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Sample records for salmonella food poisoning

  1. Surveillance and management of salmonella food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainsworth, Terry

    Reports of Salmonella Montevideo in UK chocolate have put foodborne disease back in the headlines. This article looks at the nature, prevalence and management of this public health problem and highlights the importance of surveillance.

  2. Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Poisoning KidsHealth / For Kids / Food Poisoning What's in ... find out how to avoid it. What Is Food Poisoning? Food poisoning comes from eating foods that ...

  3. Trends in salmonella food poisoning in England and Wales 1941-72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, J H

    1975-04-01

    Cattle and pig herds and flocks of domestic fowl have formed the main reservoir of human salmonella food poisoning in England and Wales from 1941 to 1972. Changes in the incidence of human salmonella food poisoning and in the serotypes of salmonellas isolated from human infections are shown to have been associated with the introduction of new foods, with changes in animal husbandry, and with changes in the relative proportions of flesh food from different species consumed. New foods, dried powdered egg, liquid egg and frozen liquid egg were introduced during the period of food rationing which extended from 1940 to 1953. Changes in animal husbandry, in particular the intensive production of pigs, poultry and eggs, followed the re-establishment of pig herds and fowl flocks after the derationing of animal feed in 1953. The changes in the proportions of flesh foods consumed followed the introduction of frozen oven-ready fowl in the late 1950s and early 1960s which by 1964 became cheaper than traditional flesh foods.

  4. Food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David T; Dobmeier, Stephen G; Bechtel, Laura K; Holstege, Christopher P

    2007-05-01

    Food poisoning is encountered throughout the world. Many of the toxins responsible for specific food poisoning syndromes are no longer limited to isolated geographic locations. With increased travel and the ease of transporting food products, it is likely that a patient may present to any emergency department with the clinical effects of food poisoning. Recognizing specific food poisoning syndromes allows emergency health care providers not only to initiate appropriate treatment rapidly but also to notify health departments early and thereby prevent further poisoning cases. This article reviews several potential food-borne poisons and describes each agent's mechanism of toxicity, expected clinical presentation, and currently accepted treatment.

  5. Outbreak of food poisoning due to Salmonella typhimurium DT4 in mayonnaise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Benito, J M; Langridge, P

    1992-05-01

    In July 1989 a large outbreak of food poisoning (68 cases) occurred at a private club in Teddington (London Borough of Richmond-upon-Thames). Initial enquiries indicated that the peak of the outbreak occurred between 20th and 26th July. An epidemiological investigation (using self-completed questionnaires) was set up to determine the probable source of infection. Two groups among those exposed were selected: club staff (129), and cricket teams playing in a club tournament (105). Response rates were 89% and 64% respectively. Overall 50% (89) had gastrointestinal symptoms, including two hospital admissions. A highly significant association was found between illness and eating sandwiches containing mayonnaise. Microbiological investigations found Salmonella typhimurium DT4 in 36 of 68 faecal samples taken. This organism is not usually associated with food poisoning outbreaks. The probable source was identified as a flock of one of the egg suppliers.

  6. Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-16

    enterotoxemia and other bacterial enterotoxemias due to contamination of food by preformed toxins, botulism, mushroom poisoning and "other poisons of...Preformed Toxins of Bacterial Origin Enterotoxemia Protein toxins produced during the growth of Staphylococcal aureus in food cause the most common...NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subttl*e) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Food Poisoning AD A 1 2 A- S

  7. Salmonella Weltevreden food poisoning in a tea garden of Assam: An outbreak investigation

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    L Saikia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden has been a rare cause of acute gastroenteritis occurring worldwide. Here, we report an outbreak of food poisoning in a tea garden. Objectives: To determine the aetiological agent and risk factors responsible for the outbreak and to take necessary steps for prevention of future outbreaks. Materials and Methods: Affected area was visited by a team of microbiologists for collecting stool samples/rectal swabs from affected patients. Samples were processed by culture followed by confirmation of the isolates biochemically, automated bacterial identification system, conventional serotyping and molecular typing. Water samples were also processed for detection of faecal contamination. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion technique according to the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute guidelines. Results: The isolates were confirmed as S. enterica subspecies enterica serovar Weltevreden. They were found sensitive to ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, co-trimoxazole and doxycycline. Water samples showed high-level faecal contamination. Source of outbreak was found to be drinking water contaminated with dead livestock. House to house visit was made for early diagnosis and treatment of the cases, awareness campaigning and chlorination of drinking water. Conclusions: This report emphasises the geographical distribution of this organism in Assam. As S. Weltevreden is widely distributed in domestic animals, people should be made aware of immediate reporting of any unusual death among the livestock and their safe disposal which can significantly reduce the incidence of non-typhoidal salmonellosis in the country.

  8. Histamine Food Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirone, Maria; Visciano, Pierina; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The consumption of food containing high amounts of histamine and other biogenic amines can cause food poisoning with different symptoms linked to the individual sensitivity and the detoxification activity. Histamine is the only biogenic amine with regulatory limits set by the European Commission in fish and fishery products, because it can lead to a fatal outcome. However, also fermented foods can be involved in outbreaks and sporadic cases of intoxication. The factors affecting the presence of histamine in food are variable and product specific including the availability of the precursor amino acid, the presence of microorganisms producing decarboxylases, and the conditions allowing their growth and enzyme production. Generally, the good quality of raw material and hygienic practices during food processing as well as the use of histidine decarboxylase-negative starter cultures can minimize the occurrence of histamine. Further studies are necessary to estimate the human exposure and the relationship between the total amount of the biogenic amines ingested with food and health effects.

  9. The risk of salmonellae shedding by dogs fed Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diets

    OpenAIRE

    Finley, Rita; Ribble, Carl; Aramini, Jeff; Vandermeer, Meredith; Popa, Maria; Litman, Marcus; Reid-Smith, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-eight research dogs were enrolled to determine the prevalence of salmonellae shedding after consumption of 1 Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diet meal. Sixteen dogs were exposed to Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diets and 12 to Salmonella-free commercial raw food diets. Seven of the exposed dogs shed salmonellae 1–7 days after consumption of Salmonella-contaminated raw food diets. None of the dogs fed Salmonella-free diets shed salmonellae. No clinical signs we...

  10. A survey of bacterial toxins involved in food poisoning: a suggestion for bacterial food poisoning toxin nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granum, P E; Tomas, J M; Alouf, J E

    1995-12-01

    There is at present no accepted nomenclature for bacterial protein toxins, although there have been several attempts at dividing them into groups by their mode of action. In this paper we will not try to describe all known bacterial protein toxins, but concentrate on the toxins involved in food poisoning. Although most of these toxins are enterotoxins (protein exotoxins with the site of action on the mucosal cells of the intestinal tract) there are also other toxins involved in food poisoning, like the neurotoxins. In Table 1 the most important food pathogens in Europe are listed. For most, but not all, of these food pathogens, toxins are virulence factors. Generally, we divide food poisoning into infections and intoxications, where Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. are typical examples of infections and Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus for intoxications. We consider it better to make four different groups of food pathogenic bacteria, according to Table 2. Today the first three groups are all defined as infections, although for both group 2 and 3 the bacterium itself does not harm the host directly. The bacterium in such locations is like an 'enterotoxin factory'. The bacteria belonging to group 3 do not even interact with the epithelial cells in the intestine, while the bacteria of group 2 must colonise the epithelial cells prior to enterotoxin production.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of salmonellae isolated from food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transmission of typhoid bacilli and other Salmonella spp. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella spp. from food handlers and cattle and compare the patterns with specimens from patients. Methods: A total of 206 stool samples from apparently healthy food ...

  12. Fight Homemade Poisons: Home Food Care and Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Rosanne

    One of a series of instructional materials produced by the Literacy Council of Alaska, this booklet provides information about food poisoning. Using a simplified vocabulary and shorter sentences, it explains the various kinds of food poisoning, how people get food poisoning, and how to prevent it. (FL)

  13. Be Food Safe: Protect Yourself from Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Be Food Safe: Protect Yourself from Food Poisoning Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... illness that lasts more than 3 days. Be Food Safe: Learn the Risks and Rules Anyone can ...

  14. The risk of salmonellae shedding by dogs fed Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Rita; Ribble, Carl; Aramini, Jeff; Vandermeer, Meredith; Popa, Maria; Litman, Marcus; Reid-Smith, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-eight research dogs were enrolled to determine the prevalence of salmonellae shedding after consumption of 1 Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diet meal. Sixteen dogs were exposed to Salmonella-contaminated commercial raw food diets and 12 to Salmonella-free commercial raw food diets. Seven of the exposed dogs shed salmonellae 1-7 days after consumption of Salmonella-contaminated raw food diets. None of the dogs fed Salmonella-free diets shed salmonellae. No clinical signs were observed in either group. Five of the 7 dogs shed the same serotypes as those recovered from food samples used for feeding. Results showed the same serotypes and antimicrobial resistance pattern in 2 of the 7 shedders. Dogs fed Salmonella-contaminated raw food diets can shed salmonellae and may, therefore, be a source of environmental contamination potentially leading to human or animal illness.

  15. [Histamine food poisonings in Japan and other countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Miou; Yamamoto, Miyako; Uneyama, Chikako; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Histamine food poisonings are allergy-like food poisonings caused by the ingestion of spoiled fish containing markedly elevated histamine levels. We examined histamine food poisonings in Japan from 1998 to 2008. In average 8 food poisonings and 150 cases were reported annually and there was no fatality case. In more than 80% of remaining food samples, histamine content exceeded 20 mg/100 g. These poisonings were caused by tuna, billfish (marlin) and mackerel, which contained higher level of histamine than other fishes in histamine food poisonings in Japan. Cooking methods of these fishes were mainly "broiled". We also studied histamine food poisonings in other countries. Tuna was the main fish in histamine food poisonings reported to Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US and Ozfoodnet in Australia from 2000 to 2006. In the US, histamine food poisonings were also caused by mahimahi and escolar fish. Our review will be useful for in taking measures to reduce risk of histamine food poisonings.

  16. [Food poisoning--importance of international perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2012-08-01

    It is important to obtain the information on food security in the countries other than Japan since more than 60 % of the food consumed come from these countries. Food security is now considered as a global issue. A global trend persuading us to provide safe food to humans is based on the concept of human security development associated with a sense of human mission to sustain one's life. Another global tendency pushing us to secure safety and hygiene of food is driven by the economic pressure coming from the rules in international trade established by Codex Committee under FAO/WHO. In contrast to these trends under globalization requesting safe and hygienic food, food habits based on tradition or religion are maintained locally in various parts of the world. These local habits include eating raw or improperly cooked foods, which may become a risk of being exposed to food poisoning pathogens. This issue may be adequately solved by a risk assessment approach based on the concept of appropriate level of protection (ALOP). Like or not, people in some local areas live in the unhygienic environment where they are unintentionally and frequently exposed to enteric pathogens or immunologically cross-reacting microorganisms through which they may acquire specific immunity to the pathogens and escape from infection by the pathogens. There are therefore many areas in the world where people understand the necessity to provide safe food at the international level (globalization) but actually consume food in varying hygienic conditions from area to area due in part to traditional food habits or living environments (localization); we call this situation as glocalization (global+local).

  17. Food-poisoning and commercial air travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, R; Edwards, P J; Kelly, M J; Millar, B C; Rooney, P J; Moore, J E

    2007-09-01

    With the introduction of budget airlines and greater competitiveness amongst all airlines, air travel has now become an extremely popular form of travel, presenting its own unique set of risks from food poisoning. Foodborne illness associated with air travel is quite uncommon in the modern era. However, when it occurs, it may have serious implications for passengers and when crew are affected, has the potential to threaten safety. Quality, safe, in-flight catering relies on high standards of food preparation and storage; this applies at the airport kitchens (or at subcontractors' facilities), on the aircraft and in the transportation vehicles which carry the food from the ground source to the aircraft. This is especially challenging in certain countries. Several foodborne outbreaks have been recorded by the airline industry as a result of a number of different failures of these systems. These have provided an opportunity to learn from past mistakes and current practice has, therefore, reached such a standard so as to minimise risk of failures of this kind. This review examines: (i) the origin of food safety in modern commercial aviation; (ii) outbreaks which have occurred previously relating to aviation travel; (iii) the microbiological quality of food and water on board commercial aircraft; and (iv) how Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points may be employed to maintain food safety in aviation travel.

  18. Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens: Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    USDA), Athens, USA. Accepted 6 ... Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a food borne pathogen of humans causing food-poisoning .... Comparison of percent sero-positive hens per group and means of Salmonella.

  19. Poisoned food, poisoned uniforms, and anthrax: or, how guerillas die in war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Luise

    2004-01-01

    Many people believe that Rhodesia, struggling to maintain minority rule in Africa, used chemical and biological weapons against African guerilla armies in the liberation war. Clothes and food were routinely poisoned, and Rhodesian agents, perhaps in concert with global forces of reaction, caused the largest single outbreak of anthrax in modern times. Oral interviews with traditional healers and Rhodesians' confessional memoirs of the war suggest that deaths by poisoning or disease were not so straightforward, that guerillas and healers and doctors struggled to understand not only what caused death but also what kind of death a poisoned uniform or poisoned boot was.

  20. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. isolated from food other than meat in Poland

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    Łukasz Mąka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives. Antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic bacteria can result in therapy failure, increased hospitalization, and increased risk of death. In Poland, [i]Salmonella[/i] spp. is a major bacterial agent of food poisoning. The majority of studies on antimicrobial resistance in [i]Salmonella[/i] spp. isolates from food have focused on meat products as the source of this pathogen. In comparison, this study examines the antimicrobial susceptibility of [i]Salmonella[/i] spp. isolated from retail food products other than meat in Poland. Materials and Methods. A collection of 122 [i]Salmonella[/i] spp. isolates were isolated in Poland in 2008–2012 from foods other than meat: confectionery products, eggs, fruits, vegetables, spices and others. The resistance of these isolates to 19 antimicrobial agents was tested using the disc diffusion method. Results. [i]Salmonella[/i] Enteritidis was the most frequently identified serotype (84.4% of all tested isolates. In total, 42.6% of the [i]Salmonella[/i] spp. isolates were resistant to antibiotics. The highest frequencies of resistance were observed in isolates from 2009 (60.0% and 2012 (59.5%. Antibiotic resistance was most prevalent among [i]Salmonella[/i] spp. isolated from egg-containing food samples (68.0%. Resistance to nalidixic acid was most common and was observed in 35.2% of all tested isolates. The isolates were less frequently resistant to sulphonamides (6.6%, ampicillin (4.9%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (2.5% and to streptomycin, cefoxitin, gentamicin and tetracycline (1.6%. Only one isolate showed resistance to chloramphenicol. Four isolates displayed multiresistance. Conclusions. Although, the level of resistance and multiresistance of [i]Salmonella[/i] spp. isolates from non-meat foods was lower than in those from meat products, the presence of these resistant bacteria poses a real threat to the health of consumers.

  1. The evaluation of forensic cases reported due to food poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyza Urazel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study it is aimed to examine forensic food poisoning cases and to evaluate the clinical presentation of food poisoning in people within the context of forensic medicine. Methods: In the study, 215 food poisoning cases are evaluated, which applied to the forensic medicine branch office in our city between 01.01.2007 and 31.12.2011. The forensic reports and forensic investigations of these cases are analyzed retrospectively. The cases are examined in terms of gender, age, the type of food consumed, the treatment applied and the result of the forensic report. Results: It is determined that in 83 cases (38.6% food poisoning was caused by chicken products, and in 178 cases (82.8% the poisoned people were students. In 3 cases (1.4% the poisoning was life threatening. For 75 cases (34.9% no forensic report was prepared in emergency service and among the 140 cases for which a forensic report was prepared, only 3 of the reports were prepared in a correct manner. Conclusions: It is determined that the demographic data of the cases complies with the city where the study was conducted. It is found out that in emergency services the food poisoning cases are usually misevaluated.

