifies those members of a large library of transposon mutants that are attenuated. TMDH employs custom transposons with outward-facing T7 and SP6 promoters. Fluorescently-labelled transcripts from the promoters are hybridised to whole-genome tiling microarrays, to allow the position of the transposon insertions to be determined. Comparison of microarray data from the mutant library grown in vitro (input with equivalent data produced after passage of the library through mice (output enables an attenuation score to be determined for each transposon mutant. These scores are significantly correlated with bacterial counts obtained during infection of mice using mutants with individual defined deletions of the same genes. Defined deletion mutants of several novel targets identified in the TMDH screen are effective live vaccines.

  15. Studies on the therapeutic effect of propolis along with standard antibacterial drug in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infected BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Preeti; Kumar, Neelima R; Harjai, Kusum

    2016-11-25

    Antibiotic resistance is an emerging public health problem. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has described antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing health problems in 21st century. WHO rated antibiotic resistance as "one of the three greatest threats to human health". One important strategy employed to overcome this resistance is the use of combination of drugs. Many plants, natural extracts have been shown to exhibit synergistic response with standard drugs against microorganisms. The present study focused on the antibacterial potential of propolis in combination with the standard antibiotic Cefixime against the typhoid causing bacteria i.e. Salmonella. Ethanolic extract of propolis was taken for the present work. For the experiment BALB/c mice were taken as animal model and divided into ten groups. Along with normal and infected control groups, four different combinations of cefixime and propolis were used. Biochemical, hematological and histopathological indices were studied by following the standard protocols. In BALB/c mice, Salmonella causes severe biochemical, hematological and histopathological alterations by 5th day of infection. Ethanolic extract of propolis at a dose of 300 mg/kg body weight of mice when used alone to treat Salmonella infection in mice gave significant results by 30th day of treatment. Similarly, when cefixime (4 mg/kg body weight of mice) was used to treat infection in mice, significant results as compared to infected control were observed after 5th day. But when propolis and cefixime were used together in different concentrations in combination therapy, evident results were observed after 5 days of treatment. The levels of various liver and kidney function enzymes, blood indices and the histopathology of liver, spleen and kidney were restored to near normal after 5 days of treatment and at much lower doses as compared to the effective dose when used alone. The study confirmed that significant

  16. Salmonella – A Brief Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurmi Esko

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonellosis is the main cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis in most European countries. Infections with Salmonella is usually subclinical, whereas clinical cases show symptoms with a wide range of severity. Infection is most commonly associated with the consumption of meat, especially poultry or pork, and eggs and their products. Salmonella can enter the food chain at any point throughout its length. The principal reservoir of Salmonellae is the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and birds, but Salmonellae are able to survive and even multiply in many external environments. In Norway, Sweden and Finland cost effective prevention methods have been used for several years to prevent and control Salmonellea infections. In addition, competitive exclusion (CE and vaccination might be relevant as biological methods to prevent colonisation of bird intestines by enteropathogens, especially Salmonella. Antibiotic drug resistance has been a problem since the start of the antibiotic era. The cause for anxiety is that more and more bacteria are becoming resistant, often to a whole range of antibiotics. The debate on the use of antimicrobials in veterinary medicine and animal production dates back almost as long as the use itself. There is a clear evidence to show that antibacterial agents given to animals for growth promotion, prophylactic purposes or treatment induce a rise in the number of antibiotic resistant strains isolated from the animals. These bacteria may be transmitted to humans by several possible routes. There are thus strong arguments for preventive efforts which have to be directed towards identifying real critical control points (HACCP throughout the whole food chain, which starts from the farm and ends at the consumer's table.

  17. International outbreak of multiple Salmonella serotype infections linked to sprouted chia seed powder - USA and Canada, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R R; Heiman Marshall, K E; Burnworth, L; Hamel, M; Tataryn, J; Cutler, J; Meghnath, K; Wellman, A; Irvin, K; Isaac, L; Chau, K; Locas, A; Kohl, J; Huth, P A; Nicholas, D; Traphagen, E; Soto, K; Mank, L; Holmes-Talbot, K; Needham, M; Barnes, A; Adcock, B; Honish, L; Chui, L; Taylor, M; Gaulin, C; Bekal, S; Warshawsky, B; Hobbs, L; Tschetter, L R; Surin, A; Lance, S; Wise, M E; Williams, I; Gieraltowski, L

    2017-06-01

    Salmonella is a leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness. We report the collaborative investigative efforts of US and Canadian public health officials during the 2013-2014 international outbreak of multiple Salmonella serotype infections linked to sprouted chia seed powder. The investigation included open-ended interviews of ill persons, traceback, product testing, facility inspections, and trace forward. Ninety-four persons infected with outbreak strains from 16 states and four provinces were identified; 21% were hospitalized and none died. Fifty-four (96%) of 56 persons who consumed chia seed powder, reported 13 different brands that traced back to a single Canadian firm, distributed by four US and eight Canadian companies. Laboratory testing yielded outbreak strains from leftover and intact product. Contaminated product was recalled. Although chia seed powder is a novel outbreak vehicle, sprouted seeds are recognized as an important cause of foodborne illness; firms should follow available guidance to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination during sprouting.

  18. Prevention of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    The interest in mass gathering and its implications has been increasing due to globalization and international travel. The potential occurrence of infectious disease outbreaks during mass gathering is most feared. In this context, respiratory tract infections are of great concern due to crowding in a limited space which facilitates and magnifies the potential of disease spread among attendees. Pneumococcal disease is best described among pilgrims to Makkah and vaccination is one of the methods for the prevention of this disease. Pneumonia was described in a mass gathering with a prevalence of 4.8/100,000 pilgrims and contributes to 15–39% of hospitalizations. Various studies showed that 7–37% of pilgrims are 65 y of age or older. The uptake of pneumococcal vaccine among pilgrims is low at 5%. There is no available data to make strong recommendations for S. pneumoniae vaccination of all pilgrims, it is important that a high risk population receive the indicated vaccination. We reviewed the available literature on the burden of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering and evaluate the available literature on pneumococcal vaccinations for attendees of mass gathering. PMID:26176306

  19. Outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium infection traced to contaminated chocolate and caused by a strain lacking the 60-megadalton virulence plasmid.

    OpenAIRE

    Kapperud, G; Gustavsen, S; Hellesnes, I; Hansen, A. H.; Lassen, J; Hirn, J.; Jahkola, M; Montenegro, M A; Helmuth, R

    1990-01-01

    We describe an outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium infection, caused by contaminated chocolate produced by one Norwegian company, which occurred in Norway and Finland in 1987. A total of 349 bacteriologically verified cases were recorded in Norway, and 12 cases were recorded in Finland. There was a predominance of young children among the patients (median age, 6 years), many of whom developed acute hemorrhagic diarrhea. The outbreak strain exhibited a rare phage lysis pattern and a characteris...

  20. Innovations in Wound Infection Prevention and Management and Antimicrobial Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    medical deaths 1162 surgical deaths of 132,996 admissionsArnold. Mil Med 1978;143:161 Wound Infection Prevention and Management - Epidemiology 2011 MHS...guidelines – Rapid evacuation to surgical care (irrigation/debridement) – Limit antibiotic spectrum/duration around wound management – Emphasize basic...Hospenthal. J Trauma 2008;64:S211 2011 MHS Conference Wound Infection Prevention and Management - PreventionInfection control basics – Handwashing

  1. Estimation of costs for control of Salmonella in high-risk feed materials and compound feed

    OpenAIRE

    Wierup, Martin; Widell, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Feed is a potential and major source for introducing Salmonella into the animal-derived food chain. This is given special attention in the European Union (EU) efforts to minimize human food-borne Salmonella infections from animal-derived food. The objective of this study was to estimate the total extra cost for preventing Salmonella contamination of feed above those measures required to produce commercial feed according to EU regulation (EC) No 183/2005. The study was carried ou...

  2. A Multi-Omic View of Host-Pathogen-Commensal Interplay in Salmonella-Mediated Intestinal Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Brooke LD; Li, Jie; Sanford, James A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Jones, Marcus B.; Peterson, Christine; Peterson, Scott N.; Frank, Bryan C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Brown, Joseph N.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-06-26

    The potential for commensal microorganisms indigenous to a host (the ‘microbiome’ or ‘microbiota’) to alter infection outcome by influencing host-pathogen interplay is largely unknown. We used a multi-omics “systems” approach, incorporating proteomics, metabolomics, glycomics, and metagenomics, to explore the molecular interplay between the murine host, the pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), and commensal gut microorganisms during intestinal infection with S. Typhimurium. We find proteomic evidence that S. Typhimurium thrives within the infected 129/SvJ mouse gut without antibiotic pre-treatment, inducing inflammation and disrupting the intestinal microbiome (e.g., suppressing Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes while promoting growth of Salmonella and Enterococcus). Alteration of the host microbiome population structure was highly correlated with gut environmental changes, including the accumulation of metabolites normally consumed by commensal microbiota. Finally, the less characterized phase of S. Typhimurium’s lifecycle was investigated, and both proteomic and glycomic evidence suggests S. Typhimurium may take advantage of increased fucose moieties to metabolize fucose while growing in the gut. The application of multiple omics measurements to Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation provides insights into complex molecular strategies employed during pathogenesis between host, pathogen, and the microbiome.

  3. Prevention of Salmonella contamination of finished soybean meal used for animal feed by a Norwegian production plant despite frequent Salmonella contamination of raw soy beans, 1994-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierup, Martin; Kristoffersen, Thor

    2014-07-11

    Salmonella contaminated animal feed is a major source for introducing Salmonella into the animal derived food chain. Because soybeans frequently are contaminated with Salmonella, soybean meal used as animal feed material, a by-product of a "crushing plant" which produces oil from soybeans, can be important source of Salmonella in the animal feed. During the 19-year period, 34% of samples collected during unloading of ships delivering soybeans yielded Salmonella; the proportion of samples from ships that yielded Salmonella varied from 12-62% each year. Dust samples from all shiploads from South America yielded Salmonella. In total 94 serovars of Salmonella were isolated, including nine (90%) of the EU 2012 top ten serovars isolated from clinical cases of salmonellosis in humans, including major animal pathogenic serovars like Spp. Typhimurium and Enteritidis. This study shows that a HAACP-based control program in a soybean crushing plant can produce Salmonella free soybean meal despite frequent Salmonella contamination of raw soybeans. That approach is suggested as an effective way to minimize the risk of Salmonella exposure of the animal feed mills and contamination of the subsequent animal feed chain.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis causing mixed infections in febrile children in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García V

    2018-01-01

    multidrug-resistant isolates of S. Enteritidis. Nearly half of the children were coinfected with both serovars, a fact expected to aggravate the disease and hamper the treatment. However, particularly poor outcomes were not observed for the coinfected patients. Conclusion: Mixed Salmonella infections could frequently occur in febrile children in Mozambique. Additional studies are required to determine their actual impact and consequences, not only in this country, but also in other African countries. Keywords: invasive nontyphoidal salmonellosis, bloodstream infection, multidrug resistance, virulence-resistance plasmid, ST313, ST1479

  5. Epidemics of invasive Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis and S. enterica Serovar typhimurium infection associated with multidrug resistance among adults and children in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Melita A; Graham, Stephen M; Walsh, Amanda L; Wilson, Lorna; Phiri, Amos; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Zijlstra, Eduard E; Heyderman, Robert S; Hart, C Anthony; Molyneux, Malcolm E

    2008-04-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellae (NTS) have become the most common cause of bacteremia in tropical Africa, particularly among susceptible children and HIV-infected adults. We describe 4956 episodes of NTS bacteremia (2439 episodes in adults and 2517 episodes in children) that occurred in Blantyre, Malawi, during the 7-year period 1998-2004. A total of 75% of the cases of NTS bacteremia were due to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and 21% were due to S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. Epidemic increases in the incidence of NTS bacteremia were seen sequentially, occurring first among cases caused by S. Enteritidis and then among cases caused by S. Typhimurium. Increased incidence of bacteremia was temporally associated with the acquisition of multidrug resistance to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, and chloramphenicol by each serovar and occurred while the incidence of infection due to other common bloodstream pathogens remained constant. These epidemics were observed among adults and children. A seasonal pattern was also seen, with increased incidence during and after the rainy season. The median age of the patients was 32 years among adults and 22 months among children. Acquisition of multidrug-resistant infection was not associated with an increased case-fatality rate among children (22%), and the case-fatality rate among adults showed a significant trend toward decreasing (from 29% to 20%). These data have important implications for the treatment of severe febrile illness in adults and children in tropical Africa. Further understanding of the molecular basis of these epidemics of multidrug-resistant NTS infection, including ongoing whole-genome sequencing of multidrug-resistant isolates, will yield important tools for the study of NTS pathogenesis, transmission, epidemiology, and prevention.

  6. Host and Pathogen Copper-Transporting P-Type ATPases Function Antagonistically during Salmonella Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Khan, Aslam; Shanbhag, Vinit; Cavet, Jennifer S; Chan, Jefferson; Weisman, Gary A; Petris, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Copper is an essential yet potentially toxic trace element that is required by all aerobic organisms. A key regulator of copper homeostasis in mammalian cells is the copper-transporting P-type ATPase ATP7A, which mediates copper transport from the cytoplasm into the secretory pathway, as well as copper export across the plasma membrane. Previous studies have shown that ATP7A-dependent copper transport is required for killing phagocytosed Escherichia coli in a cultured macrophage cell line. In this investigation, we expanded on these studies by generating Atp7a(LysMcre) mice, in which the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in cells of the myeloid lineage, including macrophages. Primary macrophages isolated from Atp7a(LysMcre) mice exhibit decreased copper transport into phagosomal compartments and a reduced ability to kill Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium compared to that of macrophages isolated from wild-type mice. The Atp7a(LysMcre) mice were also more susceptible to systemic infection by S Typhimurium than wild-type mice. Deletion of the S Typhimurium copper exporters, CopA and GolT, was found to decrease infection in wild-type mice but not in the Atp7a(LysMcre) mice. These studies suggest that ATP7A-dependent copper transport into the phagosome mediates host defense against S Typhimurium, which is counteracted by copper export from the bacteria via CopA and GolT. These findings reveal unique and opposing functions for copper transporters of the host and pathogen during infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Inactivation of Salmonella in Organic Soil by Cinnamaldehyde, Eugenol, Ecotrol, and Sporan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella can survive in soil for months to years; consequently, soil can be a preharvest source of contamination of produce. Elimination of Salmonella with natural products and processes such as essential oils is important to prevent infection among consumers. Essential oils have been mainly eval...

  8. Selective Infection of Antigen-Specific B Lymphocytes by Salmonella Mediates Bacterial Survival and Systemic Spreading of Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; de Wit, Jelle; Martinoli, Chiara; Zagato, Elena; Janssen, Hans; Jorritsma, Tineke; Bar-Ephraïm, Yotam E.; Rescigno, Maria; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2012-01-01

    Background: The bacterial pathogen Salmonella causes worldwide disease. A major route of intestinal entry involves M cells, providing access to B cell-rich Peyer's Patches. Primary human B cells phagocytose Salmonella typhimurium upon recognition by the specific surface Ig receptor (BCR). As it is

  9. A FRET-Based DNA Biosensor Tracks OmpR-Dependent Acidification of Salmonella during Macrophage Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Smarajit; Mizusaki, Hideaki; Kenney, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, one paradigm for signal transduction is the two-component regulatory system, consisting of a sensor kinase (usually a membrane protein) and a response regulator (usually a DNA binding protein). The EnvZ/OmpR two-component system responds to osmotic stress and regulates expression of outer membrane proteins. In Salmonella, EnvZ/OmpR also controls expression of another two-component system SsrA/B, which is located on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island (SPI) 2. SPI-2 encodes a type III secretion system, which functions as a nanomachine to inject bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. During the intracellular phase of infection, Salmonella switches from assembling type III secretion system structural components to secreting effectors into the macrophage cytoplasm, enabling Salmonella to replicate in the phagocytic vacuole. Major questions remain regarding how bacteria survive the acidified vacuole and how acidification affects bacterial secretion. We previously reported that EnvZ sensed cytoplasmic signals rather than extracellular ones, as intracellular osmolytes altered the dynamics of a 17-amino-acid region flanking the phosphorylated histidine. We reasoned that the Salmonella cytoplasm might acidify in the macrophage vacuole to activate OmpR-dependent transcription of SPI-2 genes. To address these questions, we employed a DNA-based FRET biosensor (“I-switch”) to measure bacterial cytoplasmic pH and immunofluorescence to monitor effector secretion during infection. Surprisingly, we observed a rapid drop in bacterial cytoplasmic pH upon phagocytosis that was not predicted by current models. Cytoplasmic acidification was completely dependent on the OmpR response regulator, but did not require known OmpR-regulated genes such as ompC, ompF, or ssaC (SPI-2). Microarray analysis highlighted the cadC/BA operon, and additional experiments confirmed that it was repressed by OmpR. Acidification was blocked in the ompR null background in a Cad

  10. Severe infection with multidrug-resistant Salmonella choleraesuis in a young patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Philip G; Reinheimer, Claudia; Jozsa, Katalin; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kempf, Volkhard Aj; Waidmann, Oliver; Grammatikos, Georgios

    2017-03-21

    Massive global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella spp. expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and additional resistance to fluoroquinolones has often been attributed to high international mobility as well as excessive use of oral antibiotics in livestock farming. However, MDR Salmonella spp. have not been mentioned as a widespread pathogen in clinical settings so far. We demonstrate the case of a 25-year-old male with primary sclerosing cholangitis who tested positive for MDR Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis expressing ESBL and fluoroquinolone resistance. The pathogen was supposedly acquired during a trip to Thailand, causing severe fever, cholangitis and pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in Europe expressing such a multidrug resistance pattern. ESBL resistance of Salmonella enterica spp. should be considered in patients with obstructive biliary tract pathology and travel history in endemic countries.

  11. Microbiological, clinical and molecular findings of non-typhoidal Salmonella bloodstream infections associated with malaria, Oriental Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falay, Dadi; Kuijpers, Laura Maria Francisca; Phoba, Marie-France; De Boeck, Hilde; Lunguya, Octavie; Vakaniaki, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Sophie; Mattheus, Wesley; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Vanhoof, Raymond; Devlieger, Hugo; Van Geet, Chris; Verheyen, Erik; Ngbonda, Dauly; Jacobs, Jan

    2016-06-10

    In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) can cause bloodstream infections, referred to as invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella disease (iNTS disease); it can occur in outbreaks and is often preceded by malaria. Data from Central Africa is limited. Clinical, microbiological and molecular findings of NTS recovered in a blood culture surveillance project (2009-2014) were analyzed. In March-July 2012 there was an epidemic increase in malaria infections in the Oriental Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). In one referral hospital, overall hospital admissions in June 2012 were 2.6 times higher as compared to the same period in the years before and after (336 versus an average of 128 respectively); numbers of malaria cases and blood transfusions were nearly three- and five-fold higher respectively (317 versus 112 and 250 versus 55). Case fatality rates (in-hospital deaths versus all admissions) peaked at 14.6 %. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis together accounted for 88.9 % of pathogens isolated from blood cultures collected during an outreach visit to the affected districts in June 2012. Children infected with Salmonella Enteritidis (33 patient files available) tended to be co-infected with Plasmodium falciparum more often than children infected with Salmonella Typhimurium (40 patients files available) (81.8 % versus 62.5 %). Through the microbiological surveillance project (May 2009-May 2014) 113 unique NTS isolates were collected (28.5 % (113/396) of pathogens); most (95.3 %) were recovered from children Salmonella Typhimurium (n = 54) and Salmonella Enteritidis (n = 56) accounted for 47.8 % and of 49.6 % NTS isolates respectively. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) revealed more heterogeneity for Salmonella Typhimurium than for Salmonella Enteritidis. Most (82/96, 85.4 %) NTS isolates that were available for antibiotic susceptibility testing were multidrug resistant. All isolates

  12. Effects of Salmonella typhimurium Infection and Ofloxacin Treatment on Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism in Caco-2/TC-7 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Posho, Leta; Delbos-Bocage, Laurence; Gueylard, Delphine; Farinotti, Robert; Carbon, Claude

    1998-01-01

    The effects of both Salmonella typhimurium infection and 5 mM ofloxacin treatment on 2 mM glutamine and 5 mM glucose metabolism in the enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC-7 cell line were studied. These cells utilized glutamine (212.07 ± 16.75 [mean ± standard deviation] nmol per h per 106 viable cells) and, to a lesser extent, glucose (139.63 ± 11.52 nmol per h per 106 viable cells). Metabolism of these substrates in Caco-2/TC-7 cells resembled that in rat, pig, or human enterocytes. Infection by S. t...

  13. [Prevention of bacterial infections in immunocompromised hosts, excluding HIV infection and mycobacterium infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguin, G

    1997-01-01

    The immunocompromised host is an individual whose defense mechanisms against infectious agents are altered in such a significant way that he is abnormally susceptible to infections agents in general and bacterial "opportunists" in particular. The type of infection and etiologic agents vary with the nature and the severity of the immune defect. The goal of prophylactic treatments is to prevent the occurrence or recurrence of infections, and so, to reduce the infectious morbidity and mortality when the nature of severity of immunosuppression make these complications probable. Beside specific measures, which are detailed in this article, the strict application of the so-called universal precautions, particularly handwashing, remain at the basis of the prevention of bacterial infections in the immunocompromised host.

