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  1. Hepatitis B virus induces IL-23 production in antigen presenting cells and causes liver damage via the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

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    Qinghong Wang

    Full Text Available IL-23 regulates myriad processes in the innate and adaptive immune systems, and is a critical mediator of the proinflammatory effects exerted by Th17 cells in many diseases. In this study, we investigated whether and how hepatitis B virus (HBV causes liver damage directly through the IL-23 signaling pathway. In biopsied liver tissues from HBV-infected patients, expression of both IL-23 and IL-23R was remarkably elevated. In vivo observations also indicated that the main sources of IL-23 were myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and macrophages. Analysis of in vitro differentiated immature DCs and macrophages isolated from healthy donors revealed that the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg efficiently induces IL-23 secretion in a mannose receptor (MR-dependent manner. Culture with an endosomal acidification inhibitor and the dynamin inhibitor showed that, upon binding to the MR, the HBsAg is taken up by mDCs and macrophages through an endocytosis mechanism. In contrast, although the HBV core antigen (HBcAg can also stimulate IL-23 secretion from mDCs, the process was MR- and endocytosis-independent. In addition, IL-23 was shown to be indispensible for HBsAg-stimulated differentiation of naïve CD4(+ T cells into Th17 cells, which were determined to be the primary source of IL-17 in HBV-infected livers. The cognate receptor, IL-17R, was found to exist on the hepatic stellate cells and mDCs, both of which might represent the potential target cells of IL-17 in hepatitis B disease. These data provide novel insights into a yet unrecognized mechanism of HBV-induced hepatitis, by which increases in IL-23 expression, through an MR/endocytosis-dependent or -independent manner, produce liver damage through the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

  2. IL-23R+ innate lymphoid cells induce colitis via interleukin-22-dependent mechanism

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    Eken, A; Singh, AK; Treuting, PM; Oukka, M

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphisms of interleukin (IL)-23R and signaling components are associated with several autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Similar to T helper type 17 (Th17) lineage, type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) express retinoic acid–related orphan receptor γt (Rorγt) and IL-23R and hence, produce Th17-type cytokines. Recent reports implicated type 3 ILCs in IBD; however, how IL-23R signaling in these cells contributes to pathogenesis is unknown. IL-22, produced in copious amounts by type 3 ILCs, was reported to have both beneficial and pathogenic effects in adaptive, yet only a protective role in innate colitis models. Herein, by employing chronic CD45RBhigh CD4+ T-cell transfer and anti-CD40 antibody-induced acute innate colitis models in Rag1−/− mice, wedemonstrated opposite roles for IL-23R in colitogenesis: in the former a protective, and in the latter a pathogenic role. Furthermore, we show that IL-23R signaling promotes innate colitis via IL-22 as neutralization of IL-22 protected mice from colitis and adding back of IL-22 to IL-23R-deficient animals restored the disease. Collectively, our results reveal that similar to its controversial role during chronic or adaptive colitis, IL-22 may also have opposite roles in innate colitis pathogenesis in a context and insult-dependent manner. PMID:23715173

  3. IL-23 induces atopic dermatitis-like inflammation instead of psoriasis-like inflammation in CCR2-deficient mice.

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    Shannon K Bromley

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disease, characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and infiltration of leukocytes into the dermis and epidermis. IL-23 is expressed in psoriatic skin, and IL-23 injected into the skin of mice produces IL-22-dependent dermal inflammation and acanthosis. The chemokine receptor CCR2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis. CCR2-positive cells and the CCR2 ligand, CCL2 are abundant in psoriatic lesions. To examine the requirement of CCR2 in the development of IL-23-induced cutaneous inflammation, we injected the ears of wild-type (WT and CCR2-deficient (CCR2(-/- mice with IL-23. CCR2(-/- mice had increased ear swelling and epidermal thickening, which was correlated with increased cutaneous IL-4 levels and increased numbers of eosinophils within the skin. In addition, TSLP, a cytokine known to promote and amplify T helper cell type 2 (Th2 immune responses, was also increased within the inflamed skin of CCR2(-/- mice. Our data suggest that increased levels of TSLP in CCR2(-/- mice may contribute to the propensity of these mice to develop increased Th2-type immune responses.

  4. Th17-Inducing Cytokines IL-6 and IL-23 Are Crucial for Granuloma Formation during Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis

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    Fabrine Sales Massafera Tristão

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a chronic granulomatous disease caused by the thermally dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii, has the highest mortality rate among systemic mycosis. The T helper 1-mediated immunity is primarily responsible for acquired resistance during P. brasiliensis infection, while susceptibility is associated with Th2 occurrence. Th17 is a population of T CD4+ cells that, among several chemokines and cytokines, produces IL-17A and requires the presence of IL-1, IL-6, and TGF-β for differentiation in mice and IL-23 for its maintenance. Th17 has been described as an arm of the immune system that enhances host protection against several bacterial and fungal infections, as Pneumocystis carinii and Candida albicans. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the Th17 immune response and the role of Th17-associated cytokines (IL-6, IL-23, and IL-17A during experimental PCM. First, we observed that P. brasiliensis infection [virulent yeast strain 18 of P. brasiliensis (Pb18] increased the IL-17A production in vitro and all the evaluated Th17-associated cytokines in the lung tissue from C57BL/6 wild-type mice. In addition, the deficiency of IL-6, IL-23, or IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA impaired the compact granuloma formation and conferred susceptibility during infection, associated with reduced tumor necrosis factor-α, IFN-γ, and inducible nitric oxide synthase enzyme expression. Our data suggest that IL-6 production by bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs is important to promote the Th17 differentiation during Pb18 infection. In accordance, the adoptive transfer of BMDMs from C57BL/6 to infected IL-6−/− or IL-17RA−/− mice reduced the fungal burden in the lungs compared to nontransferred mice and reestablished the pulmonary granuloma formation. Taken together, these results suggest that Th17-associated cytokines are involved in the modulation of immune response and granuloma formation during

  5. Loss of the lupus autoantigen Ro52/Trim21 induces tissue inflammation and systemic autoimmunity by disregulating the IL-23-Th17 pathway.

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    Espinosa, Alexander; Dardalhon, Valerie; Brauner, Susanna; Ambrosi, Aurelie; Higgs, Rowan; Quintana, Fransisco J; Sjöstrand, Maria; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Ní Gabhann, Joan; Winqvist, Ola; Sundelin, Birgitta; Jefferies, Caroline A; Rozell, Björn; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2009-08-03

    Ro52/Trim21 is targeted as an autoantigen in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Polymorphisms in the Ro52 gene have been linked to these autoimmune conditions, but the molecular mechanism by which Ro52 may promote development of systemic autoimmune diseases has not been explored. To address this issue, we generated Ro52-null mice (Ro52(-/-)), which appear phenotypically normal if left unmanipulated. However, Ro52(-/-) mice develop severe dermatitis extending from the site of tissue injury induced by ear tags. The affected mice further develop several signs of systemic lupus with hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies to DNA, proteinuria, and kidney pathology. Ro52, which was recently identified as an E3 ligase, mediates ubiquitination of several members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, and the Ro52-deficient mice have an enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines that are regulated by the IRF transcription factors, including cytokines involved in the Th17 pathway (interleukin [IL] 6, IL-12/IL-23p40, and IL-17). Loss of IL-23/IL-17 by genetic deletion of IL-23/p19 in the Ro52(-/-) mice conferred protection from skin disease and systemic autoimmunity. These data reveal that the lupus-associated Ro52 protein is an important negative regulator of proinflammatory cytokine production, and they provide a mechanism by which a defective Ro52 function can lead to tissue inflammation and systemic autoimmunity through the IL-23-Th17 pathway.

  6. Live AttenuatedLeishmania donovaniCentrin Gene-Deleted Parasites Induce IL-23-Dependent IL-17-Protective Immune Response against Visceral Leishmaniasis in a Murine Model.

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    Banerjee, Antara; Bhattacharya, Parna; Dagur, Pradeep K; Karmakar, Subir; Ismail, Nevien; Joshi, Amritanshu B; Akue, Adovi D; KuKuruga, Mark; McCoy, John Philip; Dey, Ranadhir; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2018-01-01

    No vaccine exists against visceral leishmaniasis. To develop effective vaccines, we have previously reported protective role of live attenuated centrin gene-deleted Leishmania donovani ( LdCen -/- ) parasites through induction of Th1 type immune response in mice, hamsters, and dogs. In this study, we specifically explored the role of Th17 cells in LdCen -/- -induced host protection in mice. Our results showed that compared with wild-type L. donovani infection, LdCen -/- parasites induce significantly higher expression of Th17 differentiation cytokines in splenic dendritic cells. There was also induction of IL-17 and its promoting cytokines in total splenocytes and in both CD4 and CD8 T cells following immunization with LdCen -/- Upon challenge with wild-type parasites, IL-17 and its differentiating cytokines were significantly higher in LdCen -/- -immunized mice compared with nonimmunized mice that resulted in parasite control. Alongside IL-17 induction, we observed induction of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells as reported earlier. However, Th17 cells are generated before Th1 cells. Neutralization of either IL-17 or IFN-γ abrogated LdCen -/- -induced host protection further confirming the essential role of Th17 along with Th1 cytokines in host protection. Treatment with recombinant IL-23, which is required for stabilization and maintenance of IL-17, heightened Th17, and Tc17 responses in immunized mice splenocytes. In contrast, Th17 response was absent in immunized IL-23R -/- mice that failed to induce protection upon virulent Leishmania challenge suggesting that IL-23 plays an essential role in IL-17-mediated protection by LdCen -/- parasites. This study unveiled the role of IL-23-dependent IL-17 induction in LdCen -/- parasite-induced immunity and subsequent protection against visceral leishmaniasis.

  7. Effect of turmeric on colon histology, body weight, ulcer, IL-23, MPO and glutathione in acetic-acid-induced inflammatory bowel disease in rats.

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    Bastaki, Salim M A; Al Ahmed, Mohammed Majed; Al Zaabi, Ahmed; Amir, Naheed; Adeghate, Ernest

    2016-02-23

    This study investigates the protective effects of turmeric (Curcuma longa, CL) on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was induced in male Wistar rats by intra-rectal administration of 1 ml of 4% acetic acid at 8 cm proximal to the anus for 30 s. Curcuma longa (CL) powder, (1, 10, or 100 mg/kg/day) was administered for either 3 days before or after IBD for 7 days. The body weight, macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the colon of CL-treated IBD rats and that of control rats (no IBD, no CL) were performed on 0 day, 2, 4 and 7th day. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), IL-23 and glutathione levels in control, untreated and treated rats were measured by ELISA. CL significantly (P weight and mean macroscopic ulcer score. Administration of CL also significantly (P weight gain, mean macroscopic and microscopic ulcer scores in the colon of rats suffering from acetic acid-induced IBD. CL reduced both MPO and IL-23 in the mucosa of the colon. The increase in the mean serum glutathione level may help in the reduction of oxidative stress associated with IBD.

  8. Interleukin (IL)-23 mediates Toxoplasma gondii-induced immunopathology in the gut via matrixmetalloproteinase-2 and IL-22 but independent of IL-17

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    Muñoz, Melba; Heimesaat, Markus M; Danker, Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    Peroral infection with Toxoplasma gondii leads to the development of small intestinal inflammation dependent on Th1 cytokines. The role of Th17 cells in ileitis is unknown. We report interleukin (IL)-23-mediated gelatinase A (matrixmetalloproteinase [MMP]-2) up-regulation in the ileum of infected...

  9. The role of IL 23 in the treatment of psoriasis.

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    Puig, Lluís

    2017-06-01

    The IL-23/IL-17 axis is currently considered to be crucial in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Human IL-23 is primarily produced by antigen-presenting cells and induces and maintains differentiation of Th17 cells and Th22 cells, a primary cellular source of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 and IL-22, which mediate the epidermal hyperplasia, keratinocyte immune activation and tissue inflammation inherent in psoriasis. Agents that target the p40 subunit common to both IL-12 and IL-23 have shown robust clinical activity, but selectivity for IL-23p19 could offer advantages in efficacy and safety with respect to anti-p40 blockade. Areas covered: Relevant references regarding the role of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway in the pathogenesis of psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis and clinical trials with IL-23p40 and IL-23p19 blocking agents were obtained through a literature search in MEDLINE/Pubmed for articles published until November 2016. Moreover, ongoing registered clinical trials (RCTs) of moderate-to-severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis were searched through clinicaltrials.gov website, and a manual search was made for pertinent communications at the 2016 American Academy of Dermatology and European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology meetings. Expert commentary: There are potential advantages in selective blockade of the IL23-specific p19 subunit with respect to distal blockade of IL-17A or its receptor. Acting upstream in the IL-23/IL-17 cytokine pathway is likely to reduce the expression of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines acting on keratinocytes -including IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-22-, in addition to IL-17A. On the other hand, safety data thus far suggest that these drugs might be devoid of some adverse effects of IL-17A blockade that seem to be class related, such as mucocutaneous Candida infections or triggering or worsening of inflammatory bowel disease. Specific IL-23p19 blockade with high-affinity monoclonal antibodies seems to be able to induce long

  10. Role of interleukin-23 (IL-23) receptor signaling for IL-17 responses in human Lyme disease.

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    Oosting, Marije; ter Hofstede, Hadewych; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Sturm, Patrick; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; van der Meer, Jos W M; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2011-11-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is known to play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of T helper 17 cells. It has been previously demonstrated that IL-17 is involved in experimental Lyme arthritis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria. However, the precise role of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) for the B. burgdorferi-induced IL-17 responses or human Lyme disease has not yet been elucidated. IL-23R single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11209026 was genotyped using the TaqMan assay. Functional studies were performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and cytokines were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Dose-dependent production of IL-23 and IL-17 by B. burgdorferi could be observed. Interestingly, when IL-23 bioactivity was inhibited by a specific antibody against IL-23p19, IL-17 production was significantly downregulated. In contrast, production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was not affected after the blockade of IL-23 activity. Moreover, individuals bearing a single nucleotide polymorphism in the IL-23R gene (Arg381Gln) produced significantly less IL-17 after B. burgdorferi stimulation compared with that of the individuals bearing the wild type. Despite lower IL-17 production, the IL-23R gene polymorphism did not influence the development of chronic Lyme disease in a cohort of patients with Lyme disease. This study demonstrates that IL-23R signaling is needed for B. burgdorferi-induced IL-17 production in vitro and that an IL-23R gene SNP leads to impaired IL-17 production. However, the IL-23R gene polymorphism is not crucial for the pathogenesis of chronic Lyme.

  11. IL-23 Limits the Production of IL-2 and Promotes Autoimmunity in Lupus.

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    Dai, Hong; He, Fan; Tsokos, George C; Kyttaris, Vasileios C

    2017-08-01

    The IL-23/IL-17 pathway is important in multiple autoimmune diseases, but its effect on lupus pathology remains unclear, with opposing trials in murine models of the disease. In this study, we show a disease activity-related upregulation of serum IL-23 and IL-23 receptor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as compared with healthy controls. When added in SLE T cell in vitro cultures, IL-23 induced IL-17 and limited IL-2 production, whereas T follicular helper and double negative (DN) T cells significantly expanded. To further dissect the role of IL-23 in the expression of autoimmunity and related pathology, we generated IL-23 receptor-deficient MRL.lpr mice. These IL-23R-/-MRL.lpr mice displayed attenuated lupus nephritis with a striking decrease in the accumulation of DN T cells in the kidneys and secondary lymphoid organs. Moreover, T cells from IL-23R-/-MRL.lpr mice produced increased amounts of IL-2 and reduced amounts of IL-17 compared with T cells from wild type animals. In vitro IL-23 treatment promoted IL-17 production and downregulated IL-2 production. The IL-23R-/-MRL.lpr had fewer T follicular helper cells, B cells, and plasma cells, leading to decreased production of anti-dsDNA Abs. Our results show that IL-23 accounts for the main aspects of human and murine lupus including the expansion of DN T cells, decreased IL-2, and increased IL-17 production. We propose that blockade of IL-23 should have a therapeutic value in patients with SLE. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on IL-17/IL-23 axis, IFN-γ and IL-4 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus induced mice model

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    Fatemeh Faraji

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our findings showed that vitamin D3 supplementation in lupus induced mice through modulating the expression rate of some inflammatory cytokines diminished the inflammatory conditions in SLE.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis multi-drug-resistant strain M induces IL-17(+) IFNγ(-) CD4(+) T cell expansion through an IL-23 and TGF-β-dependent mechanism in patients with MDR-TB tuberculosis.

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    Basile, J I; Kviatcovsky, D; Romero, M M; Balboa, L; Monteserin, J; Ritacco, V; Lopez, B; Sabio y García, C; García, A; Vescovo, M; Montaner, P G; Palmero, D; Del Carmen Sasiain, M; de la Barrera, S

    2017-01-01

    We have reported previously that T cells from patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) express high levels of interleukin (IL)-17 in response to the MDR strain M (Haarlem family) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Herein, we explore the pathways involved in the induction of Th17 cells in MDR-TB patients and healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative healthy donors (PPD(+) HD)] by the M strain and the laboratory strain H37Rv. Our results show that IL-1β and IL-6 are crucial for the H37Rv and M-induced expansion of IL-17(+) interferon (IFN)-γ(-) and IL-17(+) IFN-γ(+) in CD4(+) T cells from MDR-TB and PPD(+) HD. IL-23 plays an ambiguous role in T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 profiles: alone, IL-23 is responsible for M. tuberculosis-induced IL-17 and IFN-γ expression in CD4(+) T cells from PPD(+) HD whereas, together with transforming growth factor (TGF-β), it promotes IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) expansion in MDR-TB. In fact, spontaneous and M. tuberculosis-induced TGF-β secretion is increased in cells from MDR-TB, the M strain being the highest inducer. Interestingly, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 signalling mediates the expansion of IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) cells and the enhancement of latency-associated protein (LAP) expression in CD14(+) and CD4(+) T cells from MDR-TB, which suggests that the M strain promotes IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) T cells through a strong TLR-2-dependent TGF-β production by antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T cells. Finally, CD4(+) T cells from MDR-TB patients infected with MDR Haarlem strains show higher IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) and lower IL-17(+) IFN-γ(+) levels than LAM-infected patients. The present findings deepen our understanding of the role of IL-17 in MDR-TB and highlight the influence of the genetic background of the infecting M. tuberculosis strain on the ex-vivo Th17 response. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Role of Interleukin-23 (IL-23) Receptor Signaling for IL-17 Responses in Human Lyme Disease ▿

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    Oosting, Marije; ter Hofstede, Hadewych; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Sturm, Patrick; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is known to play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of T helper 17 cells. It has been previously demonstrated that IL-17 is involved in experimental Lyme arthritis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria. However, the precise role of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) for the B. burgdorferi-induced IL-17 responses or human Lyme disease has not yet been elucidated. IL-23R single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11209026 was genotyped using the TaqMan assay. Functional studies were performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and cytokines were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Dose-dependent production of IL-23 and IL-17 by B. burgdorferi could be observed. Interestingly, when IL-23 bioactivity was inhibited by a specific antibody against IL-23p19, IL-17 production was significantly downregulated. In contrast, production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was not affected after the blockade of IL-23 activity. Moreover, individuals bearing a single nucleotide polymorphism in the IL-23R gene (Arg381Gln) produced significantly less IL-17 after B. burgdorferi stimulation compared with that of the individuals bearing the wild type. Despite lower IL-17 production, the IL-23R gene polymorphism did not influence the development of chronic Lyme disease in a cohort of patients with Lyme disease. This study demonstrates that IL-23R signaling is needed for B. burgdorferi-induced IL-17 production in vitro and that an IL-23R gene SNP leads to impaired IL-17 production. However, the IL-23R gene polymorphism is not crucial for the pathogenesis of chronic Lyme. PMID:21896776

  15. IL-23 activates innate lymphoid cells to promote neonatal intestinal pathology.

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    Chen, Lili; He, Zhengxiang; Slinger, Erik; Bongers, Gerold; Lapenda, Taciana L S; Pacer, Michelle E; Jiao, Jingjing; Beltrao, Monique F; Soto, Alan J; Harpaz, Noam; Gordon, Ronald E; Ochando, Jordi C; Oukka, Mohamed; Iuga, Alina Cornelia; Chensue, Stephen W; Blander, Julie Magarian; Furtado, Glaucia C; Lira, Sergio A

    2015-03-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) responsive group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have been implicated in immune homeostasis and pathogenesis in the adult, but little is known about their roles in the newborn. Here we show that IL-23 promotes conversion of embryonic intestinal Lin(-)IL-23R(+)Thy1(+) cells into IL-22-producing Thy1(+)Sca-1(hi) ILC3s in vitro. Gut-specific expression of IL-23 also activated and expanded Thy1(+)Sca-1(hi) ILC3s, which produced IL-22, IL-17, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and were distinct from canonical CD4(+) lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. These ILC3s accumulated under the epithelium in intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1-positive cell aggregates together with neutrophils that disrupted the epithelium, leading to the formation of discrete intestinal erosions, bleeding, and neonatal death. Genetic and antibody depletion of ILC3s rescued the mice from neonatal death. Antibiotic treatment of pregnant mothers and offspring prolonged survival of IL-23 transgenic mice, suggesting a role for the commensal flora on ILC3-induced pathogenesis. Our results reveal a novel role for the IL-23-ILC3s axis in the pathogenesis of neonatal intestinal inflammation.

  16. IL-23 promotes CD4(+) T cells to produce IL-17 in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease

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    Chi, W.; Yang, P.Z.; Li, B.; Wu, C.Y.; Jin, H.L.; Zhu, X.F.; Chen, L.N.; Zhou, H.Y.; Huang, X.K.; Kijlstra, A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease is a systemic refractory autoimmune disease. IL-23 has been thought to play a critical role in autoimmune disease through inducing the development of IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells. Objective: To investigate the expression of IL-23 and IL-17 and the

  17. The IL23R A/Gln381 allele promotes IL-23 unresponsiveness in human memory T-helper 17 cells and impairs Th17 responses in psoriasis patients.

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    Di Meglio, Paola; Villanova, Federica; Napolitano, Luca; Tosi, Isabella; Terranova Barberio, Manuela; Mak, Rose K; Nutland, Sarah; Smith, Catherine H; Barker, Jonathan N W N; Todd, John A; Nestle, Frank O

    2013-10-01

    We and others have shown that the minor, nonconserved allele Gln381 of the Arg381Gln single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs11209026G>A) of the IL-23 receptor gene (IL23R) protects against psoriasis. Moreover, we have recently shown impaired IL-23-induced IL-17A production and STAT-3 phosphorylation in Th17 cells generated in vitro from healthy individuals heterozygous for the protective A allele (GA). However, the biological effect of this variant has not been determined in homozygous carriers of the protective A allele (AA), nor in psoriatic patients. Here we expand our functional investigation of the IL23R Arg381Gln gene variant to include AA homozygous individuals. By using isolated memory CD4+ T cells, we found attenuated IL-23-induced Th17 response in heterozygous individuals. Moreover, we found that AA homozygous individuals were strikingly unresponsive to IL-23, with minimal or no IL-17A and IL-17F production and failure of human memory Th17 cell survival/expansion. Finally, IL-23-induced Th17 response was also attenuated in age- and sex-matched GA versus GG psoriatic patients undergoing systemic treatment. Taken together, our data provide evidence for an allele-dosage effect for IL-23R Gln381 and indicate that common gene alleles associated with complex diseases might have biological effects of considerable magnitude in homozygous carriers.

  18. Pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis

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    R.L. Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Salmonella serotypes are a major cause of food-borne diseases worldwide. Animal models other than the mouse have been employed for the study of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections because the murine model is not suitable for the study of Salmonella-induced diarrhea. The microbe has developed mechanisms to exploit the host cell machinery to its own purpose. Bacterial proteins delivered directly into the host cell cytosol cause cytoskeletal changes and interfere with host cell signaling pathways, which ultimately enhance disease manifestation. Recently, marked advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular interactions between Salmonella serotypes and their hosts. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Sensor IRE1α Enhances IL-23 Expression by Human Dendritic Cells

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    Saioa Márquez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs exposed to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs undergo bioenergetic changes that influence the immune response. We found that stimulation with PAMPs enhanced glycolysis in DCs, whereas oxidative phosphorylation remained unaltered. Glucose starvation and the hexokinase inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG modulated cytokine expression in stimulated DCs. Strikingly, IL23A was markedly induced upon 2-DG treatment, but not during glucose deprivation. Since 2-DG can also rapidly inhibit protein N-glycosylation, we postulated that this compound could induce IL-23 in DCs via activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response. Indeed, stimulation of DCs with PAMPs in the presence of 2-DG robustly activated inositol-requiring protein 1α (IRE1α signaling and to a lesser extent the PERK arm of the unfolded protein response. Additional ER stressors such as tunicamycin and thapsigargin also promoted IL-23 expression by PAMP-stimulated DCs. Pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic analyses using conditional knockout mice revealed that IL-23 induction in ER stressed DCs stimulated with PAMPs was IRE1α/X-box binding protein 1-dependent upon zymosan stimulation. Interestingly, we further evidenced PERK-mediated and CAAT/enhancer-binding protein β-dependent trans-activation of IL23A upon lipopolysaccharide treatment. Our findings uncover that the ER stress response can potently modulate cytokine expression in PAMP-stimulated human DCs.

  20. IL-23 signaling in Th17 cells is inhibited by HIV infection and is not restored by HAART: Implications for persistent immune activation.

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    Jason R Fernandes

    Full Text Available HIV infection causes a profound depletion of gut derived Th17 cells, contributing to loss of mucosal barrier function and an increase in microbial translocation, thus driving systemic immune activation. Despite normalization of circulating CD4+ T cell counts with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, Th17 frequency and function often remain impaired. Given the importance of interleukin (IL-23 in the generation and stabilization of Th17 cells we hypothesized that impaired IL-23 signaling causes persistent Th17 dysfunction in HIV infection.The effects of in vitro HIV infection on responses to IL-23 in Th17 cells were examined. These included the production of IL-17, phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3 and the transcription of retinoic acid orphan receptor C (RORC gene. Blood derived Th17 cells from untreated and HAART-treated HIV-infected individuals were also examined for the IL-23 induced production of phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3 and the expression of the IL-23 receptors.In vitro HIV infection significantly inhibited IL-17 production and IL-23 induced pSTAT3 while expression of RORC RNA was unaffected. Th17 cells isolated from untreated and HAART-treated HIV-infected individuals showed complete loss of IL-23 induced pSTAT3 without a decrease in the expression of the IL-23 receptors.This study is the first to demonstrate an effect of HIV on the IL-23 signaling pathway in Th17 cells. We show that in vitro and in vivo HIV infection results in impaired IL-23 signaling which is not reversed by HAART nor is it a result of reduced receptor expression, suggesting that HIV interferes with IL-23-activated signaling pathways. These findings may explain the inability of HAART to restore Th17 frequency and function and the resulting persistent chronic immune activation observed in HIV infected individuals.

  1. Contribution of the IL-17/IL-23 axis to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Cătană, Cristina-Sorina; Berindan Neagoe, Ioana; Cozma, Vasile; Magdaş, Cristian; Tăbăran, Flaviu; Dumitraşcu, Dan Lucian

    2015-05-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic disorders of modern society, requiring management strategies aimed at prolonging an active life and establishing the exact etiology and pathogenesis. These idiopathic diseases have environmental, genetic, immunologic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components. On the one hand, recent advances have shown that abnormal immune reactions against the microorganisms of the intestinal flora are responsible for the inflammation in genetically susceptible individuals. On the other hand, in addition to T helper cell-type (Th) 1 and Th2 immune responses, other subsets of T cells, namely regulatory T cells and Th17 maintained by IL-23 are likely to develop IBD. IL-23 acts on innate immune system members and also facilitates the expansion and maintenance of Th17 cells. The IL-17/IL-23 axis is relevant in IBD pathogenesis both in human and experimental studies. Novel biomarkers of IBD could be calprotectin, microRNAs, and serum proinflammatory cytokines. An efficient strategy for IBD therapy is represented by the combination of IL-17A and IL-17F in acute IL-17A knockout TNBS-induced colitis, and also definite decrease of the inflammatory process in IL-17F knockout, DSS-induced colitis have been observed. Studying the correlation between innate and adaptive immune systems, we hope to obtain a focused review in order to facilitate future approaches aimed at elucidating the immunological mechanisms that control gut inflammation.

  2. IL-1 and IL-23 mediate early IL-17A production in pulmonary inflammation leading to late fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paméla Gasse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating as yet untreatable disease. We demonstrated recently the predominant role of the NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β expression in the establishment of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice. METHODS: The contribution of IL-23 or IL-17 in pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis was assessed using the bleomycin model in deficient mice. RESULTS: We show that bleomycin or IL-1β-induced lung injury leads to increased expression of early IL-23p19, and IL-17A or IL-17F expression. Early IL-23p19 and IL-17A, but not IL-17F, and IL-17RA signaling are required for inflammatory response to BLM as shown with gene deficient mice or mice treated with neutralizing antibodies. Using FACS analysis, we show a very early IL-17A and IL-17F expression by RORγt(+ γδ T cells and to a lesser extent by CD4αβ(+ T cells, but not by iNKT cells, 24 hrs after BLM administration. Moreover, IL-23p19 and IL-17A expressions or IL-17RA signaling are necessary to pulmonary TGF-β1 production, collagen deposition and evolution to fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate the existence of an early IL-1β-IL-23-IL-17A axis leading to pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and identify innate IL-23 and IL-17A as interesting drug targets for IL-1β driven lung pathology.

  3. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    KAUST Repository

    García, Ana V.

    2014-04-04

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. 2014 Garca and Hirt.

  4. Role of interleukin-23 (IL-23) receptor signaling for IL-17 responses in human Lyme disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosting, M.; Hofstede, H.J.M. ter; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Sturm, P.D.J.; Kullberg, B.J.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is known to play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of T helper 17 cells. It has been previously demonstrated that IL-17 is involved in experimental Lyme arthritis, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria. However, the precise role of the IL-23 receptor (IL-23R)

  5. Ginger Extract Reduces the Expression of IL-17 and IL-23 in the Sera and Central Nervous System of EAE Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Azizi, Sayyed-Vahab; Nemati, Maryam; Khoramdel-Azad, Hossain; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Ayoobi, Fatemeh; Taghipour, Zahra; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    IL-17/IL-23 axis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and multiple sclerosis (MS). The immunomodulatory properties of ginger are reported in previous studies. To evaluate the effects of ginger extract on the expression of IL-17 and IL-23 in a model of EAE. EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with myelin oligodendroglial glycoprotein and then treated with PBS or ginger extracts, from day +3 to +30. At day 31, mice were scarificed and the expression of IL-17 and IL-23 mRNA in spinal cord were determined by using real time-PCR. The serum levels of cytokines were measured by ELISA. The mRNA expression of IL-17, IL-23 P19 and IL-23 P40 in CNS and serum levels of IL-17 and IL-23 were significantly higher in PBS-treated EAE mice than non-EAE group (pginger-treated EAE mice the mRNA expression of IL-17, P19 and P40 in CNS and serum IL-23 levels were significantly decreased as compared to PBS-treated EAE mice (pginger-treated EAE group had significantly lower expression of IL-17, P19 and P40 in CNS and lower serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels than PBS-treated EAE group (pGinger extract reduces the expression of IL-17 and IL-23 in EAE mice. The therapeutic potential of ginger for treatment of MS could be considered in further studies.

  6. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García, Ana V; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    .... Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system...

  7. Expression of IL-23/Th17-related cytokines in basal cell carcinoma and in the response to medical treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Pellegrini

    Full Text Available Several immune-related markers have been implicated in basal cell carcinoma (BCC pathogenesis. The BCC inflammatory infiltrate is dominated by Th2 cytokines, suggesting a specific state of immunosuppression. In contrast, regressing BCC are characterized by a Th1 immune response with IFN-γ promoting a tumor suppressive activity. IL-23/Th17-related cytokines, as interleukin (IL-17, IL-23 and IL-22, play a significant role in cutaneous inflammatory diseases, but their involvement in skin carcinogenesis is controversial and is poorly investigated in BCC. In this study we investigated the expression of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-22 cytokines in BCC at the protein and mRNA level and their modulation during imiquimod (IMQ treatment or photodynamic therapy (PDT. IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-22 levels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative Real Time PCR in 41 histopathologically-proven BCCs (28 superficial and 13 nodular from 39 patients. All BCC samples were analyzed at baseline and 19 of 41 also during medical treatment (9 with IMQ 5% cream and 10 with MAL-PDT. Association between cytokines expression and clinico-pathological variables was evaluated. Higher levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-22 were found in BCCs, mainly in the peritumoral infiltrate, compared to normal skin, with the expression being correlated to the severity of the inflammatory infiltrate. IFN-γ production was higher in superficial BCCs compared to nodular BCCs, while IL-17 was increased in nodular BCCs. A significant correlation was found between IFN-γ and IL-17 expression with both cytokines expressed by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. An increase of all cytokines occurred during the inflammatory phase induced by IMQ and at the early time point of PDT treatment, with significant evidence for IFN-γ, IL-23, and IL-22. Our results confirm the role of IFN-γ and support the involvement of IL-23/Th17-related cytokines in BCC pathogenesis and in the inflammatory response

  8. Expression of IL-23/Th17-related cytokines in basal cell carcinoma and in the response to medical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Cristina; Orlandi, Augusto; Costanza, Gaetana; Di Stefani, Alessandro; Piccioni, Antonella; Di Cesare, Antonella; Chiricozzi, Andrea; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Peris, Ketty; Fargnoli, Maria Concetta

    2017-01-01

    Several immune-related markers have been implicated in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) pathogenesis. The BCC inflammatory infiltrate is dominated by Th2 cytokines, suggesting a specific state of immunosuppression. In contrast, regressing BCC are characterized by a Th1 immune response with IFN-γ promoting a tumor suppressive activity. IL-23/Th17-related cytokines, as interleukin (IL)-17, IL-23 and IL-22, play a significant role in cutaneous inflammatory diseases, but their involvement in skin carcinogenesis is controversial and is poorly investigated in BCC. In this study we investigated the expression of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-22 cytokines in BCC at the protein and mRNA level and their modulation during imiquimod (IMQ) treatment or photodynamic therapy (PDT). IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-22 levels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative Real Time PCR in 41 histopathologically-proven BCCs (28 superficial and 13 nodular) from 39 patients. All BCC samples were analyzed at baseline and 19 of 41 also during medical treatment (9 with IMQ 5% cream and 10 with MAL-PDT). Association between cytokines expression and clinico-pathological variables was evaluated. Higher levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-22 were found in BCCs, mainly in the peritumoral infiltrate, compared to normal skin, with the expression being correlated to the severity of the inflammatory infiltrate. IFN-γ production was higher in superficial BCCs compared to nodular BCCs, while IL-17 was increased in nodular BCCs. A significant correlation was found between IFN-γ and IL-17 expression with both cytokines expressed by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. An increase of all cytokines occurred during the inflammatory phase induced by IMQ and at the early time point of PDT treatment, with significant evidence for IFN-γ, IL-23, and IL-22. Our results confirm the role of IFN-γ and support the involvement of IL-23/Th17-related cytokines in BCC pathogenesis and in the inflammatory response during IMQ and

  9. IL-23 (Interleukin-23)-Producing Conventional Dendritic Cells Control the Detrimental IL-17 (Interleukin-17) Response in Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Gallizioli, Mattia; Ludewig, Peter; Thom, Vivien; Arunachalam, Priyadharshini; Rissiek, Björn; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Korn, Thomas; Arumugam, Thiruma Valavan; Sedlacik, Jan; Gerloff, Christian; Tolosa, Eva; Planas, Anna M; Magnus, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms can exacerbate ischemic tissue damage and worsen clinical outcome in patients with stroke. Both αβ and γδ T cells are established mediators of tissue damage in stroke, and the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in inducing the early events of T cell activation and differentiation in stroke is not well understood. In a murine model of experimental stroke, we defined the immune phenotype of infiltrating DC subsets based on flow cytometry of surface markers, the expression of ontogenetic markers, and cytokine levels. We used conditional DC depletion, bone marrow chimeric mice, and IL-23 (interleukin-23) receptor-deficient mice to further explore the functional role of DCs. We show that the ischemic brain was rapidly infiltrated by IRF4 + /CD172a + conventional type 2 DCs and that conventional type 2 DCs were the most abundant subset in comparison with all other DC subsets. Twenty-four hours after ischemia onset, conventional type 2 DCs became the major source of IL-23, promoting neutrophil infiltration by induction of IL-17 (interleukin-17) in γδ T cells. Functionally, the depletion of CD11c + cells or the genetic disruption of the IL-23 signaling abrogated both IL-17 production in γδ T cells and neutrophil infiltration. Interruption of the IL-23/IL-17 cascade decreased infarct size and improved neurological outcome after stroke. Our results suggest a central role for interferon regulatory factor 4-positive IL-23-producing conventional DCs in the IL-17-dependent secondary tissue damage in stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Altered Immune Activation and IL-23 Signaling in Response to Candida albicans in Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Bruserud

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveAutoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare, childhood onset disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC is one of the three major disease components and is, to date, mainly explained by the presence of neutralizing auto-antibodies against cytokines [interleukin (IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22] from T helper 17 cells, which are critical for the protection against fungal infections. However, patients without current auto-antibodies also present CMC and we, therefore, hypothesized that other immune mechanisms contribute to CMC in APS-1.MethodsWhole blood was stimulated with Candida albicans (C. albicans in a standardized assay, and immune activation was investigated by analyzing 46 secreted immune mediators. Then, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with curdlan, a Dectin-1 agonist and IL-23 inducer, and the IL-23p19 response in monocytes was analyzed by flow cytometry.ResultsWe found an altered immune response in APS-1 patients compared with healthy controls. Patients fail to increase the essential ILs, such as IL-2, IL-17A, IL-22, and IL-23, when stimulating whole blood with C. albicans. A significantly altered IL-23p19 response was detected in patients’ monocytes upon stimulation with curdlan.ConclusionAPS-1 patients have an altered immune response to C. albicans including a dysregulation of IL-23p19 production in monocytes. This probably contributes to the selective susceptibility to CMC found in the majority of patients.

  11. Ustekinumab in Psoriasis Immunopathology with Emphasis on the Th17-IL23 Axis: A Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Quatresooz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic relapsing immunoinflammatory dermatosis that is commonly associated with systemic comorbidities. The pathogenic importance of interleukin (IL-12 and IL-23 is beyond doubt, as well as the involvement of T helper cells (Th1 and Th17 cells. There is upregulation of the p40 subunit shared by IL-12 and IL-23 and of the IL-23 p19 subunit, but not an increased expression of the IL-12 p35 subunit. This indicates that IL-23 appears more involved than IL-12 in the pathogenesis of psoriatic plaques. Ustekinumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin (Ig G1 class targeting the p40 subunit common to both IL-12 and IL-23, thus inhibiting both IL-12 and IL-23 receptor-mediated signalling. Ustekinumab is part of the recent biologic therapies active in psoriasis, autoimmune arthritides, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  12. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry applied to IL-23 interaction characteristics: potential impact for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Roxana E; Krystek, Stanley R; Huang, Richard Y-C; Wei, Hui; Tao, Li; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E; Doyle, Michael L; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Engen, John R; Chen, Guodong

    2015-04-01

    IL-23 is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Adnectins are targeted protein therapeutics that are derived from domain III of human fibronectin and have a similar protein scaffold to antibodies. Adnectin 2 was found to bind to IL-23 and compete with the IL-23/IL-23R interaction, posing a potential protein therapeutic. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and computational methods were applied to probe the binding interactions between IL-23 and Adnectin 2 and to determine the correlation between the two orthogonal methods. This review summarizes the current structural knowledge about IL-23 and focuses on the applicability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to investigate the higher order structure of proteins, which plays an important role in the discovery of new and improved biotherapeutics.

  13. Neisseria gonorrhoeae triggers the PGE2/IL-23 pathway and promotes IL-17 production by human memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanelli, Paola; Teloni, Raffaela; Carannante, Anna; Mariotti, Sabrina; Nisini, Roberto; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2012-10-01

    PGE2 is a potent modulator of the T helper (Th)17 immune response that plays a critical role in the host defense against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. We recently showed high serum levels of interleukin (IL)-17 in patients with gonococcal infection and we hypothesized that Neisseria gonorrhoeae could exploit a PGE2 mediated mechanism to promote IL-17 production. Here we show that N. gonorrhoeae induces human dendritic cell (DC) maturation, secretion of prostaglandin E2 and proinflammatory cytokines, including the pro-Th17 cytokine IL-23. Blocking PGE2 endogenous synthesis selectively reduces IL-23 production by DC in response to gonococcal stimulation, confirming recent data on PGE2/IL-23 crosstalk. N. gonorrhoeae stimulated DC induce a robust IL-17 production by memory CD4(+) T cells and this function correlates with PGE2 production. Our findings delineate a previously unknown role for PGE2 in the immune response to N. gonorrhoeae, suggesting its contribute via Th17 cell expansion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased IL-10 mRNA and IL-23 mRNA expression in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, Martin; Sorensen, P; Khademi, M

    2008-01-01

    volunteers served to confirm initial findings. mRNA was analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS: We found elevated expression of interleukin (IL)-23 and IL-10 in untreated MS patients. IFN-beta therapy increased IL-10 and decreased IL-23 expression independently...... of the regulatory cytokine IL-10. The elevated IL-23 mRNA levels in MS patients are noteworthy in view of the newly discovered IL-23-driven Th17 T-cell subset, which is crucial in animal models of MS. Since IFN-beta therapy resulted in decreased IL-23 mRNA levels, the Th17 axis could be another target of IFN...

  15. CCR2 defines in vivo development and homing of IL-23-driven GM-CSF-producing Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; McKenzie, Duncan R; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; Fenix, Kevin A; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Paton, James C; Mack, Matthias; Pombal, Diana R; Seillet, Cyrill; Dubois, Bénédicte; Liston, Adrian; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Belz, Gabrielle T; Smyth, Mark J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R

    2015-10-29

    IL-17-producing helper T (Th17) cells are critical for host defense against extracellular pathogens but also drive numerous autoimmune diseases. Th17 cells that differ in their inflammatory potential have been described including IL-10-producing Th17 cells that are weak inducers of inflammation and highly inflammatory, IL-23-driven, GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells. However, their distinct developmental requirements, functions and trafficking mechanisms in vivo remain poorly understood. Here we identify a temporally regulated IL-23-dependent switch from CCR6 to CCR2 usage by developing Th17 cells that is critical for pathogenic Th17 cell-driven inflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This switch defines a unique in vivo cell surface signature (CCR6(-)CCR2(+)) of GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells in EAE and experimental persistent extracellular bacterial infection, and in humans. Using this signature, we identify an IL-23/IL-1/IFNγ/TNFα/T-bet/Eomesodermin-driven circuit driving GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cell formation in vivo. Thus, our data identify a unique cell surface signature, trafficking mechanism and T-cell intrinsic regulators of GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells.

  16. Differential interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-23 production by human blood monocytes and dendritic cells in response to commensal enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuzak, Jennifer; Dillon, Stephanie; Wilson, Cara

    2012-08-01

    Human peripheral blood contains antigen-presenting cells (APC), including dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, that may encounter microbes that have translocated from the intestine to the periphery in disease states like HIV-1 infection and inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated the response of DC and monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to a panel of representative commensal enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Bacteroides fragilis. All three bacteria induced significant upregulation of the maturation and activation markers CD40 and CD83 on myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). However, only mDC produced cytokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12p40/70, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in response to bacterial stimulation. Cytokine profiles in whole PBMC differed depending on the stimulating bacterial species: B. fragilis induced production of IL-23, IL-12p70, and IL-10, whereas E. coli and Enterococcus induced an IL-10-predominant response. mDC and monocyte depletion experiments indicated that these cell types differentially produced IL-10 and IL-23 in response to E. coli and B. fragilis. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron did not induce levels of IL-23 similar to those of B. fragilis, suggesting that B. fragilis may have unique proinflammatory properties among Bacteroides species. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to PBMC cultures stimulated with commensal bacteria abrogated the IL-23 response, whereas blocking IL-10 significantly enhanced IL-23 production, suggesting that IL-10 controls the levels of IL-23 produced. These results indicate that blood mDC and monocytes respond differentially to innate stimulation with whole commensal bacteria and that IL-10 may play a role in controlling the proinflammatory response to translocated microbes.

  17. Stress induced Salmonella Typhimurium recrudescence in pigs coincides with cortisol induced increased intracellular proliferation in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in the development of carriers that intermittently excrete Salmonella in very low numbers. During periods of stress, for example transport to the slaughterhouse, recrudescence of Salmonella may occur, but the mechanism of this stress related recrudescence is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of the stress hormone cortisol in Salmonella recrudescence by pigs. We showed that a 24 h feed withdrawal increases the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in pigs, which is correlated with increased serum cortisol levels. A second in vivo trial demonstrated that stress related recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs can be induced by intramuscular injection of dexamethasone. Furthermore, we found that cortisol, but not epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, promotes intracellular proliferation of Salmonella Typhimurium in primary porcine alveolar macrophages, but not in intestinal epithelial cells and a transformed cell line of porcine alveolar macrophages. A microarray based transcriptomic analysis revealed that cortisol did not directly affect the growth or the gene expression or Salmonella Typhimurium in a rich medium, which implies that the enhanced intracellular proliferation of the bacterium is probably caused by an indirect effect through the cell. These results highlight the role of cortisol in the recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium by pigs and they provide new evidence for the role of microbial endocrinology in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22151081

  18. Stress induced Salmonella Typhimurium recrudescence in pigs coincides with cortisol induced increased intracellular proliferation in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbrugghe Elin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in the development of carriers that intermittently excrete Salmonella in very low numbers. During periods of stress, for example transport to the slaughterhouse, recrudescence of Salmonella may occur, but the mechanism of this stress related recrudescence is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of the stress hormone cortisol in Salmonella recrudescence by pigs. We showed that a 24 h feed withdrawal increases the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in pigs, which is correlated with increased serum cortisol levels. A second in vivo trial demonstrated that stress related recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs can be induced by intramuscular injection of dexamethasone. Furthermore, we found that cortisol, but not epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, promotes intracellular proliferation of Salmonella Typhimurium in primary porcine alveolar macrophages, but not in intestinal epithelial cells and a transformed cell line of porcine alveolar macrophages. A microarray based transcriptomic analysis revealed that cortisol did not directly affect the growth or the gene expression or Salmonella Typhimurium in a rich medium, which implies that the enhanced intracellular proliferation of the bacterium is probably caused by an indirect effect through the cell. These results highlight the role of cortisol in the recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium by pigs and they provide new evidence for the role of microbial endocrinology in host-pathogen interactions.

  19. New insight to IL-23/IL-17 axis in Iranian infected adult patients with gastritis: effects of genes polymorphisms on expression of cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzad, H; Bagheri, N; Azadegan-Dehkordi, F; Zamanzad, B; Izadpanah, E; Abdi, M; Ramazani, G; Sanei, M H; Ayoubian, H; Ahmadi, A; Jamalzehi, S; Aslani, P; Zandi, F

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is the hallmark of the pathogenesis of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer. IL-17A and IL-17F are inflammatory cytokines expressed by a novel subset of CD4+Th cells and play critical function in inflammation. We evaluated the relationship between IL-17A G197A, IL-17F A7488G and IL23R+2199 A/C polymorphisms with IL-6, IL-17, IL-21, IL-23 and TGF-β1 mRNAs expression in regard to H. pylori infection with chronic gastritis. Total RNA and genomic DNA were extracted from gastric biopsies of 58 H. pylori-infected patient with gastritis. Afterward, mucosal IL-6, IL-17, IL-21, IL-23 and TGF-β1 mRNAs expression and polymorphisms in IL-17A G197A, IL-17F A7488G and IL-23R +2199A/Cin gastric biopsies were determined by real-time PCR and PCR-RFLP. Our results show that IL-17A G197A, IL-17F A7488G andIL23R +2199A/C polymorphisms have no effect on mucosal expression of IL-6, IL-17, IL-21 and TGF-β1 mRNAs expression in H. pylori-infected patients with chronic gastritis. These results suggest that IL-17A G197A, IL-17F A7488G and IL23R +2199A/C polymorphisms no alter mucosal cytokine pattern in Iranian patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis diseases. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  20. DMPD: Signaling by IL-12 and IL-23 and the immunoregulatory roles of STAT4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15546391 Signaling by IL-12 and IL-23 and the immunoregulatory roles of STAT4. Watf...html) (.csml) Show Signaling by IL-12 and IL-23 and the immunoregulatory roles of STAT4. PubmedID 15546391 T...itle Signaling by IL-12 and IL-23 and the immunoregulatory roles of STAT4. Author

  1. Antigen-specific IL-23/17 pathway activation by murine semi-mature DC-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Shinya; Iwasaki, Takumi; Okano, Tomoko [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Chiba, Joe, E-mail: chibaj@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    We analyzed the phenotype and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) induced in vitro without using any serum during the late stage of cultivation. These 'serum-free' DCs (SF-DCs) possessed the ability to induce T cell proliferation as well as antibody responses, indicating that they were functional DCs. Surprisingly, the SF-DCs akin to semi-mature DCs in terms of both phenotypic and functional characteristics. The SF-DCs did not produce IL-12 but produced large amounts of IL-23 following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. The antigen-specific production of IL-17 by CD4{sup +} T cells co-cultured with OVA-loaded SF-DCs was significantly higher than that with OVA-loaded conventional DCs. These results suggest that SF-DCs tend to produce IL-23 and can consequently induce the IL-17 producing CD4{sup +} T cells. The semi-mature DC-like cells reported here will be useful vehicles for DC immunization and might contribute to studies on the possible involvement of semi-mature DCs in Th17 cell differentiation.

  2. PhoP-Induced Genes within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Andrés; Cabeza, María Laura; Spinelli, Silvana V.; McClelland, Michael; García Véscovi, Eleonora; Soncini, Fernando C.

    2006-01-01

    The invasive pathogen Salmonella enterica has evolved a sophisticated device that allows it to enter nonphagocytic host cells. This process requires the expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), which encodes a specialized type III protein secretion system (TTSS). This TTSS delivers a set of effectors that produce a marked rearrangement of the host cytoskeleton, generating a profuse membrane ruffling at the site of interaction, driving bacterial entry. It has been shown that the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system represses the expression of the SPI-1 machinery by down-regulating the transcription of its master regulator, HilA. In this work, we reveal the presence of a PhoP-activated operon within SPI-1. This operon is composed of the orgB and orgC genes, which encode a protein that interacts with the InvC ATPase and a putative effector protein of the TTSS, respectively. Under PhoP-inducing conditions, expression of this operon is directly activated by the phosphorylated form of the response regulator, which recognizes a PhoP box located at the −35 region relative to the transcription start site. Additionally, under invasion-inducing conditions, orgBC expression is driven both by the prgH promoter, induced by the SPI-1 master regulator HilA, and by the directly controlled PhoP/PhoQ promoter. Together, these results indicate that in contrast to the rest of the genes encompassed in the SPI-1 locus, orgBC is expressed during and after Salmonella entry into its host cell, and they suggest a role for the products of this operon after host cell internalization. PMID:16980492

  3. Biological therapy targeting the IL-23/IL-17 axis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstockt, Bram; Van Assche, Gert; Vermeire, Séverine; Ferrante, Marc

    2017-01-01

    As many inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients do not benefit from long-term anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, new anti-inflammatories are urgently needed. After the discovery of the interleukin (IL) 23/17 axis being pivotal in IBD pathogenesis, many different compounds were developed, targeting different components within this pathway. Areas covered: A literature search to March 2016 was performed to identify the most relevant reports on the role of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in IBD and on the different molecules targeting this pathway. First, the authors briefly summarize the immunology of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway to elucidate the mode of action of all different agents. Second, they describe all different molecules targeting this pathway. Besides discussing efficacy and safety data, they also explore immunogenicity, exposure during pregnancy and pharmacokinetics. Expert opinion: A new era in IBD treatment has recently been initiated: besides immunomodulators and TNF-antagonists, anti-adhesion molecules and monoclonal antibodies targeting the IL-23/IL-17 pathway have been developed. Biomarkers for personalized medicine are urgently needed. This therapeutic (r)evolution will further improve disease-related and patient-reported outcome, though a lot of questions should still be addressed in future years.

  4. Contribution of rs11465788 in IL23R gene to Crohn's disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    logistic regression were used to search for possible associ- ations between each SNP and ... 1. Among the 34 polymorphisms that are already present. Table 1. Primers designed for IL23R gene sequencing. Primer (forward). Primer (reverse). Fragment size (bp) Optimum temperatures (. ◦. C). Exon 1 ttcaacaaagctggaaaa.

  5. Reorganization of the Endosomal System in Salmonella-Infected Cells: The Ultrastructure of Salmonella-Induced Tubular Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Viktoria; Liebl, David; Zhang, Yuying; Rajashekar, Roopa; Chlanda, Petr; Giesker, Katrin; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Hensel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the intracellular life of Salmonella enterica, a unique membrane-bound compartment termed Salmonella-containing vacuole, or SCV, is formed. By means of translocated effector proteins, intracellular Salmonella also induce the formation of extensive, highly dynamic membrane tubules termed Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. Here we report the first detailed ultrastructural analyses of the SCV and SIF by electron microscopy (EM), EM tomography and live cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We found that a subset of SIF is composed of double membranes that enclose portions of host cell cytosol and cytoskeletal filaments within its inner lumen. Despite some morphological similarities, we found that the formation of SIF double membranes is independent from autophagy and requires the function of the effector proteins SseF and SseG. The lumen of SIF network is accessible to various types of endocytosed material and our CLEM analysis of double membrane SIF demonstrated that fluid phase markers accumulate only between the inner and outer membrane of these structures, a space continual with endosomal lumen. Our work reveals how manipulation of the endosomal membrane system by an intracellular pathogen results in a unique tubular membrane compartmentalization of the host cell, generating a shielded niche permissive for intracellular proliferation of Salmonella. PMID:25254663

  6. IL-23R is epigenetically regulated and modulated by chemotherapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie eBaird

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The IL-23/IL-23R signalling axis is an important inflammatory pathway, involved in the stimulation and regulation of the T helper (Th 17 lymphocytes, resulting in the production of IL-17. Aside from auto-immunity, this cytokine has also been linked to carcinogenesis and polymorphisms in the IL-23R gene are associated with an increased risk for the development of a number of different cancers. Activation of the IL-23 pathway results in the up regulation of STAT3 and it is thought that the pathological consequences associated with this are in part due to the production of IL-17. We have previously identified IL-23A as pro-proliferative and epigenetically regulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The current study aims to evaluate IL-23R in greater detail in NSCLC. We demonstrate that IL-23R is expressed and epigenetically regulated in NSCLC through histone post translation modifications and CpG island methylation. In addition, Gemcitabine treatment, a chemotherapy drug used in the treatment of NSCLC, resulted in the up regulation of the IL-23R. Furthermore, Apilimod (STA 5326, a small molecule which blocks the expression of IL-23 and IL-12, reduced the proliferative capacity of NSCLC cells, particularly in the adenocarcinoma (A549 sub-type. Apilimod is currently undergoing investigation in a number of clinical trials for the treatment of auto-immune conditions such as Crohn’s disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis. Our results may have implications for treating NSCLC patients with Gemcitabine or epigenetic targeted therapies. However, Apilimod may possibly provide a new treatment avenue for NSCLC patients. Work is currently ongoing to further delineate the IL-23/IL-23R axis in this disease.

  7. Increased IL-10 mRNA and IL-23 mRNA expression in multiple sclerosis: interferon-beta treatment increases IL-10 mRNA expression while reducing IL-23 mRNA expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, M.; Sorensen, P.; Khademi, M.

    2008-01-01

    volunteers served to confirm initial findings. mRNA was analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS: We found elevated expression of interleukin (IL)-23 and IL-10 in untreated MS patients. IFN-beta therapy increased IL-10 and decreased IL-23 expression independently...... of the regulatory cytokine IL-10. The elevated IL-23 mRNA levels in MS patients are noteworthy in view of the newly discovered IL-23-driven Th17 T-cell subset, which is crucial in animal models of MS. Since IFN-beta therapy resulted in decreased IL-23 mRNA levels, the Th17 axis could be another target of IFN...

  8. IL-23 p19 knockout mice exhibit minimal defects in responses to primary and secondary infection with Francisella tularensis LVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L Kurtz

    Full Text Available Our laboratory's investigations into mechanisms of protective immunity against Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS have uncovered mediators important in host defense against primary infection, as well as those correlated with successful vaccination. One such potential correlate was IL-12p40, a pleiotropic cytokine that promotes Th1 T cell function as part of IL-12p70. LVS-infected IL-12p40 deficient knockout (KO mice maintain a chronic infection, but IL-12p35 KO mice clear LVS infection; thus the role that IL-12p40 plays in immunity to LVS is independent of the IL-12p70 heterodimer. IL-12p40 can also partner with IL-23p19 to create the heterodimeric cytokine IL-23. Here, we directly tested the role of IL-23 in LVS resistance, and found IL-23 to be largely dispensable for immunity to LVS following intradermal or intranasal infection. IL-23p19 KO splenocytes were fully competent in controlling intramacrophage LVS replication in an in vitro overlay assay. Further, antibody responses in IL-23p19 KO mice were similar to those of normal wild type mice after LVS infection. IL-23p19 KO mice or normal wild type mice that survived primary LVS infection survived maximal doses of LVS secondary challenge. Thus p40 has a novel role in clearance of LVS infection that is unrelated to either IL-12 or IL-23.

  9. Increased plasma levels of IL-21 and IL-23 in spondyloarthritis are not associated with clinical and MRI findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse; Hvid, Malene

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the Th17-related cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-21, and IL-23 in spondyloarthritis (SpA) by examining their association with disease activity and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with SpA (n = 80). Furthermore, to investigate...... the cellular origins of the cytokines, paired mononuclear cells from blood and synovial fluid were examined for the expression of IL-17A, IL-21, and IL-23R using multicolor flow cytometry. Both IL-21 and IL-23 levels were increased in plasma from SpA patients compared with healthy volunteers (P ....05), whereas IL-17A was not. A significant correlation was observed between individual levels of IL-21 and IL-23 (r = 0.7, P IL-17A, IL-21, and IL-23 with C-reactive protein (CRP), MRI changes, and clinical scoring (BASMI, BASFI, and BASDAI) were observed...

  10. Cutting edge: IL-23 cross-regulates IL-12 production in T cell-dependent experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Christoph; Dornhoff, Heike; Neufert, Clemens; Fantini, Massimo C; Wirtz, Stefan; Huebner, Sabine; Nikolaev, Alexei; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Murphy, Andrew J; Valenzuela, David M; Yancopoulos, George D; Galle, Peter R; Karow, Margaret; Neurath, Markus F

    2006-09-01

    Although IL-12 and IL-23 share the common p40 subunit, IL-23, rather than IL-12, seems to drive the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and arthritis, because IL-23/p19 knockout mice are protected from disease. In contrast, we describe in this study that newly created LacZ knockin mice deficient for IL-23 p19 were highly susceptible for the development of experimental T cell-mediated TNBS colitis and showed even more severe colitis than wild-type mice by endoscopic and histologic criteria. Subsequent studies revealed that dendritic cells from p19-deficient mice produce elevated levels of IL-12, and that IL-23 down-regulates IL-12 expression upon TLR ligation. Finally, in vivo blockade of IL-12 p40 in IL-23-deficient mice rescued mice from lethal colitis. Taken together, our data identify cross-regulation of IL-12 expression by IL-23 as novel key regulatory pathway during initiation of T cell dependent colitis.

  11. Functional studies on the IBD susceptibility gene IL23R implicate reduced receptor function in the protective genetic variant R381Q.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Pidasheva

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS in several populations have demonstrated significant association of the IL23R gene with IBD (Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC and psoriasis, suggesting that perturbation of the IL-23 signaling pathway is relevant to the pathophysiology of these diseases. One particular variant, R381Q (rs11209026, confers strong protection against development of CD. We investigated the effects of this variant in primary T cells from healthy donors carrying IL23R(R381 and IL23R(Q381 haplotypes. Using a proprietary anti-IL23R antibody, ELISA, flow cytometry, phosphoflow and real-time RT-PCR methods, we examined IL23R expression and STAT3 phosphorylation and activation in response to IL-23. IL23R(Q381 was associated with reduced STAT3 phosphorylation upon stimulation with IL-23 and decreased number of IL-23 responsive T-cells. We also observed slightly reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion in IL23R(Q381 positive donors. Our study shows conclusively that IL23R(Q381 is a loss-of-function allele, further strengthening the implication from GWAS results that the IL-23 pathway is pathogenic in human disease. This data provides an explanation for the protective role of R381Q in CD and may lead to the development of improved therapeutics for autoimmune disorders like CD.