  2. Tropane alkaloids in food: poisoning incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamse, P.; Egmond, van H.P.; Noordam, M.Y.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Nijs, de W.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of wild and cultured plants produce secondary metabolites that can be toxic to humans and animals. The present study aims to provide insight into the routes of (un)intentional poisonings of humans by tropane alkaloids. Poisonings of humans by tropane alkaloids occur as unintended

  3. How Should Staphylococcal Food Poisoning Outbreaks Be Characterized?

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    Sylviane Dragacci

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most common food-borne diseases and results from the ingestion of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs preformed in food by enterotoxigenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus. To date, more than 20 SEs have been described: SEA to SElV. All SEs have superantigenic activity whereas only a few have been proved to be emetic, representing a potential hazard for consumers. Characterization of staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks (SFPOs has considerably progressed compared to 80 years ago, when staphylococci were simply enumerated and only five enterotoxins were known for qualitative detection. Today, SFPOs can be characterized by a number of approaches, such as the identification of S. aureus biovars, PCR and RT-PCR methods to identify the se genes involved, immunodetection of specific SEs, and absolute quantification by mass spectrometry. An integrated gene-to-protein approach for characterizing staphylococcal food poisoning is advocated.

  4. Salmonella-TEK, a rapid screening method for Salmonella species in food.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Poucke, L S

    1990-01-01

    A micro-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (micro-ELISA) using the Salmonella-TEK screen kit was tested for the detection of Salmonella spp. in pure cultures as well as in 30 artificially contaminated food samples and in 45 naturally contaminated food samples. Different raw, fleshy foods and processed foods were used as test products. The artificially contaminated minced meat samples were preenriched in buffered peptone water, and after incubation, different selective enrichment broths were te...

  5. Salmonellae carrier status of food vendors in Kumasi, Ghana | Feglo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Screening of 258 (230 females of 28 males) healthy food vendors for Salmonella typhi, and S. paratyphi A, B, and C, using stool culture, the widal test, and standard microbiological identification methods. Main outcome measures: Prevalence of chronic typhoidal Salmonellae carriers among food vendors in ...

  6. Thallium poisoning from maliciously contaminated food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggs, W J; Hoffman, R S; Shih, R D; Weisman, R S; Goldfrank, L R

    1994-01-01

    Four young adults presented two days after one of them had received marzipan balls packaged in a box from an expensive candy manufacturer. Two ate one candy ball, while two others shared a third. The next day, variable gastrointestinal symptoms developed. On the third day, two patients developed painful paresthesiae of the hands and feet, an early but nonspecific clinical marker of thallium poisoning. A tentative diagnosis of thallium poisoning was made based on symptoms, and treatment was initiated. The remaining candies were radiographed. Metallic densities in the candies supported the diagnosis, and atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to quantitate thallium content. Each candy contained a potentially fatal dose. Five to seven days later, hypertension and tachycardia developed in the two patients who had ingested an entire candy. All patients developed alopecia but recovered without overt neurologic or other sequelae. While the diagnosis of thallium poisoning is often delayed until alopecia develops, an early diagnosis favors an effective treatment strategy.

  7. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey R Hartford; Wills Robert; Kirkpatrick Tasha B; Howe Kevin; Karsi Attila; Lawrence Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler pro...

  8. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsi, Attila; Howe, Kevin; Kirkpatrick, Tasha B; Wills, Robert; Bailey, R Hartford; Lawrence, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler production continuum were transformed with the broad host range plasmid pAKlux1, and a chicken skin attachment model was developed. Results Salmonella strains carrying pAKlux1 constitutively expressed the luxCDABE operon and were therefore detectable using bioluminescence. Strains were characterized in terms of bioluminescence properties and plasmid stability. To assess the usefulness of bioluminescent Salmonella strains in food safety studies, we developed an attachment model using chicken skin. The effect of washing on attachment of Salmonella strains to chicken skin was tested using bioluminescent strains, which revealed the attachment properties of each strain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that bioluminescence is a sensitive and effective tool to detect Salmonella on food products in real-time. Bioluminescence imaging is a promising technology that can be utilized to evaluate new food safety measures for reducing Salmonella contamination on food products. PMID:18211715

  9. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey R Hartford

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler production continuum were transformed with the broad host range plasmid pAKlux1, and a chicken skin attachment model was developed. Results Salmonella strains carrying pAKlux1 constitutively expressed the luxCDABE operon and were therefore detectable using bioluminescence. Strains were characterized in terms of bioluminescence properties and plasmid stability. To assess the usefulness of bioluminescent Salmonella strains in food safety studies, we developed an attachment model using chicken skin. The effect of washing on attachment of Salmonella strains to chicken skin was tested using bioluminescent strains, which revealed the attachment properties of each strain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that bioluminescence is a sensitive and effective tool to detect Salmonella on food products in real-time. Bioluminescence imaging is a promising technology that can be utilized to evaluate new food safety measures for reducing Salmonella contamination on food products.

  10. Bacteriophages safely reduce Salmonella contamination in pet food and raw pet food ingredients

    OpenAIRE

    Soffer, Nitzan; Abuladze, Tamar; Woolston, Joelle; Li, Manrong; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Heyse, Serena; Charbonneau, Duane; Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of pet food with Salmonella is a serious public health concern, and several disease outbreaks have recently occurred due to human exposure to Salmonella tainted pet food. The problem is especially challenging for raw pet foods (which include raw meats, seafood, fruits, and vegetables). These foods are becoming increasingly popular because of their nutritional qualities, but they are also more difficult to maintain Salmonella-free because they lack heat-treatment. Among various m...

  11. [Survival of Salmonella in spices and growth in cooked food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Yurie; Minai, Yuji; Haga, Minoru; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Ishiguro, Atsushi; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2008-04-01

    Contamination of spices with pathogens has been reported worldwide, and Salmonella might result in foodborne infections. In this study, we investigated the survival of Salmonella in black pepper and red pepper, and the growth of the surviving Salmonella in cooked food. Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Weltevreden and Salmonella Senftenberg were inoculated into spices, and their survival during storage was examined. In black pepper, S. Enteritidis was no longer viable after storage for 28 days, but S. Weltevreden and S. Senftenberg remained viable. In red pepper, S. Weltevreden and S. Senftenberg survived for 28 days although S. Enteritidis was not viable after 7 days. Salmonella Weltevreden and Salmonella Senftenberg were inoculated into cooked food, and their survival during storage was determined. In potato salad, egg salad, namul and kimchi as cooked foods, both pathogens grew at 30 degrees C, but not at 10 degrees C. Our results indicate that cooked food should be stored at low temperature after addition of spices, such as black pepper and red pepper, following the cooking.

  12. Sources and distribution of Salmonella serotypes isolated from food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant serovars were S. braenderup, S. dublin and S. saintpaul followed by S. typhimurium (including var. Copenhagen) and S. anatum Salmonella enteritidis was detected from chicken, cattle and camel meat. Salmonella typhimurium, S. anatum and S. dublin were isolated in man as well as in food animals and ...

  13. Food poisoning outbreak in Tokyo, Japan caused by Staphylococcus argenteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Kubota, Hiroaki; Ono, Hisaya K; Kobayashi, Makiko; Murauchi, Konomi; Kato, Rei; Hirai, Akihiko; Sadamasu, Kenji

    2017-12-04

    Staphylococcus argenteus is a novel species subdivided from Staphylococcus aureus. Whether this species can cause food poisoning outbreaks is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the enterotoxigenic activities of two food poisoning isolates suspected to be S. argenteus (Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069). The results for phylogenic trees, constructed via whole genome sequencing, demonstrated that both isolates were more similar to a type strain of S. argenteus (MSHR1132) than any S. aureus strain. Moreover, the representative characteristics of S. argenteus were present in both strains, namely both isolates belong to the CC75 lineage and both lack a crtOPQMN operon. Thus, both were determined to be "S. argenteus." The compositions of the two isolates' accessory elements differed from those of MSHR1132. For example, the seb-related Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island, SaPIishikawa11, was detected in Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069 but not in MSHR1132. Both isolates were suggested to belong to distinct lineages that branched off from MSHR1132 lineages in terms of accessory elements. Tokyo13064 and Tokyo13069 expressed high levels of s(arg)eb and produced S(arg)EB protein, indicating that both have the ability to cause food poisoning. Our findings suggest that S. argenteus harboring particular accessory elements can cause staphylococcal diseases such as food poisoning, similarly to S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An outbreak of food poisoning among children attending an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To describe an outbreak of food poisoning at a major international sports event in Johannesburg and to determine the likely cause and source of the outbreak. Design. A descriptive, case-control study. Setting. An international sports event in Johannesburg. Methods. A questionnaire survey of involved children ...

  15. Bacteriophage cocktail for biocontrol of Salmonella in dried pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, Serena; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Woolston, Joelle; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Charbonneau, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Human salmonellosis has been associated with contaminated pet foods and treats. Therefore, there is interest in identifying novel approaches for reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination within pet food manufacturing environments. The use of lytic bacteriophages shows promise as a safe and effective way to mitigate Salmonella contamination in various food products. Bacteriophages are safe, natural, highly targeted antibacterial agents that specifically kill bacteria and can be targeted to kill food pathogens without affecting other microbiota. In this study, we show that a cocktail containing six bacteriophages had a broadspectrum activity in vitro against a library of 930 Salmonella enterica strains representing 44 known serovars. The cocktail was effective against 95% of the strains in this tested library. In liquid culture dose-ranging experiments, bacteriophage cocktail concentrations of ≥10(8) PFU/ml inactivated more than 90% of the Salmonella population (10(1) to 10(3) CFU/ml). Dried pet food inoculated with a mixture containing equal proportions of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis (ATCC 4931), Montevideo (ATCC 8387), Senftenberg (ATCC 8400), and Typhimurium (ATCC 13311) and then surface treated with the six-bacteriophage cocktail (≥2.5 ± 1.5 × 10(6) PFU/g) achieved a greater than 1-log (P food that tested positive for Salmonella. Our results indicate that bacteriophage biocontrol of S. enterica in dried pet food is technically feasible.

  16. Evaluation of VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) easy Salmonella method for the detection of Salmonella in a variety of foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Erin; Bird, Patrick; Fisher, Kiel; Goetz, Katherine; Benzinger, M Joseph; Agin, James; Goins, David; Johnson, Ronald L

    2011-01-01

    The VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) Easy Salmonella method is a specific enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay performed in the automated VIDAS instrument. The VIDAS Easy Salmonella method is a simple 2-step enrichment procedure, using pre-enrichment followed by selective enrichment in a newly formulated broth, SX2 broth. This new method was compared in a multilaboratory collaborative study to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 5 method for five food matrixes (liquid egg, vanilla ice cream, spinach, raw shrimp, and peanut butter) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook 4.04 method for deli turkey. Each food type was artificially contaminated with Salmonella at three inoculation levels. A total of 15 laboratories representing government, academia, and industry, throughout the United States, participated. In this study, 1583 samples were analyzed, of which 792 were paired replicates and 791 were unpaired replicates. Of the 792 paired replicates, 285 were positive by both the VIDAS and reference methods. Of the 791 unpaired replicates, 341 were positive by the VIDAS method and 325 were positive by the cultural reference method. A Chi-square analysis of each of the six food types was performed at the three inoculation levels tested. For all foods evaluated, the VIDAS Easy SLM method demonstrated results comparable to those of the reference methods for the detection of Salmonella.

  17. [Epidemiological characteristics of Salmonella in animal source foods in Hunan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huayun; Gao, Lidong; Guo, Yunchang; Li, Weiwei; Wang, Lan; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Hong

    2014-08-01

    To study the molecular epidemiological characteristics of Salmonella in animal source foods in Hunan. The fair trade markets and supermarkets of ten cities were chosen to sample animal source foods for isolating Salmonella in Hunan province in 2010. A total of 692 samples were collected by aseptic sampling, included 159 livestock meats, 152 poultry meats, and 381 aquatic products.Salmonella strains isolated were subjected to stereotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Salmonella was detected in 93 of 692 animal food samples with the detection rate of 13.4%. The detection rates of Salmonella in poultry meats, livestock meats and aquatic products were 23.0% (35/152), 22.6% (36/159) and 5.8% (22/381) respectively. Therefore, the detection rate in aquatic products was lower than that of poultry meats and livestock meats (χ(2) = 33.86, P Salmonella Derby (33/94, 35.1%) was the predominant serotypes.79.8% (75/94) strains showed resistant to more than one antibiotic used in the test, 31.9% (30/94) strains showed resistant to more than 5 antibiotics. A significant difference was observed for multidrug resistance between Salmonella isolated from poultry (47.2%, 17/36) and livestock meats (22.2%, 8/36) (χ(2) = 4.96, P Salmonella contamination in animal source foods were serious in Hunan province, and the isolates expressed high level resistance to the antibiotics.Furthermore the PFGE results indicated that there were epidemic strains of Salmonella in Hunan.

  18. Visual immunoassay for detection of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Klatt, M J; Keelan, S L

    1988-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 13 laboratories to validate a visual enzyme immunoassay (EIA) procedure, TECRA, for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. The EIA method was compared with the standard culture procedure for detection of Salmonella in 6 food types: ground black pepper, soy flour, dried whole eggs, milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, and raw deboned turkey. Uninoculated and inoculated samples were included in each food group analyzed. There was no significant difference in the productivity of the EIA and culture procedures at the 5% level for any of the 6 foods. The enzyme immunoassay screening method has been approved interim official first action.

  19. Bacteriocins: modes of action and potentials in food preservation and control of food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abee, T; Krockel, L; Hill, C

    1995-12-01

    -negative bacteria possess an additional layer, the so-called outer membrane which is composed of phospholipids, proteins and lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and this membrane is impermeable to most molecules. Nevertheless, the presence of porins in this layer will allow the free diffusion of molecules with a molecular mass below 600 Da. The smallest bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria are approximately 3 kDa and are thus too large to reach their target, the cytoplasmic membrane (Klaenhammer, 1993; Stiles and Hastings, 1991). However, Stevens et al. (1991) and Ray (1993) have demonstrated that Salmonella species and other Gram-negative bacteria become sensitive to nisin after exposure to treatments that change the permeability barrier properties of the outer membrane (see below). This review will focus on the mode of action of lantibiotics (class I) and class II LAB bacteriocins and their potentials in food preservation and control of food poisoning.

  20. Bacteriophages safely reduce Salmonella contamination in pet food and raw pet food ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, Nitzan; Abuladze, Tamar; Woolston, Joelle; Li, Manrong; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Heyse, Serena; Charbonneau, Duane; Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Contamination of pet food with Salmonella is a serious public health concern, and several disease outbreaks have recently occurred due to human exposure to Salmonella tainted pet food. The problem is especially challenging for raw pet foods (which include raw meats, seafood, fruits, and vegetables). These foods are becoming increasingly popular because of their nutritional qualities, but they are also more difficult to maintain Salmonella-free because they lack heat-treatment. Among various methods examined to improve the safety of pet foods (including raw pet food), one intriguing approach is to use bacteriophages to specifically kill Salmonella serotypes. At least 2 phage preparations (SalmoFresh® and Salmonelex™) targeting Salmonella are already FDA cleared for commercial applications to improve the safety of human foods. However, similar preparations are not yet available for pet food applications. Here, we report the results of evaluating one such preparation (SalmoLyse®) in reducing Salmonella levels in various raw pet food ingredients (chicken, tuna, turkey, cantaloupe, and lettuce). Application of SalmoLyse® in low (ca. 2–4×106 PFU/g) and standard (ca. 9×106 PFU/g) concentrations significantly (P Salmonella contamination in all raw foods examined compared to control treatments. When SalmoLyse®-treated (ca. 2×107 PFU/g) dry pet food was fed to cats and dogs, it did not trigger any deleterious side effects in the pets. Our data suggest that the bacteriophage cocktail lytic for Salmonella can significantly and safely reduce Salmonella contamination in various raw pet food ingredients. PMID:27738557

  1. InstantLabs®? Salmonella species food safety kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neil; Bambusch, Lauren; Le, Thu; Hayman, Melinda; Montez, Sergio J

    2014-01-01

    The InstantLabs® Salmonella Species Food Safety Kit was validated against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) reference method* 6579:2002 for the detection of Salmonella species. The matrixes (unprocessed rolled oats, wheat flour, and oat flour) were inoculated with 1 CFU/test portion of Salmonella to generate fractional positives (5-15) in 20 inoculated samples. The inatrixes were co-inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 at 2-5 times the level of Salmonella to demonstrate the potential for using the same enrichment culture in the future to detect of multiple organisms. Samples were validated using 750 g test portion enriched in FASTGRO SE at 42 ± 1°C for 16-20 h. All samples were confirmed using the ISO reference method, regardless of initial screen result. The InstantLabs test method performed as well as or better than the reference method for the detection of Salmonella species in unprocessed rolled oats, wheat flour, and oat flour. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 100 Salmonella serovars and 30 non-Salmonella species examined. Finally, the method was shown to be robust when variations to enrichment time, DNA extract hold time, and DNA volume were varied (data not shown).