  14. Bayesian Modeling of MPSS Data: Gene Expression Analysis of Bovine Salmonella Infection

    KAUST Repository

    Dhavala, Soma S.

    2010-09-01

    Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) is a high-throughput, counting-based technology available for gene expression profiling. It produces output that is similar to Serial Analysis of Gene Expression and is ideal for building complex relational databases for gene expression. Our goal is to compare the in vivo global gene expression profiles of tissues infected with different strains of Salmonella obtained using the MPSS technology. In this article, we develop an exact ANOVA type model for this count data using a zero-inflatedPoisson distribution, different from existing methods that assume continuous densities. We adopt two Bayesian hierarchical models-one parametric and the other semiparametric with a Dirichlet process prior that has the ability to "borrow strength" across related signatures, where a signature is a specific arrangement of the nucleotides, usually 16-21 base pairs long. We utilize the discreteness of Dirichlet process prior to cluster signatures that exhibit similar differential expression profiles. Tests for differential expression are carried out using nonparametric approaches, while controlling the false discovery rate. We identify several differentially expressed genes that have important biological significance and conclude with a summary of the biological discoveries. This article has supplementary materials online. © 2010 American Statistical Association.

  15. Characterization of endolysin from a Salmonella Typhimurium-infecting bacteriophage SPN1S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-A; Shin, Hakdong; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-04-01

    The full genome sequence of bacteriophage SPN1S, which infects Salmonella, contains genes that encode homologues of holin, endolysin and Rz/Rz1-like accessory proteins, which are 4 phage lysis proteins. The ability of these proteins to lyse Escherichia coli cells when overexpressed was evaluated. In contrast to other endolysins, the expression of endolysin and Rz/Rz1-like proteins was sufficient to cause lysis. The endolysin was tagged with oligohistidine at the N-terminus and purified by affinity chromatography. The endolysin has a lysozyme-like superfamily domain, and its activity was much stronger than that of lysozyme from chicken egg white. We used the chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), to increase outer membrane permeability, and it greatly enhanced the lytic activity of SPN1S endolysin. The antimicrobial activity of endolysin was stable over broad pH and temperature ranges and was active from pH 7.0 to 10.5 and from 25 °C to 45 °C. The SPN1S endolysin could kill most of the tested Gram-negative strains, but the Gram-positive strains were resistant. SPN1S endolysin, like lysozyme, cleaves the glycosidic bond of peptidoglycan. These results suggested that SPN1S endolysin has potential as a therapeutic agent against Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation into an unusual increase of human cases of Salmonella Goldcoast infection in Hungary in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, J K; Mengel, M; Krisztalovics, K; Nogrady, N; Pászti, J; Lenglet, A; Takkinen, J

    2013-03-14

    We describe the outbreak investigation associated with an unusual increase in Salmonella Goldcoast cases in Hungary observed in autumn 2009, which included descriptive and analytical epidemiological studies and microbiological and veterinary investigations. Sixty cases were identified between 1 January 2009 and 1 March 2010, 50 of them from late July 2009 to January 2010. Of 50 S. Goldcoast isolates, 44 showed an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile. We conducted a matched case-control study that indicated a statistically significant association between S. Goldcoast infection and the consumption of pork cheese. The majority of cases (seven of nine) reporting consumption of this product belonged to a single family cluster. After removing six cases of this cluster, pork cheese still showed an elevated but non-significant risk for being a case in the univariable analysis (Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (MH OR): 3.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38-39.47). A single S. Goldcoast isolate was identified during routine veterinary surveillance activities in 2009 in minced beef from a butcher's shop, originating from an abattoir where also pigs were slaughtered. We conclude that the outbreak was probably due to multiple sources of contaminated meat, probably pork, released on the market over a period of several months in 2009.

  17. The effect on the virulence and infectivity of Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella gallinarum of acquiring antibiotic resistance plasmids from organisms that had caused serious outbreaks of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H W; Tucker, J F

    1979-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance plasmids from organisms that had caused serious epidemics, including those responsible for epidemics of chloramphenicol-resistant typhoid fever and dysentery in Central America, were transferred to a strain of Salmonella typhimurium and of Salmonella gallinarum. The virulence and infectivity of these R(+) forms were then compared with the R(-) parent forms in orally inoculated chickens.None of the R(+) forms were more virulent than their R(-) parent forms. The mortality rates they produced were either the same as or less than that of their R(-) parent forms. The mortality rates were not increased by feeding the chickens on diets containing antibiotics against which the plasmids provided resistance.The removal of the plasmids from some R(+) forms of decreased virulence was not accompanied by any alteration in virulence, indicating that they were less virulent mutants of the parent strain that had conjugated preferentially. In other cases their virulence was increased, indicating that the very possession of the plasmid was involved in their decreased virulence. Of four forms of the S. gallinarum strain harbouring the plasmid that had been incriminated in the Central American dysentery outbreak, one was as virulent as the parent R(-) form and the other three were less virulent. Preferential conjugation by an avirulent mutant was responsible for the lack of virulence of one of them but the very possession of the plasmid appeared responsible for the decreased virulence of the other two. The decreased virulence of de-repressed F(+) and I(+) forms of the S. typhimurium strain was increased to that of repressed F(+) form and of the parent form by plasmid removal.Organisms of the R(+) forms of the S. typhimurium strain were not excreted in larger amounts or for longer periods of time by infected chickens than organisms of the R(-) parent form were. Neither did organisms of the R(+) forms of this strain or the S. gallinarum strain spread more rapidly or

  18. PREVENTION OF ADENOVIRAL EYE INFECTION - REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Mirjane Janicijevic

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Epidemic viral conjunctivitis caused by adenovirus is the most common infectious conjunctivitis. The exact incidence of adenoviral conjunctivitis is still poorly known, but there are two well-defined adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis clinical syndromes: epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC and pharyngoconjunctival fever (PCF. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis is also the most severe form and presents with watery discharge, hyperemia, chemosis and ipsilateral lymphadenopathy. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, but its etiology can be confirmed using cell cultures, antigen detection, polymerase chain reaction or immune-chromatography. Multiple treatments have been tried for this disease, but none of them seem to be completely effective. Viruses are resistant to desiccation and certain common surface disinfectants. Prevention is the most reliable and recommended strategy to control this epidemic infection. Global epidemic surveillance system definitely needs to be established to monitor and analyze the epidemic conjunctivitis in the future. There is clearly a need for the national and the military public health institutions to work together on guidelines to handle future challenges.

  19. Multi-country outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis infection linked to the international ice hockey tournament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pärn, T; Dahl, V; Lienemann, T; Perevosčikovs, J; De Jong, B

    2017-08-01

    In April 2015, Finnish public health authorities alerted European Union member states of a possible multi-country Salmonella enteritidis outbreak linked to an international youth ice-hockey tournament in Latvia. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Finnish and Latvian authorities initiated an outbreak investigation to identify the source. The investigation included a description of the outbreak, retrospective cohort study, microbiological investigation and trace-back. We identified 154 suspected and 96 confirmed cases from seven countries. Consuming Bolognese sauce and salad at a specific event arena significantly increased the risk of illness. Isolates from Finnish, Swedish and Norwegian cases had an identical multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis-profile (3-10-6-4-1). Breaches in hygiene and food storing practices in the specific arena's kitchen allowing for cross-contamination were identified. Riga Cup participants were recommended to follow good hand hygiene and consume only freshly cooked foods. This investigation demonstrated that the use of ECDC's Epidemic Intelligence Information System for Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses platform was essential to progress the investigation by facilitating information exchange between countries. Cross-border data sharing to perform whole genome sequencing gave relevant information regarding the source of the outbreak.

  20. PREVENTION OF CATHETER-ASSOCIATED INFECTION IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Tepaev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to an urgent issue of intensive therapy in neonatology – prevention of catheter-related blood flow infections. The article dwells upon etiological factors, formation mechanisms and modern methods of preventing colonization of central venous catheters and catheter-related infections.

  1. [Prevention of nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckwenn, Markus; Hammerschmidt, Judith; Rösing, Claudia; Klaschik, Manuela

    2017-06-14

    Nosocomial infections and multidrug-resistant organisms are an increasing problem in nursing homes worldwide; therefore, new approaches for infection control need to be developed. This article gives an overview of infections in nursing homes, their medical treatment and previous measures for infection prevention. The article is based on a selective literature search including the literature database PubMed. In particular, scientific studies on the prevalence of nosocomial infections in German nursing homes, publications for medical care in long-term care facilities in Europe and international studies for infection prevention were evaluated. The basis for an effective reduction of infections is the establishment of a surveillance system. All participating medical professionals provide feedback about local infections and resistance situations and the presence of risk factors, such as urinary catheters or chronic wounds. Only then can targeted antibiotic strategies be adapted and the effectiveness of preventive measures, such as hand disinfection is continuously reviewed. So far, in particular multimodal, multidisciplinary prevention projects were successful. These included frequent staff training, reduction of urinary catheters and a rational use of antibiotics. Most prevention models have been previously tested in hospitals. A possible applicability of the results to the infection prevention in long-term care facilities has so far hardly been studied. Accordingly, further studies on infection control in nursing homes are absolutely necessary.

  2. Analysis of risk factors from salmonella infections and determination of critical control points in poultry industry production chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velhner Maja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper encompasses problems related to infection caused by Salmonella spp in poultry. The need to carry out adequate control measures and to provide safe food is emphasized. Using experiences from other countries, critical control points are presented in flocks during rearing and in hatcheries. In attempt to diagnose disease as early as possible and to advise proper therapy, the significance of serology monitoring is underlined. In order to produce safe food there is a need to control disease applying our Regulations concerning eradication of Salmonella spp in poultry flocks that is given in Official paper of Republic of Serbia No 6&88 and also to include serology monitoring in poultry flocks. Veterinary practitioners are expected to perform analysis of critical control points in poultry industry as well as to determine specificity and differences in production for single farms, which would enable more effective struggle with diseases in general.

  3. Seroprevalence of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infection in backyard chickens in the state of Entre Rios in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, J; Pascal, D; Crespo, E; Schell, H L; Trinidad, J A; Bueno, D J

    2011-04-01

    The present work was conducted to study the seroprevalence of Salmonella, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) infection in backyard chickens located in Entre Ríos, Argentina, over 3 periods of time. A total of 2,441 sera samples were collected from backyard chickens belonging to 256 family farms in 16 counties in the state of Entre Ríos from January to May 2003 (first period), December 2004 to April 2005 (second period), and October 2006 to May 2007 (third period). The prevalence of family farms testing seropositive for Salmonella averaged 23.9, 15.9, and 28.6% during the first, second, and third period, respectively. The highest prevalence of Salmonella-seropositive farms recorded (66.7%) was on farms from Concordia county, and the lowest prevalence (0%) was on farms from La Paz county. In contrast, the prevalence of family farms seropositive for MG averaged 32.8, 55.1, and 76.2% during the first, second, and third periods, respectively. The highest prevalence of MG-seropositive farms (100%) was found in the counties of Victoria and Tala, and the lowest prevalence (8.7%) was found on farms on Colón county. The prevalence of family farms seropositive for MS averaged 68.6 and 100% during the first and second periods, respectively. The highest prevalence of MS-seropositive farms (100%) was on farms in 85% of the counties tested, and the lowest prevalence (21.7%) was on farms from Colón county. Salmonella, MG, and MS infection are present at high levels in backyard chicken farms, and this presents a high risk to commercial poultry production in Entre Ríos, the state with the highest chicken population and density in Argentina.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis infection of the porcine jejunal Peyer’s patch rapidly induces IL-1β and IL-8 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Hyland, Kendra A.; Brown, David R.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is an enteric pathogen of swine, producing septicemia, enterocolitis, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The initial molecular events at the site of Salmonella infection are hypothesized to be critical in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses; however the acute immune response elicited by porcine intestinal tissues is not well understood. To address this need, we employed explants of jejunal Peyer’s patch (JPP) mucosa from pigs to examine Salmo...

  5. Colonization of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens housed in enriched colony cages at different stocking densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Jones, Deana R; Guard, Jean; Anderson, Kenneth E; Karcher, Darrin M

    2017-05-01

    Contaminated eggs produced by infected commercial laying flocks are often implicated as sources of human infections with Salmonella Enteritidis, but Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium have also been associated with egg-transmitted illness. Contamination of the edible contents of eggs is a consequence of the colonization of reproductive tissues in systemically infected hens. In recent years, the animal welfare implications of diverse poultry housing and management systems have been vigorously debated, but the food safety significance of laying hen housing remains uncertain. The present study evaluated the effects of 2 different bird stocking densities on the invasion of internal organs by Salmonella serovars Heidelberg and Typhimurium in groups of experimentally infected laying hens housed in colony cages enriched with perching and nesting areas. Laying hens were distributed at 2 different stocking densities (648 and 973 cm2/bird) into colony cages and (along with a group housed in conventional cages at 648 cm2/bird) orally inoculated with doses of 107 cfu of 2-strain cocktails of either Salmonella Heidelberg or Salmonella Typhimurium. At 5 to 6 d post-inoculation, hens were euthanized and samples of internal organs (cecum, liver, spleen, ovary, and oviduct) were removed for bacteriologic culturing. The overall frequency of Salmonella isolation from ceca after inoculation with strains of serovar Heidelberg (83.3%) was significantly (P  0.05) between stocking densities or cage systems in the frequencies of isolation of either Salmonella serovar from any of the five sampled tissues. These results contrast with prior studies, which reported increased susceptibility to internal organ invasion by Salmonella Enteritidis among hens in conventional cages at higher stocking densities. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Manual of infection prevention and control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damani, N. N

    2012-01-01

    .... Unlike other books on infection control, the main strength of this book is to provide clear, up-to-date and practical guidance in infection control in an easy to read format which can act as a quick...

  7. Prevention and Control of MRSA Infection

    OpenAIRE

    藤田, 信一; 井上, 正樹; Shinichi, FUJITA; Masaki, INOUE; 金沢大学大学院医学系研究科; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University; Department of Reproductive Biology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University

    2003-01-01

    Many efficacious antimicrobial agents have beem developed in the latter half of the 20th century, and this has enabled us to overcome bacterial infections. However, various drug-resistant bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been emerging. MRSA strains used to be isolated not only from compromised patients with nosocomial infection but also from patients with community-acquired infection. MRSA infection is difficult to treat because of the strong pathogen...

  8. Compliance to infection prevention and control guidelines among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infections ,commonly known as hospital acquired infections (HAI) include several pathogens like Escherichia coli, Hepatitis viruses, HIV, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus etc. These agents are transmitted directly or indirectly. Prevention and control of Nosocomial infections is the most important approach in ...

  9. Pre - and postoperative infection preventive information for surgical patient

    OpenAIRE

    Grady, Rea; Moniruzzaman, Anu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop the preoperative information given for elective surgical patients in the hospital of Kätilöopisto. The aim of this study was to find out a possible lack of preoperative instructions and how to develop the preoperative patient education materials to prevent the surgical site infection (SSI). The theoretical framework of this study included patient education, infection prevention, nursing improvement and surgical site infection. The study was done b...

  10. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. II. Active and passive immunization as protection against a lethal bacterial dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1990-01-01

    Immunization against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and thymus-bearing LEW rats. Active immunization was performed with formalin-killed whole cell vaccine or sublethal infection prior to the lethal infection. After vaccination with killed bacteria the euthymic...... animals produced antibodies against S.typhimurium, but neither the euthymic nor the athymic animals survived the infection. After non-lethal infection euthymic and thymus-grafted nude rats were not affected by the second and otherwise lethal bacterial dose, and had high antibody titres. All the athymic...... nude rats died after the second and lethal bacterial challenge. Passive immunization with plasma from immunized euthymic animals did not protect any of the animals against the lethal bacterial dose. However, all animals survived when treated with large doses of spleen cells from immunized euthymic rats...

  11. Salmonella enterica Subclinical Infection: Bacteriological, Serological, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles—Longitudinal Study in a Three-Site Farrow-to-Finish Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, German B.; Cappuccio, Javier A.; Salve, Angela; Machuca, Mariana A.; Quiroga, Maria A.; Moredo, Fabiana; Giacoboni, Gabriel; Cancer, Jose L.; Caffer, Ines G.; Binsztein, Norma; Pichel, Mariana; Perfumo, Carlos J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this surveillance was to study both Salmonella spp. shedding patterns and the time course of serological response in farrow-to-finish reared pigs from a subclinically infected farm. Antimicrobial resistance profile, molecular subtyping, and the relationship among the isolates were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A farrow-to-finish farm of 6000 sows, with a history of Salmonella Typhimurium septicemia, was selected. A longitudinal bacteriological and serological study was conducted in 25 sows before farrowing (M/S1) and in 50 offspring at 21 (M/S2), 35 (M/S3), 65 (M/S4), 86 (M/S5), 128 (M/S6), and 165 (M/S7) days of age. Serum antibodies were tested using Herdcheck® Swine Salmonella antibody test kit (Idexx Laboratories, ME). Bacteria were isolated from pooled fecal samples. Suspected isolates were confirmed by conventional biochemical assays, and those identified as Salmonella spp. were serotyped. A variation between seropositive percentages and positive fecal samples was observed. Serologically positive pigs decreased from S1 to S4, and subsequently increased from S4 to S7. The percentages of fecal positive culture increased from M1 to M3, and then declined in M4, increased in M5, and were negative in M6 and M7. In the study three serovars, Salmonella 3,10:e,h:-, Salmonella Muenster, and Salmonella Bovismorbificans, were identified with low pathogenicity for swine. Three multidrug resistance strains (one belonged to Salmonella 3,10:e,h:- and two belonged to Salmonella Muenster) were found. PFGE results showed three different but closely related patterns among the 13 isolates of Salmonella Bovismorbificans, and two patterns for the three Salmonella Muenster and Salmonella 3,10:e,h:- isolates. This longitudinal study established critical points of Salmonella spp. infection in the farm and the production stages, where appropriate control measures must be taken. PFGE showed clonal relationships in each serovar. Antibiotic

  12. Salmonella enterica subclinical infection: bacteriological, serological, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and antimicrobial resistance profiles--longitudinal study in a three-site farrow-to-finish farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, German B; Cappuccio, Javier A; Piñeyro, Pablo E; Salve, Angela; Machuca, Mariana A; Quiroga, Maria A; Moredo, Fabiana; Giacoboni, Gabriel; Cancer, Jose L; Caffer, Ines G; Binsztein, Norma; Pichel, Mariana; Perfumo, Carlos J

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this surveillance was to study both Salmonella spp. shedding patterns and the time course of serological response in farrow-to-finish reared pigs from a subclinically infected farm. Antimicrobial resistance profile, molecular subtyping, and the relationship among the isolates were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A farrow-to-finish farm of 6000 sows, with a history of Salmonella Typhimurium septicemia, was selected. A longitudinal bacteriological and serological study was conducted in 25 sows before farrowing (M/S1) and in 50 offspring at 21 (M/S2), 35 (M/S3), 65 (M/S4), 86 (M/S5), 128 (M/S6), and 165 (M/S7) days of age. Serum antibodies were tested using Herdcheck((R)) Swine Salmonella antibody test kit (Idexx Laboratories, ME). Bacteria were isolated from pooled fecal samples. Suspected isolates were confirmed by conventional biochemical assays, and those identified as Salmonella spp. were serotyped. A variation between seropositive percentages and positive fecal samples was observed. Serologically positive pigs decreased from S1 to S4, and subsequently increased from S4 to S7. The percentages of fecal positive culture increased from M1 to M3, and then declined in M4, increased in M5, and were negative in M6 and M7. In the study three serovars, Salmonella 3,10:e,h:-, Salmonella Muenster, and Salmonella Bovismorbificans, were identified with low pathogenicity for swine. Three multidrug resistance strains (one belonged to Salmonella 3,10:e,h:- and two belonged to Salmonella Muenster) were found. PFGE results showed three different but closely related patterns among the 13 isolates of Salmonella Bovismorbificans, and two patterns for the three Salmonella Muenster and Salmonella 3,10:e,h:- isolates. This longitudinal study established critical points of Salmonella spp. infection in the farm and the production stages, where appropriate control measures must be taken. PFGE showed clonal relationships in each serovar. Antibiotic

  13. An incomplete TCA cycle increases survival of Salmonella Typhimurium during infection of resting and activated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hinton, Jay C D; Thompson, Arthur

    2010-11-08

    In comparison to the comprehensive analyses performed on virulence gene expression, regulation and action, the intracellular metabolism of Salmonella during infection is a relatively under-studied area. We investigated the role of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the intracellular replication of Salmonella Typhimurium in resting and activated macrophages, epithelial cells, and during infection of mice. We constructed deletion mutations of 5 TCA cycle genes in S. Typhimurium including gltA, mdh, sdhCDAB, sucAB, and sucCD. We found that the mutants exhibited increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated murine macrophages compared to the wild-type. In contrast, an epithelial cell infection model showed that the S. Typhimurium ΔsucCD and ΔgltA strains had reduced net intracellular replication compared to the wild-type. The glyoxylate shunt was not responsible for the net increased replication of the TCA cycle mutants within resting macrophages. We also confirmed that, in a murine infection model, the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD strains are attenuated for virulence. Our results suggest that disruption of the TCA cycle increases the ability of S. Typhimurium to survive within resting and activated murine macrophages. In contrast, epithelial cells are non-phagocytic cells and unlike macrophages cannot mount an oxidative and nitrosative defence response against pathogens; our results show that in HeLa cells the S. Typhimurium TCA cycle mutant strains show reduced or no change in intracellular levels compared to the wild-type. The attenuation of the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD mutants in mice, compared to their increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated macrophages suggest that Salmonella may encounter environments within the host where a complete TCA cycle is advantageous.