  12. Preclinical development of AMG 139, a human antibody specifically targeting IL-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köck, K; Pan, W J; Gow, J M; Horner, M J; Gibbs, J P; Colbert, A; Goletz, T J; Newhall, K J; Rees, W A; Sun, Y; Zhang, Y; O'Neill, J C; Umble-Romero, A N; Prokop, S P; Krill, C D; Som, L; Buntich, S A; Trimble, M W; Tsuji, W H; Towne, J E

    2015-01-01

    AMG 139 is a human anti-IL-23 antibody currently in a phase II trial for treating Crohn's disease. To support its clinical development in humans, in vitro assays and in vivo studies were conducted in cynomolgus monkeys to determine the pharmacology, preclinical characteristics and safety of this monoclonal antibody. The in vitro pharmacology, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics and toxicology of AMG 139, after single or weekly i.v. or s.c. administration for up to 26 weeks, were evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys. AMG 139 bound with high affinity to both human and cynomolgus monkey IL-23 and specifically neutralized the biological activity of IL-23 without binding or blocking IL-12. After a single dose, linear PK with s.c. bioavailability of 81% and mean half-life of 8.4-13 days were observed. After weekly s.c. dosing for 3 or 6 months, AMG 139 exposure increased approximately dose-proportionally from 30 to 300 mg·kg(-1) and mean accumulation between the first and last dose ranged from 2- to 3.5-fold. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping, T-cell-dependent antigen responses and bone formation markers were not different between AMG 139 and vehicle treatment. No adverse clinical signs, effects on body weight, vital signs, ophthalmic parameters, clinical pathology, ECG, organ weights or histopathology were observed in the monkeys with the highest dose of AMG 139 tested (300 mg·kg(-1) s.c. or i.v.). The in vitro pharmacology, PK, immunogenicity and safety characteristics of AMG 139 in cynomolgus monkeys support its continued clinical development for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Anti-IL-23 and Anti-IL-17 Biologic Agents for the Treatment of Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieder, Jillian; Kivelevitch, Dario; Haugh, Isabel; Watson, Ian; Menter, Alan

    2018-01-01

    Advancements in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have identified interleukin (IL)-23 and IL-17 as fundamental contributors in the immune pathways of the disease. Leveraging these promising therapeutic targets has led to the emergence of a number of anti-IL-23 and -17 biologic agents with the potential to treat multiple conditions with common underlying pathology. The unprecedented clinical efficacy of these agents in the treatment of psoriasis has paved way for their evaluation in diseases such as psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to other immune-mediated conditions. Here we review the IL-23/IL-17 immune pathways and discuss the key clinical and safety data of the anti-IL-23 and anti-IL-17 biologic agents in psoriasis and other immune-mediated diseases. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. IL-23/IL-17/G-CSF pathway is associated with granulocyte recruitment to the lung during African swine fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalyan, Z; Voskanyan, H; Ter-Pogossyan, Z; Saroyan, D; Karalova, E

    2016-10-15

    The interleukin (IL)-23/IL-17 pathway plays a crucial role in various forms of inflammation but its function in acute African swine fever (ASF) is not well understood. Thus, in this study, we aimed to find out whether IL-23/IL-17/G-CSF is released in acute ASF and what function it may have. The present study revealed that the production of IL-17 and IL-23 were significantly increased in the sera of ASFV infected pigs. Using ELISA, we found that the serum levels of IL-23 and IL-17 have overexpressed in ASF virus infected pigs compared with healthy controls. The levels of IL-17 and IL-23 increase in the early stages and the levels of G-CSF and C - reactive protein in the later stages of ASF. Simultaneously, with the increase of the levels of IL-23/IL-17 extravasation of granular leukocytes in the tissue (diapedesis) is observed. Diapedesis can explain the neutropenia that we identified previously in the terminal stages of ASF. The increase in serum levels of IL-23/IL-17 is preceded by enhanced migration of neutrophils in tissues, and the last one is preceded by neutropenia. The increase in serum levels of G-CSF has compensatory nature, directed on stimulation of proliferation of granulocytes. Taken together, our results revealed an overexpression of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in the ASF virus infected pigs, suggesting that it may be a crucial pathway in the diapedesis at ASF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. IL-23R and TCR signaling drives the generation of neonatal Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells expressing high levels of cytotoxic mediators and producing IFN-gamma and IL-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Emmanuelle; Brouwer, Margreet; Dimova, Tanya; Goldman, Michel; Willems, Fabienne; Vermijlen, David

    2011-05-01

    The immune system in early life is regarded as immature. However, the IL-12 family member IL-23 is highly produced upon TLR stimulation by neonatal DCs. Human adult Vγ9Vδ2 T cells can be stimulated specifically via their TCR by phosphoantigens (as the pathogen-derived HMB-PP) or agents and infections that lead to their endogenous accumulation (as the aminobisphosphonate zoledronate). As increasing evidence indicates that γδ T cells are especially important in early life, we investigated the effect of IL-23 on neonatal Vγ9Vδ2 T cells stimulated via their TCR. Zoledronate induced clear proliferation and IFN-γ production in neonatal Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. In contrast, HMB-PP did not elicit a distinct response unless at high concentrations. Addition of IL-23 to zoledronate enhanced the expression of IFN-γ and generated a distinct, IFN-γ-negative, neonatal Vγ9Vδ2 T cell population producing IL-17. Furthermore, IL-23 significantly enhanced the expression of a range of cytotoxic mediators (perforin, granzymes, granulysin). Although the costimulatory effect of IL-23 on IFN-γ and cytotoxic mediators was also observed within adult Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, the induction of an IL-17+IFN-γ- subset was unique to neonatal Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. In conclusion, neonatal DC-derived IL-23 combined with specific TCR signaling drives the generation of neonatal Vγ9Vδ2 T cells equipped with a range of cytotoxic mediators and distinct subpopulations producing IFN-γ and IL-17.

  16. IL-23 Promotes Myocardial I/R Injury by Increasing the Inflammatory Responses and Oxidative Stress Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammation and oxidative stress play an important role in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury. We hypothesized that IL-23, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, could promote myocardial I/R injury by increasing the inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into sham operated control (SO group, ischemia and reperfusion (I/R group, (IL-23 + I/R group and (anti-IL-23 + I/R group. At 4 h after reperfusion, the serum concentration of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and the tissue MDA concentration and SOD activity were measured. The infarcte size was measured by TTC staining. Apoptosis in heart sections were measured by TUNEL staining. The expression of HMGB1 and IL-17A were detected by Western Blotting and the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 were detected by Elisa. Results: After 4 h reperfusion, compared with the I/R group, IL-23 significantly increased the infarct size, the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and the levels of LDH and CK (all P 0.05. All these effects were abolished by anti-IL-23 administration. Conclusion: The present study suggested that IL-23 may promote myocardial I/R injury by increasing the inflammatory responses and oxidative stress reaction.

  17. IL-22 production is regulated by IL-23 during Listeria monocytogenes infection but is not required for bacterial clearance or tissue protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Graham

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes (LM is a gram-positive bacterium that is a common contaminant of processed meats and dairy products. In humans, ingestion of LM can result in intracellular infection of the spleen and liver, which can ultimately lead to septicemia, meningitis, and spontaneous abortion. Interleukin (IL-23 is a cytokine that regulates innate and adaptive immune responses by inducing the production of IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22. We have recently demonstrated that the IL-23/IL-17 axis is required for optimal recruitment of neutrophils to the liver, but not the spleen, during LM infection. Furthermore, these cytokines are required for the clearance of LM during systemic infection. In other infectious models, IL-22 induces the secretion of anti-microbial peptides and protects tissues from damage by preventing apoptosis. However, the role of IL-22 has not been thoroughly investigated during LM infection. In the present study, we show that LM induces the production of IL-22 in vivo. Interestingly, IL-23 is required for the production of IL-22 during primary, but not secondary, LM infection. Our findings suggest that IL-22 is not required for clearance of LM during primary or secondary infection, using both systemic and mucosal models of infection. IL-22 is also not required for the protection of LM infected spleens and livers from organ damage. Collectively, these data indicate that IL-22 produced during LM infection must play a role other than clearance of LM or protection of tissues from pathogen- or immune-mediated damage.

  18. O-Serotype Conversion in Salmonella Typhimurium Induces Protective Immune Responses against Invasive Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Liu, Qing; Luo, Hongyan; Liang, Kang; Yi, Jie; Luo, Ying; Hu, Yunlong; Han, Yue; Kong, Qingke

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella infections remain a big problem worldwide, causing enteric fever by Salmonella Typhi (or Paratyphi) or self-limiting gastroenteritis by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in healthy individuals. NTS may become invasive and cause septicemia in elderly or immuno-compromised individuals, leading to high mortality and morbidity. No vaccines are currently available for preventing NTS infection in human. As these invasive NTS are restricted to several O-antigen serogroups including B1, D1, C1, and C2, O-antigen polysaccharide is believed to be a good target for vaccine development. In this study, a strategy of O-serotype conversion was investigated to develop live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against the major serovars of NTS infections. The immunodominant O4 serotype of S. Typhimurium was converted into O9, O7, and O8 serotypes through unmarked chromosomal deletion-insertion mutations. O-serotype conversion was confirmed by LPS silver staining and western blotting. All O-serotype conversion mutations were successfully introduced into the live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccine S738 (Δcrp Δcya) to evaluate their immunogenicity in mice model. The vaccine candidates induced high amounts of heterologous O-polysaccharide-specific functional IgG responses. Vaccinated mice survived a challenge of 100 times the 50% lethality dose (LD50) of wild-type S. Typhimurium. Protective efficacy against heterologous virulent Salmonella challenges was highly O-serotype related. Furthermore, broad-spectrum protection against S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, and S. Choleraesuis was observed by co-vaccination of O9 and O7 O-serotype-converted vaccine candidates. This study highlights the strategy of expressing heterologous O-polysaccharides via genetic engineering in developing live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against NTS infections.

  19. O-Serotype Conversion in Salmonella Typhimurium Induces Protective Immune Responses against Invasive Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella infections remain a big problem worldwide, causing enteric fever by Salmonella Typhi (or Paratyphi or self-limiting gastroenteritis by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS in healthy individuals. NTS may become invasive and cause septicemia in elderly or immuno-compromised individuals, leading to high mortality and morbidity. No vaccines are currently available for preventing NTS infection in human. As these invasive NTS are restricted to several O-antigen serogroups including B1, D1, C1, and C2, O-antigen polysaccharide is believed to be a good target for vaccine development. In this study, a strategy of O-serotype conversion was investigated to develop live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against the major serovars of NTS infections. The immunodominant O4 serotype of S. Typhimurium was converted into O9, O7, and O8 serotypes through unmarked chromosomal deletion–insertion mutations. O-serotype conversion was confirmed by LPS silver staining and western blotting. All O-serotype conversion mutations were successfully introduced into the live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccine S738 (Δcrp Δcya to evaluate their immunogenicity in mice model. The vaccine candidates induced high amounts of heterologous O-polysaccharide-specific functional IgG responses. Vaccinated mice survived a challenge of 100 times the 50% lethality dose (LD50 of wild-type S. Typhimurium. Protective efficacy against heterologous virulent Salmonella challenges was highly O-serotype related. Furthermore, broad-spectrum protection against S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, and S. Choleraesuis was observed by co-vaccination of O9 and O7 O-serotype-converted vaccine candidates. This study highlights the strategy of expressing heterologous O-polysaccharides via genetic engineering in developing live attenuated S. Typhimurium vaccines against NTS infections.

  20. Allergen uptake, activation, and IL-23 production by pulmonary myeloid DCs drives airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma-susceptible mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian P Lewkowich

    Full Text Available Maladaptive, Th2-polarized inflammatory responses are integral to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. As regulators of T cell activation, dendritic cells (DCs are important mediators of allergic asthma, yet the precise signals which render endogenous DCs "pro-asthmatic", and the extent to which these signals are regulated by the pulmonary environment and host genetics, remains unclear. Comparative phenotypic and functional analysis of pulmonary DC populations in mice susceptible (A/J, or resistant (C3H to experimental asthma, revealed that susceptibility to airway hyperresponsiveness is associated with preferential myeloid DC (mDC allergen uptake, and production of Th17-skewing cytokines (IL-6, IL-23, whereas resistance is associated with increased allergen uptake by plasmacytoid DCs. Surprisingly, adoptive transfer of syngeneic HDM-pulsed bone marrow derived mDCs (BMDCs to the lungs of C3H mice markedly enhanced lung IL-17A production, and rendered them susceptible to allergen-driven airway hyperresponsiveness. Characterization of these BMDCs revealed levels of antigen uptake, and Th17 promoting cytokine production similar to that observed in pulmonary mDCs from susceptible A/J mice. Collectively these data demonstrate that the lung environment present in asthma-resistant mice promotes robust pDC allergen uptake, activation, and limits Th17-skewing cytokine production responsible for driving pathologic T cell responses central to the development of allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

  1. Transforming growth factor-β, interleukin-17, and IL-23 gene expression profiles associated with human peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardegan, Gustavo Pereira; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Roth, Leandro Amadeu; Faveri, Marcelo; Giro, Gabriela; Bastos, Marta Ferreira

    2017-07-01

    The mRNA expression profiles of IL-23/Th17 and the Treg-associated cytokine TGF-β in peri-implantitis are currently under research. This study characterized the IL-17, IL-23, and TGF-β gene expression levels in healthy and diseased peri-implant tissues and correlated these data with radiographic bone loss. Peri-implant soft tissues from 40 subjects (20 healthy controls with mean age of 59.4 ± 6.3, and 20 with peri-implantitis with mean age of 56.6 ± 5.5) were enrolled in this study, and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to define the profile of IL-17, IL-23, and TGF-β gene expression. Higher levels of TGF-β mRNA were observed in biopsies taken from healthy controls, and the IL-23 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the peri-implantitis group (P  0.05). Data presented in this report demonstrated a predominant Th17 response in peri-implantitis subjects based on the higher levels of IL-23 and lower levels of TGF-β detected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Potentially functional polymorphism in IL-23 receptor and risk of acute myeloid leukemia in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifeng Qian

    Full Text Available The interleukin-23 (IL-23 and its receptor (IL-23R mediate the direct antitumor activities in human hematologic malignancies including pediatric acute leukemia. Two potentially functional genetic variants (IL-23R rs1884444 T>G and rs6682925 T>C have been found to contribute to solid cancer susceptibility. In this study, we conducted a case-control study including 545 acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients and 1,146 cancer-free controls in a Chinese population to assess the association between these two SNPs and the risk of AML. We found that IL-23R rs1884444 TG/GG and rs6682925 TC/CC variant genotypes were associated with significantly increased risk of AML [rs1884444: adjusted odds ratio (OR = 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.01-1.62; rs6682925: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95%CI = 1.01-1.67], compared to their corresponding wild-type homozygotes, respectively. These findings indicated that genetic variants in IL-23R may contribute to AML risk in our Chinese population.

  3. rs1004819 is the main disease-associated IL23R variant in German Crohn's disease patients: combined analysis of IL23R, CARD15, and OCTN1/2 variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Glas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The IL23R gene has been identified as a susceptibility gene for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in the North American population. The aim of our study was to test this association in a large German IBD cohort and to elucidate potential interactions with other IBD genes as well as phenotypic consequences of IL23R variants. METHODS: Genomic DNA from 2670 Caucasian individuals including 833 patients with Crohn's disease (CD, 456 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, and 1381 healthy unrelated controls was analyzed for 10 IL23R SNPs. Genotyping included the NOD2 variants p.Arg702Trp, p.Gly908Arg, and p.Leu1007fsX1008 and polymorphisms in SLC22A4/OCTN1 (1672 C-->T and SLC22A5/OCTN2 (-207 G-->C. RESULTS: All IL23R gene variants analyzed displayed highly significant associations with CD. The strongest association was found for the SNP rs1004819 [P = 1.92x10(-11; OR 1.56; 95 % CI (1.37-1.78]. 93.2% of the rs1004819 TT homozygous carriers as compared to 78% of CC wildtype carriers had ileal involvement [P = 0.004; OR 4.24; CI (1.46-12.34]. The coding SNP rs11209026 (p.Arg381Gln was protective for CD [P = 8.04x10(-8; OR 0.43; CI (0.31-0.59]. Similar, but weaker associations were found in UC. There was no evidence for epistasis between the IL23R gene and the CD susceptibility genes CARD15 and SLC22A4/5. CONCLUSION: IL23R is an IBD susceptibility gene, but has no epistatic interaction with CARD15 and SLC22A4/5. rs1004819 is the major IL23R variant associated with CD in the German population, while the p.Arg381Gln IL23R variant is a protective marker for CD and UC.

  4. Association of NOD2 and IL23R with inflammatory bowel disease in Puerto Rico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veroushka Ballester

    Full Text Available The Puerto Rico population may be modeled as an admixed population with contributions from three continents: Sub-Saharan Africa, Ancient America, and Europe. Extending the study of the genetics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD to an admixed population such as Puerto Rico has the potential to shed light on IBD genes identified in studies of European populations, find new genes contributing to IBD susceptibility, and provide basic information on IBD for the care of US patients of Puerto Rican and Latino descent. In order to study the association between immune-related genes and Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC in Puerto Rico, we genotyped 1159 Puerto Rican cases, controls, and family members with the ImmunoChip. We also genotyped 832 subjects from the Human Genome Diversity Panel to provide data for estimation of global and local continental ancestry. Association of SNPs was tested by logistic regression corrected for global continental descent and family structure. We observed the association between Crohn's disease and NOD2 (rs17313265, 0.28 in CD, 0.19 in controls, OR 1.5, p = 9×10-6 and IL23R (rs11209026, 0.026 in CD, 0.0.071 in controls, OR 0.4, p = 3.8×10-4. The haplotype structure of both regions resembled that reported for European populations and "local" continental ancestry of the IL23R gene was almost entirely of European descent. We also observed suggestive evidence for the association of the BAZ1A promoter SNP with CD (rs1200332, 0.45 in CD, 0.35 in controls, OR 1.5, p = 2×10-6. Our estimate of continental ancestry surrounding this SNP suggested an origin in Ancient America for this putative susceptibility region. Our observations underscored the great difference between global continental ancestry and local continental ancestry at the level of the individual gene, particularly for immune-related loci.

  5. Association of NOD2 and IL23R with inflammatory bowel disease in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Veroushka; Guo, Xiuqing; Vendrell, Roberto; Haritunians, Talin; Klomhaus, Alexandra M; Li, Dalin; McGovern, Dermot P B; Rotter, Jerome I; Torres, Esther A; Taylor, Kent D

    2014-01-01

    The Puerto Rico population may be modeled as an admixed population with contributions from three continents: Sub-Saharan Africa, Ancient America, and Europe. Extending the study of the genetics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to an admixed population such as Puerto Rico has the potential to shed light on IBD genes identified in studies of European populations, find new genes contributing to IBD susceptibility, and provide basic information on IBD for the care of US patients of Puerto Rican and Latino descent. In order to study the association between immune-related genes and Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in Puerto Rico, we genotyped 1159 Puerto Rican cases, controls, and family members with the ImmunoChip. We also genotyped 832 subjects from the Human Genome Diversity Panel to provide data for estimation of global and local continental ancestry. Association of SNPs was tested by logistic regression corrected for global continental descent and family structure. We observed the association between Crohn's disease and NOD2 (rs17313265, 0.28 in CD, 0.19 in controls, OR 1.5, p = 9×10-6) and IL23R (rs11209026, 0.026 in CD, 0.0.071 in controls, OR 0.4, p = 3.8×10-4). The haplotype structure of both regions resembled that reported for European populations and "local" continental ancestry of the IL23R gene was almost entirely of European descent. We also observed suggestive evidence for the association of the BAZ1A promoter SNP with CD (rs1200332, 0.45 in CD, 0.35 in controls, OR 1.5, p = 2×10-6). Our estimate of continental ancestry surrounding this SNP suggested an origin in Ancient America for this putative susceptibility region. Our observations underscored the great difference between global continental ancestry and local continental ancestry at the level of the individual gene, particularly for immune-related loci.

  6. Diverse Genome-wide Association Studies Associate the IL12/IL23 Pathway with Crohn Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Kugathasan, Subra; Annese, Vito; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Russell, Richard K.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Imielinski, Marcin; Glessner, Joseph; Hou, Cuiping; Wilson, David C.; Walters, Thomas; Kim, Cecilia; Frackelton, Edward C.; Lionetti, Paolo; Barabino, Arrigo; Van Limbergen, Johan; Guthery, Stephen; Denson, Lee; Piccoli, David; Li, Mingyao; Dubinsky, Marla; Silverberg, Mark; Griffiths, Anne; Grant, Struan F.A.; Satsangi, Jack; Baldassano, Robert; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2009-01-01

    Previous genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically focus on single-locus analysis, which may not have the power to detect the majority of genuinely associated loci. Here, we applied pathway analysis using Affymetrix SNP genotype data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) and uncovered significant association between Crohn Disease (CD) and the IL12/IL23 pathway, harboring 20 genes (p = 8 × 10−5). Interestingly, the pathway contains multiple genes (IL12B and JAK2) or homologs of genes (STAT3 and CCR6) that were recently identified as genuine susceptibility genes only through meta-analysis of several GWA studies. In addition, the pathway contains other susceptibility genes for CD, including IL18R1, JUN, IL12RB1, and TYK2, which do not reach genome-wide significance by single-marker association tests. The observed pathway-specific association signal was subsequently replicated in three additional GWA studies of European and African American ancestry generated on the Illumina HumanHap550 platform. Our study suggests that examination beyond individual SNP hits, by focusing on genetic networks and pathways, is important to unleashing the true power of GWA studies. PMID:19249008

  7. Protein engineering of the chemokine CCL20 prevents psoriasiform dermatitis in an IL-23-dependent murine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Getschman, A E; Imai, Y; Larsen, O

    2017-01-01

    signaling. When given in an IL-23-dependent mouse model for psoriasis, CCL20 S64C prevented psoriatic inflammation and the up-regulation of IL-17A and IL-22. Our results validate CCR6 as a tractable therapeutic target for psoriasis and demonstrate the value of CCL20 S64C as a lead compound....

  8. A study of the changes of Th17 cells and IL-23 in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-ping HE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is an acute autoimmune-mediated inflammatory neuropathy. In this paper, the percentage of Th17 in peripheral blood lymphocyte and the level of IL-23 in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with GBS were detected. Twenty-five patients with GBS and 20 controls were analyzed. The percentage of Th17 cells in patients with GBS was (4.86 ± 0.60%, which was higher than that in controls [(2.71 ± 0.54%; t = 2.616, P = 0.012]. Serum IL-23 increased in patients with GBS [(111.80 ± 13.84 pg/ml vs (72.55 ± 8.19 pg/ml; t = 2.300, P = 0.026]. The level of IL-23 in serum and CSF from patients with GBS before therapy [(110.50 ± 15.66 and (102.30 ± 7.52 pg/ml] declined to normal after therapy [(74.13 ± 6.18 and (72.92 ± 12.09 pg/ml], and the difference was statistically significant (t = 2.557, P = 0.022; t = 1.422, P = 0.046. Th17 cells and IL-23 increased in patients with GBS, indicating that they may involve in the pathogenesis of GBS. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.012

  9. IL23R gene confers susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis concomitant with uveitis in a Han Chinese population.

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    Hongtao Dong

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The interleukin-23 receptor (IL-23R has been shown to be associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS in many different populations. This study examined whether IL-23R polymorphisms were associated with susceptibility to this disease in a Chinese Han population. METHODS: Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, rs7517847, rs11209032, and rs17375018, were genotyped in 291 AS patients and 312 age-, sex-, and ethnically matched healthy controls using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay. RESULTS: The genotype and allele frequencies of rs17375018, rs7517847, and rs11209032 were not different between the patients with AS and the healthy controls. On the one hand, stratification analysis indicated that the rs17375018 GG genotype and the G allele were increased in AS patients who were HLA-B27 positive (corrected p = 0.024, odds ratio [OR] 2.35, 95% CI 1.30-4.24; p c = 0.006, OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.28-3.07, respectively. On the other hand, the analysis according to clinical characteristics showed a significantly increased prevalence of the homozygous rs17375018 GG genotype and the G allele in patients with AS and uveitis compared with the controls (p c = 0.024 and p c = 0.024, respectively. In addition, haplotype analysis performed with the SHEsis platform revealed no significant difference concerning the haplotypes between AS patients and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the results suggested that the rs17375018 of IL23R was positively associated with HLA-B27-positive AS and that the rs17375018 GG of IL-23R was associated with AS concomitant with uveitis. We found no evidence for an association between the other two SNPs of IL-23R and AS.

  10. No Evidence of Association between Common Autoimmunity STAT4 and IL23R Risk Polymorphisms and Non-Anterior Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Coma, Miguel; Gorroño-Echebarría, Marina Begoña; Fonollosa, Alejandro; Adán, Alfredo; Martínez-Berriotxoa, Agustín; Díaz Valle, David; Pato, Esperanza; Blanco, Ricardo; Cañal, Joaquín; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; García Serrano, José Luis; de Ramón, Enrique; del Rio, María José; Martín-Villa, José Manuel; Molins, Blanca; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Martín, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Objective STAT4 and IL23R loci represent common susceptibility genetic factors in autoimmunity. We decided to investigate for the first time the possible role of different STAT4/IL23R autoimmune disease-associated polymorphisms on the susceptibility to develop non-anterior uveitis and its main clinical phenotypes. Methods Four functional polymorphisms (rs3821236, rs7574865, rs7574070, and rs897200) located within STAT4 gene as well as three independent polymorphisms (rs7517847, rs11209026, and rs1495965) located within IL23R were genotyped using TaqMan® allelic discrimination in a total of 206 patients with non-anterior uveitis and 1553 healthy controls from Spain. Results No statistically significant differences were found when allele and genotype distributions were compared between non-anterior uveitis patients and controls for any STAT4 (rs3821236: P=0.39, OR=1.12, CI 95%=0.87-1.43; rs7574865: P=0.59 OR=1.07, CI 95%=0.84-1.37; rs7574070: P=0.26, OR=0.89, CI 95%=0.72-1.10; rs897200: P=0.22, OR=0.88, CI 95%=0.71-1.08;) or IL23R polymorphisms (rs7517847: P=0.49, OR=1.08, CI 95%=0.87-1.33; rs11209026: P=0.26, OR=0.78, CI 95%=0.51-1.21; rs1495965: P=0.51, OR=0.93, CI 95%=0.76-1.15). Conclusion Our results do not support a relevant role, similar to that described for other autoimmune diseases, of IL23R and STAT4 polymorphisms in the non-anterior uveitis genetic predisposition. Further studies are needed to discard a possible weak effect of the studied variant. PMID:24312163

  11. Epigenetic imprinting by commensal probiotics inhibits the IL-23/IL-17 axis in an in vitro model of the intestinal mucosal immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadimi, Darab; Helwig, Ulf; Schrezenmeir, Juergen; Heller, Knut J; de Vrese, Michael

    2012-10-01

    The pathophysiology of IBD is characterized by a complex interaction between genes and the environment. Genetic and environmental differences are attributed to the heterogeneity of the disease pathway and to the epigenetic modifications that lead to altered gene expression in the diseased tissues. The epigenetic machinery consists of short interfering RNA, histone modifications, and DNA methylation. We evaluated the effects of Bifidobacterium breve (DSMZ 20213) and LGG (ATCC 53103), as representatives of commensal probiotics on the expression of IL-17 and IL-23, which play an important role in IBD, and on the epigenetic machinery in a 3D coculture model composed of human intestinal HT-29/B6 or T84 cells and PBMCs. The cells were treated with LPS in the presence or absence of bacteria for 48 h, and the expression of IL-17, IL-23, and CD40 at the mRNA and protein levels was assessed using TaqMan qRT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Western blotting was used to assess the expression of the MyD88, the degradation of IRAK-1 and IκBα, the expression of the NF-κB p50/p65 subunits, the p-p38 MAPK and p-MEK1, as well as histone modifications. NF-κB activity was assessed by NF-κB-dependent luciferase reporter gene assays. The accumulation of Ac-H4 and DNA methylation was quantitatively assessed using colorimetric assays. B. breve and LGG diminished the LPS-induced expression of IL-17, IL-23, CD40, and histone acetylation, while slightly enhancing DNA methylation. These effects were paralleled by a decrease in the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, as demonstrated by a decrease in the expression of MyD88, degradation of IRAK-1 and IκBα expression of the nuclear NF-κB p50/p65 subunits, p-p38 MAPK and p-MEK1, and NF-κB-dependent luciferase reporter gene activity in LPS-stimulated cells. B. breve and LGG may exert their anti-inflammatory effects in the gut by down-regulating the expression of the IBD-causing factors (IL-23/IL-17/CD40) associated with epigenetic processes

  12. O-Serotype Conversion in Salmonella Typhimurium Induces Protective Immune Responses against Invasive Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Pei; Liu, Qing; Luo, Hongyan; Liang, Kang; Yi, Jie; Luo, Ying; Hu, Yunlong; Han, Yue; Kong, Qingke

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella infections remain a big problem worldwide, causing enteric fever by Salmonella Typhi (or Paratyphi) or self-limiting gastroenteritis by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) in healthy individuals. NTS may become invasive and cause septicemia in elderly or immuno-compromised individuals, leading to high mortality and morbidity. No vaccines are currently available for preventing NTS infection in human. As these invasive NTS are restricted to several O-antigen serogroups including B1, D1, C...

  13. Involvement of IL17A, IL17F and IL23R Polymorphisms in Colorectal Cancer Therapy.

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    Inés Omrane

    Full Text Available IL23/IL17 pathway plays an important role in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. In general, the genes encoding the cytokines are genetically polymorphic and polymorphisms in genes IL23R and IL17 have been proved to be associated with its susceptibility to inflammatory diseases as well as cancer including colorectal cancer. Moreover, it has been shown that these interleukins are involved in anti-tumor or pro-tumor effects of various cancers. Previously, we showed that there is a significant association between IL17A, IL17F and IL23R polymorphisms as well as the occurrence of colorectal cancer and the clinical features of the disease. The purpose of the present work is to investigate an association between IL17A, IL17F and IL23R polymorphisms in 102 Tunisian patients with colorectal cancer treatment. The association was analyzed by statistical tools. We found that patients with mutated genotypes of IL17A G197A SNP could be a risk factor for the inefficiency of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Unlike IL17F variant, patients with wild type genotypes require surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. On the one hand, we found no evidence that supports a significant association between IL23R polymorphism and the combined genotypes of these three genes and the colorectal cancer treatment. On the other hand, we showed that there is an important interaction between IL17A/IL17F polymorphisms and the stage of the disease as well as its treatment. Finally, patients with IL17F wild type genotype highlighted that there is a valid longer OS without all treatments and with radiotherapy and a neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In contrast, we observed that there are no relationships between IL17A, IL23R and the survival of these patients neither with nor without the treatment. Our results suggest that polymorphisms in IL17A and IL17F genes may be a predictive source of colorectal cancer therapy type. Therefore, IL17F may serve as an independent prognostic factor

  14. IL-12 and IL-23 modulate plasticity of FoxP3+regulatory T cells in human Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarique, Mohd; Saini, Chaman; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Khanna, Neena; Sharma, Alpana; Rao, D N

    2017-03-01

    Leprosy is a bacterial disease caused by M. leprae. Its clinical spectrum reflects the host's immune response to the M. leprae and provide an ideal model to investigate the host pathogen interaction and immunological dysregulation. Tregs are high in leprosy patients and responsible for immune suppression of the host by producing IL-10 and TGF-β cytokines. In leprosy, plasticity of Tregs remain unstudied. This is the first study describing the conversion of Tregs into Th1-like and Th17-like cells using in vitro cytokine therapy in leprosy patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leprosy patients were isolated and stimulated with M. leprae antigen (MLCwA), rIL-12 and rIL-23 for 48h. Expression of FoxP3 in CD4 + CD25 + Tregs, intracellular cytokines IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-17 in Tregs cells were evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS) after stimulation. rIL-12 treatment increases the levels of pStat4 in Tregs and IFN-γ production. In the presence of rIL-23, pStat3 + and IL-17A + cells increase. rIL-12 and r-IL-23 treatment downregulated the FoxP3 expression, IL-10 and TGF-β production by Tregs and enhances the expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86). In conclusion rIL-12 converts Tregs into IFN-γ producing cells through STAT-4 signaling while rIL-23 converts Tregs into IL-17 producing cells through STAT-3 signaling in leprosy patients. This study may helpful to provide a new avenue to overcome the immunosuprression in leprosy patients using in vitro cytokine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Expressions and significance of IL-17 and IL-23 in intestinal mucosa of mice infected with Blastocystis hominis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-Yuan; Fu, Rui-Jia; Lu, Zuo-Chao; Tang, Li-Li; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Deng-Yu

    2012-12-01

    To study the expressions of interleukin-17 (IL-17) and interleukin-23 (IL-23) in the intestinal mucosa of BABL/C mice infected with Blastocystis hominis. A total of 30 BABL/C mice were randomly divided into different groups: an experimental group, an immunosuppressant group and a normal group. Each mouse of the experimental group and immunosuppressant group was administered intraperieneally with dexamethasone (2 mg, gd, for 5 days) and one of the control group was given physiological saline (0.2 ml). In the experimental group, each mouse was infected with Blastocystis hominis (107 parasites per 0.5 ml) by the intragastric infusion method; in the immunosuppressant group and normal group, the mice were fed with equal physiological saline. On the fifth day post-infection, the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon of the mice of the 3 groups were taken out for the tissue section. The pathological changes of bowel mucosa were determined by HE staining, and the expressions of IL-17 and IL-23 in different parts of bowel mucosa were determined by immunohistochemistry assay. The pathological examinations showed intestinal mucosa had various degrees of inflammatory changes. The expressions of IL-17 and IL-23 in the intestinal mucosa of the mice in the experimental group was significantly higher than those in the immunosuppressant group or normal group (both P 0.05). The expression of IL-17 in the duodenum or jejunum or colon of the mice was significantly higher than that in the ileum in the experimental group (P Blastocystis hominis. IL-23 may also be involved in the immunomodulatory effects of Blastocystis hominis infection, which plays a mutual regulatory role with IL-17.

  16. Microbiotadown regulates dendritic cell expression of miR-10a which targets IL-12/IL-23p40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaochang; Feng, Ting; Yao, Suxia; Wolf, Kyle J.; Liu, Chang-Gong; Liu, Xiuping; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2011-01-01

    Commensal flora plays important roles in the regulation of the gene expression involved in many intestinal functions and the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, act as key regulators in many biological processes. The miRNAs are highly conserved among species and appear to play important roles in both innate and adaptive immunity, as they can control the differentiation of various immune cells as well as their functions. However, it is still largely unknown how microbiota regulates miRNA expression, thereby contributing to intestinal homeostasis and pathogenesis of IBD. In our current study, we found that microbiota negatively regulated intestinal miR-10a expression, in that the intestines, as well as intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells of specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice, expressed much lower levels of miR-10a compared to those in germ-free (GF) mice. Commensal bacteria downregulated DC miR-10a expression via TLR-TLR ligand interactions through a MyD88-dependent pathway. We identified IL-12/IL-23p40, a key molecule for innate immune responses to commensal bacteria, as a target of miR-10a. The ectopic expression of miR-10a precursor inhibited, whereas miR-10a inhibitor promoted, the expression of IL-12/IL-23p40 in DC. Mice with colitis expressing higher levels of IL-12/IL-23p40 exhibit lower levels of intestinal miR-10a compared to that in the control mice. Collectively, our data demonstrated that microbiota negatively regulates host miR-10a expression, which may contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by targeting IL-12/IL-23p40 expression. PMID:22068236

  17. Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis infection of the porcine jejunal Peyer's patch rapidly induces IL-1beta and IL-8 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Kendra A; Brown, David R; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2006-01-15

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is an enteric pathogen of swine, producing septicemia, enterocolitis, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The initial molecular events at the site of Salmonella infection are hypothesized to be critical in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses; however, the acute immune response elicited by porcine intestinal tissues is not well understood. To address this need, we employed explants of jejunal Peyer's patch (JPP) mucosa from pigs to examine Salmonella-induced immune responses under controlled conditions as well as to overcome limitations of whole animal approaches. JPP explants mounted in Ussing chambers maintained normal histological structure for 2 h and stable short-circuit current and electrical conductance for 2.5 h. After ex vivo luminal exposure to Salmonella serovar Choleraesuis, JPP responded with an increase in mRNA expression of IL-1beta and IL-8, but not TNFalpha. Increased IL-1beta and IL-8 expression were dependent on efficient Salmonella adhesion and internalization, whereas mutant Salmonella did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. Commensal enteric bacteria, present in some experiments, also did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicate that Salmonella uptake by Peyer's patch is important in the induction of an innate response involving expression of IL-1beta and IL-8, and that ex vivo intestinal immune tissue explants provide an intact tissue model that will facilitate investigation of mucosal immunity in swine.

  18. Identification of in vivo-induced genes during infection of chickens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Zhicheng; Lin, Zhijie; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-06-01

    Chickens are an important source of food worldwide and are often infected with food-poisoning serovars of Salmonella enterica, frequently Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), without exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Ivi (in vivo induced) genes identified using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) are expressed only during bacterial infection and have the potential value of identifying epidemic strains and antigens which can form the basis for sub-unit vaccine development. We applied IVIAT to SE strain 50041 and identified 42 ivi genes. Eight representative ivi genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR as being expressed only in vivo within 48 h of infection compared with that of in vitro-cultured. Although our results indicated that the identified ivi genes are expressed only in vivo, further research is needed to elucidate the exact roles of these genes during infection and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. T-2 toxin induced Salmonella Typhimurium intoxication results in decreased Salmonella numbers in the cecum contents of pigs, despite marked effects on Salmonella-host cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The mycotoxin T-2 toxin and Salmonella Typhimurium infections pose a significant threat to human and animal health. Interactions between both agents may result in a different outcome of the infection. Therefore, the aim of the presented study was to investigate the effects of low and relevant concentrations of T-2 toxin on the course of a Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs. We showed that the presence of 15 and 83 μg T-2 toxin per kg feed significantly decreased the amount of Salmonella Typhimurium bacteria present in the cecum contents, and a tendency to a reduced colonization of the jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and colon contents was noticed. In vitro, proteomic analysis of porcine enterocytes revealed that a very low concentration of T-2 toxin (5 ng/mL) affects the protein expression of mitochondrial, endoplasmatic reticulum and cytoskeleton associated proteins, proteins involved in protein synthesis and folding, RNA synthesis, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and regulatory processes. Similarly low concentrations (1-100 ng/mL) promoted the susceptibility of porcine macrophages and intestinal epithelial cells to Salmonella Typhimurium invasion, in a SPI-1 independent manner. Furthermore, T-2 toxin (1-5 ng/mL) promoted the translocation of Salmonella Typhimurium over an intestinal porcine epithelial cell monolayer. Although these findings may seem in favour of Salmonella Typhimurium, microarray analysis showed that T-2 toxin (5 ng/mL) causes an intoxication of Salmonella Typhimurium, represented by a reduced motility and a downregulation of metabolic and Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 genes. This study demonstrates marked interactions of T-2 toxin with Salmonella Typhimurium pathogenesis, resulting in bacterial intoxication. PMID:22440148

  20. mgtA Expression is induced by rob overexpression and mediates a Salmonella enterica resistance phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiesi, Julieta; Castelli, María E; Soncini, Fernando C; Véscovi, Eleonora García

    2008-07-01

    Rob is a member of the Sox/Mar subfamily of AraC/XylS-type transcriptional regulators implicated in bacterial multidrug, heavy metal, superoxide, and organic solvent resistance phenotypes. We demonstrate that, in Salmonella enterica, Rob overexpression upregulates the transcription of mgtA, which codes for the MgtA Mg2+ transporter. mgtA was previously characterized as a member of the Mg2+-modulated PhoPQ regulon. Here we demonstrate that Rob (but not its paralog protein SoxS or MarA) is able to induce mgtA transcription in a PhoP-independent fashion by binding to a conserved Mar/Sox/Rob motif localized downstream of the PhoP-box and overlapping the PhoP-dependent transcriptional start site. We found that Rob-induced mgtA expression confers low-level cyclohexane resistance on Salmonella. Because mgtA intactness is required for Rob-induced cyclohexane resistance, provided the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump can be expressed, we postulate that MgtA is involved in the AcrAB-mediated cyclohexane detoxification mechanism promoted by Rob in Salmonella.

  1. The enhanced immune responses induced by Salmonella enteritidis ghosts loaded with Neisseria gonorrhoeae porB against Salmonella in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Hongmei; Yang, Hui; Zhao, Dan; He, Li; Chen, Jin; Li, Guocai

    2016-11-01

    Human health has been seriously endangered by highly prevalent salmonellosis and multidrug-resistant Salmonella strains. Current vaccines suffer from variable immune-protective effects, so more effective ones are needed to control Salmonella infection : Bacterial ghosts have been produced by the expression of lysis gene E from bacteriophage PhiX174 and can be filled with considerable exogenous substances such as DNA or drugs as a novel platform. In this study, Salmonella enteritidis (SE) ghosts were developed and loaded with Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin B (porB) to construct a novel inactive vaccine. Our new studies show that SE ghosts loaded with porB displayed increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12p70) in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), and elicited significantly higher specific systemic and mucosal immune responses to Salmonella than SE ghosts alone. In addition, the novel porB-loaded ghosts conferred higher protective effects on virulent Salmonella challenge. For the first time, we demonstrate that N. gonorrhoeae porB, as a novel adjuvant, can increase the immunogenicity of SE ghosts. Our studies suggested that Salmonella enteritidis ghosts loaded with Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin B might be a useful mucosal Salmonella vaccine candidate for practical use in the future. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Interleukin 17 regulates SHP-2 and IL-17RA/STAT-3 dependent Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF expression and RANKL mediated osteoclastogenesis by fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2017-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 predominately produced by the Th17 cells, plays a crucial role in the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) mediated disease process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). IL-17 exerts its pathogenic effects in RA-FLS by IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling. Recent studies have shown that RA-FLS produces SHP-2, Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL which results in worsening of the disease. However, whether IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling regulates SHP-2, Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL expressions in RA-FLS remains unknown. In this study, IL-17 treatment dramatically induced the production of Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF in FLS isolated from adjuvant induced arthritis (AA) rats. Conversely, IL-17 mediated production of Cyr61, IL-23 and GM-CSF was abrogated by knockdown of IL-17RA using a small interfering RNA or blockade of STAT-3 activation with S3I-201 in AA-FLS. Interestingly, IL-17 treatment noticeably increased the expression of IL-17RA and SHP-2 in AA-FLS. However, silencing of IL-17RA reversed the effect of IL-17 on the expression of IL-17RA and SHP-2 in AA-FLS. In addition, an increased number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells were observed in a coculture system consisting of IL-17 treated AA-FLS and rat bone marrow derived monocytes/macrophages. Further, mechanistically we found that IL-17 upregulated RANKL expression in AA-FLS that was dependent on the IL-17/IL-17RA/STAT-3 signaling cascade. Knockdown of IL-17RA or inhibition of STAT-3 activation decreased the IL- 17 induced RANKL expression by AA-FLS and their osteoclastogenic potential. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that IL-17 regulates SHP-2 expression and IL-17RA/STAT-3 dependent production of Cyr61, IL-23, GM-CSF and RANKL in AA-FLS and may reveal a new insight into the pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. IL-17 Induction by ArtinM is Due to Stimulation of IL-23 and IL-1 Release and/or Interaction with CD3 in CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Aparecido da Silva

    Full Text Available ArtinM is a D-mannose-binding lectin extracted from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus that interacts with TLR2 N-glycans and activates antigen-presenting cells (APCs, as manifested by IL-12 production. In vivo ArtinM administration induces Th1 immunity and confers protection against infection with several intracellular pathogens. In the murine model of Candida albicans infection, it was verified that, in addition to Th1, ArtinM induces Th17 immunity manifested by high IL-17 levels in the treated animals. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms accounting for the ArtinM-induced IL-17 production. We found that ArtinM stimulates the IL-17 production by spleen cells in BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice, a response that was significantly reduced in the absence of IL-23, MyD88, or IL-1R. Furthermore, we showed that ArtinM directly induced the IL-23 mRNA expression and the IL-1 production by macrophages. Consistently, in cell suspensions depleted of macrophages, the IL-17 production stimulated by ArtinM was reduced by 53% and the exogenous IL-23 acted synergistically with ArtinM in promoting IL-17 production by spleen cell suspensions. We verified that the absence of IL-23, IL-1R, or MyD88 inhibited, but did not block, the IL-17 production by ArtinM-stimulated spleen cells. Therefore, we investigated whether ArtinM exerts a direct effect on CD4+ T cells in promoting IL-17 production. Indeed, spleen cell suspensions depleted of CD4+ T cells responded to ArtinM with very low levels of IL-17 release. Likewise, isolated CD4+ T cells under ArtinM stimulus augmented the expression of TGF-β mRNA and released high levels of IL-17. Considering the observed synergism between IL-23 and ArtinM, we used cells from IL-23 KO mice to assess the direct effect of lectin on CD4+ T cells. We verified that ArtinM increased the IL-17 production significantly, a response that was inhibited when the CD4+ T cells were pre-incubated with anti-CD3 antibody. In conclusion, Artin

  4. IL-17 Induction by ArtinM is Due to Stimulation of IL-23 and IL-1 Release and/or Interaction with CD3 in CD4+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Mariano, Vania Sammartino; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; de Souza, Maria Aparecida; Mineo, Tiago Wilson Patriarca; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ArtinM is a D-mannose-binding lectin extracted from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus that interacts with TLR2 N-glycans and activates antigen-presenting cells (APCs), as manifested by IL-12 production. In vivo ArtinM administration induces Th1 immunity and confers protection against infection with several intracellular pathogens. In the murine model of Candida albicans infection, it was verified that, in addition to Th1, ArtinM induces Th17 immunity manifested by high IL-17 levels in the treated animals. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms accounting for the ArtinM-induced IL-17 production. We found that ArtinM stimulates the IL-17 production by spleen cells in BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice, a response that was significantly reduced in the absence of IL-23, MyD88, or IL-1R. Furthermore, we showed that ArtinM directly induced the IL-23 mRNA expression and the IL-1 production by macrophages. Consistently, in cell suspensions depleted of macrophages, the IL-17 production stimulated by ArtinM was reduced by 53% and the exogenous IL-23 acted synergistically with ArtinM in promoting IL-17 production by spleen cell suspensions. We verified that the absence of IL-23, IL-1R, or MyD88 inhibited, but did not block, the IL-17 production by ArtinM-stimulated spleen cells. Therefore, we investigated whether ArtinM exerts a direct effect on CD4+ T cells in promoting IL-17 production. Indeed, spleen cell suspensions depleted of CD4+ T cells responded to ArtinM with very low levels of IL-17 release. Likewise, isolated CD4+ T cells under ArtinM stimulus augmented the expression of TGF-β mRNA and released high levels of IL-17. Considering the observed synergism between IL-23 and ArtinM, we used cells from IL-23 KO mice to assess the direct effect of lectin on CD4+ T cells. We verified that ArtinM increased the IL-17 production significantly, a response that was inhibited when the CD4+ T cells were pre-incubated with anti-CD3 antibody. In conclusion, ArtinM stimulates the production

  5. IL23R and IL12B SNPs and Haplotypes Strongly Associate with Crohn's Disease Risk in a New Zealand Population

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    Lynnette R. Ferguson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA samples from 339 Crohn's disease (CD and 407 randomly selected controls from the Auckland (New Zealand IBD project, were genotyped for five common single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-23R (rs11805303, rs7517847, rs1343151, rs11209026, and rs10889677 and two in IL-12B (rs1363670 and rs6887695. While the IL-12B variants did not show an overall association and other IL23R variants led to minor changes in the risk of CD, rs1343151 and/or rs7517847 variants in the IL-23R gene strongly reduced the risk of developing CD at both allelic and genotype levels. A significantly decreased risk of first diagnosis of childhood CD was observed in individuals carrying the A allele of rs1343151, or between 17–40 y in individuals carrying the G allele in rs7517847 of IL-23R. A significantly decreased risk of ileocolonic or structuring disease was observed in individuals carrying the A allele in either rs11209026 or rs1343151, or the G allele in rs7517847 of IL-23R, and when such individuals did develop the disease, they were unlikely to require a bowel resection. Certain haplotypes very strongly modified risk. There was evidence for interactions of IL-23R variants with the NOD2 wild-type (d/d genotype. Down-regulating the function of the IL-23R gene may decrease CD risk in the normal population.

  6. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages

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    Van Parys Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host’s immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig’s immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology.

  7. Immunogenicity and Cross-Protective Efficacy Induced by Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Typhimurium Mutants with Truncated LPS in Mice

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    Qiong Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a major virulence factor present in the outer membrane of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs from Salmonella show high immunogenicity and provide protection against Salmonella infection, and truncated LPS alters the outer membrane composition of the cell wall. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Salmonella mutants carrying truncated LPS failed to induce strong immune responses and cross-reaction to other enteric bacteria, due to their high attenuation and low colonization in the host. Therefore, we plan to investigate whether outer membrane proteins from Salmonella mutants with truncated LPS resulting from a series of nonpolar mutations, including ∆waaC12, ∆waaF15, ∆waaG42, ∆rfaH49, ∆waaI43, ∆waaJ44, ∆waaL46, ∆wbaP45 and ∆wzy-48, affect immunogenicity and provide protection against diverse Salmonella challenge. In this study, the immunogenicity and cross-protection efficiency of purified OMPs from all mutants were investigated to explore a potential OMP vaccine to protect against homologous or heterologous serotype Salmonella challenge. The results demonstrated that OMPs from three Salmonella mutants (∆waaC12, ∆waaJ44 and ∆waaL46 induced higher immune responses and provided good protection against homologous S. Typhimurium. The OMPs from these three mutants were also selected to determine the cross-protective efficacy against homologous and heterologous serotype Salmonella. Our results indicated that the mutant ∆waaC12 can elicit higher cross-reactivity and can provide good protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis infection and that the cross-reactivity may be ascribed to an antigen of approximately 18.4–30 kDa.

  8. Clinical Significance of IL-23 Regulating IL-17A and/or IL-17F Positive Th17 Cells in Chronic Periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenhua Luo; Hui Wang; Yunlong Wu; Zheng Sun; Yafei Wu

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the expression level and clinical significance of (IL-17A+ and/or IL-17F+) Th17 cells under IL-23 regulation in patients of chronic periodontitis (CP) and healthy controls (HC). Materials and Methods. The whole peripheral blood samples were collected from 30 CP patients and 25 healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used to test the (IL-17A+ and/or IL-17F+) Th17 expression level. Recombinant human IL-23 (rhIL-23) was used to detect Th17 differentiation and expansion. Co...

  9. The Agricultural Antibiotic Carbadox Induces Phage-mediated Gene Transfer in Salmonella

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    Bradley L. Bearson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the U.S. during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness

  10. The different effects of probiotics treatment on Salmonella-induced interleukin-8 response in intestinal epithelia cells via PI3K/Akt and NOD2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F-C; Huang, S-C

    2016-11-30

    Salmonella spp. remains a major public health problem for the whole world. Intestinal epithelial cells serve as an essential component of the innate mucosal immune system to defend against Salmonella infection. A substantial amount of evidence has accumulated that probiotics can regulate interleukin 8 (IL-8) involved in innate immunity. However, the exact effect of probiotics on epithelial IL-8 response to Salmonella infection is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the action of probiotics on Salmonella-infected Caco-2 cells and its novel mechanisms. Two probiotic strains were examined for Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses and regulating proteins using Caco-2 cell cultures. We demonstrated probiotic, either Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM10140, administered before Salmonella infection conferred significantly suppressive effect on Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses in Caco-2 cells, either in secreted protein or mRNA, via the PI3K/Akt signal pathway while probiotic administered after infection enhanced Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses via nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein 2 expression in membrane. These findings suggest that the different regulation of probiotics on Salmonella-induced IL-8 responses in Caco-2 cells according to the administered timing supports a rationale for the therapeutic use of probiotics in the treatment of Salmonella colitis and inflammatory bowel disease. This can explain the reported controversial effect of probiotics on these diseases.

  11. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  12. Increased interleukin 21 (IL-21) and IL-23 are associated with increased disease activity and with radiographic status in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tue Kruse; Andersen, Thomas; Hvid, Malene

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the levels of the T helper (Th)17-related cytokines interleukin 17A (IL-17A), IL-21, and IL-23 and their association with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the levels of the T helper (Th)17-related cytokines interleukin 17A (IL-17A), IL-21, and IL-23 and their association with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  13. Association between Plasma Levels of Transforming Growth Factor-beta1, IL-23 and IL-17 and the Severity of Autism in Egyptian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Haitham; Abdelrahman, Hadeel; Mohammed, Doaa; Karam, Rehab

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently shown that dysregulation of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), IL-23 and IL-17 has been identified as a major factor involved in autoimmune disorders. Based on the increasing evidence of immune dysfunction in autism the aim of this study was to measure serum levels of TGF-beta1, IL-23 and IL-17 in relation to the…

  14. HMGB1 exacerbates experimental mouse colitis by enhancing innate lymphoid cells 3 inflammatory responses via promoted IL-23 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Li, Lingyun; Khan, Muhammad Noman; Shi, Lifeng; Wang, Zhongyan; Zheng, Fang; Gong, Feili; Fang, Min

    2016-11-01

    In inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), as an endogenous inflammatory molecule, can promote inflammatory cytokines secretion by acting on TLR2/4 resulting in tissue damage. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report a novel role of HMGB1 in controlling the maintenance and function of intestine-resident group-3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) that are important innate effector cells implicated in mucosal homeostasis and IBD pathogenesis. We showed that mice treated with anti-HMGB1 Ab, or genetically deficient for TLR2 -/- or TLR4 -/- mice, displayed reduced intestinal inflammation. In these mice, the numbers of colonic ILC3s were significantly reduced, and the levels of IL-17 and IL-22 that can be secreted by ILC3s were also decreased in the colon tissues. Furthermore, HMGB1 promoted DCs via TLR2/4 signaling to produce IL-23, activating ILC3s to produce IL-17 and IL-22. Our data thus indicated that the HMGB1-TLR2/4-DCs-IL-23 cascade pathway enhances the functions of ILC3s to produce IL-17 and IL-22, and this signal way might play a vital role in the development of IBD.

  15. Cis association of galectin-9 with Tim-3 differentially regulates IL-12/IL-23 expressions in monocytes via TLR signaling.

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    Cheng J Ma

    Full Text Available Human monocytes/macrophages (M/M(Ф of the innate immunity sense and respond to microbial products via specific receptor coupling with stimulatory (such as TLR and inhibitory (such as Tim-3 receptors. Current models imply that Tim-3 expression on M/M(Ø can deliver negative signaling to TLR-mediated IL-12 expression through trans association with its ligand Galectin-9 (Gal-9 presented by other cells. However, Gal-9 is also expressed within M/M(Ø, and the effect of intracellular Gal-9 on Tim-3 activities and inflammatory responses in the same M/M(Ø remains unknown. In this study, our data suggest that Tim-3 and IL-12/IL-23 gene transcriptions are regulated by enhanced or silenced Gal-9 expression within monocytes through synergizing with TLR signaling. Additionally, TLR activation facilitates Gal-9/Tim-3 cis association within the same M/M(Ø to differentially regulate IL-12/IL-23 expressions through STAT-3 phosphorylation. These results reveal a ligand (Gal-9 compartment-dependent regulatory effect on receptor (Tim-3 activities and inflammatory responses via TLR pathways--a novel mechanism underlying cellular responses to external or internal cues.

  16. Src kinases are required for a balanced production of IL-12/IL-23 in human dendritic cells activated by Toll-like receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuka, Mirela; Baronio, Roberta; Valentini, Sara; Monaci, Elisabetta; Muzzi, Alessandro; Aprea, Susanna; De Gregorio, Ennio; D'Oro, Ugo

    2010-07-09

    Pathogen recognition by dendritic cells (DC) is crucial for the initiation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Activation of Toll-like Receptors (TLRs) by microbial molecular patterns leads to the maturation of DC, which present the antigen and activate T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Cytokine production by DC is critical for shaping the adaptive immune response by regulating T helper cell differentiation. It was previously shown by our group that Src kinases play a key role in cytokines production during TLR4 activation in human DC. In this work we investigated the role of Src kinases during different TLRs triggering in human monocyte-derived DC (MoDC). We found that Src family kinases are important for a balanced production of inflammatory cytokines by human MoDC upon stimulation of TLR3 and 8 with their respective agonists. Disruption of this equilibrium through pharmacological inhibition of Src kinases alters the DC maturation pattern. In particular, while expression of IL-12 and other inflammatory cytokines depend on Src kinases, the induction of IL-23 and co-stimulatory molecules do not. Accordingly, DC treated with Src inhibitors are not compromised in their ability to induce CD4 T cell proliferation and to promote the Th17 subset survival but are less efficient in inducing Th1 differentiation. We suggest that the pharmacological modulation of DC maturation has the potential to shape the quality of the adaptive immune response and could be exploited for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases.

  17. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation induces an adverse pregnancy outcome in the murine model.

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    Mariángeles Noto Llana

    Full Text Available Foodborne diseases caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis are a significant health problem. Pregnancy, state of immunological tolerance, is a predisposing condition for the development of infections with intracellular pathogens. Salmonella species can cause pregnancy complications such as chorioamnionitis, transplacental fetal infection, pre term labor, abortions, neonatal and maternal septicemia. However, the specific mechanisms by which Salmonella infections trigger these alterations are not clear. In the present work, using a self-limiting enterocolitis murine model, we show that the ingestion of a low dose of S. Enteritidis at late stages of pregnancy (day 15 of gestation is sufficient to induce massive maternal infection. We found that Salmonella infection leads to 40% of pre term delivery, 33% of abortion and fetal growth restriction. Placental dysfunction during S. Enteritidis enterocolitis was confirmed through cellular infiltration and hypoxia markers (MPO activity and COX-1 and COX-2 expression, respectively. Apoptosis in placental tissue due to Salmonella infection was also evident at day 18 of gestation when investigated by morphometric procedure, DNA fragmentation and Fas/FasL expression. Also, the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-10 was up regulated in response to Salmonella not only in placenta, but also in amniotic fluid and maternal serum. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S. Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation causes detrimental effect on pregnancy outcome.

  18. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms of IL23R and IL17 with ulcerative colitis risk in a Chinese Han population.

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    Pengli Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies implicated that IL23R and IL17 genes play an important role in autoimmune inflammation. Genome-wide association studies have also identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the IL23R gene region associated with inflammatory bowel diseases. This study examined the association of IL23R and IL17A gene SNPs with ulcerative colitis susceptibility in a population in China. METHODOLOGY: A total of 270 ulcerative colitis and 268 healthy controls were recruited for the analyses of 23 SNPs in the IL23R and IL17A regions. Genomic DNA was extracted and analysis of these 23 SNPs using ligase detection reaction allelic (LDR technology. Genotype and allele associations were calculated using SPSS 13.0 software package. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Compared to the healthy controls, the variant alleles IL23R rs7530511, and rs11805303 showed a statistically significant difference for ulcerative colitis susceptibility (0.7% vs 3.3%, P = 0.002; 60.4% vs 53.2%, P = 0.0017, respectively. The linkage disequilibrium (LD patterns of these SNPs were measured and three LD blocks from the SNPs of IL23R and one block from those of IL17A were identified. A novel association with ulcerative colitis susceptibility occurred in haplotypes of IL23R (Block1 H3 P = 0.02; Block2 H2 P = 0.019; Block3 H4 P = 0.029 and IL17A (H4 P = 0.034. Pair-wise analyses showed an interaction between the risk haplotypes in IL23R and IL17A (P = 0.014. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that rs7530511, and rs11805303 of IL23R were significantly associated with ulcerative colitis susceptibility in the Chinese population. The most noticeable finding was the linkage of IL23R and IL17A gene region to ulcerative colitis risk due to the gene-gene interaction.

  19. IL-23 actived γδ T cells affect Th17 cells and regulatory T cells by secreting IL-21 in children with primary nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yan, Junli; Yang, Baohui; Zhang, Gaofu; Wang, Mo; Dong, Shifang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Haiping; Li, Qiu

    2017-11-09

    This study (1) analyzed the percentage of γδ T cells, γδ T cell subsets, Th17 cells, and regulatory T cells (Treg cells), and (2) determined the role of IL-23 in primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS) patients with active disease and in remission. Eighty-four PNS patients and 51 healthy age-matched controls were included in this study. The percentage of γδ T cells, γδ T cell subsets, Th17 cells, and Treg cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMBCs from PNS patients with active disease were cultured in the presence of IL-23, IL-23 and an IL-23 antagonist, or IL23 and an anti-IL-21 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The percentage of γδT cells, IL-23R+ γδ T cells, and IL-17+ γδ T cells were significantly increased in PNS patients with active disease. There was a positive correlation between the percentage of γδ T cells, IL-23R+ γδ T cells, IL-17+ γδ T cells, and the Th17/Treg ratio. IL-23 increased the percentage of γδ T cells and Th17 cells and decreased the percentage of Treg cells in PBMCs isolated from PNS patients with active disease. Anti-IL-21 mAb reduced the percentage of γδ T cells and Th17 cells, but increased the percentage of Treg cells. γδ T cells, IL-17+ γδ T cells, and IL-23R+ γδ T cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of pediatric PNS by modulating the balance of Th17/Treg cells. γδT cells may cause an imbalance in Th17/Treg cells by secreting IL-21 in the presence of IL-23. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Salmonella infects B cells by macropinocytosis and formation of spacious phagosomes but does not induce pyroptosis in favor of its survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reyes, Roberto; Pérez-López, Araceli; Sánchez-Gómez, Concepción; Hernández-Mote, Rosaura Ruth; Castro-Eguiluz, Denisse; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia Mercedes

    2012-06-01

    We have previously reported that Salmonella infects B cells and survives within endosomal-lysosomal compartments. However, the mechanisms used by Salmonella to enter B cells remain unknown. In this study, we have shown that Salmonella induces its own entry by the induction of localized ruffling, macropinocytosis, and spacious phagosome formation. These events were associated with the rearrangement of actin and microtubule networks. The Salmonella pathogenesis island 1 (SPI-1) was necessary to invade B cells. In contrast to macrophages, B cells were highly resistant to cell death induced by Salmonella. These data demonstrate the ability of Salmonella to infect these non-professional phagocytic cells, where the bacterium can find an ideal intracellular niche to support persistence and the possible dissemination of infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Th-17 regulatory cytokines IL-21, IL-23, and IL-6 enhance neutrophil production of IL-17 cytokines during asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halwani, Rabih; Sultana, Asma; Vazquez-Tello, Alejandro; Jamhawi, Amer; Al-Masri, Abeer A; Al-Muhsen, Saleh

    2017-11-01

    In a subset of severe asthma patients, chronic airway inflammation is associated with infiltration of neutrophils, Th-17 cells and elevated expression of Th-17-derived cytokines (e.g., interleukin [IL]-17, IL-21, IL-22). Peripheral neutrophils from allergic asthmatics are known to express higher IL-17 cytokine levels than those from healthy subjects, but the regulatory mechanisms involved are not well understood. We hypothesize that Th-17 regulatory cytokines could modulate IL-17 expression in neutrophils. Peripheral blood neutrophils isolated from asthmatics were stimulated with IL-21, IL-23, and IL-6 cytokines and their ability to produce IL-17A and IL-17F was determined relative to healthy controls. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation levels were measured in stimulated neutrophil using flow cytometry. The requirement for STAT3 phosphorylation was determined by blocking its activation using a specific chemical inhibitor. Stimulating asthmatic neutrophils with IL-21, 23, and 6 enhanced the production of IL-17A and IL-17F at significantly higher levels comparatively to healthy controls. Stimulating neutrophils with IL-21, IL-23, and IL-6 cytokines enhanced STAT3 phosphorylation, in all cases. Interestingly, inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation using a specific chemical inhibitor dramatically blocked the ability of neutrophils to produce IL-17, demonstrating that STAT3 activation is the major factor mediating IL-17 gene expression. These findings suggest that neutrophil infiltration in lungs of severe asthmatics may represent an important source of pro-inflammatory IL-17A and -F cytokines, a production enhanced by Th-17 regulatory cytokines, and thus providing a feedback mechanism that sustains inflammation. Our results suggest that STAT3 pathway could be a potential target for regulating neutrophilic inflammation during severe asthma.