  2. Recent Trends in Salmonella Outbreaks and Emerging Technology for Biocontrol of Salmonella Using Phages in Foods: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Hyun; Park, Mi-Kyung

    2017-12-28

    Salmonella is one of the principal causes of foodborne outbreaks. As traditional control methods have shown less efficacy against emerging Salmonella serotypes or antimicrobialresistant Salmonella , new approaches have been attempted. The use of lytic phages for the biocontrol of Salmonella in the food industry has become an attractive method owing to the many advantages offered by the use of phages as biocontrol agents. Phages are natural alternatives to traditional antimicrobial agents; they have proven effective in the control of bacterial pathogens in the food industry, which has led to the development of different phage products. The treatment with specific phages in the food industry can prevent the decay of products and the spread of bacterial diseases, and ultimately promotes safe environments for animal and plant food production, processing, and handling. After an extensive investigation of the current literature, this review focuses predominantly on the efficacy of phages for the successful control of Salmonella spp. in foods. This review also addresses the current knowledge on the pathogenic characteristics of Salmonella , the prevalence of emerging Salmonella outbreaks, the isolation and characterization of Salmonella -specific phages, the effectiveness of Salmonella -specific phages as biocontrol agents, and the prospective use of Salmonella -specific phages in the food industry.

  3. Case report of Salmonella cross-contamination in a food laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Rasschaert, Geertrui; De Reu, K; Heyndrickx, M.; Herman, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background This paper describes a case of Salmonella cross-contamination in a food laboratory. In 2012, chocolate bars shipped from Belgium to the USA were prevented from entering the USA because a Salmonella Rissen strain had been isolated from one of the chocolate bars in a Belgian food laboratory. However, a retrospective study of the Salmonella isolates sent from the laboratory to the Belgian National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella revealed that 7?weeks prior, a Salmonella Rissen str...

  4. Bacteriophages safely reduce Salmonella contamination in pet food and raw pet food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, Nitzan; Abuladze, Tamar; Woolston, Joelle; Li, Manrong; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Heyse, Serena; Charbonneau, Duane; Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of pet food with Salmonella is a serious public health concern, and several disease outbreaks have recently occurred due to human exposure to Salmonella tainted pet food. The problem is especially challenging for raw pet foods (which include raw meats, seafood, fruits, and vegetables). These foods are becoming increasingly popular because of their nutritional qualities, but they are also more difficult to maintain Salmonella-free because they lack heat-treatment. Among various methods examined to improve the safety of pet foods (including raw pet food), one intriguing approach is to use bacteriophages to specifically kill Salmonella serotypes. At least 2 phage preparations (SalmoFresh® and Salmonelex™) targeting Salmonella are already FDA cleared for commercial applications to improve the safety of human foods. However, similar preparations are not yet available for pet food applications. Here, we report the results of evaluating one such preparation (SalmoLyse®) in reducing Salmonella levels in various raw pet food ingredients (chicken, tuna, turkey, cantaloupe, and lettuce). Application of SalmoLyse® in low (ca. 2-4×106 PFU/g) and standard (ca. 9×106 PFU/g) concentrations significantly (P contamination in all raw foods examined compared to control treatments. When SalmoLyse®-treated (ca. 2×107 PFU/g) dry pet food was fed to cats and dogs, it did not trigger any deleterious side effects in the pets. Our data suggest that the bacteriophage cocktail lytic for Salmonella can significantly and safely reduce Salmonella contamination in various raw pet food ingredients.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixandru, Brînduşa-Elena; Drăcea, Nicoleta Olguţa; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Drăgulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Luminiţa; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species.

  6. Evanescent Wave Fiber Optic Biosensor for Salmonella Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Bhunia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a major food-borne pathogen of world-wide concern. Sensitive and rapid detection methods to assess product safety before retail distribution are highly desirable. Since Salmonella is most commonly associated with poultry products, an evanescent wave fiber-optic assay was developed to detect Salmonella in shell egg and chicken breast and data were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF assay. Anti-Salmonella polyclonal antibody was immobilized onto the surface of an optical fiber using biotin-avidin interactions to capture Salmonella. Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated antibody (MAb 2F-11 was used as the reporter. Detection occurred when an evanescent wave from a laser (635 nm excited the Alexa Fluor and the fluorescence was measured by a laser-spectrofluorometer at 710 nm. The biosensor was specific for Salmonella and the limit of detection was established to be 103 cfu/mL in pure culture and 104 cfu/mL with egg and chicken breast samples when spiked with 102 cfu/mL after 2–6 h of enrichment. The results indicate that the performance of the fiber-optic sensor is comparable to TRF, and can be completed in less than 8 h, providing an alternative to the current detection methods.

  7. Salmonella identification from foods in eight hours: A prototype study with Salmonella Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    A Koluman; Celik, G.; Unlu, T

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The significant rise in food borne infections is mainly caused by Campylobacter spp., Salmonella serovars and Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli. As the emerging food borne pathogens cause disease, more studies have been conducted for rapid detection of these pathogens. The combination of immunomagnetic separation and polymerase chain reaction (IMS-PCR) is the most accurate and rapid test preferred by almost every researcher. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTI...

  8. Enzyme immunoassay for detection of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Eckner, K; Gabis, D A; Robison, B J; Mattingly, J A; Silliker, J H

    1986-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 25 laboratories to validate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) procedure utilizing 2 specific monoclonal antibodies for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. The EIA was compared with the standard culture procedure for detection of Salmonella in 6 food types: ground black pepper, soy isolate, dried whole eggs, milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, and raw deboned turkey. Uninoculated and inoculated samples were included in each food group analyzed, with the exception of poultry which was naturally contaminated. There was no significant difference in the productivity of the EIA and culture procedures at the 5% level for any of the 6 foods. The enzyme immunoassay screening method has been adopted official first action.

  9. Detection of Salmonella in Foods Using a Reference PN-ISO Method and an Alternative Method Based on Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Coupled with Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarowska, Jolanta; Frej-Mądrzak, Magdalena; Jama-Kmiecik, Agnieszka; Kilian, Anna; Teryks-Wołyniec, Dorota; Choroszy-Król, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella, one of the primary indicators of food safety, is a common cause of food poisoning of an epidemic nature around the world. These microorganisms can colonize the gastrointestinal tract of both people and animals, and next contaminate not only eggs, milk, meat and dairy products, but also vegetables, fruit, grains and even spices. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples using a reference PN-ISO method and an alternative method based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) coupled with bioluminescence. Food samples were obtained in cooperation with the State Sanitary-Epidemiological Station in Wrocław. Dairy products, meat, fish, pastry and confectionery, vegetables, herbs and spices were analyzed. The food samples were examined using a standard culturing method according to PN-ISO 6579:2003 for Salmonella spp. and an alternative method based on the isothermal amplification and bioluminescence phenomenon using the 3M MDS device. In 399 tested food samples in 8 materials, using both the reference and the alternative LAMP-based method, the presence of salmonella was confirmed. The results obtained show the 100% sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the presented alternative, LAMP-based technique compared to the reference PN-ISO method. The alternative method using isothermal amplification and bioluminescence makes it possible to detect Salmonella in foods in a much shorter time than the referential culturing method.

  10. Salmonella identification from foods in eight hours: A prototype study with Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koluman, A; Celik, G; Unlu, T

    2012-03-01

    The significant rise in food borne infections is mainly caused by Campylobacter spp., Salmonella serovars and Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli. As the emerging food borne pathogens cause disease, more studies have been conducted for rapid detection of these pathogens. The combination of immunomagnetic separation and polymerase chain reaction (IMS-PCR) is the most accurate and rapid test preferred by almost every researcher. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) is preferred for being a new, user friendly and rapid technique in microbiological analyses. The main aim of this study is to detect application of IMS-FTIR for Salmonella identification from foods in a short time with a higher sensitivity. Conventional Culture Technique (CC), IMS-CC, IMS-PCR and IMS-FTIR techniques were compared with each other for rapid detection in artificially contaminated minced beef with Salmonella Typhimurium, as of the 2(nd), 4(th) and 8(th) hours of contamination. The method was evaluated in different food matrices and sensitivity, specifity and overall recovery was calculated. The results indicate that IMS-FTIR can detect S. Typhimurium as of the 8(th) hour with sensitivity of 95.6667, accuracy of 91.69329, false positive ratio of 0.04333 and overall recovery of 95.66%. It can be suggested that the IMS-FTIR method is capable of detecting S.Typhimurium in a short time with lower cost.

  11. Electrochemical immunosensors for Salmonella detection in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathogen detection is a critical point for the identification and the prevention of problems related to food safety. Failures at detecting contaminations in food may cause outbreaks with drastic consequences to public health. In spite of the real need for obtaining analytical results in the shortest...

  12. Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens: Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a food borne pathogen of humans causing food-poisoning and sometimes deaths. In order to control egg-borne transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis to humans, prompt and accurate detection of infected poultry flocks is essential. This paper examined the effects of challenge dose ...

  13. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongduo Bao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076 and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184, were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4% and 298 (95.8% of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 104 CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, then treated with 1 × 108 PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5–4 log CFU/sample, p < 0.05 was observed in all tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 ºC, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods.

  14. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 104 CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 108 PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5–4 log CFU/sample, p tested foods. The two phages on the three food samples were relatively stable, especially at 4 °C, with the phages exhibiting the greatest stability in milk. Our research shows that our phages have potential effectiveness as a bio-control agent of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26305252

  15. Salmonella, Shigella and growth potential of other food-borne pathogens in Ethiopian street vended foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleta, D; Ashenafi, M

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate the bacteriological safety of food items sold by street vendors with regard to Salmonella and Shigella and to assess the growth potential of some foodborne pathogens in some street foods. Collection of street-vended foods and laboratory based microbiological analysis. Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Most of the street food samples had aerobic mesophilic counts >10(7) cfu/g. Nine "kitfo" and one "egg sandwich" samples yielded Salmonella. Shigella was isolated from three "macaroni" samples. The Salmonella isolates were sensitive to all ten drugs tested but the Shigella isolates had multiple resistance against five drugs. In a challenge study, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Staphylococcus aureus grew in street-vended food samples to hazardous levels within eight to twelve hours. Street foods are heavily contaminated with micro-organisms and are potential sources of food borne infections. Health hazards from street foods may be significantly minimised by consumption within four hours of preparation.

  16. [Determination of illudin S in Omphalotus guepiniformis and foods that caused food poisoning by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Yoshimasa; Itou, Takeshi

    2009-08-01

    A simple method was developed for determination of illudin S in fungi (Omphalotus guepiniformis: poisonous mushroom) and a food that caused food poisoning, using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Illudin S in fungi and the food that caused food poisoning was extracted with methanol and then cleaned up with an Oasis HLB cartridge. LC separation was performed with an octadecylated silica column (Inertsil ODS-3, 2.1 mm i.d. x 150 mm) and a mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid-methanol (7 : 3) at a flow rate 0.2 mL/min. Mass spectral acquisition was performed in the positive mode and illudin S was targeted using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with electrospray ionization (ESI). The recoveries of illudin S were 84-94% from edible fungi (Lentinula edodes, Pleurotus ostreatus and Panellus serotinus). The detection limits of illudin S in the fungi (L. edodes, P. ostreatus and P. serotinus) were 0.08-0.10 microg/g respectively. Illudin S was detected in the food that caused food poisoning at the level of 2.0 and 15.1 microg/g in the soup and fungi, respectively. The recovery of illudin S from a mushroom soup (cooked at 100 degrees C for 10 min) sample which simulated food poisoning was 74.8%. These results indicate that the developed method is suitable for the determination of illudin S in fungi (O. guepiniformis) and foods that caused food poisoning.

  17. Evaluation of the Assurance GDS for Salmonella method in foods and environmental surfaces: multilaboratory collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldsine, Philip T; Jucker, Markus T; Kaur, Mandeep; Lienau, Andrew H; Kerr, David E

    2010-01-01

    A multilaboratory collaborative study was conducted to compare the detection of Salmonella by the Assurance GDS for Salmonella method and the Reference culture methods. Six foods, representing a variety of low microbial and high microbial load foods were analyzed. Seventeen laboratories in the United States and Canada participated in this study. No statistical differences (P Salmonella and the Reference culture methods for any inoculation level of any food type or naturally contaminated food, except for pasta, for which the Assurance GDS method had a higher number of confirmed test portions for Salmonella compared to the Reference method.

  18. Bio-Control of Salmonella Enteritidis in Foods Using Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-24

    Two lytic phages, vB_SenM-PA13076 (PA13076) and vB_SenM-PC2184 (PC2184), were isolated from chicken sewage and characterized with host strains Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) ATCC13076 and CVCC2184, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that they belonged to the family Myoviridae. The lytic abilities of these two phages in liquid culture showed 104 multiplicity of infection (MOI) was the best in inhibiting bacteria, with PC2184 exhibiting more activity than PA13076. The two phages exhibited broad host range within the genus Salmonella. Phage PA13076 and PC2184 had a lytic effect on 222 (71.4%) and 298 (95.8%) of the 311 epidemic Salmonella isolates, respectively. We tested the effectiveness of phage PA13076 and PC2184 as well as a cocktail combination of both in three different foods (chicken breast, pasteurized whole milk and Chinese cabbage) contaminated with SE. Samples were spiked with 1 × 10(4) CFU individual SE or a mixture of strains (ATCC13076 and CVCC2184), then treated with 1 × 10(8) PFU individual phage or a two phage cocktail, and incubated at 4 °C or 25 °C for 5 h. In general, the inhibitory effect of phage and phage cocktail was better at 4 °C than that at 25 °C, whereas the opposite result was observed in Chinese cabbage, and phage cocktail was better than either single phage. A significant reduction in bacterial numbers (1.5-4 log CFU/sample, p Salmonella in foods.

  19. Rapid detection of Salmonella in foods using a combination of SPRINT TM,MSRV TM and Salmonella Latex TestTM

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Maria Lafayette Neves Gelinski; Gunnar Martin; Maria Teresa Destro; Mariza Landgraf; Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo Franco

    2002-01-01

    A new procedure for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods, based on the combination of SPRINT TM, MSRV TM and Salmonella Latex TestTM, was evaluated. SPRINT TM is a system to reduce the preenrichment and selective enrichment steps to 24 hours. MSRV TM is a semi-solid selective media for detection of motile Salmonella. Salmonella Latex TestTM is a rapid latex agglutination test for Salmonella. Using the three systems in combination, the total time for detection of Salmonella in a food sample ...

  20. A mass food poisoning in two construction company workers taking meal from the same food company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Dorman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study, outbreaks of food poisoning that occurred in the two different construction company caused by the same food company were investigated via outbreak investigation were made.Methods: Thirty-nine people were admitted with nausea, vomiting, fever, abdominal pain, headache, joint pain and fatigue to a private hospital diarrhea on April 28, 2008 evening. At following day, Head of Hospitals and other local health authorities held meetings and a collective action plan was prepared. The food samples of last 3 days and chemical and bacteriological water samples were collected for bacteriological and chemical analysis. Outbreak investigation steps in accordance with the presence of epidemic were confirmed via person-locality-time feature, determination of person that were under risk, localization of new cases, protection and control measures to be taken and reported procedures were performed. A structured questionnaire was applied to cases and control group.Results: Hospital records were examined and 114 patients were identified as admitted to hospitals with food poisoning complaints between 28 April and 1 May, 2008. An interview was performed with 109 persons (55 food-staff workers and 54 patients. According to the results of food samples taken C.perfringens from haricot beans with meat and S.aureus from salad were produced.Conclusion: The food industry in our country and the developing world is increasingly ongoing although still food born outbreaks can be seen. Particular attention to the rules of hygiene in food-industry and regular controls will prevent the formation of food borne outbreaks

  1. Nutritional strategies to combat Salmonella in mono-gastric food animal production

    OpenAIRE

    Berge, Anna; Wierup, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional strategies to minimize Salmonella in food animal production are one of the key components in producing safer food. The current European approach is to use a farm-to-fork strategy, where each sector must implement measures to minimize and reduce Salmonella contamination. In the pre-harvest phase, this means that all available tools need to be used such as implementation of biosecurity measures, control of Salmonella infections in animals at the farm as well as in transport and trad...