  14. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium systemic infection of wild type and immune-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Oshota

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica are a threat to public health. Current vaccines are not fully effective. The ability to grow in infected tissues within phagocytes is required for S. enterica virulence in systemic disease. As the infection progresses the bacteria are exposed to a complex host immune response. Consequently, in order to continue growing in the tissues, S. enterica requires the coordinated regulation of fitness genes. Bacterial gene regulation has so far been investigated largely using exposure to artificial environmental conditions or to in vitro cultured cells, and little information is available on how S. enterica adapts in vivo to sustain cell division and survival. We have studied the transcriptome, proteome and metabolic flux of Salmonella, and the transcriptome of the host during infection of wild type C57BL/6 and immune-deficient gp91-/-phox mice. Our analyses advance the understanding of how S. enterica and the host behaves during infection to a more sophisticated level than has previously been reported.

  15. Outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 1 infection in British tourists visiting Mallorca, June 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, P; Ward, Linda; Crespi, S; Furtado, C

    1997-01-01

    Three British tourists became ill while on holiday in the same hotel in Alcudia, Mallorca from 11 to 25 June 1996; Salmonella enteritidisinfections were diagnosed upon their return to England. An environmental health officer informed the Gastrointestinal

  16. Preliminary assessment of the risk of Salmonella infection in dogs fed raw chicken diets

    OpenAIRE

    Joffe, Daniel J.; Schlesinger, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    This preliminary study assessed the presence of Salmonella spp. in a bones and raw food (BARF) diet and in the stools of dogs consuming it. Salmonella was isolated from 80% of the BARF diet samples (P < 0.001) and from 30% of the stool samples from dogs fed the diet (P = 0.105). Dogs fed raw chicken may therefore be a source of environmental contamination.

  17. Evaluating risk factors for endemic human Salmonella Enteritidis infections with different phage types in Ontario, Canada using multinomial logistic regression and a case-case study approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Csaba

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying risk factors for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE infections in Ontario will assist public health authorities to design effective control and prevention programs to reduce the burden of SE infections. Our research objective was to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various phage types (PT in Ontario, Canada. We hypothesized that certain PTs (e.g., PT8 and PT13a have specific risk factors for infection. Methods Our study included endemic SE cases with various PTs whose isolates were submitted to the Public Health Laboratory-Toronto from January 20th to August 12th, 2011. Cases were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire that included questions pertaining to demographics, travel history, clinical symptoms, contact with animals, and food exposures. A multinomial logistic regression method using the Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model procedure and a case-case study design were used to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various PTs in Ontario, Canada. In the multinomial logistic regression model, the outcome variable had three categories representing human infections caused by SE PT8, PT13a, and all other SE PTs (i.e., non-PT8/non-PT13a as a referent category to which the other two categories were compared. Results In the multivariable model, SE PT8 was positively associated with contact with dogs (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.01-4.68 and negatively associated with pepper consumption (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.94, after adjusting for age categories and gender, and using exposure periods and health regions as random effects to account for clustering. Conclusions Our study findings offer interesting hypotheses about the role of phage type-specific risk factors. Multinomial logistic regression analysis and the case-case study approach are novel methodologies to evaluate associations among SE infections with different PTs and various risk factors.

  18. Efeito de probiótico na infecção e excreção fecal de Salmonella em suínos Effect of probiotic on the Salmonella infection and fecal excretion in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gomes Nogueira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A transmissão de Salmonella na cadeia produtiva de suínos é um problema de difícil controle. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar o efeito da administração oral de probiótico sobre a ocorrência de infecção e excreção fecal de Salmonella em suínos em fase de crescimento. Os tratamentos consistiram de ração basal sem aditivos (controle ou adicionada de probiótico (10(7ufc g-1 de células viáveis dos gêneros Bifidobacterium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus e Saccharomyces. Foram alocados seis leitões de 50 dias em cada tratamento, com duas repetições por tratamento. Todos os animais foram inoculados com Salmonella Typhimurium (10(6ufc mL-1 após 14 dias do alojamento. Semanalmente, foram coletadas amostras de sangue e fezes e no dia 35 pós-inoculação os animais foram sacrificados e necropsiados. Os animais de ambos os tratamentos foram infectados por Salmonella e soroconverteram. Não houve diferença (P>0,05 entre os grupos nas médias de Salmonella, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus e coliformes totais nas fezes, porém a administração de probiótico resultou em menor frequência de isolamento de Salmonella a partir de fígado (P=0,04, linfonodos mesentéricos (P=0,04, pulmão (P=0,03 e baço (P=0,01. Conclui-se que os microrganismos probióticos testados não foram capazes de impedir a infecção ou a excreção fecal de Salmonella em suínos de crescimento, mas diminuíram o número de portadores em linfonodos mesentéricos.Control of Salmonella transmission has been a challenge for the pork production companies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral administration of probiotics on the occurrence of infection and fecal excretion of Salmonella in growers. The treatments consisted of basal diet without additives (control or added of probiotic (10(7cfu g-1 of viable cells of the genera Bifidobacterium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces. Six 50 days-old pigs were allocated into each treatment, with two

  19. Time-to-event analysis of predictors for recovery from Salmonella Dublin infection in Danish dairy herds between 2002 and 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Dohoo, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Dublin infections reduce gross margins and compromise animal health and welfare in dairy cattle herds. Despite on-going control efforts in several countries the duration and risk factors of a persistent infection have been difficult to study due to a lack of suitable data. This study u...

  20. Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth G. Jepson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs. This is the third update of our review first published in 1998 and updated in 2004 and 2008. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations. METHODS: Search methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations and checked reference lists of review articles and relevant studies. Date of search: July 2012. Selection criteria: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs or quasi-RCTs of cranberry products for the prevention of UTIs. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently assessed and extracted data. Information was collected on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (incidence of symptomatic UTIs, positive culture results, side effects, adherence to therapy. Risk ratios (RR were calculated where appropriate, otherwise a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review includes a total of 24 studies (six cross-over studies, 11 parallel group studies with two arms; five with three arms, and two studies with a factorial design with a total of 4473 participants. Ten studies were included in the 2008 update, and 14 studies have been added to this update. Thirteen studies (2380 participants evaluated only cranberry juice/concentrate; nine studies (1032 participants evaluated only cranberry tablets/capsules; one study compared cranberry juice and tablets; and one study compared cranberry capsules and tablets. The comparison/control arms were placebo, no treatment, water, methenamine hippurate, antibiotics, or lactobacillus. Eleven studies were not included in the meta

  1. Forum: Tuberculosis prevention in HIV-infected pregnant women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forum: Tuberculosis prevention in HIV-infected pregnant women in South Africa. CE Martin, V Black. Abstract. The high burden of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) among pregnant women in South Africa contributes to a high maternal mortality rate. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is recommended for the prevention of active TB ...

  2. A framework for preventing healthcare-associated infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To ensure safe healthcare delivery to children, a co-ordinated HAI prevention strategy should promote development of infection prevention norms and policies, education, patient safety advocacy, healthcare infrastructure, surveillance and research. We present a framework for SA to develop and expand HAI prevention in ...

  3. An outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, T; Sørensen, G; Forshell, L P; Jensen, T; Nygard, K; Kapperud, G; Lindstedt, B A; Berglund, T; Wingstrand, A; Petersen, R F; Müller, L; Kjelsø, C; Ivarsson, S; Hjertqvist, M; Löfdahl, S; Ethelberg, S

    2009-03-12

    In November-December 2008, Norway and Denmark independently identified outbreaks of Salmonella Typhimurium infections characterised in the multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) by a distinct profile. Outbreak investigations were initiated independently in the two countries. In Denmark, a total of 37 cases were identified, and multiple findings of the outbreak strain in pork and pigs within the same supply chain led to the identification of pork in various forms as the source. In Norway, ten cases were identified, and the outbreak investigation quickly indicated meat bought in Sweden as the probable source and the Swedish authorities were alerted. Investigations in Sweden identified four human cases and two isolates from minced meat with the distinct profile. Subsequent trace-back of the meat showed that it most likely originated from Denmark. Through international alert from Norway on 19 December, it became clear that the Danish and Norwegian outbreak strains were identical and, later on, that the source of the outbreaks in all three countries could be traced back to Danish pork. MLVA was instrumental in linking the outbreaks in the different countries and tracing the source. This outbreak illustrates that good international communication channels, early alerting mechanisms, inter-sectoral collaboration between public health and food safety authorities and harmonised molecular typing tools are important for effective identification and management of cross-border outbreaks. Differences in legal requirements for food safety in neighbouring countries may be a challenge in terms of communication with consumers in areas where cross-border shopping is common.

  4. Analysis of pools of targeted Salmonella deletion mutants identifies novel genes affecting fitness during competitive infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Santiviago

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Pools of mutants of minimal complexity but maximal coverage of genes of interest facilitate screening for genes under selection in a particular environment. We constructed individual deletion mutants in 1,023 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes, including almost all genes found in Salmonella but not in related genera. All mutations were confirmed simultaneously using a novel amplification strategy to produce labeled RNA from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, introduced during the construction of each mutant, followed by hybridization of this labeled RNA to a Typhimurium genome tiling array. To demonstrate the ability to identify fitness phenotypes using our pool of mutants, the pool was subjected to selection by intraperitoneal injection into BALB/c mice and subsequent recovery from spleens. Changes in the representation of each mutant were monitored using T7 transcripts hybridized to a novel inexpensive minimal microarray. Among the top 120 statistically significant spleen colonization phenotypes, more than 40 were mutations in genes with no previously known role in this model. Fifteen phenotypes were tested using individual mutants in competitive assays of intraperitoneal infection in mice and eleven were confirmed, including the first two examples of attenuation for sRNA mutants in Salmonella. We refer to the method as Array-based analysis of cistrons under selection (ABACUS.

  5. Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis infection of the porcine jejunal Peyer’s patch rapidly induces IL-1β and IL-8 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Kendra A.; Brown, David R.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is an enteric pathogen of swine, producing septicemia, enterocolitis, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The initial molecular events at the site of Salmonella infection are hypothesized to be critical in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses; however the acute immune response elicited by porcine intestinal tissues is not well understood. To address this need, we employed explants of jejunal Peyer’s patch (JPP) mucosa from pigs to examine Salmonella-induced immune responses under controlled conditions as well as to overcome limitations of whole animal approaches. JPP explants mounted in Ussing chambers maintained normal histological structure for 2 h and stable short-circuit current and electrical conductance for 2.5 h. After ex vivo luminal exposure to Salmonella serovar Choleraesuis, JPP responded with an increase in mRNA expression of IL-1β and IL-8, but not TNFα. Increased IL-1β and IL-8 expression were dependent on efficient Salmonella adhesion and internalization, whereas mutant Salmonella did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. Commensal enteric bacteria, present in some experiments, also did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicate that Salmonella uptake by Peyer’s patch is important in the induction of an innate response involving expression of IL-1β and IL-8, and that ex vivo intestinal immune tissue explants provide an intact tissue model that will facilitate investigation of mucosal immunity in swine. PMID:16115691

  6. Multinational outbreak of travel-related Salmonella Chester infections in Europe, summers 2014 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteneau, Laure; Jourdan Da Silva, Nathalie; Fabre, Laetitia; Ashton, Philip; Torpdahl, Mia; Müller, Luise; Bouchrif, Brahim; El Boulani, Abdellah; Valkanou, Eleni; Mattheus, Wesley; Friesema, Ingrid; Herrera Leon, Silvia; Varela Martínez, Carmen; Mossong, Joël; Severi, Ettore; Grant, Kathie; Weill, François-Xavier; Gossner, Céline M; Bertrand, Sophie; Dallman, Tim; Le Hello, Simon

    2017-02-16

    Between 2014 and 2015, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control was informed of an increase in numbers of Salmonella enterica serotype Chester cases with travel to Morocco occurring in six European countries. Epidemiological and microbiological investigations were conducted. In addition to gathering information on the characteristics of cases from the different countries in 2014, the epidemiological investigation comprised a matched case-case study involving French patients with salmonellosis who travelled to Morocco that year. A univariate conditional logistic regression was performed to quantify associations. The microbiological study included a whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of clinical and non-human isolates of S. Chester of varied place and year of isolation. A total of 162 cases, mostly from France, followed by Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain, Denmark and Sweden were reported, including 86 (53%) women. The median age per country ranged from 3 to 38 years. Cases of S. Chester were more likely to have eaten in a restaurant and visited the coast of Morocco. The results of WGS showed five multilocus sequence types (ST), with 96 of 153 isolates analysed clustering into a tight group that corresponded to a novel ST, ST1954. Of these 96 isolates, 46 (48%) were derived from food or patients returning from Morocco and carried two types of plasmids containing either qnrS1 or qnrB19 genes. This European-wide outbreak associated with travel to Morocco was likely a multi-source outbreak with several food vehicles contaminated by multidrug-resistant S. Chester strains. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  7. Highly resistant Salmonella Newport-MDRAmpC transmitted through the domestic US food supply: a FoodNet case-control study of sporadic Salmonella Newport infections, 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Jay K; Marcus, Ruthanne; Stenzel, Sara A; Hanna, Samir S; Gettner, Sharmeen; Anderson, Bridget J; Hayes, Tameka; Shiferaw, Beletshachew; Crume, Tessa L; Joyce, Kevin; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Voetsch, Andrew C; Angulo, Frederick J

    2006-07-15

    A new multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain of Salmonella serotype Newport, Newport-MDRAmpC, has recently emerged. We sought to identify the medical, behavioral, and dietary risk factors for laboratory-confirmed Salmonella Newport infection, including that with Newport-MDRAmpC. A 12-month population-based case-control study was conducted during 2002-2003 in 8 sites of the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), with 215 case patients with Salmonella Newport infection and 1154 healthy community control subjects. Case patients with Newport-MDRAmpC infection were more likely than control subjects to have taken an antimicrobial agent to which Newport-MDRAmpC is resistant during the 28 days before the onset of diarrheal illness (odds ratio [OR], 5.0 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.6-16]). Case patients with Newport-MDRAmpC infection were also more likely to have eaten uncooked ground beef (OR, 7.8 [95% CI, 1.4-44]) or runny scrambled eggs or omelets prepared in the home (OR, 4.9 [95% CI, 1.3-19]) during the 5 days before the onset of illness. International travel was not a risk factor for Newport-MDRAmpC infection but was a strong risk factor for pansusceptible Salmonella Newport infection (OR, 7.1 [95% CI, 2.0-24]). Case patients with pansusceptible infection were also more likely to have a frog or lizard in their household (OR, 2.9 [95% CI, 1.1-7.7]). Newport-MDRAmpC infection is acquired through the US food supply, most likely from bovine and, perhaps, poultry sources, particularly among persons already taking antimicrobial agents.

  8. Temporal changes in the expression of avian β-defensins in the chicken vagina during sexual maturation and Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, Maria; Avdi, Melpomeni; Theodoridis, Alexandros; Michailidis, Georgios

    2013-06-01

    Avian β-defensins (AvβDs) constitute a family of antimicrobial peptides that are critical to innate immunity in chickens, providing protection against microbial pathogens including Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). As apart from the digestive tract another main route of SE colonization in birds is via infection of the oviduct and specifically of the vagina, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the complete family of AvβDs, in the chicken vagina in vivo, to determine whether sexual maturation affects their mRNA abundance and to investigate whether SE infection alters the vaginal AvβDs expression. Expression analysis revealed that 11 members of the AvβD family were expressed in the chicken vagina. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA abundance of five AvβDs was up regulated and of one AvβD was down regulated with respect to sexual maturation. In addition SE infection resulted in a significant induction of AvβD5, 7, 10, 11, 12 and 14 in the vagina of sexually mature birds, and in a significant induction of AvβD5 and 11 in the vagina of aged birds. These findings provide strong evidence to suggest that an AvβD-mediated immune response mechanism exists in the chicken vagina providing protection against bacterial pathogens including Salmonella species.

  9. Salmonella enteritidis infections associated with foods purchased from mobile lunch trucks--Alberta, Canada, October 2010-February 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    During October 2010-February 2011, an outbreak of 91 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Alberta, Canada, was investigated by a local public health department (Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone). Index cases initially were linked through a common history of consumption of food purchased from mobile food-vending vehicles (lunch trucks) operating at worksites in Alberta. Further investigation implicated one catering company that supplied items for the lunch trucks and other vendors. In 85 cases, patients reported consumption of food prepared by the catering company in the 7 days before illness. Six patients were employees of the catering company, and two food samples collected from the catering company were positive for SE. Foods likely were contaminated directly or indirectly through the use of illegally sourced, SE-contaminated eggs at the implicated catering facility and by catering employees who were infected with SE. Public health interventions put into place to control the outbreak included screening employees for Salmonella, excluding those infected from food-handling duties, and training employees in safe food-handling procedures. No further outbreak cases were identified after full implementation of the interventions. This investigation highlights the potential for lunch trucks to be a source of foodborne illness and the need for robust regulatory compliance monitoring of lunch trucks and their food suppliers.

  10. Recurrent outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in a Texas restaurant: phage type 4 arrives in the United States.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, T. G.; Koo, D.; Swerdlow, D. L.; Gomez, T. M.; Serrano, B.; Nickey, L. N.; Hickman-Brenner, F. W.; Malcolm, G. B.; Griffin, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years infection caused by Salmonella serotype Enteritidis (SE) phage type 4 has spread through Europe but has been uncommon in the USA. The first recognized outbreak of this strain in the USA occurred in a Chinese restaurant in EI Paso, Texas, in April 1993; no source was identified. In September 1993, a second outbreak caused by SE phage type 4 was associated with the same restaurant. To determine the cause of the second outbreak, we compared food exposures of the 19 patients with ...

  11. Evolving issues in the prevention of surgical site infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2009-06-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the more common causes of post-operative morbidity. Such infections contribute to prolonged recovery, delayed discharge and increasing costs to both patients and the health service. In the current climate increased emphasis is being placed on minimising the risks of acquiring or transmitting these nosocomial infections. This article reviews the current literature obtained from a Pubmed database search in relation to three specific aspects of surgical site infection: compliance with prophylactic antibiotics, post-discharge surveillance and novel methods for preventing surgical site infections. These topics represent areas where many institutions will find room for improvement in the prevention of surgical site infections. Tight adherence to prophylactic antibiotic guidelines, close followup of surgical wounds during and after hospital discharge, and attention to oxygenation status and the body temperature of patients may all prove to be useful adjuncts in significantly decreasing surgical site infections.

  12. [Prevention of nosocomial infections in the pediatric ward - own experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowska, Teresa; Pawlik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Patients pediatric wards are particularly at risk of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the newest principles of prevention of infections should be implemented and monitored. 1) to determine the prevalence, etiology and clinical manifestations of nosocomial infections in hospitalized patients; 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of procedures that aim at preventing hospital rotavirus infections and catheter-related bloodstream infections; 3) to analyse the incidence of flu among staff in two consecutive seasons of the epidemic influenza H1N1 (2009/2010 and 2010/2011); 4) to promote vaccinations of the medical staff. The study involved 4432 children hospitalized from October 2007 to December 2009 and 57 medical staff (doctors, nurses, orderlies). The effectiveness was assessed of prevention procedures for nosocomial infections and morbidity, and of vaccination against influenza among the sta$, as deƒned by the Act on the prevention and suppression of infection and infectious diseases human and the criteria developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nosocomial infections were diagnosed in 2.2% of hospitalized children, where 96% were of acute gastroenteritis; 3% were bloodstream infections associated with peripheral vascular catheter. The 1% had respiratory infections (influenza). Hospital gastrointestinal infections were caused by the rotavirus (78%), norovirus (13%) and adenovirus (0.9%). In 1.1% of cases the etiology had not been determined. As a result of implementing prophylactic activities, a statistically signifiƒcant reduction of the incidence of nosocomial infections by the rotavirus was achieved (from 7.1 to 1.5%). The occurrence catheter-related bloodstream infections was entirely eliminated. Influenza and influenza-like infections were reported in 7% of the medical staff in the season of 2009/2010 and 5% in the season of 2010/2011. 42% of the medical staff was immunized against the influenza (92% of doctors, 7% nurses, 0% orderlies). The

  13. Structural and enzymatic characterization of a host-specificity determinant from Salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Amanda C. [Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Spanò, Stefania; Galán, Jorge E. [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536 (United States); Stebbins, C. Erec, E-mail: stebbins@rockefeller.edu [Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The Salmonella effector protein GtgE functions as a cysteine protease to cleave a subset of the Rab-family GTPases and to prevent delivery of antimicrobial agents to the Salmonella-containing vacuole. GtgE is an effector protein from Salmonella Typhimurium that modulates trafficking of the Salmonella-containing vacuole. It exerts its function by cleaving the Rab-family GTPases Rab29, Rab32 and Rab38, thereby preventing the delivery of antimicrobial factors to the bacteria-containing vacuole. Here, the crystal structure of GtgE at 1.65 Å resolution is presented, and structure-based mutagenesis and in vivo infection assays are used to identify its catalytic triad. A panel of cysteine protease inhibitors were examined and it was determined that N-ethylmaleimide, antipain and chymostatin inhibit GtgE activity in vitro. These findings provide the basis for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat Salmonella infections.