  2. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived macrophages as a cellular system to study salmonella and other pathogens.

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    Christine Hale

    Full Text Available A number of pathogens, including several human-restricted organisms, persist and replicate within macrophages (Mφs as a key step in pathogenesis. The mechanisms underpinning such host-restricted intracellular adaptations are poorly understood, in part, due to a lack of appropriate model systems. Here we explore the potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived macrophages (iPSDMs to study such pathogen interactions. We show iPSDMs express a panel of established Mφ-specific markers, produce cytokines, and polarise into classical and alternative activation states in response to IFN-γ and IL-4 stimulation, respectively. iPSDMs also efficiently phagocytosed inactivated bacterial particles as well as live Salmonella Typhi and S. Typhimurium and were able to kill these pathogens. We conclude that iPSDMs can support productive Salmonella infection and propose this as a flexible system to study host/pathogen interactions. Furthermore, iPSDMs can provide a flexible and practical cellular platform for assessing host responses in multiple genetic backgrounds.

  3. Resveratrol induces membrane and DNA disruption via pro-oxidant activity against Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonjong; Lee, Dong Gun

    2017-07-22

    Resveratrol is a flavonoid found in various plants including grapes, which has been reported to be active against various pathogenic bacteria. However, antibacterial effects and mechanisms via pro-oxidant property of resveratrol remain unknown and speculative. This research investigated antibacterial mechanism of resveratrol against a food-borne human pathogen Salmonella typhimurium, and confirmed the cell death associated oxidative damage. Resveratrol increased outer membrane permeability and membrane depolarization. It also was observed DNA injury responses such as DNA fragmentation, increasing DNA contents and cell division inhibition. Intracellular ROS accumulation, GSH depletion and significant increased malondialdehyde levels were confirmed, which indicated pro-oxidant activity of resveratrol and oxidative stress. Furthermore, the observed lethal damages were reduced by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine treatment supported the view that resveratrol-induced oxidative stress stimulated S. typhimurium cell death. In conclusion, this study expands understanding on role of pro-oxidant property and insight into previously unrecognized oxygen-dependent anti-Salmonella mechanism on resveratrol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech; Baker, A; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-01-01

    ). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT...... marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast-mediated epithelial cell barrier protection from Salmonella invasion, thus encouraging future...

  5. Leptin deficiency down-regulates IL-23 production in glomerular podocytes resulting in an attenuated immune response in nephrotoxic serum nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kei; Kaneko, Yoshikatsu; Sato, Yuya; Otsuka, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Suguru; Goto, Shin; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Madaio, Michael P; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-04-01

    Leptin, one of the typical adipokines, is reported to promote Th17 cell responses and to enhance production of proinflammatory cytokines. To clarify the role of leptin in the regulation of the IL-23/IL-17 axis and the development of kidney disease, we used a murine model of nephrotoxic serum (NTS) nephritis (NTN). Sheep NTS was administered in wild-type C57BL/6J mice and food-restricted, leptin-deficient C57BL/6J-ob/ob(FR-ob/ob) mice after preimmunization with sheep IgG. The profile of mRNA expression relevant to T helper lymphocytes in the kidneys was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Cultured murine glomerular podocytes and peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs) were used to investigate the direct effect of leptin on IL-23 or MCP-1 production by qRT-PCR. Kidney injury and macrophage infiltration were significantly attenuated in FR-ob/obmice 7 days after NTS injection. The Th17-dependent secondary immune response against deposited NTS in the glomeruli was totally impaired in FR-ob/obmice because of deteriorated IL-17 and proinflammatory cytokine production including IL-23 and MCP-1 in the kidney. IL-23 was produced in glomerular podocytes in NTN mice and cultured murine glomerular podocytes produced IL-23 under leptin stimulation. MCP-1 production in PEMs was also promoted by leptin. Induction of MCP-1 expression was observed in PEMs regardless of Ob-Rb, and the leptin signal was transduced without STAT3 phosphorylation in PEMs. Leptin deficiency impairs the secondary immune response against NTS and down-regulates IL-23 production and Th17 responses in the NTN kidney, which is accompanied by decreased MCP-1 production and macrophage infiltration in the NTN kidney. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Interleukin-23 (IL-23), independent of IL-17 and IL-22, drives neutrophil recruitment and innate inflammation during Clostridium difficile colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Andrew J; Falkowski, Nicole R; McDonald, Roderick A; Pandit, Chinmay R; Young, Vincent B; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the role of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-23 (IL-23) in promoting neutrophil recruitment, inflammatory cytokine expression and intestinal histopathology in response to Clostridium difficile infection. Wild-type (WT) and p19(-/-) (IL-23KO) mice were pre-treated with cefoperazone in their drinking water for 5 days, and after a 2-day recovery period were challenged with spores from C. difficile strain VPI 10463. Interleukin-23 deficiency was associated with significant defects in both the recruitment of CD11b(High) Ly6G(H) (igh) neutrophils to the colon and the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants and stabilization factors including Cxcl1, Cxcl2, Ccl3 and Csf3 within the colonic mucosa as compared with WT animals. Furthermore, the expression of inflammatory cytokines including Il33, Tnf and Il6 was significantly reduced in IL-23-deficient animals. There was also a trend towards less severe colonic histopathology in the absence of IL-23. The induction of Il17a and Il22 was also significantly abrogated in IL-23KO mice. Inflammatory cytokine expression and neutrophilic inflammation were not reduced in IL-17a-deficient mice or in mice treated with anti-IL-22 depleting monoclonal antibody. However, induction of RegIIIg was significantly reduced in animals treated with anti-IL-22 antibody. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-23, but not IL-17a or IL-22, promotes neutrophil recruitment and inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in the colon in response to C. difficile infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Interleukin-23 Receptor Gene Polymorphism May Enhance Expression of the IL-23 Receptor, IL-17, TNF-α and IL-6 in Behcet's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxuan Jiang

    Full Text Available Recent studies identified an association between Behcet's disease (BD and the IL-23R gene polymorphism (rs17375018 in different populations. This study examined whether this IL-23R gene polymorphism is associated with enhanced inflammatory responses.We recruited 27 BD patients and 32 controls with three genotypes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were seeded with or without anti-CD3 and CD28. Cells were incubated for 24 hours, and then supernatants were collected and stored at -20◦C until analyzed. Levels of interferon (IFN-γ, tissue necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-17 and IL-6 were detected by ELISA. IL-23R expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.The expression of IL-23R was significantly higher in both BD patients and healthy controls with the GG genotype compared to the AG and AA genotype with anti-CD3 and CD28 stimulation (all P-value < 0.05. Among the PBMCs cultured with anti-CD3 and CD28 stimulation, there was an elevated secretion of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17 in BD patients and healthy controls with the GG genotype. However, there was no significant change in secretion of IFN- γ in BD patients and healthy controls among the genotype of this IL-23R gene polymorphism.The results suggest that the GG genotype of the rs17375018 variant in the IL-23R gene enhances pro-inflammatory cytokine responses.

  8. Lack of association between rheumatoid arthritis and genetic variants rs10889677, rs11209026 and rs2201841 of IL-23R gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Malinowski, Damian; Haladyj, Ewa; Olesinska, Marzena; Safranow, Krzysztof; Pawlik, Andrzej

    2018-01-19

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune diseases, where different genetic variants in cytokine genes may play a pathogenic role. A GWAS in autoimmune diseases highlighted the IL-23R gene as a one of the susceptibility factors. We examined three candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs10889677, rs11209026 and rs2201841 of the IL-23R gene, as well as determined their possible association with RA in a Polish population. The IL-23R gene polymorphisms were genotyped for 422 RA patients and 348 healthy individuals using TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. The genotypes frequency did not deviate from HWE in each examined group. A comparison of the allele as well as genotype frequencies of the IL-23R polymorphisms under codominant, dominant and recessive genetic model revealed no significant differences between RA patients and healthy subjects. We also demonstrated that IL-23R rs2201841 and rs11209026 as well as rs11209026 and rs10889677 were in complete linkage disequilibrium (D'=1.0). Our genotype-phenotype analysis demonstrated that in carriers of rs10889677C and/or rs2201841A allele the RF, extra-articular manifestations and erosion were more frequent present than in patients with rs10889677A and/or rs2201841A allele, although this association was not significant. Present findings indicated that the autoimmune disease-associated genetic variants in IL-23R gene are not associated with RA in the Polish population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Leptin deficiency down-regulates IL-23 production in glomerular podocytes resulting in an attenuated immune response in nephrotoxic serum nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kei; Sato, Yuya; Otsuka, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Suguru; Goto, Shin; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Madaio, Michael P.; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, one of the typical adipokines, is reported to promote Th17 cell responses and to enhance production of proinflammatory cytokines. To clarify the role of leptin in the regulation of the IL-23/IL-17 axis and the development of kidney disease, we used a murine model of nephrotoxic serum (NTS) nephritis (NTN). Sheep NTS was administered in wild-type C57BL/6J mice and food-restricted, leptin-deficient C57BL/6J-ob/ob (FR-ob/ob) mice after preimmunization with sheep IgG. The profile of mRNA expression relevant to T helper lymphocytes in the kidneys was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT–PCR). Cultured murine glomerular podocytes and peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs) were used to investigate the direct effect of leptin on IL-23 or MCP-1 production by qRT–PCR. Kidney injury and macrophage infiltration were significantly attenuated in FR-ob/ob mice 7 days after NTS injection. The Th17-dependent secondary immune response against deposited NTS in the glomeruli was totally impaired in FR-ob/ob mice because of deteriorated IL-17 and proinflammatory cytokine production including IL-23 and MCP-1 in the kidney. IL-23 was produced in glomerular podocytes in NTN mice and cultured murine glomerular podocytes produced IL-23 under leptin stimulation. MCP-1 production in PEMs was also promoted by leptin. Induction of MCP-1 expression was observed in PEMs regardless of Ob-Rb, and the leptin signal was transduced without STAT3 phosphorylation in PEMs. Leptin deficiency impairs the secondary immune response against NTS and down-regulates IL-23 production and Th17 responses in the NTN kidney, which is accompanied by decreased MCP-1 production and macrophage infiltration in the NTN kidney. PMID:26567290

  10. Association of IL-23R Polymorphisms (rs6682925, rs10889677, rs1884444) With Cancer Risk: A PRISMA-Compliant Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-Han; Dai, Zhi-Ming; Kang, Hua-Feng; Lin, Shuai; Ma, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Meng; Liu, Kang; Dai, Cong; Wang, Xi-Jing; Dai, Zhi-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Although interleukin (IL)-23 receptor (IL-23R) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple cancers, its association with cancer risk is inconsistent across different studies. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis with the aim of resolving the relationship among the 3 common polymorphisms of IL-23R (rs6682925, rs10889677, rs1884444) and cancer risk.Case-control studies evaluating the association between IL-23R polymorphisms (rs6682925, rs10889677, rs1884444) and cancer risk were searched in the PubMed, Web of Science, and CNKI databases.Data were included in the meta-analysis if they were from original studies adopting a case-control design investigating the association between IL-23R polymorphisms and risk of any cancer; all cancer cases must have been confirmed by histology or pathology, and controls selected from noncancer individuals. Case-only studies and review papers were excluded.Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the relationship of IL-23R polymorphisms (rs6682925, rs10889677, rs1884444) with cancer risk. A random-effects model or fixed-effects model was used depending on the heterogeneity of the data.Ultimately, 15 studies, involving 8784 cancer patients and 10,321 cancer-free controls, were included in our meta-analysis. In the overall analysis, the rs10889677 polymorphism was associated with breast cancer (BC) under the allelic, homozygous, dominant, and heterozygous models. Rs1884444 polymorphism was relevant to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) under the homozygous, recessive, and allelic models. However, no evidence of a relationship between IL-23R polymorphisms (rs6682925, rs10889677, rs1884444) and cancer risk was found in the overall population.Our meta-analysis provides no evidence supporting a global association of IL-23R polymorphisms (rs6682925, rs10889677, rs1884444) with the risk of cancer. However, rs10889677 may be associated with BC susceptibility and rs1884444 had association with HCC risk

  11. Polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor and the IL-23/IL-17 pathways were associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), result from the combined effects of susceptibility genes and environmental factors. Previous studies have shown that polymorphisms in the Toll-like receptor (TLR), the apoptosis, the IL-23/IL-17...... of TLR1 and TLR5 was associated with increased risk of both CD and UC and CD, respectively. This supports that the host microbial composition or environmental factors in the gut are involved in risk of IBD. Furthermore, genetically determined high activity of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway was associated...

  12. Src kinases are required for a balanced production of IL-12/IL-23 in human dendritic cells activated by Toll-like receptor agonists.

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    Mirela Kuka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogen recognition by dendritic cells (DC is crucial for the initiation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Activation of Toll-like Receptors (TLRs by microbial molecular patterns leads to the maturation of DC, which present the antigen and activate T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Cytokine production by DC is critical for shaping the adaptive immune response by regulating T helper cell differentiation. It was previously shown by our group that Src kinases play a key role in cytokines production during TLR4 activation in human DC. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we investigated the role of Src kinases during different TLRs triggering in human monocyte-derived DC (MoDC. We found that Src family kinases are important for a balanced production of inflammatory cytokines by human MoDC upon stimulation of TLR3 and 8 with their respective agonists. Disruption of this equilibrium through pharmacological inhibition of Src kinases alters the DC maturation pattern. In particular, while expression of IL-12 and other inflammatory cytokines depend on Src kinases, the induction of IL-23 and co-stimulatory molecules do not. Accordingly, DC treated with Src inhibitors are not compromised in their ability to induce CD4 T cell proliferation and to promote the Th17 subset survival but are less efficient in inducing Th1 differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the pharmacological modulation of DC maturation has the potential to shape the quality of the adaptive immune response and could be exploited for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases.

  13. The intestinal microbiota plays a role in Salmonella-induced colitis independent of pathogen colonization.

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    Rosana B R Ferreira

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota is composed of hundreds of species of bacteria, fungi and protozoa and is critical for numerous biological processes, such as nutrient acquisition, vitamin production, and colonization resistance against bacterial pathogens. We studied the role of the intestinal microbiota on host resistance to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-induced colitis. Using multiple antibiotic treatments in 129S1/SvImJ mice, we showed that disruption of the intestinal microbiota alters host susceptibility to infection. Although all antibiotic treatments caused similar increases in pathogen colonization, the development of enterocolitis was seen only when streptomycin or vancomycin was used; no significant pathology was observed with the use of metronidazole. Interestingly, metronidazole-treated and infected C57BL/6 mice developed severe pathology. We hypothesized that the intestinal microbiota confers resistance to infectious colitis without affecting the ability of S. Typhimurium to colonize the intestine. Indeed, different antibiotic treatments caused distinct shifts in the intestinal microbiota prior to infection. Through fluorescence in situ hybridization, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, and real-time PCR, we showed that there is a strong correlation between the intestinal microbiota composition before infection and susceptibility to Salmonella-induced colitis. Members of the Bacteroidetes phylum were present at significantly higher levels in mice resistant to colitis. Further analysis revealed that Porphyromonadaceae levels were also increased in these mice. Conversely, there was a positive correlation between the abundance of Lactobacillus sp. and predisposition to colitis. Our data suggests that different members of the microbiota might be associated with S. Typhimurium colonization and colitis. Dissecting the mechanisms involved in resistance to infection and inflammation will be critical for the development of

  14. Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin Induce Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand Expression by Normal Mouse and Human Osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Emily H.; Bento, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Francis M.; Marriott, Ian; Hudson, Michael C.; Bost, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin invade osteoblasts and are causative agents of human bone disease. In the present study, we examined the ability of S. aureus and Salmonella serovar Dublin to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by normal osteoblasts. Normal mouse and human osteoblasts were cocultured with S. aureus or Salmonella serovar Dublin at different multiplicities of infection. Following initial incubation and examination of TRAIL expression, extracellular bacteria were killed by the addition of media containing the antibiotic gentamicin. Lysates and conditioned media from osteoblast cultures were then collected at various times following invasion and analyzed. The results demonstrated that S. aureus and Salmonella serovar Dublin are potent inducers of TRAIL expression by osteoblasts. Mouse and human TRAIL mRNA expression was induced by bacterial infection and demonstrated a dose-dependent response. Analysis of kinetics suggested that TRAIL mRNA was induced within 30 min after exposure to bacteria and that its level of expression remained relatively constant over the time period examined. mRNA molecules encoding TRAIL receptors were constitutively expressed by osteoblasts. Furthermore, TRAIL protein was detected as early as 45 min and up to 24 h following infection. The quantity of TRAIL protein produced also increased in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings suggest a mechanism whereby bacterial pathogens mediate bone destruction via osteoblast apoptosis. PMID:11179330

  15. The differential effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on Salmonella-induced interleukin-8 and human beta-defensin-2 in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F-C

    2016-07-01

    Salmonellosis or Salmonella, one of the most common food-borne diseases, remains a major public health problem worldwide. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) play an essential role in the mucosal innate immunity of the host to defend against the invasion of Salmonella by interleukin (IL)-8 and human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2). Accumulated research has unravelled important roles of vitamin D in the regulation of innate immunity. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) on Salmonella-induced innate immunity in IECs. We demonstrate that pretreatment of 1,25D3 results in suppression of Salmonella-induced IL-8 but enhancement of hBD-2, either protein secretion and mRNA expression, in IECs. Furthermore, 1,25D3 enhanced Salmonella-induced membranous recruitment of nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD2) and its mRNA expression and activation of protein kinase B (Akt), a downstream effector of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signal counteracted the suppressive effect of 1,25D3 on Salmonella-induced IL-8 expression, while knock-down of NOD2 by siRNA diminished the enhanced hBD-2 expression. These data suggest differential regulation of 1,25D3 on Salmonella-induced IL-8 and hBD-2 expression in IECs via PI3K/Akt signal and NOD2 protein expression, respectively. Active vitamin D-enhanced anti-microbial peptide in Salmonella-infected IECs protected the host against infection, while modulation of proinflammatory responses by active vitamin D prevented the host from the detrimental effects of overwhelming inflammation. Thus, active vitamin D-induced innate immunity in IECs enhances the host's protective mechanism, which may provide an alternative therapy for invasive Salmonella infection. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Membrane-bound IL-12 and IL-23 serve as potent mucosal adjuvants when co-presented on whole inactivated influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tila; Heffron, Connie L; High, Kevin P; Roberts, Paul C

    2014-05-03

    Potent and safe adjuvants are needed to improve the efficacy of parenteral and mucosal vaccines. Cytokines, chemokines and growth factors have all proven to be effective immunomodulatory adjuvants when administered with a variety of antigens. We have previously evaluated the efficacy of membrane-anchored interleukins (IL) such as IL-2 and IL-4 co-presented as Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccines (CYT-IVACs) using a mouse model of influenza challenge. Here, we describe studies evaluating the parenteral and mucosal adjuvanticity of membrane-bound IL-12 and IL-23 CYT-IVACs in young adult mice. Mucosal immunization using IL-12 and IL-23 bearing whole influenza virus vaccine (WIV) was more effective at eliciting virus-specific nasal IgA and reducing viral lung burden following challenge compared to control WIV vaccinated animals. Both IL-12 and IL-23 bearing WIV elicited the highest anti-viral IgA levels in serum and nasal washes. This study highlights for the first time the mucosal adjuvant potential of IL-12 and IL-23 CYT-IVAC formulations in eliciting mucosal immune responses and reducing viral lung burden. The co-presentation of immunomodulators in direct context with viral antigen in whole inactivated viral vaccines may provide a means to significantly lower the dose of vaccine required for protection.

  17. Serum 25-OH vitamin D level in treatment-naïve systemic lupus erythematosus patients: Relation to disease activity, IL-23 and IL-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, D; El-Farahaty, R M; Houssen, M E; Machaly, S A; Sallam, M; ElSaid, T O; Neseem, N O

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the vitamin D status in treatment-naïve SLE patients and its association with clinical and laboratory markers of disease activity, including serum levels of IL-17 and IL-23. Methods Fifty-seven treatment-naïve SLE patients along with 42 matched controls were included. SLEDAI score was used to estimate disease activity. Serum levels of 25(OH) D, IL-17 and IL-23 were measured. Results The median level of 25(OH) D in SLE patients (40.8; 4-70 ng/ml) was significantly lower than in the controls (47; 25-93 ng/ml) ( P = 0.001). A total of 38.6% of SLE cases had 25 (OH) D levels < 30 ng/ml (hypovitaminosis D) vs. 4.8% of the controls ( P < 0.0001). Apart from thrombocytopenia, vitamin D was not associated with clinical signs of SLE. There were negative correlations between serum 25(OH) D and serum levels of IL-17, IL-23 and ANA (rho = -0.5, -0.8, -0.5, P ≤ 0.05) in SLE patients. Conclusion Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent in treatment naïve SLE patients. It contributes to ANA antibody production and is associated with high serum levels of IL-23 and IL-17; thus they may trigger the inflammatory process in SLE.

  18. Association between lower frequency of R381Q variant (rs11209026) in IL-23 receptor gene and increased risk of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Elham; Tavasolian, Fataneh; Ghasemi, Nasrin; Mirghanizadeh, Seyed Ali; Azizi, Mohammdareza; Ghoryani, Mohsen; Samadi, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) is defined as three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions before the 20th week of gestation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the interleukin (IL)-23 receptor gene (IL-23R; rs11209026, 1142 G wild type → A reduced function, Arg381Gln, R381Q) and RSA. For the study, 200 RSA patients (confirmed using established diagnostic criteria) and 200 normal individuals in fertility and infertility centers in the cities of Yazd and Isfahan were recruited during a period from 2012-2013. Using PCR-RFLP, the R381Q variant was screened for in the IL-23R gene of the patients and controls. The results indicated there were significant differences in the frequency of this genetic variant in the patients versus the healthy controls, i.e. 2% and 7.5%, respectively (p value = 0.01; odds ratio = 0.25; CI = 95%). No significant difference was found for the G allelic frequency in patients with RSA and in the control group (p = 0.60). The A allelic frequency was significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.01). Based on these findings, it is concluded that the frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism in the IL-23 receptor (R381Q) in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) is less than that found in normal control women.

  19. Salmonella-induced changes in the gut microbiota and immune response genes transcriptome during administration of vancomycin and Bacteroides fragilis

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    Yu. V. Bukina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim. To study Salmonella-induced changes in the intestinal wall microbiota, the expression of Salmonella effector proteins SipA, SopB, SopE2 and transcriptional activity of genes FFAR2, Foxp3, RORγt in rat GALT during administration of vancomycin and B.fragilis. Methods. Investigations of qualitative and quantitative composition of the microbiota of the wall of the small intestine were carried out, and the expression level of rat genes Foxp3, Rorc (Royt, FFAR2 and Salmonella effector proteins SipA, SopB and SopE2 were determined by RT-PCR, the relationship between groups of microorganisms was established. Results. Administration of B.fragilis against the background pre-treatment with vancomycin and Salmonella infection alters the quantitative composition of the microbiota in the wall of the small intestine contents: a decrease in Salmonella spp., E.coli, P.aeruginosa, Proteus spp., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp. and Shigella spp., as well as increasing Bacteroides spp., E.faecalis, E.faecium and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius. The level of expression of Salmonella effector proteins in animals with the combined administration of vancomycin and S.enteritidis (I group, S.typhimurium (II group increased: SopB – 101 and 20 times; SopE2 - 80 and 2 times; SipA - 613 times (II group, and also 5-fold decrease was noted in the I group. Relative normalized number of mRNA of genes FFAR2, Foxp3, RORγt in GALT of rats in groups III and IV increased: FFAR2 - 2.7 and 5.4 times; Foxp3 - 2.5 and 85 times, RORγt level decreased by 70% and only in IV group. Conclusions. Using B.fragilis creates conditions for the correction of Salmonella-induced changes of the intestinal microbiome. Pretreatment of animals with vancomycin causes increased transcriptional activity of genes SipA, SopB and SopE2, except SipA after administration of S.enteritidis. Administration of B.fragilis increases the level of mRNA of genes FFAR2 and Foxp3 in GALT and reduces ROR

  20. Respiratory virus-induced TLR7 activation controls IL-17-associated increased mucus via IL-23 regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukacs, Nicholas W; Smit, Joost J; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Morris, Susan B; Nunez, Gabriel; Lindell, Dennis M

    2010-01-01

    The response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), negative strand ssRNA virus, depends upon the ability to recognize specific pathogen-associated targets. In the current study, the role of TLR7 that recognizes ssRNA was examined. Using TLR7(-/-) mice, we found that the response to RSV infection in

  1. Overexpression of MicA induces production of OmpC-enriched outer membrane vesicles that protect against Salmonella challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Il; Kim, Moonjeong; Jeon, Jinseong; Han, Jin Kwan; Kim, Kwang-Sun

    2017-08-26

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from bacteria are promising candidates for subunit vaccines. Stresses that modulate the composition of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are important for OMV synthesis. Small RNAs (sRNAs) expressed in response to stress regulate OMPs, although the mechanism underlying sRNA-mediated OMV biogenesis and its utility for developing vaccine platforms remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterized the role of a sRNA, MicA, which regulates OmpA, a major OMP involved in both production of OMVs and reactive immunity against Salmonella challenge. A Salmonella strain overexpressing MicA generated more OMVs than a control strain. In addition, OmpC was the major component of MicA-derived OMV proteins. MicA-derived OMVs induced Th1- and Th17-type immune responses in vitro and reduced Salmonella-mediated lethality in a mouse model. Thus, OmpA-regulatory sRNA-derived OMVs may facilitate production of Salmonella-protective vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis infection of the porcine jejunal Peyer’s patch rapidly induces IL-1β and IL-8 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Kendra A.; Brown, David R.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is an enteric pathogen of swine, producing septicemia, enterocolitis, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The initial molecular events at the site of Salmonella infection are hypothesized to be critical in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses; however the acute immune response elicited by porcine intestinal tissues is not well understood. To address this need, we employed explants of jejunal Peyer’s patch (JPP) mucosa from pigs to examine Salmonella-induced immune responses under controlled conditions as well as to overcome limitations of whole animal approaches. JPP explants mounted in Ussing chambers maintained normal histological structure for 2 h and stable short-circuit current and electrical conductance for 2.5 h. After ex vivo luminal exposure to Salmonella serovar Choleraesuis, JPP responded with an increase in mRNA expression of IL-1β and IL-8, but not TNFα. Increased IL-1β and IL-8 expression were dependent on efficient Salmonella adhesion and internalization, whereas mutant Salmonella did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. Commensal enteric bacteria, present in some experiments, also did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicate that Salmonella uptake by Peyer’s patch is important in the induction of an innate response involving expression of IL-1β and IL-8, and that ex vivo intestinal immune tissue explants provide an intact tissue model that will facilitate investigation of mucosal immunity in swine. PMID:16115691

  3. A new Polyherbal formulation to control bacterial enteritis in poultry: a case study in Salmonella enteritidis induced experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K.Baishya

    Full Text Available An experiemental study was conducted in day old 150 VenCobb chicks to evaluate efficacy of polyherbal formulation in induced bacterial enteritis with Salmonella enteritidis. Birds were randomly divided into three groups: negative control, infected and untreated control & prophylactically treated group with AV/ADC/16 (14th-28th days. Salmonella infection was induced on day 21st. A significant decrease in overall growth, productivity, feed conversion and mortality was evident in untreated infected group in addition to severity of clinical signs. However, prophylactic administration of herbal formulation reduced mortality and clinical symptoms were mild to negligible. No negative effect on growth & performance was observed in treated group III. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(11.000: 333-334

  4. Sensing and adaptation to low pH mediated by inducible amino acid decarboxylases in Salmonella.

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    Julie P M Viala

    Full Text Available During the course of infection, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium must successively survive the harsh acid stress of the stomach and multiply into a mild acidic compartment within macrophages. Inducible amino acid decarboxylases are known to promote adaptation to acidic environments. Three low pH inducible amino acid decarboxylases were annotated in the genome of S. Typhimurium, AdiA, CadA and SpeF, which are specific for arginine, lysine and ornithine, respectively. In this study, we characterized and compared the contributions of those enzymes in response to acidic challenges. Individual mutants as well as a strain deleted for the three genes were tested for their ability (i to survive an extreme acid shock, (ii to grow at mild acidic pH and (iii to infect the mouse animal model. We showed that the lysine decarboxylase CadA had the broadest range of activity since it both had the capacity to promote survival at pH 2.3 and growth at pH 4.5. The arginine decarboxylase AdiA was the most performant in protecting S. Typhimurium from a shock at pH 2.3 and the ornithine decarboxylase SpeF conferred the best growth advantage under anaerobiosis conditions at pH 4.5. We developed a GFP-based gene reporter to monitor the pH of the environment as perceived by S. Typhimurium. Results showed that activities of the lysine and ornithine decarboxylases at mild acidic pH did modify the local surrounding of S. Typhimurium both in culture medium and in macrophages. Finally, we tested the contribution of decarboxylases to virulence and found that these enzymes were dispensable for S. Typhimurium virulence during systemic infection. In the light of this result, we examined the genomes of Salmonella spp. normally responsible of systemic infection and observed that the genes encoding these enzymes were not well conserved, supporting the idea that these enzymes may be not required during systemic infection.

  5. Plant pathogen-induced water-soaking promotes Salmonella enterica growth on tomato leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potnis, Neha; Colee, James; Jones, Jeffrey B; Barak, Jeri D

    2015-12-01

    Plant pathogen infection is a critical factor for the persistence of Salmonella enterica on plants. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of S. enterica on diseased tomato plants by using four diverse bacterial spot Xanthomonas species that differ in disease severities. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and X. gardneri infection fostered S. enterica growth, while X. perforans infection did not induce growth but supported the persistence of S. enterica. X. vesicatoria-infected leaves harbored S. enterica populations similar to those on healthy leaves. Growth of S. enterica was associated with extensive water-soaking and necrosis in X. euvesicatoria- and X. gardneri-infected plants. The contribution of water-soaking to the growth of S. enterica was corroborated by an increased growth of populations on water-saturated leaves in the absence of a plant pathogen. S. enterica aggregates were observed with bacterial spot lesions caused by either X. euvesicatoria or X. vesicatoria; however, more S. enterica aggregates formed on X. euvesicatoria-infected leaves as a result of larger lesion sizes per leaf area and extensive water-soaking. Sparsely distributed lesions caused by X. vesicatoria infection do not support the overall growth of S. enterica or aggregates in areas without lesions or water-soaking; S. enterica was observed as single cells and not aggregates. Thus, pathogen-induced water-soaking and necrosis allow S. enterica to replicate and proliferate on tomato leaves. The finding that the pathogen-induced virulence phenotype affects the fate of S. enterica populations in diseased plants suggests that targeting of plant pathogen disease is important in controlling S. enterica populations on plants. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. AZ17: a new bispecific drug targeting IL-6 and IL-23 with potential clinical use-improves psoriasis in a human xenograft transplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, Karin; Kjeldsen, Cecilia Rosada; Shanebeck, K

    2015-01-01

    ; widely accepted to be associated with psoriasis. To meet the need for new therapeutics, we aimed to create a clinically relevant bispecific drug, by combining the inhibitory properties of anti-IL-6 and anti-IL-23 antibodies, exhibiting high affinity, high stability and the ability to be produced in high...... yield. The bispecific molecule AZ17 was created by combining high affinity binding domains originating from monoclonal antibodies targeting human IL-6 and IL-23. To allow for high and efficient production, AZ17 was assembled by site-specific bioconjugation from two individual single chain fragment...... model where psoriasis skin is transplanted onto immune-deficient mice. The data presented here suggest AZ17 to be a promising drug candidate in psoriasis and other inflammatory diseases associated with Th17 cell development....

  7. Fermented Beetroot Juice as a Factor Limiting Chemical Mutations Induced by MNNG in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Klewicka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of fresh and fermented beetroot juice to limit chemical mutations has been studied using the Ames test and the strains of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. Beetroot juice was fermented in either spontaneous or controlled fermentation, with the use of selected cultures of lactic acid bacteria, three Lactobacillus paracasei strains designated as 0916, 0920, 0923, and one Lactobacillus brevis strain 0944. N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG was used as a standard mutagen for the induction of His+ revertants in mutations of Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. The ability to reduce mutations was studied using the Ames test and the doses of beetroot juice of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mL per plate. The study showed that the fermented beetroot juice (10 µL/plate reduced the level of MNNG-induced mutations by 64 % in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and by 65 % in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. The beetroot juice obtained by spontaneous fermentation retained only 24–25 % of initial antimutagenic activity (in Salmonella strain and at the highest tested dose of the juice, i.e. 10 µL/plate. The doses of 10 µL/plate of the beetroot juice fermented by three L. paracasei cultures (0916, 0920 and 0923 decreased the intensity of mutations induced by MNNG by 61, 50 and 56 % in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and by 65, 56 and 49 % in Salmonella typhimurium TA100, respectively. The juice (10 µL/plate fermented by L. brevis 0944 strain reduced the number of mutations by 58 % in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and by 55 % in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. Thus, the controlled lactic acid fermentation of beetroot juice conducted by selected Lactobacillus strains maintains its antimutagenic activity.

  8. Association analysis of IL10, TNF-α and IL23R-IL12RB2 SNPs with Behçet's disease risk in Western Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouahiba eKhaib Dit Naib

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have conducted the first study of the association of interleukin (IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and IL23R-IL12RB2 regionSNPswith Behçet's disease (BD in Western Algeria. Methods: A total of 51 BD patients and 96 unrelated controls from West region of Algeria were genotyped by direct sequencing for 11 SNPs including 2 SNPsfrom the IL10 promoter [c.-819T>C (rs1800871, c.-592A>C (rs1800872], 6 SNPs from the TNF-α promoter [c.-1211T>C (rs1799964, c.-1043C>A (rs1800630, c.-1037C>T (rs1799724, c.-556G>A (rs1800750, c.-488G>A (rs1800629 and c.-418G>A (rs361525], and 3 SNPs from the IL23R-IL12RB2 region [g.67747415A>C (rs12119179, g.67740092G>A (rs11209032 and g.67760140T>C (rs924080]. Results: The minor alleles c.-819T and c.-592A were significantly associated with BD (OR= 2.18; 95% CI 1.28-3.73, p = 0.003; whereas, there was weaker association between TNF-αpromoter SNPs or IL23R-IL12RB2 region and disease risk.Conclusion: Unlike the TNF-αand the IL23R-IL12RB2 region SNPs, the two IL10 SNPs were strongly associated with BD. The -819T, and -592A alleles and the -819TT, -819CT, and -592AA and -592CA genotypes seem to be highly involved in the risk of developing of BD in the population of Western Algeria.

  9. Clinical Efficiency of Topical Calcipotriol/Betamethasone Treatment in Psoriasis Relies on Suppression of the Inflammatory TNFα - IL-23 - IL-17 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubin, Minna E; Kokkonen, Nina; Palatsi, Riitta; Hägg, Päivi M; Väyrynen, Juha P; Glumoff, Virpi; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Hurskainen, Tiina; Tasanen, Kaisa

    2017-04-06

    The effects of topical calcipotriol/betamethasone combination therapy and betamethasone monotherapy on inflammatory T-cell numbers and molecular markers were compared in patients with psoriasis. Combination therapy down-regulated the expression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-23A, IL-17A, S100A7, CCL-20 and interferon (IFN)-γ in skin and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23A, T-bet and IFN-γ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Betamethasone monotherapy had less effect. Expression of FoxP3 in both skin and PBMCs was down-regulated by calcipotriol/betamethasone, but not by betamethasone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that calcipotriol/betamethasone reduced the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and Tregs in psoriatic lesions more than betamethasone. Flow cytometric analyses demonstrated that calcipotriol/betamethasone decreased the numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells, Tregs, skin-homing Th17 memory cells and Th22 memory cells, while betamethasone had little or no effect. Glucocorticoid receptors GRα and GRß were expressed in psoriatic skin. In conclusion, calcipotriol increases the immunosuppressive power of betamethasone by suppressing the inflammatory TNF-α - IL-23 - IL-17 axis.

  10. The relation of interleukin 17 (IL-17) and IL-23 to Th1/Th2 cytokines and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Mo Yin; Wu, Hai Jing; Lo, Yi; Lau, Chak Sing

    2010-10-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) was recently linked to pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but its relation to disease activity has not been well characterized. We examined the relation between serum levels of Th17 (IL-17, IL-23), Th1 (IL-12, interferon-γ), Th2 (IL-10, IL-6, IL-4) cytokines and disease activity in patients with SLE. Serum cytokines were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. Disease activity was determined by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), anti-dsDNA antibody, and C3 and C4 levels. Serum levels of IL-17 (p IL-17 level above the detection limit was more frequently found in patients who had active lupus nephritis (11/23, 47.8%) (p = 0.002), nonrenal active disease (9/15, 60%) (p = 0.001), and inactive lupus (21/32, 65.6%) (p IL-17 levels were otherwise comparable between these 3 groups of patients and were not related to SLEDAI, glomerular filtration rate, activity or chronicity score and ISN/RPS criteria class among patients with active lupus nephritis. There was no significant correlation between serum IL-17/IL-23 and Th1 or Th2 cytokine levels. SLE patients had higher serum IL-17 levels than healthy controls. Elevated serum IL-23 was found in patients with inflammatory manifestations including cutaneous involvement and serositis. The lack of correlation between Th17, Th1, and Th2 cytokines suggested independent regulatory mechanisms for these cytokines.

  11. Generation of IL-23 Producing Dendritic Cells (DCs) by Airborne Fungi Regulates Fungal Pathogenicity via the Induction of TH-17 Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Lande, Roberto; Gregorio, Josh; Meller, Stephan; Goldman, William E.; Gilliet, Michel; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) producing T helper cells (TH-17) comprise a newly recognized T cell subset with an emerging role in adaptive immunity to a variety of fungi. Whether different airborne fungi trigger a common signaling pathway for TH-17 induction, and whether this ability is related to the inherent pathogenic behavior of each fungus is currently unknown. Here we show that, as opposed to primary pathogenic fungi (Histoplasma capsulatum), opportunistic fungal pathogens (Aspergillus and Rhizopus) trigger a common innate sensing pathway in human dendritic cells (DCs) that results in robust production of IL-23 and drives TH-17 responses. This response requires activation of dectin-1 by the fungal cell wall polysaccharide b-glucan that is selectively exposed during the invasive growth of opportunistic fungi. Notably, unmasking of b-glucan in the cell wall of a mutant of Histoplasma not only abrogates the pathogenicity of this fungus, but also triggers the induction of IL-23 producing DCs. Thus, b-glucan exposure in the fungal cell wall is essential for the induction of IL-23/TH-17 axis and may represent a key factor that regulates protective immunity to opportunistic but not pathogenic fungi. PMID:20886035

  12. Lactobacillus plantarum reduces Streptococcus pyogenes virulence by modulating the IL-17, IL-23 and Toll-like receptor 2/4 expressions in human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Antonietta; Losacco, Antonio; Carratelli, Caterina Romano; Domenico, Marina Di; Bevilacqua, Nazario

    2013-10-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a common colonizer of the mucosal layers in the mouth, nose, and pharynx but it is also a major Gram-positive human pathogen that causes infections ranging from pharyngitis to severe systemic diseases. The lactobacilli colonize the oral tracts and are known to protect against colonization by many pathogens. Epithelial cells participate in the innate host defense by expressing a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and TLRs in the interaction with microorganisms. The potentially probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum was investigated for its capacity to influence the innate immune response of HEp-2 and A549 epithelial cells to S. pyogenes infection. In both epithelial cell types, pre-treatment with L. plantarum showed inhibition of S. pyogenes growth and a greater decrease in IL-17 and IL-23 levels compared to the control. Pre-treatment with the anti-TLR2/4 antibody abolished the inhibitory effects of L. plantarum on IL-17 and IL-23 production following S. pyogenes infection, indicating that L. plantarum downregulates TLR2/4-dependent IL-17 and IL-23 production. Overall, our findings suggest that in epithelial cell cultures with S. pyogenes, cytokine responses are modulated by the presence of L. plantarum through the induction of TLR2/TLR4. © 2013.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-induced biliary factors enhance invasion of Salmonella enteritidis in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A F; Moss, N D; Dai, Y; Smith, M S; Collins, A M; Jackson, G D

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the role of the hepatobiliary system in the early pathogenesis of Salmonella enteritidis infection was investigated in a rat model. Intravenous (i.v.) challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has previously been shown to enhance the translocation of normal gut flora. We first confirmed that LPS can similarly promote the invasion of S. enteritidis. Oral infection of outbred Australian Albino Wistar rats with 10(6) to 10(7) CFU of S. enteritidis led to widespread tissue invasion after days. If animals were similarly challenged after intravenous administration of S. enteritidis LPS (3 to 900 microg/kg of body weight), significant invasion of the livers and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) occurred within 24 h, with invasion of the liver increasing in a dose-dependent fashion (P < 0.01). If bile was prevented from reaching the intestine by bile duct ligation or cannulation, bacterial invasion of the liver and MLN was almost totally abrogated (P < 0.001). As i.v. challenge with LPS could induce the delivery of inflammatory mediators into the bile, biliary tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations were measured by bioassay. Biliary concentrations of TNF-alpha rose shortly after LPS challenge, peaked with a mean concentration of 27.0 ng/ml at around 1 h postchallenge, and returned to baseline levels (3.1 ng/ml) after 2.5 h. Although TNF-alpha cannot be directly implicated in the invasion process, we conclude that the invasiveness of the enteric pathogen S. enteritidis is enhanced by the presence of LPS in the blood and that this enhanced invasion is at least in part a consequence of the delivery of inflammatory mediators to the gastrointestinal tract by the hepatobiliary system.

  14. Systemic and mucosal immunity induced by attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing ORF7 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young Woo; Kim, Seong Bum; Rahman, Masudur; Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Lee, Byung Min; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Ki In; Hong, Jin Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Eo, Seong Kug

    2011-07-01

    Oral administration of attenuated Salmonella vaccine may provide valuable advantages such as low cost, easy preparation, and safety. Attenuated Salmonella vaccines also serve as carriers of foreign antigens and immunomodulatory cytokines. Presently, an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain was used as a carrier for open reading frame 7 (ORF7) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a swine pathogen of significant global economic importance. Initially, an attenuated S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing ORF7 gene derived from PRRSV Korean isolate was constructed. Following oral administration of a single dose of the attenuated Salmonella vaccine expressing PRRSV ORF7, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses specific for ORF7 were induced at both systemic and mucosal sites including spleen, mesenteric lymph node, Peyer's patch, and laminar propria, as evaluated by determining serum ORF7-specific IgG and mucosal IgA responses, as well as Th1- and Th2-type cytokine production from antigen-stimulated T cells. The induced humoral responses were sustained for at least 12weeks post-immunization. In particular, the immunized mice displayed immune responses to both the foreign ORF7 antigen and Salmonella itself. The results indicate the value of attenuated S. enterica serovar Typhimurium as an oral carrier of PRRSV antigenic proteins to induce effective systemic and mucosal immunity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Associations of Functional MicroRNA Binding Site Polymorphisms in IL23/Th17 Inflammatory Pathway Genes with Gastric Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyan Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available IL23/Th17 axis acts as an inflammatory pathway in gastric carcinogenesis. MicroRNA- (miRNA- binding site single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of inflammatory genes may alter gastric cancer (GC susceptibility. In this study, four miRNA binding site SNPs (rs3748067 of IL17A, rs887796, rs1468488 of IL17RA, and rs10889677 of IL23R were genotyped from 500 patients and 500 controls. Unconditional logistic regression analyses and multifactor dimensionality reduction software were used to evaluate the relationships of SNPs with GC and gene-environment interactions, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and luciferase report gene assay were applied for function verification. We found that CT (ORadj = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.44–0.79, CT + TT (ORadj = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.43–0.77 genotypes, and T allele (ORadj = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.47–0.80 of rs3748067 reduced GC risk; the rs10889677 CC genotype (ORadj = 2.22; 95% CI: 1.27–3.87 and C allele (ORadj = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.02–1.52 increased GC risk. A meaningful interaction among ever smoked, family history of GC, and rs3748068 could intensify GC risk by 2.25-fold. Functional tests demonstrated the inhibitory effect of miR-10a-3p on IL17A expression in SGC-7901 cells. These results suggested that miRNA binding site SNPs within IL23/Th17 inflammatory pathway genes and their interactions with environmental factors could be associated with GC risk.

  16. Association between rs7517847 and rs2201841 polymorphisms in IL-23 receptor gene and risk of ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To comprehensively evaluate the association between rs7517847 and rs2201841 polymorphisms in the Interleukin-23 (IL-23 receptor gene and ankylosing spondylitis (AS, a meta-analysis was performed. The Pubmed, Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, VIP, Wanfang and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc databases were searched to identify eligible studies on rs7517847 and rs2201841 polymorphisms in the IL-23 receptor gene and AS that were published through September 2014. Data of interest were extracted from each study, and the meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0. Four studies were eligible for the meta-analysis and included a total patient population of 2,465. With regards to rs7517847, the current study showed that the genotype GG and allele G might play a protective role during AS (OR = 0.76, 95% CI [0.59–0.99]; OR = 0.88, 95% CI [0.78–0.99] for homozygote and allelic models, respectively. However, according to the meta-analysis, there was no statistical association between the genotype or allele of rs2201841 and an individual’s susceptibility to AS in all genetic models. In conclusion, it was the IL-23 rs7517847 polymorphism rather than the rs2201841 polymorphism that had a statistical association with AS. Nevertheless, more evidence is needed to confirm this result. Consequently, it is necessary to carry out more high-quality studies to confirm the associations between these two single nucleotide polymorphisms and AS.

  17. Rice hull smoke extract protects mice against a salmonella lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice hulls accounting for 20% of the rice crop are a byproduct of post-harvest rice processing. Endotoxemia (sepsis, septic shock) is an inflammatory, virulent often fatal disease that results mainly from infection with Salmonella and other Gram-negative bacteria. The present study investigated the...

  18. SPI1 defective mutants of Salmonella enterica induce cross-protective immunity in chickens against challenge with serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Babak, Vladimir; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-06-28

    In this study we were interested in the serovar cross-protection potential of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1) attenuated vaccine strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium and immune response of vaccinated and naive chickens to Salmonella infection. The immune response was characterized by real time PCR quantifying transcripts of interleukins IL1β, IL17, IL22, interferon gamma (IFNγ), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), immunoglobulins IgM, IgA, IgY and Ig light chain, and six genes of acute phase response including avidin, serum amyloid A, extracellular fatty acid-binding protein (Ex-FABP), immune responsive gene 1, chemokine AH221 and trappin-6. Vaccination with SPI1 mutants of both serovars protected chickens against Salmonella infection, independent of the serovar used for the challenge and the time post infection. However, expressions of all interleukins, iNOS and Ex-FABP showed that protection against homologous serovars was significantly higher than against heterologous serovars after intravenous challenge at 4 days post infection. The vaccination with a mixture of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium SPI1 mutants induced an intermediate protection against challenge with both serovars, i.e. the mixed vaccine provided an additional protective effect when compared with the chickens vaccinated with a vaccine formed by only a single Salmonella serovar. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Salmonella Osteomyelitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAnearney, S; McCall, D

    2015-01-01

    .... Salmonella as an aetiological agent in osteomyelitis is essentially rare and salmonella osteomyelitis in itself is predominantly seen in patients with haemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease or thalassemia...

  20. Vitamin D differentially regulates Salmonella-induced intestine epithelial autophagy and interleukin-1β expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Chen

    2016-12-21

    To investigate the effects of active vitamin D3 on autophagy and interleukin (IL)-1β expression in Salmonella-infected intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Caco-2 cells, NOD2 siRNA-, Atg16L1 siRNA- or vitamin D receptor (VDR) siRNA-transfected Caco-2 cells were pretreated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3), and then infected by wild-type S. typhimurium strain SL1344. The conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II was detected by Western blot analysis and LC3+ autophagosome was analyzed by immunofluorescence. Caco-2 cells or VDR siRNA-transfected cells were pretreated with 1,25D3, and then infected by SL1344. Membrane protein and total RNA were analyzed by Western blot and RT-PCR for VDR and Atg16L1 protein and mRNA expression, respectively. Atg16L1 siRNA-transfected Caco-2 cells were pretreated by 1,25D3 and then infected with SL1344. Total RNA was analyzed by RT-PCR for IL-1β mRNA expression. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25D3, showed enhanced VDR-mediated Atg16L1 mRNA expression, membranous Atg16L1 protein expression leading to enhanced autophagic LC3II protein expression and LC3 punctae in Salmonella-infected Caco-2 cells which was counteracted by Atg16L1 and VDR siRNA, but Atg16L1 mediated suppression of IL-1β expression. Thus, active vitamin D may enhance autophagy but suppress inflammatory IL-1β expression in Salmonella-infected IECs. Active vitamin D might enhance autophagic clearance of Salmonella infection, while modulation of inflammatory responses prevents the host from detrimental effects of overwhelming inflammation.

  1. Acetic acid induces pH-independent cellular energy depletion in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Mei; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-03-01

    Weak organic acids are widely used as preservatives and disinfectants in the food industry. Despite their widespread use, the antimicrobial mode of action of organic acids is still not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of acetic acid on the cell membranes and cellular energy generation of four Salmonella strains. Using a nucleic acid/protein assay, it was established that acetic acid did not cause leakage of intracellular components from the strains. A scanning electron microscopy study further confirmed that membrane disruption was not the antimicrobial mode of action of acetic acid. Some elongated Salmonella cells observed in the micrographs indicated a possibility that acetic acid may inhibit DNA synthesis in the bacterial cells. Using an ATP assay, it was found that at a neutral pH, acetic acid caused cellular energy depletion with an ADP/ATP ratio in the range between 0.48 and 2.63 (pacid molecules. The antimicrobial effect of acetic acid was better under acidic conditions (ADP/ATP ratio of 5.56 ± 1.27; pacid molecules can act together. We concluded that the inhibitory effect of acetic acid is not solely attributable to acidic pH but also to undissociated acid molecules. This finding has implication for the use of acetic acid as an antimicrobial against Salmonella on food products, such as chicken meat, which can buffer its pH.

  2. An IL-23R/IL-22 circuit regulates epithelial serum amyloid A to promote local effector Th17 responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Teruyuki; Huang, Wendy; Hall, Jason A.; Yang, Yi; Chen, Alessandra; Gavzy, Samuel J.; Lee, June-Yong; Ziel, Joshua; Miraldi, Emily R.; Bonneau, Richard; Littman, Dan R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RORγt+ Th17 cells are important for mucosal defenses, but also contribute to autoimmune disease. They accumulate in the intestine in response to microbiota and produce IL-17 cytokines. Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are Th17-inducing commensals that potentiate autoimmunity in mice. RORγt+ T cells were induced in mesenteric lymph nodes early after SFB colonization and distributed across different segments of the gastrointestinal tract. However, robust IL-17A production was restricted to the ileum, where SFB makes direct contact with the epithelium and induces serum amyloid A proteins 1 and 2 (SAA1/2), which promote local IL-17A expression in RORγt+ T cells. We identified an SFB-dependent role of type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), which secreted IL-22 that induced epithelial SAA production in a Stat3-dependent manner. This highlights the critical role of tissue microenvironment in activating effector functions of committed Th17 cells, which may have important implications for how these cells contribute to inflammatory disease. PMID:26411290

  3. Evaluation of 4-methylimidazole, in the Ames/Salmonella test using induced rodent liver and lung S9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Carol; Adamson, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    4-methylimidazole (4-MeI) is formed by the interaction of ammonia with reducing sugars and low levels have been identified as a by-product in coffee, soy sauce, wine, dark beers, soft drinks, and caramel colors. The 4-MeI has been reported to induce alveolar/bronchiolar tumors in mice but not rats. Its mechanism of action is unlikely to be due to genotoxicity as 4-MeI does not induce mutation in Salmonella typhimurium and does not induce micronuclei in rodent peripheral erythrocytes or bone marrow cells. However, the question of whether genetically reactive intermediates could be formed via lung-specific metabolism has not previously been addressed. The 4-MeI was tested for its ability to induce mutation in five standard Ames strains of S. typhimurium using induced rat (F344/N) and mouse (B6C3F1) liver and lung S9 as a source of exogenous metabolism. The chemicals were tested in an OECD 471-compliant bacterial reverse mutation assay, using both plate-incorporation and pre-incubation methodologies, together with 10% S-9 metabolic activation. No induction of mutation (as measured by an increase in revertant colonies) was observed and it was concluded that 4-MeI was not mutagenic in S. typhimurium using either rodent liver or lung S9 for exogenous metabolism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Transfer of primed CD4+OX40- T lymphocytes induces increased immunity to experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Christensen, H B; Hougen, H P

    1997-01-01

    The protective effect of primed CD4 T cells against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in Lewis rats. Primed CD4 T cells were obtained by inoculating Lewis rats with a non-lethal dose of S. typhimurium. Four weeks after the infection, spleen non-adherent mononuclear cells were......4+ T cells sorted into OX40- or OX40- subpopulations significantly increased animal survival compared to controls. Animals receiving OX40+CD4+ T cells did not differ significantly in survival probability from those receiving unsorted CD+ T cells. However, animals receiving OX40-CD4+ T cells had...... a significantly better survival compared to animals given unsorted CD4+ T cells. It is concluded that OX40-CD4+ T cells can induce significant protection against S. typhimurium infections in rats. This is most likely due to the fact that the OX40-CD4+ T-cell population contains a significant number of antigen...

  5. Role of murine intestinal interleukin-1 receptor 1-expressing lymphoid tissue inducer-like cells in Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent L Chen

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-1 signaling plays a critical role in intestinal immunology. Here, we report that the major population of intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes expressing IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1 is the lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi-like cell, a type of innate lymphoid cell. These cells are significant producers of IL-22, and this IL-22 production depends on IL-1R1 signaling. LTi-like cells are required for defense against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Moreover, colonic LTi-like cell numbers depend on the presence of the intestinal microbiota. LTi-like cells require IL-1R1 for production of protective cytokines and confer protection in infectious colitis, and their cell numbers in the colon depend upon having a microbiome.

  6. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Salmonella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Salmonella Infections Print A ... Last? Can Salmonella Infections Be Prevented? What Is Salmonella ? Salmonella is a kind of bacteria , with many ...

  7. SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica is required for the suppression of porcine alveolar macrophage cytokine expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova Barbora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genes localized at Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1 are involved in Salmonella enterica invasion of host non-professional phagocytes. Interestingly, in macrophages, SPI-1-encoded proteins, in addition to invasion, induce cell death via activation of caspase-1 which also cleaves proIL-1β and proIL-18, precursors of 2 proinflammatory cytokines. In this study we were therefore interested in whether SPI-1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS may influence proinflammatory response of macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages with wild-type S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis and their isogenic SPI-1 deletion mutants. ΔSPI1 mutants of both serovars invaded approx. 5 times less efficiently than the wild-type strains and despite this, macrophages responded to the infection with ΔSPI1 mutants by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, TNFα, IL-23α and GM-CSF. Identical macrophage responses to that induced by the ΔSPI1 mutants were also observed to the infection with sipB but not the sipA mutant. The hilA mutant exhibited an intermediate phenotype between the ΔSPI1 mutant and the wild-type S. Enteritidis. Our results showed that the SPI-1-encoded T3SS is required not only for cell invasion but in macrophages also for the suppression of early proinflammatory cytokine expression.

  8. Salmonella: Salmonellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Trine; Maurischat, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella remains one of the most important zoonotic pathogenic bacteria and is the causative agents of salmonellosis. The aim of this article is to give an overview of Salmonella and salmonellosis, starting by describing the characteristics of the microorganism Salmonella, including biochemical...... properties, physiology, classification, and nomenclature. Thereafter, the epidemiology of the organism is introduced, including the routes of transmission. Finally, the disease salmonellosis, the virulence mechanisms, and the occurrence in different types of food are described....

  9. Effects of vitamins A and E on methylazoxymethanol-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavan, E; Maziere, S; Narbonne, J F; Cassand, P

    1997-07-03

    The aim of this study is to report the antimutagenic effect of vitamin A and vitamin E towards methylazoxymethanol (MAM)-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 sensitive to alkylating agents. In order to characterize different levels of action of these two fat-soluble vitamins towards the mutagenicity of MAM, several assays have been considered to show the antimutagenic effect and the possible interactions of vitamins with MAM or with the bacteria. Thus, for each vitamin, three different assays with three different incubations have been conducted: (i) MAM, bacteria and vitamins together, (ii) MAM and vitamins, (iii) bacteria and vitamins. The results showed that both vitamins A and E present an antimutagenic effect towards MAM induced mutagenesis. alpha-Tocopherol seems to have an action directly on to the mutagenic agent, whereas the action of retinol is likely due to a protection of the bacterial genoma against MAM. These in vitro results could help to interpret results of colon carcinogenesis studies using animals induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and fed vitamins supplemented diet.

  10. Vaccination with Salmonella Typhi recombinant outer membrane protein 28 induces humoral but non-protective immune response in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjani Saxena

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Typhoid is one of the most important food and water borne disease causing millions of deaths over the world. Presently, there is no cost effective vaccine available in India. The outer-membrane proteins (Omps of Salmonella have been exhibited as a potential candidate for development of subunit vaccine against typhoid. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of recombinant Omp 28 protein for immunization of rabbit to elucidate its protection against virulent Salmonella Typhi. Materials and Methods: Immune potential of recombinant Omp28 was tested in New Zealand Rabbits. Rabbits were divided into two groups, i.e., control and test group. Control group was injected with phosphate buffer saline with adjuvant while test group were injected with recombinant Omp28 along with adjuvant. Rabbits were bleed and serum was collected from each rabbit. Serum was tested by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for humoral response. Rabbits were challenged with virulent culture to test the protective immunity. Results: Humoral response was provoked at 15th day and maintained till 30th day. The mean ELISA titer at 15th day was 1 : 28000 (mean titer log 10 : 4.4472 and on the 30th day was 1 : 25866 (mean titer log 10 : 4.4127. Protective immune potential of Omp 28 was assessed by challenge studies in rabbits for which vaccinated and control rabbits were challenged with 109 cells of virulent culture of S. Typhi. In control group, out of six, no rabbit could survive after 48 days while in vaccinated group, three out of six rabbit were survived. Conclusion: Immunization of rabbit with recombinant Omp 28 induced a strong humoral response which was exhibited by high antibody titer in ELISA. Subsequently, intraperitoneal homologous challenge of the immunized New Zealand rabbit resulted in lack of significant protection. These findings indicate that Omp 28 though provoked the humoral immunity but could not provide the protective immunity in

  11. Acid tolerance in Salmonella typhimurium induced by culturing in the presence of organic acids at different growth temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2010-02-01

    The influence of growth temperature and acidification of the culture medium up to pH 4.25 with acetic, citric, lactic and hydrochloric acids on the growth and subsequent acid resistance at pH 3.0 of Salmonella typhimurium CECT 443 was studied. The minimum pH value which allowed for S. typhimurium growth within the temperature range of 25-37 degrees C was 4.5 when the pH was reduced using citric and hydrochloric acids, and 5.4 and 6.4 when lactic acid and acetic acid were used, respectively. At high (45 degrees C) or low (10 degrees C) temperatures, the growth pH boundary was increased about 1 pH unit. The growth temperature markedly modified the acid resistance of the resulting cells. In all cases, D-values were lower for cells grown at 10 degrees C and significantly increased with increasing growth temperature up to 37 degrees C, at which D-values obtained were up to 10 times higher. Cells grown at 45 degrees C showed D-values similar to those found for cells grown at 25 degrees C. The growth of cells in acidified media, regardless of the pH value, caused an increase in their acid resistance at the four incubation temperatures, although the magnitude of the Acid Tolerance Response (ATR) observed depended on the growth temperature. Acid adapted cultures at 10 degrees C showed D-values ranging from 5.75 to 6.91 min, which turned out to be about 2 times higher than those corresponding to non-acid adapted cultures, while higher temperatures induced an increase in D-values of at least 3.5 times. Another finding was that, while at 10 and 45 degrees C no significant differences among the effect of the different acids tested in inducing an ATR were observed, when cells were grown at 25 and 37 degrees C citric acid generally turned out to be the acid which induced the strongest ATR. Results obtained in this study show that growth temperature is an important factor affecting S. typhimurium acid resistance and could contribute to find new strategies based on intelligent

  12. Novel inducers of the envelope stress response BaeSR in Salmonella Typhimurium: BaeR is critically required for tungstate waste disposal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Appia-Ayme

    Full Text Available The RpoE and CpxR regulated envelope stress responses are extremely important for Salmonella Typhimurium to cause infection in a range of hosts. Until now the role for BaeSR in both the Salmonella Typhimurium response to stress and its contribution to infection have not been fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate stationary phase growth, iron and sodium tungstate as novel inducers of the BaeRregulon, with BaeR critically required for Salmonella resistance to sodium tungstate. We show that functional overlap between the resistance nodulation-cell division (RND multidrug transporters, MdtA, AcrD and AcrB exists for the waste disposal of tungstate from the cell. We also point to a role for enterobactinsiderophores in the protection of enteric organisms from tungstate, akin to the scenario in nitrogen fixing bacteria. Surprisingly, BaeR is the first envelope stress response pathway investigated in S. Typhimurium that is not required for murine typhoid in either ity(S or ity(R mouse backgrounds. BaeR is therefore either required for survival in larger mammals such as pigs or calves, an avian host such as chickens, or survival out with the host altogether where Salmonella and related enterics must survive in soil and water.

  13. SALMONELLA SPECIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    e. Biochemical screening and serological tests for Salmonellae. Identification of Salmonella species was done biochemically. Triple sugar Iron (TSI) agar motility, urease and citrate utilization tests were also used to screen the isolates before serologic testing was performed. (Cheesbrough, 2002; Perilla, 2003). Triple sugar ...

  14. Iron-induced virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium at the intestinal epithelial interface can be suppressed by carvacrol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortman, Guus A M; Roelofs, Rian W H M; Swinkels, Dorine W.; De Jonge, Marien I.; Burt, Sara A.; Tjalsma, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Oral iron therapy can increase the abundance of bacterial pathogens, e.g., Salmonella spp., in the large intestine of African children. Carvacrol is a natural compound with antimicrobial activity against various intestinal bacterial pathogens, among which is the highly prevalent Salmonella enterica

  15. Very long O-antigen chains enhance fitness during Salmonella-induced colitis by increasing bile resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Crawford

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal inflammation changes the luminal habitat for microbes through mechanisms that have not been fully resolved. We noticed that the FepE regulator of very long O-antigen chain assembly in the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium conferred a luminal fitness advantage in the mouse colitis model. However, a fepE mutant was not defective for survival in tissue, resistance to complement or resistance to polymyxin B. We performed metabolite profiling to identify changes in the luminal habitat that accompany S. Typhimurium-induced colitis. This analysis suggested that S. Typhimurium-induced colitis increased the luminal concentrations of total bile acids. A mutation in fepE significantly reduced the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of S. Typhimurium for bile acids in vitro. Oral administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine resin lowered the concentrations of total bile acids in colon contents during S. Typhimurium infection and significantly reduced the luminal fitness advantage conferred by the fepE gene in the mouse colitis model. Collectively, these data suggested that very long O-antigen chains function in bile acid resistance of S. Typhimurium, a property conferring a fitness advantage during luminal growth in the inflamed intestine.