  2. Specificity tests of an oligonucleotide probe against food-outbreak salmonella for biosensor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I.-H.; Horikawa, S.; Xi, J.; Wikle, H. C.; Barbaree, J. M.; Chin, B. A.

    2017-05-01

    Phage based magneto-elastic (ME) biosensors have been shown to be able to rapidly detect Salmonella in various food systems to serve food pathogen monitoring purposes. In this ME biosensor platform, the free-standing strip-shaped magneto-elastic sensor is the transducer and the phage probe that recognizes Salmonella in food serves as the bio-recognition element. According to Sorokulova et al. at 2005, a developed oligonucleotide probe E2 was reported to have high specificity to Salmonella enterica Typhimurium. In the report, the specificity tests were focused in most of Enterobacterace groups outside of Salmonella family. Here, to understand the specificity of phage E2 to different Salmonella enterica serotypes within Salmonella Family, we further tested the specificity of the phage probe to thirty-two Salmonella serotypes that were present in the major foodborne outbreaks during the past ten years (according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). The tests were conducted through an Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) format. This assay can mimic probe immobilized conditions on the magnetoelastic biosensor platform and also enable to study the binding specificity of oligonucleotide probes toward different Salmonella while avoiding phage/ sensor lot variations. Test results confirmed that this oligonucleotide probe E2 was high specific to Salmonella Typhimurium cells but showed cross reactivity to Salmonella Tennessee and four other serotypes among the thirty-two tested Salmonella serotypes.

  3. Application of BAX system, Tecra Unique Salmonella test, and a conventional culture method for the detection of Salmonella in ready-to-eat and raw foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, P-Y; Kwok, K K; Kam, K M

    2007-07-01

    To compare the BAX system, the Tecra Unique Salmonella test, and a conventional culture method for the detection of Salmonella in various foods. Ready-to-eat and raw foods were inoculated with Salmonella serotype Typhimurium, Salmonella serotype Enteritidis, Salmonella serotype Typhi, or Salmonella serotype Derby. Incubated pre-enrichment cultures were examined using the BAX system, the Tecra Unique Salmonella test, and a conventional culture method. Salmonella could be detected in all ready-to-eat food samples inoculated with S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, or S. Derby, with any of the three test methods. However, false negatives were obtained with the Tecra test and the culture method when samples with higher background flora were inoculated with S. Typhi. Sensitivity test results suggested the two rapid tests performed as well as the culture method in the detection of 10(1) CFU of S. Typhimurium in 25-g cooked or raw food. The BAX system and the Tecra Unique Salmonella test demonstrated results comparable with those of the culture method in the detection of Salmonella serotypes used except S. Typhi. This is the first evaluation of the BAX system, the Tecra Unique Salmonella test, and a culture method in the detection of Salmonella in a variety of western and oriental foods.

  4. Validation of FoodChek™ - Salmonella for Rapid Detection of Salmonella in Eggs, Derivative Products, and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzinhani, Melissa; Tremblay, Renaud; Martinez, Gabriela; Giuffre, Michael; Hammack, Thomas; Fernandez, Maria Cristina; Ziemer, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The FoodChek™ - Salmonella assay is an immunomagnetic lateral flow assay for the rapid detection (shorter than 24 h) of the most frequently isolated Salmonella (groups B-E) in eggs, egg-derivative products, and environmental surfaces. The FoodChek - Salmonella assay correctly identified 99.6% (239/240) of the samples tested in the matrix studied, and the statistical analysis of the method comparison study results demonstrated that it performs as well as U.S. culture-based reference methods. Ninety-nine percent of the 103 Salmonella strains tested belonging to serogroups B-E were detected during the inclusivity study. Concerning the exclusivity, 31 nontarget strains were tested. No cross-reactivity was observed in FoodChek - Salmonella assay enrichment conditions. In addition, the assay shows strong robustness, good stability, and consistency among lots. The present study proves that the assay is an effective tool for the rapid detection of Salmonella spp. in whole liquid eggs, liquid egg white (liquid egg albumen), shell eggs, dried whole eggs, dried egg yolks, and environmental surfaces as stainless steel, plastic, rubber, ceramic tiles, and sealed concrete.

  5. DNA-DNA hybridization assay for detection of Salmonella spp. in foods.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitts, R; Diamond, M.; Hamilton, C; Neri, M.

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a DNA-DNA hybridization test for the presence of Salmonella spp. in foods. This test requires an initial pre-enrichment of food samples in nutrient broth but does not require selective enrichment. Samples of food cultures are collected on membrane filters and assayed by molecular hybridization to labeled probes. The probes consist of DNA sequences which are unique to the genus Salmonella and are widely distributed in the genus. A diverse panel of foods was assayed successful...

  6. Evaluation of 3M molecular detection assay (MDA) Salmonella for the detection of Salmonella in selected foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Patrick; Fisher, Kiel; Boyle, Megan; Huffman, Travis; Benzinger, M Joseph; Bedinghaus, Paige; Flannery, Jonathan; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Benesh, DeAnn; David, John

    2013-01-01

    The 3M Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) Salmonella is used with the 3M Molecular Detection System for the detection of Salmonella spp. in food, food-related, and environmental samples after enrichment. The assay utilizes loop-mediated isothermal amplification to rapidly amplify Salmonella target DNA with high specificity and sensitivity, combined with bioluminescence to detect the amplification. The 3M MDA Salmonella method was compared using an unpaired study design in a multilaboratory collaborative study to the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service-Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (USDA/FSIS-MLG 4.05), Isolation and Identification of Salmonella from Meat, Poultry, Pasteurized Egg and Catfish Products for raw ground beef and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration/Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA/BAM) Chapter 5 Salmonella reference method for wet dog food following the current AOAC guidelines. A total of 20 laboratories participated. For the 3M MDA Salmonella method, raw ground beef was analyzed using 25 g test portions, and wet dog food was analyzed using 375 g test portions. For the reference methods, 25 g test portions of each matrix were analyzed. Each matrix was artificially contaminated with Salmonella at three inoculation levels: an uninoculated control level (0 CFU/test portion), a low inoculum level (0.2-2 CFU/test portion), and a high inoculum level (2-5 CFU/test portion). In this study, 1512 unpaired replicate samples were analyzed. Statistical analysis was conducted according to the probability of detection (POD). For the low-level raw ground beef test portions, the following dLPOD (difference between the POD of the reference and candidate method) values with 95% confidence intervals were obtained: -0.01 (-0.14, +0.12). For the low-level wet dog food test portions, the following dLPOD with 95% confidence intervals were obtained: -0.04 (-0.16, +0.09). No significant differences were observed in the number of positive

  7. Outbreak of food poisoning in a working men's hostel: A retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Singh Grewal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Food poisoning is an acute gastroenteritis caused by ingestion of food or drink contaminated with either living bacteria or their toxins or inorganic chemical substances and poisons derived from plants and animals, commonly occurring as explosive outbreaks. The authors investigated an outbreak of food poisoning reported from a working men's hostel in urban area of Pune, Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study design was adopted to investigate the outbreak. Of the total 170 members, 68 had symptoms of food poisoning. Remaining 102 unexposed members were also interviewed as part of the study. Data for environmental and laboratory parameters were also collected. Results: The point source outbreak indicated cooked chicken as the source with a risk ratio of 3.34 (95% confidence interval: 2.02–5.54 and attributable fraction for chicken was 75.3%. As is the case with 70% of food poisoning outbreaks, laboratory confirmation of causative organism could not be established, due to lack of specimens. However, the clinicoepidemiological profile of the patients displays a median incubation period of 8 h (range 5–17 h, along with the clinical symptomatology of a self-limiting disease of diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and nausea; suggested the implicating organisms to be either Clostridium perfringens or Bacillus cereus. Conclusion: The defaulting environmental parameters of compromised sanitary conditions, inadequate storage in refrigerator, improper storage of raw food, and unsafe cooking practices were enhancing factors, which need to be mandatorily addressed in bulk cooking.

  8. One Health and Food-Borne Disease: Salmonella Transmission between Humans, Animals, and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudia; Calva, Edmundo; Maloy, Stanley

    2014-02-01

    There are >2,600 recognized serovars of Salmonella enterica. Many of these Salmonella serovars have a broad host range and can infect a wide variety of animals, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and insects. In addition, Salmonella can grow in plants and can survive in protozoa, soil, and water. Hence, broad-host-range Salmonella can be transmitted via feces from wild animals, farm animals, and pets or by consumption of a wide variety of common foods: poultry, beef, pork, eggs, milk, fruit, vegetables, spices, and nuts. Broad-host-range Salmonella pathogens typically cause gastroenteritis in humans. Some Salmonella serovars have a more restricted host range that is associated with changes in the virulence plasmid pSV, accumulation of pseudogenes, and chromosome rearrangements. These changes in host-restricted Salmonella alter pathogen-host interactions such that host-restricted Salmonella organisms commonly cause systemic infections and are transmitted between host populations by asymptomatic carriers. The secondary consequences of efforts to eliminate host-restricted Salmonella serovars demonstrate that basic ecological principles govern the environmental niches occupied by these pathogens, making it impossible to thwart Salmonella infections without a clear understanding of the human, animal, and environmental reservoirs of these pathogens. Thus, transmission of S. enterica provides a compelling example of the One Health paradigm because reducing human infections will require the reduction of Salmonella in animals and limitation of transmission from the environment.

  9. Evaluation of the 3M™ Petrifilm™ Salmonella express system for the detection of Salmonella species in selected foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Patrick; Flannery, Jonathan; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Jechorek, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The 3M™ Petriflm™ Salmonella Express (SALX) System is a simple, ready-to-use chromogenic culture medium system for the rapid qualitative detection and biochemical confirmation of Salmonella spp. in food and food process environmental samples. The 3M Petrifilm SALX System was compared using an unpaired study design in a multilaboratory collaborative study to the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA/FSIS) Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) 4.07 (2013) Isolation and Identification of Salmonella from Meat, Poultry, Pasteurized Egg and Catfish Products and Carcass and Environmental Sponges for raw ground beef and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA/BAM) Chapter 5, Salmonella (2011) reference method for dry dog food following the current AOAC validation guidelines. For this study, a total of 17 laboratories located throughout the continental United States evaluated 1872 test portions. For the 3M Petrifilm SALX System, raw ground beef was analyzed using 25 g test portions, and dry dog food was analyzed using 375 g test portions. For the reference methods, 25 g test portions of each inatrix were analyzed. The two matrices were artificially contaminated with Salmonella at three inoculation levels: an uninoculated control level (0 CFU/test portion), a low inoculum level (0.2-2 CFU/test portion), and a high inoculum level (2-5 CFU/test portion). Each inoculation level was statistically analyzed using the probability of detection statistical model. For the raw ground beef and dry dog food test portions, no significant differences at the 95% confidence interval were observed in the number of positive samples detected by the 3M Petrifilm SALX System versus either the USDA/FSIS-MLG or FDA/BAM methods.

  10. 77 FR 14022 - Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella Species in Human Foods and Direct-Human-Contact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella Species in Human Foods and Direct-Human-Contact Animal Foods; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... availability of a guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella Species in Human Foods and...

  11. Climate change and the incidence of food poisoning in England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Graham; Langford, Ian H.

    1995-06-01

    In recent years there have been several spells of high temperatures providing analogues for the conditions that might become more common as a result of the enhanced greenhouse effect. Statistical models were developed of the relationship between the monthly incidence of food poisoning and temperatures and these were then used to provide estimates of the possible effects of future warmer summers. Routinely collected data on the number of reported cases of food poisoning were analysed for the years 1982 1991. Regression analysis was used to establish the relationship between the monthly incidence of food poisoning and temperatures of the same and the previous month. Published scenarios for future temperatures were applied to these statistical models to provide estimates of the possible impacts of warmer conditions. The monthly incidence of food poisoning was found to be significantly associated with the temperature of the same and of the previous month with the latter having the stronger effect. Using published data on the relationship between reported and actual numbers of cases of food poisoning, it is estimated that annually there might be an additional 179 000 cases of food poisoning by the year 2050 as a result of climate change. The observed relationship with the same month's temperature underlines the need for improvements in storage, preparation and hygiene close to the point of consumption. However, there was a much stronger relationship with the temperature of the previous month, indicating the importance of conditions earlier in the food production process. Improvements in areas such as animal husbandry and slaughtering may also be necessary to avoid the adverse effects of a warmer climate.

  12. [Detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp. in food by multiplex PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Chen, Fusheng; Wang, Xiaohong; Shao, Yanchun

    2008-07-01

    To establish a multiplex PCR method for simultaneous detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp. in food. Staphylococcus aureus was enriched by 7.5% NaCl broth while Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp. were enriched by GN medium . The primers were designed according to the gene nuc of Staphylococcus aureus, the gene ipaH of Shigella spp. and the gene invA of Salmonella spp. The target genes of these pathogens in food were amplified by multiplex PCR, which reaction conditions were optimized specifically. The multiplex PCR method established in this experment was of high specificity, which detection limit was 1 cfu/ml of Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella spp. and Salmonella spp. when the milk samples contaminated with these pathogens. The multiplex PCR method, which was rapid, convenient, and with high sensitivity, could be suitable for rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp. in food, and could have a great prospect.

  13. Food poisoning due to yam flour consumption in Kano (Northwest Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleke SI

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Food poisoning is known to occur sporadically from time to time due to poor hygienic preparations. Its occurrence rarely assumes epidemic proportion. The objective was to report the occurrence of food poisoning due to yam flour among three families which occurred almost in quick succession between March and July 2007 among three families in Kano. They presented with diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, convulsion and loss of consciousness. They all recovered within 48hours of admission. Investigations indicated that the use of certain lethal preservatives for the processing of the yam flour might be responsible. Poisoning from consumption of yam flour should be a differential diagnosis of acute seizure disorders or occurrence of vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain in the tropics. It is recommended that education on proper processing of all food products in view of the public health implication

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and typing of Salmonella isolated from street vended foods and associated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anukampa; Shagufta, Bi; Sivakumar, M; Kumar, Surender; Agarwal, Rajesh Kumar; Bhilegaonkar, Kiran Narayan; Kumar, Ashok; Dubal, Zunjar Baburao

    2017-07-01

    The present study was carried out to find out the occurrence and types of Salmonella present in street vended foods and associated environment, and their resistance pattern against various antibiotics. About 1075 street vended food and associated environment samples were processed for isolation and confirmation of different Salmonella spp. by targeting gene specific invA gene and serotype specific Sdf I, Via B and Spy genes by PCR. Selected Salmonella isolates were screened for antibiotic resistance by using Baeur-Kirby disk diffusion test. Out of 1075 samples, only 31 (2.88%) isolates could be amplified the invA gene of which 19 could be recovered from meat vendors; 8 from egg vendors while remaining 4 from milk vendors. Though, majority of Salmonella recovered from raw foods the ready-to-eat food like chicken gravy and rasmalai also showed its presence which pose a serious public health threat. Overall, 19, 6 and 1 isolates of S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhi could be detected by PCR while remaining 5 isolates could not be amplified suggesting other type of Salmonella. Selected Salmonella isolates were completely resistance to Oxacillin (100%) followed by Cefoxitin (30.43%) and Ampicillin (26.10%). Thus, it is observed that the street vended foods of animal origin and associated environment play an important role in transmission of food borne pathogens including Salmonella.