  14. Surveillance Data Highlights Feed Form, Biosecurity, and Disease Control as Significant Factors Associated with Salmonella Infection on Farrow-to-Finish Pig Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Argüello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the zoonotic pathogens affecting pigs, Salmonella stands out due to the high number of human cases linked to pork consumption. In the last two decades many countries have put considerable effort into the control of the infection by surveillance and control strategies on farm. Despite this effort, many herds still have a high Salmonella prevalence and they require guidance to address this problem. The present study, using the serological surveillance data of finishing pigs from the Irish National pig Salmonella Control Programme, aimed to highlight factors associated with increased risk or that might mitigate Salmonella occurrence on farm. A questionnaire with 33 questions regarding herd characteristics, management, feeding, biosecurity, and health was completed for 61 individual herds. After the multivariate analysis by linear regression, nine variables were retained in the final model and linked to herd seroprevalence. Home produced-feed linked to the use of meal showed an eight points reduction in Salmonella prevalence compared to purchased feed (p = 0.042. Different biosecurity measures were associated to lower seroprevalence. Changing of footwear from outside to inside the farm decreased seroprevalence nearly 20 units (p = 0.014 and policies not permitting access to the farmyard to feed trucks (p = 0.048 or avoiding the presence of cats on the farm (p = 0.05 were estimated in 10 units less of seroprevalence. In contrast, the lack of perimeter fence increased the chance to have higher seroprevalence in five units (p = 0.05. Finally, intestinal diseases such as swine dysentery (p = 0.044 and E. coli diarrhea (p = 0.1 were estimated to increase Salmonella prevalence in ~20 and 10 units, respectively, demonstrating the importance of controlling other enteric pathogens in an on-farm Salmonella control programme. These results show the usefulness of surveillance data to improve on-farm control and confirm that Salmonella infection in pigs is

  15. PREVENTION OF INFECTION FROM FOOD AND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter discusses microbial contaminants found either in foor or water, and primarily addresses microbial contaminants that infect human consumers. Many types of diseases have been associated with the consumption of food. Diseases also are asslcoated with either ingeston or ...

  16. Knowledge and attitudes about HIV infection and prevention of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and attitudes about HIV infection and prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV in an urban, low income community in Durban, South Africa: Perspectives of residents and health care volunteers.

  17. Adaptive Architecture and the Prevention of Infections in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khai Tran van

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches has shown that climate change may spark global epidemics. The objectives of hospital design consistent with a high standard of sustainable architecture must not only be the tropicalization of buildings but also a system to confront the impact of infectious diseases which arise from climate change. Infection control is the discipline concerned with preventing nosocomial or healthcare-associated infection. Infection control addresses factors related to the spread of infections within the hospital building, including prevention, monitoring and management measures. As the application of new technologies such as the Heating, ventilation and air conditioning system (HVAC with high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA has application range within stamina, the study suggests the need to adopt an integrated adaptive hospital design strategy to prevent infection.

  18. Assessing the Public Health Impact and Effectiveness of Interventions To Prevent Salmonella Contamination of Sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hongliu; Fu, Tong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Sprouts have been a recurring public health challenge due to microbiological contamination, and Salmonella has been the major cause of sprout-associated outbreaks. Although seed treatment and microbiological testing have been applied as risk reduction measures during sprout production, the extent to which their effectiveness in reducing the public health risks associated with sprouts has not been well investigated. We conducted a quantitative risk assessment to measure the risk posed by Salmonella contamination in sprouts and to determine whether and how mitigation strategies can achieve a satisfactory risk reduction based on the assumption that the risk reduction achieved by a microbiological sampling and testing program at a given sensitivity is equivalent to that achieved by direct inactivation of pathogens. Our results indicated that if the sprouts were produced without any risk interventions, the health impact caused by sprouts contaminated with Salmonella would be very high, with a median annual estimated loss of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of 691,412. Seed treatment (with 20,000 ppm of calcium hypochlorite) or microbiological sampling and testing of spent irrigation water (SIW) alone could reduce the median annual impact to 734 or 4,856 DALYs, respectively. Combining seed treatment with testing of the SIW would further decrease the risk to 58 DALYs. This number could be dramatically lowered to 3.99 DALYs if sprouts were produced under conditions that included treating seeds with 20,000 ppm of calcium hypochlorite plus microbiological testing of seeds, SIW, and finished products. Our analysis shows that the public health impact due to Salmonella contamination in sprouts could be controlled if seeds are treated to reduce pathogens and microbiological sampling and testing is implemented. Future advances in intervention strategies would be important to improve sprout safety further.

  19. Feeding a high dosage of zinc oxide affects suppressor of cytokine gene expression in Salmonella Typhimurium infected piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Jasper N; Brockmann, Gudrun A; Kreuzer-Redmer, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins play an important role in the regulation of the immune response by inhibiting cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of zinc oxide fed at three different dosages (LZN=57ppm, MZN=167ppm, HZN=2425ppm) to weaned piglets that were or were not orally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT 104. We detected higher expression of SOCS3 six days after weaning for all analyzed piglets, regardless of the infection or the zinc feeding, suggesting a stress induced immune response. Whereas, SOCS1 showed only higher transcript amounts in S. Typhimurium infected piglets, especially the LZN group. This might indicate an infection regulating effect of zinc oxide in the infection model. After 42days of infection, the expression of SOCS2, SOCS4, and SOCS7 was increased only in animals fed the highest concentrations of zinc oxide, while non-infected piglets at the age of 56days showed no regulation for these genes. The up-regulation of SOCS genes in the mesenteric lymph nodes of piglets fed a diet with a very high concentration of zinc over 6 weeks suggests that such treatments may impair the immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of IgG avidity ELISA to differentiate acute from persistent infection with Salmonella Dublin in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.R.; Nielsen, L.R.; Lind, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether an immunoglobulin (Ig)G avidity ELISA can be used to differentiate between acute and persistent infection with Salmonella (S.) Dublin in cattle. To determine whether the IgG isotype, IgG(1) and IgG(2) responses in acute and persistent infections differ. Methods...... of persistent infection with S. Dublin in cattle, it can be concluded that the IgG-AI can aid in differentiating between acute and long-term infection on herd level. However, for the test to be useful as an alternative tool to repeated sampling over time for detection of persistently infected carriers during...... control strategies in cattle herds, the test needs to be optimized and studied further in a larger sample of well-characterized infections in cattle. The affinity of IgG(2) is higher than IgG(1) early in the S. Dublin infection. There appears to be no difference in the IgG(2)-AI between the acute...

  1. Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Anatum Infections Linked to Imported Hot Peppers - United States, May-July 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Rashida; Rounds, Joshua; Sorenson, Alida; Leos, Greg; Concepción-Acevedo, Jeniffer; Griswold, Taylor; Tesfai, Adiam; Blessington, Tyann; Hardy, Cerise; Basler, Colin

    2017-06-30

    Foodborne salmonellosis causes an estimated 1 million illnesses and 400 deaths annually in the United States (1). Salmonella Anatum is one of the top 20 Salmonella serotypes in the United States. During 2013-2015 there were approximately 300-350 annual illnesses reported to PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance. In June 2016, PulseNet identified a cluster of 16 Salmonella Anatum infections with an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern from four states.* In April 2016, the same PFGE pattern had been uploaded to PulseNet from an isolate obtained from an Anaheim pepper, a mild to medium hot pepper. Hot peppers include many pepper varieties, such as Anaheim, jalapeño, poblano, and serrano, which can vary in heat level from mild to very hot depending on the variety and preparation. This rare PFGE pattern had been seen only 24 times previously in the PulseNet database, compared with common PFGE patterns for this serotype which have been seen in the database hundreds of times. Local and state health departments, CDC, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated to determine the cause of the outbreak. Thirty-two patients in nine states were identified with illness onsets from May 6-July 9, 2016. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed to characterize clinical isolates and the Anaheim pepper isolate further. The combined evidence indicated that fresh hot peppers were the likely source of infection; however, a single pepper type or source farm was not identified. This outbreak highlights challenges in reconciling epidemiologic and WGS data, and the difficulties of identifying ingredient-level exposures through epidemiologic investigations alone.

  2. Pneumonia associated with Salmonella spp. infection in a cat receiving cyclosporine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, C; Palermo, G; Greco, M F; Corrente, M; Piseddu, E; Auriemma, E; Zini, E

    2014-10-01

    Salmonellosis is uncommon in cats, usually affects the gastrointestinal tract or skin, and can be fatal. This report describes a domestic shorthair cat with severe pneumonia caused by Salmonella spp. without accompanying gastrointestinal or skin manifestations, in which previous administration of cyclosporine may have played a permissive role in its development. Clinical and laboratory findings as well as follow-up are described from diagnosis until complete recovery. This unusual presentation serves to alert practitioners to consider Salmonella spp. as a possible cause of lung disease in cats, especially if immunocompromised.

  3. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci: Epidemiology, Infection Prevention, and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Katherine; Bardossy, Ana Cecilia; Zervos, Marcus

    2016-12-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infections have acquired prominence as a leading cause of health care-associated infections. Understanding VRE epidemiology, transmission modes in health care settings, risk factors for colonization, and infection is essential to prevention and control of VRE infections. Infection control strategies are pivotal in management of VRE infections and should be based on patient characteristics, hospital needs, and available resources. Hand hygiene is basic to decrease acquisition of VRE. The effectiveness of surveillance and contact precautions is variable and controversial in endemic settings, but important during VRE outbreak investigations and control. Environmental cleaning, chlorhexidine bathing, and antimicrobial stewardship are vital in VRE prevention and control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevention of nosocomial bloodstream infections in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProtecting patients from harm is the overarching theme of the studies presented here. More precisely, this thesis places a focus on the prevention of nosocomial or hospitalacquired bloodstream infections in preterm infants, thus saving them from further harm. A nosocomial infection is an

  5. Survey of High School Athletic Programs in Iowa Regarding Infections and Infection Prevention Policies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mark; Doyle, Matthew R.; Beste, Alan; Diekema, Daniel J.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Herwaldt, Loreen A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess high school athletic programs’ infection prevention policies and procedures and to estimate the frequency of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) among Iowa’s high school athletes. Methods An on-line survey of high school athletic programs. Results Nearly 60% of programs responded. Schools in higher classifications were more likely to have a certified athletic trainer (AT; P high school athletes. Staff should review and update their infection prevention policies. Athletic programs need resources to support infection prevention efforts. PMID:24027469

  6. [Infection prevention by the anesthesia team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stübner, S

    2013-01-01

    The anesthesia team acts every day in a highly complex and high risk environment for the transmission of pathogenic organisms and the induction of infectious complications. With strict adherence to standard precautions and infection control practices in particular regular hand disinfection before and after direct patient contact and before performance of aseptic tasks during anesthesia and an optimized perioperative process the members of the anesthesia team can become infection control pioneers within the hospital. In order to be successful, structural and organizational resources in the form of training, personnel, materials and time, need to be adequate for the situation. This review summarizes the infection control recommendations for anesthesia practice based on the most recent literature and guidelines and offers practical advice for commonly observed mistakes.

  7. Infection prevention in alternative health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Elaine; Chopra, Teena; Mody, Lona

    2011-03-01

    With the changing health care delivery, patients receive care at various settings, including acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and ambulatory clinics, thus becoming exposed to pathogens. Various health care settings face unique challenges requiring individualized infection control programs. The programs in SNFs should address surveillance for infections and antimicrobial resistance, outbreak investigation and control plan for epidemics, isolation precautions, hand hygiene, staff education, and employee and resident health programs. In ambulatory clinics, the program should address triage and standard transmission-based precautions; cleaning, disinfection, and sterilization principles; surveillance in surgical clinics; safe injection practices; and bioterrorism and disaster planning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Synergy between CD40 and MyD88 does not influence host survival to Salmonella infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Alexander Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies using purified TLR ligands plus agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies showed that TLRs and CD40 can act synergistically on dendritic cells (DCs to optimize T cell activation and Th1 differentiation. However, a synergistic effect of TLRs and CD40 during bacterial infection is not known. Here we show that mice lacking the TLR adaptor MyD88 alone, or lacking both MyD88 and CD40 (DKO mice, are compromised in survival to Salmonella infection but have intact recruitment of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as well as unaltered abundance of DC subsets and DC activation in infected tissues. In contrast to infected wildtype and CD40-/- mice, both MyD88-/- mice and DKO mice lack detectable serum IFN-γ and have elevated IL-10. A synergistic effect of TLRs and CD40 was revealed in co-culture experiments where OT-II T cell proliferation was compromised when DKO DCs were pulsed with OVA protein and OVA323-339 peptide, but not with heat-killed Salmonella expressing OVA (HKSOVA, relative to MyD88-/- DCs. In contrast, MyD88-/- or DKO DCs pulsed with any of the antigens had a similar ability to induce IFN-γ that was lower than WT or CD40-/- DCs. DKO DCs pulsed with HKSOVA, but not with OVA or OVA323-339, had increased IL-10 relative to MyD88-/- DCs. Finally, HKSOVA-pulsed MyD88-/- and DKO DCs had similar and low induction of NFκB- dependent and -independent genes upon co-culture with OT-II cells. Overall, our data revealed that synergistic effects of CD40 and MyD88 do not influence host survival to Salmonella infection or serum levels of IFN-γ or IL-10. However, synergistic effects of MyD88 and CD40 may be apparent on some (IL-10 production but not all (OT-II proliferation and IFN-γ production DC functions and depend on the complexity of the antigen. Indeed, synergistic effects observed using purified ligands and well-defined antigens may not necessarily apply when complex antigens, such as live bacteria, challenge the immune system.

  9. Tuberculosis prevention in HIV-infected pregnant women in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-02

    Nov 2, 2012 ... Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is recommended for the prevention of active TB in HIV-infected individuals, including pregnant women. However, there are few data regarding IPT use in the latter, with concern regarding the concurrent use of. IPT with nevirapine in pregnancy, as both treatments are ...

  10. Increased production of the ether-lipid platelet-activating factor in intestinal epithelial cells infected by Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; Giménez, Rosa; Lúcia, David; Modolell, Ines; Badía, Josefa; Baldoma, Laura; Aguilar, Juan

    2008-05-01

    When exposed to enteric pathogens intestinal epithelial cells produce several cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators. To date there is no evidence that the ether-lipid platelet-activating factor (PAF) is one of these mediators. Our results revealed a significant increase in PAF production by human colonic tissue 4 h after infection by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) or Salmonella enteritidis. PAF is produced in the gut by cells of the immune system in response to bacterial infection. To determine whether the epithelial cells of colonic mucosa might also modulate PAF levels, we carried out PAF quantification and analysis of the enzymes involved in PAF synthesis in 5-day-old (undifferentiated) or 28-day-old (differentiated) Caco-2 cell cultures. Infection of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells with either bacterium had no effect on PAF levels, whereas in differentiated cells, infection by S. enteritidis increased PAF levels. Following infection by S. enteritidis, there were no changes in the activity of dithiothreitol-insensitive choline phosphotransferase. However, the enzymes of the remodeling pathway cytosolic phospholipase A(2), which catalyzes the formation of the PAF precursor lysoPAF, and lysoPAF acetyltransferase, are activated in the infected epithelial cells. This response is Ca(2+)-dependent.

  11. First Description of the Extended Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase Gene blaCTX-M-109 in Salmonella Grumpensis Strains Isolated from Neonatal Nosocomial Infections in Dakar, Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadou Diop

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are very common in African hospitals, particularly in neonatal units. These infections are most often caused by bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp and Staphylococcus spp. Salmonella strains are rarely involved in nosocomial infections. Here, we report the first description of S. Grumpensis in neonatal infections in Senegal. Seventeen Salmonella strains were isolated from hospitalized infants' stool samples. The following resistance phenotype was described in strains: AMXRTICRCFR FOXRCFXRCTXRCAZRIMPSATMRNARNORRCIPRTMRGMRTERSXTR. All isolates were susceptible to imipenem, 15 out of 17 produced an extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL. blaOXA-1, blaSHV-1, blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M1 genes were detected in strains 8, 13, 5 and 8, respectively. blaCTX-M1 sequencing revealed the presence of blaCTX-M-109. Thirteen of the 17 Salmonella Grumpensis strains were analyzed by PFGE. These 13 isolates belonged to a single pulsotype and were genotypically identical. This is the first report of neonatal S. Grumpensis infections in Senegal, and the first report of blaCTX-M-109 in the genus Salmonella.

  12. Intermittent fasting favored the resolution of Salmonella typhimurium infection in middle-aged BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Arciniega-Martínez, Ivonne Maciel; Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Cruz-Hernández, Teresita Rocío; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2016-02-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) reportedly increases resistance and intestinal IgA response to Salmonella typhimurium infection in mature mice. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of aging on the aforementioned improved immune response found with IF. Middle-aged male BALB/c mice were submitted to IF or ad libitum (AL) feeding for 40 weeks and then orally infected with S. typhimurium. Thereafter, infected animals were all fed AL (to maximize their viability) until sacrifice on day 7 or 14 post-infection. We evaluated body weight, bacterial load (in feces, Peyer's patches, spleen and liver), total and specific intestinal IgA, lamina propria IgA+ plasma cells, plasma corticosterone, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of α-chain, J-chain, and the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) in liver and intestinal mucosa. In comparison with the infected AL counterpart, the infected IF group (long-term IF followed by post-infection AL feeding) generally had lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads as well as higher total IgA on both post-infection days. Both infected groups showed no differences in corticosterone levels, body weight, or food and caloric intake. The increase in intestinal IgA was associated with enhanced pIgR mRNA expression in the intestine (day 7) and liver. Thus, to maintain body weight and caloric intake, IF elicited metabolic signals that possibly induced the increased hepatic and intestinal pIgR mRNA expression found. The increase in IgA probably resulted from intestinal IgA transcytosis via pIgR. This IgA response along with phagocyte-induced killing of bacteria in systemic organs (not measured) may explain the resolution of the S. typhimurium infection.

  13. Invasive Salmonella infections in areas of high and low malaria transmission intensity in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Holly M; Lester, Rebecca; Nadjm, Behzad; Mtove, George; Todd, Jim E; Kinabo, Grace D; Philemon, Rune; Amos, Ben; Morrissey, Anne B; Reyburn, Hugh; Crump, John A

    2014-03-01

     The epidemiology of Salmonella Typhi and invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) differs, and prevalence of these pathogens among children in sub-Saharan Africa may vary in relation to malaria transmission intensity.  We compared the prevalence of bacteremia among febrile pediatric inpatients aged 2 months to 13 years recruited at sites of high and low malaria endemicity in Tanzania. Enrollment at Teule Hospital, the high malaria transmission site, was from June 2006 through May 2007, and at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), the low malaria transmission site, from September 2007 through August 2008. Automated blood culture, malaria microscopy with Giemsa-stained blood films, and human immunodeficiency virus testing were performed.  At Teule, 3639 children were enrolled compared to 467 at KCMC. Smear-positive malaria was detected in 2195 of 3639 (60.3%) children at Teule and 11 of 460 (2.4%) at KCMC (P Salmonella Typhi was isolated from 11 (0.3%) children at Teule and 6 (1.3%) at KCMC (P = .008). With NTS excluded, the prevalence of bacteremia at Teule was 5.0% and at KCMC 4.1% (P = .391).  Where malaria transmission was intense, invasive NTS was common and Salmonella Typhi was uncommon, whereas the inverse was observed at a low malaria transmission site. The relationship between these pathogens, the environment, and the host is a compelling area for further research.

  14. Outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Manhattan infection associated with meat products, France, 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noël, H; Dominguez, M; Weill, F X; Brisabois, A; Duchazeaubeneix, C; Kerouanton, A; Delmas, G; Pihier, N; Couturier, E

    2006-01-01

    ... (OR=5.9, confidence interval CI [1.3; 26.9]) and beef (OR=9.3, CI [1.3; 68.6]). At the same time, 19 strains of Salmonella Manhattan isolated from meat products in southeastern France, reported to the French food safety agency...

  15. Pathologic and microbiologic aspects of pet psittacine infected by Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul A.S. Siqueira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The role of Escherichia coli in healthy microbiota of psittacine is controversial, and the presence of Salmonella sp. indicates possible disease. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the presence of E. coli and Salmonella spp. in a psittacine pet that died in Fortaleza, Brazil, correlating pathogenicity aspects of the isolates through the evaluation of lesions and antimicrobial susceptibility. Psittacine pets sent to the Laboratory of Ornithological Studies, State University of Ceará, that died in 2014 and 2015 were necropsied. Fragments of liver, kidneys, intestine, lung, heart, spleen and brain were collected for microbiological and histopathological analyses. Scores were attributed to lesions and isolated strains submitted to antimicrobial susceptibility test. From the seventy necropsied birds, nineteen were positive for E. coli and one for Salmonella Typhimurium. Congestive lesions and lymphoplasmocitic inflammatory infiltrate were observed varying from light to moderate and were the main findings. In the analyzed strains, multidrug resistance against different groups of antibiotics was observed. In conclusion, according to the results, E. coli strains and the Salmonella Typhimurium isolate produced significant lesions in the psittacine pets, and multidrug resistance may hinder treatments with antibiotics used in avian pet medicine.

  16. Some putative prebiotics increase the severity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Pedersen, Anna Lovmand

    2009-01-01

    containing 10% of either of the following carbohydrates: inulin, fructo-oligosaccharide, xylo-oligosaccharide, galacto-oligosaccharide, apple pectin, polydextrose or beta-glucan for three weeks prior to oral Salmonella challenge (107 CFU) and compared to mice fed a cornstarch-based control diet. RESULTS...