  16. Deep resequencing of GWAS loci identifies rare variants in CARD9, IL23R and RNF186 that are associated with ulcerative colitis.

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    Mélissa Beaudoin

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies and follow-up meta-analyses in Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC have recently identified 163 disease-associated loci that meet genome-wide significance for these two inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. These discoveries have already had a tremendous impact on our understanding of the genetic architecture of these diseases and have directed functional studies that have revealed some of the biological functions that are important to IBD (e.g. autophagy. Nonetheless, these loci can only explain a small proportion of disease variance (~14% in CD and 7.5% in UC, suggesting that not only are additional loci to be found but that the known loci may contain high effect rare risk variants that have gone undetected by GWAS. To test this, we have used a targeted sequencing approach in 200 UC cases and 150 healthy controls (HC, all of French Canadian descent, to study 55 genes in regions associated with UC. We performed follow-up genotyping of 42 rare non-synonymous variants in independent case-control cohorts (totaling 14,435 UC cases and 20,204 HC. Our results confirmed significant association to rare non-synonymous coding variants in both IL23R and CARD9, previously identified from sequencing of CD loci, as well as identified a novel association in RNF186. With the exception of CARD9 (OR = 0.39, the rare non-synonymous variants identified were of moderate effect (OR = 1.49 for RNF186 and OR = 0.79 for IL23R. RNF186 encodes a protein with a RING domain having predicted E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase activity and two transmembrane domains. Importantly, the disease-coding variant is located in the ubiquitin ligase domain. Finally, our results suggest that rare variants in genes identified by genome-wide association in UC are unlikely to contribute significantly to the overall variance for the disease. Rather, these are expected to help focus functional studies of the corresponding disease loci.

  17. Cinnamaldehyde induces changes in the protein profile of Salmonella Typhimurium biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Alex Fiori; Dos Santos, Adriele Rodrigues; Coelho Trevisan, Daliah Alves; Ribeiro, Alessandra Braga; Zanetti Campanerut-Sá, Paula Aline; Kukolj, Caroline; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; de Abreu Filho, Benicio Alves; Junior, Miguel Machinski; Graton Mikcha, Jane Martha

    2017-09-30

    The effect of cinnamaldehyde against biofilm cells of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 was evaluated. We also assessed differential protein patterns that were expressed by biofilms compared with planktonic cells and protein expression by cinnamaldehyde-treated biofilms cells. This compound decreased biofilm biomass and metabolic activity of biofilms at both concentrations tested. Cinnamaldehyde treatment reduced the number of attached cells in polypropylene, reflected by colony count and scanning electron microscopy. The proteomic analysis of biofilms compared with planktonic cells indicated that several proteins were upregulated or downregulated, especially proteins that are involved in energy metabolism. Peroxiredoxin, ATP synthase alpha chain protein, conjugal transfer nickase/helicase TraI and elongation factor G were upregulated in untreated-biofilm cells, and their expression decreased as a function of cinnamaldehyde treatment. Cinnamaldehyde had antibiofilm activity, and several differentially expressed proteins identified provide potential and interesting targets to explore new control strategies for S. Typhimurium biofilms. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. An inducible and secreted eukaryote-like serine/threonine kinase of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi promotes intracellular survival and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeya, Nagaraja; Ta, Atri; Das, Sayan; Mandal, Rahul S; Chakrabarti, Oishee; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ghosh, Amar N; Das, Santasabuj

    2015-02-01

    Eukaryote-like serine/threonine kinases (eSTKs) constitute an important family of bacterial virulence factors. Genome analysis had predicted putative eSTKs in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, although their functional characterization and the elucidation of their role in pathogenesis are still awaited. We show here that the primary sequence and secondary structure of the t4519 locus of Salmonella Typhi Ty2 have all the signatures of eukaryotic superfamily kinases. t4519 encodes a ∼39-kDa protein (T4519), which shows serine/threonine kinase activities in vitro. Recombinant T4519 (rT4519) is autophosphorylated and phosphorylates the universal substrate myelin basic protein. Infection of macrophages results in decreased viability of the mutant (Ty2Δt4519) strain, which is reversed by gene complementation. Moreover, reactive oxygen species produced by the macrophages signal to the bacteria to induce T4519, which is translocated to the host cell cytoplasm. That T4519 may target a host substrate(s) is further supported by the activation of host cellular signaling pathways and the induction of cytokines/chemokines. Finally, the role of T4519 in the pathogenesis of Salmonella Typhi is underscored by the significantly decreased mortality of mice infected with the Ty2Δt4519 strain and the fact that the competitive index of this strain for causing systemic infection is 0.25% that of the wild-type strain. This study characterizes the first eSTK of Salmonella Typhi and demonstrates its role in promoting phagosomal survival of the bacteria within macrophages, which is a key determinant of pathogenesis. This, to the best of our knowledge, is the first study to describe the essential role of eSTKs in the in vivo pathogenesis of Salmonella spp. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Downregulation of microRNA-107 in intestinal CD11c(+) myeloid cells in response to microbiota and proinflammatory cytokines increases IL-23p19 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaochang; Cao, Anthony T; Cao, Xiaocang; Yao, Suxia; Carlsen, Eric D; Soong, Lynn; Liu, Chang-Gong; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Zhanju; Duck, L Wayne; Elson, Charles O; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-03-01

    Commensal flora plays an important role in the development of the mucosal immune system and in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. However, the mechanisms involved in regulation of host-microbiota interaction are still not completely understood. In this study, we examined how microbiota and intestinal inflammatory conditions regulate host microRNA expression and observed lower microRNA-107 (miR-107) expression in the inflamed intestines of colitic mice, compared with that in normal control mice. miR-107 was predominantly reduced in epithelial cells and CD11c(+) myeloid cells including dendritic cells and macrophages in the inflamed intestines. We demonstrate that IL-6, IFN-γ, and TNF-α downregulated, whereas TGF-β promoted, miR-107 expression. In addition, miR-107 expression was higher in the intestines of germ-free mice than in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions, and the presence of microbiota downregulated miR-107 expression in DCs and macrophages in a MyD88- and NF-κB-dependent manner. We determined that the ectopic expression of miR-107 specifically repressed the expression of IL-23p19, a key molecule in innate immune responses to commensal bacteria. We concluded that regulation of miR-107 by intestinal microbiota and proinflammatory cytokine serve as an important pathway for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Association of UGT2B7, UGT1A9, ABCG2, and IL23R polymorphisms with rejection risk in kidney transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cilião, Heloísa Lizotti; Camargo-Godoy, Rossana Batista Oliveira; de Souza, Marilesia Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in testing compatibility between donor and recipient, graft rejection remains a current concern. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that codify altered enzymes of metabolism, drug transport, and the immune system may contribute to graft rejection in transplant patients....... This study examined the association between SNPs present in genes of these processes and occurrence of graft rejection episodes in 246 kidney transplant patients, 35% of which were diagnosed with rejection. Genotype-gene expression associations were also assessed. Peripheral blood samples were used...... for genotyping of 24 SNPs on the following genes: CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2E1, POR, UGT2B7, UGT1A9, ABCB1, ABCC2, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, TNF, IL2, IRF5, TGFB1, NFKBIA, IL10, IL23R, NFAT, and CCR5 by real-time PCR. The analysis of gene expression was performed by RT-qPCR. The association between graft rejection episodes...

  1. Downregulation of MicroRNA-107 in intestinal CD11c+ myeloid cells in response to microbiota and proinflammatory cytokines increases IL-23p19 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaochang; Cao, Anthony T.; Cao, Xiaocang; Yao, Suxia; Carlson, Eric D.; Soong, Lynn; Liu, Chang-Gong; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Zhanju; Duck, L. Wayne; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Commensal flora plays an important role in the development of the mucosal immune system and in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. However, the mechanisms involved in regulation of host-microbiota interaction are still not completely understood. In this study, we examined how microbiota and intestinal inflammatory conditions regulate host microRNA expression and observed lower microRNA-107 (miR-107) expression in the inflamed intestines of colitic mice, compared with that in normal control mice. miR-107 was predominantly reduced in epithelial cells and CD11c+ myeloid cells including dendritic cells and macrophages in the inflamed intestines. We demonstrate that IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α downregulated, whereas TGF-β promoted, miR-107 expression. In addition, miR-107 expression was higher in the intestines of germ-free mice than in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions, and the presence of microbiota downregulated miR-107 expression in DCs and macrophages in a MyD88- and NF-κB-dependent manner. We determined that the ectopic expression of miR-107 specifically repressed the expression of IL-23p19, a key molecule in innate immune responses to commensal bacteria. We concluded that regulation of miR-107 by intestinal microbiota and pro-inflammatory cytokine serve as an important pathway for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. PMID:24293139

  2. Involvement of MicroRNAs in Probiotics-Induced Reduction of the Cecal Inflammation by Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoling Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The microRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to play important roles in the development of the immune system and in regulation of host inflammation responses. Probiotics can effectively alleviate the inflammation caused by Salmonella in chickens. However, whether and how miRNAs are involved in modulation of the inflammation response in the gut of chickens have not been reported. In this study, the impact of a probiotics, Lactobacillus plantarum Z01 (LPZ01, was investigated on the cecal miRNAs and cytokine secretions in Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium-infected chickens at the age of 3 days. Newly hatched chicks were assigned to four groups (1: NC (basal diet (2: S (basal diet + S. Typhimurium challenged (3: SP (basal diet + S. Typhimurium challenged + LPZ01 (4: P (basal diet + LPZ01. In comparison with the S group, chicks in the SP group reduced the number of S. Typhimurium and had lower levels of interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF in ceca post challenge. Expression of 14 miRNAs was significantly affected by the presence of S. Typhimurium and/or lactobacillus. Five differential expression miRNAs (gga-miR-215-5p, gga-miR-3525, gga-miR-193a-5p, gga-miR-122-5p, and gga-miR-375 were randomly selected for confirmation by the RT-PCR. Predicted target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were enriched in regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, stress-activated MAPK cascade, immune system development and regulation of immune system process as well as in immune related pathways such as MAPK and Wnt signaling pathways. The relationship between changes of miRNAs and changes of cytokines was explored. Finally, 119 novel miRNAs were identified in 36 libraries totally. Identification of novel miRNAs significantly expanded the repertoire of chicken miRNAs and provided the basis for understanding the function of miRNAs in the host. Our results suggest that the probiotics

  3. Bacteriophage-induced reduction in Salmonella Enteritidis counts in the crop of broiler chickens undergoing preslaughter feed withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto Marietto; Donato, Tais Cremasco; Baptista, Ana Angelita Sampaio; Corrêa, Isadora Mainieri de Oliveira; Garcia, Keila Carolina Ornellas Dutka; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella food poisoning is a public health problem. Feed withdrawal from broiler chickens before slaughter can favor the multiplication of Salmonella in the cecum and crop of contaminated animals and subsequently lead to contamination of carcasses in the processing plant. In the present study, a cocktail of lytic bacteriophages isolated from sewage water was orally administered to 45-d-old broiler chickens 1 h after they received an oral dose of 10(7) cfu/mL Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis. Immediately after phage administration and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 h thereafter, groups of chicken were killed. Ceca and crops were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella. At 3 h posttreatment, there were 10(3) cfu/g and 10(1) cfu/g of cecal and crop suspension, respectively. At 6 h after treatment, the number of Salmonella was 10(3) cfu/g in the cecal suspension, but below the detection limit in the crops. Our results suggest that bacteriophage therapy may be able to reduce the contamination of chicken carcasses by reducing the preslaughter load of Salmonella in the birds.

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies of a Diverse Isotype Induced by an O-Antigen Glycoconjugate Vaccine Mediate In Vitro and In Vivo Killing of African Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yun Shan; Clare, Simon; Micoli, Francesca; Saul, Allan; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), particularly Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, is responsible for a major global burden of invasive disease with high associated case-fatality rates. We recently reported the development of a candidate O-antigen–CRM197 glycoconjugate vaccine against S. Typhimurium. Here, using a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies generated by the vaccine, we examined the relative efficiency of different antibody isotypes specific for the O:4 antigen of S. Typhimurium to effect in vitro and in vivo killing of the invasive African S. Typhimurium strain D23580. All O:4-specific antibody isotypes could mediate cell-free killing and phagocytosis of S. Typhimurium by mouse blood cells. Opsonization of Salmonella with O:4-specific IgA, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b, but not IgM, resulted in cell-dependent bacterial killing. At high concentrations, O:4-specific antibodies inhibited both cell-free complement-mediated and cell-dependent opsonophagocytic killing of S. Typhimurium in vitro. Using passive immunization in mice, the O:4-specific antibodies provided in vivo functional activity by decreasing the bacterial load in the blood and tissues, with IgG2a and IgG2b being the most effective isotypes. In conclusion, an O-antigen–CRM197 glycoconjugate vaccine can induce O-antigen-specific antibodies of different isotypes that exert in vitro and in vivo killing of S. Typhimurium. PMID:26169269

  5. Exposure of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium to Three Humectants Used in the Food Industry Induces Different Osmoadaptation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Sarah; Rogers, Lisa; Händler, Kristian; McClure, Peter; Amézquita, Alejandro; Hinton, Jay C D; Fanning, Séamus

    2015-10-01

    Common salt (NaCl) is frequently used by the food industry to add flavor and to act as a humectant in order to reduce the water content of a food product. The improved health awareness of consumers is leading to a demand for food products with reduced salt content; thus, manufacturers require alternative water activity-reducing agents which elicit the same general effects as NaCl. Two examples include KCl and glycerol. These agents lower the water activity of a food matrix and also contribute to limit the growth of the microbiota, including foodborne pathogens. Little is currently known about how foodborne pathogens respond to these water activity-lowering agents. Here we examined the response of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 4/74 to NaCl, KCl, and glycerol at three time points, using a constant water activity level, compared with the response of a control inoculum. All conditions induced the upregulation of gluconate metabolic genes after 6 h of exposure. Bacteria exposed to NaCl and KCl demonstrated the upregulation of the osmoprotective transporter mechanisms encoded by the proP, proU, and osmU (STM1491 to STM1494) genes. Glycerol exposure elicited the downregulation of these osmoadaptive mechanisms but stimulated an increase in lipopolysaccharide and membrane protein-associated genes after 1 h. The most extensive changes in gene expression occurred following exposure to KCl. Because many of these genes were of unknown function, further characterization may identify KCl-specific adaptive processes that are not stimulated by NaCl. This study shows that the response of S. Typhimurium to different humectants does not simply reflect reduced water activity and likely involves systems that are linked to specific humectants. Copyright © 2015 Finn et al.

  6. Application of Bacillus subtilis to the roots of leafy greens, in the presence of Listeria innocua and Salmonella Newport, induces closure of stomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markland, Sarah M; Ferelli, Angela M; Craighead, Shani A; Bais, Harsh; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2015-10-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis UD1022 has been shown to trigger an induced systemic response in Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction causes plant stomata to close, protecting the plant from infection by plant pathogens and thereby increasing crop yield. The purpose of this study was to determine whether UD1022 applied to the roots of plants is able to induce stomata closure in leafy greens as well as influence the persistence of human pathogens (Listeria and Salmonella) on plants. UD1022 induced stomata closure in the presence of human pathogens on both lettuce and spinach 3 h post-inoculation (pListeria on plants after 3 days post-inoculation (p=0.02) but had less of an effect on the persistence of Salmonella. The results of this study indicate that plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium B. subtilis UD1022 may be able to prevent contamination by some human pathogens. This is the first study to investigate the use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to control the persistence of human pathogens on plants.

  7. Colostrum whey down-regulates the expression of early and late inflammatory response genes induced by Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium components in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, M; Fortier, M; Pouliot, Y; Gauthier, S F; Boutin, Y; Asselin, C; Lessard, M

    2015-01-28

    Pathogenic invasion by Escherichia coli and Salmonellae remains a constant threat to the integrity of the intestinal epithelium and can rapidly induce inflammatory responses. At birth, colostrum consumption exerts numerous beneficial effects on the properties of intestinal epithelial cells and protects the gastrointestinal tract of newborns from pathogenic invasion. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of colostrum on the early and late inflammatory responses induced by pathogens. The short-term (2 h) and long-term (24 h) effects of exposure to heat-killed (HK) E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium on gene expression in the porcine intestinal epithelial cell (IPEC-J2) model were first evaluated by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. Luciferase assays were performed using a NF-κB-luc reporter construct to investigate the effect of colostrum whey treatment on the activation of NF-κB induced by HK bacteria. Luciferase assays were also performed using NF-κB-luc, IL-8-luc and IL-6-luc reporter constructs in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2/15 cells exposed to dose-response stimulations with HK bacteria and colostrum whey. Bovine colostrum whey treatment decreased the expression of early and late inflammatory genes induced by HK bacteria in IPEC-J2, as well as the transcriptional activation of NF-κB-luc induced by HK bacteria. Unlike that with colostrum whey, treatment with other milk fractions failed to decrease the activation of NF-κB-luc induced by HK bacteria. Lastly, the reduction of the HK bacteria-induced activation of NF-κB-luc, IL-8-luc and IL-6-luc by colostrum whey was dose dependent. The results of the present study indicate that bovine colostrum may protect and preserve the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier in the host by controlling the expression levels of early and late inflammatory genes following invasion by enteric pathogens.

  8. 2-Nitroanisole-induced oxidative DNA damage in Salmonella typhimurium and in rat urinary bladder cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kunio; Katoh, Yoshitaka; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Yamada, Masami; Matsumoto, Kyomu

    2017-04-01

    2-Nitroanisole (2-NA) is used in the manufacturing of azo dyes and causes cancer, mainly in the urinary bladder. Previous in vivo genotoxic data seems to be insufficient to explain the mechanism through which 2-NA induces carcinogenesis, and several bladder carcinogens were reported to induce oxidative DNA damage. Thus, we examined the potential induction of oxidative DNA damage by 2-NA using bacterial strain YG3008, a mutMST-deficient derivative of strain TA100. Consequently, strain YG3008, when compared with strain TA100, was found to be more sensitive to 2-NA, indicating oxidative DNA damage in bacterial cells. For further investigation, we performed the comet assay using the urinary bladder and liver of rats, with and without human 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), to confirm the potential of 2-NA for inducing oxidative DNA damage. Simultaneously, we conducted a micronucleus test using bone marrow from rats to assess the genotoxicity of 2-NA in vivo. 2-NA was administered orally to male Fischer 344 rats for 3 consecutive days. The rats were divided into 6 treatment groups: 3 groups treated with 2-NA at doses of 125, 250, and 500mg/kg; a group treated with the combination of 2-NA and glutathione-SH (GSH); a negative control group; and a positive control group. The comet assay without hOGG1 detected no DNA damage in the liver or urinary bladder, and the micronucleus test did not show clastogenic effects in bone marrow cells. However, the comet assay with hOGG1 was positive in the urinary bladder samples, indicating the induction of oxidative DNA damage in the urinary bladder for the group treated with 2-NA at 500mg/kg. Moreover, an antioxidant of GSH significantly reduced oxidative DNA damage caused by 2-NA. These results indicate that oxidative DNA damage is a possible mode of action for carcinogenesis in the urinary bladder of rats treated with 2-NA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Flagella overexpression attenuates Salmonella pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghong Yang

    Full Text Available Flagella are cell surface appendages involved in a number of bacterial behaviors, such as motility, biofilm formation, and chemotaxis. Despite these important functions, flagella can pose a liability to a bacterium when serving as potent immunogens resulting in the stimulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Previous work showing appendage overexpression, referred to as attenuating gene expression (AGE, was found to enfeeble wild-type Salmonella. Thus, this approach was adapted to discern whether flagella overexpression could induce similar attenuation. To test its feasibility, flagellar filament subunit FliC and flagellar regulon master regulator FlhDC were overexpressed in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium wild-type strain H71. The results show that the expression of either FliC or FlhDC alone, and co-expression of the two, significantly attenuates Salmonella. The flagellated bacilli were unable to replicate within macrophages and thus were not lethal to mice. In-depth investigation suggests that flagellum-mediated AGE was due to the disruptive effects of flagella on the bacterial membrane, resulting in heightened susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide and bile. Furthermore, flagellum-attenuated Salmonella elicited elevated immune responses to Salmonella presumably via FliC's adjuvant effect and conferred robust protection against wild-type Salmonella challenge.

  10. Flagella Overexpression Attenuates Salmonella Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Suo, Zhiyong; Jun, SangMu; Robison, Amanda; Li, Jinquan; Lim, Timothy; Cao, Ling; Hoyt, Teri; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Flagella are cell surface appendages involved in a number of bacterial behaviors, such as motility, biofilm formation, and chemotaxis. Despite these important functions, flagella can pose a liability to a bacterium when serving as potent immunogens resulting in the stimulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Previous work showing appendage overexpression, referred to as attenuating gene expression (AGE), was found to enfeeble wild-type Salmonella. Thus, this approach was adapted to discern whether flagella overexpression could induce similar attenuation. To test its feasibility, flagellar filament subunit FliC and flagellar regulon master regulator FlhDC were overexpressed in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium wild-type strain H71. The results show that the expression of either FliC or FlhDC alone, and co-expression of the two, significantly attenuates Salmonella. The flagellated bacilli were unable to replicate within macrophages and thus were not lethal to mice. In-depth investigation suggests that flagellum-mediated AGE was due to the disruptive effects of flagella on the bacterial membrane, resulting in heightened susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide and bile. Furthermore, flagellum-attenuated Salmonella elicited elevated immune responses to Salmonella presumably via FliC’s adjuvant effect and conferred robust protection against wild-type Salmonella challenge. PMID:23056473

  11. Interleukin-23 mediates the pathogenesis of LPS/GalN-induced liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Suxia; Zhao, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Li, Ning; Huang, Chong; Chen, Mingquan; Cheng, Qi; Zhu, Mengqi; Yu, Kangkang; Liu, Chenghai; Shi, Guangfeng

    2017-05-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is required for T helper 17 (Th17) cell responses and IL-17 production in hepatitis B virus infection. A previous study showed that the IL-23/IL-17 axis aggravates immune injury in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. However, the role of IL-23 in acute liver injury remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the inflammatory cytokine IL-23 in lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN)-induced acute liver injury in mice. Serum IL-23 from patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and healthy individuals who served as healthy controls (HCs) was measured by ELISA. An IL-23p19 neutralizing antibody or an IL-23p40 neutralizing antibody was administered intravenously at the time of challenge with LPS (10μg/kg) and GalN (400mg/kg) in C57BL/6 mice. Hepatic pathology and the expression of Th17-related cytokines, including IL-17 and TNF-α; neutrophil chemoattractants, including Cxcl1, Cxcl2, Cxcl9, and Cxcl10; and the stabilization factor Csf3 were assessed in liver tissue. Serum IL-23 was significantly upregulated in ACLF patients compared with CHB patients and HCs (Pliver tissue histopathology and significant reductions in the expression of Th17-related inflammatory cytokine, including IL-17 and TNF-α; neutrophil chemoattractants, including Cxcl1, Cxcl2, Cxcl9, and Cxcl10; and stabilization factors Csf3 within the liver tissue compared with LPS/GalN mice (Pliver injury in mice. IL-23 neutralizing antibodies attenuated liver injury by reducing the expression of Th17-related inflammatory cytokines, neutrophil chemoattractants and stabilization factors within the liver tissue, which indicated that IL-23 likely functions upstream of Th17-related cytokine and chemokine expression to recruit inflammatory cells into the liver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Salmonella typhimurium ghost vaccine induces cytokine expression in vitro and immune responses in vivo and protects rats against homologous and heterologous challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Vinod

    Full Text Available Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium are important food-borne bacterial pathogens, which are responsible for diarrhea and gastroenteritis in humans and animals. In this study, S. typhimurium bacterial ghost (STG was generated based on minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of sodium hydroxide (NaOH. Experimental studies performed using in vitro and in vivo experimental model systems to characterize effects of STG as a vaccine candidate. When compared with murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 exposed to PBS buffer (98.1%, the macrophages exposed to formalin-killed inactivated cells (FKC, live wild-type bacterial cells and NaOH-induced STG at 1 × 108 CFU/mL showed 85.6%, 66.5% and 84.6% cell viability, respectively. It suggests that STG significantly reduces the cytotoxic effect of wild-type bacterial cells. Furthermore, STG is an excellent inducer for mRNAs of pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β and factor (iNOS, anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10 and dual activities (IL-6 in the stimulated macrophage cells. In vivo, STG vaccine induced humoral and cellular immune responses and protection against homologous and heterologous challenges in rats. Furthermore, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of STG vaccine were compared with those of FKC and non-vaccinated PBS control groups. The vaccinated rats from STG group exhibited higher levels of serum IgG antibody responses, serum bactericidal antibodies, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell populations than those of the FKC and PBS control groups. Most importantly, after challenge with homologous and heterologous strains, the bacterial loads in the STG group were markedly lower than the FKC and PBS control groups. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the STG vaccine induces protective immunity against homologous and heterologous challenges.

  13. Inflammation induced by phytomodulatory proteins from the latex of Calotropis procera (Asclepiadaceae) protects against Salmonella infection in a murine model of typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Raquel S B; Figueiredo, Ingrid S T; Freitas, Lyara B N; Pinheiro, Rachel S P; Brito, Gerly Anne C; Alencar, Nylane M N; Ramos, Márcio V; Ralph, Maria T; Lima-Filho, José V

    2012-07-01

    Laticifer proteins (LP) of Calotropis procera were fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography, and the influence of a sub-fraction (LP(PI)) on the inflammatory response of Swiss mice challenged by Salmonella enterica Ser. Typhimurium was investigated. Mice (n = 10) received LP(PI) (30 or 60 mg/kg) in a single inoculum by the intraperitoneal route 24 h before infection. To investigate the relevance of the proteolytic activity, three additional groups were included: the first one received heat-treated LP (30 mg/kg-30 min at 100 °C), the second received LP (30 mg/kg) inactivated by iodoacetamide, and a control group received only phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The survival rate reached 100 % in mice treated with LP(PI) and was also observed with the other treatment, whereas the PBS group died 1-3 days after infection. The neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity of pretreated mice was enhanced and accompanied by high bacterial clearance from the bloodstream. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA transcripts, but not interferon-gamma, were detected early in spleen cells of pretreated mice after infection; however, the nitric oxide contents in the bloodstream were decreased in comparison to the PBS group. The inflammatory stimulus of C. procera proteins increased phagocytosis and balanced the nitric oxide release in the bloodstream, preventing septic shock induced by Salmonella infection.

  14. Proteolytic Inhibition of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium-Induced Activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases ERK and JNK in Cultured Human Intestinal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynott, Tracey L.; Crossett, Ben; Prathalingam, S. Radhika

    2002-01-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple stems, blocks signaling by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK-1) and ERK-2, inhibits inflammation, and protects against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection. In this study, we examined the effect of bromelain on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, since an important feature of its pathogenesis is its ability to induce activation of ERK-1 and ERK-2, which leads to internalization of bacteria and induction of inflammatory responses. Our results show that bromelain dose dependently blocks serovar Typhimurium-induced ERK-1, ERK-2, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Caco-2 cells. Bromelain also blocked signaling induced by carbachol and anisomycin, pharmacological MAP kinase agonists. Despite bromelain inhibition of serovar Typhimurium-induced MAP kinase signaling, it did not prevent subsequent invasion of the Caco-2 cells by serovar Typhimurium or alter serovar Typhimurium -induced decreases in resistance across Caco-2 monolayers. Surprisingly, bromelain also did not block serovar Typhimurium-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion but synergized with serovar Typhimurium to enhance IL-8 production. We also found that serovar Typhimurium does not induce ERK phosphorylation in Caco-2 cells in the absence of serum but that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion and decreases in monolayer resistance are unaffected. Collectively, these data indicate that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion of Caco-2 cells, changes in the resistance of epithelial cell monolayers, and IL-8 production can occur independently of the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Data also confirm that bromelain is a novel inhibitor of MAP kinase signaling pathways and suggest a novel role for proteases as inhibitors of signal transduction pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:11748167

  15. Ethanol adaptation induces direct protection and cross-protection against freezing stress in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S; Zhou, X; Shi, C; Shi, X

    2016-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salm. Enteritidis) encounters mild ethanol stress during its life cycle. However, adaptation to a stressful condition may affect bacterial resistance to subsequent stresses. Hence, this work was undertaken to investigate the influences of ethanol adaptation on stress tolerance of Salm. Enteritidis. Salmonella Enteritidis was subjected to different ethanol adaptation treatments (2·5-10% ethanol for 1 h). Cellular morphology and tolerance to subsequent environmental stresses (15% ethanol, -20°C, 4°C, 50°C and 10% NaCl) were evaluated. It was found that 10% was the maximum ethanol concentration that allowed growth of the target bacteria. Ethanol adaptation did not cause cell-surface damage in Salm. Enteritidis as revealed by membrane permeability measurements and electron micrograph analysis. Salmonella Enteritidis adapted with 2·5-10% ethanol displayed an enhanced resistance to a 15%-ethanol challenge compared with an unchallenged control. The maximum ethanol resistance was observed when ethanol concentration used for ethanol adaptation was increased to 5·0%. Additionally, pre-adaptation to 5·0% ethanol cross-protected Salm. Enteritidis against -20°C, but not against 4°C, 50°C or 10% NaCl. Ethanol adaptation provided Salm. Enteritidis direct protection from a high level ethanol challenge and cross-protection from freezing, but not other stresses tested (low temperature, high salinity or high temperature). The results are valuable in developing adequate and efficient control measures for Salm. Enteritidis in foods. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Hericium erinaceus mushroom extracts protect infected mice against Salmonella Typhimurium-Induced liver damage and mortality by stimulation of innate immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Phil; Moon, Eunpyo; Nam, Seok Hyun; Friedman, Mendel

    2012-06-06

    The present study investigated the antibacterial effect of four extracts from the fruitbody of the edible medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus (hot water extract, HWE; microwave/50% ethanol extract, MWE; acid extract, ACE; and alkaline extract, AKE) against murine salmonellosis. The extracts had no effect on Salmonella ser. Typhimurium growth in culture. Nor were the extracts toxic to murine macrophage cells, RAW 264.7. HWE and MWE stimulated uptake of the bacteria into the macrophage cells as indicated by increased colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of the contents of the lysed macrophages infected with Salmonella Typhimurium for 30 and 60 min. Two hours postinfection, the bacterial counts increased in the macrophages, but 4 and 8 h postinfection the HWE- and MWE-treated cells showed greater activity against the bacteria than the control. HWE- and MWE-treated noninfected macrophages had altered morphology and elevated inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression. In the presence of S. Typhimurium, iNOS mRNA expression was further increased, accompanied by an increase in NO production. Histology assays of the livers of mice infected with a sublethal dose (1 × 10(4) CFU) of S. Typhimurium showed that HWE and MWE, administered by daily intraperitoneal injection, protected against necrosis of the liver, a biomarker of in vivo salmonellosis. The lifespans of mice similarly infected with a lethal dose of S. Typhimurium (1 × 10(5) CFU) were significantly extended by HWE and MWE. β-Glucan, known to stimulate the immune system, was previously found to be present in high amounts in the active extracts. These results suggest that the mushroom extract activities against bacterial infection in mice occur through the activation of innate immune cells.

  17. Oral Challenge with Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Induces Distinct Changes in B Cell Subsets in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin R Toapanta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi was recently established by the Oxford Vaccine Group. In this model, 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of participants developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD- 6-9 days post-challenge. TD was diagnosed in participants meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12h and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia endpoints. Changes in B cell subpopulations following S. Typhi challenge remain undefined. To address this issue, a subset of volunteers (6 TD and 4 who did not develop TD -NoTD- was evaluated. Notable changes included reduction in the frequency of B cells (cells/ml of TD volunteers during disease days and increase in plasmablasts (PB during the recovery phase (>day 14. Additionally, a portion of PB of TD volunteers showed a significant increase in activation (CD40, CD21 and gut homing (integrin α4β7 molecules. Furthermore, all BM subsets of TD volunteers showed changes induced by S. Typhi infections such as a decrease in CD21 in switched memory (Sm CD27+ and Sm CD27- cells as well as upregulation of CD40 in unswitched memory (Um and Naïve cells. Furthermore, changes in the signaling profile of some BM subsets were identified after S. Typhi-LPS stimulation around time of disease. Notably, naïve cells of TD (compared to NoTD volunteers showed a higher percentage of cells phosphorylating Akt suggesting enhanced survival of these cells. Interestingly, most these changes were temporally associated with disease onset. This is the first study to describe differences in B cell subsets directly related to clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild-type S. Typhi in humans.

  18. Oral Challenge with Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Induces Distinct Changes in B Cell Subsets in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toapanta, Franklin R; Bernal, Paula J; Fresnay, Stephanie; Magder, Laurence S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2016-06-01

    A novel human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) was recently established by the Oxford Vaccine Group. In this model, 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of participants developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD-) 6-9 days post-challenge. TD was diagnosed in participants meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12h) and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia) endpoints. Changes in B cell subpopulations following S. Typhi challenge remain undefined. To address this issue, a subset of volunteers (6 TD and 4 who did not develop TD -NoTD-) was evaluated. Notable changes included reduction in the frequency of B cells (cells/ml) of TD volunteers during disease days and increase in plasmablasts (PB) during the recovery phase (>day 14). Additionally, a portion of PB of TD volunteers showed a significant increase in activation (CD40, CD21) and gut homing (integrin α4β7) molecules. Furthermore, all BM subsets of TD volunteers showed changes induced by S. Typhi infections such as a decrease in CD21 in switched memory (Sm) CD27+ and Sm CD27- cells as well as upregulation of CD40 in unswitched memory (Um) and Naïve cells. Furthermore, changes in the signaling profile of some BM subsets were identified after S. Typhi-LPS stimulation around time of disease. Notably, naïve cells of TD (compared to NoTD) volunteers showed a higher percentage of cells phosphorylating Akt suggesting enhanced survival of these cells. Interestingly, most these changes were temporally associated with disease onset. This is the first study to describe differences in B cell subsets directly related to clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild-type S. Typhi in humans.

  19. phoP, SPI1, SPI2 and aroA mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis induce a different immune response in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Kyrova, Kamila; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rahman, Masudur; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-09-17

    Poultry is the most frequent reservoir of non-typhoid Salmonella enterica for humans. Understanding the interactions between chickens and S. enterica is therefore important for vaccine design and subsequent decrease in the incidence of human salmonellosis. In this study we therefore characterized the interactions between chickens and phoP, aroA, SPI1 and SPI2 mutants of S. Enteritidis. First we tested the response of HD11 chicken macrophage-like cell line to S. Enteritidis infection monitoring the transcription of 36 genes related to immune response. All the mutants and the wild type strain induced inflammatory signaling in the HD11 cell line though the response to SPI1 mutant infection was different from the rest of the mutants. When newly hatched chickens were inoculated, the phoP as well as the SPI1 mutant did not induce an expression of any of the tested genes in the cecum. Despite this, such chickens were protected against challenge with wild-type S. Enteritidis. On the other hand, inoculation of chickens with the aroA or SPI2 mutant induced expression of 27 and 18 genes, respectively, including genes encoding immunoglobulins. Challenge of chickens inoculated with these two mutants resulted in repeated induction of 11 and 13 tested genes, respectively, including the genes encoding immunoglobulins. In conclusion, SPI1 and phoP mutants induced protective immunity without inducing an inflammatory response and antibody production. Inoculation of chickens with the SPI2 and aroA mutants also led to protective immunity but was associated with inflammation and antibody production. The differences in interaction between the mutants and chicken host can be used for a more detailed understanding of the chicken immune system.

  20. Salmonella Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FDA) USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Follow Salmonella RSS Diagnosis and Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How Can Salmonella Infections Be Diagnosed? Diagnosing salmonellosis requires testing a ...

  1. Salmonella in Swedish cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Ågren, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    In Sweden, all herds detected with salmonella are put under restrictions and measures aiming at eradication are required. The purpose of these studies was to provide a basis for decisions on how surveillance and control of salmonella in Swedish cattle can be made more cost-efficient. Results from a bulk milk screening were used to investigate seroprevalence of salmonella and to study associations between salmonella status and geographical location, local animal density, number of test pos...

  2. 78 FR 42526 - Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog Food; Withdrawal of...) entitled ``Sec. 690.700 Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog Food.'' This CPG is obsolete. DATES: The.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: FDA issued the CGP entitled ``Sec. 690.700 Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog Food...

  3. A polysaccharide isolated from the liquid culture of Lentinus edodes (Shiitake) mushroom mycelia containing black rice bran protects mice against a Salmonella lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Phil; Park, Sun Ok; Lee, Sang Jong; Nam, Seok Hyun; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-11-20

    Endotoxemia (sepsis, septic shock) is an inflammatory, virulent disease that results mainly from bacterial infection. The present study investigates the inhibitory effect of a bioprocessed polysaccharide (BPP) isolated from the edible Lentinus edodes liquid mycelial mushroom culture supplemented with black rice bran against murine endotoxemia induced by the Salmonella lipopolysaccharide and d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN). BPP was obtained after dialysis against water using a cellulose tube with a molecular weight cutoff of 10000. BPP eluted as a single peak on an HPLC chromatogram. Acid hydrolysis of BPP showed the presence of the following sugars: fucose, galactose, galactosamine, glucose, glucosamine, mannose, rhamnose, and xylose. Treatment of BPP with β-glucanase reduced its immunostimulating activity, suggesting that the polysaccharide has a β-glucan structure. Pretreatment of mice with BPP via oral or intraperitoneal (ip) administration for 2 weeks resulted in the suppression of LPS/GalN-induced catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and transaminase (GOT/GPT) liver enzymes, amelioration of necrotic liver lesions, and reduction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and nitrite serum levels as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, an index of necrotic injury. Immunostimulating macrophage activity was up to 5.4-fold greater than that observed with the culture without the rice bran. BPP also extended the lifespan of the toxemic mice. These positive results with inflammation biomarkers and lifespan studies suggest that the BPP can protect mice against LPS/GalN-induced liver, lung, and kidney injuries and inflammation by blocking oxidative stress and TNF-α production, thus increasing the survival of the toxic shock-induced mice. The polysaccharide has the potential to serve as a new functional food.

  4. Suppressive effects of retinoids, carotenoids and antioxidant vitamins on heterocyclic amine-induced umu C gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium (TA 1535/pSK 1002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okai, Y; Higashi-Okai, K; Nakamura, S; Yano, Y; Otani, S

    1996-06-12

    Effects of retinoids, carotenoids and antioxidant vitamins were studied by mutagen-induced umu C gene expression system in Salmonella typhimurium (TA 1535/pSK 1002). Retinol (vitamin A), retinol acetate and retinoic acid showed remarkable inhibitory activities, whereas retinol palmitate exhibited significant but weak activity for umu C gene expression in tester bacteria induced by 3-amino-3,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4.3-b]indol (Trp-P-1) in the presence of hepatic metabolizing enzymes (S9 mixture). Carotenoids having provitamin A activity (beta-carotene and canthaxanthin) exhibited moderate suppressive effects on the same experimental system. The ranks of suppressive activities were retinol > retinol acetate > retinoic acid > canthaxanthin > beta-carotene > retinol palmitate and their doses for inhibition by 50% (ID50) were estimated to be 1.2 x 10(-7), 3.0 x 10(-7), 5.4 x 10(-7), 1.5 x 10(-6), 4.0 x 10(-5) and 6.0 x 10(-5) M, respectively. However, they did not cause significant inhibition on umu C gene expression induced by direct-acting mutagen (adriamycin or mitomycin C) in the absence of S9 mixture. Inhibition of umu gene expression appears to be due to inhibition of P450-mediated metabolic activation of the heterocyclic amine Trp-P-1. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) showed weak but significant suppressive activity at high-dose concentrations (3 x 10(-6) - 10(-4)M). However, alpha-tocopherol did not exhibit significant suppression at all dose concentrations. The significance of the experimental results is discussed from the viewpoint of the chemoprevention against genotoxicity associated with carcinogenesis.

  5. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi plasmid pR ST98 enhances intracellular bacterial growth and S. typhi-induced macrophage cell death by suppressing autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyan He

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Plasmid pR ST98 is a hybrid resistance-virulence plasmid isolated from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi. Previous studies demonstrated that pR ST98 could enhance the virulence of its host bacteria. However, the mechanism of pR ST98-increased bacterial virulence is still not fully elucidated. This study was designed to gain further insight into the roles of pR ST98 in host responses. METHODS: Human-derived macrophage-like cell line THP-1 was infected with wild-type (ST8, pR ST98-deletion (ST8-ΔpR ST98, and complemented (ST8-c-pR ST98 S. typhi strains. Macrophage autophagy was performed by extracting the membrane-unbound LC3-I protein from cells, followed by flow cytometric detection of the membrane-associated fraction of LC3-II. Intracellular bacterial growth was determined by colony-forming units (cfu assay. Macrophage cell death was measured by flow cytometry after propidium iodide (PI staining. Autophagy activator rapamycin (RAPA was added to the medium 2 h before infection to investigate the effect of autophagy on intracellular bacterial growth and macrophage cell death after S. typhi infection. RESULTS: Plasmid pR ST98 suppressed autophagy in infected macrophages and enhanced intracellular bacterial growth and S. typhi-induced macrophage cell death. Pretreatment with RAPA effectively restricted intracellular bacterial growth of ST8 and ST8-c-pR ST98, and alleviated ST8 and ST8-c-pR ST98-induced macrophage cell death, but had no significant effect on ST8-ΔpR ST98. CONCLUSIONS: Plasmid pR ST98 enhances intracellular bacterial growth and S. typhi-induced macrophage cell death by suppressing autophagy.

  6. Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207 induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of HepG2 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baowei Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella typhimurium is probably most extensively studied tumor-targeting bacteria and SL7207 is one of its attenuated strains. SL7207 was first made for bacterial vaccine development and its therapeutic efficacy and safety for hepatocellular carcinoma has not been characterized. In this study, the inhibitory ability of SL7207-lux on human hepatoma HepG2 cells was tested in vitro and in vivo. A bacterial luminescent gene cluster (lux CDABE was transfected into SL7207 to better monitor the invasion of the bacteria. The results show that SL7207-lux can rapidly enter HepG2 cells and localize in the cytoplasm. This invasion represses cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. In vivo real-time invasion studies showed that the bacteria gradually accumulate in the tumor. This enrichment was confirmed by anatomic observation at 5 days after inoculation. About 40% of tumor growth was inhibited by SL7207-lux at 34 days post-treatment without significant loss of body weight. The area of necrosis of tumor tissue was clearly increased in the treated group. Bacterial quantification showed that the number of colony-forming units per gram of bacteria within tumor tissue was approximately 1000-fold higher than that of liver and spleen. These data suggest that attenuated S. typhimurium strain SL7207 has potential for the treatment of cancers.

  7. Salmonella – A Brief Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurmi Esko

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonellosis is the main cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis in most European countries. Infections with Salmonella is usually subclinical, whereas clinical cases show symptoms with a wide range of severity. Infection is most commonly associated with the consumption of meat, especially poultry or pork, and eggs and their products. Salmonella can enter the food chain at any point throughout its length. The principal reservoir of Salmonellae is the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and birds, but Salmonellae are able to survive and even multiply in many external environments. In Norway, Sweden and Finland cost effective prevention methods have been used for several years to prevent and control Salmonellea infections. In addition, competitive exclusion (CE and vaccination might be relevant as biological methods to prevent colonisation of bird intestines by enteropathogens, especially Salmonella. Antibiotic drug resistance has been a problem since the start of the antibiotic era. The cause for anxiety is that more and more bacteria are becoming resistant, often to a whole range of antibiotics. The debate on the use of antimicrobials in veterinary medicine and animal production dates back almost as long as the use itself. There is a clear evidence to show that antibacterial agents given to animals for growth promotion, prophylactic purposes or treatment induce a rise in the number of antibiotic resistant strains isolated from the animals. These bacteria may be transmitted to humans by several possible routes. There are thus strong arguments for preventive efforts which have to be directed towards identifying real critical control points (HACCP throughout the whole food chain, which starts from the farm and ends at the consumer's table.

  8. Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis infection of the porcine jejunal Peyer’s patch rapidly induces IL-1β and IL-8 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Hyland, Kendra A.; Brown, David R.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is an enteric pathogen of swine, producing septicemia, enterocolitis, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The initial molecular events at the site of Salmonella infection are hypothesized to be critical in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses; however the acute immune response elicited by porcine intestinal tissues is not well understood. To address this need, we employed explants of jejunal Peyer’s patch (JPP) mucosa from pigs to examine Salmo...

  9. Applications of microscopy in Salmonella research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malt, Layla M; Perrett, Charlotte A; Humphrey, Suzanne; Jepson, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative enteropathogen that can cause localized infections, typically resulting in gastroenteritis, or systemic infection, e.g., typhoid fever, in humans and many other animals. Understanding the mechanisms by which Salmonella induces disease has been the focus of intensive research. This has revealed that Salmonella invasion requires dynamic cross-talk between the microbe and host cells, in which bacterial adherence rapidly leads to a complex sequence of cellular responses initiated by proteins translocated into the host cell by a type 3 secretion system. Once these Salmonella-induced responses have resulted in bacterial invasion, proteins translocated by a second type 3 secretion system initiate further modulation of cellular activities to enable survival and replication of the invading pathogen. Elucidation of the complex and highly dynamic pathogen-host interactions ultimately requires analysis at the level of single cells and single infection events. To achieve this goal, researchers have applied a diverse range of microscopy techniques to analyze Salmonella infection in models ranging from whole animal to isolated cells and simple eukaryotic organisms. For example, electron microscopy and high-resolution light microscopy techniques such as confocal microscopy can reveal the precise location of Salmonella and its relationship to cellular components. Widefield light microscopy is a simpler approach with which to study the interaction of bacteria with host cells and often has advantages for live cell imaging, enabling detailed analysis of the dynamics of infection and cellular responses. Here we review the use of imaging techniques in Salmonella research and compare the capabilities of different classes of microscope to address specific types of research question. We also provide protocols and notes on some microscopy techniques used routinely in our own research.

  10. Polymorphisms in the inflammatory pathway genes TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, LY96, NFKBIA, NFKB1, TNFA, TNFRSF1A, IL6R, IL10, IL23R, PTPN22, and PPARG are associated with susceptibility of inflammatory bowel disease in a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Steffen; Skytt Andersen, Paal; Burisch, Johan

    2014-01-01

    associated with risk of CD and the polymorphisms TLR2 (rs1816702), TLR4 (rs1554973 and rs12377632), TLR9 (rs352139), LY96 (rs11465996), NFKBIA (rs696), TNFA (rs1800629), TNFRSF1A (rs4149570), IL10 (rs3024505), IL23R (rs11209026), PTPN22 (rs2476601) and PPARG (rs1801282) were associated with risk of UC. When...

  11. Oral Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Ameliorates Salmonella Infantis-Induced Inflammation in a Pig Model via Activation of the IL-22BP/IL-22/STAT3 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gui-Yan; Yu, Jiao; Su, Jin-Hui; Jiao, Lian-Guo; Liu, Xiao; Zhu, Yao-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The high rate of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis (S. Infantis) infection poses significant risk for the development of non-typhoidal Salmonella gastroenteritis. However, efficient strategies to prevent or treat the infection remain elusive. Here, we explored the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) administration in preventing S. Infantis infection in a pig model. Probiotic LGG (1.0 × 10(10) CFU/day) was orally administered to newly weaned piglets for 1 week before S. Infantis challenge. LGG pretreatment reduced the severity of diarrhea and alleviated intestinal inflammation caused by S. Infantis. Pre-administration of LGG excluded Salmonella from colonization of the jejunal mucosa but increased the abundance of Bifidobacterium in the feces. LGG promoted the expansion of CD4(+) T-bet(+) IFNγ(+) T cells but attenuated S. Infantis-induced increases in the percentage of CD4(+) IFNγ(+) T cells and serum interleukin (IL)-22 levels in peripheral blood after S. Infantis challenge. In the small intestine, LGG pretreatment upregulated expression of the transcription factor T-bet but downregulated the S. Infantis-induced increase of CD4(+) IFNγ(+) T cells in Peyer's patches and IL-7Rα expression in the jejunum. Notably, LGG-treated pigs had enhanced expression of IL-22 and activated STAT3 in the ileum in response to S. Infantis infection. Pretreatment of pigs with LGG also elevated intestinal IL-22-binding protein production in response to S. Infantis challenge. In contrast, LGG consumption reduced the S. Infantis-induced increase in the number of CCL20-expressing cells in the jejunum. Our results suggest that the mechanism by which LGG ameliorates the intestinal inflammation caused by S. Infantis involves the upregulation of T-bet, activation of STAT3, and downregulation of CCL20.

  12. Salmonella Sepsis in African Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with both Salmonella typhiand non-typhi salmonella. (NTS) is common among children in many African countries. Salmonella typhi predominates among older children and adults with the typical localising features of enteric fever. Nontyphoid salmonellae species are more often reported among children under 5 ...

  13. Genomics of Salmonella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Rocio; McClelland, Michael; Santiviago, Carlos A.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    Progress in the study of Salmonella survival, colonization, and virulence has increased rapidly with the advent of complete genome sequencing and higher capacity assays for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Although many of these techniques have yet to be used to directly assay Salmonella growth on foods, these assays are currently in use to determine Salmonella factors necessary for growth in animal models including livestock animals and in in vitro conditions that mimic many different environments. As sequencing of the Salmonella genome and microarray analysis have revolutionized genomics and transcriptomics of salmonellae over the last decade, so are new high-throughput sequencing technologies currently accelerating the pace of our studies and allowing us to approach complex problems that were not previously experimentally tractable.

  14. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1989-01-01

    The course of experimentally induced Salmonella typhimurium infection was studied in three groups of inbred LEW rats: homozygous +/+, athymic rnu/rnu and isogeneic thymus-grafted rnu/rnu rats. In the first experiment the animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(8) bacteria and all animals...

  15. USING BASE-SPECIFIC SALMONELLA TESTER STRAINS TO CHARACTERIZE THE TYPES OF MUTATION INDUCED BY BENZIDINE AND BENZIDINE CONGENERS AFTER REDUCTIVE METABOLISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine HCl, 3,3'-dimethylbenzidine, 3,3'- dimethoxybenzidine and benzidine congener-based dye trypan blue were mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium TAl 00 only with metabolic activation. It was found that a hamster liver 89 ...

  16. Salmonella enteritidis ventriculitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johan, A J; Hung, L C; Norlijah, O

    2013-01-01

    .... We present a case of Salmonella enteritidis meningitis in a six week old female who presented with a one week history of fever, diarrhea and seizures which was unsuccessfully treated with a third...

  17. Cell lines and Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge R; Hendriks H; Garssen J; MGB; LPI

    2001-01-01

    Infectie met Salmonella kan gepaard gaan met de invasie van darmepitheelcellen. De aan de invasie voorafgaande aanhechting leidt reeds tot de transmigratie van witte bloedcellen (neutrofielen) vanuit de bloedbaan naar het epitheelweefsel. De migratie wordt gestimuleerd door de productie van

  18. Interaction of Salmonella spp. with the intestinal microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian MM Ahmer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella spp. are major cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Upon entry into the human host, Salmonella spp. must overcome the resistance to colonization mediated by the gut microbiota and the innate immune system. They successfully accomplish this by inducing inflammation and mechanisms of innate immune defense. Many models have been developed to study Salmonella spp. interaction with the microbiota that have helped to identify factors necessary to overcome colonization resistance and to mediate disease. Here we review the current state of studies into this important pathogen/microbiota/host interaction in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract.

  19. Behaviour of temperate phage Mu in Salmonella typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberon, M; Gama, M J; Richelle, J; Martuscelli, J

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a convenient system for genetic analysis of Salmonella typhi exploiting the properties of the mutator phage Mu. In spite of the fact that wild-type Salmonella typhi strains do not allow Mu to form plaques on them, we have shown that these strains are actually sensitive to the phage. It proved possible to use Mu to induce mutations and to promote intra- and interspecific genetic transfer, without having to introduce the phage into the bacteria by means other than infection. Furthermore, we isolated Salmonella typhi derivatives on which Mu formed plaques, and studied the behaviour of Mu in these and wild-type strains.

  20. phoP, SPI1, SPI2 and aroA mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis induce a different immune response in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Varmuzova, Karolina; Kyrova, Kamila; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Rahman, Masudur; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Poultry is the most frequent reservoir of non-typhoid Salmonella enterica for humans. Understanding the interactions between chickens and S. enterica is therefore important for vaccine design and subsequent decrease in the incidence of human salmonellosis. In this study we therefore characterized the interactions between chickens and phoP, aroA, SPI1 and SPI2 mutants of S. Enteritidis. First we tested the response of HD11 chicken macrophage-like cell line to S. Enteritidis infection monitorin...

  1. Quantitative imaging by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound reveals a linear relationship between synovial vascular perfusion and the recruitment of pathogenic IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD161+ CD4+ T helper cells in psoriatic arthritis joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Ugo; Stramare, Roberto; Martini, Veronica; Coran, Alessandro; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Felicetti, Mara; Rizzo, Gaia; Tonietto, Matteo; Scanu, Anna; Oliviero, Francesca; Raffeiner, Bernd; Vezzù, Maristella; Lunardi, Francesca; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sacerdoti, David; Rubaltelli, Leopoldo; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea; Grisan, Enrico

    2017-02-01

    To develop quantitative imaging biomarkers of synovial tissue perfusion by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), we studied the relationship between CEUS synovial vascular perfusion and the frequencies of pathogenic T helper (Th)-17 cells in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) joints. Eight consecutive patients with PsA were enrolled in this study. Gray scale CEUS evaluation was performed on the same joint immediately after joint aspiration, by automatic assessment perfusion data, using a new quantification approach of pixel-based analysis and the gamma-variate model. The set of perfusional parameters considered by the time intensity curve includes the maximum value (peak) of the signal intensity curve, the blood volume index or area under the curve, (BVI, AUC) and the contrast mean transit time (MTT). The direct ex vivo analysis of the frequencies of SF IL17A-F+CD161+IL23+ CD4+ T cells subsets were quantified by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). In cross-sectional analyses, when tested for multiple comparison setting, a false discovery rate at 10%, a common pattern of correlations between CEUS Peak, AUC (BVI) and MTT parameters with the IL17A-F+IL23+ - IL17A-F+CD161+ - and IL17A-F+CD161+IL23+ CD4+ T cells subsets, as well as lack of correlation between both peak and AUC values and both CD4+T and CD4+IL23+ T cells, was observed. The pixel-based CEUS assessment is a truly measure synovial inflammation, as a useful tool to develop quantitative imaging biomarker for monitoring target therapeutics in PsA.

  2. Two Novel Salmonella Bivalent Vaccines Confer Dual Protection against Two Salmonella Serovars in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Dai, Qinlong; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella includes thousands of serovars that are leading causes of foodborne diarrheal illness worldwide. In this study, we constructed three bivalent vaccines for preventing both Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Newport infections by using the aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Asd)-based balanced-lethal vector-host system. The constructed Asd+ plasmid pCZ11 carrying a subset of the Salmonella Newport O-antigen gene cluster including the wzx-wbaR-wbaL-wbaQ-wzy-wbaW-wbaZ genes was introduced into three Salmonella Typhimurium mutants: SLT19 (Δasd) with a smooth LPS phenotype, SLT20 (Δasd ΔrfbN) with a rough LPS phenotype, and SLT22 (Δasd ΔrfbN ΔpagL::T araC PBAD rfbN) with a smooth LPS phenotype when grown with arabinose. Immunoblotting demonstrated that SLT19 harboring pCZ11 [termed SLT19 (pCZ11)] co-expressed the homologous and heterologous O-antigens; SLT20 (pCZ11) exclusively expressed the heterologous O-antigen; and when arabinose was available, SLT22 (pCZ11) expressed both types of O-antigens, while in the absence of arabinose, SLT22 (pCZ11) expressed only the heterologous O-antigen. Exclusive expression of the heterologous O-antigen in Salmonella Typhimurium decreased the swimming ability of the bacterium and its susceptibility to polymyxin B. Next, the crp gene was deleted from the three recombinant strains for attenuation purposes, generating the three bivalent vaccine strains SLT25 (pCZ11), SLT26 (pCZ11), and SLT27 (pCZ11), respectively. Groups of BALB/c mice (12 mice/group) were orally immunized with 109 CFU of each vaccine strain twice at an interval of 4 weeks. Compared with a mock immunization, immunization with all three vaccine strains induced significant serum IgG responses against both Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Newport LPS. The bacterial loads in the mouse tissues were significantly lower in the three vaccine-strain-immunized groups than in the mock group after either Salmonella Typhimurium or Salmonella

  3. Two Novel Salmonella Bivalent Vaccines Confer Dual Protection against Two Salmonella Serovars in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-typhoidal Salmonella includes thousands of serovars that are leading causes of foodborne diarrheal illness worldwide. In this study, we constructed three bivalent vaccines for preventing both Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Newport infections by using the aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Asd-based balanced-lethal vector-host system. The constructed Asd+ plasmid pCZ11 carrying a subset of the Salmonella Newport O-antigen gene cluster including the wzx-wbaR-wbaL-wbaQ-wzy-wbaW-wbaZ genes was introduced into three Salmonella Typhimurium mutants: SLT19 (Δasd with a smooth LPS phenotype, SLT20 (Δasd ΔrfbN with a rough LPS phenotype, and SLT22 (Δasd ΔrfbN ΔpagL::T araC PBADrfbN with a smooth LPS phenotype when grown with arabinose. Immunoblotting demonstrated that SLT19 harboring pCZ11 [termed SLT19 (pCZ11] co-expressed the homologous and heterologous O-antigens; SLT20 (pCZ11 exclusively expressed the heterologous O-antigen; and when arabinose was available, SLT22 (pCZ11 expressed both types of O-antigens, while in the absence of arabinose, SLT22 (pCZ11 expressed only the heterologous O-antigen. Exclusive expression of the heterologous O-antigen in Salmonella Typhimurium decreased the swimming ability of the bacterium and its susceptibility to polymyxin B. Next, the crp gene was deleted from the three recombinant strains for attenuation purposes, generating the three bivalent vaccine strains SLT25 (pCZ11, SLT26 (pCZ11, and SLT27 (pCZ11, respectively. Groups of BALB/c mice (12 mice/group were orally immunized with 109 CFU of each vaccine strain twice at an interval of 4 weeks. Compared with a mock immunization, immunization with all three vaccine strains induced significant serum IgG responses against both Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Newport LPS. The bacterial loads in the mouse tissues were significantly lower in the three vaccine-strain-immunized groups than in the mock group after either Salmonella Typhimurium or

  4. Salmonella in sesame seed products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Stefan O; Piechotowski, Isolde; Kimmig, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In the context of an international outbreak of multiresistant Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 that was correlated to the consumption of halvah ("helva," an Asian candy made from sesame seed), we examined several sesame seed products for the occurrence of Salmonella. Of 117 ready-to-eat food items containing sesame, we isolated salmonellae from 11 (9.4%) samples. In addition to finding Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in the halvah involved in the outbreak, we also isolated different Salmonella Typhimurium strains out of halvah from other manufacturers and countries of origin, as well as Salmonella Offa, Salmonella Tennessee, and Salmonella Poona from sesame paste (tahini) and sesame seed, which is sold for raw consumption in cereals.

  5. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Braukmann

    Full Text Available Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2 for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S. Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, interleukin (IL-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages.

  6. Red seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down regulate virulence factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and induce immune responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima eKulshreshtha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars towards multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis. Spread plate assay revealed that Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG and Chondrus crispus (CC (1%, w/v significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 mg/ml to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5-5.3 and log 5.7-6.0, respectively. However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1 associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a high degree of conservation, these results

  7. Red Seaweeds Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii and Chondrus crispus down Regulate Virulence Factors of Salmonella Enteritidis and Induce Immune Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Borza, Tudor; Rathgeber, Bruce; Stratton, Glenn S; Thomas, Nikhil A; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Red seaweeds are a rich source of unique bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites that are known to improve human and animal health. S. Enteritidis is a broad range host pathogen, which contaminates chicken and poultry products that end into the human food chain. Worldwide, Salmonella outbreaks have become an important economic and public health concern. Moreover, the development of resistance in Salmonella serovars toward multiple drugs highlights the need for alternative control strategies. This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of red seaweeds extracts against Salmonella Enteritidis using the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. Six red seaweed species were tested for their antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis and two, Sarcodiotheca gaudichaudii (SG) and Chondrus crispus (CC), were found to exhibit such properties. Spread plate assay revealed that SG and CC (1%, w/v) significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis. Seaweed water extracts (SWE) of SG and CC, at concentrations from 0.4 to 2 mg/ml, significantly reduced the growth of S. Enteritidis (log CFU 4.5-5.3 and log 5.7-6.0, respectively). However, methanolic extracts of CC and SG did not affect the growth of S. Enteritidis. Addition of SWE (0.2 mg/ml, CC and SG) significantly decreased biofilm formation and reduced the motility of S. Enteritidis. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that SWE (CC and SG) suppressed the expression of quorum sensing gene sdiA and of Salmonella Pathogenesis Island-1 (SPI-1) associated genes sipA and invF, indicating that SWE might reduce the invasion of S. Enteritidis in the host by attenuating virulence factors. Furthermore, CC and SG water extracts significantly improved the survival of infected C. elegans by impairing the ability of S. Enteritidis to colonize the digestive tract of the nematode and by enhancing the expression of C. elegans immune responsive genes. As the innate immune response pathways of C. elegans and mammals show a high

  8. The risk of salmonellae shedding by dogs fed Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diets

    OpenAIRE

    Finley, Rita; Ribble, Carl; Aramini, Jeff; Vandermeer, Meredith; Popa, Maria; Litman, Marcus; Reid-Smith, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-eight research dogs were enrolled to determine the prevalence of salmonellae shedding after consumption of 1 Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diet meal. Sixteen dogs were exposed to Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diets and 12 to Salmonella-free commercial raw food diets. Seven of the exposed dogs shed salmonellae 1–7 days after consumption of Salmonella-contaminated raw food diets. None of the dogs fed Salmonella-free diets shed salmonellae. No clinical signs we...