  15. Case report of Salmonella cross-contamination in a food laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasschaert, Geertrui; De Reu, K; Heyndrickx, M; Herman, L

    2016-03-10

    This paper describes a case of Salmonella cross-contamination in a food laboratory. In 2012, chocolate bars shipped from Belgium to the USA were prevented from entering the USA because a Salmonella Rissen strain had been isolated from one of the chocolate bars in a Belgian food laboratory. However, a retrospective study of the Salmonella isolates sent from the laboratory to the Belgian National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella revealed that 7 weeks prior, a Salmonella Rissen strain has been isolated from fish meal in the same food laboratory. The chocolate bars were not expected to be contaminated with Salmonella because the ingredients all tested negative during the production process. Furthermore, because Salmonella Rissen is only rarely isolated from food, it was hypothesized that the two Salmonella Rissen isolates belonged to the same strain and that the second isolation event in this laboratory was caused by cross-contamination. To confirm this hypothesis, both Salmonella Rissen isolates were fingerprinted using different molecular techniques. To evaluate the discriminatory power of the techniques used, 11 other Salmonella Rissen isolates from different origins were included in the comparison. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, repetitive element palindromic PCR and three random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR assays were used. Repetitive element palindromic PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR assays were insufficiently discriminatory, whereas pulsed-field gel electrophoresis using the combination of two restriction enzymes showed sufficient discrimination to confirm the hypothesis. Although cross-contamination in food laboratories are rarely reported, cross-contamination can always occur. Laboratories should therefore always be aware of the possibility of cross-contamination, especially when enrichment is used in the microbiological analysis. Furthermore, it is advised that results showing isolates of the same serotype isolated in a short time frame

  16. Thermal stability and structural changes in bacterial toxins responsible for food poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Regenthal

    Full Text Available The staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs are secreted by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and are the most common causative agent in staphylococcal food poisoning. The staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA has been associated with large staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks, but newer identified SEs, like staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH has recently been shown to be present at similar levels as SEA in food poisoning outbreaks. Thus, we set out to investigate the thermo-stability of the three-dimensional structures of SEA, SEH and staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE, since heat inactivation is a common method to inactivate toxins during food processing. Interestingly, the investigated toxins behaved distinctly different upon heating. SEA and SEE were more stable at slightly acidic pH values, while SEH adopted an extremely stable structure at neutral pH, with almost no effects on secondary structural elements upon heating to 95°C, and with reversible formation of tertiary structure upon subsequent cooling to room temperature. Taken together, the data suggests that the family of staphylococcal enterotoxins have different ability to withstand heat, and thus the exact profile of heat inactivation for all SEs causing food poisoning needs to be considered to improve food safety.

  17. Thermal stability and structural changes in bacterial toxins responsible for food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenthal, Paulina; Hansen, Jesper S; André, Ingemar; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2017-01-01

    The staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are secreted by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and are the most common causative agent in staphylococcal food poisoning. The staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) has been associated with large staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks, but newer identified SEs, like staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) has recently been shown to be present at similar levels as SEA in food poisoning outbreaks. Thus, we set out to investigate the thermo-stability of the three-dimensional structures of SEA, SEH and staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE), since heat inactivation is a common method to inactivate toxins during food processing. Interestingly, the investigated toxins behaved distinctly different upon heating. SEA and SEE were more stable at slightly acidic pH values, while SEH adopted an extremely stable structure at neutral pH, with almost no effects on secondary structural elements upon heating to 95°C, and with reversible formation of tertiary structure upon subsequent cooling to room temperature. Taken together, the data suggests that the family of staphylococcal enterotoxins have different ability to withstand heat, and thus the exact profile of heat inactivation for all SEs causing food poisoning needs to be considered to improve food safety.

  18. A centrifugal direct recombinase polymerase amplification (direct-RPA) microdevice for multiplex and real-time identification of food poisoning bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Goro; Jung, Jae Hwan; Park, Byung Hyun; Oh, Seung Jun; Seo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Jong Seob; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-06-21

    In this study, we developed a centrifugal direct recombinase polymerase amplification (direct-RPA) microdevice for multiplex and real-time identification of food poisoning bacteria contaminated milk samples. The microdevice was designed to contain identical triplicate functional units and each unit has four reaction chambers, thereby making it possible to perform twelve direct-RPA reactions simultaneously. The integrated microdevice consisted of two layers: RPA reagents were injected in the top layer, while spiked milk samples with food poisoning bacteria were loaded into sample reservoirs in the bottom layer. For multiplex bacterial detection, the target gene-specific primers and probes were dried in each reaction chamber. The introduced samples and reagents could be equally aliquoted and dispensed into each reaction chamber by centrifugal force, and then the multiplex direct-RPA reaction was executed. The target genes of bacteria spiked in milk could be amplified at 39 °C without a DNA extraction step by using the direct-RPA cocktails, which were a combination of a direct PCR buffer and RPA enzymes. As the target gene amplification proceeded, the increased fluorescence signals coming from the reaction chambers were recorded in real-time at an interval of 2 min. The entire process, including the sample distribution, the direct-RPA reaction, and the real-time analysis, was accomplished with a custom-made portable genetic analyzer and a miniaturized optical detector. Monoplex, duplex, and triplex food poisoning bacteria (Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) detection was successfully performed with a detection sensitivity of 4 cells per 3.2 μL of milk samples within 30 min. By implementing the direct-PRA on the miniaturized centrifugal microsystem, the on-site food poisoning bacteria analysis would be feasible with high speed, sensitivity, and multiplicity.

  19. Deteksi Kuman Salmonella Pada Ayam Goreng Yang Dijual Di Warung Makan Dan Pola Kepekaan Terhadap Berbagai Zat Antibiotika

    OpenAIRE

    Wulandari, Syuriati; Suryani, Lilis

    2008-01-01

    There are many types of bacteria that cause food poisoned. One of the bacterias is Salmonella typhi. This type of bacteria mostly inhabit the farm animals or wild animals. Mostly bacterias on cats, dogs, rats, flies and cockroaches defile chickens, meat, eggs and raw milk. Salmonella typhi defiles riped foods during storage and serving. Researches meant to detect Salmonella presence on foods sold at restaurants in Yogyakarta are rarely conducted. This research was in demand to find out the sa...

  20. Colorimetric deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization assay for rapid screening of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiale, M S; Klatt, M J; Mozola, M A

    1990-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 11 laboratories to validate a colorimetric DNA hybridization (DNAH) method for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. The method was compared to the standard culture method for detection of Salmonella in nonfat dry milk, milk chocolate, soy isolate, dried whole egg, ground black pepper, and raw ground turkey. Samples inoculated with high (0.4-2 cells/g) and low (0.04-0.2 cells/g) levels of Salmonella and uninoculated control samples were included in each food group analyzed. There was no significant difference in the proportion of samples positive by DNAH and culture procedure for any of the 6 foods. The colorimetric DNA hybridization assay screening method has been adopted official first action as a rapid screening method for detection of Salmonella in all foods.

  1. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. isolated from food other than meat in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Mąka

    2015-09-01

    Although, the level of resistance and multiresistance of Salmonella spp. isolates from non-meat foods was lower than in those from meat products, the presence of these resistant bacteria poses a real threat to the health of consumers.

  2. Human health implications of Salmonella-contaminated natural pet treats and raw pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Rita; Reid-Smith, Richard; Weese, J Scott

    2006-03-01

    Human salmonellosis occurs mainly as a result of handling or consuming contaminated food products, with a small percentage of cases being related to other, less well-defined exposures, such as contact with companion animals and natural pet treats. The increasing popularity of raw food diets for companion animals is another potential pet-associated source of Salmonella organisms; however, no confirmed cases of human salmonellosis have been associated with these diets. Pets that consume contaminated pet treats and raw food diets can be colonized with Salmonella organisms without exhibiting clinical signs, making them a possible hidden source of contamination in the household. Pet owners can reduce their risk of acquiring Salmonella organisms by not feeding natural pet treats and raw food diets to their pets, whereas individuals who investigate cases of salmonellosis or interpret surveillance data should be aware of these possible sources of Salmonella organisms.

  3. COMPARISON OF TWO METHODS FOR THE ISOLATION OF SALMONELLAE FROM IMPORTED FOODS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAYLOR, W I; HOBBS, B C; SMITH, M E

    1964-01-01

    Two methods for the detection of salmonellae in foods were compared in 179 imported meat and egg samples. The number of positive samples and replications, and the number of strains and kinds of serotypes were statistically comparable by both the direct enrichment method of the Food Hygiene Laboratory in England, and the pre-enrichment method devised for processed foods in the United States. Boneless frozen beef, veal, and horsemeat imported from five countries for consumption in England were found to have salmonellae present in 48 of 116 (41%) samples. Dried egg products imported from three countries were observed to have salmonellae in 10 of 63 (16%) samples. The high incidence of salmonellae isolated from imported foods illustrated the existence of an international health hazard resulting from the continuous introduction of exogenous strains of pathogenic microorganisms on a large scale.

  4. An outbreak of food poisoning due to egg yolk reaction-negative Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, N; Kawamura, A; Masuda, T; Akiyama, M

    2001-03-20

    An outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning due to an egg yolk (EY) reaction-negative strain occurred in Japan. Twenty-one of 53 dam construction workers who ate boxed lunches prepared at their company cafeteria became ill, and eight required hospital treatment. The outbreak showed a typical incubation time (1.5-4 h with a median time of 2.7 h) and symptoms (vomiting and diarrhea) of staphylococcal food poisoning. Staphylococcus aureus, which produces staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) A, was isolated from four fecal specimens of eight patients tested. Scrambled egg in the boxed lunches contained 20-40 ng/g of SEA, and 3.0 x 10(9)/g of viable S. aureus cells that produced this toxin. All isolates from patients and the food were EY reaction-negative, coagulase type II, and showed the same restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern. We concluded that the outbreak was caused by scrambled egg contaminated with EY reaction-negative S. aureus. In Japan, outbreaks of staphylococcal food poisoning are mainly caused by EY reaction-positive S. aureus, and EY reaction-negative colonies grown on agar plates containing EY are usually not analyzed further for detection of S. aureus. The present outbreak suggested that EY reaction-negative isolates should be subjected to further analysis to detect the causative agents of staphylococcal food poisoning.

  5. Effect of Food Residues in Biofilm Formation on Stainless Steel and Polystyrene Surfaces by Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Poultry Houses

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Méndez, Alba María; Lamas, Alexandre; Vázquez, Beatriz; Miranda, José Manuel; Cepeda, Alberto; Franco, Carlos Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella spp. is a major food-borne pathogen around the world. The ability of Salmonella to produce biofilm is one of the main obstacles in reducing the prevalence of these bacteria in the food chain. Most of Salmonella biofilm studies found in the literature used laboratory growth media. However, in the food chain, food residues are the principal source of nutrients of Salmonella. In this study, the biofilm formation, morphotype, and motility of 13 Salmonella strains belonging to three dif...

  6. Presentation of a general algorithm for effect-assessment on secondary poisoning. II Terrestrial food chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn CAFM; Luttik R; Slooff W; Canton JH

    1991-01-01

    In an earlier report, a simple algorithm for effect-assessment on secondary poisoning of birds and mammals was presented. This algorithm (MAR = NOEC/BCF) was drawn up by analyzing an aquatic food chain. In the present study it was tested whether this algorithm can be used equally well for

  7. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Associated with Food Poisoning in Shenzhen, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Xiaomei; Wang, Bing; Tao, Xiaoxia; Hu, Qinghua; Cui, Zhigang; Zhang, Jianzhong; Lin, Yiman; You, Yuanhai; Shi, Xiaolu; Grundmann, Hajo

    To characterize isolates of Staphylococcus aureus that were associated with staphylococcal food poisoning between 2006 and 2009 in Shenzhen, Southern China, a total of 52 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from 11 outbreaks were analyzed by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, and

  8. Reveal Salmonella 2.0 test for detection of Salmonella spp. in foods and environmental samples. Performance Tested Method 960801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerner, Rebecca; Feldpausch, Jill; Gray, R Lucas; Curry, Stephanie; Islam, Zahidul; Goldy, Tim; Klein, Frank; Tadese, Theodros; Rice, Jennifer; Mozola, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Reveal Salmonella 2.0 is an improved version of the original Reveal Salmonella lateral flow immunoassay and is applicable to the detection of Salmonella enterica serogroups A-E in a variety of food and environmental samples. A Performance Tested Method validation study was conducted to compare performance of the Reveal 2.0 method with that of the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service or U.S. Food and Drug Administration/Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference culture methods for detection of Salmonella spp. in chicken carcass rinse, raw ground turkey, raw ground beef, hot dogs, raw shrimp, a ready-to-eat meal product, dry pet food, ice cream, spinach, cantaloupe, peanut butter, stainless steel surface, and sprout irrigation water. In a total of 17 trials performed internally and four trials performed in an independent laboratory, there were no statistically significant differences in performance of the Reveal 2.0 and reference culture procedures as determined by Chi-square analysis, with the exception of one trial with stainless steel surface and one trial with sprout irrigation water where there were significantly more positive results by the Reveal 2.0 method. Considering all data generated in testing food samples using enrichment procedures specifically designed for the Reveal method, overall sensitivity of the Reveal method relative to the reference culture methods was 99%. In testing environmental samples, sensitivity of the Reveal method relative to the reference culture method was 164%. For select foods, use of the Reveal test in conjunction with reference method enrichment resulted in overall sensitivity of 92%. There were no unconfirmed positive results on uninoculated control samples in any trials for specificity of 100%. In inclusivity testing, 102 different Salmonella serovars belonging to serogroups A-E were tested and 99 were consistently positive in the Reveal test. In exclusivity testing of 33 strains of non-salmonellae

  9. Modeling the long-term kinetics of Salmonella survival on dry pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Mishra, Abhinav; Guo, Miao; Cao, Huilin; Buchanan, Robert L; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-09-01

    Due to multiple outbreaks and large-scale product recalls, Salmonella has emerged as a priority pathogen in dry pet food and treats. However, little data are available to quantify risks posed by these classes of products to both pets and their owners. Specifically, the kinetics of Salmonella survival on complex pet food matrices are not available. This study measured the long-term kinetics of Salmonella survival on a dry pet food under storage conditions commonly encountered during production, retail, and in households (aw Salmonella enterica cocktail of 12 strains isolated from dry pet foods and treats was used to inoculate commercial dry dog food. Salmonella was enumerated on non-selective (BHI) and selective (XLD and BS) media. Results at 570 days indicated an initial relatively rapid decline (up to 54 days), followed by a much slower extended decline phase. The Weibull model provided a satisfactory fit for time series of Log-transformed Salmonella counts from all three media (δ: mean 4.65 day/Log (CFU/g); p: mean 0.364 on BHI). This study provides a survival model that can be applied in quantitative risk assessment models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella Isolated from Animal-Origin Food Items in Gondar, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrat Ejo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella has been found to be the major cause of foodborne diseases and a serious public health problem in the world, with an increasing concern for the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant strains. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February 2014 and December 2015 on food items of animal origin to assess the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Salmonella isolates using standard bacteriological methods. The overall prevalence rate of 5.5% was recorded from the total analyzed food items of animal origin. Salmonella isolates were detected from 12% of raw meat, 8% of minced meat, 2.9% of burger samples, 18% of raw eggs, and 6% of raw milk. Furthermore, antimicrobial susceptibility test identified 47.6% resistant Salmonella isolates, 28.6% intermediately sensitive isolates, and 23.8% susceptible isolates. Among Salmonella isolates tested, 42.6%, 28.6%, and 14.3% were found to be relatively resistant to tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and ampicillin, respectively, while 9.5%–19% were intermediately resistant to tetracycline, amoxicillin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and nitrofurantoin. Therefore, our findings provide the prevalence and drug resistance of Salmonella from foods of animal origin and contribute information to scientists as well as public health researchers to minimize the prevalent and resistant foodborne Salmonella species in Ethiopia.

  11. Identification and measurement of staphylococcal enterotoxin M from Staphylococcus aureus isolate associated with staphylococcal food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Zhu, A; Tang, J; Tang, C; Chen, J

    2017-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide variety of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs, SEA to SEX), which are responsible for staphylococcal food poisoning. This study is aimed to establish a system to detect staphylococcal enterotoxin M (SEM) protein in food matrixes. In the present study, sem gene was characterized in a S. aureus isolate H4 associated with food poisoning. The amino acid sequence of the deduced SEM protein was same as that of previously identified SEM from S. aureus 04-02981. Subsequently, mature SEM protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and purified with a Ni-NTA spin column. The polyclonal and monoclonal antibody against it were prepared. Using these antibodies, a highly sensitive, specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was developed capable of detecting SEM in milk, meat and rice. Cross-reactivity with SEB, SEI and SEK in this method was insignificant. Quantification of SEM secretion in vitro using this novel capture ELISA revealed that SEM was mainly secreted during the transition from the exponential to the stationary phase. Furthermore, sem gene and SEM protein production were screened by PCR and the developed ELISA system. The results indicated that there were two SEM+ strains of 19 S. aureus isolates originating in cold dishes and humans suffering from food poisoning. The investigations make it possible to assess SEM in food hygiene supervision in near future. Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) are the main causative agents of staphylococcal food poisoning. Unlike classical SEs (SEA to SEE), the relationship between newly identified SEs (SEG to SEX) and staphylococcal food poisoning has not been clearly elucidated. Recently, mild emetic potential of staphylococcal enterotoxin M (SEM) has been demonstrated, which indicated that SEM might be associated with food poisoning. However, there is currently no commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit available for immunological

  12. Food contamination with salmonella and human health in Kinshasa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the level of salmonella contamination of fish and meat from public markets, meat from butcheries and beef carcasses offered for retail sale in Kinshasa, the capital city of the Democratic Republic of Congo Methodology and results: Salmonella spp. in fish and meat was ...