  17. Detection of egg yolk antibodies reflecting Salmonella enteritidis infections using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, M.E.; Bouma, A.; Eerden, van E.; Landman, W.J.M.; Knapen, van F.; Stegeman, J.A.; Bergwerff, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor assay was developed on the basis of a lipopolysaccharide antigen of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis (S. enterica serovar enteritidis) to detect egg yolk antibodies against S. enterica serovar enteritidis. This biosensor assay was compared to two

  18. Rice hull smoke extract inactivates Salmonella Typhimurium in laboratory media and protects infected mice against mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    A recently discovered and characterized rice hull liquid smoke extract was tested for bactericidal activity against Salmonella Typhimurium using the disc-agar method. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) value of rice hull smoke extract was found to be 0.822% (v/v). The in vivo antibacterial a...

  19. Outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium infection traced to contaminated chocolate and caused by a strain lacking the 60-megadalton virulence plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapperud, G; Gustavsen, S; Hellesnes, I; Hansen, A H; Lassen, J; Hirn, J; Jahkola, M; Montenegro, M A; Helmuth, R

    1990-12-01

    We describe an outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium infection, caused by contaminated chocolate produced by one Norwegian company, which occurred in Norway and Finland in 1987. A total of 349 bacteriologically verified cases were recorded in Norway, and 12 cases were recorded in Finland. There was a predominance of young children among the patients (median age, 6 years), many of whom developed acute hemorrhagic diarrhea. The outbreak strain exhibited a rare phage lysis pattern and a characteristic plasmid profile lacking the 60-MDa virulence-associated plasmid. DNA hybridization failed to demonstrate any DNA sequence homology between the outbreak strain and the virulence plasmid. The outbreak strain was nonlethal for orally infected mice. The finding of only less than or equal to 10 S. typhimurium cells per 100 g of chocolate in about 90% of the positive samples obtained from retail outlets suggested that an inoculum of fewer than 10 organisms may have been sufficient to cause symptomatic disease.

  20. Transfer of primed CD4+OX40- T lymphocytes induces increased immunity to experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Christensen, H B; Hougen, H P

    1997-01-01

    The protective effect of primed CD4 T cells against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in Lewis rats. Primed CD4 T cells were obtained by inoculating Lewis rats with a non-lethal dose of S. typhimurium. Four weeks after the infection, spleen non-adherent mononuclear cells were......4+ T cells sorted into OX40- or OX40- subpopulations significantly increased animal survival compared to controls. Animals receiving OX40+CD4+ T cells did not differ significantly in survival probability from those receiving unsorted CD+ T cells. However, animals receiving OX40-CD4+ T cells had...... a significantly better survival compared to animals given unsorted CD4+ T cells. It is concluded that OX40-CD4+ T cells can induce significant protection against S. typhimurium infections in rats. This is most likely due to the fact that the OX40-CD4+ T-cell population contains a significant number of antigen...

  1. Frozen chicken nuggets and strips--a newly identified risk factor for Salmonella Heidelberg infection in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Laura; Fyfe, Murray; McIntyre, Lorraine; Paccagnella, Ana; Cordner, Keir; Kerr, Alan; Aramini, Jeff

    2004-06-01

    Salmonella enterica var. Heidelberg was isolated from an unusual food source during routine case follow-up, prompting a case control investigation of frozen chicken nuggets and strips. Most frozen nuggets and strips are raw; however, par-frying lends a cooked appearance. As such, suitable food preparation precautions might not be undertaken by consumers. Cases were confirmed in the laboratory between 1 January and 1 April 2003. Controls were generated through forward-digit dialing and individually matched by age category. Telephone interviews were conducted, and limited sampling of unopened product was performed. Eighteen matched pairs were interviewed. The odds of infection were 11 times higher in individuals who had consumed frozen processed chicken nuggets and strips (95% confidence interval, 1.42 nuggets and strips to be precooked, and one quarter used the microwave, an ill-advised cooking method. Consumer misconceptions contributed to the risk of infection. Clear labels identifying nuggets and strips as raw poultry are needed.

  2. [Importance and prevention of nosocomial infections in the outpatient setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Giorgio; Lazor-Blanchet, Catherine; Petignat, Christiane

    2010-04-07

    The concept of nosocomial infections (or healthcare-related infections) applies to the outpatients clinics. However, data are scarce and imprecise in this setting compared with hospitals. The choice of preventive measures is therefore difficult. A lower risk in the outpatient facilities does not justify the complete implementation of hospital precautions. The latter can nevertheless be adapted since infection may be acquired during an ambulatory consultation through the same mechanisms as in hospitals. We propose a preventive strategy derived from standard precautions to be applied in every case, transmission-based precautions that are more rarely needed, and asepsis in case of invasive procedure.

  3. Lactoferrin for prevention of common viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Oda, Hirotsugu; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki

    2014-11-01

    Although lactoferrin has many biological functions, the host-protective effects against pathogenic microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and viruses are regarded as one of the most important. Here, we review research on the protective role of lactoferrin administration against common viral infections. Many studies have shown the in vitro antiviral activity of lactoferrin against viral pathogens that cause common infections such as the common cold, influenza, gastroenteritis, summer cold, and herpes, where lactoferrin inhibits mainly viral attachment to the target cells. Recently, studies indicating the in vivo protective effects of lactoferrin by oral administration against common viral infections have been increasing. For instance, norovirus is an extremely important emerging human pathogen that causes a majority of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide that may be a target candidate for lactoferrin. Lactoferrin consumption reduced the incidence of noroviral gastroenteritis in children and a similar effect was observed in a wide range of ages in a preliminary survey. A recent in vitro study reported that lactoferrin inhibits both cellular attachment of the murine norovirus, a virus closely-related to the human norovirus, and viral replication in the cells by inducing antiviral cytokines interferon (IFN)-α/β. Lactoferrin administration also enhances NK cell activity and Th1 cytokine responses, which lead to protection against viral infections. In conclusion, lactoferrin consumption may protect the host from viral infections through inhibiting the attachment of a virus to the cells, replication of the virus in the cells, and enhancement of systemic immune functions. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Loss of Humoral and Cellular Immunity to Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella during Current or Convalescent Plasmodium falciparum Infection in Malawian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Tonney S; Nyirenda, James T; Tembo, Dumizulu L; Storm, Janet; Dube, Queen; Msefula, Chisomo L; Jambo, Kondwani C; Mwandumba, Henry C; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Melita A; Mandala, Wilson L

    2017-07-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) infections are commonly associated with Plasmodium falciparum infections, but the immunologic basis for this linkage is poorly understood. We hypothesized that P. falciparum infection compromises the humoral and cellular immunity of the host to NTS, which increases the susceptibility of the host to iNTS infection. We prospectively recruited children aged between 6 and 60 months at a Community Health Centre in Blantyre, Malawi, and allocated them to the following groups; febrile with uncomplicated malaria, febrile malaria negative, and nonfebrile malaria negative. Levels of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-specific serum bactericidal activity (SBA) and whole-blood bactericidal activity (WBBA), complement C3 deposition, and neutrophil respiratory burst activity (NRBA) were measured. Levels of SBA with respect to S Typhimurium were reduced in febrile P. falciparum-infected children (median, -0.20 log10 [interquartile range {IQR}, -1.85, 0.32]) compared to nonfebrile malaria-negative children (median, -1.42 log10 [IQR, -2.0, -0.47], P = 0.052). In relation to SBA, C3 deposition on S Typhimurium was significantly reduced in febrile P. falciparum-infected children (median, 7.5% [IQR, 4.1, 15.0]) compared to nonfebrile malaria-negative children (median, 29% [IQR, 11.8, 48.0], P = 0.048). WBBA with respect to S Typhimurium was significantly reduced in febrile P. falciparum-infected children (median, 0.25 log10 [IQR, -0.73, 1.13], P = 0.0001) compared to nonfebrile malaria-negative children (median, -1.0 log10 [IQR, -1.68, -0.16]). In relation to WBBA, S Typhimurium-specific NRBA was reduced in febrile P. falciparum-infected children (median, 8.8% [IQR, 3.7, 20], P = 0.0001) compared to nonfebrile malaria-negative children (median, 40.5% [IQR, 33, 65.8]). P. falciparum infection impairs humoral and cellular immunity to S Typhimurium in children during malaria episodes, which may explain the increased risk of iNTS observed in

  5. Frequency of parasites and Salmonella infection in captive maned-wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, kept in Zoos at the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilioli R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-one captive maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger 1815 from 11 Zoos at the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were screened to investigate the presence of parasites and Salmonella infection by parasitological diagnostic methods and fecal selective culture. The most frequent ecto and endoparasites found were Ctenocephalides felis (56.2%, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (12.5%, Ancylostoma caninum (45.1%, Strongyloides sp. (29.0%, Uncinaria stenocephala (3.2%, Capillaria sp. (3.2%, Entamoeba sp. (22.9%, Sarcocystis sp. (29.0%, Cryptosporidium sp. (19.3%, Eimeria sp. (19.3%, Giardia sp. (9.6% and Isospora sp. (3.2%. Four different serotypes of Salmonella were identified in six animals (25%. Only one infected animal showed clinical signs of diarrhea. The ability to harbor Salmonella spp. as normal nonpathogenic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract may be a physiological adaptation of this specie.

  6. Prevention of hepatitis B virus infection and liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the five leading causes of cancer death in human. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common etiologic agent of HCC in the world, particularly in areas prevalent for HBV infection such as Asia, Africa, southern part of Eastern and Central Europe, and the Middle East. Risk factors of HBV-related HCC include (1) viral factors-persistent high viral replication, HBV genotype C or D, pre-S2 or core promoter mutants; (2) host factors-older age (>40 years old) at HBeAg seroconversion, male gender; (3) mother-to-infant transmission; and (4) other carcinogenic factors-smoking, habitual use of alcohol, etc. Prevention is the best way to control cancer. There are three levels of liver cancer prevention, i.e., primary prevention by HBV vaccination targeting the general population, secondary prevention by antiviral agent for high-risk subjects with chronic HBV infection, and tertiary prevention by antiviral agent to prevent recurrence for patients who have been successfully treated for liver cancer. Primary prevention by hepatitis B vaccination is most cost effective. Its cancer preventive efficacy supports it as the first successful example of cancer preventive vaccine in human. This experience can be extended to the development of other cancer preventive vaccine. Careful basic and clinical research is needed to develop ideal vaccines to induce adequate protection. Understanding the main transmission route and age at primary infection may help to set the optimal target age to start a new cancer preventive vaccination program. Besides timely HBV vaccination, the earlier administration of hepatitis B immunoglobulin immediately after birth, and even antiviral agent during the third trimester of pregnancy to block mother-to-infant transmission of HBV are possible strategies to enhance the prevention efficacy of HBV infection and its related liver cancer.

  7. Group B Strep Infection: Prevention in Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the mother, including a mild reaction to penicillin (in about 1 out of every 10 women). There is a rare chance (about 1 out of every 10,000 women) of the mother having a severe allergic reaction that requires emergency treatment. Preventing Late-Onset Disease ...

  8. PREVENTION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Karneeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of inflammatory diseases of the upper airways and eardrum remains relevant and associated both with high prevalence of this pathology and likelihood of developing complications. Inflammation of nasal cavity’s mucosal lining causes discomfort, while chronic dysfunction of nasal breathing significantly reduces the patient’s quality of life. Difficulty in nasal breathing of newborns and infants results in quite severe complications. Nearly 70% of acute respiratory infections cases in children are complicated with acute inflammation of eardrum, 90% of children under 3 years once develop secretory otitis media, 50% of them have several cases of eardrum inflammation.Key words: acute respiratory infections, otitis, treatment, children.

  9. Infection prevention and control – quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Broad, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Effective hand hygiene is one of the easiest ways to reduce healthcare associated infections (HCAIs) (WHO 2009a). This study is based on a previous study by Barrett and Randle (2008) which examined student nurses knowledge and the barriers that they faced to hand hygiene compliance. A thorough literature review revealed a lack of empirical studies that examined Health care workers hand hygiene practices within nursing homes. This study consequently examined HCWs’ perceptions of t...

  10. PREVENTION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    O.V. Karneeva

    2009-01-01

    The issue of inflammatory diseases of the upper airways and eardrum remains relevant and associated both with high prevalence of this pathology and likelihood of developing complications. Inflammation of nasal cavity’s mucosal lining causes discomfort, while chronic dysfunction of nasal breathing significantly reduces the patient’s quality of life. Difficulty in nasal breathing of newborns and infants results in quite severe complications. Nearly 70% of acute respiratory infections cases in c...

  11. Prevention of Transfusion-Transmitted Infections: Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans L. Zaaijer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To make blood components and blood products safe, many safety measures are applied to avoid transfusion-transmitted infections. Defining a balanced safety policy is not easy, we face several dilemmas: How safe should blood be? Should we opt for maximal or optimal safety? Are perceived threats real and relevant? Should blood be clean while food, air, or mosquitoes are not? Is vCJD still a threat? It seems wise to discuss these issues more in the open.

  12. HIV INFECTION AND AIDS: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Alparslan BABAYIÐIT

    Full Text Available Human Immune-deficiency Virus (HIV was first discovered in 1981 in the United States of America and the day of December 1, was announced as ?World AIDS Day? by WHO (World Health Organization. In Turkey, the first announcement of the people living with HIV was made in 1985. HIV/AIDS has killed more than 20 millions people and more than 16,000 people become newly infected each day since the first cases were diagnosed in 1981. It is estimated that 39.4 million people would have been infected with HIV at the end of 2004, with 4.9 million new cases that year. Sub-Saharan Africa is the worst-hit region, with 70 percent of all people living with HIV. In Africa alone, 10,000 people become infected each day. This year?s main theme is ?Women, Girls, HIV and AIDS,? which reflects a focus on how the effects of HIV/AIDS have significantly increased among women. Women now make up half of all people living with HIV worldwide with the number of 17,6 million. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(11.000: 280-290

  13. Lack of effect of feeding lactoferrin on intestinal populations and fecal shedding of Salmonella typhimurium in experimentally-infected weaned pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of the iron-binding molecule lactoferrin on reducing gut populations and fecal shedding of Salmonella typhimurium in experimentally infected weaned pigs. For each experiment, crossbred barrows and gilts were purchased locally and transported to ...

  14. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids: Part II. Effects on intestinal histology and active nutrient transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on intestinal morphology and active nutrient absorption in weanling pigs following deliberate Salmonella infection. Pigs (n = 88) were weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age and assigned to one...

  15. Vaccination with Bivalent DNA Vaccine of α1-Giardin and CWP2 Delivered by Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Reduces Trophozoites and Cysts in the Feces of Mice Infected with Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xian-Min; Zheng, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Shi, Wen-Yan; Li, Yao; Cui, Bai-Ji; Wang, Hui-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is one of the most common infectious protozoans in human that may cause diarrhea in travelers. Searching for antigens that induced effectively protective immunity has become a key point in the development of vaccine against giardiasis. Mice vaccinated with G. lamblia trophozozite-specific α1-giardin DNA vaccine delivered orally by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7027 elicited 74.2% trophozoite reduction, but only 28% reduction in cyst shedding compared with PBS buffer control. Oral vaccination with Salmonella-delivered cyst-specific CWP2 DNA produced 89% reduction in cysts shedding in feces of vaccinated mice. Significantly, the mice vaccinated with Salmonella-delivered bivalent α1-giardin and CWP2 DNA vaccines produced significant reduction in both trophozoite (79%) and cyst (93%) in feces of vaccinated mice. This parasite reduction is associated with the strong local mucosal IgA secretion and the IgG2a-dominant systemic immune responses in vaccinated mice. The results demonstrate that bivalent vaccines targeting α1-giardin and CWP2 can protect mice against the colonization of Giardia trophozoite and block the transformation of cyst in host at the same time, and can be used to prevent Giardia infection and block the transmission of giardiasis.

  16. Vaccination with Bivalent DNA Vaccine of α1-Giardin and CWP2 Delivered by Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Reduces Trophozoites and Cysts in the Feces of Mice Infected with Giardia lamblia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Min Feng

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia is one of the most common infectious protozoans in human that may cause diarrhea in travelers. Searching for antigens that induced effectively protective immunity has become a key point in the development of vaccine against giardiasis.Mice vaccinated with G. lamblia trophozozite-specific α1-giardin DNA vaccine delivered orally by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7027 elicited 74.2% trophozoite reduction, but only 28% reduction in cyst shedding compared with PBS buffer control. Oral vaccination with Salmonella-delivered cyst-specific CWP2 DNA produced 89% reduction in cysts shedding in feces of vaccinated mice. Significantly, the mice vaccinated with Salmonella-delivered bivalent α1-giardin and CWP2 DNA vaccines produced significant reduction in both trophozoite (79% and cyst (93% in feces of vaccinated mice. This parasite reduction is associated with the strong local mucosal IgA secretion and the IgG2a-dominant systemic immune responses in vaccinated mice.The results demonstrate that bivalent vaccines targeting α1-giardin and CWP2 can protect mice against the colonization of Giardia trophozoite and block the transformation of cyst in host at the same time, and can be used to prevent Giardia infection and block the transmission of giardiasis.

  17. Co-infection of Avian Leukosis Virus and Salmonella pullorum with the Preliminary Eradication in Breeders of Chinese Local “ShouGuang” Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qiang Huang, Jing Kai Xin, Cui Mao, Feng Zhong and Jia Qian Chai*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to investigate the infection status and to finish the preliminary eradication of avian leukosis virus (ALV and Salmonella pullorum (SP in breeders of Chinese local “ShouGuang” chickens. ALV antigen and antibody was tested via ELISA, and SP antibody was detected by serum plate agglutination test (SPAT. The etiology and pathology was also studied. The ALV-P27 antigen, ALV-A/B and SP antibody positive chickens were eliminated in turn, and then the negative were retained as the breeder flocks. The results showed that the positive rate of antigen to ALV-P27, antibody to ALV-A/B, ALV-J and SP was 57.8, 6.7, 0 and 17.8% in this breeder farm, respectively. The co-infection of ALV and SP was confirmed and the positive rate of both SP and ALV-P27 or ALV-A/B was 10 and 1%, respectively. There were obvious tumor nodules and lymphoid tumor cells in the comb, liver and spleen of the co-infected chickens. The degenerative and atrophic ovarian follicles, inflammatory cell infiltration in muscle biopsies were also found. The elimination rate of ALV-p27, ALV-A/B and SP positive chickens was 55.4, 13 and 6.1%, respectively. The final amount of the breeder conservation was 309 chickens. In conclusion, the co-infection of ALV-B and SP was found and more emphasis should be given on its prevention; the preliminary eradication of “ShouGuang” breeder chickens was finished.

  18. Rota virus infections: prevalence, diagnosis and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanabhan Vidya,; Arun Ponnambalam,; Palani Gunasekeran,; Kavitha Arunagiri,; Mohana Sambasivam; Kaveri Krishnasami

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diarrhoea is one of the leading causes of infant mortality. Various diagnostic methods are available and there is a need to select an ideal one. The use of Vaccines, its efficacy needs to be studied. Methods: A pubmed search, pubchem assay journal of epidemiology and infection, Google search generated results were included for review, out of 900 articles generated 111 articles are studied and were included for review. Conclusion: Molecular typing methods for viruses should aim to ...

  19. Minor Salmonella: potential pathogens in eggs in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, Ammar; Bennoune, Omar; Heleili, Nouzha; Alloui, Nadir

    2015-10-29

    Salmonellosis is one of the major foodborne diseases known to be closely related to the consumption of contaminated eggs, infected poultry, and poultry products. Control and survey of the poultry chain are the key elements and the most critical steps in the prevention of human transmission of Salmonella. This study was carried out in East Algeria on 150 eggs meant for consumption collected from mini-markets and immediately tested for Salmonella using standard methods (ISO AFNOR 6579 modified in 2002). Briefly, the shell surfaces were carefully wiped using sterile appropriated tissues while the white and yellow yolks were separated. All 10 samples were pooled together and a total of 45 samples were carefully analyzed. A contamination rate of 4.4% was found, and two strains of Salmonella bradford were isolated from white and yellow yolks. The results showed that XLT4 was the best medium for Salmonella isolation from yolks. Screening for other Salmonella in parental chickens using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test revealed seropositive cases of Salmonella enteritidis at the top of the poultry production pyramid. Occurrence of Salmonella in yolks and seropositive results for S. in parental chickens is a serious and potential danger to public health. Radical and preventive measures must be taken at the critical points to control and to avoid human transmission. These measures must be installed at all levels of egg production through the application of appropriate and strict regulations, and use of good hygienic practices in transport, storage, and food preparation.