  9. Salmonella Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Brosset Ugas MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics.

  10. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium delivering DNA vaccine encoding duck enteritis virus UL24 induced systemic and mucosal immune responses and conferred good protection against challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orally delivered DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV were developed using live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207 as a carrier and Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB as a mucosal adjuvant. DNA vaccine plasmids pVAX-UL24 and pVAX-LTB-UL24 were constructed and transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 resulting SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 and SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 respectively. After ducklings were orally inoculated with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 or SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24, the anti-DEV mucosal and systemic immune responses were recorded. To identify the optimum dose that confers maximum protection, we used different doses of the candidate vaccine SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 during oral immunization. The strongest mucosal and systemic immune responses developed in the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 (1011 CFU immunized group. Accordingly, oral immunization of ducklings with SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 showed superior efficacy of protection (60-80% against a lethal DEV challenge (1000 LD50, compared with the limited survival rate (40% of ducklings immunized with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24. Our study suggests that the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 can be a candidate DEV vaccine.

  11. Stably Integrated luxCDABE for Assessment of Salmonella Invasion Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly N. Flentie

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium is a common cause of gastroenteritis in humans and also localizes to neoplastic tumors in animals. Invasion of specific eukaryotic cells is a key mechanism of Salmonella interactions with host tissues. Early stages of gastrointestinal cell invasion are mediated by a Salmonella type III secretion system, powered by the adenosine triphosphatase invC. The aim of this work was to characterize the invC dependence of invasion kinetics into disparate eukaryotic cells traditionally used as models of gut epithelium or neoplasms. Thus, a nondestructive real-time assay was developed to report eukaryotic cell invasion kinetics using lux+ Salmonella that contain chromosomally integrated luxCDABE genes. Bioluminescence-based invasion assays using lux+ Salmonella exhibited inoculum dose-response correlation, distinguished invasion-competent from invasion-incompetent Salmonella, and discriminated relative Salmonella invasiveness in accordance with environmental conditions that induce invasion gene expression. In standard gentamicin protection assays, bioluminescence from lux+ Salmonella correlated with recovery of colony-forming units of internalized bacteria and could be visualized by bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, this assay distinguished invasion-competent from invasion-incompetent bacteria independent of gentamicin treatment in real time. Bioluminescence reported Salmonella invasion of disparate eukaryotic cell lines, including neoplastic melanoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and glioma cell lines used in animal models of malignancy. In each case, Salmonella invasion of eukaryotic cells was invC dependent.

  12. Efficient Salmonella entry requires activity cycles of host ADF and cofilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shipan; Sarmiere, Patrick D; Wiggan, O'Neil; Bamburg, James R; Zhou, Daoguo

    2004-05-01

    Entry of Salmonella into mammalian cells is strictly dependent on the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton induced by a panel of Salmonella type III secreted proteins. Although several factors have been identified to be responsible for inducing the actin polymerization and stability, little is known about how the actin depolymerization contributes to Salmonella-induced actin rearrangements. We report here that activity cycles of host actin depolymerizing factor (ADF and cofilin) are modulated by Salmonella during bacterial entry. Efficient Salmonella internalization involves an initial dephosphorylation of ADF and cofilin followed by phosphorylation, suggesting that ADF and cofilin activities are increased briefly. Expression of a kinase dead form of an ADF/cofilin kinase (LIM kinase 1) or a catalytically inactive ADF/cofilin phosphatase (Slingshot), but not constitutively active LIM kinase 1 or wild-type Slingshot, resulted in decreased invasion. These data suggest that ADF/cofilin activities play a key role in the actin polymerization/depolymerization process induced by Salmonella. The activation of ADF/cofilin is brief and has to be reversed to facilitate efficient bacterial entry. Surprisingly, co-expression of constitutive active ADF and cofilin prevented efficient Salmonella entry, whereas expression of either one alone had no effect. We propose that ADF and cofilin actin-dynamizing activities and their activity cycling via phosphorylation are required for efficient Salmonella internalization.

  13. Salmonella from Baby Turtles

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-01-09

    Dr. Stacey Bosch, a veterinarian with CDC, discusses her article on Salmonella infections associated with baby turtles.  Created: 1/9/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/9/2017.

  14. Salmonella Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know - 한국어 (Korean) PDF Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Spanish (español) Expand Section Salmonella Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Infecciones por salmonela: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español ( ...

  15. Thermal inactivation of eight Salmonella serotypes on dry corn flour.

    OpenAIRE

    VanCauwenberge, J E; Bothast, R J; Kwolek, W F

    1981-01-01

    Dry heat was used to inactivate Salmonella newington, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella cubana, Salmonella seftenberg, Salmonella thompson, and Salmonella tennessee in corn flour at 10 and 15% moisture. The flour was spray inoculated at 10(5) Salmonella cells per g and then stored at 49 degrees C (120 degrees F); viable Salmonella cells were counted on Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems) soy agar plates every 30 min for the first 4 h and then at 4-h ...

  16. Oral Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Challenge Induces Activation of Circulating Monocytes and Dendritic Cells in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toapanta, Franklin R; Bernal, Paula J; Fresnay, Stephanie; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2015-06-01

    A new human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) was recently developed. In this model, ingestion of 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of subjects developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD-) 5-10 days post-challenge. TD criteria included meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12 h) and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia) endpoints. One of the first lines of defense against pathogens are the cells of the innate immune system (e.g., monocytes, dendritic cells -DCs-). Various changes in circulating monocytes and DCs have been described in the murine S. Typhimurium model; however, whether similar changes are present in humans remains to be explored. To address these questions, a subset of volunteers (5 TD and 3 who did not develop typhoid despite oral challenge -NoTD-) were evaluated for changes in circulating monocytes and DCs. Expression of CD38 and CD40 were upregulated in monocytes and DCs in TD volunteers during the disease days (TD-0h to TD-96h). Moreover, integrin α4β7, a gut homing molecule, was upregulated on monocytes but not DCs. CD21 upregulation was only identified in DCs. These changes were not observed among NoTD volunteers despite the same oral challenge. Moreover, monocytes and DCs from NoTD volunteers showed increased binding to S. Typhi one day after challenge. These monocytes showed phosphorylation of p38MAPK, NFkB and Erk1/2 upon stimulation with S. Typhi-LPS-QDot micelles. In contrast, monocytes from TD volunteers showed only a moderate increase in S. Typhi binding 48 h and 96 h post-TD, and only Erk1/2 phosphorylation. This is the first study to describe different activation and migration profiles, as well as differential signaling patterns, in monocytes and DCs which relate directly to the clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild type S. Typhi.

  17. Polymorphisms in the inflammatory pathway genes TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, LY96, NFKBIA, NFKB1, TNFA, TNFRSF1A, IL6R, IL10, IL23R, PTPN22, and PPARG are associated with susceptibility of inflammatory bowel disease in a Danish cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Bank

    Full Text Available The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, result from the combined effects of susceptibility genes and environmental factors. Polymorphisms in genes regulating inflammation may explain part of the genetic heritage.Using a candidate gene approach, 39 mainly functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 26 genes regulating inflammation were assessed in a clinical homogeneous group of severely diseased patients consisting of 624 patients with CD, 411 patients with UC and 795 controls. The results were analysed using logistic regression.Sixteen polymorphisms in 13 genes involved in regulation of inflammation were associated with risk of CD and/or UC (p ≤ 0.05. The polymorphisms TLR2 (rs1816702, NFKB1 (rs28362491, TNFRSF1A (rs4149570, IL6R (rs4537545, IL23R (rs11209026 and PTPN22 (rs2476601 were associated with risk of CD and the polymorphisms TLR2 (rs1816702, TLR4 (rs1554973 and rs12377632, TLR9 (rs352139, LY96 (rs11465996, NFKBIA (rs696, TNFA (rs1800629, TNFRSF1A (rs4149570, IL10 (rs3024505, IL23R (rs11209026, PTPN22 (rs2476601 and PPARG (rs1801282 were associated with risk of UC. When including all patients (IBD the polymorphisms TLR2 (rs4696480 and rs1816702, TLR4 (rs1554973 and rs12377632, TLR9 (rs187084, TNFRSF1A (rs4149570, IL6R (rs4537545, IL10 (rs3024505, IL23R (rs11209026 and PTPN22 (rs2476601 were associated with risk. After Bonferroni correction for multiple testing, both the homozygous and the heterozygous variant genotypes of IL23R G>A(rs11209026 (OR(CD,adj: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.21-0.67, p = 0.03; OR(IBD,adj 0.43, 95% CI: 0.28-0.67, p = 0.007 and PTPN22 1858 G>A(rs2476601 (OR(CD,unadj 0.54, 95% CI: 0.41-0.72, p = 7*10-4; OR(IBD,unadj: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.48-0.77, p = 0.001 were associated with reduced risk of CD.The biological effects of the studied polymorphisms suggest that genetically determined high inflammatory response was associated with increased risk of CD. The many SNPs found in TLRs

  18. The persistence of Salmonella following desiccation under feed processing environmental conditions: a subject of relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habimana, O; Nesse, L L; Møretrø, T; Berg, K; Heir, E; Vestby, L K; Langsrud, S

    2014-11-01

    Although Salmonella persistence has been predominantly linked to biofilm formation, the physiological state of Salmonella should also be considered as a possible pathway for persistence and survival in the feed industry. Hence, the purpose of this study was to assess the extent of viability of Salmonella cells through long-term desiccation periods under conditions typically found in feed processing environments, and whether these same cells could resuscitate and cause salmonellosis in vivo. We showed that upon desiccation, Salmonella Agona, a representative feed industry isolate and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, a laboratory strain, were induced into a nonculturable state at 35 and 85% relative humidity conditions, at defined temperatures of 30 and 12°C, respectively. Although the reduction in culturable cells was more than 6 log10 , metabolic activity was found in more than 1% of the population. Desiccation-induced nonculturable Salm. Typhimurium could not be revived and were nonvirulent in a mouse model following infection through oral gavage. These results suggest that the specific conditions for reviving nonculturable Salmonella after long periods of desiccation are yet to be fully identified. The need for mapping key factors involved in the persistence of Salmonella would help better detect it and improve feed safety measures. While Salmonella has been shown to persist for years in feed processing environments, it is still unknown how temperature and humidity affect the persistence of Salmonella cells over time in terms of their metabolic states and cultivability. Here, we show that long-term exposure to feed processing environmental conditions induces Salmonella into a nonculturable state even though about 1% of the population remains metabolically active. This has significant implications when monitoring Salmonella from the environment which could yield false-negative results using conventional pre-enrichment detection methods. © 2014 The Society

  19. Functional and phenotypic profiling of innate immunity during Salmonella infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Brandt; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    Salmonellae are food borne pathogens, typically acquired by the oral ingestion of contaminated food or water, causing disease in both healthy and immunocompromised individuals. To gain insight into early immune regulation events caused by Salmonella as well as inflammatory signatures induced...... subsets, two of which following infection, accumulated in Peyer’s patches and lamina propria, respectively. Generally, we tend to set apart pathogenic bacteria from opportunistic pathogens and commensal bacteria based on their abilities to induce disease in different hosts, however, the nature...... to treatment regimes, as targeted modulation of DC profiles for instance by probiotics, could lead to improved therapy for a number of gut related diseases....

  20. High occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Salmonella in broiler carcasses from poultry slaughterhouses in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Jung, Hae-In; Kuk, Min; Kim, Young-Ji; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne Salmonella has become a major public health problem. Consumption of undercooked poultry contaminated with Salmonella can induce food poisoning in humans. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and antibiotic resistance patterns of Salmonella spp. isolated from 120 chicken carcasses produced in 6 poultry slaughterhouses in South Korea. A total of 11 samples (9.2%) were found contaminated with Salmonella: 5 isolates were serotyped as Salmonella Bellevue strain (slaughterhouse C) and 6 isolates were serotyped as Salmonella Enteritidis strain (slaughterhouse E). Salmonella Bellevue isolates were resistant to five antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole), while Salmonella Enteritidis isolates were resistant to nine antibiotics (ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefazolin, cephalothin, amikacin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and tetracycline). All cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis isolates exhibited the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype and carried the gene encoding CTX-M-15, the most prevalent ESBL enzyme worldwide. Based on molecular subtyping performed using the automated rep-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system (DiversiLab), the isolates showing ≥ 95 similarity in their rep-PCR banding patterns were classified into 5 pulsotypes. Given that cephalosporins are the drugs of choice for invasive Salmonella infections, the high incidence of ESBL-producing strains in chicken should emphasize the necessity of regular monitoring of the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant ESBL-positive Salmonella strains in poultry meat.

  1. Oral Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Challenge Induces Activation of Circulating Monocytes and Dendritic Cells in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin R Toapanta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi was recently developed. In this model, ingestion of 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of subjects developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD- 5-10 days post-challenge. TD criteria included meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12 h and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia endpoints. One of the first lines of defense against pathogens are the cells of the innate immune system (e.g., monocytes, dendritic cells -DCs-. Various changes in circulating monocytes and DCs have been described in the murine S. Typhimurium model; however, whether similar changes are present in humans remains to be explored. To address these questions, a subset of volunteers (5 TD and 3 who did not develop typhoid despite oral challenge -NoTD- were evaluated for changes in circulating monocytes and DCs. Expression of CD38 and CD40 were upregulated in monocytes and DCs in TD volunteers during the disease days (TD-0h to TD-96h. Moreover, integrin α4β7, a gut homing molecule, was upregulated on monocytes but not DCs. CD21 upregulation was only identified in DCs. These changes were not observed among NoTD volunteers despite the same oral challenge. Moreover, monocytes and DCs from NoTD volunteers showed increased binding to S. Typhi one day after challenge. These monocytes showed phosphorylation of p38MAPK, NFkB and Erk1/2 upon stimulation with S. Typhi-LPS-QDot micelles. In contrast, monocytes from TD volunteers showed only a moderate increase in S. Typhi binding 48 h and 96 h post-TD, and only Erk1/2 phosphorylation. This is the first study to describe different activation and migration profiles, as well as differential signaling patterns, in monocytes and DCs which relate directly to the clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild type S. Typhi.

  2. Waardevermindering pluimveevlees besmet met Salmonella enteritidis en Salmonella typhymurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, van P.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    De doelstelling van het onderzoek is om de waardevermindering van met Salmonella enteritidis (S.e.) en Salmonella typhymurium (S.t.) besmet pluimveevlees van vleeskuikens te bepalen. Hoe hoog is de opbrengstenderving en hoe hoog zijn de extra kosten van maatregelen voor de slachterij of

  3. Immunization with the conjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇ against Salmonella typhi induces Vi-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Fabio; Ciabattini, Annalisa; Rondini, Simona; Pozzi, Gianni; Martin, Laura B; Medaglini, Donata

    2012-09-21

    Typhoid fever is a public health problem, especially among young children in developing countries. To address this need, a glycoconjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇, composed of the polysaccharide antigen Vi covalently conjugated to the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin CRM₁₉₇, is under development. Here, we assessed the antibody and cellular responses, both local and systemic, following subcutaneous injection of Vi-CRM₁₉₇. The glycoconjugate elicited Vi-specific serum IgG titers significantly higher than unconjugated Vi, with prevalence of IgG1 that persisted for at least 60 days after immunization. Vi-specific IgG, but not IgA, were present in intestinal washes. Lymphocytes proliferation after restimulation with Vi-CRM₁₉₇ was observed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. These data confirm the immunogenicity of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ and demonstrate that the vaccine-specific antibody and cellular immune responses are present also in the intestinal tract, thus strengthening the suitability of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ as a promising candidate vaccine against Salmonella Typhi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain induces protection in different sites after Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium challenge in gnotobiotic and conventional mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Mendonça

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain isolated from a healthy breast-fed human newborn to reduce the pathological consequences for the host due to an experimental oral infection with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serov. Typhimurium in vivo was determined using gnotobiotic and conventional mice. Conventional mice received 0.1mL probiotic milk (8.0 log colony-forming unit daily for 10 days before the oral pathogenic challenge (5.0 log colony-forming unit. Then probiotic treatment was continued until the end of the experiment. Probiotic treatment in germ-free mice consisted of a single dose of the probiotic milk at the beginning of the experiment and a challenge with S. Typhimurium 10 days later (3.0 log colony-forming unit. A protective effect was observed in both gnotobiotic and conventional animals in terms of histopathologic and morphometric data, but in different anatomical sites. This protection was observed in liver and intestines, respectively, for gnotobiotic and conventional mice. However, S. Typhimurium populations were similar in the feces of both treated and control gnotobiotic mice. We conclude that a protective effect of L. rhamnosus against experimental S. Typhimurium was observed. This protection was not due to the reduction of the population of pathogenic bacteria in the intestine.

  5. Detection of Salmonella in Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Flemming; Mansdal, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Cost-effective and rapid monitoring of Salmonella in the meat production chain can contribute to food safety. The objective of this study was to validate an easy-to-use pre-PCR sample preparation method based on a simple boiling protocol for screening of Salmonella in meat and carcass swab samples...

  6. Salmonella onderzoek bij Nederlands pluimvee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Giessen AW; Berkers PATA; Peters R; Notermans SHW

    1989-01-01

    Gedurende de eerste helft van 1989 werden 59 pluimveebedrijven uit de leg- en mestsector onderzocht op de aanwezigheid van Salmonella-kiemen. Op 53 bedrijven (90%) kon Salmonella bij pluimvee worden aangetoond. Op 10 bedrijven (17%) bleek S. enteritidis bij pluimvee aanwezig te zijn. Van de 19

  7. Prevalence of Salmonella in Australian reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheelings, T Franciscus; Lightfoot, Dianne; Holz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    From January 2007 until June 2008, 504 reptiles of four families and 57 species were examined for Salmonella by using cloacal or intestinal swabs. Salmonella was identified in 139 (28%) of the 504 animals tested. Of the 504 reptiles examined, 210 were captive and 294 were wild. Ninety-eight (47%) of the captive reptiles were shedding Salmonella at the time of sampling. In contrast, only 41 (14%) of the wild reptiles were shedding Salmonella. The higher prevalence of Salmonella in captive reptiles was statistically significant (Preptiles in Australia are not natural carriers of Salmonella and that diet and captivity may influence Salmonella excretion in other species.

  8. Tenth CRL-Salmonella interlaboratory comparison study on typing of Salmonella spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver H; Maas HME; Ward LR; Mevius DJ; Mooijman KA; MGB

    2006-01-01

    Het tiende ringonderzoek voor de typering van Salmonella werd in maart 2005 georganiseerd door het Communautair Referentie Laboratorium voor Salmonella (CRL-Salmonella, Bilthoven, Nederland) in samenwerking met de Health Protection Agency (HPA, Londen, Verenigd Koninkrijk) en het Centraal Instituut

  9. Eleventh CRL-Salmonella interlaboratory comparison study on typing of Salmonella spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk PA; Maas HME; de Pinna E; Mooijman KA; MGB

    2006-01-01

    Het elfde ringonderzoek voor de typering van Salmonella werd in maart 2006 georganiseerd door het Communautair Referentie Laboratorium voor Salmonella (CRL-Salmonella, Bilthoven, Nederland) in samenwerking met de Health Protection Agency (HPA, Londen, Verenigd Koninkrijk). 26 Nationale Referentie

  10. Osteomielitis por salmonella

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia Velázquez Pérez; Teresa P. Rodríguez Torres; Orelvis Pérez Duerto

    2014-01-01

    Se presenta el caso de una paciente femenina de color blanco y dos años de edad, con diagnóstico prenatal de sicklemia, que desde edades tempranas tiene problemas de la enfermedad. Ingresó en esta ocasión por una de las complicaciones infecciosas que ocasiona este padecimiento, una osteomielitis del húmero izquierdo, aislándose el germen en el hemocultivo realizado, una salmonella. Necesitó de tratamiento enérgico y prolongado; se obtuvo un resultado satisfactorio en la evolución de la enferm...

  11. Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, John; Frank, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia cause a well-characterized spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from asymptomatic carriage to hemorrhagic colitis and fatal typhoidal fever. These pathogens are responsible for millions of cases of food-borne illness in the U.S. each year, with substantial costs measured in hospitalizations and lost productivity. In the developing world, illness caused by these pathogens is not only more prevalent, but is also associated with a greater case-fatality rate. Classical methods for identification rely on selective media and serology, but newer methods based on mass spectrometry and PCR show great promise for routine clinical testing. PMID:26004640

  12. Salmonella, a cross-kingdom pathogen infecting humans and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schikora, Adam

    2013-06-01

    Infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella strains are constant and are a non-negligible threat to the human population. In the last two decades, salmonellosis outbreaks have increasingly been associated with infected fruits and vegetables. For a long time, Salmonellae were assumed to survive on plants after a more or less accidental infection. However, this notion has recently been challenged. Studies on the infection mechanism in vegetal hosts, as well as on plant immune systems, revealed an active infection process resembling in certain features the infection in animals. On one hand, Salmonella requires the type III secretion systems to effectively infect plants and to suppress their resistance mechanisms. On the other hand, plants recognize these bacteria and react to the infection with an induced defense mechanism similar to the reaction to other plant pathogens. In this review, we present the newest reports on the interaction between Salmonellae and plants. We discuss the possible ways used by these bacteria to infect plants as well as the plant responses to the infection. The recent findings indicate that plants play a central role in the dissemination of Salmonella within the ecosystem. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide-induced negative regulation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ompW by the response regulator ArcA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Eduardo H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and hypochlorous acid (HOCl are reactive oxygen species that are part of the oxidative burst encountered by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium upon internalization by phagocytic cells. In order to survive, bacteria must sense these signals and modulate gene expression. Growing evidence indicates that the ArcAB two component system plays a role in the resistance to reactive oxygen species. We investigated the influx of H2O2 and HOCl through OmpW and the role of ArcAB in modulating its expression after exposure to both toxic compounds in S. Typhimurium. Results H2O2 and HOCl influx was determined both in vitro and in vivo. A S. Typhimurium ompW mutant strain (∆ompW exposed to sub-lethal levels of H2O2 and HOCl showed a decreased influx of both compounds as compared to a wild type strain. Further evidence of H2O2 and HOCl diffusion through OmpW was obtained by using reconstituted proteoliposomes. We hypothesized that ompW expression should be negatively regulated upon exposure to H2O2 and HOCl to better exclude these compounds from the cell. As expected, qRT-PCR showed a negative regulation in a wild type strain treated with sub-lethal concentrations of these compounds. A bioinformatic analysis in search for potential negative regulators predicted the presence of three ArcA binding sites at the ompW promoter region. By electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and using transcriptional fusions we demonstrated an interaction between ArcA and one site at the ompW promoter region. Moreover, qRT-PCR showed that the negative regulation observed in the wild type strain was lost in an arcA and in arcB mutant strains. Conclusions OmpW allows the influx of H2O2 and HOCl and is negatively regulated by ArcA by direct interaction with the ompW promoter region upon exposure to both toxic compounds.

  14. Pathobiology of Salmonella, intestinal microbiota, and the host innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Lima Santos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella is a relevant pathogen under a clinical and public health perspective. Therefore, there has been a significant scientific effort to learn about pathogenic determinants of this pathogen. The clinical relevance of the disease, associated with the molecular tools available to study Salmonella as well as suitable animal models for salmonellosis, have provided optimal conditions to drive the scientific community to generate a large expansion of our knowledge about the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enterocolitis that took place during the past two decades. This research effort has also generated a wealth of information on the host immune mechanisms that complements gaps in the fundamental research in this area. This review focus on how the interaction between Salmonella, the microbiota and intestinal innate immunity leads to disease manifestation. As a highly successful enteropathogen, Salmonella actively elicits a robust acute intestinal inflammatory response from the host, which could theoretically lead to the pathogen demise. However, Salmonella has evolved redundant molecular machineries that renders this pathogen highly adapted to the inflamed intestinal environment, in which Salmonella is capable of outcompete resident commensal organisms. The adaptation of Salmonella to the inflamed intestinal lumen associated with the massive inflammatory response that leads to diarrhea, generate perfect conditions for transmission of the pathogen. These conditions illustrate the complexity of the co-evolution and ecology of the pathogen, commensals and the host.

  15. Pathobiology of salmonella, intestinal microbiota, and the host innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renato Lima

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is a relevant pathogen under a clinical and public health perspective. Therefore, there has been a significant scientific effort to learn about pathogenic determinants of this pathogen. The clinical relevance of the disease, associated with the molecular tools available to study Salmonella as well as suitable animal models for salmonellosis, have provided optimal conditions to drive the scientific community to generate a large expansion of our knowledge about the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enterocolitis that took place during the past two decades. This research effort has also generated a wealth of information on the host immune mechanisms that complements gaps in the fundamental research in this area. This review focus on how the interaction between Salmonella, the microbiota and intestinal innate immunity leads to disease manifestation. As a highly successful enteropathogen, Salmonella actively elicits a robust acute intestinal inflammatory response from the host, which could theoretically lead to the pathogen demise. However, Salmonella has evolved redundant molecular machineries that renders this pathogen highly adapted to the inflamed intestinal environment, in which Salmonella is capable of outcompete resident commensal organisms. The adaptation of Salmonella to the inflamed intestinal lumen associated with the massive inflammatory response that leads to diarrhea, generate perfect conditions for transmission of the pathogen. These conditions illustrate the complexity of the co-evolution and ecology of the pathogen, commensals, and the host.

  16. Take the tube: remodelling of the endosomal system by intracellular Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Viktoria; Hensel, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is a facultative intracellular pathogen residing in a unique host cell-derived membrane compartment, termed Salmonella-containing vacuole or SCV. By the activity of effector proteins translocated by the SPI2-endoced type III secretion system (T3SS), the biogenesis of the SCV is manipulated to generate a habitat permissive for intracellular proliferation. By taking control of the host cell vesicle fusion machinery, intracellular Salmonella creates an extensive interconnected system of tubular membranes arising from vesicles of various origins, collectively termed Salmonella-induced tubules (SIT). Recent work investigated the dynamic properties of these manipulations. New host cell targets of SPI2-T3SS effector proteins were identified. By applying combinations of live cell imaging and ultrastructural analyses, the detailed organization of membrane compartments inhabited and modified by intracellular Salmonella is now available. These studies provided unexpected new details on the intracellular environments of Salmonella. For example, one kind of SIT, the LAMP1-positive Salmonella-induced filaments (SIF), are composed of double-membrane tubules, with an inner lumen containing host cell cytosol and cytoskeletal filaments, and an outer lumen containing endocytosed cargo. The novel findings call for new models for the biogenesis of SCV and SIT and give raise to many open questions we discuss in this review. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Salmonella Control Programs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Hald, Tine; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo

    2003-01-01

    We describe Salmonella control programs of broiler chickens, layer hens, and pigs in Denmark. Major reductions in the incidence of foodborne human salmonellosis have occurred by integrated control of farms and food processing plants. Disease control has been achieved by monitoring the herds...... and flocks, eliminating infected animals, and diversifying animals (animals and products are processed differently depending on Salmonella status) and animal food products according to the determined risk. In 2001, the Danish society saved U.S.$25.5 million by controlling Salmonella. The total annual...... Salmonella control costs in year 2001 were U.S.$14.1 million (U.S.$0.075/kg of pork and U.S.$0.02/kg of broiler or egg). These costs are paid almost exclusively by the industry. The control principles described are applicable to most industrialized countries with modern intensive farming systems....

  18. Salmonella in Sheep in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnarsson E

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1995 several outbreaks of food poisoning in humans occurred in Iceland, that were traced to salmonella contamination of singed sheep heads. This prompted us to study the prevalence of salmonella infection in sheep and to trace where and how infection might have occurred. Faecal, intestinal contents and tonsillar samples were collected in the spring and autumn from sheep on 50 farms in the southwestern part of the country, where salmonellosis had been detected and from 5 farms in the northwestern part of the country. All faecal samples from the southwest were negative, whereas samples from 3 farms obtained in the autumn in the northwest were positive. Tonsillae taken in the autumn were positive in sheep from 3 farms in the southwest and 2 in the northwest. Our results show that salmonella infection is rare in Icelandic sheep but healthy carriers may harbour the bacteria in tonsillae. Salmonella was not detected in drainage from slaughterhouses nor in singed sheep heads.

  19. Using molecular techniques for rapid detection of Salmonella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For this experiment, the whole chicken eggs were negative for Salmonella species by SMT. Salmonella enteritidis was dominating among the recovered Salmonella serovars, followed by. Salmonella typhimurium, while only two strains of Salmonella agona and Salmonella newport were isolated. The PCR assay combined ...

  20. Osteomielitis por salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Velázquez Pérez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de una paciente femenina de color blanco y dos años de edad, con diagnóstico prenatal de sicklemia, que desde edades tempranas tiene problemas de la enfermedad. Ingresó en esta ocasión por una de las complicaciones infecciosas que ocasiona este padecimiento, una osteomielitis del húmero izquierdo, aislándose el germen en el hemocultivo realizado, una salmonella. Necesitó de tratamiento enérgico y prolongado; se obtuvo un resultado satisfactorio en la evolución de la enfermedad y se sigue sistemáticamente por consulta externa en la actualidad

  1. A novel Salmonella serovar isolated from Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus nestlings in Sweden: Salmonella enterica enterica serovar Pajala (Salmonella Pajala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Hernández

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel Salmonella serovar was isolated from Peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus nestlings in northern Sweden in 2006. Three isolates of the same clone was retrieved from three falcon siblings and characterized as Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica: O-phase 13, 23:-: e, n, z 15 and the H-phase was not present. We propose the geographical name Salmonella enterica, sub-species enterica serovar Pajala to this novel Salmonella.

  2. Effect of Low Dose of Fumonisins on Pig Health: Immune Status, Intestinal Microbiota and Sensitivity to Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Christine; Tanguy, Mael; Guerre, Philippe; Boilletot, Eric; Cariolet, Roland; Queguiner, Marilyne; Postollec, Gilbert; Pinton, Philippe; Salvat, Gilles; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Fravalo, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the effects of chronic exposure to fumonisins via the ingestion of feed containing naturally contaminated corn in growing pigs infected or not with Salmonella spp. This exposure to a moderate dietary concentration of fumonisins (11.8 ppm) was sufficient to induce a biological effect in pigs (Sa/So ratio), but no mortality or pathology was observed over 63 days of exposure. No mortality or related clinical signs, even in cases of inoculation with Salmonella (5 × 104 CFU), were observed either. Fumonisins, at these concentrations, did not affect the ability of lymphocytes to proliferate in the presence of mitogens, but after seven days post-inoculation they led to inhibition of the ability of specific Salmonella lymphocytes to proliferate following exposure to a specific Salmonella antigen. However, the ingestion of fumonisins had no impact on Salmonella translocation or seroconversion in inoculated pigs. The inoculation of Salmonella did not affect faecal microbiota profiles, but exposure to moderate concentrations of fumonisins transiently affected the digestive microbiota balance. In cases of co-infection with fumonisins and Salmonella, the microbiota profiles were rapidly and clearly modified as early as 48 h post-Salmonella inoculation. Therefore under these experimental conditions, exposure to an average concentration of fumonisins in naturally contaminated feed had no effect on pig health but did affect the digestive microbiota balance, with Salmonella exposure amplifying this phenomenon. PMID:23612754

  3. Effect of Low Dose of Fumonisins on Pig Health: Immune Status, Intestinal Microbiota and Sensitivity to Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Fravalo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to measure the effects of chronic exposure to fumonisins via the ingestion of feed containing naturally contaminated corn in growing pigs infected or not with Salmonella spp. This exposure to a moderate dietary concentration of fumonisins (11.8 ppm was sufficient to induce a biological effect in pigs (Sa/So ratio, but no mortality or pathology was observed over 63 days of exposure. No mortality or related clinical signs, even in cases of inoculation with Salmonella (5 × 104 CFU, were observed either. Fumonisins, at these concentrations, did not affect the ability of lymphocytes to proliferate in the presence of mitogens, but after seven days post-inoculation they led to inhibition of the ability of specific Salmonella lymphocytes to proliferate following exposure to a specific Salmonella antigen. However, the ingestion of fumonisins had no impact on Salmonella translocation or seroconversion in inoculated pigs. The inoculation of Salmonella did not affect faecal microbiota profiles, but exposure to moderate concentrations of fumonisins transiently affected the digestive microbiota balance. In cases of co-infection with fumonisins and Salmonella, the microbiota profiles were rapidly and clearly modified as early as 48 h post-Salmonella inoculation. Therefore under these experimental conditions, exposure to an average concentration of fumonisins in naturally contaminated feed had no effect on pig health but did affect the digestive microbiota balance, with Salmonella exposure amplifying this phenomenon.

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Several Essential Oils towards Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella paratyphi B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Mazhar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant essential oils are natural products extracted from plants and because of their antimicrobial properties can be used as natural additives in foods. They are also useful for decontamination of food-borne pathogens and can be a safe additive in foods. The antimicrobial activities of essential oils belonging to Saturiea hortensis, Thymus vulgaris, Mentha polegium, Cuminum cyminum, Lavandula officinalis and Mentha viridis L. (spearmint were investigated at different concentrations (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10%v/v against Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella paratyphi B by using the agar well diffusion method. Essential oils showed inhibitory effect on Salmonella spp. in the agar well diffusion assay. In addition, the capability of essential oils for decontamination of minced row beef, ground beef, minced raw chicken and minced raw fish inoculated with Salmonella spp. at 0.1 and 0.5%v/v were assessed. Reduction of the Salmonella spp. population was observed following the inoculation of the cultures with 0.1 and 0.5%v/v essential oils.

  5. The risk of salmonellae shedding by dogs fed Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Rita; Ribble, Carl; Aramini, Jeff; Vandermeer, Meredith; Popa, Maria; Litman, Marcus; Reid-Smith, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-eight research dogs were enrolled to determine the prevalence of salmonellae shedding after consumption of 1 Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diet meal. Sixteen dogs were exposed to Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diets and 12 to Salmonella-free commercial raw food diets. Seven of the exposed dogs shed salmonellae 1-7 days after consumption of Salmonella-contaminated raw food diets. None of the dogs fed Salmonella-free diets shed salmonellae. No clinical signs were observed in either group. Five of the 7 dogs shed the same serotypes as those recovered from food samples used for feeding. Results showed the same serotypes and antimicrobial resistance pattern in 2 of the 7 shedders. Dogs fed Salmonella-contaminated raw food diets can shed salmonellae and may, therefore, be a source of environmental contamination potentially leading to human or animal illness.

  6. A comparative study of thermal and acid inactivation kinetics in fruit juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg grown at acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2009-11-01

    Acid and heat inactivation in orange and apple juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (i.e., Spanish Type Culture Collection) 443 (CECT 443) (Salmonella Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg CECT 4384 (Salmonella Senftenberg) grown in buffered brain heart infusion (pH 7.0) and acidified brain heart infusion up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic, and hydrochloric acids was evaluated. Acid adaptation induced an adaptive response that increased the subsequent resistance to extreme pH conditions (pH 2.5) and to heat, although the magnitude of these responses differed between the two isolates and fruit juices. The acid resistance in orange juice for acid-adapted cells (D-values of 28.3-34.5 min for Salmonella Senftenberg and 30.0-39.2 min for Salmonella Typhimurium) resulted to be about two to three times higher than that corresponding to non-acid-adapted cells. In apple juice, acid-adapted Salmonella Senftenberg cells survived better than those of Salmonella Typhimurium, obtaining mean D-values of 114.8 +/- 12.3 and 41.9 +/- 2.5 min, respectively. The thermotolerance of non-acid-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in orange (D(58)-value: 0.028 min) and apple juices (D(58)-value: 0.10 min) was approximately double for acid-adapted cells. This cross-protection to heat was more strongly expressed in Salmonella Senftenberg. D(58)-values obtained for non-acid-adapted cells in orange (0.11 min) and apple juices (0.19 min) increased approximately 10 and 5 times, respectively, after their growth in acidified media. The conditions prevailing during bacterial growth and heat treatment did not significantly influence the z-values observed (6.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Typhimurium and 7.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Senftenberg). The enhanced acid resistance found for both isolates could enable them to survive for prolonged time periods in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the risk of illness. Further, it

  7. Salmonella exploits the host endolysosomal tethering factor HOPS complex to promote its intravacuolar replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhwani, Aastha; Kaur, Harmeet; Tuli, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium extensively remodels the host late endocytic compartments to establish its vacuolar niche within the host cells conducive for its replication, also known as the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). By maintaining a prolonged interaction with late endosomes and lysosomes of the host cells in the form of interconnected network of tubules (Salmonella-induced filaments or SIFs), Salmonella gains access to both membrane and fluid-phase cargo from these compartments. This is essential for maintaining SCV membrane integrity and for bacterial intravacuolar nutrition. Here, we have identified the multisubunit lysosomal tethering factor—HOPS (HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting) complex as a crucial host factor facilitating delivery of late endosomal and lysosomal content to SCVs, providing membrane for SIF formation, and nutrients for intravacuolar bacterial replication. Accordingly, depletion of HOPS subunits significantly reduced the bacterial load in non-phagocytic and phagocytic cells as well as in a mouse model of Salmonella infection. We found that Salmonella effector SifA in complex with its binding partner; SKIP, interacts with HOPS subunit Vps39 and mediates recruitment of this tethering factor to SCV compartments. The lysosomal small GTPase Arl8b that binds to, and promotes membrane localization of Vps41 (and other HOPS subunits) was also required for HOPS recruitment to SCVs and SIFs. Our findings suggest that Salmonella recruits the host late endosomal and lysosomal membrane fusion machinery to its vacuolar niche for access to host membrane and nutrients, ensuring its intracellular survival and replication. PMID:29084291

  8. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of Salmonella serotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of Salmonella and human pathogens in unpasteurized milk remains a public health hazard. The study reported the phenotypic and molecular characterization of Salmonella serotypes in cow raw milk, cheese and traditional yoghurt marketed for man's consumption in Nigeria. Isolation of Salmonella was done ...

  9. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  10. Immunity to intestinal pathogens: lessons learned from Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Salmonella are a common source of food or water-borne infection and cause a wide range of clinical disease in human and animal hosts. Salmonella are relatively easy to culture and manipulate in a laboratory setting, and the infection of laboratory animals induces robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, immunologists have frequently turned to Salmonella infection models to expand understanding of immunity to intestinal pathogens. In this review, I summarize current knowledge of innate and adaptive immunity to Salmonella and highlight features of this response that have emerged from recent studies. These include the heterogeneity of the antigen-specific T-cell response to intestinal infection, the prominence of microbial mechanisms to impede T and B-cell responses, and the contribution of non-cognate pathways for elicitation of T-cell effector functions. Together, these different issues challenge an overly simplistic view of host-pathogen interaction during mucosal infection but also allow deeper insight into the real-world dynamic of protective immunity to intestinal pathogens. PMID:24942689

  11. A rabbit model of non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Aruna; Tatarov, Ivan; Masek, Billie Jo; Hardick, Justin; Crusan, Annabelle; Wakefield, Teresa; Carroll, Karen; Yang, Samuel; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Lipsky, Michael M; McLeod, Charles G; Levine, Myron M; Rothman, Richard E; Gaydos, Charlotte A; DeTolla, Louis J

    2014-09-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. In this study, we focused on the development of an animal model of bacteremia induced by non-typhoidal Salmonella. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated with a human isolate of non-typhoidal Salmonella strain CVD J73 via the intra-peritoneal route. Blood samples were collected at specific time points and at euthanasia from infected rabbits. Additionally, tissue samples from the heart, lungs, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys were obtained at euthanasia. All experimentally infected rabbits displayed clinical signs of disease (fever, dehydration, weight loss and lethargy). Tissues collected at necropsy from the animals exhibited histopathological changes indicative of bacteremia. Non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteria were detected in the blood and tissue samples of infected rabbits by microbiological culture and real-time PCR assays. The development of this animal model of bacteremia could prove to be a useful tool for studying how non-typhoidal Salmonella infections disseminate and spread in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction of genetic markers for the study of Salmonella typhimurium infection of murine macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    effectors and host cell regulators and is a prokaryotic developmental program that follows a strict temporal and spatial path. Immediately following invasion, individual Salmonella cells are found within discrete vacuoles. Subsequently, intracellular bacterial replication begins after an initial lag period......  Salmonella pathogenesis is dependent on its ability to invade and replicate within a variety of host cells. Upon bacterial uptake by macrophages, maturation of the Salmonella Containing Vacuole (the SCV) initiates. The process of SCV maturation depends on the interactions between Salmonella...... and is accompanied by the formation of extensive membrane tubules (Salmonella-induced filaments, Sifs), which project from the SCVs and extend throughout the host cell. These events are coupled to interactions with host cell components and can be divided into discrete temporal and spatial steps: (1) Initial contact...

  13. Prevalence and susceptibility of salmonella Typhi and salmonella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Blood samples collected from presumptive typhoid fever patients from Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Federal College of Education (FCE) and presumptive typhoid fever patients that attended two private clinics (Salama Clinics and Savanna Polyclinics) in Zaria were cultured for Salmonella species and identified ...

  14. Cellulitis Due to Salmonella infantis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish R Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Salmonella are highly adapted for the growth in both humans and animals and cause a wide spectrum of disease. The growth of Serotypes S. typhi and S. paratyphi is restricted to human hosts, in whom these organisms cause enteric (typhoid fever. The remaining Serotypes (non typhoidal Salmonella or NTS can colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of the broad range of animals, including mammals, reptiles, birds and insects. The usual clinical presentation of non-typhoidal salmonellae (NTS infection is self limited gastroenteritis; however bacteremia and focal extra intestinal infection may occur. However salmonella localization to the skin presenting as cutaneous ulceration is regarded as a rare event. Rates of morbidity and mortality associated with NTS are highest among the elderly, infants, and immunocompromised individuals, including those with hemoglobinopathies, HIV infection, or infections that cause blockade of the reticuloendothelial system. We isolated S.infantis in 50 years old man with left leg cellulitis. The serotype was confirmed at Central Research Institute, Kasauli.

  15. Salmonella radicidation of poultry carcasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, R.W.A.W.

    1982-01-01

    Validity of methods

    Experiments were carried out In which it was assessed which Salmonella isolation method is the most productive one In the examination of broiler carcasses. Refrigerated, refrigerated and radiated (2.50 kGy), frozen and frozen and

  16. Salmonella Infection and Water Frogs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-01-12

    This podcast, featuring lead investigator Shauna Mettee, discusses the first known outbreak of Salmonella in people due to contact with water frogs.  Created: 1/12/2010 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 1/12/2010.

  17. 'Acute Salmonella typhz' Acalculdus Cholecystitz's

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnosis of AACwas established byultrasono graphy and confirmed at lapar otomy: Laboratory cultures grew Salmonella 1377M from bile and citrobacter spp. from the blood. Following surgical intervention, the child had an uneventful recovery andwas discharged three weeks after surgery. 7. Key words: Typhoid fever, ...

  18. Immunogenic potential of a Salmonella Typhimurium live vaccine for pigs against monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium DT 193.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuß, Tobias; Ueberham, Elke; Lehmann, Jörg; Lindner, Thomas; Springer, Sven

    2017-11-17

    Monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (mSTM) strains account for up to 8.6% of all human Salmonellosis cases. They have an increasing prevalence during recent years and several human cases with hospitalisation were reported. These strains are often isolated from pigs and pork - one primary source of human infection. A Salmonella Typhimurium (STM) live vaccine has been proven successful in controlling of STM infections in pigs for many years. The aim of this study was to test the immunogenicity of the vaccine in weaners during oral challenge with a virulent mSTM strain and to examine the kinetics of STM-specific IgA, IgM and IgG antibodies induced by vaccination and infection. Despite clinical signs being present in both groups, the vaccination led to a significant reduction of diarrhoea, overall clinical symptoms and a milder elevation of the body temperature. Necropsy revealed fewer pathological lesions in the gastrointestinal tract of vaccinated compared to control animals. Moreover, in the ileal and caecal mucosa and in the ileocaecal lymph nodes the challenge strain burden was significantly reduced by vaccination. Significant differences in the antibody responses of both groups were present during the vaccination period and after infection. In vaccinated animals Salmonella-specific IgA and IgG antibody levels increased significantly after vaccination and were even more pronounced in response to challenge. In contrast, similarly low levels of IgM antibodies were detected during the vaccination period in both vaccinated and non-vaccinated animals. However, after challenge IgM antibody levels increased significantly in control pigs while neither IgA nor IgG antibodies were detectable. The data demonstrate that mSTM can evoke clinical signs in weaners. Due to the vaccination their incidence and magnitude were significantly milder. Vaccination also led to a significantly reduced challenge strain burden in the intestine and the lymph nodes which is comparable to previous

  19. EU Interlaboratory comparison study VII on bacteriological detection of Salmonella spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver H; Nagelkerke NJD; Giessen AW van de; Mooijman KA; MGB; IMAR

    2005-01-01

    In 2003 a seventh interlaboratory comparison study on bacteriological detection of Salmonella spp. was organised by the Community Reference Laboratory for Salmonella (CRL-Salmonella, Bilthoven, the Netherlands). National Reference Laboratories for Salmonella (NRLs-Salmonella) of the EU Member

  20. 75 FR 48973 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella... availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During... ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation'' (the...

  1. Identification and characterization of salmonella serotypes using DNA spectral characteristics by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analysis of DNA samples of Salmonella serotypes (Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky) were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrometer by placing directly in contact with a diamond attenua...

  2. Anaerobiosis induced virulence of Salmonella typhi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapoor, Sarika; Singh, R D; Sharma, P C

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Anaerobic conditions are frequently encountered by pathogens invading the gastrointestinal tract due to low/limiting oxygen conditions prevalent in the small intestine. This anaerobic stress has been suggested to enhance the virulence of gut pathogens. In the present stud...... dismutase (SOD) and catalase. INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that exposure of S. Typhi to anaerobic conditions enhances its virulence....

  3. Salmonella paratyphi C: genetic divergence from Salmonella choleraesuis and pathogenic convergence with Salmonella typhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qiao Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although over 1400 Salmonella serovars cause usually self-limited gastroenteritis in humans, a few, e.g., Salmonella typhi and S. paratyphi C, cause typhoid, a potentially fatal systemic infection. It is not known whether the typhoid agents have evolved from a common ancestor (by divergent processes or acquired similar pathogenic traits independently (by convergent processes. Comparison of different typhoid agents with non-typhoidal Salmonella lineages will provide excellent models for studies on how similar pathogens might have evolved. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced a strain of S. paratyphi C, RKS4594, and compared it with previously sequenced Salmonella strains. RKS4594 contains a chromosome of 4,833,080 bp and a plasmid of 55,414 bp. We predicted 4,640 intact coding sequences (4,578 in the chromosome and 62 in the plasmid and 152 pseudogenes (149 in the chromosome and 3 in the plasmid. RKS4594 shares as many as 4346 of the 4,640 genes with a strain of S. choleraesuis, which is primarily a swine pathogen, but only 4008 genes with another human-adapted typhoid agent, S. typhi. Comparison of 3691 genes shared by all six sequenced Salmonella strains placed S. paratyphi C and S. choleraesuis together at one end, and S. typhi at the opposite end, of the phylogenetic tree, demonstrating separate ancestries of the human-adapted typhoid agents. S. paratyphi C seemed to have suffered enormous selection pressures during its adaptation to man as suggested by the differential nucleotide substitutions and different sets of pseudogenes, between S. paratyphi C and S. choleraesuis. CONCLUSIONS: S. paratyphi C does not share a common ancestor with other human-adapted typhoid agents, supporting the convergent evolution model of the typhoid agents. S. paratyphi C has diverged from a common ancestor with S. choleraesuis by accumulating genomic novelty during adaptation to man.

  4. Salmonella Protein AvrA Activates the STAT3 Signaling Pathway in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella infection in humans can become chronic, which leads to low-grade persistent inflammation. These chronic infections increase the risk of several gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer. Salmonella AvrA is a multifunctional protein that influences eukaryotic cell pathways by regulating ubiquitination and acetylation. In an animal model, we have demonstrated that infection with AvrA-expressing Salmonella induces beta-catenin signals and enhances colonic tumorigenesis. Beta-catenin signaling is a key player in intestinal proliferation and tumorigenesis. The relative contributions of AvrA-induced proliferation and inflammation on tumorigenesis, however, are unknown. STAT3 is activated in chronically inflamed intestines in human inflammatory bowel diseases and in colitis-associated colon cancer. In the current study, mice were colonized with Salmonella AvrA-sufficient or AvrA-deficient bacterial strains. Then, inflammation-associated colon cancer was induced through the use of azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium. We determined that AvrA-expressing bacteria activated the STAT3 pathway, which is predicted to enhance proliferation and promote tumorigenesis. Transcriptional activity of STAT3 and its target genes were upregulated by Salmonella expressing AvrA, thus promoting proliferation and intestinal tumorigenesis. Our findings provide new insights regarding a STAT3-dependent mechanism by which the specific bacterial product AvrA enhances the development of infection-associated colon cancer. These insights might suggest future biomarkers to risk assessment and early detection of infection-related cancer.

  5. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  6. Eleventh CRL-Salmonella interlaboratory comparison study on typing of Salmonella spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk PA; Maas HME; Pinna E de; Mooijman KA; MGB

    2006-01-01

    The eleventh interlaboratory comparison study on the typing of Salmonella was organised by the Community Reference Laboratory for Salmonella (CRL-Salmonella, Bilthoven, The Netherlands) in collaboration with the Health Protection Agency (HPA, London, United Kingdom) in March 2006. 26 National

  7. Salmonella Typhimurium infection in the porcine intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The normal intestinal epithelium is renewed with a turnover rate of 3-5 days. During Salmonella infection increased cell loss is observed, possibly as a result of programmed cell death (PCD). We have, therefore, studied the effects of Salmonella Typhimurium infection on three elements involved...... in scattered epithelial cells and the number of positive cells increased with increasing times of exposure to Salmonella (P

  8. Effects of Low-Dose and Long-Term Treatment with Erythromycin on Interleukin-17 and Interleukin-23 in Peripheral Blood and Induced Sputum in Patients with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caimei; Huang, Huijuan; Zhang, Jianquan; He, Zhiyi; Zhong, Xiaoning; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of low-dose and long-term treatment with erythromycin on IL-17 and IL-23, in peripheral blood and induced sputum, in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients were randomly divided into placebo-treated group, group A (12 months of additive treatment with erythromycin, N = 18), and group B (6 months of additive treatment with erythromycin followed by 6 months of follow-up, N = 18). Inflammatory cells in induced sputum, pulmonary function, and the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) were analyzed. Concentrations of IL-17 and IL-23 in peripheral blood and sputum were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. After treatment, sputum and peripheral blood concentrations of IL-17 and IL-23 significantly decreased in groups A and B compared with placebo-treated group. There were no significant differences after erythromycin withdrawal at months 9 and 12 in group B compared with placebo-treated group. An increase in 6MWD was observed after treatment. Erythromycin was beneficial and reduced airway inflammation in COPD patients. Underlying mechanisms may involve inhibition of IL-17 and IL-23 mediated airway inflammation. COPD patients treated with erythromycin for 6 months experienced improved exercise capacity. Finally, treatment for 12 months may be more effective than treatment for 6 months.

  9. Integrated Stress Responses in Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shu; Fang, Ferric C.

    2011-01-01

    The foodborne gram-negative pathogen Salmonella must adapt to varied environmental conditions encountered within foods, the host gastrointestinal tract and the phagosomes of host macrophages. Adaptation is achieved through the coordinate regulation of gene expression in response to environmental signals such as temperature, pH, osmolarity, redox state, antimicrobial peptides, and nutrient deprivation. This review will examine mechanisms by which the integration of regulatory responses to a broad array of environmental signals can be achieved. First, in the most straightforward case, tandem promoters allow gene expression to respond to multiple signals. Second, versatile sensor proteins may respond to more than one environmental signal. Third, transcriptional silencing and counter-silencing as demonstrated by the H-NS paradigm provides a general mechanism for the convergence of multiple regulatory inputs. Fourth, signaling cascades allow gene activation by independent sensory elements. These mechanisms allow Salmonella to utilize common adaptive stress pathways in response to a diverse range of environmental conditions. PMID:21570144

  10. Salmonella proteomics under oxidative stress reveals coordinated regulation of antioxidant defense with iron metabolism and bacterial virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiaqi; Qi, Linlu; Hu, Mo; Liu, Yanhua; Yu, Kaiwen; Liu, Qian; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2017-03-22

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a bacterial pathogen that can cause widespread gastroenteritis. Salmonella encounters reactive oxygen species both under free-living conditions and within their mammalian host during infection. To study its response to oxidative stress, we performed the first large-scale proteomic profiling of Salmonella upon exposure to H 2 O 2 . Among 1600 detected proteins, 83 proteins showed significantly altered abundance. Interestingly, only a subset of known antioxidants was induced, likely due to distinct regulatory mechanisms. In addition, we found elevation of several Salmonella acquired phage products with potential contribution to DNA repair under oxidative stress. Furthermore, we observed robust induction of iron-uptake systems and disruption of these pathways led to bacterial survival defects under H 2 O 2 challenge. Importantly, this work is the first to report that oxidative stress severely repressed the Salmonella type III secretion system (T3SS), reducing its virulence. Biological significance Salmonella, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, encounters reactive oxygen species (ROS) both endogenously and exogenously. To better understand its response to oxidative stress, we performed the first large-scale profiling of Salmonella protein expression upon H 2 O 2 treatment. Among 1600 quantified proteins, the abundance of 116 proteins was altered significantly. Notably, iron acquisition systems were induced to promote bacterial survival under oxidative stress. Furthermore, we are the first to report that oxidative stress severely repressed Salmonella type III secretion system and hence reduced its virulence. We believe that these findings will not only help us better understand the molecular mechanisms that Salmonella has evolved to counteract ROS but also the global impact of oxidative stress on bacterial physiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Bioprocessed Polysaccharide from Lentinus edodes Mycelia Cultures with Turmeric Protects Chicks from a Lethal Challenge of Salmonella Gallinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dalmuri; Lee, Hyung Tae; Lee, June Bong; Kim, Yongbaek; Lee, Sang Jong; Yoon, Jang Won

    2017-02-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that a bioprocessed polysaccharide (BPP) isolated from Lentinus edodes mushroom mycelia cultures supplemented with black rice bran can protect mice against Salmonella lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia and reduce the mortality from Salmonella Typhimurium infection through upregulated T-helper 1 immunity. Here, we report that a BPP from L. edodes mushroom mycelia liquid cultures supplemented with turmeric (referred to as BPP-turmeric) alters chicken macrophage responses against avian-adapted Salmonella Gallinarum and protects chicks against a lethal challenge from Salmonella Gallinarum. In vitro analyses revealed that the water extract of BPP-turmeric (i) changed the protein expression or secretion profile of Salmonella Gallinarum, although it was not bactericidal, (ii) reduced the phagocytic activity of the chicken-derived macrophage cell line HD-11 when infected with Salmonella Gallinarum, and (iii) significantly activated the transcription expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in response to various Salmonella infections, whereas it repressed that of IL-4, IL-6, interferon-β, and interferon-γ. We also found that BPP-turmeric (0.1 g/kg of feed) as a feed additive provided significant protection to 1-day-old chicks infected with a lethal dose of Salmonella Gallinarum. Collectively, these results imply that BPP-turmeric contains biologically active component(s) that protect chicks against Salmonella Gallinarum infection, possibly by regulating macrophage immune responses. Further studies are needed to evaluate the potential efficacy of BPP-turmeric as a livestock feed additive for the preharvest control of fowl typhoid or foodborne salmonellosis.

  12. Flagella Overexpression Attenuates Salmonella Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Xinghong Yang; Theresa Thornburg; Zhiyong Suo; SangMu Jun; Amanda Robison; Jinquan Li; Timothy Lim; Ling Cao; Teri Hoyt; Recep Avci; Pascual, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Flagella are cell surface appendages involved in a number of bacterial behaviors, such as motility, biofilm formation, and chemotaxis. Despite these important functions, flagella can pose a liability to a bacterium when serving as potent immunogens resulting in the stimulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Previous work showing appendage overexpression, referred to as attenuating gene expression (AGE), was found to enfeeble wild-type Salmonella. Thus, this approach was adapted to...

  13. Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei Attenuate Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium Colonization and Virulence Gene Expression In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Muyyarikkandy, Muhammed Shafeekh; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), and Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) have been responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. Salmonella colonization in chicken is characterized by initial attachment to the cecal epithelial cells (CEC) followed by dissemination to the liver, spleen, and oviduct. Since cecal colonization is critical to Salmonella transmission along the food chain continuum, reducing this intestinal association c...

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  15. Reiter's syndrome after salmonella infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čanović Predrag S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Two patients with Reiter's syndrome, after Salmonella infection were treated on the Infections disease ward at Clinical hospital center in Kragujevac. In the first patient, ten days after the onset of Salmonella infection, signs of edema and pain in the right ankle occurred, accompanied by expressed conjunctivitis. Within next two months consecutive metatarsophalanges changes joint of the right foot have appeared. In the second patient, two weeks after the onset of Salmonella infection, edema of the left hand joints and a week later edema of the right hand and right ankle joints appeared. In both patients inflammatory syndrome was expressed (high erythrocyte sedimentation rates, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein along with negative rheumatoid factors and positive antigen HLA-B27. Outcome of the disease in both cases was favorable upon receiving nonsteroid antirheumatic therapy. Signs of arthritis disappeared after three months. No signs of recurrent arthritis have been seen during the next four years in the first and next two years in the second patient.

  16. FAKTOR VIRULENSI Salmonella enterica SEROVAR TYPHI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvy Khrisna Pranamartha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Demam tifoid disebabkan oleh bakteri Salmonella typhi, dengan gejala umum berupa demam tinggi dan nyeri perut. Tifoid adalah penyakit infeksi yang disebabkan oleh bakteri Salmonella typhi, yang masuk ke dalam tubuh melalui mulut dan saluran cerna.1 Untuk bisa memahami patogenesis dari demam tifoid sampai ke tingkat selular dan molekular, ada 5 hal penting yang harus digaris bawahi, yaitu: 1.\tTipe 3 Sistem Sekresi (T3SS 2.\tVirulence Genes dari Salmonella yang mengkode 5 SIP (Salmonella Invasion Protein SIP A, B, C, D, dan E. 3.\tToll R2 dan toll R3 yang merupakan lapisan luar dari makrofag. 4.\tSistem imun lumen usus sampai ke organ dalam 5.\tFungsi endotelial sel dalam inflamasi. Infeksi Salmonella dapat berakibat fatal kepada bayi, balita, ibu hamil dan kandungannya serta orang lanjut usia. Hal ini disebabkan karena kekebalan tubuh mereka yang menurun. Virulensi salmonella tidak lepas dari peranan SPI, yang terletak di dalam kromosom dan plasmid bakteri. Dimana SPI 1 dan SPI 2 telah dikaji cukup mendalam karena keterkaitannya dengan T3SS, dan berperan sangat penting pada invasi awal serta siklus hidup intrasel dari bakteri Salmonella. Kontaminasi Salmonella dapat dicegah dengan mencuci tangan dan menjaga kebersihan makanan yang dikonsumsi. Selalu menjaga kebersihan lingkungan hidup kita agar terhindar dari kontaminasi dengan bakteri Salmonella typhi. Agar mewaspadai sejak dini pencegahan dan pengobatan penyakit typhus. Studi mendalam perlu dilakukan agar kita mampu lebih memahami proses kompleks antara patogen dan sel inang. Mengingat dari 15 SPI yang sudah diketahui, hanya SPI 1 dan SPI 2 yang sudah dikaji secara mendalam. Kata Kunci: Salmonella, Salmonella Invasion Protein, Typhi.

  17. Ultra-fast and sensitive detection of non-typhoidal Salmonella using microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence ("MAMEF".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Tennant

    Full Text Available Certain serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica cause invasive disease (e.g., enteric fever, bacteremia, septicemia, meningitis, etc. in humans and constitute a global public health problem. A rapid, sensitive diagnostic test is needed to allow prompt initiation of therapy in individual patients and for measuring disease burden at the population level. An innovative and promising new rapid diagnostic technique is microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF. We have adapted this assay platform to detect the chromosomal oriC locus common to all Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovars. We have shown efficient lysis of biologically relevant concentrations of Salmonella spp. suspended in bacteriological media using microwave-induced lysis. Following lysis and DNA release, as little as 1 CFU of Salmonella in 1 ml of medium can be detected in <30 seconds. Furthermore the assay is sensitive and specific: it can detect oriC from Salmonella serovars Typhi, Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, Paratyphi C, Typhimurium, Enteritidis and Choleraesuis but does not detect Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae or Acinetobacter baumanii. We have also performed preliminary experiments using a synthetic Salmonella oriC oligonucleotide suspended in whole human blood and observed rapid detection when the sample was diluted 1:1 with PBS. These pre-clinical data encourage progress to the next step to detect Salmonella in blood (and other ordinarily sterile, clinically relevant body fluids.

  18. Ultra-fast and sensitive detection of non-typhoidal Salmonella using microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence ("MAMEF").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M; Zhang, Yongxia; Galen, James E; Geddes, Chris D; Levine, Myron M

    2011-04-08

    Certain serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica cause invasive disease (e.g., enteric fever, bacteremia, septicemia, meningitis, etc.) in humans and constitute a global public health problem. A rapid, sensitive diagnostic test is needed to allow prompt initiation of therapy in individual patients and for measuring disease burden at the population level. An innovative and promising new rapid diagnostic technique is microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF). We have adapted this assay platform to detect the chromosomal oriC locus common to all Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovars. We have shown efficient lysis of biologically relevant concentrations of Salmonella spp. suspended in bacteriological media using microwave-induced lysis. Following lysis and DNA release, as little as 1 CFU of Salmonella in 1 ml of medium can be detected in Salmonella serovars Typhi, Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, Paratyphi C, Typhimurium, Enteritidis and Choleraesuis but does not detect Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae or Acinetobacter baumanii. We have also performed preliminary experiments using a synthetic Salmonella oriC oligonucleotide suspended in whole human blood and observed rapid detection when the sample was diluted 1:1 with PBS. These pre-clinical data encourage progress to the next step to detect Salmonella in blood (and other ordinarily sterile, clinically relevant body fluids).