  13. Food contamination with salmonella and human health in Kinshasa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-10-31

    Oct 31, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the level of salmonella contamination of fish and meat ... Conclusions and applications: This study revealed salmonella contamination of fishes and meats offered for retail sale in ... separate sterile plastic bags, stored in cool boxes and.

  14. Survival of Salmonella Copenhagen in food bowls following contamination with experimentally inoculated raw meat: Effects of time, cleaning, and disinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Weese, J Scott; Rousseau, J.

    2006-01-01

    There are concerns regarding the safety of feeding raw meat to household pets. This study demonstrated that Salmonella persists in food bowls that are inoculated with Salmonella-containing raw meat. Standard methods of cleaning and disinfection were minimally effective at eliminating Salmonella contamination.

  15. Staphylococcal food poisoning caused by Staphylococcus argenteus harboring staphylococcal enterotoxin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Yuki; Umeda, Kaoru; Yonogi, Shinya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Kaori; Kumeda, Yuko; Kawatsu, Kentaro

    2018-01-16

    Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) is caused by staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) preformed in food materials. SE genes are encoded on mobile genetic elements and are widely found across Staphylococcus species including S. argenteus, although most SFP cases are caused by S. aureus. S. argenteus, recently discriminated from S. aureus as a novel species, are non-pigmented staphylococci phenotypically related to S. aureus. In 2014 and 2015, two independent food poisoning cases occurred in Osaka, Japan, in which non-pigmented staphylococci were predominantly isolated. Several enterotoxin genes (seb, seg, sei, sem, sen, seo, and selu2) were found in their genome and the production of SEB was confirmed by reverse passive agglutination tests. The non-pigmented isolates from patients, food handlers, food, and cooking utensils all produced the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. These non-pigmented isolates were coagulase-positive and biochemically identical to S. aureus. We performed further genetic analysis using nucA sequencing and multi-locus sequence typing, and identified these isolates as S. argenteus. We also found that seb was encoded on the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island, while seg, sei, sem, sen, seo, and selu2 were encoded on the enterotoxin gene cluster. From these results, we concluded that the two food poisoning outbreaks were SFP cases caused by S. argenteus harboring SE genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. TECRA Unique test for rapid detection of Salmonella in food: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D; Dailianis, A E; Hill, L; McIntyre, D A; Anderson, A

    2001-01-01

    The TECRA Unique Salmonella test uses the principle of immunoenrichment to allow rapid detection of Salmonellae in food. A collaborative study was conducted to compare the TECRA Salmonella Unique test with the reference culture method given in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual. Three food types (milk powder, pepper, and soy flour) were analyzed in Australia and 2 food types (milk chocolate and dried egg) were analyzed in the United States. Forty-one collaborators participated in the study. For each of the 5 foods at each of the 3 levels, a comparison showed no significant differences (p > or = 0.05) in the proportion of positive test samples for Unique and that for the reference method using the Chi-square test for independence with continuity correction.

  17. Development of a Salmonella cross-protective vaccine for food animal production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heithoff, Douglas M; House, John K; Thomson, Peter C; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Intensive livestock production is associated with increased Salmonella exposure, transmission, animal disease, and contamination of food and water supplies. Modified live Salmonella enterica vaccines that lack a functional DNA adenine methylase (Dam) confer cross-protection to a diversity of salmonellae in experimental models of murine, avian, ovine, and bovine models of salmonellosis. However, the commercial success of any vaccine is dependent upon the therapeutic index, the ratio of safety/efficacy. Herein, secondary virulence-attenuating mutations targeted to genes involved in intracellular and/or systemic survival were introduced into Salmonella dam vaccines to screen for vaccine candidates that were safe in the animal and the environment, while maintaining the capacity to confer cross-protective immunity to pathogenic salmonellae serotypes. Salmonella dam mgtC, dam sifA, and dam spvB vaccine strains exhibited significantly improved vaccine safety as evidenced by the failure to give rise to virulent revertants during the infective process, contrary to the parental Salmonella dam vaccine. Further, these vaccines exhibited a low grade persistence in host tissues that was associated with reduced vaccine shedding, reduced environmental persistence, and induction of cross-protective immunity to pathogenic serotypes derived from infected livestock. These data indicate that Salmonella dam double mutant vaccines are suitable for commercial applications against salmonellosis in livestock production systems. Reducing pre-harvest salmonellae load through vaccination will promote the health and productivity of livestock and reduce contamination of livestock-derived food products, while enhancing overall food safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence and detection of antibiotic-resistant determinant in Salmonella isolated from food-producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Isoken Henrietta

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella spp. infections are considered as the most common food-borne disease globally. The contamination of food products with Salmonella has given rise to severe health and economic challenges. This study assessed the prevalence of Salmonella in the faeces of cows and goats in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, their antibiotic resistance patterns as well as antibiotic-resistant gene determinant. Antibiotic disc was used for antibiogram profiles while polymerase chain reaction was employed for the detection of antibiotic-resistant genes. A total of 150 Salmonella were isolated from the faecal samples. Eighty two (55%) isolates were recovered from cow faeces while 68 (45%) were isolated from goat faeces. All Salmonella isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin (100%) while 95% were sensitive to ofloxacin. Also, a high sensitivity of 93 and 89% was observed against nalidixic acid and ofloxacin, respectively. Salmonella isolates demonstrated moderate sensitivity against cephalothin (70%), chloramphenicol (75%) and minocycline (68%) while 49% were resistant to tetracycline and erythromycin. The prevalence of the antibiotic-resistant genes in Salmonella isolates were detected as follows: integron conserved segment 28% (42/150), bla TEM gene 19.3% (29/150), blapse₁ 7.3% (11/150) and blaampC 4.7% (7/150). The results obtained in the study imply that cow and goat faeces could be potential reservoirs of Salmonella and could possibly cause infections as a result of contamination of food products. There is a need for a surveillance system to track resistance patterns of Salmonella circulating in South Africa.

  19. Nutritional strategies to combat Salmonella in mono-gastric food animal production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, A C; Wierup, M

    2012-04-01

    Nutritional strategies to minimize Salmonella in food animal production are one of the key components in producing safer food. The current European approach is to use a farm-to-fork strategy, where each sector must implement measures to minimize and reduce Salmonella contamination. In the pre-harvest phase, this means that all available tools need to be used such as implementation of biosecurity measures, control of Salmonella infections in animals at the farm as well as in transport and trade, optimal housing and management including cleaning, disinfection procedures as well as efforts to achieve Salmonella-free feed production. This paper describes some nutritional strategies that could be used in farm control programmes in the major mono-gastric food production animals: poultry and pigs. Initially, it is important to prevent the introduction of Salmonella onto the farm through Salmonella-contaminated feed and this risk is reduced through heat treatment and the use of organic acids and their salts and formaldehyde. Microbiological sampling and monitoring for Salmonella in the feed mills is required to minimize the introduction of Salmonella via feed onto the farm. In addition, feed withdrawal may create a stressful situation in animals, resulting in an increase in Salmonella shedding. Physical feed characteristics such as coarse-ground meal to pigs can delay gastric emptying, thereby increasing the acidity of the gut and thus reducing the possible prevalence of Salmonella. Coarse-ground grains and access to litter have also been shown to decrease Salmonella shedding in poultry. The feed can also modify the gastro-intestinal tract microflora and influence the immune system, which can minimize Salmonella colonization and shedding. Feed additives, such as organic acids, short- and medium-chain fatty acids, probiotics, including competitive exclusion cultures, prebiotics and certain specific carbohydrates, such as mannan-based compounds, egg proteins, essential oils

  20. Characterization of Salmonella spp. from wastewater used for food production in Morogoro, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mhongole, Ofred J; Mdegela, Robinson H; Kusiluka, Lughano J M

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater use for crop irrigation and aquaculture is commonly practiced by communities situated close to wastewater treatment ponds. The objective of this study was to characterize Salmonella spp. and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among isolates from wastewater and Tilapia fish...... and chloramphenicol (6%). Salmonella Kentucky, S. Chandans, S. Durban and S. Kiambu showed multiple antimicrobial resistance to 7, 6 and 3 antimicrobials, respectively. This study has demonstrated that wastewater at the study sites is contaminated with Salmonella spp. which are resistant to common antimicrobials used...... for treatment of diseases in humans. Wastewater may, therefore, contaminate pristine surface water bodies and foodstuffs including fish and irrigated crops as well as food handlers....

  1. Use of a bacteriophage cocktail to control Salmonella in food and the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spricigo, Denis Augusto; Bardina, Carlota; Cortés, Pilar; Llagostera, Montserrat

    2013-07-15

    The use of lytic bacteriophages for the biocontrol of food-borne pathogens in food and in the food industry is gaining increasing acceptance. In this study, the effectiveness of a bacteriophage cocktail composed of three different lytic bacteriophages (UAB_Phi 20, UAB_Phi78, and UAB_Phi87) was determined in four different food matrices (pig skin, chicken breasts, fresh eggs, and packaged lettuce) experimentally contaminated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. A significant bacterial reduction (>4 and 2 log/cm(2) for S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, respectively; p≤0.005) was obtained in pig skin sprayed with the bacteriophage cocktail and then incubated at 33 °C for 6h. Significant decreases in the concentration of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis were also measured in chicken breasts dipped for 5 min in a solution containing the bacteriophage cocktail and then refrigerated at 4 °C for 7 days (2.2 and 0.9 log10 cfu/g, respectively; p≤0.0001) as well as in lettuce similarly treated for 60 min at room temperature (3.9 and 2.2 log10 cfu/g, respectively; p≤0.005). However, only a minor reduction of the bacterial concentration (0.9 log10 cfu/cm(2) of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium; p≤0.005) was achieved in fresh eggs sprayed with the bacteriophage cocktail and then incubated at 25 °C for 2 h. These results show the potential effectiveness of this bacteriophage cocktail as a biocontrol agent of Salmonella in several food matrices under conditions similar to those used in their production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. an outbreak of food poisoning among children attending an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbiological analysis revealed high bacterial loads in samples of the fruit juice and the presence of Shigella fIexneri in the maize-meal porridge. Visits to the suppliers of the implicated foods revealed several deficiencies in terms of food. hygiene precautions. Conclusion. The likely vehicles and causes of this outbreak.

  3. VIDAS enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay for detection of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiale, M S; Gangar, V; Gravens, C

    1997-01-01

    The VIDAS SLM method for detection of Salmonella was compared with the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM)/AOAC culture method in a collaborative study. Twenty laboratories participated in the evaluation. Each laboratory tested one or more of 6 test products: milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, dried whole egg, soy flour, ground black pepper, and ground raw turkey. No significant differences (P Salmonella in foods has been adopted first action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  4. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella Isolated from Animal-Origin Food Items in Gondar, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Mebrat Ejo; Legesse Garedew; Zabishwork Alebachew; Walelgn Worku

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella has been found to be the major cause of foodborne diseases and a serious public health problem in the world, with an increasing concern for the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant strains. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February 2014 and December 2015 on food items of animal origin to assess the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Salmonella isolates using standard bacteriological methods. The overall prevalence rate of 5.5% was recorded f...

  5. DNA hybridization assay for detection of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Klatt, M J; Mozola, M A; Curiale, M S; Gabis, D A; Silliker, J H

    1987-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 11 laboratories to validate a DNA hybridization (DNAH) procedure for detection of Salmonella in foods. The DNAH procedure was compared to the standard culture method for detection of Salmonella in 6 foods: ground pepper, soy flour, dry whole egg, milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, and raw deboned turkey. With the exception of turkey which was naturally contaminated, uninoculated and inoculated samples of each food group were analyzed. Results for the DNAH method were significantly better than for the standard culture method at the 5% probability level for the detection of Salmonella in turkey. There was no significant difference between the methods for the other 5 foods. The method has been adopted official first action.

  6. Fluorescent enzyme immunoassay for rapid screening of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Klatt, M J; Keelan, S L; Swaminathan, B; Gehle, W D; Chandonnet, H E

    1989-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 13 laboratories to validate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) procedure for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. The EIA was compared with the standard culture procedure for detection of Salmonella in 6 food types: ground black pepper, soy flour, dried whole eggs, milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, and raw deboned turkey. Uninoculated and inoculated samples were included in each food group analyzed. There was no significant difference in the proportion of samples positive by the EIA and culture procedures at the 5% level for any of the 6 foods. The enzyme immunoassay screening method has been adopted official first action as a rapid screening method for detection of Salmonella.

  7. Identification of drug-resistant Salmonella from food handlers at the University of Gondar, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garedew-Kifelew, Legesse; Wondafrash, Nishanwork; Feleke, Amsalu

    2014-08-18

    Salmonella species are among the most common food borne pathogens worldwide and their infection is one of the major global public health problems. During the last decade, multidrug-resistant Salmonella species have increased to a great deal, especially in developing countries. The prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Salmonella isolates among food handlers at the University of Gondar, Ethiopia, were described in the current investigation. A cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2013 at the University of Gondar. Stool samples from selected volunteer food handlers were collected and analyzed complemented with questionnaire. Standard isolation, identification and biochemical tests were performed to identify Salmonella isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were also carried out on each isolate using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The data was entered into Epi info version 3.5.4 and analyzed using SPSS version 21. Out of 423 food handlers participated, 303(71.6%) were females. Almost two-third (71.4%) of food handlers had no previous medical checkup to Salmonella infection and only 24(5.7%) of them were certified as food handlers. Thirteen (3.1%) food handlers were found to be positive for Salmonella isolates. The results of antimicrobial susceptibility test in the current research revealed that from a total of 13 isolates; 9(69.2%), 8(61.5%), 6(46.2%) and 6(46.2%) of the isolates were resistant to amoxicillin, ampicillin, nitrofurantoin and tetracycline, respectively. In addition, nearly half (46.2%) of the isolates were multidrug-resistant. However; all of them were sensitive for both ceftriaxone and gentamycin. This study indicated that drug resistant including multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates were circulating among food handlers at the University of Gondar. These Salmonella positive food handlers pose significant risk of infection to the university community particularly to the student population. It is

  8. Salmonella: Dry Pet Foods and Pet Treats (FAQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will have a decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. However, not all pets carrying Salmonella will appear sick. Apparently well but infected animals can be carriers and may infect other animals ...

  9. Interactions of Salmonella with animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Agnès; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chaussé, Anne-Marie; Schikora, Adam; Velge, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica species are Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for a wide range of food- and water-borne diseases in both humans and animals, thereby posing a major threat to public health. Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports, linking Salmonella contaminated raw vegetables and fruits with food poisoning. Many studies have shown that an essential feature of the pathogenicity of Salmonella is its capacity to cross a number of barriers requiring invasion of a large variety of cells and that the extent of internalization may be influenced by numerous factors. However, it is poorly understood how Salmonella successfully infects hosts as diversified as animals or plants. The aim of this review is to describe the different stages required for Salmonella interaction with its hosts: (i) attachment to host surfaces; (ii) entry processes; (iii) multiplication; (iv) suppression of host defense mechanisms; and to point out similarities and differences between animal and plant infections.