  20. Intermittent fasting promotes bacterial clearance and intestinal IgA production in Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godínez-Victoria, M; Campos-Rodriguez, R; Rivera-Aguilar, V; Lara-Padilla, E; Pacheco-Yepez, J; Jarillo-Luna, R A; Drago-Serrano, M E

    2014-05-01

    The impact of intermittent fasting versus ad libitum feeding during Salmonella typhimurium infection was evaluated in terms of duodenum IgA levels, bacterial clearance and intestinal and extra-intestinal infection susceptibility. Mice that were intermittently fasted for 12 weeks or fed ad libitum were infected with S. typhimurium and assessed at 7 and 14 days post-infection. Next, we evaluated bacterial load in the faeces, Peyer's patches, spleen and liver by plate counting, as well as total and specific intestinal IgA and plasmatic corticosterone levels (by immunoenzymatic assay) and lamina propria IgA levels in plasma cells (by cytofluorometry). Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, α- and J-chains, Pax-5 factor, pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (transforming growth factor-β) mRNA levels were assessed in mucosal and liver samples (by real-time PCR). Compared with the infected ad libitum mice, the intermittently fasted infected animals had (1) lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads; (2) higher SIgA and IgA plasma cell levels; (3) higher mRNA expression of most intestinal parameters; and (4) increased or decreased corticosterone levels on day 7 and 14 post-infection, respectively. No contribution of liver IgA was observed at the intestinal level. Apparently, the changes following metabolic stress induced by intermittent fasting during food deprivation days increased the resistance to S. typhimurium infection by triggering intestinal IgA production and presumably, pathogen elimination by phagocytic inflammatory cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Preventing surgical site infection. Where now?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is increasingly recognised as a measure of the quality of patient care by surgeons, infection control practitioners, health planners and the public. There is increasing pressure to compare SSI rates between surgeons, institutions and countries. For this to be meaningful, data must be standardised and must include post-discharge surveillance (PDS) as many superficial SSIs do not present to the original institution. Further work is required to determine the best method of conducting PDS. In 2008 two important documents on SSI were published from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America\\/The Infectious Disease Society of America and the National Institute for Health and Clincal Excellence, UK. Both emphasise key aspects during the preoperative, operative and postoperative phases of patient care. In addition to effective interventions known to be important for some time, e.g. not shaving the surgical site until the day of the procedure, there is increasing emphasis on physiological parameters, e.g. blood glucose concentrations, oxygen tensions and body temperature. Laparoscopic procedures are increasingly associated with reduced SSI rates, and the screening and decontamination of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers is effective for certain surgical procedures but has to be balanced by cost and the risk of mupirocin resistance. Finally, there is a need to convert theory into practice by the rigorous application of SSI healthcare bundles. Recent studies suggest that, with a multidisciplinary approach, simple measures can be effective in reducing SSI rates.

  2. Non-typhoidal Salmonella and Campylobacter infections among HIV-positive patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, I.K.; Gradel, Kim Oren; Helms, M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and Campylobacter are common causes of diarrhoea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. To investigate if incidence has changed since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), we combined data from The Danish Surveillance...... population. Moreover our study suggests that there is an increased incidence of Campylobacter-related illness among homosexual men in the HIV-positive population....

  3. Determination of Optimum Sanitizer Levels for Prevention of Salmonella Cross-Contamination of Mature Round Tomatoes in a Laboratory Model Flume System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Aswathy; Li, You; De, Jaysankar; Gutierrez, Alan; Silverberg, Rachael; Schneider, Keith R

    2017-09-01

    Salmonella has been reported to be involved in several foodborne illness outbreaks, many of which resulted from consumption of raw tomatoes. This research aimed to optimize and evaluate the concentration of free chlorine (hypochlorous acid [HOCl]) used as a sanitizer to prevent cross-contamination of tomatoes inoculated with a cocktail of five rifampin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovars in a laboratory-based model flume system. Organic load, prepared using sterilized Scotts Premium Topsoil, was added in different quantities to the flume wash water to simulate real-world packinghouse conditions. In a typical packinghouse operation utilizing a recirculating flume system, the organic matter washed from tomato surfaces accumulates over time. In this study, different concentrations (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm) of HOCl were used as sanitizers under three organic load conditions (0, 650, and 1,000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand). Results showed that 100 ppm of HOCl was necessary to prevent Salmonella cross-contamination of uninoculated tomatoes in the model flume system in the presence of organic loading. Also, when treated with 100 ppm of HOCl, Salmonella levels were reduced by >4.5 log CFU per tomato from inoculated tomatoes in the presence of organic load. At 75 ppm of HOCl, Salmonella cross-contamination was prevented, but only in the absence of organic loading. In studies in which plate counts were negative, whole tomato enrichment studies were performed. No cross-contamination of uninoculated tomatoes was recorded when 100 ppm of HOCl was used, even in the presence of high organic load (1,000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand). Although sanitizer application reduces contamination on tomato surfaces, the primary function of sanitizers in the wash water is to prevent cross-contamination.

  4. Infection Prevention and Control in Pediatric Ambulatory Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Mobeen H; Jackson, Mary Anne

    2017-11-01

    Since the American Academy of Pediatrics published its statement titled "Infection Prevention and Control in Pediatric Ambulatory Settings" in 2007, there have been significant changes that prompted this updated statement. Infection prevention and control is an integral part of pediatric practice in ambulatory medical settings as well as in hospitals. Infection prevention and control practices should begin at the time the ambulatory visit is scheduled. All health care personnel should be educated regarding the routes of transmission and techniques used to prevent the transmission of infectious agents. Policies for infection prevention and control should be written, readily available, updated every 2 years, and enforced. Many of the recommendations for infection control and prevention from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for hospitalized patients are also applicable in the ambulatory setting. These recommendations include requirements for pediatricians to take precautions to identify and protect employees likely to be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials while on the job. In addition to emphasizing the key principles of infection prevention and control in this policy, we update those that are relevant to the ambulatory care patient. These guidelines emphasize the role of hand hygiene and the implementation of diagnosis- and syndrome-specific isolation precautions, with the exemption of the use of gloves for routine diaper changes and wiping a well child's nose or tears for most patient encounters. Additional topics include respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette strategies for patients with a respiratory tract infection, including those relevant for special populations like patients with cystic fibrosis or those in short-term residential facilities; separation of infected, contagious children from uninfected children when feasible; safe handling and disposal of needles and other sharp medical devices; appropriate use of personal

  5. Preventing HIV infection: educating the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroger, F

    1991-01-01

    This essay discusses the rationale for targeting HIV prevention programs to the general public, as opposed to focusing strictly on high-risk populations. The author first considers varying definitions of the term "general public," then explains the goal of general public education programs. Additionally, the author lays down the theoretical foundations of general audience education programs and weights related research findings. Finally, he offers recommendations for future practice. Noting the complex socioecological elements involved in health behavior, the author argues in favor of a broad definition for the general public. This broad outlook allows programs to still target high-risk population while not bypassing low-risk persons, who are sometimes treated as irrelevant because they do not contribute to excess morbidity or mortality. When it comes to HIV educational programs for the general public, their goals should be to instruct the public on how the virus is transmitted, to allay unfounded fears, and to increase the level of support for AIDS prevention and control. Such a program would require a theoretical basis drawn from multiple sources: health education, health communication, clinical and social psychology, and social marketing. The author concludes by proving recommendations designed to reinforce existing programs: 1) strengthen efforts to ensure that all people are educated about HIV and to encourage people to treat AIDS patients with compassion; 2) continue to explore for the most effective communication channels; 3) strengthen the communication infrastructure for those who are disenfranchised from health education; and 4) strengthen evaluation efforts of health communication programs.

  6. Rota virus infections: prevalence, diagnosis and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanabhan Vidya,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diarrhoea is one of the leading causes of infant mortality. Various diagnostic methods are available and there is a need to select an ideal one. The use of Vaccines, its efficacy needs to be studied. Methods: A pubmed search, pubchem assay journal of epidemiology and infection, Google search generated results were included for review, out of 900 articles generated 111 articles are studied and were included for review. Conclusion: Molecular typing methods for viruses should aim to provide clinically and biologically useful information about field viruses, particularly with regard to virulence, viral epidemiology, and virus serotype identification. These data may be important for assessing the need for introducing rotavirus surveillance and vaccines into immunization programs in India particularly Tamilnadu.

  7. Salmonella on feces, hides and carcasses in beef slaughter facilities in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez-Bravo, Claudia; Rodas-González, Argenis; Fuenmayor, Yrimar; Flores-Rondon, Carolina; Carruyo, Gabriela; Moreno, Mireya; Perozo-Mena, Armindo; Hoet, Armando E

    2013-09-02

    This study determined Salmonella prevalence at different stages during the slaughtering in three beef slaughter plants (A, B and C) located in the western region of Venezuela (Zulia and Lara states). Each facility was visited three times at monthly intervals, from the months October through December of 2006. Samples were collected from hides (n=80), fecal grabs (n=80) and carcasses (n=80) at the phases of pre-evisceration, after-evisceration and pre-cooler at three sampling sites on the animals (rump, flank and brisket). Salmonella prevalence was higher on hides (36.3%) than on feces (13.8%) (P<0.05). Differences among slaughter plants for overall Salmonella prevalence were observed (P=0.001; A: 3.5%, B: 11.1%, C: 4.4%). From the isolated strains, Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica ser. Saintpaul, Salmonella ser. Javiana and Salmonella ser. Weltevreden were identified. Cattle feces and hides might be considered as important sources of Salmonella for carcass contamination at different slaughter stages. The presence of potentially pathogenic Salmonella serotypes at the slaughtering stages is an evidence of the circulation of this pathogen in the food environment; its presence could increase consumers' risks of infection if proper food handling and preparation techniques are not followed. These data should serve as a baseline for future comparisons in Salmonella prevalence on beef carcasses to be used by the government and industry in order to establish preventive measures and to better address the risks of Salmonella contamination. © 2013.

  8. Implementing AORN recommended practices for prevention of transmissible infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Marcia R; Hicks, Rodney W

    2013-12-01

    Preventing infection in the perioperative setting is a critical element of patient and health care worker safety. This article reviews the recommendations in the AORN "Recommended practices for prevention of transmissible infections in the perioperative practice setting." The recommended practices are intended to help perioperative nurses implement standard and transmission-based precautions (ie, contact, droplet, airborne), including use of personal protective equipment as well as interventions to prevent surgical site infections and exposure to bloodborne pathogens. Additional recommendations cover vaccination programs and how to manage personnel who require work restrictions. Hospital and ambulatory patient scenarios are included to help perioperative nurses apply the recommendations in daily practice. Copyright © 2013 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New horizon for infection prevention technology and implantable device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kondo, MD, PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the number of patients receiving cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED over the last two decades. CIED infection represents a serious complication after CIED implantation and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, newly advanced technologies have offered attractive and suitable therapeutic alternatives. Notably, the leadless pacemaker and anti-bacterial envelope decrease the potential risk of CIED infection and the resulting mortality, when it does occur. A completely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator is also an alternative to the transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD, as it does not require implantation of any transvenous or epicardial leads. Among the patients who require ICD removal and subsequent antibiotics secondary to infection, the wearable cardioverter defibrillator represents an alternative approach to inpatient monitoring for the prevention of sudden cardiac death. In this review paper, we aimed to introduce the advanced technologies and devices for prevention of CIED infection.

  10. Infections in Nursing Homes: Epidemiology and Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Ana; Cassone, Marco; Mody, Lona

    2016-08-01

    This review summarizes current literature pertaining to infection prevention in nursing home population including post-acute care patients and long-term care residents. Approximately 2 million infections occur each year and more than one-third of older adults harbor multidrug-resistant organisms in this setting. Surveillance, hand hygiene, isolation precautions, resident and employee health programs, education, and antibiotic stewardship are essential elements of infection prevention and control programs in nursing homes. This article discusses emerging evidence suggesting the usefulness of interactive multimodal bundles in reducing infections and antimicrobial resistance, thereby enhancing safety and quality of care for older adults in nursing homes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quinolones in the treatment of Salmonella carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Noriega, E; Andrade-Villanueva, J; Amaya-Tapia, G

    1989-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella typhi are commonly followed by a chronic carrier state despite positive clinical and initial bacteriologic responses. The use of primary antibiotics like chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has several major drawbacks, including in some instances the failure to prevent the carrier state. The appearance worldwide of strains with multiple resistance to the most commonly used regimens has prompted the search for new forms of therapy. Among the agents studied have been third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones, which are active in vitro against bacterial enteropathogens like S. typhi. Resolution of chronic carriage of S. typhi and other salmonellae is difficult, and regimens commonly fail (including those that combine antibiotic administration with removal of the gallbladder). In addition to being active in vitro against Salmonella species, the newer quinolones adequately penetrate the intestinal lumen, liver, bile, and gallbladder. Initial experience with norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin in oral treatment of the chronic S. typhi carrier state in adults has been promising.

  12. The Project Protect Infection Prevention Fellowship: A model for advancing infection prevention competency, quality improvement, and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Janine D; Wojcik, Anna; Jenkins, Ian; Edson, Barbara; Pegues, David A; Greene, Linda

    2017-08-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2016 Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) Progress Report documented no change in catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) between 2009 and 2014. There is a need for investment in additional efforts to reduce HAIs, specifically CAUTI. Quality improvement fellowships are 1 approach to expand the capacity of dedicated leaders and infection prevention champions. The fellowship used a model that expanded collaboration among disciplines and focused on partnership by recruiting a diverse cohort of fellows and by providing 1-on-1 mentoring to enhance leadership development. The curriculum supported the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Prevention Competency Model in 2 domains: leadership and performance improvement and implementation science. The fellowship was successful. The fellows and mentors had self-reported high level of satisfaction, fellows' knowledge increased, and they demonstrated leadership, quality improvement, and implementation science competency within the completed capstone projects. A model encompassing diverse educational topics, discussions, workshops, and mentorship can serve as a template for developing infection prevention champions. Although this project focused on CAUTI, this template can be used in a variety of settings and applied to a range of other HAIs and performance improvement projects. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of quality metrics for ambulatory pediatric cardiology: Infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jonathan N; Barrett, Cindy S; Franklin, Wayne H; Graham, Eric M; Halnon, Nancy J; Hattendorf, Brandy A; Krawczeski, Catherine D; McGovern, James J; O'Connor, Matthew J; Schultz, Amy H; Vinocur, Jeffrey M; Chowdhury, Devyani; Anderson, Jeffrey B

    2017-12-01

    In 2012, the American College of Cardiology's (ACC) Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Council established a program to develop quality metrics to guide ambulatory practices for pediatric cardiology. The council chose five areas on which to focus their efforts; chest pain, Kawasaki Disease, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries after arterial switch, and infection prevention. Here, we sought to describe the process, evaluation, and results of the Infection Prevention Committee's metric design process. The infection prevention metrics team consisted of 12 members from 11 institutions in North America. The group agreed to work on specific infection prevention topics including antibiotic prophylaxis for endocarditis, rheumatic fever, and asplenia/hyposplenism; influenza vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis (palivizumab); preoperative methods to reduce intraoperative infections; vaccinations after cardiopulmonary bypass; hand hygiene; and testing to identify splenic function in patients with heterotaxy. An extensive literature review was performed. When available, previously published guidelines were used fully in determining metrics. The committee chose eight metrics to submit to the ACC Quality Metric Expert Panel for review. Ultimately, metrics regarding hand hygiene and influenza vaccination recommendation for patients did not pass the RAND analysis. Both endocarditis prophylaxis metrics and the RSV/palivizumab metric passed the RAND analysis but fell out during the open comment period. Three metrics passed all analyses, including those for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with heterotaxy/asplenia, for influenza vaccination compliance in healthcare personnel, and for adherence to recommended regimens of secondary prevention of rheumatic fever. The lack of convincing data to guide quality improvement initiatives in pediatric cardiology is widespread, particularly in infection prevention. Despite this, three metrics were

  14. Role of disinfection in the Infection Prevention Multibarrier System

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The role of disinfection in infection prevention has been analyzed over the past 50 years both in the form of benefit-risk evaluations as well as in an epidemiological sense. This has served as the basis for not only national and international guidelines and recommendations, but has also created the legal and normative framework for regulation of infection control (and hence of disinfection) in numerous and acts and ordinances. Likewise, today the efficacy of disinfection measures, user safet...

  15. PRE-EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS FOR PREVENTION OF HIV INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Diniz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review existing data on Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP for prevention of HIV infection, including the role of medical male circumcision, oral administration of antiretroviral drugs and topical microbicides. Data Sources: PubMed and www.clinicaltrials.gov. Review Methods: Comprehensive review. Results: Medical male circumcision has been shown to prevent 48-60% of new HIV-1 infections. The efficacy rate of antiretroviral drugs given per os to prevent HIV infection varies in direct association with the adherence rate (62.2% in TDF2 study with 84% adherence; 44% in iPrEx study with <50% adherence; 48% in Bangkok study with 67% adherence; 67-75% in Partners PrEP study with 82% adherence; and 6% in FEM-PrEP study with 40% adherence. As for the use of topic microbicides, the CAPRISA 004 study showed 39% reduction in HIV infection using a 1% tenofovir gel. On the other hand, PRO2000 gel showed a modest reduction of 30% which was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The studies suggest that medical male circumcision is highly cost-effective at preventing HIV infection but requires careful communication strategies to be successful. PrEP using antiretroviral drugs is also very effective but it is highly dependent on the adherence rate. As for topical microbicides, 1% tenofovir gel is currently the only promising option.

  16. Survivorship: Immunizations and Prevention of Infections, Version 2.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Raza, Muhammad; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole R.; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors are at an elevated risk for infection because of immune suppression associated with prior cancer treatments, and they are at increased risk of complications from vaccine-preventable diseases. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides recommendations for the prevention of infections in survivors through education, antimicrobial prophylaxis, and the judicious use of vaccines. These guidelines provide information about travel and gardening precautions and safe pet care/avoidance of zoonosis, and include detailed recommendations regarding vaccinations that should be considered and encouraged in cancer and transplant survivors. PMID:25099442

  17. Essentials of infection prevention in the pediatric population

    OpenAIRE

    Koutlakis-Barron, Irene; Hayden, Tina Ann

    2016-01-01

    Application of infection prevention and control (IP&C) measures is synonymous with safety, quality, resource saving, and the rights of all patients, staff and visitors. An extensive literature review was undertaken to identify key IP&C measures that address pediatric-specific requirements, taking into account age-related factors, diseases that occur most frequently among pediatric populations, and the important role of the caregiver in prevention and disease transmission. IP&C initiatives tha...

  18. Antibody-integrated and functionalized graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, produced using ammonia gas plasma technology, for capturing Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Chou, Han; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella spp. is the single and most important causative agent of foodborne infections, especially involving foods such as eggs, milk and meat. To prevent infection, a reliable surveillance system is required that can quickly and sensitively detect Salmonella. Here, we describe the development of antibody-integrated magnetic beads that are functionalized by a novel strategy using ammonia gas plasma. Ammonia plasma, produced by a radio frequency (RF) power supply, was allowed to react with the surface of graphite-encapsulated magnetic beads, resulting in the introduction of amino groups. An anti-Salmonella antibody was then anchored by sulfide groups present on the protein surface to the amino groups of the magnetic beads via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The potential usefulness of these magnetic beads for capturing Salmonella was examined as follows. The beads were incubated with Salmonella in liquid medium and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thorough washing, adsorption of Salmonella to the beads was confirmed by immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction and a direct culture assay. Our findings indicate that the capture and concentration of Salmonella using the antibody-integrated magnetic beads was more efficient than commercial Dynabeads® anti-Salmonella, which are conventionally used for concentrating Salmonella from liquid cultures. We believe this novel bead technology will contribute to the enhanced detection of Salmonella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Quercetin-induced apoptosis prevents EBV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minjung; Son, Myoungki; Ryu, Eunhyun; Shin, Yu Su; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Sung, Gi-Ho; Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gamma-1 herpesvirus that establishes a lifelong latency in over 90% of the world's population. During latency, virus exists predominantly as a chromatin-associated, multicopy episome in the nuclei of a variety of tumor cells derived from B cells, T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and epithelial cells. Licorice is the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis or G. glabra that has traditionally cultivated in eastern part of Asia. Licorice was reported to have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, anti-atopic, hepatoprotective, anti-neurodegenerative, anti-tumor, anti-diabetic effects and so forth. Quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are produced from licorice and highly similar in molecular structure. They have diverse bioactive effects such as antiviral activity, anti-asthmatic activity, anti-cancer activity, anti-inflammation activity, monoamine-oxidase inhibitor, and etc. To determine anti-EBV and anti-EBVaGC (Epstein-Barr virus associated gastric carcinoma) effects of licorice, we investigated antitumor and antiviral effects of quercetin and isoliquiritigenin against EBVaGC. Although both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin are cytotoxic to SNU719 cells, quercetin induced more apoptosis in SNU719 cells than isoliquiritigenin, more completely eliminated DNMT1 and DNMT3A expressions than isoliquiritigenin, and more strongly affects the cell cycle progression of SNU719 than isoliquiritigenin. Both quercetin and isoliquiritigenin induce signal transductions to stimulate apoptosis, and induce EBV gene transcription. Quercetin enhances frequency of F promoter use, whereas isoliquiritigenin enhances frequency of Q promoter use. Quercetin reduces EBV latency, whereas isoliquiritigenin increases the latency. Quercetin increases more the EBV progeny production, and inhibits more EBV infection than isoliquiritigenin. These results indicate that quercetin could be a promising candidate for antiviral and antitumor agents against EBV and human gastric carcinoma