  19. Protective effect of probiotics on Salmonella infectivity assessed with combined in vitro gut fermentation-cellular models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihler Annina

    2011-12-01

    epithelial integrity compared to previous E. coli L1000 periods, as reflected by a significant mean increase of TER by 58% in all reactors. Inulin addition enhanced Salmonella growth and invasion when tested with distal and proximal reactor samples, respectively, but induced a limited decrease of TER (minus 18% in all reactors. Conclusions Our results highlight the benefits of combining suitable cellular and colonic fermentation models to assess strain-specific first-level host protection properties of probiotics during Salmonella infection, providing an efficient system biology tool for preclinical development of new antimicrobials.

  20. Rapid detection and characterization of Salmonella enterica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for molecular typing of Salmonella enterica serovars in Egypt. During the summer of 2010, a total of 1075 samples were collected from cattle, sheep and poultry farms to be subjected for isolation of Salmonella (290 rectal swabs from cattle, 335 rectal swabs from sheep ...

  1. Case Report: Salmonella lung infection | Ohanu | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of an 84 year old man admitted because of fever, abdominal discomfort, weakness, past history of cough wheezing and abuse of prednisolone and Erythromycin. He had Bronchopneumonia and diabetes. Salmonella typhimurium was isolated from both his sputum and blood while stool was negative for salmonella.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella typhi and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility testing patterns of Candida Albicans and Salmonella typhi isolates. Fifteen isolates of each microorganism were collected from three hospitals located in Dar es Salaam region within a 3-month period in the year 2005. Candida Albicans and Salmonella typhi ...

  3. Antibiotic susceptibilities of Salmonella species prevalent among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of Salmonella species among children having diarrhea in Katsina State, Nigeria. A total of 220 diarrhea stool samples of children aged five years and below (0-5 years) were collected and screened for Salmonella species using culture technique. Presumptively positive ...

  4. Quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    over Asia and Africa) emerged from Southeast Asia and then spread to other regions of the world [13]. Travellers also played a significant role in spreading the resistant. Salmonella Typhi, especially to the developed world [16,. 17]. The quinolone-resistant Salmonella Typhi is not only prevalent in hospital settings but also in ...

  5. Experimental reproduction of rotavirus and Salmonella pullorum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2017-07-10

    Jul 10, 2017 ... were inoculated with 1 X 106 cfu/ml of Salmonella pullorum, group C chicks were inoculated with 1 X 106 pfu/ml of rotavirus and ... Significant growth retardation was observed in chicks given either rotavirus or Salmonella pullorum, but this effect was more ... feed and water were provided ad libitum. All the.

  6. Experimental Salmonella-associated conjunctivitis in cats.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, J G; Beaucage, C M; Murphy, J C; Niemi, S M

    1984-01-01

    Cats were infected experimentally with Salmonella typhimurium via the conjunctiva. Clinical signs consisted of lacrimation, conjunctivitis, blepharospasm, prominent nictitating membrane and scleral injection. These signs were accompanied by an absolute neutrophilia and conjunctival smears indicative of moderate to severe suppurative inflammation. Ocular signs disappeared by day 6 postinfection. Salmonella typhimurium was cultured intermittently from the inoculated conjunctivae and rectal swab...

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of salmonellae isolated from food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transmission of typhoid bacilli and other Salmonella spp. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella spp. from food handlers and cattle and compare the patterns with specimens from patients. Methods: A total of 206 stool samples from apparently healthy food ...

  8. Seroprevalence of Salmonella Gallinarum Infection in Chicken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    ABSTRACT. Ethiopia owns a large poultry population whose growth is highly constrained by diseases. Fowl typhoid is a serious concern in growing and adult poultry and results from infection by. Salmonella Gallinarum (Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar. Gallinarum). Knowledge of the ...

  9. Experimental reproduction of rotavirus and Salmonella pullorum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2017-07-10

    Jul 10, 2017 ... experiment. Body weight. Growth retardation was observed from day 7 P.I. in all infected group till the end of the study. The effects of Rotavirus and ... Table 2: Mean body weights of birds inoculated orally with Rotavirus, Salmonella or Rotavirus/Salmonella .... species and humans (Mettifogo et al., 2014).

  10. Salmonella in the lairage of pig slaughterhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, M.; Urlings, H.A.P.; Keuzenkamp, D.A.; Snijders, J.M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if lairages of pig slaughterhouses can act as a source of contamination of slaughtered pigs with Salmonella. The prevalence and variety of serotypes of Salmonella in the lairages of two pig slaughterhouses were determined, and the efficacy of the usual

  11. 9 CFR 113.122 - Salmonella Choleraesuis Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salmonella Choleraesuis Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.122 Salmonella Choleraesuis Bacterin. Salmonella Choleraesuis Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Salmonella choleraesuis which has been inactivated and is...

  12. 9 CFR 113.123 - Salmonella Dublin Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salmonella Dublin Bacterin. 113.123... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.123 Salmonella Dublin Bacterin. Salmonella Dublin Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Salmonella dublin which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of...

  13. 9 CFR 113.120 - Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.120 Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin. Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Salmonella typhimurium which has been inactivated and is...

  14. Report on the fifth workshop organised by CRL-Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raes M; Henken AM; MGB

    2001-01-01

    At 18 and 19 September 2000 a workshop was organised by the Community Reference Laboratory for Salmonella (CRL-Salmonella) in Bilthoven, the Netherlands. All National Reference Laboratories for Salmonella (NRLs-Salmonella) of the EU Member States and Norway participated (in total 38 participants).

  15. Interactions of Salmonella with animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Agnès; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chaussé, Anne-Marie; Schikora, Adam; Velge, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica species are Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for a wide range of food- and water-borne diseases in both humans and animals, thereby posing a major threat to public health. Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports, linking Salmonella contaminated raw vegetables and fruits with food poisoning. Many studies have shown that an essential feature of the pathogenicity of Salmonella is its capacity to cross a number of barriers requiring invasion of a large variety of cells and that the extent of internalization may be influenced by numerous factors. However, it is poorly understood how Salmonella successfully infects hosts as diversified as animals or plants. The aim of this review is to describe the different stages required for Salmonella interaction with its hosts: (i) attachment to host surfaces; (ii) entry processes; (iii) multiplication; (iv) suppression of host defense mechanisms; and to point out similarities and differences between animal and plant infections.

  16. Interactions of Salmonella with animals and plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Agnès; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chaussé, Anne-Marie; Schikora, Adam; Velge, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica species are Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for a wide range of food- and water-borne diseases in both humans and animals, thereby posing a major threat to public health. Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports, linking Salmonella contaminated raw vegetables and fruits with food poisoning. Many studies have shown that an essential feature of the pathogenicity of Salmonella is its capacity to cross a number of barriers requiring invasion of a large variety of cells and that the extent of internalization may be influenced by numerous factors. However, it is poorly understood how Salmonella successfully infects hosts as diversified as animals or plants. The aim of this review is to describe the different stages required for Salmonella interaction with its hosts: (i) attachment to host surfaces; (ii) entry processes; (iii) multiplication; (iv) suppression of host defense mechanisms; and to point out similarities and differences between animal and plant infections. PMID:25653644

  17. Salmonella - at home in the host cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti eMalik Kale

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica has developed an array of sophisticated tools to manipulate the host cell and establish an intracellular niche, for successful propagation as a facultative intracellular pathogen. While Salmonella exerts diverse effects on its host cell, only the cell biology of the classic trigger-mediated invasion process and the subsequent development of the Salmonella-containing vacuole have been investigated extensively. These processes are dependent on cohorts of effector proteins translocated into host cells by two type III secretion systems (T3SS, although T3SS-independent mechanisms of entry may be important for invasion of certain host cell-types. Recent studies into the intracellular lifestyle of Salmonella have provided new insights into the mechanisms used by this pathogen to modulate its intracellular environment. Here we discuss current knowledge of Salmonella-host interactions including invasion and establishment of an intracellular niche within the host.

  18. Salmonella investigation in an Ontario feed mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, W C; Mitchell, W R; Carlson, H C

    1978-01-01

    The frequency of Salmonella contamination of feedstuffs and finished broiler chicken feeds at an Ontario feed mill were investigated over a four-month period. Samples of feed ingredients and finished pelleted feeds were collected at various points during manufacture and cultured in trypticase soy broth prior to selective enrichment for isolation of Salmonella. Salmonella contamination was found in 4.3% of 93 finished pelleted broiler feeds examined. The contamination appeared to result primarily from the incorporation of contaminated animal protein ingredients into the feed. Meatmeal and the broiler, premix, which contained meatmeal as a filler, were most frequently contaminated followed by feather meal. Pelleting failed to eliminate the Salmonellae from the feeds. The methods used failed to detect Salmonella in the environment of the feed mill or its delivery trucks. Recommendations for control are made. PMID:369663

  19. Survival of Salmonella east bourne and Salmonella typhimurium in chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, S K; Beumer, R R; Kampelmacher, E H; van Leusden, F M

    1976-02-01

    Experiments were carried out to assess the reduction rate of two salmonella strains (S. eastbourne and S. typhimurium) in chocolate bars. After artificial contamination of chocolate, after 'conching', with about 10(6) S. eastbourne/g. this organism was still recovered after 9 months storage. The strain of S. typhimurium was less resistant. Both serotypes died off more rapidly in bitter chocolate than in milk chocolate. After contamination with a smaller dose (about 10(3)/g.) with these two serotypes, similar differences were observed.

  20. Salmonella infection upregulates the leaky protein claudin-2 in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-guo Zhang

    Full Text Available Tight junctions seal the space between adjacent epithelial cells. Mounting evidence suggests that tight junction proteins play a key role in the pathogenesis of human disease. Claudin is a member of the tight junction protein family, which has 24 members in humans. To regulate cellular function, claudins interact structurally and functionally with membrane and scaffolding proteins via their cytoplasmic domain. In particular, claudin-2 is known to be a leaky protein that contributes to inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. However, the involvement of claudin-2 in bacterial infection in the intestine remains unknown.We hypothesized that Salmonella elevates the leaky protein claudin-2 for its own benefit to facilitate bacterial invasion in the colon. Using a Salmonella-colitis mouse model and cultured colonic epithelial cells, we found that pathogenic Salmonella colonization significantly increases the levels of claudin-2 protein and mRNA in the intestine, but not that of claudin-3 or claudin-7 in the colon, in a time-dependent manner. Immunostaining studies showed that the claudin-2 expression along the crypt-villous axis postinfection. In vitro, Salmonella stimulated claudin-2 expression in the human intestinal epithelial cell lines SKCO15 and HT29C19A. Further analysis by siRNA knockdown revealed that claudin-2 is associated with the Salmonella-induced elevation of cell permeability. Epithelial cells with claudin-2 knockdown had significantly less internalized Salmonella than control cells with normal claudin-2 expression. Inhibitor assays demonstrated that this regulation is mediated through activation of the EGFR pathway and the downstream protein JNK.We have shown that Salmonella targets the tight junction protein claudin-2 to facilitate bacterial invasion. We speculate that this disruption of barrier function contributes to a new mechanism by which bacteria interact with their host cells and suggests the possibility of blocking

  1. Disruption of type III secretion in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by external guide sequences

    OpenAIRE

    McKinney, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Haifeng; Kubori, Tomoko; Galán, Jorge E.; Altman, Sidney

    2004-01-01

    The type III secretion system involved in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invasion of host cells has been disrupted using inducibly expressed oligonucleotide external guide sequences (EGSs) complementary to invB or invC mRNA. These EGSs direct single site cleavage in these mRNAs by endogenous RNase P, and their expression in Salmonella results in invC mRNA and InvC protein depletion, decreased type III secretion and interference with host cell invasion. Comparison of these effects wit...

  2. Recurrent meningitis due to Salmonella enteritidis: A case report from Kashmir India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B A Fomda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent bacterial meningitis in children is potentially life-threatening and induces psychological trauma to the patients through repeated hospitalization. Here we report a case of recurrent meningitis in a one month old baby. The CSF and blood culture grew Salmonella enteritidis. Injection ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were given for 3 weeks. Baby became symptomatically better and was afebrile at discharge. Twenty eight days after discharge baby got readmitted with complaints of fever and refusal of feeds. Blood and CSF culture again showed growth of Salmonella enteritidis. Physicians should be educated about the possibility of recurrence which may occur days or even weeks after apparent successful antibiotic treatment.

  3. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. III. Transfer of immunity with primed lymphocyte subpopulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T

    1990-01-01

    The protective effect of primed lymphocytes against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and euthymic LEW rats. Primed lymphocytes were obtained by inoculating euthymic and thymus-grafted animals with a non-lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium. Four weeks after...... as low as 10(4) cells from both euthymic or thymus-grafted animals were effective, and athymic and euthymic recipients survived equally well. Four weeks after the infection both athymic and euthymic animals housed very few bacteria and had high antibacterial antibody titres. The percentages of splenic...... and lymph node CD4+ cells in the athymic rats were comparable to those found in the euthymic animals. The study shows that primed CD4+ lymphocytes even in very low doses are able to induce immunity against a Salmonella typhimurium infection....

  4. Disruption of type III secretion in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by external guide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Jeffrey S; Zhang, Haifeng; Kubori, Tomoko; Galán, Jorge E; Altman, Sidney

    2004-01-01

    The type III secretion system involved in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invasion of host cells has been disrupted using inducibly expressed oligonucleotide external guide sequences (EGSs) complementary to invB or invC mRNA. These EGSs direct single site cleavage in these mRNAs by endogenous RNase P, and their expression in Salmonella results in invC mRNA and InvC protein depletion, decreased type III secretion and interference with host cell invasion. Comparison of these effects with those from studies of Salmonella invB and invC mutants suggests that invB EGSs have polar effects on invC mRNA.

  5. Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium as a Vaccine Vector for HIV-1 Gag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyasha Chin'ombe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains a global health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. An effective HIV-1 vaccine is therefore badly required to mitigate this ever-expanding problem. Since HIV-1 infects its host through the mucosal surface, a vaccine for the virus needs to trigger mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. Oral, attenuated recombinant Salmonella vaccines offer this potential of delivering HIV-1 antigens to both the mucosal and systemic compartments of the immune system. So far, a number of pre-clinical studies have been performed, in which HIV-1 Gag, a highly conserved viral antigen possessing both T- and B-cell epitopes, was successfully delivered by recombinant Salmonella vaccines and, in most cases, induced HIV-specific immune responses. In this review, the potential use of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a live vaccine vector for HIV-1 Gag is explored.

  6. COORDINATED VIRULENCE FACTORS OF ZOONOTIC PATHOGEN Salmonella Typhimurium ASSOCIATED WITH SYSTEMIC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermin Schadich

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available  The pivotal virulence factors of foodborne zoonotic pathogen Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium associated with pathogenesis of systemic disease of humans and mice are the effectors of type three secretion systems. They are encoded by genes located on two different gene clusters named Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2 and Salmonella plasmid virulence locus whose expressions are coordinated by regulatory networks in spatial and temporal manners. Secretion of the SPI-1 effectors required for bacterial internalization into specific compartments called Salmonella- containing vacuole (SCV of infected intestinal epithelial cells, is induced by environmental conditions via Hil transcription factors network. Secretion of SPI-2 and plasmid effectors required for bacterial survival inside of the SCVs of these cells and subsequently infected phagocytic cells, systemic spread, immunosuppression and cytotoxicity, is coordinated by broader regulatory network with the two response regulators, SsrB and SlyA, as the terminal regulators that integrate multiple environmental signals. Key words: Salmonella Typhimurium, effectors, virulence, systemic disease

  7. Nitric oxide antagonizes the acid tolerance response that protects Salmonella against innate gastric defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Bourret

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive nitrogen species (RNS derived from dietary and salivary inorganic nitrogen oxides foment innate host defenses associated with the acidity of the stomach. The mechanisms by which these reactive species exert antimicrobial activity in the gastric lumen are, however, poorly understood.The genetically tractable acid tolerance response (ATR that enables enteropathogens to survive harsh acidity was screened for signaling pathways responsive to RNS. The nitric oxide (NO donor spermine NONOate derepressed the Fur regulon that controls secondary lines of resistance against organic acids. Despite inducing a Fur-mediated adaptive response, acidified RNS largely repressed oral virulence as demonstrated by the fact that Salmonella bacteria exposed to NO donors during mildly acidic conditions were shed in low amounts in feces and exhibited ameliorated oral virulence. NO prevented Salmonella from mounting a de novo ATR, but was unable to suppress an already functional protective response, suggesting that RNS target regulatory cascades but not their effectors. Transcriptional and translational analyses revealed that the PhoPQ signaling cascade is a critical ATR target of NO in rapidly growing Salmonella. Inhibition of PhoPQ signaling appears to contribute to most of the NO-mediated abrogation of the ATR in log phase bacteria, because the augmented acid sensitivity of phoQ-deficient Salmonella was not further enhanced after RNS treatment.Since PhoPQ-regulated acid resistance is widespread in enteric pathogens, the RNS-mediated inhibition of the Salmonella ATR described herein may represent a common component of innate host defenses.

  8. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Molecular methods for serovar determination of Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chunlei; Singh, Pranjal; Ranieri, Matthew Louis; Wiedmann, Martin; Moreno Switt, Andrea Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella is a diverse foodborne pathogen, which has more than 2600 recognized serovars. Classification of Salmonella isolates into serovars is essential for surveillance and epidemiological investigations; however, determination of Salmonella serovars, by traditional serotyping, has some important limitations (e.g. labor intensive, time consuming). To overcome these limitations, multiple methods have been investigated to develop molecular serotyping schemes. Currently, molecular methods to predict Salmonella serovars include (i) molecular subtyping methods (e.g. PFGE, MLST), (ii) classification using serovar-specific genomic markers and (iii) direct methods, which identify genes encoding antigens or biosynthesis of antigens used for serotyping. Here, we reviewed reported methodologies for Salmonella molecular serotyping and determined the "serovar-prediction accuracy", as the percentage of isolates for which the serovar was correctly classified by a given method. Serovar-prediction accuracy ranged from 0 to 100%, 51 to 100% and 33 to 100% for molecular subtyping, serovar-specific genomic markers and direct methods, respectively. Major limitations of available schemes are errors in predicting closely related serovars (e.g. Typhimurium and 4,5,12:i:-), and polyphyletic serovars (e.g. Newport, Saintpaul). The high diversity of Salmonella serovars represents a considerable challenge for molecular serotyping approaches. With the recent improvement in sequencing technologies, full genome sequencing could be developed into a promising molecular approach to serotype Salmonella.

  10. Control of Salmonella enteritidis in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierup, M; Engström, B; Engvall, A; Wahlström, H

    1995-05-01

    The Swedish control of Salmonella, with special reference to Salmonella enteritidis, in poultry is described. The control is directed at all serotypes of Salmonella and imported grandparent chickens are controlled, which is considered to be the main reason why Sweden so far is not found to be involved in the worldwide spread of different phagetypes of S. enteritidis. However, this spread has initiated a more stringent control of Salmonella in layers as earlier existed in broilers. Since 1990, 90% of the layer flocks are voluntarily tested for Salmonella before slaughter by bacteriological examination of pooled faecal samples. If S. enteritidis is isolated the flock is destroyed. This test, and in addition two similar tests during the production are mandatory as of January 1st, 1994. The voluntary Salmonella control programme has also been extended to all of the layer parents and hatcheries since 1991. Only heat-treated feed is given to all layer chickens during the rearing period and its use is becoming gradually more common also during the production period. Since 1987, four layer flocks have been found to be infected by S. enteritidis phagetype 4 and one flock with phagetype 6. During 1970-1984, 90% of all flocks of broilers were voluntarily tested bacteriologically for Salmonella before slaughter, and since 1984 such a control is mandatory to all flocks. As a result of this and other controls, S. enteritidis has not been isolated from broilers since 1972. Based on a governmental regulation from 1961, introduced as a result of a large Salmonella epidemic in 1953, Sweden runs an active, official control of Salmonella (Wierup et al., 1992).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Occurrence of Salmonella sp in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gama NMSQ

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the presence of Salmonella sp in flocks of white laying hens. In different farms, the transport boxes of twelve flocks were inspected at arrival for the presence of Salmonella. Four positive (A, B, L and M and one negative (I flocks were monitored at each four weeks using bacteriological examination of cecal fresh feces up to 52 weeks. Birds were also evaluated at 52 weeks, when 500 eggs were taken randomly, and at 76 weeks, after forced molt. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and S. enterica rough strain were isolated from the transport boxes of the four positive flocks (flocks A, B, L and M. Salmonella sp was not isolated from the transport boxes or from the feces after 76 weeks-old in flock I. Salmonella sp was isolated in the 1st, 11th, 34th, 42nd and 76th weeks from flock A; in the 1st, 4th, 11th and 76th weeks from flock B; in the first week and in the 17th to 52nd weeks from flock L; and in the 1st and 76th weeks from flock M. S. Enteritidis, S. enterica rough strain and Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis were isolated from the four positive flocks. Besides, Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana was isolated from flocks B and L, and Salmonella enterica serovar Mbandaka was isolated from flock L. Eggs produced by flock A and by flock L were contaminated with S. Enteritidis and S. enterica rough strain. According to these results, Salmonella-infected flocks may produce contaminated eggs.

  12. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria and their surface lipids efficiently induced IL-17 production in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Bodil; Ridell, Malin; Wold, Agnes E

    2012-11-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is produced by a subset of CD4(+) T helper (Th) lymphocytes known as Th17 cells. In humans, IL-1β, enhanced by IL-6 and IL-23 is crucial for differentiation of these cells. IL-17 evokes inflammation and is involved in host defence against microorganisms, although little is known about its role in diseases caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria. The genus Mycobacterium contains both obligate and opportunistic pathogens as well as saprophytes, and the mycobacterial cell envelope is unique in its abundance of lipids. Here we investigated IL-17 and IL-23 production in human PBMC in response to intact UV-inactivated mycobacteria and mycobacterial surface lipids from two opportunistic (Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium abscessus) and one generally non-pathogenic (Mycobacterium gordonae) species. Representative Gram-positive (Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mitis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria were included as controls. Intact mycobacteria induced production of large amounts of IL-17, while IL-17 responses to control bacteria were negligible. Purified CD4(+) T cells, but not CD4-depleted cell fractions, produced this IL-17. Isolated mycobacterial surface lipids induced IL-17, but not IL-23 production. The ability of the non-tuberculous mycobacteria to induce IL-17 production in CD4(+) T cells was the same regardless of the pathogenic potential of the particular mycobacterial species. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Cirtical role for Salmonella effector SopB in regulating inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gui-Qiu; Song, Pei-Xuan; Chen, Wei; Qi, Shuai; Yu, Shui-Xing; Du, Chong-Tao; Deng, Xu-Ming; Ouyang, Hong-Sheng; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2017-10-01

    Salmonella is known to evolve many mechanisms to avoid or delay inflammasome activation which remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the SopB protein critical to bacteria virulence capacity was an effector that involved in the regulation of inflammasome activation. BMDMs from NLRC4-, NLRP3-, caspase-1/-11-, IFI16- and AIM2-deficient mice were pretreated with LPS, and subsequently stimulated with a series of SopB-related strains of Salmonella, inflammasome induced cell death, IL-1β secretion, cleaved caspase-1 production and ASC speckle formation were detected. We found that SopB could inhibit host IL-1β secretion, caspase-1 activation and inflammasome induced cell death using a series of SopB-related strains of Salmonella; however the reduction of IL-1β secretion was not dependent on sensor that contain PYD domain, such as NLRP3, AIM2 or IFI16, but dependent on NLRC4. Notably, SopB specifically prevented ASC oligomerization and the enzymatic activity of SopB was responsible for the inflammasome inhibition. Furthermore, inhibition of Akt signaling induced enhanced inflammasome activation. These results revealed a novel role in inhibition of NLRC4 inflammasome for Salmonella effector SopB. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Survival of Salmonella Newport in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christopher M; Armstrong, Alexandra E; Evans, Sanford; Mild, Rita M; Langdon, Christopher J; Joens, Lynn A

    2011-08-02

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of laboratory-confirmed foodborne illness in the United States and raw shellfish consumption is a commonly implicated source of gastrointestinal pathogens. A 2005 epidemiological study done in our laboratory by Brands et al., showed that oysters in the United States are contaminated with Salmonella, and in particular, a specific strain of the Newport serovar. This work sought to further investigate the host-microbe interactions between Salmonella Newport and oysters. A procedure was developed to reliably and repeatedly expose oysters to enteric bacteria and quantify the subsequent levels of bacterial survival. The results show that 10 days after an exposure to Salmonella Newport, an average concentration of 3.7 × 10(3)CFU/g remains within the oyster meat, and even after 60 days there still can be more than 10(2)CFU/g remaining. However, the strain of Newport that predominated in the market survey done by Brands et al. does not survive within oysters or the estuarine environment better than any other strains of Salmonella we tested. Using this same methodology, we compared Salmonella Newport's ability to survive within oysters to a non-pathogenic strain of E. coli and found that after 10 days the concentration of Salmonella was 200-times greater than that of E. coli. We also compared those same strains of Salmonella and E. coli in a depuration process to determine if a constant 120 L/h flux of clean seawater could significantly reduce the concentration of bacteria within oysters and found that after 3 days the oysters retained over 10(4)CFU/g of Salmonella while the oysters exposed to the non-pathogenic strain of E. coli contained 100-times less bacteria. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that any of the clinically relevant serovars of Salmonella can survive within oysters for significant periods of time after just one exposure event. Based on the drastic differences in survivability between Salmonella and a non

  15. Pleural Empyema due to Group D Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. Kam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-typhi Salmonella normally presents as a bacteremia, enterocolitis, and endovascular infection but rarely manifests as pleuropulmonary disease. We present a case of a 66-year-old female with underlying pulmonary pathology, secondary to an extensive smoking history, who presented with a left-sided pleural effusion. The causative agent was identified as being group D Salmonella. Decortication of the lung was performed and the patient was discharged on antibiotics with resolution of her symptoms. This case helps to support the inclusion of Salmonella group D as a possible etiological agent of infection in the differential causes of exudative pleural effusions.

  16. Trauma Associated Acute Navicular Salmonella Osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Sertan Kara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Akut osteomyelit tani ve tedavide gecikme olmasi durumunda yol acabilecegi olasi sekeller ve mortalite nedeniyle tahrip edici olabilecek bir hastaliktir. Navikula nadiren tutulur ve Salmonella turleri de saglikli cocuklarda akut osteomyelite neden olabilir. Burada 4 yasinda, daha once bilinen bir immun yetmezligi, orak hucreli anemisi, hic bir gastrointestinal yakinma ya da supheli besin tuketim oykusu olmayan, ancak ayak bilegi burkulma oykusu olan ve akut navikuler Salmonella osteomiyeliti tanisi konulan bir erkek cocuk olgusu sunulmustur. Hasta cerrahi gecirmeden ve komplikasyon gelismeden iyilesmistir. Travma, altta yatan hastaligi olmayan, saglikli cocuklarda Salmonella osteomyelitini kolaylastirabilmektedir. Uygun tani ve tedavi, akut osteomiyelitin komplikasyonlarini ve gerekebilecek bir cerrahi girisimi engelleyebilir.

  17. EU Interlaboratory comparison study VII on bacteriological detection of Salmonella spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver H; Nagelkerke NJD; van de Giessen AW; Mooijman KA; MGB; IMAR

    2005-01-01

    In 2003 werd door het Communautair Referentie Laboratorium voor Salmonella (CRL-Salmonella, Bilthoven, the Netherlands) het zevende bacteriologische ringonderzoek georganiseerd. Nationale Referentie Laboratoria voor Salmonella (NRL's-Salmonella) van de EU lidstaten (16), van NRL Noorwegen en

  18. Salmonella bongori provides insights into the evolution of the Salmonellae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fookes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The genus Salmonella contains two species, S. bongori and S. enterica. Compared to the well-studied S. enterica there is a marked lack of information regarding the genetic makeup and diversity of S. bongori. S. bongori has been found predominantly associated with cold-blooded animals, but it can infect humans. To define the phylogeny of this species, and compare it to S. enterica, we have sequenced 28 isolates representing most of the known diversity of S. bongori. This cross-species analysis allowed us to confidently differentiate ancestral functions from those acquired following speciation, which include both metabolic and virulence-associated capacities. We show that, although S. bongori inherited a basic set of Salmonella common virulence functions, it has subsequently elaborated on this in a different direction to S. enterica. It is an established feature of S. enterica evolution that the acquisition of the type III secretion systems (T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 has been followed by the sequential acquisition of genes encoding secreted targets, termed effectors proteins. We show that this is also true of S. bongori, which has acquired an array of novel effector proteins (sboA-L. All but two of these effectors have no significant S. enterica homologues and instead are highly similar to those found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC. Remarkably, SboH is found to be a chimeric effector protein, encoded by a fusion of the T3SS-1 effector gene sopA and a gene highly similar to the EPEC effector nleH from enteropathogenic E. coli. We demonstrate that representatives of these new effectors are translocated and that SboH, similarly to NleH, blocks intrinsic apoptotic pathways while being targeted to the mitochondria by the SopA part of the fusion. This work suggests that S. bongori has inherited the ancestral Salmonella virulence gene set, but has adapted by incorporating virulence determinants that resemble those employed by EPEC.

  19. Evaluation of a CHROMagar Salmonella Medium for the Isolation of Salmonella Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yesim cekin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Salmonella infections are the leading cause of food-borne infections and can cause gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. Salmonella species is defined as inability to lactose fermentation, using citrate as a carbon source, using lysine as nitrate source and forming Hydrogen sulfide (H2S in TSI agar. However, confirmation of false positive results is time consuming and lead to increased costs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of CHROMagar Salmonella (CHROMagar Microbiology, France which is developed for isolation and detection of Salmonella species. Material and Method: For this purpose, among a total of 148 isolates which were isolated from various clinical specimens and stocked at the Central Laboratory of Akdeniz University Hospital, 65 were Salmonella spp., 10 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were E. coli, 10 were Acinetobacter baumannii, 10 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 18 were Morganella morganii, 11 were Citrobacter spp., 5 were Providencia spp., 4 were Aeromonas spp., 5 were Proteus spp. were included in this study. All of the 65 Salmonella spp. isolates apperared with mauve colonies at the CHROMagar Salmonella. Results: E. coli and Klebsiella pnemoniae species were seen as blue, Providencia species were seen as pale-blue; Morganella morganii species were seen as pale-pink, mauve; and Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were seen as pale. Acinebacter baumannii and Aeromonas spp. species were also seen as mauve colonies. Dicussion: CHROMagar Salmonella medium can detect Salmonella species with %100 sensitivity, however there is a need to biochemical or serological confirmation.

  20. PREVALENCE OF SALMONELLA IN CAPTIVE REPTILES FROM CROATIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Maja; Pedersen, Karl; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella

    2015-06-01

    Salmonellosis transmitted by pet reptiles is an increasing public health issue worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella strains from captive reptiles in Croatia. From November 2009 to November 2011 a total of 292 skin, pharyngeal, cloacal, and fecal samples from 200 apparently healthy reptiles were tested for Salmonella excretions by bacteriologic culture and serotyping. These 200 individual reptiles included 31 lizards, 79 chelonians, and 90 snakes belonging to private owners or housed at the Zagreb Zoo, Croatia. Salmonella was detected in a total of 13% of the animals, among them 48.4% lizards, 8.9% snakes, and 3.8% turtles. Representatives of five of the six Salmonella enterica subspecies were identified with the following proportions in the total number of isolates: Salmonella enterica enterica 34.6%, Salmonella enterica houtenae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica arizonae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica diarizonae 15.4%, and Salmonella enterica salamae 3.8%. The 14 different serovars isolated included several rarely occurring serovars such as Salmonella Apapa, Salmonella Halle, Salmonella Kisarawe, and Salmonella Potengi. These findings confirm that the prevalence of Salmonella is considerable in captive reptiles in Croatia, indicating that these animals may harbor serovars not commonly seen in veterinary or human microbiologic practice. This should be addressed in the prevention and diagnostics of human reptile-transmitted infections.

  1. Division of the Salmonella-Containing Vacuole and Depletion of Acidic Lysosomes in Salmonella-Infected Host Cells Are Novel Strategies of Salmonella enterica To Avoid Lysosomes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M.; Negi, Vidya Devi; Chakraborty, Sangeeta; Chandrasekhar Sagar, B. K.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella has evolved several strategies to counteract intracellular microbicidal agents like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. However, it is not yet clear how Salmonella escapes lysosomal degradation. Some studies have demonstrated that Salmonella can inhibit phagolysosomal fusion, whereas other reports have shown that the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) fuses/interacts with lysosomes. Here, we have addressed this issue from a different perspective by investigating if the infected ...

  2. Inactivation of Salmonella Senftenberg, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Tennessee in peanut butter by 915 MHz microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Jae; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 915 MHz microwave with 3 different levels to inactivate 3 serovars of Salmonella in peanut butter. Peanut butter inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Tennessee were treated with a 915 MHz microwave with 2, 4 and 6 kW and acid and peroxide values and color changes were determined after 5 min of microwave heating. Salmonella populations were reduced with increasing treatment time and treatment power. Six kW 915 MHz microwave treatment for 5 min reduced these three Salmonella serovars by 3.24-4.26 log CFU/g. Four and two kW 915 MHz microwave processing for 5 min reduced these Salmonella serovars by 1.14-1.48 and 0.15-0.42 log CFU/g, respectively. Microwave treatment did not affect acid, peroxide, or color values of peanut butter. These results demonstrate that 915 MHz microwave processing can be used as a control method for reducing Salmonella in peanut butter without producing quality deterioration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Surveillance and management of salmonella food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainsworth, Terry

    Reports of Salmonella Montevideo in UK chocolate have put foodborne disease back in the headlines. This article looks at the nature, prevalence and management of this public health problem and highlights the importance of surveillance.

  4. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA SPECIES IN RIVER WATER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The survival of four Salmonella strains in river water microcosms was monitored using culturing techniques, direct counts, whole cell hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and resuscitation techniques via the direct viable count method and flow cytrometry. Plate counts of...

  5. antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of salmonella species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Empirical treatment for enteric fevers should, therefore, be discouraged while quinolones, cefepime, carbapenem, azithromycin and third generation cephalosporins be given preference. KEY WORDS: Susceptibility, Antimicrobial, Salmonella species, Enteric fever. INTRODUCTION. In the 21st century, enteric fever in the.

  6. A carbon nanotube immunosensor for Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell B. Lerner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-functionalized carbon nanotube devices have been suggested for use as bacterial detectors for monitoring of food purity in transit from the farm to the kitchen. Here we report progress towards that goal by demonstrating specific detection of Salmonella in complex nutrient broth solutions using nanotube transistors functionalized with covalently-bound anti-Salmonella antibodies. The small size of the active device region makes them compatible with integration in large-scale arrays. We find that the on-state current of the transistor is sensitive specifically to the Salmonella concentration and saturates at low concentration (<1000 cfu/ml. In contrast, the carrier mobility is affected comparably by Salmonella and other bacteria types, with no sign of saturation even at much larger concentrations (108 cfu/ml.

  7. Experimental reproduction of rotavirus and Salmonella pullorum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group A chicks were inoculated with 1 X 106 pfu/ml of rotavirus, group B chicks were inoculated with 1 X 106 cfu/ml of Salmonella pullorum, group C chicks were inoculated with 1 X 106 pfu/ml of rotavirus and 1 X 106 cfu/ml of Salmonella pullorum, while group D birds were given 1ml of PBS alone. Birds in all groups were ...

  8. Quantification of viable but nonculturable Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. during sludge anaerobic digestion and their reactivation during cake storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, B; Jiang, Q; Liu, H-B; Liu, H

    2015-10-01

    The presence of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) bacterial pathogens which often fail to be detected by cultivation and can regain the cultivability if the living conditions improve were reported. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of VBNC Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. in the biosolids during anaerobic digestion and its reactivation during the cake storage. The occurrence of VBNC Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. during mesophilic, temperature-phased, thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and the subsequent storage were studied by RT-qPCR and most probable number (MPN) method. The VBNC incidence of Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. during thermophilic digestion was four orders of magnitude higher than those of mesophilic digestion. Accordingly, higher resuscitation ratio of VBNC pathogens was also achieved in thermophilic digested sludge. As a result, the culturable Salmonella typhimurium contents in thermophilic digested sludge after cake storage were two orders of magnitude higher than mesophilic digestion. Both quantitative PCR and reverse transcription quantitative PCR assay results showed the two bacterial counting numbers remained stable throughout the cake storage. The results indicate that the increase in the culturable Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. after centrifugal dewatering was attributed to the resuscitation from the VBNC state to the culturable state. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion mainly induced Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. into VBNC state rather than killed them, suggesting that the biological safety of sewage sludge by temperature-phased anaerobic digestion should be carefully assessed. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Conservation of Salmonella infection mechanisms in plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Adam; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Bueso, Eduardo; Garcia, Ana V; Nilau, Theodora; Charrier, Amélie; Pelletier, Sandra; Menanteau, Pierrette; Baccarini, Manuela; Velge, Philippe; Hirt, Heribert

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella virulence in animals depends on effectors injected by Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs). In this report we demonstrate that Salmonella mutants that are unable to deliver effectors are also compromised in infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Transcriptome analysis revealed that in contrast to wild type bacteria, T3SS mutants of Salmonella are compromised in suppressing highly conserved Arabidopsis genes that play a prominent role during Salmonella infection of animals. We also found that Salmonella originating from infected plants are equally virulent for human cells and mice. These results indicate a high degree of conservation in the defense and infection mechanism of animal and plant hosts during Salmonella infection.

  10. Tentative Colistin Epidemiological Cut-Off Value for Salmonella spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Torpdahl, Mia; Zachariasen, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    . Interestingly, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Enteritidis belong to the same O-group (O:1, 9,12), suggesting that surface lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the cell (O-antigen) play a role in colistin susceptibility. The epidemiological cut-off value of >2 mg/L for colistin suggested by European Committee...... on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) is placed inside the distribution for both Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Enteritidis. All tested Salmonella Dublin isolates, regardless of MIC colistin value, had identical pmrA and pmrB sequences. Missense mutations were found only in pmrA in one Salmonella...

  11. Interactions of Salmonella enterica with lettuce leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupitski, Y; Pinto, R; Brandl, M T; Belausov, E; Sela, S

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the interactions of Salmonella enterica with abiotic and plant surfaces and their effect on the tolerance of the pathogen to various stressors. Salmonella strains were tested for their ability to form biofilm in various growth media using a polystyrene plate model. Strong biofilm producers were found to attach better to intact Romaine lettuce leaf tissue compared to weak producers. Confocal microscopy and viable count studies revealed preferential attachment of Salmonella to cut-regions of the leaf after 2 h at 25 degrees C, but not for 18 h at 4 degrees C. Storage of intact lettuce pieces contaminated with Salmonella for 9 days at 4 degrees C resulted only in small changes in population size. Exposure of lettuce-associated Salmonella cells to acidic conditions (pH 3.0) revealed increased tolerance of the attached vs planktonic bacteria. Biofilm formation on polystyrene may provide a suitable model to predict the initial interaction of Salmonella with cut Romaine lettuce leaves. Association of the pathogen with lettuce leaves facilitates its persistence during storage and enhances its acid tolerance. Understanding the interactions between foodborne pathogens and lettuce might be useful in developing new approaches to prevent fresh produce-associated outbreaks.

  12. Salmonella Vaccination in Pigs: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, A D; Davies, R H

    2017-02-01

    The control of Salmonella enterica in pig production is necessary for both public and animal health. The persistent and frequently asymptomatic nature of porcine Salmonella infection and the organism's abilities to colonize other animal species and to survive in the environment mean that effective control generally requires multiple measures. Vaccination is one such measure, and the present review considers its role and its future, drawing on studies in pigs from the 1950s to the present day. Once established in the body as an intracellular infectious agent, Salmonella can evade humoral immunity, which goes some way to explaining the often disappointing performance of inactivated Salmonella vaccines. More recent approaches, using mucosal presentation of antigens, live vaccines and adjuvants to enhance cell-mediated immunity, have met with more success. Vaccination strategies that involve stimulating both passive immunity from the dam plus active immunity in offspring appear to be most efficacious, although either approach alone can yield significant control of Salmonella. Problems that remain include relatively poor control of Salmonella serovars that are dissimilar to the vaccine antigen mix, and difficulties in measuring and predicting the performance of candidate vaccines in ways that are highly relevant to their likely use in commercial production. © 2016 Crown copyright. Zoonoses and Public Health published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.

  13. Expression of antimicrobial peptides in cecal tonsils of chickens treated with probiotics and infected with Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Haghighi, Hamid Reza; Chambers, James R; Brisbin, Jennifer; Read, Leah R; Sharif, Shayan

    2008-11-01

    Several strategies currently exist for control of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in the chicken intestine, among which the use of probiotics is of note. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of probiotic-mediated reduction of Salmonella colonization. In this study, we asked whether the effect of probiotics is mediated by antimicrobial peptides, including avian beta-defensins (also called gallinacins) and cathelicidins. Four treatment groups were included in this study: a negative-control group, a probiotic-treated group, a Salmonella-infected group, and a probiotic-treated and Salmonella-infected group. On days 1, 3, and 5 postinfection (p.i.), the cecal tonsils were removed, and RNA was extracted and used for measurement of avian beta-defensin 1 (AvBD1), AvBD2, AvBD4, AvBD6, and cathelicidin gene expression by real-time PCR. The expressions of all avian beta-defensins and cathelicidin were detectable in all groups, irrespective of treatment and time point. Probiotic treatment and Salmonella infection did not affect the expression of any of the investigated genes on day 1 p.i. Furthermore, probiotic treatment had no significant effect on the expression of the genes at either 3 or 5 days p.i. However, the expression levels of all five genes were significantly increased (P probiotics eliminated the effect of Salmonella infection on the expression of antimicrobial genes. These findings indicate that the expression of antimicrobial peptides may be repressed by probiotics in combination with Salmonella infection or, alternatively, point to the possibility that, due to a reduction in Salmonella load in the intestine, these genes may not be induced.

  14. Use of Carbapenems against clinical, nontyphoid Salmonella isolates: results from in vitro and in vivo animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Chi-Chung; Zhang, Chun-Cheng; Cheng, Kuo Chen; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Ku, Yee Huang; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chuang, Yin-Ching

    2012-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates has created the need for new therapeutic agents. We evaluated the intracellular activity of four carbapenem compounds against clinical nontyphoid Salmonella (NTS) isolates in vitro and ex vivo. Subsequently, the efficacy of carbapenem treatment against selected Salmonella isolates in vivo was assessed using a murine peritonitis model. The MIC(50) and MIC(90) for doripenem, ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem against 126 NTS isolates were found to be 0.062 and 0.062, 0.015 and 0.015, 0.5 and 1, and 0.031 and 0.031 μg/ml, respectively. The intracellular killing effect of ertapenem was sustained for 24 h and was superior to that of imipenem, meropenem, and doripenem; its effect was comparable to that of ceftriaxone. Ertapenem demonstrated an excellent pharmacokinetic profile with a percent time above the MIC of 75.5% and an area under the concentration-time curve/MIC ratio of 20,733. When peritoneal exudate cells were examined directly ex vivo from mice with Salmonella-induced peritonitis, cells from mice treated with ertapenem and ceftriaxone had intracellular and extracellular bacterial counts reduced 10(2)- to 10(4)-fold and exhibited killing effects similar to each other. The survival rates of mice inoculated with 1 × 10(5) and 10(6) CFU of a ceftriaxone-susceptible Salmonella isolate that were subsequently treated with ertapenem or ceftriaxone were 100% and 90%, respectively. When mice were inoculated with 5 × 10(4) and 10(5) CFU of a ceftriaxone-resistant and ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella isolate, mice treated with ertapenem had a higher survival rate than mice treated with ceftriaxone (70% versus 0% and 50% versus 0%, respectively; P Salmonella infections and show that further clinical investigations on the potential use of ertapenem in treatment of human Salmonella infections are warranted.

  15. NRL Salmonella ringonderzoek II: bacteriologische detectie van Salmonella in aanwezigheid van competitieve flora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt N; in ' t Veld PH; Nagelkerke N; van de Giessen AW; MGB

    1999-01-01

    In april 1998 werd een bacteriologisch ringonderzoek voor de detectie van Salmonella in aanwezigheid van stoorflora georganiseerd door het Nationaal Referentie Laboratorium (NRL) voor Salmonella (RIVM, Bilthoven). Aan het ringonderzoek werd deelgenomen door 23 laboratoria in het kader van het Plan

  16. Impact of litter Salmonella status during feed withdrawal on Salmonella recovery from the broiler crop and ceca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, R J; Bourassa, D V; Hinton, A; Fairchild, B D; Ritz, C W

    2017-12-01

    Research was conducted to evaluate the impact of litter Salmonella status during feed withdrawal on Salmonella recovery from the crop and ceca following feed withdrawal. In 4 experiments, pens of broilers in separate rooms were challenged with marker strains of either Salmonella Montevideo or Salmonella Heidelberg. Three d post challenge, a 12-hour feed withdrawal was initiated, and one pen of broilers was switched between rooms for each Salmonella serotype. In experiments 3 and 4, non-challenged broilers also were added to the Salmonella challenge pens. The litter of each pen was sampled before and after the feed withdrawal period, the broilers euthanized, and the crop and ceca aseptically removed for Salmonella isolation. Results showed that only the challenge Salmonella serotype was recovered from the litter in challenge pens where broilers were not moved, while both Salmonella serotypes were recovered from the litter of the switched pens. Salmonella was recovered from 56/80 crops and from 66/80 ceca of challenged broilers that remained in the challenge pens. The challenge Salmonella serotype was recovered from 50/80 crops and from 60/80 ceca, and the switched pens' litter Salmonella serotype was recovered from 19/80 crops but not from the ceca in broilers challenged with Salmonella and then switched between pens. For experiments 3 and 4, Salmonella was recovered from 19/40 crops and from only 2/40 ceca from the non-challenged broilers placed into the Salmonella challenge pens. The results from broilers that were switched between Salmonella challenge pens indicate that the recovery of Salmonella from the crop of broilers following feed withdrawal (on Salmonella-contaminated litter) appears to depend mainly on the initial challenge Salmonella (62%) and less on the litter Salmonella (24%) status during the feed withdrawal period. In contrast, only the initial challenge Salmonella was recovered from the ceca (79%) from broilers that remained in challenge pens or

  17. Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked to Raw Meal Organic Shake and Meal Products Recall & Advice to Consumers Case Count Maps Epi Curves ... Infections Associated with a Raw Scraped Ground Tuna Product Recall & Advice to Consumers Case Count Maps Epi Curves ...

  18. Protection against Salmonella typhi infection in mice after immunization with outer membrane proteins isolated from Salmonella typhi 9,12,d, Vi.

    OpenAIRE

    Isibasi, A.; ORTIZ,V; Vargas, M.; Paniagua, J; GONZÁLEZ, C.1,3; Moreno, J.; Kumate, J.

    1988-01-01

    The current studies were undertaken to assess the ability of the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Salmonella typhi to induce protection against challenge with the bacteria in mucin. OMPs were isolated as described by Schnaitman (J. Bacteriol. 108:553-556, 1971) and were found to be contaminated with approximately 4% lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Immunization with as little as 30 micrograms of OMPs conferred 100% protection to mice challenged with up to 1,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of two strain...

  19. Influence of On-farm pig Salmonella status on Salmonella Shedding at Slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Higes, A; Andrés-Barranco, S; Mainar-Jaime, R C

    2017-08-01

    The risk of Salmonella shedding among pigs at slaughter with regard to their previous on-farm Salmonella status was assessed in a group of pigs from a farm from NE of Spain. A total of 202 pigs that had been serologically monitored monthly during the fattening period and from which mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and faecal (SFEC) samples were collected at slaughter for Salmonella isolation were included. A repeated-measures anova was used to assess the relationship between mean OD% values during the fattening period and sampling time and bacteriology on MLN and SFEC. Pigs were also grouped into four groups, that is pigs seronegative during the fattening period and Salmonella negative in MLN (group A; n = 69); pigs seronegative during the fattening period but Salmonella positive in MLN (B; n = 36); pigs seropositive at least once and Salmonella positive in MLN (C; n = 50); and pigs seropositive at least once but Salmonella negative in (D; n = 47). Pigs shedding at slaughter seroconverted much earlier and showed much higher mean OD% values than non-shedders pigs. The proportion of Salmonella shedders in groups A and D was high and similar (26.1% and 29.8%, respectively), but significantly lower than that for groups B and C. The odds of shedding Salmonella for groups B and C were 4.8 (95% CI = 1.5-15.5) and 20.9 (3.7-118) times higher, respectively, when compared to A. It was concluded that a large proportion of Salmonella seronegative pigs may shed Salmonella at slaughter, which would be likely associated to previous exposure with contaminated environments (i.e. transport and lairage). For pigs already infected at farm, the likelihood of shedding Salmonella was much higher and may depend on whether the bacterium has colonized the MLN or not. The odds of shedding Salmonella spp. were always much higher for pigs in which Salmonella was isolated from MLN. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Innate Immune Detection of Flagellin Positively and Negatively Regulates Salmonella Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Marvin A.; Quarles, Ellen K.; López-Yglesias, Américo H.; Zhao, Xiaodan; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a flagellated bacterium and one of the leading causes of gastroenteritis in humans. Bacterial flagellin is required for motility and also a prime target of the innate immune system. Innate immune recognition of flagellin is mediated by at least two independent pathways, TLR5 and Naip5-Naip6/NlrC4/Caspase-1. The functional significance of each of the two independent flagellin recognition systems for host defense against wild type Salmonella infection is complex, and innate immune detection of flagellin contributes to both protection and susceptibility. We hypothesized that efficient modulation of flagellin expression in vivo permits Salmonella to evade innate immune detection and limit the functional role of flagellin-specific host innate defenses. To test this hypothesis, we used Salmonella deficient in the anti-sigma factor flgM, which overproduce flagella and are attenuated in vivo. In this study we demonstrate that flagellin recognition by the innate immune system is responsible for the attenuation of flgM− S. Typhimurium, and dissect the contribution of each flagellin recognition pathway to bacterial clearance and inflammation. We demonstrate that caspase-1 controls mucosal and systemic infection of flgM− S. Typhimurium, and also limits intestinal inflammation and injury. In contrast, TLR5 paradoxically promotes bacterial colonization in the cecum and systemic infection, but attenuates intestinal inflammation. Our results indicate that Salmonella evasion of caspase-1 dependent flagellin recognition is critical for establishing infection and that evasion of TLR5 and caspase-1 dependent flagellin recognition helps Salmonella induce intestinal inflammation and establish a niche in the inflamed gut. PMID:23977202

  1. Oral Delivery of a Novel Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Expressing Influenza A Virus Proteins Protects Mice against H5N1 and H1N1 Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenglin Pei

    Full Text Available Attenuated strains of invasive enteric bacteria, such as Salmonella, represent promising gene delivery agents for nucleic acid-based vaccines as they can be administrated orally. In this study, we constructed a novel attenuated strain of Salmonella for the delivery and expression of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus. We showed that the constructed Salmonella strain exhibited efficient gene transfer activity for HA and NA expression and little cytotoxicity and pathogenicity in mice. Using BALB/c mice as the model, we evaluated the immune responses and protection induced by the constructed Salmonella-based vaccine. Our study showed that the Salmonella-based vaccine induced significant production of anti-HA serum IgG and mucosal IgA, and of anti-HA interferon-γ producing T cells in orally vaccinated mice. Furthermore, mice orally vaccinated with the Salmonella vaccine expressing viral HA and NA proteins were completely protected from lethal challenge of highly pathogenic H5N1 as well as H1N1 influenza viruses while none of the animals treated with the Salmonella vaccine carrying the empty expression vector with no viral antigen expression was protected. These results suggest that the Salmonella-based vaccine elicits strong antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and provides effective immune protection against multiple strains of influenza viruses. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the feasibility of developing novel attenuated Salmonella strains as new oral vaccine vectors against influenza viruses.

  2. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M

    2015-07-15

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines.

  3. Immune Efficacy of Salmonella ohio Somatic antigen in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf Abdulrahman Yousif

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of Salmonella ohio Somatic antigen on humoral and cellular immunity in mice. Two groups of mice (thirty in each were used, first group was immunized twice at two weeks’ intervals subcutaneously (S/C with 0.5 ml of somatic antigen (prepared by heat inactivation of S. ohio containing 1×108C.F. U (protein content 200 µg; second group was injected S/C with phosphate buffer saline(PBS. Blood samples were collected at 2, 4, and 6 weeks post booster dose. Humoral immunity was detected by ELISA test, while cellular immunity detected by E. rosette and delayed type hypersensitivity test (DTH. The immunized and control mice groups were challenged with 5LD50 of virulent Salmonella ohio six weeks post booster dose. IgG was increased significantly (P<0.05 at 2, 4, and 6 weeks in the immunized group, and the maximum increase of antibody titers was determined at fourth week (651.7 ± 21.3 in comparison with the control group which remained within the normal value in all times of the experiment. E. rosette test showed a significantly increase in the mean of the activated lymphocyte of the immunized group at fourth week of immunization while control group gave normal range of active lymphocyte. In DTH test, immunized group showed a significant increase in footpad thickness after 24 hours post inoculation with soluble antigen in comparison with control group. Immunized mice were resist the challenge dose 5LD50 {5x (1.5x107} of virulent Salmonella ohio and all mice of control group died within (3- 4 days. In conclusion, immunization of mice with somatic S. ohio antigen was induced humoral and cellular immune response against Salmonellosis.

  4. Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Salmonella from Eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Salmonella and Eggs Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... can I reduce my chance of getting a Salmonella infection? Consider buying and using pasteurized eggs and ...

  5. Autophagy Facilitates Salmonella Replication in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong B.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Marchiando, Amanda M.; Ferreira, Rosana B. R.; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. PMID:24618251

  6. Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... year homemade ice cream causes several outbreaks of Salmonella infection with up to several hundred victims at ...

  7. Epidemiological Investigation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kedougou in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pornruangwong, Srirat; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Salmonella enterica serovar Kedougou is among the top 10 serovars reported in northern Thailand. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with Salmonella Kedougou infection in Thailand and to compare the molecular types and antimicrobial resistance with Salmo......Objective: Salmonella enterica serovar Kedougou is among the top 10 serovars reported in northern Thailand. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with Salmonella Kedougou infection in Thailand and to compare the molecular types and antimicrobial resistance.......023), region (northern Thailand; p factors associated with Salmonella Kedougou infection compared to other nontyphoid Salmonella. Of the Salmonella Kedougou isolates of human origin, 84% exhibited resistance to at least three antimicrobial classes...... association, whereas the majority of the animal isolates from United Kingdom clustered separately. Conclusions: This study reveals Salmonella Kedougou as a major cause of human infections in northern Thailand especially during the hot period and suggests a global spread probably due to travel. The clonal...

  8. Prevalence and antimicrobial profiles of Salmonella serovars from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and antimicrobial profiles of Salmonella serovars from ... Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed with 17 antimicrobial agents ... for specific Salmonella control program to be instituted as part of a national food safety strategy.

  9. Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens: Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    USDA), Athens, USA. Accepted 6 ... Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a food borne pathogen of humans causing food-poisoning .... Comparison of percent sero-positive hens per group and means of Salmonella.

  10. Test results of Salmonella typing by the NRLs-Salmonella in the Member States of the EU and the EnterNet Laboratories - Collaborative study VI on typing of Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver H; Raes M; Maas HME; Ward LR; Wannet WJB; Henken AM; MGB; LIS

    2002-01-01

    Test resultaten van Salmonella sero- en faagtypering en antimicrobiele gevoeligheidsbepalingen door de Nationale Referentie Laboratoria voor Salmonella in de Lidstaten van de Europese Unie en EnterNet Laboratoria: Ringonderzoek VI (2001) voor Salmonella. Een zesde ringonderzoek betreffende de

  11. Test results of Salmonella typing by the National Reference Laboratories for Salmonella in the Member States of the European Union and the EnterNet Laboratories - Collaborative study VII on typing of Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver H; Maas HME; Ward LR; Wannet WJB; Henken AM; MGB; LIS

    2003-01-01

    Het Communautair Referentie Laboratorium voor Salmonella (CRL-Salmonella, Bilthoven, Nederland) organiseerde in samenwerking met Public Health Laboratory Services (PHLS), London, Verenigd Koninkrijk een zevende ringonderzoek aangaande de typering van Salmonella. Zeventien Nationale Referentie

  12. Differential antibacterial response of chicken granulosa cells to invasion by Salmonella serovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Uma S; Harrison, Lisa M; Patel, Isha R; Ramirez, Gerardo A; Williams, Kristina M; Pereira, Marion; Balan, Kannan V

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis (SE) is among the leading bacterial cause of foodborne illness via consumption of raw or undercooked eggs. The top Salmonella serovars implicated in U.S. foodborne outbreaks associated with chicken consumption include SE, Typhimurium (ST), Heidelberg (SH), Montevideo, Mbandka, Braenderup, and Newport. While enforcement actions target the eradication of SE from layer hens, there is a growing concern that other serovars could occupy this niche and be a cause of egg-transmitted human salmonellosis. Therefore, we tested the invasion and survival of SE, SH, ST, and Salmonella enterica ser. Hadar (S. Hadar) at 4 and 20 h post infection (hpi) in chicken ovarian granulosa cells (cGC); a cellular layer which surrounds the previtelline layer and central yolk in egg-forming follicles. We also evaluated cGC transcriptional changes, using an antibacterial response PCR array, to assess host response to intracellular SalmonellaWe observed that invasion of cGC by SE, SH, and ST was significantly higher than invasion by S. Hadar, with ST showing the highest level of invasion. The Bacterial Survival Index, defined as the ratio of intracellular bacteria at 20 and 4 h, were 18.94, 7.35, and 15.27 for SE, SH, and ST, respectively, with no significant difference in survival between SE or ST compared to SH. Evaluation of cGC anti-Salmonella gene responses indicated that at 4 hpi there was a significant decrease in Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mRNA in cGC infected with SE, whereas TLR5 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 were significantly down regulated across all serovars. At 4 hpi, invasion by Salmonella serovars resulted in significant upregulation of several antimicrobial genes, and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (PICs). At 20 hpi, all the serovars induced PICs with SH being the strongest inducer. Additionally, SE, SH and ST differentially induced signal transduction pathways. Although only a single

  13. Evaluation of VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) easy Salmonella method for the detection of Salmonella in a variety of foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Erin; Bird, Patrick; Fisher, Kiel; Goetz, Katherine; Benzinger, M Joseph; Agin, James; Goins, David; Johnson, Ronald L

    2011-01-01

    The VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) Easy Salmonella method is a specific enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay performed in the automated VIDAS instrument. The VIDAS Easy Salmonella method is a simple 2-step enrichment procedure, using pre-enrichment followed by selective enrichment in a newly formulated broth, SX2 broth. This new method was compared in a multilaboratory collaborative study to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 5 method for five food matrixes (liquid egg, vanilla ice cream, spinach, raw shrimp, and peanut butter) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook 4.04 method for deli turkey. Each food type was artificially contaminated with Salmonella at three inoculation levels. A total of 15 laboratories representing government, academia, and industry, throughout the United States, participated. In this study, 1583 samples were analyzed, of which 792 were paired replicates and 791 were unpaired replicates. Of the 792 paired replicates, 285 were positive by both the VIDAS and reference methods. Of the 791 unpaired replicates, 341 were positive by the VIDAS method and 325 were positive by the cultural reference method. A Chi-square analysis of each of the six food types was performed at the three inoculation levels tested. For all foods evaluated, the VIDAS Easy SLM method demonstrated results comparable to those of the reference methods for the detection of Salmonella.

  14. The type VI secretion system encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 19 is required for Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum survival within infected macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Carlos J; Jiménez, Juan C; Leiva, Lorenzo E; Alvarez, Sergio A; Pinto, Bernardo I; Contreras, Francisca; Pezoa, David; Santiviago, Carlos A; Contreras, Inés

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum is the causative agent of fowl typhoid, a disease characterized by high morbidity and mortality that causes major economic losses in poultry production. We have reported that S. Gallinarum harbors a type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 19 (SPI-19) that is required for efficient colonization of chicks. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the SPI-19 T6SS functionality and to investigate the mechanisms behind the phenotypes previously observed in vivo. Expression analyses revealed that SPI-19 T6SS core components are expressed and produced under in vitro bacterial growth conditions. However, secretion of the structural/secreted components Hcp1, Hcp2, and VgrG to the culture medium could not be determined, suggesting that additional signals are required for T6SS-dependent secretion of these proteins. In vitro bacterial competition assays failed to demonstrate a role for SPI-19 T6SS in interbacterial killing. In contrast, cell culture experiments with murine and avian macrophages (RAW264.7 and HD11, respectively) revealed production of a green fluorescent protein-tagged version of VgrG soon after Salmonella uptake. Furthermore, infection of RAW264.7 and HD11 macrophages with deletion mutants of SPI-19 or strains with genes encoding specific T6SS core components (clpV and vgrG) revealed that SPI-19 T6SS contributes to S. Gallinarum survival within macrophages at 20 h postuptake. SPI-19 T6SS function was not linked to Salmonella-induced cytotoxicity or cell death of infected macrophages, as has been described for other T6SS. Our data indicate that SPI-19 T6SS corresponds to a novel tool used by Salmonella to survive within host cells.

  15. Detection and classification of salmonella serotypes using spectral signatures collected by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spectral signatures of Salmonella serotypes namely Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky were collected using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). About 5-10 µL of Salmonella suspensions with concentrations of 1...

  16. The dark side of the salad: Salmonella typhimurium overcomes the innate immune response of Arabidopsis thaliana and shows an endopathogenic lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Adam; Carreri, Alessandro; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Hirt, Heribert

    2008-05-28

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium contaminated vegetables and fruits are considerable sources of human infections. Bacteria present in raw plant-derived nutrients cause salmonellosis, the world wide most spread food poisoning. This facultative endopathogen enters and replicates in host cells and actively suppresses host immune responses. Although Salmonella survives on plants, the underlying bacterial infection mechanisms are only poorly understood. In this report we investigated the possibility to use Arabidopsis thaliana as a genetically tractable host system to study Salmonella-plant interactions. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) marked bacteria, we show here that Salmonella can infect various Arabidopsis tissues and proliferate in intracellular cellular compartments. Salmonella infection of Arabidopsis cells can occur via intact shoot or root tissues resulting in wilting, chlorosis and eventually death of the infected organs. Arabidopsis reacts to Salmonella by inducing the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades and enhanced expression of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. The induction of defense responses fails in plants that are compromised in ethylene or jasmonic acid signaling or in the MKK3-MPK6 MAPK pathway. These findings demonstrate that Arabidopsis represents a true host system for Salmonella, offering unique possibilities to study the interaction of this human pathogen with plants at the molecular level for developing novel drug targets and addressing current safety issues in human nutrition.