  10. Interactions of Salmonella with animals and plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Agnès; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chaussé, Anne-Marie; Schikora, Adam; Velge, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica species are Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for a wide range of food- and water-borne diseases in both humans and animals, thereby posing a major threat to public health. Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports, linking Salmonella contaminated raw vegetables and fruits with food poisoning. Many studies have shown that an essential feature of the pathogenicity of Salmonella is its capacity to cross a number of barriers requiring invasion of a large variety of cells and that the extent of internalization may be influenced by numerous factors. However, it is poorly understood how Salmonella successfully infects hosts as diversified as animals or plants. The aim of this review is to describe the different stages required for Salmonella interaction with its hosts: (i) attachment to host surfaces; (ii) entry processes; (iii) multiplication; (iv) suppression of host defense mechanisms; and to point out similarities and differences between animal and plant infections. PMID:25653644

  11. Predicting survival of Salmonella in low-water activity foods: an analysis of literature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana Farakos, Sofia M; Schaffner, Donald W; Frank, Joseph F

    2014-09-01

    Factors such as temperature, water activity (aw), substrate, culture media, serotype, and strain influence the survival of Salmonella in low-aw foods. Predictive models for Salmonella survival in low-aw foods at temperatures ranging from 21 to 80(u) C and water activities below 0.6 were previously developed. Literature data on survival of Salmonella in low-aw foods were analyzed in the present study to validate these predictive models and to determine global influencing factors. The results showed the Weibull model provided suitable fits to the data in 75% of the curves as compared with the log-linear model. The secondary models predicting the time required for log-decimal reduction (log δ) and shape factor (log β) values were useful in predicting the survival of Salmonella in low-aw foods. Statistical analysis indicated overall fail-safe secondary models, with 88% of the residuals in the acceptable and safe zones (survival kinetics of Salmonella in low-aw foods and its influencing factors.

  12. Robustness of Salmonella loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for food applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q; Wang, F; Prinyawiwatkul, W; Ge, B

    2014-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays have been developed recently for Salmonella detection. This study aimed at evaluating the robustness of two Salmonella LAMP assays in comparison with PCR and real-time quantitative PCR for food applications. Performance of the assays was examined under abusive preparation conditions, running temperatures and pH, and with the addition of various inhibitors and food rinses. LAMP achieved robust detection under abusive assay preparation conditions (holding at 22 and 37°C for up to 30 min) and running temperatures (57-68°C). With a hot-start DNA polymerase, PCR obtained comparable results under these temperature ranges. However, PCR performed markedly poorer under abusive pH. LAMP also showed greater tolerance to potential inhibitors than PCR. When food rinses including meat juice, chicken rinse, egg homogenate and produce homogenate were added at 20% of the reaction mix, PCR amplifications were completely inhibited, but LAMP reactions were not. Our results demonstrated that LAMP is a robust alternative to PCR in Salmonella detection for food applications. This study filled important knowledge gaps regarding the robustness of Salmonella LAMP assays. The findings will help bring Salmonella LAMP assays closer to wider applications in food testing. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. [Report on Salmonella isolates in livestock, food and feed, received at the German national reference laboratory for Salmonella during 2004-2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Alexandra; Dorn, Christina; Schroeter, Andreas; Szabo, Istvan; Jaber, Manuela; Berendonk, Gabriele; Brom, Martha; Ledwolorz, Johanna; Helmuth, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The German National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella receives Salmonella isolates from diverse laboratories in Germany. Most of the Salmonella strains originated from livestock and food.This report summarizes the studies of the German National Reference Laboratory on the prevalence of Salmonella ssp. in livestock, food and feed for the years 2004-2008. In the past five years, the National Reference Laboratory received 23,949 Salmonella isolates with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis as the most prevalent serovars. In addition, we summarize the incidence of emerging serovars, such as S. enterica serovar Paratyphi B (d-tartrate positive), the monophasic variant of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. enterica subspecies (subsp.) enterica serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:-) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar 1,4,12:d:-.

  14. Validation of the ANSR Salmonella method for detection of Salmonella spp. in a variety of foods. Performance Tested Method 061203.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Oscar; Alles, Susan; Gray, R Lucas; Tolan, Jerry; Mozola, Mark; Rice, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a proposal to extend the matrix claims for the ANSR Salmonella test, Performance Tested Method 061203. The test is based on the nicking enzyme amplification reaction (NEAR) isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The assay platform features simple instrumentation, minimal labor, and following a single-step 16-24 h enrichment (depending on sample type), an extremely short assay time of 30 min including sample preparation. Detection is real-time using fluorescent molecular beacon probes. ANSR Salmonella was originally validated for detection of Salmonella spp. in chicken carcass rinse, raw ground turkey, raw ground beef, hot dogs, and oat cereal, and on stainless steel, plastic, sealed concrete, ceramic tile, and rubber surfaces. The matrixes tested in this study include pet food, ice cream, soy flour, raw almonds, peanut butter, spinach, black pepper, raw frozen shrimp, cocoa powder, and pasteurized dried egg. In unpaired comparative testing there were no statistically significant differences in the number of positive results obtained with the ANSR and the reference culture methods. Enrichment for 16 h was effective for all commodities tested except ice cream, black pepper, dried pasteurized egg, and 375 g samples of dry pet food, for which enrichment for 24 h is indicated.

  15. Investigating an outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning among travellers across two Australian states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephanie; Boonwaat, Leng; Moore, Terry; Chavada, Ruchir; Conaty, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of staphylococcal food poisoning in Australia with several outbreaks associated with foods prepared by commercial caterers. Laboratory testing on cases of gastrointestinal illness caused by enterotoxin-producing S. aureus is not routinely done as this condition is self-limiting. Hence outbreaks of such illness may go undetected. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among a group of tourists who were hospitalized in Sydney shortly after flying from Queensland. The group had consumed food prepared by a restaurant on the Gold Coast before transit. Laboratory analyses on stool specimens were conducted in Sydney. An environmental assessment of the restaurant in the Gold Coast was conducted, and environmental specimens were assessed for contamination. Epidemiological investigations linked the outbreak to a restaurant in the Gold Coast where the suspected food was produced. Stool samples from two of the hospitalized cases were confirmed to have enterotoxin-producing S. aureus, and several environmental samples were found to be contaminated with S. aureus as well. Investigations suggested that absence of hand washing and other unhygienic food handling at the implicated restaurant was the likely cause of this outbreak. Food poisoning due to toxin-mediated S. aureus is frequently undetected and underreported. Public health units should consider toxin-producing pathogens such as S. aureus when investigating outbreaks where vomiting is the predominant symptom and occurs rapidly after consuming food.

  16. Characterization of Salmonella spp. from wastewater used for food production in Morogoro, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhongole, Ofred J; Mdegela, Robinson H; Kusiluka, Lughano J M; Forslund, Anita; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2017-03-01

    Wastewater use for crop irrigation and aquaculture is commonly practiced by communities situated close to wastewater treatment ponds. The objective of this study was to characterize Salmonella spp. and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among isolates from wastewater and Tilapia fish. A total of 123 Salmonella spp. isolates were isolated from 52 water and 21 fish intestinal samples. Genotyping of Salmonella spp. isolates was done by Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) technique. A total of 123 Salmonella spp. isolates represented 13 different serovars and 22 PFGE groups. Salmonella serovars showed resistance to 8 out of 14 antimicrobials; sulfamethaxazole (94%), streptomycin (61%), tetracycline (22%), ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid (17%), trimethoprim (11%); gentamycin and chloramphenicol (6%). Salmonella Kentucky, S. Chandans, S. Durban and S. Kiambu showed multiple antimicrobial resistance to 7, 6 and 3 antimicrobials, respectively. This study has demonstrated that wastewater at the study sites is contaminated with Salmonella spp. which are resistant to common antimicrobials used for treatment of diseases in humans. Wastewater may, therefore, contaminate pristine surface water bodies and foodstuffs including fish and irrigated crops as well as food handlers.

  17. Molecular epidemiology and identification of a Staphylococcus aureus clone causing food poisoning outbreaks in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Naito, Ikunori; Ono, Hisaya K; Nakane, Akio; Sugai, Motoyuki; Yamagishi, Norio; Hu, Dong-Liang

    2014-07-01

    Molecular characterization of isolates from staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) outbreaks in Japan showed that the dominant lineage causing SFP outbreaks is clonal complex 81 (CC81), a single-locus variant of sequence type 1, coagulase type VII, positive for sea and/or seb, and positive for seh. Among various CC lineages producing staphylococcal enterotoxin A, CC81 showed the highest toxin productivity. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Validation of the ANSR Salmonella method for detection of Salmonella spp. in selected foods and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozola, Mark; Norton, Paul; Alles, Susan; Gray, R Lucas; Tolan, Jerry; Caballero, Oscar; Pinkava, Lisa; Hosking, Edan; Luplow, Karen; Rice, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    ANSR Salmonella is a new molecular diagnostic assay for detection of Salmonella spp. in foods and environmental samples. The test is based on the nicking enzyme amplification reaction (NEAR) isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The assay platform features simple instrumentation, minimal labor, and, following a single-step 10-24 h enrichment (depending on sample type), an extremely short assay time of 30 min, including sample preparation. Detection is real-time using fluorescent molecular beacon probes. Inclusivity testing was performed using a panel of 113 strains of S. enterica and S. bongori, representing 109 serovars and all genetic subgroups. With the single exception of the rare serovar S. Weslaco, all serovars and genetic subgroups were detected. Exclusivity testing of 38 non-salmonellae, mostly Enterobacteriaceae, yielded no evidence of cross-reactivity. In comparative testing of chicken carcass rinse, raw ground turkey, raw ground beef, hot dogs, and oat cereal, there were no statistically significant differences in the number of positive results obtained with the ANSR and the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service or U.S. Food and Drug Administration/Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference culture methods. In testing of swab or sponge samples from five different environmental surfaces, four trials showed no statistically significant differences in the number of positive results by the ANSR and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration/ Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference methods; in the trial with stainless steel surface, there were significantly more positive results by the ANSR method. Ruggedness experiments showed a high degree of assay robustness when deviations in reagent volumes and incubation times were introduced.

  19. [Quantitative microbiological risk assessment of Salmonella spp. in connmmon catering foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yong-xiang; Liu, Xiu-mei

    2008-05-01

    To study the relationship between foodborne diseases (FBD) and contamination of Salmonella spp. in catering foods, quantitative microbiological risk assessment (QMRA) of Salmonella spp. was used to evaluate the food material or the ready to eat food. The contamination data of Salmonella spp. in 10 896 food samples of 9 categories of food which were collected by National Food Contamination and Food Borne Disease Surveillance Net, combining with diet consumption data from National Food Nutrition Survey in 2002, were analyzed by the microbiological risk assessment model developed by WHO/FAO or FDA/FSIS of US to predict probability of FBD. The results of MRA showed that the probability of salmonellosis by consuming ready to eat meat in summer and autumn was 0.20, much higher than the other foods. Although the contamination level in raw poultry was higher than meat, the probability of salmonellosis by raw poultry (9.11 x 10(-6)) was lower than meat (3.14 x 10(-5)) because of the low consumption volume. Probability of FBD was significantly correlated with the volume of food consumption, the status of economy and bacteria contamination level. The level of FBD in summer season was higher than in winter and spring because of ambient temperature.

  20. Surtos de enfermidades transmitidas por alimentos causados por Salmonella Enteritidis Food borne disease outbreaks caused by Salmonella Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline T.M. Peresi

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: São descritos surtos de salmonelose notificados no período de julho de 1993 a junho de 1997 na região Noroeste do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, tendo em vista os vários surtos de veiculação alimentar ocasionados por Salmonella nessa região. MÉTODO: Foram obtidos 19 inquéritos epidemiológicos para análise de dados, 87 amostras de fezes e 38 amostras de alimentos, incluindo 12 de ovos para análise microbiológica. Cepas de Salmonella foram submetidas a sorotipagem, fagotipagem e teste de sensibilidade a 13 agentes antimicrobianos. RESULTADOS: Foram acometidas 906 pessoas com 295 hospitalizações. Cepas de Salmonella Enteritidis Fagotipo 4 foram isoladas de 80,5% das coproculturas, de todas amostras de alimentose de 41,7% dos ovos. Em 22 (95,7% surtos os a salmonela foi veiculada por alimentos contendo ovos crus ou semicrus. Os testes de sensibilidade a antimicrobianos revelaram sensibilidade à maioria das cepas. CONCLUSÕES: Considerando os resultados obtidos, torna-se necessária a implantação e intensificação de medidas de controle na produção e armazenamento dos ovos, além da orientação à população quanto aos riscos no consumo inadequado desse alimento.OBJECTIVE: It is to describe outbreaks of salmonellosis reported from July 1993 through June 1997 in the Northwest region of S. Paulo State, Brazil, one of the areas where several foodborne outbreaks of salmonellosis have been recently detected. METHOD: Data of 19 epidemiological investigations were analysed; 87 stool specimens and 38 food samples (including 12 of shell eggs were processed for microbiological analysis. Salmonella strains were identified by serotyping, phagetyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. RESULTS: There were 906 ill persons including 295 hospitalized patients. Phage type 4 (PT 4 Salmonella Enteritidis strains were isolated from 80.5% of stool samples, from all food samples and from 41.7% of eggs. Of the outbreaks, 95.7% were

  1. Salmonella in Sheep in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnarsson E

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1995 several outbreaks of food poisoning in humans occurred in Iceland, that were traced to salmonella contamination of singed sheep heads. This prompted us to study the prevalence of salmonella infection in sheep and to trace where and how infection might have occurred. Faecal, intestinal contents and tonsillar samples were collected in the spring and autumn from sheep on 50 farms in the southwestern part of the country, where salmonellosis had been detected and from 5 farms in the northwestern part of the country. All faecal samples from the southwest were negative, whereas samples from 3 farms obtained in the autumn in the northwest were positive. Tonsillae taken in the autumn were positive in sheep from 3 farms in the southwest and 2 in the northwest. Our results show that salmonella infection is rare in Icelandic sheep but healthy carriers may harbour the bacteria in tonsillae. Salmonella was not detected in drainage from slaughterhouses nor in singed sheep heads.

  2. It is safe from O-157 and salmonellae. Food hygiene and food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hitoshi [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    Despite the improvement of the systems of food hygiene and food distribution on the markets compared with old times, food-borne diseases are increasing and spreading in the world. Food-borne diseases by pathogenic Escherichia coli O-157:H7 are also increasing seriously. Japan has been importing the large amount of foodstuffs which sometimes contaminating with pathogens or parasites. Many types of food-borne diseases have been caused by non-spore forming bacteria such as salmonellae, V. parahaemolyticus, pathogenic E. coli, Campylobacter and Staphylococcus aureus, and these bacteria can inactivate at dose in the range of 1 - 3 kGy in chilled meat. These pathogenic bacteria can also inactivate in the range of 2 - 5 kGy in frozen condition of meat. For the inactivation of Bacillus cereus or Clostridium botulinum, necessary doses should be more than 10 kGy, however, a dose of 3 kGy is also effective to control the growth at storage below 10degC. Food-borne diseases have been caused also by mycotoxins of fungi in Japan. Aflatoxins and sterigmatocystin are carcinogens and are stable to radiation. However, many fungi for responsible to produce mycotoxins are radiation sensitive and should be easily inactivated in the range of 3 - 5 kGy. If moisture content is controlled below 15%, low dose irradiation is also effective in the range of 0.2 - 0.5 kGy to control the growth of fungi and pests in grain or other dried foods. (author)

  3. Biocontrol of Salmonella Typhimurium in RTE foods with the virulent bacteriophage FO1-E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Susanne; Herzig, Oliver; Fieseler, Lars; Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2012-03-01

    Foodborne Salmonella infections are a major public health concern worldwide. Bacteriophages offer highly specific and effective biocontrol of such pathogens. We evaluated the broad host range, virulent phage FO1-E2 for reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium in different RTE foods. Samples were spiked with 1×10³ Salmonella cells and treated with 3×10⁸ pfu/g phage, and incubated for 6 days at 8 °C or 15 °C. At 8 °C, no viable cells remained following FO1-E2 application, corresponding to a more than 3 log₁₀ unit reduction. At 15 °C, application of phage lowered S. Typhimurium counts by 5 log units on turkey deli meat and in chocolate milk, and by 3 logs on hot dogs and in seafood. In egg yolk, an effect was observed only after 2 days, but not after 6 days. Phage particles retained their infectivity, although they were readily immobilized by the food matrix, resulting in loss of their ability to diffuse and infect target cells. At the end of the incubation period, phage-resistant Salmonella strains appeared which, however, were not able to compensate for the initial killing effect. Altogether, our data show that virulent phages such as FO1-E2 offer an effective biocontrol measure for Salmonella in foods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Salmonella in foods--a new enrichment procedure for use with the TECRA Salmonella visual immunoassay: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D; Dailianis, A E; Hill, L; Curiale, M S; Gangar, V

    1999-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to compare a new enrichment procedure for the TECRA Salmonella Visual Immunoassay with the reference method given in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM 7th Ed.). Three food types (milk powder, black pepper, and soy flour) were analyzed in Australia, and 3 food types (milk chocolate, dried egg, and raw turkey) were analyzed in the United States. Thirty-eight collaborators participated in the study. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were observed for the pairwise comparison of the proportion of positive samples for the TECRA method with that for the reference method. The new enrichment procedure for the TECRA method has been adopted First Action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  5. LOCATE enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Salmonella in food: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangar, V; Curiale, M S; D'Onorio, A; Donnelly, C; Dunnigan, P

    1998-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 27 laboratories to validate the enzyme-linked immunosorbent procedure LOCATE for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. Results were read visually and with a microtiter plate reader. The LOCATE method was compared with the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM)/AOAC INTERNATIONAL culture method for detecting Salmonella in 6 foods: milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, dried whole egg, soy flour, ground black pepper, and ground raw turkey. Two foods--dried whole egg and black pepper--required repeat rounds because insufficient data sets were produced initially (AOAC INTERNATIONAL stipulates a minimum of 15 sets per food type). Each laboratory tested one or more of the 6 foods. A total of 1 439 samples were analyzed, and no significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed between LOCATE with either visual or reader detection and BAM/AOAC INTERNATIONAL results. The LOCATE screening method with visual or reader detection is recommended for Official First Action Approval.