  20. Co-occurrence of ACSSuT and cephalosporin resistance phenotypes is mediated by int1-associated elements in nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica from human infections in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Maria Jorge; Palomo, Gonzalo; Hormeño, Lorena; Ugarte, María; Porrero, María Concepción; Herrera-León, Silvia; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Quesada, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    A screening of antimicrobial resistance and its genetic determinants has been performed on 300 Salmonella enterica isolates collected during 2004-2008 from human infections in Spain. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis were the major serotypes, which were found with similar frequencies covering 80% of the bacterial collection. Salmonella Typhimurium isolates frequently shared low susceptibility to antimicrobials of the penta-resistance phenotype (ACSSuT) and/or cephalosporin resistance. The ACSSuT profile was found closely linked to int1-associated gene cassettes, with major elements carrying DNA fragments of 1.0 Kb (aadA2 gene) plus 1.2 Kb (blaPSE-1 gene) or 2.0 Kb (aadA1 and blaOXA-1 genes). Among these, ACSSuT and cephalosporin resistances were associated in Salmonella Typhimurium isolates expressing the blaOXA gene. β-lactamase activities were also detected from isolates carrying blaTEM, blaCMY, or blaSHV, although only the two last genes expressed extended-spectrum β-lactamases. The clonal analysis of S. enterica strains suggests that both horizontal and vertical transfer mechanisms are involved in the wide dissemination of their antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Infection prevention and control in pediatric ambulatory settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Since the American Academy of Pediatrics published a statement titled "Infection Control in Physicians' Offices" (Pediatrics. 2000;105[6]:1361-1369), there have been significant changes that prompted this updated statement. Infection prevention and control is an integral part of pediatric practice in ambulatory medical settings as well as in hospitals. Infection prevention and control practices should begin at the time the ambulatory visit is scheduled. All health care personnel should be educated regarding the routes of transmission and techniques used to prevent transmission of infectious agents. Policies for infection prevention and control should be written, readily available, updated annually, and enforced. The standard precautions for hospitalized patients from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with a modification from the American Academy of Pediatrics exempting the use of gloves for routine diaper changes and wiping a well child's nose or tears, are appropriate for most patient encounters. As employers, pediatricians are required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to take precautions to identify and protect employees who are likely to be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials while on the job. Key principles of standard precautions include hand hygiene (ie, use of alcohol-based hand rub or hand-washing with soap [plain or antimicrobial] and water) before and after every patient contact; implementation of respiratory hygiene and cough-etiquette strategies for patients with suspected influenza or infection with another respiratory tract pathogen to the extent feasible; separation of infected, contagious children from uninfected children when feasible; safe handling and disposal of needles and other sharp medical devices and evaluation and implementation of needle-safety devices; appropriate use of personal protective equipment such as gloves, gowns, masks, and eye protection; and appropriate sterilization

  2. The effect of recombinant human lactoferrin from the milk of transgenic cows on Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinghuan; Hu, Yujie; Du, Chunming; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Lichen; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional protein with antibacterial and immunomodulatory activities. Given this beneficial effect, transgenic approaches have been used to produce lactoferrin. The aim of the current study was to investigate the in vivo effect of recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) from the milk of transgenic cows on Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (ST) infection in mice. Two hours before the infection with 0.3 ml at 2 × 10(5) CFU ml(-1) of ST, each animal in the ST + rhLF group received 0.3 ml of rhLF with 20 mg ml(-1) concentration while the ST group received PBS as placebos with the same volume through oral gavage. The mice were infected with ST once only on the first day. After the infection, the mice received 0.3 ml of rhLF with 20 mg ml(-1) (6 mg d(-1)) concentration or PBS, respectively, for 7 days. Mortality and weight were monitored daily. Bacterial enumeration in the blood, liver, and spleen and histopathological analysis of the liver, spleen, kidney and intestine were conducted. The results showed that rhLF decreased the bacterial load in the liver and spleen of mice, reduced the degree of mice hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, and attenuated infectious inflammation with less histopathological abnormalities in the liver, spleen and kidney of mice in the ST infection. This study showed that rhLF with 6 mg per day had antibacterial activity of alleviating the infection caused by ST bacteria, which indicated that rhLF could be used as a supplement in special products.

  3. Salmonella enterica serotype Virchow associated with human infections in Switzerland: 2004-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adank Luzius

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis is one of the most important foodborne diseases and a major threat to public health. Salmonella serotype Virchow ranks among the top five serovars in Europe. Method A total of 153 strains isolated from different patients from 2004 through 2009 in Switzerland were further characterized by (i assessing phenotypic antibiotic resistance profiles using the disk diffusion method and (ii by genotyping using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE after macrorestriction with XbaI in order to evaluate strain relationship. Results The relative frequency of S. Virchow among other Salmonella serovars varied between 4th to 8th rank. The annual incidence ranged from 0.45/100'000 in 2004 to 0.40/100'000 in 2009. A total of 48 strains (32% were resistant to one to 3 antimicrobials, 54 strains (36% displayed resistance patterns to more than three antibiotics. No trend was identifiable over the years 2004 to 2009. We found a high prevalence (62% of nalidixic acid resistant strains, suggesting an equally high rate of decreased fluoroqionolone susceptibility, whereas intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin was negligible. Two strains were extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers. Analysis of PFGE patterns uncovered a predominant cluster (similarity coefficient above 80% consisting of 104 of the 153 strains. Conclusion The worldwide increase of antibiotic resistances in Salmonella is an emerging public health problem. For Switzerland, no clear trend is identifiable over the years 2004 to 2009 for S. Virchow. Antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance profiles varied considerably within this period. Nevertheless, the situation in Switzerland coincided with findings in other European countries. Genotyping results of this strain collection revealed no evidence for an undetected outbreak within this time period.

  4. Prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandijck, Dominique M; Labeau, Sonia O; Vogelaers, Dirk P; Blot, Stijn I

    2010-01-01

    Changes in patient profile, and in the health care environment, altering socioeconomic conditions and advances in science and information technology challenge the nursing profession, in particular intensive care nursing. All these changes will undoubtedly affect the way we will practice in the (near) future. A comprehensive understanding of these factors is therefore essential if nursing is to meet the challenges presented by tomorrow's critical care environment. Precisely because of the often expensive high-tech evolutions that have occurred at a rapid pace and are to be further expected, a continued focus on the basics of nursing, the core role of care, as well as maintaining confidence in the capacity to deliver safe, high-quality, and evidence-based patient care will increasingly be a challenge to critical care nurses. In particular, basic nursing skills and knowledge remain a key prerequisite in the prevention of nosocomial infections, which is a continuing major complication and threat to intensive care unit patients. However, critical care nurses' knowledge about the evidence-based consensus recommendations for infection prevention and control has been found to be rather poor. It has nevertheless been demonstrated that a meticulous implementation of such preventive bundles may result in significantly better patient and process outcomes. Moreover, many preventive strategies are considered to be easy to implement and inexpensive. As such, a first and critical step should be to increase critical care nurses' adherence to the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this article, an up-to-date assessment of evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of nosocomial infections, with special focus on catheter-related bloodstream infections and strategies relevant for nurses working in critical care environments, will be provided. Additionally, we will detail on a number of approaches advocated to translate the internationally

  5. Data-quality issues and alternative variable-screening methods in a questionnaire-based study on subclinical Salmonella enterica infection in Danish pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stege, H.; Christensen, J.; Nielsen, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to determine risk factors for subclinical Salmonella enterica infection in Danish finishing-pig herds. In this paper, the evaluation, combining and initial reduction of variables is presented, along with assessment of the hypothesis in the preliminary statistical testing. The first...... group of herds was selected at random with no former knowledge of S. enterica infection. Both the herd prevalence and the within-herd prevalence among these herds turned out to be low; hence, some additional herds were selected from The Danish Salmonella Control program, based on their high......-limiting precautions and feed and feeding procedures. To establish the prevalence of S. enterica infection within herds at the time of the visit, 50 blood samples from each herd were collected and serologically examined. The reliability of each variable from the questionnaire was assessed and it was decided which...

  6. Multistate outbreak of human Salmonella Typhimurium infections linked to live poultry from agricultural feed stores and mail-order hatcheries, United States 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara C. Anderson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Live poultry-associated salmonellosis is an emerging public health issue in the United States. Public and animal health officials collaborated to investigate one of the largest (356 cases, 39 states of these outbreaks reported to date. A case was defined as illness in a person infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium with illness onset between 1 March and 22 October 2013. The median patient age was seven years (range: <1–87 years; 58% of ill persons were children ≤10 years, 51% were female, 25% were hospitalized; 189 (76% of 250 patients reported live poultry exposure in the week before illness; and 149 (95% of 157 reported purchasing live poultry from agricultural feed stores. Traceback investigations identified 18 live poultry sources, including 16 mail-order hatcheries. Environmental sampling was conducted at two mail-order hatcheries. One (2.5% of 40 duplicate samples collected at one hatchery yielded the outbreak strain. Live poultry are an important source of human salmonellosis, particularly among children, highlighting the need for educational campaigns and comprehensive interventions at the mail-order hatchery and agricultural feed store levels. Prevention and control efforts depend on a One Health approach, involving cooperation between public and animal health officials, industry, health professionals, and consumers.

  7. A multistate epidemic outbreak of Salmonella Goldcoast infection in humans, June 2009 to March 2010: the investigation in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, G; Ciaravino, G; Luzzi, I; Lenglet, A; Ricci, A; Barco, L; Pavan, A; Zaffanella, F; Dionisi, A M

    2013-03-14

    After an urgent inquiry into a suspected international outbreak of Salmonella Goldcoast infection was launched by Hungary in October 2009 a nationwide multidisciplinary investigation was carried out in Italy. The aims were to verify whether the higher than expected number of cases of S. Goldcoast infection that had occurred in Italy in the previous months were linked to the outbreak in Hungary and to determine their origin. Between June 2009 and March 2010, 79 confirmed cases of S. Goldcoast infection were identified. Of these, 17 were part of three different point-source outbreaks probably associated with the consumption of salami. Eating salami was also reported by 20 of the 39 sporadic cases that could be interviewed. Fifteen strains of S. Goldcoast isolated from the cases were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. They shared more than 90% homology with the Hungarian epidemic strain and were also highly similar to S. Goldcoast strains that had been isolated in Italy from pigs and pork-containing food items in 2009 and 2010. Although the origin of the outbreak and the common source linking the Hungarian and the Italian cases could not be definitively identified, our results suggest a possible zoonotic connection of the outbreak cases with the pork production chain.

  8. Sporadic salmonellosis in Lower Saxony, Germany, 2011-2013: raw ground pork consumption is associated with Salmonella Typhimurium infections and foreign travel with Salmonella Enteritidis infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettenbacher-Riefler, S; Ziehm, D; Kreienbrock, L; Campe, A; Pulz, M; Dreesman, J

    2015-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for sporadic salmonellosis, for each notified case four randomly selected population controls matched for age, sex and geographical region were interviewed via self-administered questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression analysis of 285 matched pairs revealed significant associations for raw ground pork consumption [odds ratio (OR) 6·0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·8-20·1], taking antacids (OR 5·8, 95% CI 1·4-24·5), eating meat outside the home (OR 5·7, 95% CI 2·2-14·6) and daily changing or cleaning of dishcloth (OR 2·1, 95% CI 1·2-3·9). Animal contact and ice cream consumption were negatively associated with salmonellosis (OR 0·5, 95% CI 0·2-1 and OR 0·3, 95% CI 0·1-0·6, respectively). S. Typhimurium infections were significantly associated with raw ground pork consumption (OR 16·7, 95% CI 1·4-194·4) and S. Enteritidis infections with having travelled abroad (OR 9·7, 95% CI 2·0-47·3). Raw egg consumption was not a risk factor, substantiating the success of recently implemented national control programmes in the poultry industry. Unexpectedly, hygienic behaviour was more frequently reported by cases, probably because they overestimated their hygiene precautions retrospectively. Although animal contact might enhance human immunocompetence, underreporting of salmonellosis by pet owners could have occurred. Eating raw pork products is the major risk factor for sporadic human S. Typhimurium infections in Lower Saxony.

  9. Does undergraduate teaching of infection prevention and control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Knowledge, skills and desirable clinical practices in infection prevention and control (IPC) should be acquired during undergraduate medical training. Although knowledge and skills are learnt in the formal curriculum, attitudes and practices are assimilated by observation and modelling. We investigated ...

  10. Knowledge and attitudes of infection prevention and control among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: To assess students' knowledge and attitudes regarding infection prevention and control and their sources of information, a self-administered questionnaire was used to look at standard precautions especially hands hygiene. Results: One hundred sixty two students participated in this study of which 31 were ...

  11. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be

  12. Knowledge and attitudes of infection prevention and control among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Methods: To assess students' knowledge and attitudes regarding infection prevention and control and their sources of information, a self-administered questionnaire was used to look at standard precautions especially hands hygiene. Results: One hundred sixty two ... vehicles as food or water. Exposure to infectious.

  13. isoniazid prophylaxis for tuberculosis prevention among hiv infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 77 No. 9 September 2000. ISONIAZID PROPHYLAXIS FOR TUBERCULOSIS PREVENTION AMONG HIV INFECTED POLICE OFFICERS IN DAR ES SALAAM. M. Bakari, MD, MMed, Lecturer and Specialist Physician, A. Moshi, MD, MMed, Specialist Physician, E.A. Aris, MD, MMed, ...

  14. Nurses infection prevention practices in handling injections: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that patient safety in public hospital is still relatively low. The adherence to basic infection prevention procedures/aseptic techniques in handling of injections by health workers is still a concern. The adherence to aseptic techniques in handling injections is significantly ...

  15. The role of surface disinfection in infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, Jürgen; Exner, Martin; French, Gary; Chartier, Yves; Christiansen, Bärbel; Gemein, Stefanie; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heudorf, Ursel; Kramer, Axel; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Oltmanns, Peter; Rotter, Manfred; Sonntag, Hans-Günther

    2013-01-01

    The Rudolf Schuelke Foundation addresses topics related to hygiene, infection prevention and public health. In this context a panel of scientists from various European countries discussed "The Role of Surface Disinfection in Infection Prevention". The most important findings and conclusions of this meeting are summarised in the present consensus paper. Although the relevance of surface disinfection is increasingly being accepted, there are still a number of issues which remain controversial. In particular, the following topics were addressed: Transferral of microbes from surface to patients as a cause of infection, requirements for surface disinfectants, biocidal resistance and toxicity, future challenges. After discussion and review of current scientific literature the authors agreed that contaminated surfaces contribute to the transmission of pathogens and may thus pose an infection hazard. Targeted surface disinfection based on a risk profile is seen as an indispensable constituent in a multibarrier approach of universal infection control precautions. Resistance and cross-resistance depend on the disinfectant agent as well as on the microbial species. Prudent implementation of surface disinfection regimens tested to be effective can prevent or minimize adverse effects. Disinfection must be viewed as a holistic process. There is a need for defining standard principles for cleaning and disinfection, for ensuring compliance with these principles by measures such as written standard operating procedures, adequate training and suitable audit systems. Also, test procedures must be set up in order to demonstrate the efficacy of disinfectants including new application methods such as pre-soaked wipes for surface disinfection.

  16. Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections and other coinfections in HIV-infected patients: May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, José Antonio; Rubio, Rafael; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, Jose Ramón; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu; Gutiérrez, Félix; Lopez Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Losa, Juan Emilio; Miró, José Ma; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez Molina, José; Podzamczer, Daniel; Pulido, Federico; Riera, Melchor; Rivero, Antonio; Sanz Moreno, José; Amador, Concha; Antela, Antonio; Arazo, Piedad; Arrizabalaga, Julio; Bachiller, Pablo; Barros, Carlos; Berenguer, Juan; Caylá, Joan; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Knobel, Hernando; Locutura, Jaime; López Aldeguer, José; Llibre, Josep Ma; Lozano, Fernando; Mallolas, Josep; Malmierca, Eduardo; Miralles, Celia; Miralles, Pilar; Muñoz, Agustín; Ocampo, Agustín; Olalla, Julián; Pérez, Inés; Pérez Elías, Ma Jesús; Pérez Arellano, José Luis; Portilla, Joaquín; Ribera, Esteban; Rodríguez, Francisco; Santín, Miguel; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, Ma Jesús; Torralba, Miguel; Valencia, Eulalia; Von Wichmann, Miguel Angel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the huge advance that antiretroviral therapy represents for the prognosis of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), opportunistic infections (OIs) continue to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. OIs often arise because of severe immunosuppression resulting from poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy, failure of antiretroviral therapy, or unawareness of HIV infection by patients whose first clinical manifestation of AIDS is an OI. The present article updates our previous guidelines on the prevention and treatment of various OIs in HIV-infected patients, namely, infections by parasites, fungi, viruses, mycobacteria, and bacteria, as well as imported infections. The article also addresses immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy trials of biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldor, John M; Guy, Rebecca J; Wilson, David

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this article is to outline key challenges facing the conduct of efficacy trials for biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection. The past 2-3 years have seen tumultuous development in this field. There have been disappointing findings in efficacy trials of vaginal microbicides, vaccines, the diaphragm and suppressive therapy for herpes, but a major breakthrough with the evidence that male circumcision prevents acquisition of infection. Meanwhile, clarity has started to emerge on a number of issues regarding trial conduct, including provision of standard of care, involvement of communities, and preparation for implementing effective interventions. HIV prevention practice must continue to rely on condom promotion and other established strategies while biomedical approaches continue to be assessed and their implementation strategies evolve.

  18. Prevalence of salmonella in captive reptiles from Croatia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukac, Maja; Pedersen, Karl; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis transmitted by pet reptiles is an increasing public health issue worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella strains from captive reptiles in Croatia. From November 2009 to November 2011 a total of 292 skin, pharyngeal, cloacal, and fecal samples...... of Salmonella is considerable in captive reptiles in Croatia, indicating that these animals may harbor serovars not commonly seen in veterinary or human microbiologic practice. This should be addressed in the prevention and diagnostics of human reptile-transmitted infections.......Salmonellosis transmitted by pet reptiles is an increasing public health issue worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella strains from captive reptiles in Croatia. From November 2009 to November 2011 a total of 292 skin, pharyngeal, cloacal, and fecal samples......% of the animals, among them 48.4% lizards, 8.9% snakes, and 3.8% turtles. Representatives of five of the six Salmonella enterica subspecies were identified with the following proportions in the total number of isolates: Salmonella enterica enterica 34.6%, Salmonella enterica houtenae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica...

  19. Surgical attire and the operating room: role in infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salassa, Tiare E; Swiontkowski, Marc F

    2014-09-03

    ➤ Although there is some evidence that scrubs, masks, and head coverings reduce bacterial counts in the operating room, there is no evidence that these measures reduce the prevalence of surgical site infection.➤ The use of gloves and impervious surgical gowns in the operating room reduces the prevalence of surgical site infection.➤ Operating-room ventilation plays an unclear role in the prevention of surgical site infection.➤ Exposure of fluids and surgical instruments to the operating-room environment can lead to contamination. Room traffic increases levels of bacteria in the operating room, although the role of this contamination in surgical site infection is unclear. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  20. Clinical presentation of extraintestinal infections caused by non-typhoid Salmonella serotypes among patients at the University Hospital in Cracow during an 7-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierska, Jolanta; Piatkowska-Jakubas, Beata; Kedzierska, Anna; Biesiada, Grazyna; Brzychczy, Andrzej; Parnicka, Agnieszka; Miekinia, Beata; Kubisz, Aldona; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2008-01-01

    The most characteristic finding in non-typhoid salmonella (NTS) infection is acute food related outbreaks of gastroenteritis, which is usually benign and self-limiting. However, more serious extraintestinal findings, such as bacteraemia and focal infections localized to any organ may appear. The objective of this paper is to describe the most important characteristic of the extraintestinal infections due to NTS serotypes observed in University Hospital, in Cracow between January 2000 and December 2006. To do so, we reviewed the clinical presentations, risk groups, complications and outcomes of in-patients, in which extraintestinal non-typhoid Salmonella serotypes were isolated, applying a clinomicrobiological protocol. Out of 30 patients with either bacteraemias (n = 22) or focal salmonella infections (n = 8), 12 had malignancies, 17 had immune dysfunction state, 9 had gastrointestinal disorders and 8 had chronic heart, pulmonary or kidney disease. Four of these patients (13%) who had hematological malignancies (2), renal transplantation (1) and pulmonary disease (1) died. Regarding the clinical picture, primary bacteraemia and focal infections occurred with similar frequency (33.3% and 26.7%, respectively); the remaining were bacteraemias secondary to gastroenteritis. The incidence rate (mean 0.30/1000 hospital admission/year) increased steadily from 0.19/1000 to 0.32/1000 hospital admission during the study period. From 30 Salmonella isolates from extraintestinal samples collected, only four isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. This finding indicate that multidrug resistance does not represent a serious problem among NTS serotypes collected from the our medical center as monitored over a period of 7 years. Given this presentation, clinicians need to have a high index of suspicion and to consider preemptive therapy, especially in elderly patients who are likely to develop severe immunosuppression following

  1. Impact of antibiotics on the intestinal microbiota and on the treatment of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szych, Jolanta; Wołkowicz, Tomasz; La Ragione, Roberto; Madajczak, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    This review evaluates the current literature based on the impact of antibiotics on the intestinal microbiota and the critical role of intestinal bacteria in controlling infection and subsequent clinical disease caused by STEC and Salmonella, and the transmissibility of these important pathogens.A number of studies have indicated that antibiotic therapy could result in unexpected changes in the clinical picture of disease. This is observed, for example, in the case of infections associated with Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), when antibiotics used in treatment of the disease may increase the risk of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thus fatal outcomes. In the case of such infections, treatment with antibiotics is usually discouraged. The use of antibiotics could cause also undesirable changes in the intestinal microbial flora and prolonged pathogen shedding, which is observed in the case of Salmonella infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy can result in Salmonella remaining in the host's cells (intracellular) and thus resulting in further asymptomatic carriage and a further complication is the development of resistance.