  17. Ultra-Fast and Sensitive Detection of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Using Microwave-Accelerated Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (“MAMEF”)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, James E.; Geddes, Chris D.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Certain serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica cause invasive disease (e.g., enteric fever, bacteremia, septicemia, meningitis, etc.) in humans and constitute a global public health problem. A rapid, sensitive diagnostic test is needed to allow prompt initiation of therapy in individual patients and for measuring disease burden at the population level. An innovative and promising new rapid diagnostic technique is microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF). We have adapted this assay platform to detect the chromosomal oriC locus common to all Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovars. We have shown efficient lysis of biologically relevant concentrations of Salmonella spp. suspended in bacteriological media using microwave-induced lysis. Following lysis and DNA release, as little as 1 CFU of Salmonella in 1 ml of medium can be detected in Salmonella serovars Typhi, Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, Paratyphi C, Typhimurium, Enteritidis and Choleraesuis but does not detect Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae or Acinetobacter baumanii. We have also performed preliminary experiments using a synthetic Salmonella oriC oligonucleotide suspended in whole human blood and observed rapid detection when the sample was diluted 1∶1 with PBS. These pre-clinical data encourage progress to the next step to detect Salmonella in blood (and other ordinarily sterile, clinically relevant body fluids). PMID:21494634

  18. The dark side of the salad: Salmonella typhimurium overcomes the innate immune response of Arabidopsis thaliana and shows an endopathogenic lifestyle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Schikora

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium contaminated vegetables and fruits are considerable sources of human infections. Bacteria present in raw plant-derived nutrients cause salmonellosis, the world wide most spread food poisoning. This facultative endopathogen enters and replicates in host cells and actively suppresses host immune responses. Although Salmonella survives on plants, the underlying bacterial infection mechanisms are only poorly understood. In this report we investigated the possibility to use Arabidopsis thaliana as a genetically tractable host system to study Salmonella-plant interactions. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP marked bacteria, we show here that Salmonella can infect various Arabidopsis tissues and proliferate in intracellular cellular compartments. Salmonella infection of Arabidopsis cells can occur via intact shoot or root tissues resulting in wilting, chlorosis and eventually death of the infected organs. Arabidopsis reacts to Salmonella by inducing the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades and enhanced expression of pathogenesis related (PR genes. The induction of defense responses fails in plants that are compromised in ethylene or jasmonic acid signaling or in the MKK3-MPK6 MAPK pathway. These findings demonstrate that Arabidopsis represents a true host system for Salmonella, offering unique possibilities to study the interaction of this human pathogen with plants at the molecular level for developing novel drug targets and addressing current safety issues in human nutrition.

  19. A Review of Temperature, pH, and Other Factors that Influence the Survival of Salmonella in Mayonnaise and Other Raw Egg Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilini Piushani Keerthirathne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is one of the main causes of foodborne illnesses worldwide, with outbreaks predominately linked to contamination of eggs and raw egg products, such as mayonnaise. This review explores previous studies that have investigated Salmonella control mechanisms utilized in the production of raw egg mayonnaise and other food products. Apart from the use of pasteurized eggs, the main control mechanism identified is the pH of the raw egg products, which plays an important role in the consistency and stability while affecting the survival of Salmonella spp. However, currently there is no consensus regarding the critical pH limit for the control of Salmonella. The effectiveness of pH as a control mechanism is influenced by the type of acid used, with the effectiveness of lemon juice compared with vinegar highly debated. Additionally, Salmonella susceptibility to pH stresses may also be influenced by storage temperature (in some studies refrigeration temperatures protected Salmonella spp. from acidulants and is further complicated by the development of Salmonella cross-tolerance-induced responses, pH homeostasis achieved by the cellular antiport and symport systems, and acid tolerance response (ATR. These mechanisms all provide Salmonella with an added advantage to ensure survival under various pH conditions. Other confounding factors include the fat content, and the addition of NaCl, garlic and plant essential oils (PEOs from mint, cinnamon, cardamom and clove.

  20. Extended Spectrum Beta-lactam Resistance among Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella is an important food bourn pathogen capable of infecting both humans and animals. One of the most effective treatments for Salmonella infections is beta-lactam antibiotics, particularly extended spectrum beta-lactams; however, Salmonella resistant to these antibiotics have been recovered ...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salmonella spp. serological reagents. 866.3550... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3550 Salmonella spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Salmonella spp. serological reagents are devices that...

  2. 76 FR 16425 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella Species... availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Testing for Salmonella Species in Human Foods and... and other persons who are covered by FDA's final rule ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell...

  3. 76 FR 81513 - Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis... availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During... with certain provisions contained in FDA's final rule ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell...

  4. 9 CFR 113.30 - Detection of Salmonella contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of Salmonella contamination... REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.30 Detection of Salmonella contamination. The test for detection of Salmonella contamination provided in this section shall be conducted when such a test is prescribed in an...

  5. 78 FR 42451 - Animal Feeds Contaminated With Salmonella Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 500 Animal Feeds Contaminated With Salmonella... Administration (FDA or Agency) is revoking an advisory opinion on animal feeds contaminated with Salmonella... enforcement strategy articulated in a final compliance policy guide (CPG) on Salmonella in food for animals...

  6. Characterization of a multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica give ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salmonella enterica Give is one of the serotypes that have been incriminated in Salmonella infections; sometimes associated with hospitalization and mortalities in humans and animals in some parts of the world. In this work, we characterized one Salmonella Give isolated from cloaca swab of an Agama agama lizard ...

  7. Biofilm formation of Salmonella species isolated from fresh cabbage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to isolate Salmonella from fresh cabbage and spinach vegetables, determine antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation of the isolates. Spinach and cabbage farm vegetables were found to harbour Salmonella. A total of eighty-two Salmonella isolates were recovered from both vegetables and ...

  8. Mechanism of Salmonella reduction in fermented pig feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winsen, van R.L.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Biesterveld, S.; Urlings, B.A.P.; Snijders, J.M.A.; Knapen, van F.

    2001-01-01

    To protect consumers from Salmonella infection acquired through the consumption of pork meat, it is necessary to eradicate Salmonella from pork. In order to achieve this, the whole pork production chain should be free from Salmonella, including the pigs at the farm. In epidemiological studies it was

  9. Salmonella in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in southern Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Claire; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Janecko, Nicol; Allan, Mike; McEwen, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    Numerous serotypes of Salmonella have been detected in a variety of wild animals, including raccoons (Procyon lotor). Raccoons are common, mid-size omnivores that live in close association with people in urban and rural areas in Ontario. Although raccoons are known to shed Salmonella, little is known about their potential long-term role in maintaining Salmonella infections. We sampled feces from raccoons in three areas of Ontario: one primarily urban site around Niagara, one primarily rural site north of Guelph, and the grounds of the Toronto Zoo, in 2007 to identify which serotypes of Salmonella were commonly shed by raccoons in southern Ontario. In addition, we conducted a longitudinal study at the Toronto Zoo site to determine if raccoons remain persistently infected with Salmonella. Salmonella was found in 45% of samples. The prevalence of Salmonella in raccoon feces ranged from 27% at the rural site to 65% at the urban site. We detected 16 serotypes of Salmonella in 83 positive samples. The most common serotype detected in raccoons from the rural and zoo sites was Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, whereas Salmonella Newport was detected most commonly in the urban site. Only one raccoon of 11 that were captured in four or more consecutive trapping sessions shed the same Salmonella serotype for two consecutive months, suggesting that raccoons regularly acquire new Salmonella serotypes from the environment.

  10. Molecular detection of salmonella species from selected vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular detection of salmonella species from selected vegetables sold in a north-central Nigerian setting. ... This finding shows that virulent Salmonella strains pose a major health hazard and public health concern to the affected population. Our study shows that there is a high prevalence rate of virulent Salmonella ...

  11. Resistance of broiler outbred lines to infection with Salmonella enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, N.M.; Janss, L.L.G.; Putirulan, F.F.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Salmonella infections originating from poultry are one of the major causes of food-borne disease. For the control of salmonella in poultry a multifactorial approach is more likely to be effective, and the genetic resistance of poultry breeds to salmonella infections may be a valuable contribution.

  12. Salmonella serovars in the herpetofauna of Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David L; Hulse, Arthur C

    2006-05-01

    Herpetofaunal Salmonella enterica serovars have not been fully examined in any U.S. region. Thirty-three Salmonella serovars were isolated from 156 samples from 34 species, all within Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Results suggest that herpetofaunas could potentially pose a threat to humans. Further understanding of Salmonella in herpetofaunas may prevent future human cases.

  13. Salmonella surrogate reduction using industrial peanut dry roasting parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of industrial peanut dry roasting parameters in Salmonella reduction using a Salmonella surrogate, Enterococcus faecium, which is slightly more heat tolerant than Salmonella. Runner-type peanuts were inoculated with E. faecium and roasted in a lab...

  14. Characterization of a Multidrug Resistant Salmonella Enterica Give ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. Salmonella enterica Give is one of the serotypes that have been incriminated in Salmonella infections; sometimes associated with hospitalization and mortalities in humans and animals in some parts of the world. In this work, we characterized one. Salmonella Give isolated from cloaca swab of an Agama ...

  15. Characterizing Salmonella Contamination in Two Rendering Processing Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Jiang, Xiuping

    2017-02-01

    A microbiological investigation on Salmonella contamination was conducted in two U.S. rendering plants to investigate the potential cross-contamination of Salmonella in the rendering processing environment. Sampling locations were predetermined at the areas where Salmonella contamination may potentially occur, including raw materials receiving, crax (rendered materials before grinding process) grinding, and finished meal loading-out areas. Salmonella was either enumerated directly on xylose lysine Tergitol 4 agar plates or enriched in Rappaport-Vassiliadis and tetrathionate broths. The presumptive Salmonella isolates were confirmed using CHROMagar plating and latex agglutination testing and then characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, serotyping, and biofilm-forming determination. Among 108 samples analyzed, 79 (73%) samples were Salmonella positive after enrichment. Selected Salmonella isolates (n = 65) were assigned to 31 unique pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, with 16 Salmonella serotypes, including Typhimurium and Mbandaka, identified as predominant serotypes and 10 Salmonella strains determined as strong biofilm formers. Our results indicated that the raw materials receiving area was the primary source of Salmonella and that the surfaces surrounding crax grinding and finished meal loading-out areas harbor Salmonella in biofilms that may recontaminate the finished meals. The same Salmonella serotypes found in both raw materials receiving and the finished meal loading-out areas suggested a potential of cross-contamination between different areas in the rendering processing environment.

  16. Effects of broiler feed medications on Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Victoriya V; Hubbard, Sue Ann; Magee, Danny L; Byrd, J Allen; Bailey, Richard H; Wills, Robert W

    2013-09-01

    This pilot analysis was conducted with data from 52 conventional grow-out broiler flocks in a prospective field observational study in the southeastern United States during 2003-2006. Each flock was sampled for Salmonella 1 wk before the end of grow-out, upon arrival at the processing plant, and during processing (prior to and immediately after carcass chilling). The broiler litter was sampled on the day of bird harvest. The grow-out feeding programs, including the medications delivered in feed, were surveyed with questionnaires completed by the broiler managers and feedmill managers. Each detail of the feeding program was tested for statistical association with the frequency of Salmonella in the flock at each sampling point, after accounting for variation in Salmonella frequency between the farms, broiler complexes, and companies. Significant associations were found between Salmonella frequency in the broiler flock pre- and postharvest and the inclusion of feeds containing individual coccidiostats and other antimicrobial growth promoters, days on feed, and total consumption of feeds containing these products, as well as with practices such as a mash feed and a nonmedicated withdrawal feed. The analysis provided testable hypotheses for how broiler feed medications impact the frequency of Salmonella in the flocks.

  17. Salmonella and Eggs: From Production to Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Whiley

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella contamination of eggs and egg shells has been identified as a public health concern worldwide. A recent shift in consumer preferences has impacted on the egg industry, with a push for cage-free egg production methods. There has also been an increased desire from consumers for raw and unprocessed foods, potentially increasing the risk of salmonellosis. In response to these changes, this review explores the current literature regarding Salmonella contamination of eggs during the production processing through to food handling protocols. The contamination of eggs with Salmonella during the production process is a complex issue, influenced by many variables including flock size, flock age, stress, feed, vaccination, and cleaning routines. Currently there is no consensus regarding the impact of caged, barn and free range egg production has on Salmonella contamination of eggs. The literature regarding the management and control strategies post-collection, during storage, transport and food handling is also reviewed. Pasteurisation and irradiation were identified as the only certain methods for controlling Salmonella and are essential for the protection of high risk groups, whereas control of temperature and pH were identified as potential control methods to minimise the risk for foods containing raw eggs; however, further research is required to provide more detailed control protocols and education programs to reduce the risk of salmonellosis from egg consumption.

  18. Heat Survival and Phenotype Microarray Profiling of Salmonella Typhimurium Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoud, Turki M; Khatiwara, Anita; Park, Si Hong; Davis, Morgan L; Baker, Christopher A; Ricke, Steven C; Kwon, Young Min

    2017-02-01

    Contamination of food products by pathogenic microorganisms continues to be a major public health and food industry concern. Non-typhoidal Salmonella species have led to numerous outbreaks associated with various foods. A wide variety of methods have been applied and introduced for treatment of fresh foods to eliminate pathogenic as well as spoilage microorganisms. Salmonella can become exposed to elevated temperatures while associated with hosts such as poultry. In addition, heat treatment is also applied at various stages of processing to retain the shelf life of food products. Despite this, these microorganisms may overcome exposure to such treatments through the efficient expression of stress response mechanisms and result in illness following consumption. Thermal stress induces a range of destructive exposures to bacterial cells such as protein damage and DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species. In this study, we chose three genes (∆recD, ∆STM14_5307, and ∆aroD) associated with conditionally essential genes required for different aspects of optimal growth at 42 °C and evaluated the responses of wild type and mutant Salmonella Typhimurium strains to uncover potential mechanisms that may enable survival and resistance under thermal stress. The RecBCD complex that initiates repair of double-stranded DNA breaks through homologous recombination. STM14_5307 is a transcriptional regulator involved in stationary phase growth and inositol metabolism. The gene aroD is involved in metabolism and stationary phase growth. These strains were characterized via high throughput phenotypic profiling in response to two different growth temperatures (37 °C (human host temperature) and 42 °C (poultry host temperature)). The ∆aroD strain exhibited the highest sensitivity to the various temperatures followed by the ∆recD and ∆STM14_5307 strains, respectively. Achieving more understanding of the molecular mechanisms of heat survival may lead to the development

  19. Intestinal barrier function in response to abundant or depleted mucosal glutathione in Salmonella-infected rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vink Carolien

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione, the main antioxidant of intestinal epithelial cells, is suggested to play an important role in gut barrier function and prevention of inflammation-related oxidative damage as induced by acute bacterial infection. Most studies on intestinal glutathione focus on oxidative stress reduction without considering functional disease outcome. Our aim was to determine whether depletion or maintenance of intestinal glutathione changes susceptibility of rats to Salmonella infection and associated inflammation. Rats were fed a control diet or the same diet supplemented with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO; glutathione depletion or cystine (glutathione maintenance. Inert chromium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (CrEDTA was added to the diets to quantify intestinal permeability. At day 4 after oral gavage with Salmonella enteritidis (or saline for non-infected controls, Salmonella translocation was determined by culturing extra-intestinal organs. Liver and ileal mucosa were collected for analyses of glutathione, inflammation markers and oxidative damage. Faeces was collected to quantify diarrhoea. Results Glutathione depletion aggravated ileal inflammation after infection as indicated by increased levels of mucosal myeloperoxidase and interleukin-1β. Remarkably, intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation were not increased. Cystine supplementation maintained glutathione in the intestinal mucosa but inflammation and oxidative damage were not diminished. Nevertheless, cystine reduced intestinal permeability and Salmonella translocation. Conclusion Despite increased infection-induced mucosal inflammation upon glutathione depletion, this tripeptide does not play a role in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation and diarrhoea. On the other hand, cystine enhances gut barrier function by a mechanism unlikely to be related to glutathione.

  20. Test results of Salmonella serotyping in the Member States of the European Union. (Collaborative study III amongst the National Reference Laboratories for Salmonella)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt N; Maas HME; Leeuwen WJ van; Henken AM; MGB

    1998-01-01

    Het Communautair Referentie Laboratorium (CRL) voor Salmonella heeft een derde ringonderzoek voor de serotypering van Salmonella georganiseerd. Alle Nationale Referentie Laboratoria (NRLs) voor Salmonella van de Europese Unie deden aan het onderzoek mee. Het belangrijkste doel was het

  1. The detection of antibodies against Salmonella Enteritidis in reference materials using a LPS ELISA ; A collaborative study amongst the National Reference Laboratories for Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt N; Dufrenne JB; Nagelkerke N; Veld PH in' t; Henken AM; MGB

    1997-01-01

    Het Communautair Referentie Laboratorium voor Salmonella (CRL) heeft een ringonderzoek georganiseerd waarin een immunologische methode voor het aantonen van antilichamen tegen Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) werd uitgevoerd en waaraan alle Nationale Referentie Laboratoria voor Salmonella (NRLs)

  2. Salmonella typhimurium activates virulence gene transcription within acidified macrophage phagosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpuche Aranda, C M; Swanson, J A; Loomis, W P; Miller, S I

    1992-01-01

    Survival of Salmonella typhimurium within macrophage phagosomes requires the coordinate expression of bacterial gene products. This report examines the contribution of phagosomal pH as a signal for expression of genes positively regulated by the S. typhimurium virulence regulators PhoP and PhoQ. Several hours after bacterial phagocytosis by murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, PhoP-activated gene transcription increased 50- to 77-fold. In contrast, no difference in PhoP-activated gene expression was observed after infection of cultured epithelial cells, suggesting that the membrane sensor PhoQ recognized signals unique to macrophage phagosomes. The increase in PhoP-regulated gene expression was abolished when macrophage culture medium contained NH4Cl or chloroquine, weak bases that raise the pH of acidic compartments. Measurements of pH documented that S. typhimurium delayed and attenuated acidification of its intracellular compartment. Phagosomes containing S. typhimurium required 4-5 hr to reach pH < 5.0. In contrast, within 1 hr vacuoles containing heat-killed bacteria were measured at pH < 4.5. The eventual acidification of phagosomes to pH < 5.0 correlated with the period of maximal PhoP-dependent gene expression. These observations implicate phagosome acidification as an intracellular inducer of PhoP-regulated gene expression and suggest that Salmonella survival is dependent on its ability to attenuate phagosome acidification. Images PMID:1438196

  3. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the Salmonella-lettuce interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuping; Nandakumar, Renu; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Snow, Daniel D; Hodges, Laurie; Li, Xu

    2014-11-01

    Human pathogens can internalize food crops through root and surface uptake and persist inside crop plants. The goal of the study was to elucidate the global modulation of bacteria and plant protein expression after Salmonella internalizes lettuce. A quantitative proteomic approach was used to analyse the protein expression of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis and lettuce cultivar Green Salad Bowl 24 h after infiltrating S. Infantis into lettuce leaves. Among the 50 differentially expressed proteins identified by comparing internalized S. Infantis against S. Infantis grown in Luria Broth, proteins involved in glycolysis were down-regulated, while one protein involved in ascorbate uptake was up-regulated. Stress response proteins, especially antioxidant proteins, were up-regulated. The modulation in protein expression suggested that internalized S. Infantis might utilize ascorbate as a carbon source and require multiple stress response proteins to cope with stresses encountered in plants. On the other hand, among the 20 differentially expressed lettuce proteins, proteins involved in defense response to bacteria were up-regulated. Moreover, the secreted effector PipB2 of S. Infantis and R proteins of lettuce were induced after bacterial internalization into lettuce leaves, indicating human pathogen S. Infantis triggered the defense mechanisms of lettuce, which normally responds to plant pathogens. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Impact of litter salmonella status during feed withdrawal on salmonella recovery from the broiler crop and ceca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research was conducted to evaluate the impact of litter Salmonella status during feed withdrawal on Salmonella recovery from the crop and ceca following feed withdrawal. In 4 experiments, pens of broilers in separate rooms were challenged with marker strains of either Salmonella Montevideo or Salmon...

  5. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  6. The Salmonella effector SteA binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate for subcellular targeting within host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Lia; Ismail, Ahmad; Charro, Nuno; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Holden, David W; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Mota, Luís Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The function of these effectors depends on their localization within infected cells, but the mechanisms determining subcellular targeting of each effector are mostly elusive. Here, we show that the Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA binds specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Ectopically expressed SteA localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of eukaryotic cells. However, SteA was displaced from the PM of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mutants unable to synthesize the local pool of PI(4)P and from the PM of HeLa cells after localized depletion of PI(4)P. Moreover, in infected cells, bacterially translocated or ectopically expressed SteA localized at the membrane of the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) and to Salmonella-induced tubules; using the PI(4)P-binding domain of the Legionella type IV secretion effector SidC as probe, we found PI(4)P at the SCV membrane and associated tubules throughout Salmonella infection of HeLa cells. Both binding of SteA to PI(4)P and the subcellular localization of ectopically expressed or bacterially translocated SteA were dependent on a lysine residue near the N-terminus of the protein. Overall, this indicates that binding of SteA to PI(4)P is necessary for its localization within host cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Low molecular weight thiol-dependent antioxidant and antinitrosative defenses in Salmonella pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Miryoung; Husain, Maroof; Jones-Carson, Jessica; Liu, Lin; Henard, Calvin A.; Vázquez-Torres, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    We found herein that the intracytoplasmic pool of the low-molecular weight (LMW) thiol glutathione (GSH) is readily oxidized in Salmonella exposed to nitric oxide (NO). The hypersusceptibility of gshA and gshB mutants lacking γ-glutamylcysteine and glutathione synthetases to NO and S-nitrosoglutathione indicates that GSH antagonizes the bacteriostatic activity of reactive nitrogen species. Metabolites of the GSH biosynthetic pathway do not affect the enzymatic activity of classical NO targets such as quinol oxidases. In contrast, LMW thiols diminish the nitrosative stress experienced by enzymes, such as glutamine oxoglutarate amidotransferase, that contain redox active cysteines. LMW thiols also preserve the transcription of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 gene targets from the inhibitory activity of nitrogen oxides. These findings are consistent with the idea that GSH scavenges reactive nitrogen species (RNS) other than NO. Compared to the adaptive response afforded by inducible systems such as the hmp-encoded flavohemoprotein, gshA, encoding the first step of GSH biosynthesis, is constitutively expressed in Salmonella. An acute model of salmonellosis has revealed that the antioxidant and antinitrosative properties associated with the GSH biosynthetic pathway represent a first line of Salmonella resistance against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species engendered in the context of a functional NRAMP1R divalent metal transporter. PMID:23217033

  8. InduciblespyTranscription Acts as a Sensor for Envelope Stress ofSalmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seon Mi; Lee, Hwa Jeong; Park, Yoon Mee; Kim, Jin Seok; Lee, Sang Dae; Bang, Iel Soo

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica infects a broad range of host animals, and zoonostic infection threatens both public health and the livestock and meat processing industries. Many antimicrobials have been developed to target Salmonella envelope that performs essential bacterial functions; however, there are very few analytical methods that can be used to validate the efficacy of these antimicrobials. In this study, to develop a potential biosensor for Salmonella envelope stress, we examined the transcription of the S. enterica serovar typhimurium spy gene, the ortholog of which in Escherichia coli encodes Spy (spheroplast protein y). Spy is a chaperone protein expressed and localized in the periplasm of E. coli during spheroplast formation, or by exposure to protein denaturing conditions. spy expression in S. typhimurium was examined by constructing a spy-gfp transcriptional fusion. S. typhimurium spy transcription was strongly induced during spheroplast formation, and also when exposed to membrane-disrupting agents, including ethanol and the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B. Moreover, spy induction required the activity of regulator proteins BaeR and CpxR, which are part of the major envelope stress response systems BaeS/BaeR and CpxA/CpxR, respectively. Results suggest that monitoring spy transcription may be useful to determine whether a molecule particularly cause envelope stress in Salmonella .

  9. Effect of ionizing radiation on the quantitative detection of Salmonella using real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sangyong; Jung, Jinwoo; Kim, Minjeong; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kim, Dongho

    2008-09-01

    Food irradiation is an economically viable technology for inactivating foodborne pathogens, but irradiation can mask pathogens in unhygienically prepared food. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of irradiation treatment on the detection of Salmonella using real-time PCR. Three commercially available kits were tested, of which the InstaGene Matrix procedure was most effective in preparing template DNA from Salmonella exposed to radiation in broth culture. The minimum level of detection by real-time PCR combined with InstaGene Matrix was 3 log units of Salmonella per milliliter. However, when pure cultures of Salmonella were irradiated at 3 and 5 kGy, the cycle threshold ( CT) increased 1-1.5-fold compared to irradiation at 0 and 1 kGy. This indicated that irradiation treatment may result in an underestimation of bacterial counts due to radiation-induced DNA lesions. We also compared CT values in inoculated chicken homogenates before and after irradiation, which in this model caused a 1.3-3.3-fold underestimation of bacterial counts with respect to irradiation dose.

  10. Vulnerabilities in Yersinia pestis caf operon are unveiled by a Salmonella vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Cao

    Full Text Available During infection, Yersinia pestis uses its F1 capsule to enhance survival and cause virulence to mammalian host. Since F1 is produced in large quantities and secreted into the host tissues, it also serves as a major immune target. To hold this detrimental effect under proper control, Y. pestis expresses the caf operon (encoding the F1 capsule in a temperature-dependent manner. However, additional properties of the caf operon limit its expression. By overexpressing the caf operon in wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under a potent promoter, virulence of Salmonella was greatly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, expression of the caf operon under the regulation of its native promoter exhibited negligible impairment of Salmonellae virulence. In-depth investigation revealed all individual genes in the caf operon attenuated Salmonella when overexpressed. The deleterious effects of caf operon and the caf individual genes were further confirmed when they were overexpressed in Y. pestis KIM6+. This study suggests that by using a weak inducible promoter, the detrimental effects of the caf operon are minimally manifested in Y. pestis. Thus, through tight regulation of the caf operon, Y. pestis precisely balances its capsular anti-phagocytic properties with the detrimental effects of caf during interaction with mammalian host.

  11. Vulnerabilities in Yersinia pestis caf Operon Are Unveiled by a Salmonella Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Jun, SangMu; Thornburg, Theresa; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong

    2012-01-01

    During infection, Yersinia pestis uses its F1 capsule to enhance survival and cause virulence to mammalian host. Since F1 is produced in large quantities and secreted into the host tissues, it also serves as a major immune target. To hold this detrimental effect under proper control, Y. pestis expresses the caf operon (encoding the F1 capsule) in a temperature-dependent manner. However, additional properties of the caf operon limit its expression. By overexpressing the caf operon in wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under a potent promoter, virulence of Salmonella was greatly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, expression of the caf operon under the regulation of its native promoter exhibited negligible impairment of Salmonellae virulence. In-depth investigation revealed all individual genes in the caf operon attenuated Salmonella when overexpressed. The deleterious effects of caf operon and the caf individual genes were further confirmed when they were overexpressed in Y. pestis KIM6+. This study suggests that by using a weak inducible promoter, the detrimental effects of the caf operon are minimally manifested in Y. pestis. Thus, through tight regulation of the caf operon, Y. pestis precisely balances its capsular anti-phagocytic properties with the detrimental effects of caf during interaction with mammalian host. PMID:22558420

  12. Plants as alternative hosts for Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Adam; Garcia, Ana V; Hirt, Heribert

    2012-05-01

    Recent findings show that many human pathogenic bacteria can use multiple host organisms. For example, Salmonella Typhimurium can use plants as alternative hosts to humans and other animals. These bacteria are able to adhere to plant surfaces and actively infect the interior of plants. Similarly to the infection of animal cells, S. Typhimurium suppresses plant defense responses by a type III secretion mechanism, indicating that these bacteria possess a dedicated multi-kingdom infection strategy, raising the question of host specificity. In addition, evidence is accumulating that the interaction of Salmonella with plants is an active process with different levels of specificity, because different Salmonella serovars show variations in pathogenicity, and different plant species reveal various levels of resistance towards these bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploiting host immunity: the Salmonella paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnsen, Judith; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens have evolved clever strategies to evade and in some cases exploit the attacks of an activated immune system. Salmonella enterica is one such pathogen, exploiting multiple aspects of host defense to promote its replication in the host. Here we review recent findings on the mechanisms by which Salmonella establishes systemic and chronic infection, including strategies involving manipulation of innate immune signaling and inflammatory forms of cell death, as well as immune evasion by establishing residency in M2 macrophages. We also examine recent evidence showing that the oxidative environment and the high levels of antimicrobial proteins produced in response to localized Salmonella gastrointestinal infection enable the pathogen to successfully outcompete the resident gut microbiota. PMID:25582038

  14. Salmonella-infektion kompliceret med akut nyreinsufficiens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Thøger; Jensen, Jørgen Erik; Jespersen, Bente

    2003-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a known complication to Salmonella gastroenteritis, and patients with chronic renal failure or impaired host defence are at increased risk. In the two presented cases there had been a few days of gastroenteritis before the hospitalisation, but the only symptoms...... at the admission were fatigue and dyspnoea. In both cases severe uraemia had developed and the patients and their physicians did not expect the episode of gastroenteritis to be the only etiology of acute renal failure. Both patients had normal renal histology and Salmonella was grown in their faeces. Subsequently......, their renal function was normalised. In these patients dialysis and renal biopsies would have been unnecessary if the ability of even a moderate Salmonella infection to cause acute renal failure in a healthy subject had been realised and prompt rehydration had been initiated....

  15. Quinolones in the treatment of Salmonella carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Noriega, E; Andrade-Villanueva, J; Amaya-Tapia, G

    1989-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella typhi are commonly followed by a chronic carrier state despite positive clinical and initial bacteriologic responses. The use of primary antibiotics like chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has several major drawbacks, including in some instances the failure to prevent the carrier state. The appearance worldwide of strains with multiple resistance to the most commonly used regimens has prompted the search for new forms of therapy. Among the agents studied have been third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones, which are active in vitro against bacterial enteropathogens like S. typhi. Resolution of chronic carriage of S. typhi and other salmonellae is difficult, and regimens commonly fail (including those that combine antibiotic administration with removal of the gallbladder). In addition to being active in vitro against Salmonella species, the newer quinolones adequately penetrate the intestinal lumen, liver, bile, and gallbladder. Initial experience with norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin in oral treatment of the chronic S. typhi carrier state in adults has been promising.

  16. Live cell imaging reveals novel functions of Salmonella enterica SPI2-T3SS effector proteins in remodeling of the host cell endosomal system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopa Rajashekar

    Full Text Available Intracellular Salmonella enterica induce a massive remodeling of the endosomal system in infected host cells. One dramatic consequence of this interference is the induction of various extensive tubular aggregations of membrane vesicles, and tubules positive for late endosomal/lysosomal markers are referred to as Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. SIF are highly dynamic in nature with extension and collapse velocities of 0.4-0.5 µm x sec-1. The induction of SIF depends on the function of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2 encoded type III secretion system (T3SS and a subset of effector proteins. In this study, we applied live cell imaging and electron microscopy to analyze the role of individual effector proteins in SIF morphology and dynamic properties of SIF. SIF in cells infected with sifB, sseJ, sseK1, sseK2, sseI, sseL, sspH1, sspH2, slrP, steC, gogB or pipB mutant strains showed a morphology and dynamics comparable to SIF induced by WT Salmonella. SIF were absent in cells infected with the sifA-deficient strain and live cell analyses allowed tracking of the loss of the SCV membrane of intracellular sifA Salmonella. In contrast to analyses in fixed cells, in living host cells SIF induced by sseF- or sseG-deficient strains were not discontinuous, but rather continuous and thinner in diameter. A very dramatic phenotype was observed for the pipB2-deficient strain that induced very bulky, non-dynamic aggregations of membrane vesicles. Our study underlines the requirement of the study of Salmonella-host interaction in living systems and reveals new phenotypes due to the intracellular activities of Salmonella.

  17. Media ion composition controls regulatory and virulence response of Salmonella in spaceflight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Wilson

    Full Text Available The spaceflight environment is relevant to conditions encountered by pathogens during the course of infection and induces novel changes in microbial pathogenesis not observed using conventional methods. It is unclear how microbial cells sense spaceflight-associated changes to their growth environment and orchestrate corresponding changes in molecular and physiological phenotypes relevant to the infection process. Here we report that spaceflight-induced increases in Salmonella virulence are regulated by media ion composition, and that phosphate ion is sufficient to alter related pathogenesis responses in a spaceflight analogue model. Using whole genome microarray and proteomic analyses from two independent Space Shuttle missions, we identified evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways in Salmonella that respond to spaceflight under all media compositions tested. Identification of conserved regulatory paradigms opens new avenues to control microbial responses during the infection process and holds promise to provide an improved understanding of human health and disease on Earth.

  18. Interaction between Salmonella typhimurium and phagocytic cells in pigs - Phagocytosis, oxidative burst and killing in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Lind, Peter

    1999-01-01

    leucocytes was measured as acquired fluorescence in the leukocytes and was both time and dose related. Living, serum-opsonized Salmonella bacteria induced a dose-dependent oxidative burst in PMNs and monocytes as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LC). When opsonized in normal serum...

  19. Assessment of Salmonella survival in dry-cured Italian salami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonardi, S; Bruini, I; Bolzoni, L; Cozzolino, P; Pierantoni, M; Brindani, F; Bellotti, P; Renzi, M; Pongolini, S

    2017-12-04

    The inactivation of Salmonella during curing of Italian traditional pork salami was investigated. A total of 150 batches of ground raw meat (GRM) used for salami manufacturing by four producers were tested for Salmonella by real-time PCR followed by ISO 6579 cultural confirmation and MPN enumeration. Salami produced with Salmonella positive GRMs were re-tested at the end of their curing period. Aw, pH and NaCl content were also measured. Detection of Salmonella was performed testing both 25 and 50g of the samples. By Real-Time PCR 37% of the GRMs resulted positive, but cultural detection of Salmonella was obtained in 14% of the samples only. Salmonella enumeration ranged from 31 MPN/g to Salmonella in 100% of all positive samples, vs. 62% of ISO-25g. Salami made of the contaminated GRMs were 29% Salmonella-positive, as most batches of salami produced with Salmonella-positive GRMs resulted negative after regular curing (20-48days). Overall, 13% of salami produced with Salmonella-contaminated GRMs were positive. They belonged to six batches, which turned out negative after prolonged curing ranging between 49 and 86days. Salmonella enumeration in salami ranged from 8.7 MPN/g to Salmonella in cured salami (p value: >0.05). The most common Salmonella serovars in GRMs were Derby (52%), Typhimurium monophasic variant 4, (Barbuti et al., 1993), 12:i:- (19%) and Stanley (10%). Salmonella Derby (56%), London, Branderup, Panama (13%, respectively) and Goldcoast (6%) were most frequent in cured salami. The study showed negative correlation between real-time CT values and cultural confirmation of Salmonella, as well as the importance of sample size for Salmonella detection. Among considered factors with possible effect on the occurrence of Salmonella in salami, statistical analysis revealed a role for aw in salami and for Salmonella load in GRMs, while pH and NaCl content did not significantly affect the probability of finding Salmonella in dry-cured salami in the context of

  20. Septic arthritis of the ankle due to Salmonella enteritidis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dineen, Patrick F

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella septic arthritis in healthy, immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a one-day history of painful swelling of his ankle from which was aspirated pus which subsequently grew Salmonella enteritidis. There was no history of trauma or symptoms consistent with Salmonella enterocolitis. Our patient recovered fully after two weeks on intravenous ceftriaxone and six weeks on oral ciprofloxacin. Salmonella is a notifiable disease in the European Union and the United States of America, and is associated with outbreaks as a result of food contamination. The nature of Salmonella arthritis and its appropriate management are outlined.

  1. Ultraviolet (UV-C inactivation of Enterococcus faecium, Salmonella choleraesuis and Salmonella typhimurium in porcine plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Blázquez

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an ultraviolet (UV-C, 254 nm irradiation system on reducing the load of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium, Salmonella choleraesuis (S. choleraesuis resistant to streptomycin and Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium inoculated in sterile porcine plasma and then subjected to different UV-C irradiation doses (750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L using a pilot plant UV-C device working under turbulent flow. Results indicated that UV-C treatment induced a viability reduction of 0.38, 1.18, 3.59, 4.72 and 5.06 log10 S. typhimurium when irradiated at 750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L, respectively. The observed log10 reduction of S. choleraesuis was 1.44, 2.68, 5.55, 7.07 and 7.97 at 750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L, respectively. The best-fit inactivation for S. choleraesuis was the Weibull distribution curve, while the best-fit curve for S. typhimurium was the Weibull plus tail model, indicating that around 102 cfu/mL resistant S. typhimurium was detected when the liquid plasma was UV-C irradiated at doses up to 9000 J/L. Viability reduction for E. faecium was 0.44, 1.01, 3.70, 5.61 and 6.22 log10 when irradiated at 750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L, respectively, with no bacterial resistance observed with UV-C doses of 6000 J/L or higher. The biphasic model was the best fit model for the inactivation curve for E. faecium. For the three microorganisms tested, about a 4 log-unit reduction was achieved when the liquid plasma was irradiated at 3000J/L. Overall results demonstrate the usefulness of the UV-C system to inactivate bacteria in liquid plasma before spray-drying. We conclude that the UV-C system can provide an additional biosafety feature that can be incorporated into the manufacturing process for spray-dried animal plasma.

  2. Ultraviolet (UV-C) inactivation of Enterococcus faecium, Salmonella choleraesuis and Salmonella typhimurium in porcine plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, Elena; Rodríguez, Carmen; Ródenas, Jesús; Pérez de Rozas, Ana; Segalés, Joaquim; Pujols, Joan; Polo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an ultraviolet (UV-C, 254 nm) irradiation system on reducing the load of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), Salmonella choleraesuis (S. choleraesuis) resistant to streptomycin and Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) inoculated in sterile porcine plasma and then subjected to different UV-C irradiation doses (750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L) using a pilot plant UV-C device working under turbulent flow. Results indicated that UV-C treatment induced a viability reduction of 0.38, 1.18, 3.59, 4.72 and 5.06 log10 S. typhimurium when irradiated at 750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L, respectively. The observed log10 reduction of S. choleraesuis was 1.44, 2.68, 5.55, 7.07 and 7.97 at 750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L, respectively. The best-fit inactivation for S. choleraesuis was the Weibull distribution curve, while the best-fit curve for S. typhimurium was the Weibull plus tail model, indicating that around 102 cfu/mL resistant S. typhimurium was detected when the liquid plasma was UV-C irradiated at doses up to 9000 J/L. Viability reduction for E. faecium was 0.44, 1.01, 3.70, 5.61 and 6.22 log10 when irradiated at 750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L, respectively, with no bacterial resistance observed with UV-C doses of 6000 J/L or higher. The biphasic model was the best fit model for the inactivation curve for E. faecium. For the three microorganisms tested, about a 4 log-unit reduction was achieved when the liquid plasma was irradiated at 3000J/L. Overall results demonstrate the usefulness of the UV-C system to inactivate bacteria in liquid plasma before spray-drying. We conclude that the UV-C system can provide an additional biosafety feature that can be incorporated into the manufacturing process for spray-dried animal plasma.

  3. Bactericidal Immunity to Salmonella in Africans and Mechanisms Causing Its Failure in HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yun Shan; Necchi, Francesca; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Young, Stephen P.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Mandala, Wilson L.; Gordon, Melita A.; Saul, Allan J.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella are a leading cause of death among HIV-infected Africans. Antibody-induced complement-mediated killing protects healthy Africans against Salmonella, but increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in some HIV-infected African adults block this killing. The objective was to understand how these high levels of anti-LPS antibodies interfere with the killing of Salmonella. Methodology/Principal Findings Sera and affinity-purified antibodies from African HIV-infected adults that failed to kill invasive S. Typhimurium D23580 were compared to sera from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects with bactericidal activity. The failure of sera from certain HIV-infected subjects to kill Salmonella was found to be due to an inherent inhibitory effect of anti-LPS antibodies. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and strongly associated with IgA and IgG2 anti-LPS antibodies (p<0.0001 for both). IgG anti-LPS antibodies, from sera of HIV-infected individuals that inhibit killing at high concentration, induced killing when diluted. Conversely, IgG, from sera of HIV-uninfected adults that induce killing, inhibited killing when concentrated. IgM anti-LPS antibodies from all subjects also induced Salmonella killing. Finally, the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of anti-LPS antibodies is seen with IgM as well as IgG and IgA. No correlation was found between affinity or avidity, or complement deposition or consumption, and inhibition of killing. Conclusion/Significance IgG and IgM classes of anti-S. Typhimurium LPS antibodies from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are bactericidal, while at very high concentrations, anti-LPS antibodies of all classes inhibit in vitro killing of Salmonella. This could be due to a variety of mechanisms relating to the poor ability of IgA and IgG2 to activate complement, and deposition of complement at sites where it cannot insert in the bacterial membrane. Vaccine trials

  4. Bactericidal Immunity to Salmonella in Africans and Mechanisms Causing Its Failure in HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Shan Goh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella are a leading cause of death among HIV-infected Africans. Antibody-induced complement-mediated killing protects healthy Africans against Salmonella, but increased levels of anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS antibodies in some HIV-infected African adults block this killing. The objective was to understand how these high levels of anti-LPS antibodies interfere with the killing of Salmonella.Sera and affinity-purified antibodies from African HIV-infected adults that failed to kill invasive S. Typhimurium D23580 were compared to sera from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects with bactericidal activity. The failure of sera from certain HIV-infected subjects to kill Salmonella was found to be due to an inherent inhibitory effect of anti-LPS antibodies. This inhibition was concentration-dependent and strongly associated with IgA and IgG2 anti-LPS antibodies (p<0.0001 for both. IgG anti-LPS antibodies, from sera of HIV-infected individuals that inhibit killing at high concentration, induced killing when diluted. Conversely, IgG, from sera of HIV-uninfected adults that induce killing, inhibited killing when concentrated. IgM anti-LPS antibodies from all subjects also induced Salmonella killing. Finally, the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of anti-LPS antibodies is seen with IgM as well as IgG and IgA. No correlation was found between affinity or avidity, or complement deposition or consumption, and inhibition of killing.IgG and IgM classes of anti-S. Typhimurium LPS antibodies from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are bactericidal, while at very high concentrations, anti-LPS antibodies of all classes inhibit in vitro killing of Salmonella. This could be due to a variety of mechanisms relating to the poor ability of IgA and IgG2 to activate complement, and deposition of complement at sites where it cannot insert in the bacterial membrane. Vaccine trials are required to understand the significance of

  5. Roles of Diet and the Acid Tolerance Response in Survival of Common Salmonella Serotypes in Feces of Finishing Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajtak, Ursula; Boland, Fiona; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is an important factor influencing the transmission of infection in pig production. This study evaluated the effects of acid tolerance response (ATR), organic acid supplementation, and physical properties of feed on the survival of a five-strain Salmonella mixture in porcine feces held at 4 and 22°C for 88 days. Acid-adapted or non-acid-adapted nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella strains were used to inoculate feces of pigs fed four different diets, which consisted of a nonpelleted, finely ground meal feed or a finely ground, pelleted feed that was left unsupplemented or was supplemented with K-diformate. Organic acid supplementation and physical properties of feed markedly influenced Salmonella survival, but the effects were highly dependent on storage temperature; survival was unaffected by ATR. The most pronounced effects were observed at 22°C, a temperature similar to that of finishing pig houses. The supplementation of meal diets with K-diformate significantly reduced the duration of survival (P salmonellae in feces compared to survival in feces of pigs fed unsupplemented meal. The pelleting of feed, compared to feeding meal, significantly reduced (P survival in feces held at 22°C. Only minor effects of feed form and acid supplementation on survivor numbers were observed at 4°C. Differences in the fecal survival of Salmonella could not be related to diet-induced changes in fecal physiochemical parameters. The predominant survival of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT193 and serotype 4,[5],12:i:- in porcine feces demonstrates the superior ability of these serotypes to survive in this environment. Fecal survival and transmission of Salmonella in pig herds may be reduced by dietary approaches, but effects are highly dependent on environmental temperature. PMID:22038599

  6. Roles of diet and the acid tolerance response in survival of common Salmonella serotypes in feces of finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajtak, Ursula; Boland, Fiona; Leonard, Nola; Bolton, Declan; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-01-01

    The persistence of Salmonella in the environment is an important factor influencing the transmission of infection in pig production. This study evaluated the effects of acid tolerance response (ATR), organic acid supplementation, and physical properties of feed on the survival of a five-strain Salmonella mixture in porcine feces held at 4 and 22°C for 88 days. Acid-adapted or non-acid-adapted nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella strains were used to inoculate feces of pigs fed four different diets, which consisted of a nonpelleted, finely ground meal feed or a finely ground, pelleted feed that was left unsupplemented or was supplemented with K-diformate. Organic acid supplementation and physical properties of feed markedly influenced Salmonella survival, but the effects were highly dependent on storage temperature; survival was unaffected by ATR. The most pronounced effects were observed at 22°C, a temperature similar to that of finishing pig houses. The supplementation of meal diets with K-diformate significantly reduced the duration of survival (P salmonellae in feces compared to survival in feces of pigs fed unsupplemented meal. The pelleting of feed, compared to feeding meal, significantly reduced (P survival in feces held at 22°C. Only minor effects of feed form and acid supplementation on survivor numbers were observed at 4°C. Differences in the fecal survival of Salmonella could not be related to diet-induced changes in fecal physiochemical parameters. The predominant survival of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT193 and serotype 4,[5],12:i:- in porcine feces demonstrates the superior ability of these serotypes to survive in this environment. Fecal survival and transmission of Salmonella in pig herds may be reduced by dietary approaches, but effects are highly dependent on environmental temperature.

  7. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. in reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    加藤, 行男; 村上, 賢

    2007-01-01

    A total of 291 fecal samples from 252 wild reptiles and 39 pet reptiles were examined for the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in Japan. Salmonella spp. were isolated from 29 (11.5%) of 252 wild reptiles and 22 (55.6%) of 39 pet reptiles. The isolates were identified into subspecies I to IV. The majority of isolates (43.6%) belonged to subspecies I and these isolates could be identified into 9 serovars. The serovars isolated were found to be S. Newport, S. Litchifield and S. Thompson which cause...

  8. Local transfer of delayed-type hypersensitivity after Salmonella infection in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Attridge, S R; Kotlarski, I

    1985-01-01

    An adoptive local transfer system has been used to study the mediators of delayed-type hypersensitivity induced in mice by infection with Salmonella enteritidis 11RX. The cells which transfer this state of hypersensitivity to untreated recipients are nonadherent T lymphocytes with the surface phenotype Lyt 1+2-, and successful transfer requires compatibility at the I-A subregion of the H-2 complex. In these and other respects these cells are indistinguishable from those previously found to be...

  9. Role of T3SS-1 SipD Protein in Protecting Mice against Non-typhoidal Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhos Jneid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica species are enteric pathogens that cause severe diseases ranging from self-limiting gastroenteritis to enteric fever and sepsis in humans. These infectious diseases are still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in low-income countries, especially in children younger than 5 years and immunocompromised adults. Vaccines targeting typhoidal diseases are already marketed, but none protect against non-typhoidal Salmonella. The existence of multiple non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes as well as emerging antibiotic resistance highlight the need for development of a broad-spectrum protective vaccine. All Salmonella spp. utilize two type III Secretion Systems (T3SS 1 and 2 to initiate infection, allow replication in phagocytic cells and induce systemic disease. T3SS-1, which is essential to invade epithelial cells and cross the barrier, forms an extracellular needle and syringe necessary to inject effector proteins into the host cell. PrgI and SipD form, respectively, the T3SS-1 needle and the tip complex at the top of the needle. Because they are common and highly conserved in all virulent Salmonella spp., they might be ideal candidate antigens for a subunit-based, broad-spectrum vaccine.We investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of PrgI and SipD administered by subcutaneous, intranasal and oral routes, alone or combined, in a mouse model of Salmonella intestinal challenge. Robust IgG (in all immunization routes and IgA (in intranasal and oral immunization routes antibody responses were induced against both proteins, particularly SipD. Mice orally immunized with SipD alone or SipD combined with PrgI were protected against lethal intestinal challenge with Salmonella Typhimurium (100 Lethal Dose 50% depending on antigen, route and adjuvant.Salmonella T3SS SipD is a promising antigen for the development of a protective Salmonella vaccine, and could be developed for vaccination in tropical endemic areas to control

  10. InstantLabs® Salmonella species detection method: matrix extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neil; Bambusch, Lauren; Le, Thu; Morey, Amit; Hayman, Melinda; Montez, Sergio J

    2014-01-01

    The performance of InstantLabs® Salmonella Species Food Safety Kit to detect Salmonella in four food matrixes was validated against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) reference method 6579:2002. The matrixes (raw ground beef, raw chicken breast, raw ground chicken, and lettuce) were inoculated with low levels of Salmonella (Salmonella. Samples were validated using 375 g (meat) or 25 g (lettuce and poultry) test portions enriched in FASTGRO TM SE at 42±1 °C for 12 h and 10 h, respectively. All samples were confirmed using the ISO reference method, regardless of initial-screen result. The InstantLabs test method was shown to perform as well as or better than the reference method for the detection of Salmonella species in ground beef, chicken breast, ground chicken, and lettuce. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives among the 100 Salmonella serovars and no false positives among the 30 non-Salmonella species examined, respectively.

  11. Source attribution of human Salmonella cases in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlström, H.; Andersson, Y.; Plym-Forshell, L.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the sources of sporadic domestic Salmonella cases in Sweden and to evaluate the usefulness of a source-attribution model in a country in which food animals are virtually free from Salmonella. The model allocates human sporadic domestic Salmonella cases...... to different sources according to distribution of Salmonella subtypes in the different sources. Sporadic domestic human Salmonella cases (n=1086) reported between July 2004 and June 2006 were attributed to nine food-animal and wildlife sources. Of all Salmonella cases, 82% were acquired abroad and 2.9% were...... associated with outbreaks. We estimated that 6.4% were associated with imported food, 0.5% with food-producing animals, and 0.6% with wildlife. Overall, 7.7% could not be attributed to any source. We concluded that domestic food-producing animals are not an important source for Salmonella in humans in Sweden...

  12. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallapura, G; Morgan, M J; Pumford, N R; Bielke, L R; Wolfenden, A D; Faulkner, O B; Latorre, J D; Menconi, A; Hernandez-Velasco, X; Kuttappan, V A; Hargis, B M; Tellez, G

    2014-02-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (10(6) cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens.

  13. Ultraviolet (UV-C) inactivation of Enterococcus faecium, Salmonella choleraesuis and Salmonella typhimurium in porcine plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Bl?zquez, Elena; Rodr?guez, Carmen; R?denas, Jes?s; P?rez de Rozas, Ana; Segal?s, Joaquim; Pujols, Joan; Polo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an ultraviolet (UV-C, 254 nm) irradiation system on reducing the load of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium), Salmonella choleraesuis (S. choleraesuis) resistant to streptomycin and Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) inoculated in sterile porcine plasma and then subjected to different UV-C irradiation doses (750, 1500, 3000, 6000 and 9000 J/L) using a pilot plant UV-C device working under turbulent flow. Results indicated that ...

  14. Salmonella-TEK, a rapid screening method for Salmonella species in food.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Poucke, L S

    1990-01-01

    A micro-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (micro-ELISA) using the Salmonella-TEK screen kit was tested for the detection of Salmonella spp. in pure cultures as well as in 30 artificially contaminated food samples and in 45 naturally contaminated food samples. Different raw, fleshy foods and processed foods were used as test products. The artificially contaminated minced meat samples were preenriched in buffered peptone water, and after incubation, different selective enrichment broths were te...

  15. Increased secretion of exopolysaccharide and virulence potential of a mucoid variant of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo under environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, J; Tall, Ben D; Flamer, M-L; Patel, I; Gopinath, G; Auguste, Winny; Jean, Catherine; George, Melvin; Tartera, Carmen; Ewing, L; Hanes, D E

    2017-02-01

    During an investigation to increase the recovery of Salmonella enterica from Oregano, an increased expression of exopolysaccharide was induced in Salmonella serovar Montevideo. The atypical mucoid (SAL242S) and the non-mucoid (SAL242) strains of Montevideo were compared and characterized using various methods. Serotyping analysis demonstrated that both strains are the same serovar Montevideo. Electron microscopy (EM) of cultured SAL242S cells revealed the production of a prominent EPS-like structure enveloping aggregates of cells that are composed of cellulose. Mucoid cells possessed a higher binding affinity for Calcofluor than that of the non-mucoid strain. Genotypic analysis revealed no major genomic differences between these morphotypes, while expression analyses using a DNA microarray shows that the mucoid variant exhibited heightened expression of genes encoding proteins produced by the SPI-1 type III secretion system. This increased expression of SPI1 genes may play a role in protecting Salmonella from environmental stressors. Based on these observations, Salmonella serovar Montevideo mucoid variant under stressful or low-nutrient environments presented atypical growth patterns and phenotypic changes, as well as an upregulated expression of virulence factors. These findings are significant in the understanding of survival abilities of Salmonella in a various food matrices. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Salmonella bacteriuria in a cat fed a Salmonella-contaminated diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth, Erika; Freeman, Lisa M; Cornjeo, Lilian; Markovich, Jessica E; Janecko, Nicol; Weese, J Scott

    2015-09-01

    A 9-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated because of hematuria and weight loss after an 8-year history of intermittent signs of feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD). A complete diet history revealed that the cat was eating a commercial diet that does not undergo the same processing procedures as most pet foods and so might be at increased risk for bacterial contamination owing to a nonstandard industry cooking procedure. The cat had a history consistent with FLUTD, but bacteriologic culture of the urine revealed Salmonella organisms. Additional analysis revealed Salmonella enterica serotype I:ROUGH-O:g,m,s:- in samples of urine and feces as well as Salmonella enterica serotype Johannesburg and Salmonella enterica serotype Senftenberg in the diet. The cat responded positively to antimicrobial treatment for the Salmonella bacteriuria as well as to dietary and environmental management for the clinical signs associated with FLUTD. Findings in this case highlighted an additional health consequence associated with ingestion of Salmonella-contaminated food. Such contamination is of particular concern with raw meat-based diets or diets that have not undergone standard industry cooking practices. Veterinarians should obtain a diet history for every companion animal during every evaluation to help with diagnosis and optimal treatment.

  17. First identification of Salmonella Urbana and Salmonella Ouakam in humans in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Courage Kosi Setsoafia; Escudero, Jose Antonio; Herrera-Leon, Silvia; Porrero, Maria Concepcion; Suarez, Monica; Dominguez, Lucas; Demuyakor, Bawa; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2013-10-15

    Salmonella infections are increasing worldwide, but there are few reports on Salmonella surveillance in African countries and other developing countries. This has made it difficult to estimate the actual burden of salmonellosis, especially in Africa. This study was conducted in a neglected Northern Region of Ghana where there are no previous data on Salmonella serotypes. Standard microbiological tests were used for isolation, identification, and serotyping. Micro-dilution was used for the antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Four serotypes of Salmonella were identified: S. Urbana, S. Ouakam, S. Senftenberg, and S. Stanleyville. All the serotypes were susceptible to the 20 antibiotics used in the susceptibility test. S. Urbana and S. Ouakam were identified in humans for the first time in Africa. This study may serve as a baseline study for future investigations on Salmonella in the region and may assist public health officials to take the appropriate measures in case of a disease outbreak caused by Salmonella in the area. The article may also give health officials a fair idea of the resistance level of these serotypes in the region.

  18. Salmonella enteritidis and other Salmonella in laying hens and eggs from flocks with Salmonella in their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, C; Johnson, R P; Forsberg, C M; Irwin, R J

    1992-01-01

    Seven Canadian layer flocks with Salmonella enteritidis in their environment were investigated to determine the numbers of hens infected with S. enteritidis, the localization of S. enteritidis in organs of infected hens and the numbers of S. enteritidis-infected eggs produced by two affected flocks. By a microagglutination test (MAT) using S. pullorum antigens, these flocks had more seropositive hens (mean 51.9 +/- 16.9%) than two Salmonella-free flocks (mean 13.0 +/- 4.2%). Culture of tissues of 580 hens (433 seropositive) from the seven flocks detected 26 (4.5%) S. enteritidis-infected hens from two flocks. In one flock, 2/150 hens were infected with S. enteritidis phage type (PT) 8, which was confined to the ceca, and no Salmonella spp. were isolated from 2520 eggs (one day's lay). In the second flock, where 24/150 hens were infected with S. enteritidis PT13, extraintestinal infection was found in nine hens and involved the ovaries and/or oviduct in two hens. Salmonella enteritidis PT13 was isolated from one sample of egg contents and from one sample of cracked shells from among 14,040 eggs (one day's lay) from this flock. The overall prevalence of S. enteritidis-contaminated eggs from the two flocks with infected hens was less than 0.06%. Other Salmonella spp. isolated were S. heidelberg from 58 hens (10%), and S. hadar, S. mbandaka and S. typhimurium from one hen (0.2%) each. The MAT with antigens of S. pullorum had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 24% for detecting S. enteritidis-infected hens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1423059

  19. Genotoxic activity of caramel on Salmonella and cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y N; Chen, X R; Ding, C; Cai, Z N; Li, Q G

    1984-04-01

    The genetic activity of 2 commercial caramel preparations, manufactured either by heating the malt sugar solution directly (non-ammoniated caramel) or by heating it with ammonia (ammoniated caramel) was studied in the Salmonella mutagenicity test and UDS assay in cultured mammalian cells. The non-ammoniated caramel was found to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium TA100, while the ammoniated one was genetically active in all the tester strains used, namely TA100, TA97 and TA98. It was also demonstrated that non-ammoniated caramel was capable of inducing UDS in cultured human amnion FL cells, but for the ammoniated one, no such activity was observed. Furthermore, based on the results obtained in the DNA synthesis inhibition assay, it was suggested that the DNA synthesis inhibition seen in our experiments with the ammoniated caramel was probably not of DNA damage in origin. These data indicate that the mutagenic fractions formed during ammoniated and non-ammoniated caramelization were quite different.

  20. The Salmonella enterica Pan-genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, A.; Hendriksen, R. S.; Aaresturp, F. M.; Ussery, D. W.; Friis, C.

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is divided into four subspecies containing a large number of different serovars, several of which are important zoonotic pathogens and some show a high degree of host specificity or host preference. We compare 45 sequenced S. enterica genomes that are publicly available (22

  1. Serovars of Salmonella from captive reptiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Lassen-Nielsen, Anne Marie; Nordentoft, Steen

    2009-01-01

    The distribution on serovars of 60 Salmonella isolates from reptiles kept in captivity in Denmark during the period 1995–2006 was investigated. The isolates were all recovered from clinical specimens submitted to the National Veterinary Institute. A majority of the samples were from reptiles...

  2. Attachment of Salmonella spp. to pork meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine; Riber, Leise; Löfström, Charlotta

    2011-01-01

    Five strains of Salmonella, one wildtype and four knock-out mutants (the prg, flhDC, yhjH and fliC genes) were investigated based on their probability to attach and subsequently detach from a surface of pork fillet. The attachment followed by detachment was measured and modelled for two different...

  3. Thirteenth CRL-Salmonella interlaboratory comparison study on typing of Salmonella spp. : Dertiende CRL-Salmonella ringonderzoek voor de typering van Salmonella spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk PA; Maas HME; de Pinna E; Mooijman KA; LZO; cib

    2010-01-01

    De Nationale Referentie Laboratoria (NRL's) van de 27 Europese lidstaten scoorden goed bij de kwaliteitscontrole op Salmonella-typering in 2008. Vier laboratoria hadden hiervoor een herkansing nodig. Daarnaast is een analyse van alle NRL's als groep uitgevoerd, waaruit bleek dat zij 97 %

  4. Incidence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of salmonella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to investigate the incidence of Salmonella species among 300 children using stool samples from six hospitals in the metropolitan Kano. The organisms were investigated using cultural, serological biochemical characterization and sensitivity to some antimicrobial agents. The incidence of the bacteria ...

  5. Colicinogeny in Salmonella serovars isolated in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Carvalho Campos

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available A study of colicinogeny was made in 748 strains of Salmonella (97 serovars isolated from different sources; human (291, animal (119, environmental (141, food (102 and animal feed (95. Colicin production was detected in 64 strains (8.6%, particularly isolated from foods (30.4%. Col. E1 (53 and Ia (44 were the most frequently observed, especially in S. agona for environment and food sources. Col V production was identified in 5 strains of S. typhimurium within 8 producer cultures isolated from humans. Its relationship with the sources and serovars of Salmonella are discussed.Investigou-se a produção de colicina em 748 amostras de Salmonella (97 sorovares advindas de díferentes fontes: humana (291, animal (119, ambiental (141, de alimentos (102 e rações (95. Detectaram-se 64 amostras (8,6% colicinogênicas, particularmente isoladas de alimentos (30,4%. ColE1 (53 e Ia (44 foram as mais freqüentes, especialmente no sorovar S, agona, de origem ambiental e de alimentos. Identificou-se também a produção de col V em 5 amostras de S. typhimurium dentre 8 culturas produtoras de origem humana. Discute-se a relação entre a capacidade colicinogênica e as fontes e sorovares de Salmonella.

  6. Sixteenth EURL-Salmonella interlaboratory comparison study on typing of Salmonella spp. : Zestiende EURL-Salmonella ringonderzoek voor de typering van Salmonella spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs-Reitsma WF; Pol-Hofstad IE; Maas HME; de Pinna E; Mooijman KA; LZO; cib

    2012-01-01

    De 28 Nationale Referentie Laboratoria (NRL's) van de 27 Europese lidstaten scoorden in 2011 goed bij de kwaliteitscontrole om Salmonella te typeren. Twee laboratoria hadden hiervoor een herkansing nodig. Alle NRL's samen konden gemiddeld genomen aan 97 procent van de geteste stammen de juiste naam

  7. Salmonella typhi time to change empiric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, C.; Engberg, J.; Weis, N.

    2008-01-01

    In the present case series report we describe seven recent cases of typhoid fever. All the patients were travellers returning from Pakistan, where typhoid is endemic. Salmonella typhi isolated from the patients by blood culture were reported as intermediary susceptible to fluoroquinolones in six...

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica strains isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-11-30

    Nov 30, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance profile of. Salmonella enterica isolated from raw beef, mutton and intestines sold in Ouagadougou; Burkina Faso. Methodology and Results: A total of 450 samples from raw meat of beef (n=175), mutton ...