  2. TREATMENT AND VACCINE PREVENTION OF ROTAVIRAL INFECTION AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Kulichenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of the level of healthcare system development rotaviral infection is a serious medical, social and economic problem at all times. Any infant has to undergo rotaviral gastroenteritis. The run of the disease among infants is mostly often aggravated by dehydration and needs intense treatment of exicosis. The standard of treatment is an oral rehydration, which is in most cases contributes to a quicker improvement of the children’s status. In the meantime, according to the metaphor put forward by the who experts «the best solution» to prevent acute rotaviral diarrhea today may become a rotaviral vaccine. Nowadays, in different countries of the world, two vaccines, which showed high efficiency and safety in clinical research, have been registered. Application of these vaccines may contribute to the significant reduction of the acute forms of rotaviral infection among infants, hospitalizations and mortality caused by rotaviral gastroenteritis. This article highlights the principles of treatment and possibility for vaccine prevention of rotaviral infection among children.Key words: rotaviral infection, gastroenteritis, diarrhea, children, rehydration, vaccine prevention, rotaviral vaccine.

  3. [The Infection RIsk Scan in clinical practice: improving infection prevention and antibiotic use through transparency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, I; Kluytmans, J A J W

    2016-01-01

    The increase in Highly Resistant Micro-Organisms (HRMO) in hospitals and nursing homes requires an intensification of infection prevention measures. This paper describes a new, standardised approach to infection prevention and monitoring of antibiotic use. Cross-sectional, observational study. The Infection RIsk Scan (IRIS) measures a number of objectifiable variables in the field of infection prevention, including the dissemination of HRMO, the use of antibiotics and indwelling medical devices, environmental contamination, hand hygiene and personal hygiene of healthcare workers, and various infection control preconditions. The scan converts the measurements into a risk profile and an improvement chart, a graphic presentation that is easy to understand for care professionals, managers and patients. Based on the results, targeted improvements can be made by a department or institution, and a quality cycle can be started in which the scans are repeated. The IRIS has been successfully applied in 5 hospital departments, a rehabilitation clinic and 19 nursing homes. In the hospital departments, 3 IRIS cycles resulted in a significant improvement in hand hygiene compliance (43% to 66%, pnursing home, the IRIS resulted in a previously undetected outbreak of HRMO being discovered. The IRIS method makes it possible to compare departments and institutions and can therefore provide an impetus for standardization of measurements of risks and results in the field of infection prevention, antibiotic use and resistance.

  4. Enteric Salmonella or Campylobacter infections and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Tine; Simonsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Nete Munk

    2011-01-01

    Enteric pathogens have been implicated in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but increased rates of stool testing of patients with unclear gastrointestinal symptoms might cause detection bias. Hence, the objective of this study was to analyse incidence rates of Crohn's disease and...... and ulcerative colitis among patients with Salmonella- or Campylobacter-positive and negative stool tests and to study the incidence of positive and negative stool tests among patients already diagnosed with IBD.......Enteric pathogens have been implicated in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but increased rates of stool testing of patients with unclear gastrointestinal symptoms might cause detection bias. Hence, the objective of this study was to analyse incidence rates of Crohn's disease...

  5. CRISPR typing and subtyping for improved laboratory surveillance of Salmonella infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laëtitia Fabre

    Full Text Available Laboratory surveillance systems for salmonellosis should ideally be based on the rapid serotyping and subtyping of isolates. However, current typing methods are limited in both speed and precision. Using 783 strains and isolates belonging to 130 serotypes, we show here that a new family of DNA repeats named CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats is highly polymorphic in Salmonella. We found that CRISPR polymorphism was strongly correlated with both serotype and multilocus sequence type. Furthermore, spacer microevolution discriminated between subtypes within prevalent serotypes, making it possible to carry out typing and subtyping in a single step. We developed a high-throughput subtyping assay for the most prevalent serotype, Typhimurium. An open web-accessible database was set up, providing a serotype/spacer dictionary and an international tool for strain tracking based on this innovative, powerful typing and subtyping tool.

  6. New ways of preventing HIV infection: thinking simply, simply thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R V

    2006-05-29

    HIV infection is the greatest health crisis in human history. It continues to spread unchecked among the poor in the developing world because we have failed to design simple preventative methods that are available and affordable to those living on under Dollars 2 a day. Five new methods are discussed. (i) A natural microbicide. Intravaginal lime or lemon juice has been used for centuries as a traditional contraceptive. The juice can also kill HIV in the laboratory, but clinical trials are needed to see if vaginal application is acceptable, safe and effective. (ii) Intravaginal oestrogen. Monkeys can be protected from Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection by keratinizing the vagina with topical oestrogen. If women take the oral contraceptive pill vaginally it retains its contraceptive efficacy, and the oestrogen it contains should thicken the vagina and protect against HIV infection. Clinical trials are needed. (iii) Male circumcision. Removal of the inner foreskin removes the main site of HIV entry into the penis, resulting in a sevenfold reduction in susceptibility to infection. The practice needs to be promoted. (iv) Post-coital penile hygiene. Wiping the penis immediately after intercourse with lime or lemon juice or vinegar should kill the virus before it has had a chance to infect. A clinical trial of efficacy is needed. (v) PhotoVoice. Asking schoolchildren in developing countries to photograph their impressions of HIV/AIDS is a powerful way of getting them to discuss the subject openly, and develop their own preventative strategies.

  7. Enteral tube feeding: using good practice to prevent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Hardip

    2017-01-12

    Enteral tube feeding is the delivery of nutritionally complete feed via a tube into the gut. It is used for patients who are unable to meet their nutritional needs orally. Enteral feeding can be given through a variety of different tubes that access the gastrointestinal tract either via the stomach or the small bowel. The contamination of enteral feed can often be overlooked as a source of bacterial infection. Enteral feeds can become contaminated in a variety of different ways. Most often infections result in extended lengths of stay in hospital and patients also need additional therapies and treatments in order to resolve these infections. Healthcare-associated infections not only affect the patients who acquire them but also have an impact on the staff involved in their care. Each acute trust will have its own local policies and guidelines regarding enteral feeding and infection control and prevention. These local documents will be based on national initiatives and guidelines. It is important for nurses to refer to their local policies and guidelines before they start a patient on enteral feeding to ensure that they are doing so in the safest manner possible. Nurses' practice is key to preventing bacterial contamination in such patients.

  8. Optimal diagnosis, prevention, and management of periprosthetic joint infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tafer N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nathalie Tafer,1 Wilson Belaieff,1 Céline Cuérel,1 Matthieu Zingg,1 Pierre Hoffmeyer,1 Ilker Uçkay1,2 1Orthopedic Surgery Department, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Geneva Hospitals and Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland Abstract: The pace of the aging population is steadily rising worldwide with a parallel increase in the demand for joint replacement procedures. With the increasing number of patients undergoing arthroplasty, there is also an increased risk for arthroplasty infection that may lead to severe complications, poorer outcome, and substantial extra costs for health care systems. Current rates of prosthetic joint infection are not dramatically different from the 1960s or 1970s, but some general principles are now better defined, and their management has been studied extensively during the past decades, thus resulting in a change in clinical practice. The purpose of this review is to summarize important principles of prosthetic joint infection to guide the clinician and to contribute to the optimal diagnosis, prevention, and management of periprosthetic joint infections. Keywords: arthroplasty infection, antibiotic therapy, biofilm, surgery, prevention

  9. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION: MODERN VIEW ON THE ISSUE AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.К. Tatochenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococci are spread everywhere and they are very often a component of the microflora of the upper respiratory tracts. The level of the pneumococcus carriage is correlated with age. Among children the highest frequency is observed at the age of 4,5 years (up to 90% of cases, among adults it is 5–10%. According to international and Russian data, pneumococcal infection causes up to 76% of all the aetiologically deciphered cases of community cacquired pneumonia among adults and up to 94% (aggravated cases among children. The most frequent clinical forms of pneumococcal infection among children are acute otitis media (over 30%, pneumonia and meningitis (about 5–20% of all purulent bacterial meningitis, among adults — meningitis and sepsis. In 1998, in Russia was registered the first and still the only vaccine for the prevention of pneumococcal infection — Pneumo 23 (Sanofi Pasteur. The vaccine consists of 23 antic gens of the most dangerous pneumococcus serotypes and is used for the prevention of all the forms of pneumococcal infection. The composition of Pneumo 23 corresponds to 85% of pneumococcus serotypes circulating across Europe and to 90% serotypes resistant to penicillin. According to Russian data Pneumo 23 consists of about 80% of pneumococcus serotypes isolated in healthy carriers and ill with acute respiratory diseases and of 92% of serotypes in those suffering from acute bronchitis and pneumonia. The results of the clinical studies allow us to recommend the use of the given vaccine in a complex therapy of children, suffering from latent TB infection, often recurrent episodes of bronchopulmonary pathologies, ENT diseases, bronchial asthma and other chronic diseases.Key words: therapy, pediatrics, pneumonia, bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive lungs disease, prevention, treatment, pneumococcal infection.

  10. Added value of a household-level study during an outbreak investigation of Salmonella serotype Saintpaul infections, New Mexico 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, A L; Jungk, J; Russo, E T; Redd, J T; Angulo, F J; Williams, I T; Cheek, J E; Gould, L H

    2013-10-01

    In 2008, nationwide investigations of a Salmonella serotype Saintpaul outbreak led first to consumer warnings for Roma and red round tomatoes, then later for jalapeño and serrano peppers. In New Mexico, where there were a large number of cases but no restaurant-based clusters, the NM Department of Health and the Indian Health Service participated with CDC in individual-level and household-level case-control studies of infections in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation. No food item was associated in the individual-level study. In the household-level study, households with an ill member were more likely to have had jalapeño peppers present during the exposure period and to have reported ever having serrano peppers in the household. This report illustrates the complexity of this investigation, the limitations of traditional individual-level case-control studies when vehicles of infection are ingredients or commonly eaten with other foods, and the added value of a household-level study.

  11. [Joint infection caused by radiogenic defect: prevention and therapeutic options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, H H; Lehnhardt, M; Langer, S; Drücke, D; Steinau, H U

    2002-01-01

    Exposed irradiated joints are characterized by bone and cartilage necrosis with a chronically infected joint space. The indication for treatment results from possible infection spreading and more often because of severe pain. The usual concept of sequential debridement, joint replacement and regional flap coverage, is often impossible due to the radiodermitis and bone necrosis in the neighbourhood of the joint. Even free flaps are associated with a higher failure rate, because of the irradiation of the recipient vessels long vein grafts are often needed. If regional flap coverage is desired, distant flaps with long, not irradiated pedicles must be chosen. Prevention due to special considerations during the first surgery is essential.

  12. Preventing infection from foodborne pathogens in liver transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabelof, D C

    1994-10-01

    Patients who have had an orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) experience impaired immune function resulting from the disease process and the therapeutic use of immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs. Immunoimpairment increases the risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This article describes the organisms known to cause clinically important infections and their food sources, the distinctive clinical consequences of the infection in patients who have had an OLT, and methods of preventing foodborne illness in these patients and others. Dietitians are the health care providers typically responsible for teaching OLT patients and their caregivers about safe food handling and appropriate food choices.

  13. Efficacy of bacterin-, outer membrane protein- and fimbriae extract-based vaccines for the control of Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia C. Menão

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of three vaccines was evaluated in chickens for the control of experimental infection with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE phage type 4. The vaccines were produced with bacterin, outer membrane proteins (OMP and fimbriae crude extract (FE. The chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly with two doses of each vaccine at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The chickens were then orally challenged with 10(9 CFU/chicken Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 at 18 weeks of age. Fecal swabs were performed for the recovery of shedding SE, and SE was recovered from the liver and spleen. Additionally, antibody titers were measured in the serum by micro-agglutination test. The results indicated that the vaccine produced with bacterin yielded better results and resulted in reduction of fecal shedding and organ invasion by SE after oral challenge, although no vaccine was 100% effective for the control of SE experimental infection.

  14. A national outbreak of Salmonella serotype Tennessee infections from contaminated peanut butter: a new food vehicle for salmonellosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Anandi N; Hoekstra, Mike; Patel, Nehal; Ewald, Gwen; Lord, Cathy; Clarke, Carmen; Villamil, Elizabeth; Niksich, Katherine; Bopp, Cheryl; Nguyen, Thai-An; Zink, Donald; Lynch, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella serotype Tennessee is a rare cause of the estimated 1 million cases of salmonellosis occurring annually in the United States. In January 2007, we began investigating a nationwide increase in Salmonella Tennessee infections. We defined a case as Salmonella Tennessee infection in a patient whose isolate demonstrated 1 of 3 closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and whose illness began during the period 1 August 2006 through 31 July 2007. We conducted a case-control study in 22 states and performed laboratory testing of foods and environmental samples. We identified 715 cases in 48 states; 37% of isolates were from urine specimens. Illness was associated with consuming peanut butter more than once a week (matched odds ratio [mOR], 3.5 [95% confidence interval {95% CI}, 1.4-9.9]), consuming Brand X peanut butter (mOR, 12.1 [95% CI, 3.6-66.3]), and consuming Brand Y peanut butter (mOR, 9.1 [95% CI, 1.0-433]). Brands X and Y were produced in 1 plant, which ceased production and recalled products on 14 February 2007. Laboratories isolated outbreak strains of Salmonella Tennessee from 34 Brands X and Y peanut butter jars and 2 plant environmental samples. This large, widespread outbreak of salmonellosis is the first linked to peanut butter in the United States; a nationwide recall resulted in outbreak control. Environmental contamination in the peanut butter plant likely caused this outbreak. This outbreak highlights the risk of salmonellosis from heat-processed foods of nonanimal origin previously felt to be low risk for Salmonella contamination.

  15. Prevention and treatment of surgical site infection in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI are the third most frequently reported nosocomial infection, and the most common on surgical wards. HIV-infected patients may increase the possibility of developing SSI after surgery. There are few reported date on incidence and the preventive measures of SSI in HIV-infected patients. This study was to determine the incidence and the associated risk factors for SSI in HIV-infected patients. And we also explored the preventive measures. Methods A retrospective study of SSI was conducted in 242 HIV-infected patients including 17 patients who combined with hemophilia from October 2008 to September 2011 in Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL. Results The SSI incidence rate was 47.5% (115 of 242; 38.4% incisional SSIs, 5.4% deep incisional SSIs and 3.7% organ/space SSIs. The SSI incidence rate was 37.9% in HIV-infected patients undergoing abdominal operation. Patients undergoing abdominal surgery with lower preoperative CD4 counts were more likely to develop SSIs. The incidence increased from 2.6% in clean wounds to 100% in dirty wounds. In the HIV-infected patients combined with hemophilia, the mean preoperative albumin and postoperative hemoglobin were found significantly lower than those in no-SSIs group (P Conclusions SSI is frequent in HIV-infected patients. And suitable perioperative management may decrease the SSIs incidence rate of HIV-infected patients.

  16. Clinical and microbiological features of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella associated with HIV-infected patients, Gauteng Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddy, Karen H; Musekiwa, Alfred; Sooka, Arvinda; Karstaedt, Alan; Nana, Trusha; Seetharam, Sharona; Nchabaleng, Maphoshane; Lekalakala, Ruth; Angulo, Frederick J; Klugman, Keith P

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to define factors associated with HIV-infected versus uninfected patients with invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) and factors associated with mortality, which are inadequately described in Africa.Laboratory-based surveillance for iNTS was undertaken. At selected sentinel sites, clinical data (age, sex, HIV status, severity of illness, and outcome) were collected.Surveillance was conducted in Gauteng, South Africa, from 2003 to 2013. Clinical and microbiological differences between HIV-infected and uninfected patients were defined and risk factors for mortality established.Of 4886 iNTS infections in Gauteng from 2003 to 2013, 3106 (63.5%) were diagnosed at sentinel sites. Among persons with iNTS infections, more HIV-infected persons were aged ≥5 years (χ = 417.6; P < 0.001) and more HIV-infected children were malnourished (χ = 5.8; P = 0.02). Although 760 (30.6%) patients died, mortality decreased between 2003 [97/263 (36.9%)] and 2013 [926/120 (21.7%)]. On univariate analysis, mortality was associated with patients aged 25 to 49 years [odds ratio (OR) = 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.7-2.7; P < 0.001 and ≥50 years (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 2.2-4.1; P < 0.001) compared with children < 5 years, HIV-infected patients (OR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.7-3.4; P < 0.001), and severe illness (OR = 5.4; 95% CI = 3.6-8.1; P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, mortality was associated with patients aged ≥50 years [adjusted OR (AOR) = 3.6, 95% CI = 2.1-6.1, P < 0.001] and severe illness (AOR = 6.3; 95% CI = 3.8-10.5; P < 0.001).Mortality due to iNTS in Gauteng remains high primarily due to disease severity. Interventions must be aimed at predisposing conditions, including HIV, other immune-suppressive conditions, and malignancy.

  17. Notes from the field: Infections with Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- linked to exposure to feeder rodents - United States, August 2011-February 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    CDC is collaborating with 22 state health departments in an ongoing investigation of an outbreak of human Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- infections associated with exposure to rodents sold as food for pet reptiles and amphibians (i.e., feeder rodents). This outbreak strain also was implicated in a 2009 outbreak in the United Kingdom and a 2010 outbreak in the United States, both linked to frozen feeder rodents from a single U.S. supplier, resulting in recalls.

  18. The serologic response to Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium in experimentally infected chickens, followed by an indirect lipopolysaccharide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and bacteriologic examinations through a one-year period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, M.N.; Feld, Niels Christian; Carstensen, B.

    2002-01-01

    uninfected as controls. The groups were monitored bacteriologically by examination of cloacal swabs and organs and serologically by examination of serum and egg yolk by a lipopolysaccharide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay throughout the period. Within the first week, 100% of birds in both infected groups...... at the onset of egg production. For both S. typhimurium and S. enteritidis, positive bacteriologic cultures were obtained by sampling from internal organs at the end of the experiment, more than 1 yr from the time of infection. At the age of 6-7 wk, 50% of the chickens in the two infected groups showed...... a measurable serologic response in serum samples. The response persisted throughout the study in both serum and egg yell, samples. The inclusion of serologic methods is a valuable additional tool in the detection of salmonella in poultry, but serology should be used in conjunction with bacteriologic methods...

  19. Prevention of healthcare associated infections: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, R; Castaldi, S; Marzullo, A; Ronchi, S; Laquintana, D; Lusignani, M

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to verify whether there are, and to which degree, knowledge and adherence to guidelines on the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections by nursing staff. Study design. A descriptive study was conducted on a sample of nurses in the areas of medicine, surgery, and its own specialties of the Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico in Milan from 1st December 2015 to 29th February 2016. The knowledge of the nursing staff have been investigated through the use of questionnaires with anonymous self-reporting method; inspections in the wards using observational grids were carried out in order to verify adherence to best-practice principles. The data collected concern, both for the knowledge and for the practice, the following macro-areas: a) Cleaning, disinfection and sterilization, b) Hand hygiene, c) Standard and isolation precautions, d) Prevention of catheter-related urinary tract infections, e) Prevention of catheter-related bacteremia, f) Prevention of surgical site infections, g) Prevention of respiratory tract infections. Statistical analyzes were performed using Microsoft Office Excel and STATA software. 245 nurses from 16 wards were involved. In each wards 4 inspections were conducted. 128 completed questionnaires were returned, all considered for the analysis of data; the adhesion was 52.2%. The participants achieved an overall score of 15.0 ± 4.1 (mean ± SD) on a maximum achievable score of 23 and >75% of them have reached a sufficient level. Among the most positive results, it must be underlined that nurses have demonstrated a higher level of knowledge for hand hygiene, with >81% correct answers; that the lumens of central venous catheters, when not in use, were kept covered with a protective cap in more than 99% of cases; that, for patients bearers of urinary catheter, the urinary drainage bag was maintained below the level of the bladder, as recommended, in more than 91

  20. Apyrase: A Portable Treatment to Prevent Burn Progression and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    surgical treatment are reduction of local inflammation, prevention of wound progression, and inhibition of bacterial infection. However, at this time...there are no effect treatments to reduce wound progression and the emergence of resistant bacteria has threated the efficacy of antibiotic therapy...of apyrase and act as a step towards translation of this treatment into burn wound therapy. Ultimately the goal is to improve recovery time, reduce

  1. Transient Loss of Protection Afforded by a Live Attenuated Non-typhoidal Salmonella Vaccine in Mice Co-infected with Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P Mooney

    Full Text Available In immunocompetent individuals, non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars (NTS are associated with gastroenteritis, however, there is currently an epidemic of NTS bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Plasmodium falciparum malaria is an important risk factor for invasive NTS bloodstream in African children. Here we investigated whether a live, attenuated Salmonella vaccine could be protective in mice, in the setting of concurrent malaria. Surprisingly, mice acutely infected with the nonlethal malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL exhibited a profound loss of protective immunity to NTS, but vaccine-mediated protection was restored after resolution of malaria. Absence of protective immunity during acute malaria correlated with maintenance of antibodies to NTS, but a marked reduction in effector capability of Salmonella-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Further, increased expression of the inhibitory molecule PD1 was identified on memory CD4 T cells induced by vaccination. Blockade of IL-10 restored protection against S. Typhimurium, without restoring CD4 T cell effector function. Simultaneous blockade of CTLA-4, LAG3, and PDL1 restored IFN-γ production by vaccine-induced memory