  9. Inhibition of Escherichia Coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus. aureus are of great concern to the food industry, especially in foods stored under refrigerated conditions where, unlike most food-borne pathogens are able to multiply. This investigation was conducted to study the inhibitory effect of some spice ...

  10. Quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The human restricted bacteria, Salmonella enterica serovar. Typhi is the major cause of typhoid fever (or enteric fever), a characteristic severe systemic illness [1]. In 2010, typhoid fever accounted for an estimated global burden of. 27 million new cases and 200,000 deaths [2]. For over two decades, S. enterica ...

  11. Effect of Salmonella thyphymurium Infection on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Danfodiyo University Sokoto. They were fed on wheat bran, bean offal, cowpea hay, while water was provided ad libitum. Before the commencement of the experiment, .... Agerso H., Friis C., and Nielsen J.P. (2000). Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of amoxicillin in healthy and salmonella typhimurium infected pigs.

  12. Persistence of salmonella Typhimurium in Nopal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Having documented information available on the capability of Salmonella to remain in the cladode tissue it is important to understand the role of nopal on the lifecycle of enteropathogenic bacteria in humans, as well as for management and control programs of theses pathogens in plants. Because of th...

  13. Persistence of salmonella typhimurium in nopal cladodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh produce associated outbreaks have increased in the last few years. E.coli O157:H7 and Salmonella have been causative agents of infection in these outbreaks. Fresh produce is consumed raw, and in the absence of terminal kill treatment, it is imperative to understand sources of contamination o...

  14. Virulence factors of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the major etiologic agents of human food-borne gastrointestinal infections. Efforts to control the number of serovar Enteritidis infections have had a limited success, in part because of the lack of knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that

  15. Swiss Army Pathogen: The Salmonella Entry Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Hume

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella causes disease in humans and animals ranging from mild self-limiting gastroenteritis to potentially life-threatening typhoid fever. Salmonellosis remains a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality globally, and hence imposes a huge socio-economic burden worldwide. A key property of all pathogenic Salmonella strains is the ability to invade non-phagocytic host cells. The major determinant of this invasiveness is a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS, a molecular syringe that injects virulence effector proteins directly into target host cells. These effectors cooperatively manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to drive pathogen internalization. Salmonella does not only rely on these injected effectors, but also uses several other T3SS-independent mechanisms to gain entry into host cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the methods used by Salmonella for cell invasion, with a focus on the host signaling networks that must be coordinately exploited for the pathogen to achieve its goal.

  16. Salmonella osteomyelitis by sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, H.; Tran, V.T.; Boeckmann, U.

    1985-10-01

    Case report of a 28 year old black sickle cell anemia patient with salmonella osteomyelitis of the radius. Aside from sickle cell anemia patients this skeletal complication of enteric salmonellosis is an extreme rarity. Description of the typical roentgenological features includes intracortical fissures and sequestration.

  17. Salmonella virulence plasmid: pathogenesis and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudia; Puente, José Luis; Calva, Edmundo

    2017-06-22

    A current view on the role of the Salmonella virulence plasmid in the pathogenesis of animal and human hosts is discussed; including the possible relevance in secondary ecological niches. Various strategies towards further studies in this respect are proposed within the One Health Concept. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Water Frogs, Aquariums, and Salmonella -- Oh My!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-09

    This CDC Kidtastics podcast discusses how people can get Salmonella from water frogs and aquariums.  Created: 12/9/2009 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 12/9/2009.

  19. Sixteenth EURL-Salmonella interlaboratory comparison study on typing of Salmonella spp. : Zestiende EURL-Salmonella ringonderzoek voor de typering van Salmonella spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs-Reitsma WF; Pol-Hofstad IE; Maas HME; de Pinna E; Mooijman KA; LZO; cib

    2012-01-01

    De 28 Nationale Referentie Laboratoria (NRL's) van de 27 Europese lidstaten scoorden in 2011 goed bij de kwaliteitscontrole om Salmonella te typeren. Twee laboratoria hadden hiervoor een herkansing nodig. Alle NRL's samen konden gemiddeld genomen aan 97 procent van de geteste stammen de

  20. Nontyphoid Salmonella Infection: Microbiology, Clinical Features, and Antimicrobial Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Ming Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nontyphoid Salmonella is the most common bacterial pathogen causing gastrointestinal infection worldwide. Most nontyphoid Salmonella infection is limited to uncomplicated gastroenteritis that seldom requires antimicrobial treatment. Nevertheless, invasive infections, such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis, and meningitis, may occur and require antimicrobial therapy. Continuous genetic and genomic evolution in Salmonella leading to increased virulence and resistance to multiple drugs are of significant public health concern. Two major changes in the epidemiology of nontyphoid salmonellosis in Europe and in the USA occurred in the second half of the 20th century: the emergence of foodborne human infections caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteriditis and by multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium. In the 21st century, a worsening situation is the increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in nontyphoid Salmonella. Clinical isolates showing carbapenem resistance also have been identified. Although antimicrobial therapy is usually not indicated for uncomplicated Salmonella gastroenteritis, recent studies indicated that a short-course ceftriaxone therapy (3–5 days for patients with severe gastroenteritis would lead to a faster clinical recovery. Continuous surveillance of Salmonella in both humans and animals is mandatory. A better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella may help in the devising of better interventional strategies to reduce the spread of resistant Salmonella between humans and reservoirs along the food chain.

  1. CHROMOSOME TRANSFER KINETICS OF SALMONELLA HFR STRAINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JOHNSON, E M; FALKOW, S; BARON, L S

    1964-08-01

    Johnson, E. M. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), Stanley Falkow, and L. S. Baron. Chromosome transfer kinetics of Salmonella Hfr strains. J. Bacteriol. 88:395-400. 1964.-The kinetics of chromosome transfer of an Hfr strain of Salmonella typhosa and an Hfr strain of S. typhimurium were examined in interrupted matings with multiply auxotrophic S. typhimurium recipients. The S. typhosa Hfr, TD-7, was found to transfer the pro-A, met-A, arg (A, C, F, or H), and ile markers at 8, 32, 36, and 51 min, respectively, after contact with the recipient strain. Comparison of these entry times with those of the analogous Escherichia coli Hfr P4X-6 for the same markers showed the gene order to be identical. However, the TD-7 entry times were considerably extended over those of P4X-6, which transfers these markers of E. coli F(-) strains at, respectively, 5, 20, 22.5, and 28 min. A similar extension of the entry times was noted with the S. typhimurium Hfr, SR-305, which transfers the markers in the reverse order, ile-met-A-pro-A, at 3 to 4, 18, and 46 min, respectively. Examination of P4X-6/Salmonella Hfr entry time ratios showed them to be constant at 0.63 for the earlier markers transferred by both TD-7 and SR-305. These data suggest that the physical length of the Salmonella chromosome is the same as that of E. coli, and that the rate of chromosome transfer of the Salmonella Hfr strains to S. typhimurium recipients is only 0.63 that of P4X-6 to E. coli F(-) strains under the same physical conditions.

  2. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella spp. in pork burger patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, P M; Ross, T; Holds, G L; Jarrett, R G; Kiermeier, A

    2016-02-16

    Predictive models, to estimate the reduction in Escherichia coli O157:H7 concentration in beef burgers, have been developed to inform risk management decisions; no analogous model exists for Salmonella spp. in pork burgers. In this study, "Extra Lean" and "Regular" fat pork minces were inoculated with Salmonella spp. (Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:-, Salmonella Senftenberg and Salmonella Typhimurium) and formed into pork burger patties. Patties were cooked on an electric skillet (to imitate home cooking) to one of seven internal temperatures (46, 49, 52, 55, 58, 61, 64 °C) and Salmonella enumerated. A generalised linear logistic regression model was used to develop a predictive model for the Salmonella concentration based on the internal endpoint temperature. It was estimated that in pork mince with a fat content of 6.1%, Salmonella survival will be decreased by -0.2407log10 CFU/g for a 1 °C increase in internal endpoint temperature, with a 5-log10 reduction in Salmonella concentration estimated to occur when the geometric centre temperature reaches 63 °C. The fat content influenced the rate of Salmonella inactivation (P=0.043), with Salmonella survival increasing as fat content increased, though this effect became negligible as the temperature approached 62 °C. Fat content increased the time required for patties to achieve a specified internal temperature (P=0.0106 and 0.0309 for linear and quadratic terms respectively), indicating that reduced fat pork mince may reduce the risk of salmonellosis from consumption of pork burgers. Salmonella serovar did not significantly affect the model intercepts (P=0.86) or slopes (P=0.10) of the fitted logistic curve. This predictive model can be applied to estimate the reduction in Salmonella in pork burgers after cooking to a specific endpoint temperature and hence to assess food safety risk. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 76 FR 41157 - Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding the Final Rule, Prevention of Salmonella...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Answers Regarding the Final Rule, Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production... Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation'' (the draft guidance... rule entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and...

  4. Development of a novel hexa-plex PCR method for identification and serotyping of Salmonella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruichao; Wang, Yang; Shen, Jianzhong; Wu, Congming

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is one of the most important foodborne pathogens, which causes a huge economic burden worldwide. To detect Salmonella rapidly is very meaningful in preventing salmonellosis and decreasing economic losses. Currently, isolation of Salmonella is confirmed by biochemical and serobased serotyping methods, which are time consuming, labor intensive, and complicated. To solve this problem, a hexa-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed using comparative genomics analysis and multiplex PCR technology to detect Salmonella and Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Choleraesuis, and Salmonella Pullorum simultaneously. The accuracy of this method was tested by a collection of 142 Salmonella. Furthermore, the strategy described in this article to mine serovar-specific fragments for Salmonella could be used to find specific fragments for other Salmonella serotypes and bacteria. The combination of this strategy and multiplex PCR is promising in the rapid identification of foodborne pathogens.

  5. Comparing human-Salmonella with plant-Salmonella protein-protein interaction predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia eSchleker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is the most frequent food-borne disease world-wide and can be transmitted to humans by a variety of routes, especially via animal and plant products. Salmonella bacteria are believed to use not only animal and human but also plant hosts despite their evolutionary distance. This raises the question if Salmonella employs similar mechanisms in infection of these diverse hosts. Given that most of our understanding comes from its interaction with human hosts, we investigate here to what degree knowledge of Salmonella-human interactions can be transferred to the Salmonella-plant system. Reviewed are recent publications on analysis and prediction of Salmonella-host interactomes. Putative protein-protein interactions (PPIs between Salmonella and its human and Arabidopsis hosts were retrieved utilizing purely interolog-based approaches in which predictions were inferred based on available sequence and domain information of known PPIs, and machine learning approaches that integrate a larger set of useful information from different sources. Transfer learning is an especially suitable machine learning technique to predict plant host targets from the knowledge of human host targets. A comparison of the prediction results with transcriptomic data shows a clear overlap between the host proteins predicted to be targeted by PPIs and their gene ontology enrichment in both host species and regulation of gene expression. In particular, the cellular processes Salmonella interferes with in plants and humans are catabolic processes. The details of how these processes are targeted, however, are quite different between the two organisms, as expected based on their evolutionary and habitat differences. Possible implications of this observation on evolution of host-pathogen communication are discussed.

  6. Recent Trends in Salmonella Outbreaks and Emerging Technology for Biocontrol of Salmonella Using Phages in Foods: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Hyun; Park, Mi-Kyung

    2017-12-28

    Salmonella is one of the principal causes of foodborne outbreaks. As traditional control methods have shown less efficacy against emerging Salmonella serotypes or antimicrobialresistant Salmonella , new approaches have been attempted. The use of lytic phages for the biocontrol of Salmonella in the food industry has become an attractive method owing to the many advantages offered by the use of phages as biocontrol agents. Phages are natural alternatives to traditional antimicrobial agents; they have proven effective in the control of bacterial pathogens in the food industry, which has led to the development of different phage products. The treatment with specific phages in the food industry can prevent the decay of products and the spread of bacterial diseases, and ultimately promotes safe environments for animal and plant food production, processing, and handling. After an extensive investigation of the current literature, this review focuses predominantly on the efficacy of phages for the successful control of Salmonella spp. in foods. This review also addresses the current knowledge on the pathogenic characteristics of Salmonella , the prevalence of emerging Salmonella outbreaks, the isolation and characterization of Salmonella -specific phages, the effectiveness of Salmonella -specific phages as biocontrol agents, and the prospective use of Salmonella -specific phages in the food industry.

  7. Salmonella Enteritidis universal stress protein (usp) gene expression is stimulated by egg white and supports oviduct colonization and egg contamination in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspoet, R; Gantois, I; Devloo, R; Martel, A; Haesebrouck, F; Pasmans, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-11-21

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis has caused a worldwide egg-associated pandemic since the mid 1980s. The exact mechanisms causing this egg tropism are still largely unknown, and only a few Salmonella genes have been implicated in the interaction with the oviduct or eggs. A in vivo expression technology screening performed previously, identified the uspA and uspB genes as being highly expressed in the chicken oviduct and in eggs. Here, we demonstrate that uspA and uspB gene expression is indeed induced after contact with egg white. Intra-oviduct inoculation of Salmonella Enteritidis uspB and uspBA mutant strains showed that the mutants had a decreased ability to colonize the magnum and isthmus of the oviduct, the organs that produce the egg white and eggshell membranes, respectively, at 7 days post-inoculation. Intravenous challenge showed that a Salmonella Enteritidis uspBA mutant strain had a decreased ability to contaminate eggs. Analogous to the function of universal stress proteins A and B in other bacterial species, we hypothesize that the Salmonella uspA and uspB genes are involved in long term persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis in harmful environments, such as in the oviduct and eggs, by conferring resistance against compounds that damage the bacterial cell membrane and DNA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate-chelated calcium and iron feed additives maintains egg production and prevents Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Kim, HeeKyong; Heo, Su Jeong; Cho, Hyang Hyun; Koh, Hong Bum

    2017-09-30

    We evaluated the effects of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP)-chelated calcium and iron (CaFe-GMP) on health and egg quality in layers experimentally infected with Salmonella Gallinarum. In this study, a CaFe-GMP feed additive was added to a commercial layer feed and fed to layers over a four-week period. All were inoculated with Salmonella Gallinarum. Body weight, mortality, clinical symptoms, and poultry production including feed intake, egg production, egg loss, and feed conversion rate were observed, and Salmonella Gallinarum was re-isolated from the liver, spleen, and cecum of the layers. All tested internal organs for the CaFe-GMP additive group exhibited significantly lower re-isolation numbers of Salmonella Gallinarum and less severe pathological changes than those in the control group, indicating that the CaFe-GMP feed supplement induced bacterial clearance and increased resistance to Salmonella Gallinarum. Additionally, due to the inhibitory action of CaFe-GMP on the growth of Salmonella Gallinarum, the CaFe-GMP additive group exhibited better egg production, including a higher laying rate and fewer broken eggs. The results suggest that a 0.16% CaFe-GMP additive may help prevent salmonellosis in the poultry industry.

  9. Guanosine 5′-monophosphate-chelated calcium and iron feed additives maintains egg production and prevents Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Kim, HeeKyong; Heo, Su Jeong; Cho, Hyang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of guanosine 5′-monophosphate (GMP)-chelated calcium and iron (CaFe-GMP) on health and egg quality in layers experimentally infected with Salmonella Gallinarum. In this study, a CaFe-GMP feed additive was added to a commercial layer feed and fed to layers over a four-week period. All were inoculated with Salmonella Gallinarum. Body weight, mortality, clinical symptoms, and poultry production including feed intake, egg production, egg loss, and feed conversion rate were observed, and Salmonella Gallinarum was re-isolated from the liver, spleen, and cecum of the layers. All tested internal organs for the CaFe-GMP additive group exhibited significantly lower re-isolation numbers of Salmonella Gallinarum and less severe pathological changes than those in the control group, indicating that the CaFe-GMP feed supplement induced bacterial clearance and increased resistance to Salmonella Gallinarum. Additionally, due to the inhibitory action of CaFe-GMP on the growth of Salmonella Gallinarum, the CaFe-GMP additive group exhibited better egg production, including a higher laying rate and fewer broken eggs. The results suggest that a 0.16% CaFe-GMP additive may help prevent salmonellosis in the poultry industry. PMID:28057911

  10. Immunogenicity of Salmonella vector vaccines expressing SBR of Streptococcus mutans under the control of a T7-nirB (dual) promoter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Mohammad Abdus; Katz, Jannet; Zhang, Ping; Hajishengallis, George; Michalek, Suzanne M

    2006-06-05

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if a Salmonella vector expressing the cloned saliva-binding region (SBR) of Streptococcus mutans or SBR linked to the A2 and B subunits of cholera toxin (CTA2/B) under the control of both the T7 and nirB promoters (T7-nirB dual promoter) was more effective in inducing mucosal and systemic anti-SBR antibody responses than Salmonella clones expressing the same antigens but under the control of either the nirB or T7 promoter. Mice were immunized by the intranasal route on days 0, 18 and 320 with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain BRD 509 containing one of six plasmids encoding SBR or SBR-CTA2/B under the control of the T7-nirB, T7, or nirB promoter. Serum, saliva and vaginal wash samples were collected throughout the experiment and assessed for antibody activity by ELISA. Evidence is provided that Salmonella clones expressing SBR or SBR-CAT2/B under the control of either the T7 or T7-nirB promoter induced a high and persistent mucosal and systemic anti-SBR antibody response. All Salmonella clones induced good anti-SBR responses following the boost on day 320.

  11. Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei Attenuate Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium Colonization and Virulence Gene Expression In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Shafeekh Muyyarikkandy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Enteritidis (SE, Salmonella Typhimurium (ST, and Salmonella Heidelberg (SH have been responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. Salmonella colonization in chicken is characterized by initial attachment to the cecal epithelial cells (CEC followed by dissemination to the liver, spleen, and oviduct. Since cecal colonization is critical to Salmonella transmission along the food chain continuum, reducing this intestinal association could potentially decrease poultry meat and egg contamination. Hence, this study investigated the efficacy of Lactobacillus delbreuckii sub species bulgaricus (NRRL B548; LD, Lactobacillus paracasei (DUP-13076; LP, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (NRRL B442; LR in reducing SE, ST, and SH colonization in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages. Additionally, their effect on expression of Salmonella virulence genes essential for cecal colonization and survival in macrophages was evaluated. All three probiotics significantly reduced Salmonella adhesion and invasion in CEC and survival in chicken macrophages (p < 0.05. Further, the probiotic treatment led to a significant reduction in Salmonella virulence gene expression (p < 0.05. Results of the study indicate that LD, LP, and LR could potentially be used to control SE, ST, and SH colonization in chicken. However, these observations warrant further in vivo validation.

  12. Conservation of Salmonella infection mechanisms in plants and animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Schikora

    Full Text Available Salmonella virulence in animals depends on effectors injected by Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs. In this report we demonstrate that Salmonella mutants that are unable to deliver effectors are also compromised in infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Transcriptome analysis revealed that in contrast to wild type bacteria, T3SS mutants of Salmonella are compromised in suppressing highly conserved Arabidopsis genes that play a prominent role during Salmonella infection of animals. We also found that Salmonella originating from infected plants are equally virulent for human cells and mice. These results indicate a high degree of conservation in the defense and infection mechanism of animal and plant hosts during Salmonella infection.

  13. Modeling salmonella Dublin into the dairy herd simulation model Simherd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudahl, Anne Braad

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Salmonella Dublin in the dairy herd and effects of the infection and relevant control measures are currently being modeled into the dairy herd simulation model called Simherd. The aim is to compare the effects of different control strategies against Salmonella Dublin on both within...... of the simulations will therefore be used for decision support in the national surveillance and eradication program against Salmonella Dublin. Basic structures of the model are programmed and will be presented at the workshop. The model is in a phase of face-validation by a group of Salmonella......-herd- prevalence and economy by simulations. The project Dublin on both within-herd- prevalence and economy by simulations. The project is a part of a larger national project "Salmonella 2007 - 2011" with the main objective to reduce the prevalence of Salmonella Dublin in Danish Dairy herds. Results...

  14. Microarray-based genotyping of Salmonella: Inter-laboratory evaluation of reproducibility and standardization potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Hugo Ahlm; Riber, Leise; Vigre, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial food-borne infections in humans caused by Salmonella spp. are considered a crucial food safety issue. Therefore, it is important for the risk assessments of Salmonella to consider the genomic variationamong different isolates in order to control pathogen-induced infections. Microarray...... of the microarray technique as a first step towards standardization. The low-density array contains 281 57–60-mer oligonucleotide probes for detecting a wide range of specific genomic marker genes associated with antibiotic resistance, cell envelope structures,mobile genetic elements and pathogenicity. Several...... critical methodology parameters that differed between the two labs were identified. These related to printing facilities, choice of hybridization buffer,wash buffers used following the hybridization and choice of procedure for purifying genomic DNA. Critical parameters were randomized in a four...

  15. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium adhesion and cytotoxicity during epithelial cell stress is reduced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkholder Kristin M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiological stressors may alter susceptibility of the host intestinal epithelium to infection by enteric pathogens. In the current study, cytotoxic effect, adhesion and invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium to Caco-2 cells exposed to thermal stress (41°C, 1 h was investigated. Probiotic bacteria have been shown to reduce interaction of pathogens with the epithelium under non-stress conditions and may have a significant effect on epithelial viability during infection; however, probiotic effect on pathogen interaction with epithelial cells under physiological stress is not known. Therefore, we investigated the influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus gasseri on Salmonella adhesion and Salmonella-induced cytotoxicity of Caco-2 cells subjected to thermal stress. Results Thermal stress increased the cytotoxic effect of both S. Typhimurium (P = 0.0001 and nonpathogenic E. coli K12 (P = 0.004 to Caco-2 cells, and resulted in greater susceptibility of cell monolayers to S. Typhimurium adhesion (P = 0.001. Thermal stress had no significant impact on inflammatory cytokines released by Caco-2 cells, although exposure to S. Typhimurium resulted in greater than 80% increase in production of IL-6 and IL-8. Blocking S. Typhimurium with anti-ShdA antibody prior to exposure of Salmonella decreased adhesion (P = 0.01 to non-stressed and thermal-stressed Caco-2 cells. Pre-exposure of Caco-2 cells to L. rhamnosus GG significantly reduced Salmonella-induced cytotoxicity (P = 0.001 and Salmonella adhesion (P = 0.001 to Caco-2 cells during thermal stress, while L. gasseri had no effect. Conclusion Results suggest that thermal stress increases susceptibility of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells to Salmonella adhesion, and increases the cytotoxic effect of Salmonella during infection. Use of L. rhamnosus GG as a probiotic may reduce the severity of infection during epithelial cell stress. Mechanisms

  16. An Influenza HA and M2e Based Vaccine Delivered by a Novel Attenuated Salmonella Mutant Protects Mice against Homologous H1N1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad A. Hajam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated Salmonella strains constitute a promising technology for the development of a more efficient multivalent protein based vaccines. In this study, we constructed a novel attenuated strain of Salmonella for the delivery and expression of the H1N1 hemagglutinin (HA and the conserved extracellular domain of the matrix protein 2 (M2e. We demonstrated that the constructed Salmonella strain exhibited efficient HA and M2e protein expressions and little cytotoxicity and pathogenicity in mice. Using BALB/c mice as the model, we showed that the mice vaccinated with a Salmonella strain expressing HA and M2e protein antigens, respectively, induced significant production of HA and M2e-specific serum IgG1 and IgG2a responses, and of anti-HA interferon-γ producing T cells. Furthermore, immunization with Salmonella-HA-M2e-based vaccine via different routes provided protection in 66.66% orally, 100% intramuscularly, and 100% intraperitoneally immunized mice against the homologous H1N1 virus while none of the animals survived treated with either the PBS or the Salmonella carrying empty expression vector. Ex vivo stimulated dendritic cells (DCs with heat killed Salmonella expressing HA demonstrated that DCs play an important role in the elicitation of HA-specific humoral immune responses in mice. In summary, Salmonella-HA-M2e-based vaccine elicits efficient antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses, and provides significant immune protection against a highly pathogenic H1N1 influenza virus.

  17. Ceftiofur resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg from chicken meat and humans, Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutil, Lucie; Irwin, Rebecca; Finley, Rita; Ng, Lai King; Avery, Brent; Boerlin, Patrick; Bourgault, Anne Marie; Cole, Linda; Daignault, Danielle; Desruisseau, Andrea; Demczuk, Walter; Hoang, Linda; Horsman, Greg B; Ismail, Johanne; Jamieson, Frances; Maki, Anne; Pacagnella, Ana; Pillai, Dylan R

    2010-01-01

    ...) between ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg isolated from retail chicken and incidence of ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella serovar Heidelberg infections in humans across Canada...

  18. International Spread of an Epidemic Population of Salmonella enterica Serotype Kentucky ST198 Resistant to Ciprofloxacin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simon Le Hello; Rene S. Hendriksen; Benoît Doublet; Ian Fisher; Eva Møller Nielsen; Jean M. Whichard; Brahim Bouchrif; Kayode Fashae; Sophie A. Granier; Nathalie Jourdan-Da Silva; Axel Cloeckaert; E. John Threlfall; Frederick J. Angulo; Frank M. Aarestrup; John Wain; François-Xavier Weill

    2011-01-01

    National Salmonella surveillance systems from France, England and Wales, Denmark, and the United States identified the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype...

  19. Economic effects of introducing alternative Salmonella control strategies in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian Sundström; Helene Wahlström; Sofie Ivarsson; Susanna Sternberg Lewerin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse the economic effects of introducing alternative Salmonella control strategies in Sweden. Current control strategies in Denmark and the Netherlands were used as benchmarks. The true number of human Salmonella cases was estimated by reconstructing the reporting pyramids for the various scenarios. Costs were calculated for expected changes in human morbidity (Salmonella and two of its sequelae), for differences in the control programmes and for changes i...

  20. Ludwig's angina by Salmonella Typhi: a clinical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, R K; Sharma, S; Madan, P; Sharma, N

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella Typhi has rarely been associated with focal abscesses; and in literature, there is no evidence of its association with abscesses in the neck spaces. Ability of Salmonella Typhi to invade and localise in the neck spaces not only poses a diagnostic challenge but also underscores the necessity to understand the mechanisms that facilitate Salmonella Typhi to establish infections at sites completely non-traditional to the organism.

  1. Ludwig′s angina by Salmonella Typhi: A clinical dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhi has rarely been associated with focal abscesses; and in literature, there is no evidence of its association with abscesses in the neck spaces. Ability of Salmonella Typhi to invade and localise in the neck spaces not only poses a diagnostic challenge but also underscores the necessity to understand the mechanisms that facilitate Salmonella Typhi to establish infections at sites completely non-traditional to the organism.

  2. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse...

  3. In silico knockout studies of xenophagic capturing of salmonella

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Scheidel; Leonie Amstein; Jörg Ackermann; Ivan Dikic; Ina Koch

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of cytosol-invading pathogens by autophagy, a process known as xenophagy, is an important mechanism of the innate immune system. Inside the host, Salmonella Typhimurium invades epithelial cells and resides within a specialized intracellular compartment, the Salmonella-containing vacuole. A fraction of these bacteria does not persist inside the vacuole and enters the host cytosol. Salmonella Typhimurium that invades the host cytosol becomes a target of the autophagy machinery f...

  4. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey R Hartford; Wills Robert; Kirkpatrick Tasha B; Howe Kevin; Karsi Attila; Lawrence Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler pro...

  5. Salmonella – At Home in the Host Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti eMalik Kale; Jolly, Carrie E.; Stephanie eLathrop; Seth eWinfree; Courtney eLuterbach; Olivia eSteele-Mortimer

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica has developed an array of sophisticated tools to manipulate the host cell and establish an intracellular niche, for successful propagation as a facultative intracellular pathogen. While Salmonella exerts diverse effects on its host cell, only the cell biology of the classic “trigger”-mediated invasion process and the subsequent development of the Salmonella-containing vacuole have been investigated extensively. These processes are dependent on c...

  6. A comparison between longitudinal shedding patterns of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Dublin on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, M; McLaren, I; Clifton-Hadley, F A; Liebana, E; Wales, A D; Davies, R H

    2012-08-25

    Salmonella in cattle herds may behave as epidemic or endemic infections. An intensive longitudinal sampling study across all management groups and ages on six dairy farms in the UK was used to examine patterns of Salmonella shedding, following the prior identification of either Salmonella Dublin (SD) (three farms) or Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) (three farms) on the premises in the context of clinical salmonellosis. Individual faeces, pooled faeces and environmental samples (total 5711 samples), taken approximately every six weeks for 15-24 weeks, were cultured for Salmonella. SD was detected at low frequency (on any visit, 0.5-18.3 per cent of samples positive) and most consistently in calves. By contrast, ST was isolated at higher frequency (on any visit, 6.8-75 per cent of samples positive), and in higher numbers, up to 10(7) cfu/g faeces. Significantly more samples from calves were positive for ST than were positive for SD (50.6 per cent v 3.1 per cent; P < 0.001), which was also true for milking cows (46.3 per cent v 4.4 per cent; P < 0.001). The differences could help to explain the different patterns of bovine infection classically associated with these two serovars in the UK. No consistent effect upon shedding was seen among the ST-infected herds following vaccination.

  7. New technologies in using recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtiss, Roy; Xin, Wei; Li, Yuhua; Kong, Wei; Wanda, Soo-Young; Gunn, Bronwyn; Wang, Shifeng

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines (RASVs) have been constructed to deliver antigens from other pathogens to induce immunity to those pathogens in vaccinated hosts. The attenuation means should ensure that the vaccine survives following vaccination to colonize lymphoid tissues without causing disease symptoms. This necessitates that attenuation and synthesis of recombinant gene encoded protective antigens do not diminish the ability of orally administered vaccines to survive stresses encountered in the gastrointestinal tract. We have eliminated these problems by using RASVs with regulated delayed expression of attenuation and regulated delayed synthesis of recombinant antigens. These changes result in RASVs that colonize effector lymphoid tissues efficiently to serve as "factories" to synthesize protective antigens that induce higher protective immune responses than achieved when using previously constructed RASVs. We have devised a biological containment system with regulated delayed lysis to preclude RASV persistence in vivo and survival if excreted. Attributes were added to reduce the mild diarrhea sometimes experienced with oral live RASVs and to ensure complete safety in newborns. These collective technologies have been used to develop a novel, low-cost, RASV-synthesizing, multiple-protective Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens that will be safe for newborns/infants and will induce protective immunity to diverse S. pneumoniae serotypes after oral immunization.

  8. Salmonella Typhimurium exploits inflammation to its own advantage in piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eChirullo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is responsible for foodborne zoonotic infections that, in humans, induce self-limiting gastroenteritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the wild-type strain S. Typhimurium (STM14028 is able to exploit inflammation fostering an active infection.Due to the similarity between human and porcine diseases induced by S. Typhimurium, we used piglets as a model for salmonellosis and gastrointestinal research. This study showed that STM14028 is able to efficiently colonize in vitro porcine mono-macrophages and intestinal columnar epithelial (IPEC-J2 cells, and that the colonization significantly increases with LPS pre-treatment. This increase was then reversed by inhibiting the LPS stimulation through LPS antagonist, confirming an active role of LPS stimulation in the STM14028-intracellular colonization. Moreover, LPS in vivo treatment induces increased cytokines blood level and body temperature at 4 hours post infection, which is consistent with an acute inflammatory stimulus, capable to influence the colonization of STM14028 in different organs and tissues. The present study proves for the first time that in acute enteric salmonellosis, S.Typhimurium exploits inflammation for its benefit in piglets.

  9. Prevention of Salmonella contamination of finished soybean meal used for animal feed by a Norwegian production plant despite frequent Salmonella contamination of raw soy beans, 1994–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Wierup, Martin; Kristoffersen, Thor

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonella contaminated animal feed is a major source for introducing Salmonella into the animal derived food chain. Because soybeans frequently are contaminated with Salmonella, soybean meal used as animal feed material, a by-product of a “crushing plant” which produces oil from soybeans, can be important source of Salmonella in the animal feed. We report the successful control of Salmonella from 1994 to 2012 in a Norwegian crushing plant producing soybean meal from imported soy b...

  10. DETEKSI Salmonella PADA NASI GORENG YANG DISEDIAKAN OLEH RESTORAN KERETA API KELAS EKONOMI [Detection of Salmonella on Fried Rice Served in Restaurant of Economic Class Train

    OpenAIRE

    Srianta; Elisa Rinihapsari

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella is a group of infective pathogenic bacteria for human being that cause many food borne disease outbreaks. Human, animal and some animal-based food products are whicle for Salmonella. Public transportation i.e. train/railway, often serve foods that potentially contaminated with Salmonella. Study on Salmonella detection on fried rice served in economic class train restaurant is necessary for controlling its safety and quality. Standard method was used to detect Salmonella on fried ri...

  11. Salmonellae in avian wildlife in Norway from 1969 to 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsum, T.; Handeland, K.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    2002-01-01

    -B var. Java. Variant 0:4,12 comprised 96% (451 cases) of all serovar Typhimurium isolates, including all the passerines, while variant 0:4,5,12 accounted for the remaining 4% (18 cases). The occurrence of salmonellae in small passerines showed a distinct seasonality, with a peak in February and March......Postmortem records of wild-living birds in Norway with laboratory-confirmed findings of salmonella infection were summarized for the period from 1969 to 2000. Salmonella spp. were isolated from 470 birds belonging to 26 species. The salmonella-positive birds included 441 small passerines, 15 gulls...

  12. Pathogenicity, Epidemiology and Virulence Factors of Salmonella species: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamègnon Victorien DOUGNON

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella infections are major public health problems worldwide. The hereby review aimed to establish an overview on the pathogenicity, epidemiology and virulence factors of Salmonella spp. in the world. A systematic search was conducted online using the keywords ‘Salmonella’, ‘Salmonella spp.’, ‘Salmonella spp. Epidemiology’, ‘virulence factors of Salmonella spp. in the world’, ‘bacteria responsible for the contamination of meat products’, ‘non-typhoid salmonella’. These keywords were entered into databases such as PubMed and Google Scholar using mainly French language. The obtained articles were included based on the reliability of their source, the study area (usually Benin and Africa and the subject. The review revealed that Salmonella spp. is motile Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria, of the family Enterobacteriaceae, currently counting more than 2,600 serovars. Human contamination occurs through the ingestion of contaminated water and food and can cause gastroenteritis or typhoid fever, which are two serious public health problems. A gene set constituting the pathogenicity islands determines the pathogenesis of Salmonella spp. The diagnosis is based on bacteriological, serological and molecular techniques. Salmonella infections are usually treated using antibiotics; however, emergence of antibiotic resistance in these microorganisms suggests that the anti-salmonella control should explore new sources such as medicinal plants

  13. Salmonella serotype distribution in the Dutch broiler supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselt, E D; Thissen, J T N M; van der Fels-Klerx, H J

    2009-12-01

    Salmonella serotype distribution can give insight in contamination routes and persistence along a production chain. Therefore, it is important to determine not only Salmonella prevalence but also to specify the serotypes involved at the different stages of the supply chain. For this purpose, data from a national monitoring program in the Netherlands were used to estimate the serotype distribution and to determine whether this distribution differs for the available sampling points in the broiler supply chain. Data covered the period from 2002 to 2005, all slaughterhouses (n = 22), and the following 6 sampling points: departure from hatchery, arrival at the farm, departure from the farm, arrival at the slaughterhouse, departure from the slaughterhouse, and end of processing. Furthermore, retail data for 2005 were used for comparison with slaughterhouse data. The following serotypes were followed throughout the chain: Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Paratyphi B var. Java (Salmonella Java), Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Virchow, and Salmonella Mbandaka. Results showed that serotype distribution varied significantly throughout the supply chain (P supply chain up to the retail phase.

  14. Immunity to Intracellular Salmonella Depends on Surface-associated Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudi, Beatrice; Mazé, Alain; Schemmer, Anne K.; Kirchhoff, Dennis; Schmidt, Alexander; Burton, Neil; Bumann, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Invasive Salmonella infection is an important health problem that is worsening because of rising antimicrobial resistance and changing Salmonella serovar spectrum. Novel vaccines with broad serovar coverage are needed, but suitable protective antigens remain largely unknown. Here, we tested 37 broadly conserved Salmonella antigens in a mouse typhoid fever model, and identified antigen candidates that conferred partial protection against lethal disease. Antigen properties such as high in vivo abundance or immunodominance in convalescent individuals were not required for protectivity, but all promising antigen candidates were associated with the Salmonella surface. Surprisingly, this was not due to superior immunogenicity of surface antigens compared to internal antigens as had been suggested by previous studies and novel findings for CD4 T cell responses to model antigens. Confocal microscopy of infected tissues revealed that many live Salmonella resided alone in infected host macrophages with no damaged Salmonella releasing internal antigens in their vicinity. In the absence of accessible internal antigens, detection of these infected cells might require CD4 T cell recognition of Salmonella surface-associated antigens that could be processed and presented even from intact Salmonella. In conclusion, our findings might pave the way for development of an efficacious Salmonella vaccine with broad serovar coverage, and suggest a similar crucial role of surface antigens for immunity to both extracellular and intracellular pathogens. PMID:23093937

  15. Salmonella species isolated from animal feed in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hindawi, N; Taha, R R

    1979-01-01

    Of 700 animal feed samples, 32 (4.5%) harbored Salmonella. The highest percentage of contamination was found in sheep feed and local protein. A total of 17 Salmonella serotypes were identified. The most frequent serotypes were Salmonella meleagridis. S. bornum, S. montevideo, and S. drypool. S. bornum was isolated for the first time in Iraq and from both local feed and its ingredients. The common somatic group found was that of Salmonella group C; then came groups E, G, B, and D. Three serotypes (S. enteritidis, S. california, and S. muenchen) seemed to form a link of infection among feed, food, patients, and carriers. PMID:453836

  16. Salmonella serotypes encountered in animal feed additives in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbut, N H

    1978-05-01

    Animal feed-additive samples (n = 300) were examined for the presence of salmonellae, using the selenite-F broth-enrichment method followed by subculturing on Salmonella-Shigella and brilliant green agar with sulfadiazine selective agar plates. Samples consisted of a variety of feed additives: 119 bone meal samples, 77 meat meal samples, 40 fish meal samples, and 64 miscellaneous meal samples. Results of examination found 49 (41.2%) of the bone meal samples, 6 (7.8%) of the meat meal samples and 2 (5%) of the fish meal samples contained salmonellae. Of 57 isolates representing 24 serotypes, 4 most frequently isolated serotypes were Salmonella meleagridis (35.1%), Salmonella tennessee (7%), Salmonella chester (5.2%), and Salmonella senftenberg (5.2%). This study shows a high Salmonella-contamination rate of bone meal compared with meat meal and fish meal samples. Of 12 known positive bone meal samples that were examined, 100% of 25-g samples, compared with 70% to 100% of 2.5-g samples and 30% to 90% of 0.25-g samples and 30% to 90% of 0.25-g samples, were positive for salmonellae.

  17. Using In Vitro Immunomodulatory Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Selection of Probiotics against Salmonella Infection in Broiler Chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junchang; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Luoxiong; Yang, Xin; Zhao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Poultry is known to be a major reservoir of Salmonella. The use of lactic acid bacteria has become one of successful strategies to control Salmonella in poultry. The purpose of this study was to select lactic acid bacteria strains by their in vitro immunomodulatory properties for potential use as probiotics against Salmonella infection in broiler chicks. Among 101 isolated lactic acid bacteria strains, 13 strains effectively survived under acidic (pH 2.5) and bile salt (ranging from 0.1% to 1.0%) conditions, effectively inhibited growth of 6 pathogens, and adhered to Caco-2 cells. However, their in vitro immunomodulatory activities differed significantly. Finally, three strains with higher in vitro immunomodulatory properties (Lactobacillus plantarum PZ01, Lactobacillus salivarius JM32 and Pediococcus acidilactici JH231) and three strains with lower in vitro immunomodulatory activities (Enterococcus faecium JS11, Lactobacillus salivarius JK22 and Lactobacillus salivarius JM2A1) were compared for their inhibitory effects on Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro and their antimicrobial effects in vivo. The former three strains inhibited Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro, reduced the number of Salmonella in intestinal content, spleen and liver, reduced the levels of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF), IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 in serum and increased the level of IL-10 in serum during a challenge study in vivo more efficiently than the latter three strains. These results suggest that in vitro immunomodulatory activities could be used as additional parameters to select more effective probiotics as feed supplements for poultry.

  18. Influence of the treatment of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with citral on the efficacy of various antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Surama F; Silva-Angulo, Angela B; Rosenthal, Amauri; Aliaga, Dolores Rodrigo; Martínez, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    The main goal of this work was to study the bacterial adaptive responses to antibiotics induced by sublethal concentration of citral on first-and second-generation cells of Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b (CECT 4032) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (CECT 443). The first-generation cells were not pretreated with citral, while the second-generation cells were obtained from cells previously exposed to citral during 5 h. The trials were conducted at 37°C. The presence of citral in the culture medium and the antibiotic strips resulted in a reduced minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the first-generation cells of Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b and Salmonella Typhimurium. This result was observed for almost all the antibiotics, compared with the same microorganisms of the control group (without citral), which could represent an additive effect. For Listeria serovar 4b, the second-generation cells of the test group maintained the same susceptibility to antibiotics compared with cells in the control group and in the test group of the first generation. The second-generation cells of the control group indicated that the Salmonella Typhimurium maintained the same sensitivity to the antibiotics tested compared with the first generation of this group, except in the case of erythromycin, which exhibited an increased MIC value. With respect to the second-generation cells of Salmonella Typhimurium, the presence of citral determined a decrease in the antibiotic susceptibility for almost all of the antibiotics, except colistin, compared with the first-generation of the test group, which can be seen by increase of MIC values. In conclusion, the presence of citral in the culture medium of Listeria 4b and Salmonella Typhimurium increased the antibiotic susceptibility of the first generations, while we observed an increase in antibiotic resistance in the second generation of Salmonella Typhimurium.

  19. Using In Vitro Immunomodulatory Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Selection of Probiotics against Salmonella Infection in Broiler Chicks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchang Feng

    Full Text Available Poultry is known to be a major reservoir of Salmonella. The use of lactic acid bacteria has become one of successful strategies to control Salmonella in poultry. The purpose of this study was to select lactic acid bacteria strains by their in vitro immunomodulatory properties for potential use as probiotics against Salmonella infection in broiler chicks. Among 101 isolated lactic acid bacteria strains, 13 strains effectively survived under acidic (pH 2.5 and bile salt (ranging from 0.1% to 1.0% conditions, effectively inhibited growth of 6 pathogens, and adhered to Caco-2 cells. However, their in vitro immunomodulatory activities differed significantly. Finally, three strains with higher in vitro immunomodulatory properties (Lactobacillus plantarum PZ01, Lactobacillus salivarius JM32 and Pediococcus acidilactici JH231 and three strains with lower in vitro immunomodulatory activities (Enterococcus faecium JS11, Lactobacillus salivarius JK22 and Lactobacillus salivarius JM2A1 were compared for their inhibitory effects on Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro and their antimicrobial effects in vivo. The former three strains inhibited Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro, reduced the number of Salmonella in intestinal content, spleen and liver, reduced the levels of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 in serum and increased the level of IL-10 in serum during a challenge study in vivo more efficiently than the latter three strains. These results suggest that in vitro immunomodulatory activities could be used as additional parameters to select more effective probiotics as feed supplements for poultry.

  20. Ruptured cryptogenic mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm by Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordzadeh, Ali; Rhodes, Karen May; Hanif, Muhammad Asad; Scott, Harriet; Panayiotopoulos, Yiannis

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a case of ruptured cryptogenic mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm by Salmonella enteritidis (SE) and present a comprehensive review of the literature. A 66-year-old man with a past medical history of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and polymylagia rheumatica (PMR) presented with a 2-day history of right-flank-to-groin pain and fever. He was found to have tenderness on the right of the umbilical region and laboratory data showed leukocytosis, raised C-reactive protein, and a significant drop in hemoglobin level as compared with his first visit 17 days earlier, with no hemodynamic instability. An immediate computed tomography angiogram (CTA) was performed, which showed a 4-cm, fusiform, ruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysm. Exploratory laparatomy was performed and the aorta was isolated and excised from the infrarenal level to the common iliac bificuration. A straight silver Dacron graft soaked in rifampicin was placed with an end-to-end anastomosis. The excised aorta and the lymph nodes were sent for histologic and microbiologic assessment. Blood culture and specimen microbiology grew Salmonella enteritidis (SE). The histology exhibited atherosclerosis at the rupture point with decreasing neutrophil deposition from the intima to the adventitia layer, respectively. Infrarenal abdominal mycotic aneurysm (MA) by SE was observed and showed vague, nonspecific signs and symptoms. We recommend a high index of suspicion and low threshold for use of CT imaging in any infected patient of age >60 years with fever and abdominal pain on a background of diabetes and connective tissue disease. A comprehensive review of the literature was performed due to a lack of consensus on the best surgical treatment and limited information on the path of SE-induced aortitis or MA from presentation to final outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Liver abscess caused by Salmonella choleraesuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamatani T

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Takashi Kamatani,1 Takemichi Okada,2 Hiroyoshi Iguchi,2 Yoshihito Takahashi,3 Hiroaki Yokomori1 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Surgery, Kitasato University Medical Center, Saitama, Japan Abstract: A 65-year-old man with long-term alcohol abuse presented with intermittent fever. Abdominal computed tomography revealed multiple masses. Abscess blood and pus cultures conducted after percutaneous catheter drainage with pigtail catheters yielded Salmonella choleraesuis. Antibiotic treatment with meropenem was started using multiple catheters in the liver. Drainage catheters in different locations were exchanged several times with larger-bored catheters. After septicemia was detected, abscesses spread to the peritoneal cavity. Pleural complications developed. Antibiotic treatment, with careful drainage guided by ultrasound or computed tomography, controlled the abscesses and complications. This report describes the difficult clinical course and treatment of a liver abscess from S. choleraesuis. Keywords: liver abscess, Salmonella choleraesuis, bacteremia, CT

  2. Deciphering interplay between Salmonella invasion effectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Cain

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens have evolved a specialized type III secretion system (T3SS to translocate virulence effector proteins directly into eukaryotic target cells. Salmonellae deploy effectors that trigger localized actin reorganization to force their own entry into non-phagocytic host cells. Six effectors (SipC, SipA, SopE/2, SopB, SptP can individually manipulate actin dynamics at the plasma membrane, which acts as a 'signaling hub' during Salmonella invasion. The extent of crosstalk between these spatially coincident effectors remains unknown. Here we describe trans and cisbinary entry effector interplay (BENEFIT screens that systematically examine functional associations between effectors following their delivery into the host cell. The results reveal extensive ordered synergistic and antagonistic relationships and their relative potency, and illuminate an unexpectedly sophisticated signaling network evolved through longstanding pathogen-host interaction.

  3. Aptasensors for quantitative detection of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Najmeh; Yazdian-Robati, Rezvan; Shahdordizadeh, Mahin; Wang, Zhouping; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2017-09-15

    Salmonella is one of the most frequent causes of food borne infectious disease. Among nearly 2500 documented serotypes are reported, Salmonella Typhimurium is the number one serotype associated with salmonellosis worldwide. Many different methods have been developed for the detection and quantification of S. typhimurium. Most of these assays are usually expensive, time consuming and require difficult sample preparation steps. Therefore, it is necessary to develop rapid, robust, cost-effective and sensitive alternative detection methods. In the last years, aptasensors, used for detection of S. typhimurium in different samples. In this review, recent advances and applications of aptasensors for the detection and quantification of S. typhimurium in details have been summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Whole Genome Epidemiological Typing of Salmonella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas

    Salmonella is one of the most common foodborne pathogens worldwide. In the US alone, salmonellosis was estimated to cause 1.4 million cases effecting 17,000 hospitalization and almost 600 deaths each year. Particularly, Salmonella enterica is a common cause of minor and large food borne outbreaks...... used for typing is crucial for successful discrimination. The core genes or the genes that are conserved in all members of a genus or species are potentially good candidates for investigating genomic variation in phylogeny and epidemiology. A total of 2,882 core genes have been observed among 73....../absence of all genes across genomes, is similar to the consensus tree but with higher branching confidence value. The core genes can be divided into two categories: a few highly variable genes and a larger set of conserved core genes, with low variance. These core genes are useful for investigating molecular...

  5. Salmonella Dublin kan give store tab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Dahl; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Kudahl, Anne Margrethe Braad

    2012-01-01

    Store besætninger lider størst økonomisk tab ved infektion med Salmonella Dublin. Selv i en veldrevet besætning kan tabet løbe op i mellem 1,3 og 3,3 millioner kr. over en tiårs periode. Ved uhensigtsmæssige hygiejne- og managementrutiner kan tabet nemt blive meget højere.......Store besætninger lider størst økonomisk tab ved infektion med Salmonella Dublin. Selv i en veldrevet besætning kan tabet løbe op i mellem 1,3 og 3,3 millioner kr. over en tiårs periode. Ved uhensigtsmæssige hygiejne- og managementrutiner kan tabet nemt blive meget højere....

  6. Prevalence of Nontyphoidal Salmonella and Salmonella Strains with Conjugative Antimicrobial-Resistant Serovars Contaminating Animal Feed in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Poole, Toni L; Runyon, Mick; Hume, Michael; Herrman, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize 365 nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica isolates from animal feed. Among the 365 isolates, 78 serovars were identified. Twenty-four isolates (7.0%) were recovered from three of six medicated feed types. Three of these isolates derived from the medicated feed, Salmonella Newport, Salmonella Typhimurium var. O 5- (Copenhagen), and Salmonella Lexington var. 15+ (Manila), displayed antimicrobial resistance. Susceptibility testing revealed that only 3.0% (12) of the 365 isolates displayed resistance to any of the antimicrobial agents. These 12 isolates were recovered from unmedicated dry beef feed (n = 3), medicated dry beef feed (n = 3), cabbage culls (n = 2), animal protein products (n = 2), dry dairy cattle feed (n = 1), and fish meal (n = 1). Only Salmonella Newport and Salmonella Typhimurium var. O 5- (Copenhagen) were multidrug resistant. Both isolates possessed the IncA/C replicon and the blaCMY-2 gene associated with cephalosporin resistance. Plasmid replicons were amplified from 4 of 12 resistant isolates. Plasmids (40 kb) were Salmonella Montevideo and Salmonella Kentucky. Conjugation experiments were done using 7 of the 12 resistant isolates as donors. Only Salmonella Montevideo, possessing a plasmid and amplifying IncN, produced transconjugants. Transconjugants displayed the same antimicrobial resistance profile as did the donor isolate. Three isolates that amplified replicons corresponding to IncA/C or IncHI2 did not produce transconjugants at 30 or 37°C. The results of this study suggest that the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella contaminating animal feed is low in Texas. However, Salmonella was more prevalent in feed by-products; fish meal had the highest prevalence (84%) followed by animal protein products (48%). Ten of the 35 feed types had no Salmonella contamination. Further investigation is needed to understand the possible role of specific feed types in the dissemination of antimicrobial

  7. Hydrophobic peptide auxotrophy in Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Brãnes, L V; Somers, J M; Kay, W W

    1981-01-01

    The growth of a pleiotropic membrane mutant of Salmonella typhimurium with modified lipopolysaccharide composition was found to be strictly dependent on the peptone component of complex media. Nutritional Shiftdown into minimal media allowed growth for three to four generations. Of 20 commercial peptones, only enzymatic digests supported growth to varying degrees. Neither trace cations, amino acids, vitamins, carbohydrates, lipids, glutathione, polyamines, carbodimides, nor synthetic peptides...

  8. Salmonella typhimurium phage typing for pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabsch, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Phage typing provides a rapid, accurate, and cheap method of investigating Salmonella strains for epidemiological use. Salmonella strains within a particular serovar may be differentiated into a number of phage types by their pattern of susceptibility to lysis by a set of phages with different specificity. Characterization based on the pattern of phage lysis of wild strains isolated from different patients, carriers, or other sources is valuable in epidemiological study. The phages must have well-defined propagation strains that allow reproducible discrimination between different Salmonella Typhimurium strains. Different schemes have been developed for this serovar in different countries. The Felix/Callow (England) and Lilleengen typing systems (Sweden) used for laboratory-based epidemiological analysis were helpful for control of salmonellosis. More recently, the extended phage-typing system of Anderson (England) that distinguishes more than 300 definitive phage types (DTs) has been used worldwide in Europe, the United States, and Australia. The use of this method for decades show us that some phage types (DT204 in the 1970s and DT104 in the 1990s) have a broad host range and are distributed worldwide, other phage types such as DT2 or DT99 are frequently associated with disease in pigeons, indicative of a narrow host range.

  9. Regulatory principles governing Salmonella and Yersinia virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Marc; Dersch, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Enteric pathogens such as Salmonella and Yersinia evolved numerous strategies to survive and proliferate in different environmental reservoirs and mammalian hosts. Deciphering common and pathogen-specific principles for how these bacteria adjust and coordinate spatiotemporal expression of virulence determinants, stress adaptation, and metabolic functions is fundamental to understand microbial pathogenesis. In order to manage sudden environmental changes, attacks by the host immune systems and microbial competition, the pathogens employ a plethora of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control elements, including transcription factors, sensory and regulatory RNAs, RNAses, and proteases, to fine-tune and control complex gene regulatory networks. Many of the contributing global regulators and the molecular mechanisms of regulation are frequently conserved between Yersinia and Salmonella. However, the interplay, arrangement, and composition of the control elements vary between these closely related enteric pathogens, which generate phenotypic differences leading to distinct pathogenic properties. In this overview we present common and different regulatory networks used by Salmonella and Yersinia to coordinate the expression of crucial motility, cell adhesion and invasion determinants, immune defense strategies, and metabolic adaptation processes. We highlight evolutionary changes of the gene regulatory circuits that result in different properties of the regulatory elements and how this influences the overall outcome of the infection process. PMID:26441883

  10. Distribution of virulence plasmids within Salmonellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, M J; McLaren, I; Wray, C

    1989-03-01

    The virulence region of the Salmonella dublin 50 MDa plasmid shared homology with 678 of 1021 salmonellae tested in colony hybridization experiments. The majority of S. dublin, S. typhimurium and S. enteritidis isolates tested hybridized with the region whereas, with the exception of S. hessarek, S. pullorum and S. gallinarum, other serotypes did not. Homologous virulence regions were plasmid encoded. In S. typhimurium a common 60 MDa plasmid was present in all phage types tested but not in DT4, DT37 and DT170. Smaller plasmids showing partial homology were found in DT12, DT18, DT193 and DT204C. In S. enteritidis a distinct plasmid profile for each of eight phage types was observed. Hybridizing plasmids were found in DT3, DT4, DT8, DT9 and DT11 whereas DT7, which was plasmid free, and DT10 and DT14, which harboured plasmids, did not hybridize. The extent of homology shared between S. dublin, S. typhimurium and S. enteritidis virulence plasmids was about 10 MDa and appeared conserved. Virulence plasmids from S. typhimurium and S. enteritidis did not show homology with a region of the S. dublin 50 MDa plasmid which was not associated with virulence functions whereas plasmids of about 24 MDa and 38 MDa in some S. typhimurium phage types did. The association of conserved virulence regions upon differing plasmids within salmonellae is discussed with reference to possible mechanisms of distribution and evolution of virulence genes.

  11. Antigenic relationships within the genus Salmonella as revealed by anti-Salmonella enteritidis monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M; Butchaiah, G; Bansal, M P; Siddiqui, M Z; Bakshi, C S; Singh, R K

    2002-04-01

    A panel of 38 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that react with outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Salmonella enteritidis was produced. On the basis of their binding pattern in ELISA, the MAbs were divided into three groups. The first group, consisting of 15 MAbs, was found to be Salmonella-specific as they did not cross-react with Escherichia coli or Pasteurella multocida. The second group of 15 MAbs cross-reacted with E. coli but not with P. multocida, reflecting the closer antigenic relationship of E. coli with Salmonella. The third group of 8 MAbs cross-reacted with both E. coli and P. multocida, indicating that the antigenic determinants identified by these MAbs are conserved in all the three genera. The antigenic relationship of the Salmonella serovars (S. enteritidis, S. gallinarum, S. typhimurium, S. dublin, S. agona, S. indiana and S. choleraesuis) was studied using OMPs prepared from them and the anti-S. enteritidis MAbs. Three MAbs appeared to be specific for S. enteritidis as they did not cross-react with any of the other Salmonella serovars. Twelve of the 38 MAbs cross-reacted with all the serovars tested. Six of these were specific to the Salmonella genus as they did not cross-react with any of the other Gram-negative bacteria tested. The reactivity pattern of the other MAbs indicated that S. gallinarum was antigenically close to S. enteritidis, followed in order by S. dublin, S. agona, S. typhimurium and S. indiana, whereas S. choleraesuis seemed to be antigenically quite distant from S. enteritidis.

  12. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  13. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil eChousalkar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonise reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonise the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% Typhimurium, 14.1% Mbandaka compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66% however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of

  14. Survival of Salmonella during baking of peanut butter cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Amanda A; Taylor, Tiffany; Schnepf, James

    2014-04-01

    Peanuts and peanut-based products have been the source of recent Salmonella outbreaks worldwide. Because peanut butter is commonly used as an ingredient in baked goods, such as cookies, the potential risk of Salmonella remaining in these products after baking needs to be assessed. This research examines the potential hazard of Salmonella in peanut butter cookies when it is introduced via the peanut-derived ingredient. The survival of Salmonella during the baking of peanut butter cookies was determined. Commercial, creamy-style peanut butter was artificially inoculated with a five-strain Salmonella cocktail at a target concentration of 10(8) CFU/g. The inoculated peanut butter was then used to prepare peanut butter cookie dough following a standard recipe. Cookies were baked at 350 °F (177 °C) and were sampled after 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 min. Temperature profiles of the oven and cookies were monitored during baking. The water activity and pH of the inoculated and uninoculated peanut butter, raw dough, and baked cookies were measured. Immediately after baking, cookies were cooled, and the survival of Salmonella was determined by direct plating or enrichment. After baking cookies for 10 min, the minimum reduction of Salmonella observed was 4.8 log. In cookies baked for 13 and 14 min, Salmonella was only detectable by enrichment reflecting a Salmonella reduction in the range of 5.2 to 6.2 log. Cookies baked for 15 min had no detectable Salmonella. Results of this study showed that proper baking will reduce Salmonella in peanut butter cookies by 5 log or more.

  15. Salmonella mediated the hemagglutinating virus of Japan-envelope transfer suppresses tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Che-Hsin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2017-05-23

    Salmonella can target to tumor microenvironments after systemic treatment. The hemagglutinating virus of Japan-envelope (HVJ-E) induced apoptosis in tumor cells without toxicity in normal cells. Current HVJ-E therapeutic strategies, aimed at using HVJ-E for intratumor treatment, have shown great promise in animal models but have achieved only limited systemic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the modulation of the anti-tumor efficiency of HVJ-E by coating the particles with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), designated as P-HVJ-E. Treatment with P-HVJ-E resulted in decreased hemagglutinating activity and maintained tumor cell-selective apoptosis and anti-tumor immunity. The use of Salmonella as a coating for P-HVJ-E (PHS) enhanced the antitumor activity and maintained the tumor-targeting activity. Treatment with PHS resulted in delayed tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, a Western blot assay of the tumors revealed that HVJ-E targeted to the tumor after systemic treatment with PHS. These results indicate that Salmonella coating viral particles may provide a new approach for tumor therapy.

  16. Origanum majorana Essential Oil Lacks Mutagenic Activity in the Salmonella/Microsome and Micronucleus Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea dos Santos Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the in vitro mutagenic activity of Origanum majorana essential oil. The most abundant compounds identified by GC-MS were γ-terpinene (25.73%, α-terpinene (17.35%, terpinen-4-ol (17.24%, and sabinene (10.8%. Mutagenicity was evaluated by the Salmonella/microsome test using the preincubation procedure on TA98, TA97a, TA100, TA102, and TA1535 Salmonella typhimurium strains, in the absence or in the presence of metabolic activation. Cytotoxicity was detected at concentrations higher than 0.04 μL/plate in the absence of S9 mix and higher than 0.08 μL/plate in the presence of S9 mix and no gene mutation increase was observed. For the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test, V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts were used. Cytotoxicity was only observed at concentrations higher than or equal to 0.05 μg/mL. Moreover, when tested in noncytotoxic concentrations, O. majorana essential oil was not able to induce chromosome mutation. The results from this study therefore suggest that O. majorana essential oil is not mutagenic at the concentrations tested in the Salmonella/microsome and micronucleus assays.

  17. Origanum majorana Essential Oil Lacks Mutagenic Activity in the Salmonella/Microsome and Micronucleus Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Júnior, Luiz Carlos; Guecheva, Temenouga N.; dos Santos, Luciana D.; Zanette, Régis A.; de Mello, Fernanda B.; de Mello, João Roberto Braga

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the in vitro mutagenic activity of Origanum majorana essential oil. The most abundant compounds identified by GC-MS were γ-terpinene (25.73%), α-terpinene (17.35%), terpinen-4-ol (17.24%), and sabinene (10.8%). Mutagenicity was evaluated by the Salmonella/microsome test using the preincubation procedure on TA98, TA97a, TA100, TA102, and TA1535 Salmonella typhimurium strains, in the absence or in the presence of metabolic activation. Cytotoxicity was detected at concentrations higher than 0.04 μL/plate in the absence of S9 mix and higher than 0.08 μL/plate in the presence of S9 mix and no gene mutation increase was observed. For the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test, V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts were used. Cytotoxicity was only observed at concentrations higher than or equal to 0.05 μg/mL. Moreover, when tested in noncytotoxic concentrations, O. majorana essential oil was not able to induce chromosome mutation. The results from this study therefore suggest that O. majorana essential oil is not mutagenic at the concentrations tested in the Salmonella/microsome and micronucleus assays. PMID:27891531

  18. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsi, Attila; Howe, Kevin; Kirkpatrick, Tasha B; Wills, Robert; Bailey, R Hartford; Lawrence, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler production continuum were transformed with the broad host range plasmid pAKlux1, and a chicken skin attachment model was developed. Results Salmonella strains carrying pAKlux1 constitutively expressed the luxCDABE operon and were therefore detectable using bioluminescence. Strains were characterized in terms of bioluminescence properties and plasmid stability. To assess the usefulness of bioluminescent Salmonella strains in food safety studies, we developed an attachment model using chicken skin. The effect of washing on attachment of Salmonella strains to chicken skin was tested using bioluminescent strains, which revealed the attachment properties of each strain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that bioluminescence is a sensitive and effective tool to detect Salmonella on food products in real-time. Bioluminescence imaging is a promising technology that can be utilized to evaluate new food safety measures for reducing Salmonella contamination on food products. PMID:18211715