  6. [Food poisoning caused by Clostridium botulinum type E].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureli, P; Fenicia, L; Ferrini, A M

    1984-01-01

    The results of a microbiological investigation carried out into a home-canned tuna fish are reported in relation to a suspected botulism case. Toxin of Cl. botulinum type E was detected by mouse toxicity and neutralization tests. The food specimen were also cultured for Cl. botulinum. The isolates was identified as Cl. botulinum type E by biochemical, gas chromatographic and immunological tests. The outbreak in which for the first time in Italy, the Cl. botulinum type E is involved, concerns one person who showed typical signs and symptoms consistent with botulism (abdominal cramps, dilatated pupils, diplopia, dysphagia, paralysis of lower upper limbs). The laboratory results are discussed with relation to environmental characteristics of the micro-organism and their resistance to same chemical and physical factors with are involved in the canning practice.

  7. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella species from clinical specimens and food Items in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlallah, Sukayna M; Shehab, Marwa; Cheaito, Katia; Saleh, Majd; Ghosn, Nada; Ammar, Walid; El Hajj, Rima; Matar, Ghassan M

    2017-01-30

    Foodborne illnesses can be due to a wide range of bacteria, one of the most common being Salmonella. In this study, PulseNet International was implemented in Lebanon to identify circulating pathogens at the species and strain levels, determine antimicrobial resistance, and link food sources and clinical cases during outbreaks. Clinical and food Salmonella isolates received from the Epidemiological Surveillance Unit, Ministry of Public Health (ESUMOH) and the Lebanese Agriculture Research Institute (LARI) between 2011 and 2014 were identified to the species level using API 20E. Serotyping was carried out using the Kauffman and White scheme. Antimicrobial susceptibility to a panel of antimicrobials was tested by the disc diffusion method. The DNA fingerprinting patterns were determined using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) followed by BIONUMERICS analysis. 290 clinical and 49 food isolates were identified to be Salmonella. The serotyping of the isolates revealed the prevalence of ten serotypes in the clinical isolates and seven serotypes within the food isolates; S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium being the two most common. Antimicrobial susceptibility test showed resistance to tested antimicrobials among both clinical and food isolates. PFGE results showed a wide range of pulsotypes by the different serovars. These pulsotypes were then used to confirm the linkage of two outbreaks to their food sources. This study calls out to set and implement food safety regulations and emphasizes the importance of surveillance through a "farm-to-fork" approach in identifying widely circulating food borne pathogens.

  8. Investigation of Listeria, Salmonella, and toxigenic Escherichia coli in various pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemser, Sarah M; Doran, Tara; Grabenstein, Michael; McConnell, Terri; McGrath, Timothy; Pamboukian, Ruiqing; Smith, Angele C; Achen, Maya; Danzeisen, Gregory; Kim, Sun; Liu, Yong; Robeson, Sharon; Rosario, Grisel; McWilliams Wilson, Karen; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2014-09-01

    The Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network (Vet-LIRN), in collaboration with the Food Emergency Response Network (FERN) and its Microbiology Cooperative Agreement Program (MCAP) laboratories, conducted a study to evaluate the prevalence of selected microbial organisms in various types of pet foods. The goal of this blinded study was to help the Center for Veterinary Medicine prioritize potential future pet food-testing efforts. The study also increased the FERN laboratories' screening capabilities for foodborne pathogens in animal feed matrices, since such pathogens may also be a significant health risk to consumers who come into contact with pet foods. Six U.S. Food and Drug Administration FERN MCAP laboratories analyzed approximately 1056 samples over 2 years. Laboratories tested for Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia coli O157:H7 enterohemorrhagic E. coli, and Shiga toxin-producing strains of E. coli (STEC). Dry and semimoist dog and cat foods purchased from local stores were tested during Phase 1. Raw dog and cat foods, exotic animal feed, and jerky-type treats purchased through the Internet were tested in Phase 2. Of the 480 dry and semimoist samples, only 2 tested positive: 1 for Salmonella and 1 for Listeria greyii. However, of the 576 samples analyzed during Phase 2, 66 samples were positive for Listeria (32 of those were Listeria monocytogenes) and 15 samples positive for Salmonella. These pathogens were isolated from raw foods and jerky-type treats, not the exotic animal dry feeds. This study showed that raw pet foods may harbor food safety pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella. Consumers should handle these products carefully, being mindful of the potential risks to human and animal health.

  9. Salmonella in Liquid Eggs and Other Foods in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Murakami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of Salmonella in retail and wholesale foods in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. A total of 2,021 samples collected between 1999 and 2010 were tested using a culture method. Samples consisted of liquid eggs (n=30, meat (beef and pork (n=781, offal (n=69, processed meats (n=2, seafood (n=232, processed seafood (dried fish (n=76, vegetables (n=481, processed vegetables (n=87, fruits (n=167, and herbs (n=96 from 574 outlets and wholesale agents in 15 areas (five samples were undocumented regarding outlets. Overall, liquid egg showed significantly (P<0.001 higher frequencies of Salmonella contamination (13.3% than beef (1/423, 0.2% and pork (3/235, 1.3%. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, the most common serovar as a human pathogen, were isolated from two liquid egg samples. No Salmonella were isolated from seafood and vegetable-related samples including seed sprouts (n=261. In conclusion, liquid egg is a significant Salmonella vehicle, showing a need to continue the vaccination of chickens to prevent S. Enteritidis contamination in Japanese eggs. Moreover, further study is needed to evaluate Salmonella contamination in seed sprouts with more sampling from retailers there.

  10. Validation of a Salmonella loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay in animal food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domesle, Kelly J; Yang, Qianru; Hammack, Thomas S; Ge, Beilei

    2018-01-02

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has emerged as a promising alternative to PCR for pathogen detection in food testing and clinical diagnostics. This study aimed to validate a Salmonella LAMP method run on both turbidimetry (LAMP I) and fluorescence (LAMP II) platforms in representative animal food commodities. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s culture-based Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method was used as the reference method and a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay was also performed. The method comparison study followed the FDA's microbiological methods validation guidelines, which align well with those from the AOAC International and ISO. Both LAMP assays were 100% specific among 300 strains (247 Salmonella of 185 serovars and 53 non-Salmonella) tested. The detection limits ranged from 1.3 to 28 cells for six Salmonella strains of various serovars. Six commodities consisting of four animal feed items (cattle feed, chicken feed, horse feed, and swine feed) and two pet food items (dry cat food and dry dog food) all yielded satisfactory results. Compared to the BAM method, the relative levels of detection (RLODs) for LAMP I ranged from 0.317 to 1 with a combined value of 0.610, while those for LAMP II ranged from 0.394 to 1.152 with a combined value of 0.783, which all fell within the acceptability limit (2.5) for an unpaired study. This also suggests that LAMP was more sensitive than the BAM method at detecting low-level Salmonella contamination in animal food and results were available 3days sooner. The performance of LAMP on both platforms was comparable to that of qPCR but notably faster, particularly LAMP II. Given the importance of Salmonella in animal food safety, the LAMP assays validated in this study holds great promise as a rapid, reliable, and robust method for routine screening of Salmonella in these commodities. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Factors Influencing Knowledge, Food Safety Practices and Food Preferences During Warm Weather of Salmonella and Campylobacter Cases in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Adriana; Giles, Lynne C; Zhang, Ying; Koehler, Ann P; Hiller, Janet E; Bi, Peng

    2017-03-01

    To assess food safety practices, food shopping preferences, and eating behaviors of people diagnosed with Salmonella or Campylobacter infection in the warm seasons, and to identify socioeconomic factors associated with behavior and practices. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Salmonella and Campylobacter cases with onset of illness from January 1 to March 31, 2013. Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined relationships between socioeconomic position and food safety knowledge and practices, shopping and food preferences, and preferences, perceptions, and knowledge about food safety information on warm days. Respondents in our study engaged in unsafe personal and food hygiene practices. They also carried out unsafe food preparation practices, and had poor knowledge of foods associated with an increased risk of foodborne illness. Socioeconomic position did not influence food safety practices. We found that people's reported eating behaviors and food preferences were influenced by warm weather. Our study has explored preferences and practices related to food safety in the warm season months. This is important given that warmer ambient temperatures are projected to rise, both globally and in Australia, and will have a substantial effect on the burden of infectious gastroenteritis including foodborne disease. Our results provide information about modifiable behaviors for the prevention of foodborne illness in the household in the warm weather and the need for information to be disseminated across the general population. An understanding of the knowledge and factors associated with human behavior during warmer weather is critical for public health interventions on foodborne prevention.

  12. Investigation of Listeria, Salmonella, and Toxigenic Escherichia coli in Various Pet Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Tara; Grabenstein, Michael; McConnell, Terri; McGrath, Timothy; Pamboukian, Ruiqing; Smith, Angele C.; Achen, Maya; Danzeisen, Gregory; Kim, Sun; Liu, Yong; Robeson, Sharon; Rosario, Grisel; McWilliams Wilson, Karen; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Veterinary Laboratory Investigation and Response Network (Vet-LIRN), in collaboration with the Food Emergency Response Network (FERN) and its Microbiology Cooperative Agreement Program (MCAP) laboratories, conducted a study to evaluate the prevalence of selected microbial organisms in various types of pet foods. The goal of this blinded study was to help the Center for Veterinary Medicine prioritize potential future pet food–testing efforts. The study also increased the FERN laboratories' screening capabilities for foodborne pathogens in animal feed matrices, since such pathogens may also be a significant health risk to consumers who come into contact with pet foods. Six U.S. Food and Drug Administration FERN MCAP laboratories analyzed approximately 1056 samples over 2 years. Laboratories tested for Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia coli O157:H7 enterohemorrhagic E. coli, and Shiga toxin–producing strains of E. coli (STEC). Dry and semimoist dog and cat foods purchased from local stores were tested during Phase 1. Raw dog and cat foods, exotic animal feed, and jerky-type treats purchased through the Internet were tested in Phase 2. Of the 480 dry and semimoist samples, only 2 tested positive: 1 for Salmonella and 1 for Listeria greyii. However, of the 576 samples analyzed during Phase 2, 66 samples were positive for Listeria (32 of those were Listeria monocytogenes) and 15 samples positive for Salmonella. These pathogens were isolated from raw foods and jerky-type treats, not the exotic animal dry feeds. This study showed that raw pet foods may harbor food safety pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella. Consumers should handle these products carefully, being mindful of the potential risks to human and animal health. PMID:24824368

  13. Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica Serotypes and Food Commodities, United States, 1998- 2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-09

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ study, Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica Serotypes and Food Commodities, United States, 1998- 2008.  Created: 9/9/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/9/2013.

  14. Consecutive salmonella outbreaks traced to the same bakery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. R.; Tromans, J. P.; Dexter, E. L.; Ribeiro, C. D.; Gardner, D.

    1996-01-01

    Two consecutive community outbreaks of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) traced to the same bakery occurred in Cardiff, Wales during August-September 1992. In the first outbreak, illness was associated with eating custard slices (odds ratio 23.8, 95% confidence interval 6.5-94.4, P bakery. This incident illustrates the hazard of widespread environmental contamination with salmonella and the need for thorough environmental cleansing for any premises implicated in an outbreak of food poisoning. PMID:8620907

  15. Immunodiffusion screening method for detection of motile Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Klatt, M J

    1989-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed to validate the performance of the 1-2 TEST for detection of motile salmonellae in foods. Detection is based on observation of an immobilized band of cells. Twenty-three laboratories participated in the study. The 1-2 TEST (immunodiffusion test) was compared with the standard culture procedure (BAM/AOAC; FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual) for detection of Salmonella in 6 food types: ground black pepper, soy flour, dried whole egg, milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, and raw deboned turkey. Uninoculated and inoculated samples were included in each food group analyzed. After the tests on the 6 foods were completed, analysis of the data for turkey and soy flour showed that certain collaborators obtained data inconsistent with the data from the majority of collaborators. No specific method deviations to account for the inconsistencies were reported by those collaborators, so the collaborative testing of these 2 foods was repeated. Analysis of data for pepper, chocolate, nonfat dry milk, dried whole egg, and the second set of soy flour and turkey indicated 96.1% agreement between the BAM/AOAC and immunodiffusion test methods. The false negative rates for the immunodiffusion test and BAM/AOAC methods were 3.6 and 1.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the productivity of the immunodiffusion test and BAM/AOAC method at the 5% level for any of the 6 foods. The immunodiffusion screening method has been approved official first action for detection of motile Salmonella in foods.

  16. Cold plasma rapid decontamination of food contact surfaces contaminated with Salmonella biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemira, Brendan A; Boyd, Glenn; Sites, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Cross-contamination of foods from persistent pathogen reservoirs is a known risk factor in processing environments. Industry requires a rapid, waterless, zero-contact, chemical-free method for removing pathogens from food contact surfaces. Cold plasma was tested for its ability to inactivate Salmonella biofilms. A 3-strain Salmonella culture was grown to form adherent biofilms for 24, 48, or 72 h on a test surface (glass slides). These were placed on a conveyor belt and passed at various line speeds to provide exposure times of 5, 10, or 15 s. The test plate was either 5 or 7.5 cm under a plasma jet emitter operating at 1 atm using filtered air as the feed gas. The frequency of high-voltage electricity was varied from 23 to 48 kHz. At the closer spacing (5 cm), cold plasma reduced Salmonella biofilms by up to 1.57 log CFU/mL (5 s), 1.82 log CFU/mL (10 s), and 2.13 log CFU/mL (15 s). Increasing the distance to 7.5 cm generally reduced the efficacy of the 15 s treatment, but had variable effects on the 5 and 10 s treatments. Variation of the high-voltage electricity had a greater effect on 10 and 15 s treatments, particularly at the 7.5 cm spacing. For each combination of time, distance, and frequency, Salmonella biofilms of 24, 48, and 72 h growth responded consistently with each other. The results show that short treatments with cold plasma yielded up to a 2.13 log reduction of a durable form of Salmonella contamination on a model food contact surface. This technology shows promise as a possible tool for rapid disinfection of materials associated with food processing. Pathogens such as Salmonella can form chemical-resistant biofilms, making them difficult to remove from food contact surfaces. A 15 s treatment with cold plasma reduced mature Salmonella biofilms by up to 2.13 log CFU/mL (99.3%). This contact-free, waterless method uses no chemical sanitizers. Cold plasma may therefore have a practical application for conveyor belts, equipment, and other food contact

  17. Salmonella and produce: survival in the plant environment and implications in food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatica, Marianne K; Schneider, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    There has been a continuous rise in the number of produce-based foodborne outbreaks in the recent decades despite the perception that foodborne diseases were primarily linked to animal-based products. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 95% of Salmonella-based infections originate from foodborne sources, with multiple produce-based salmonellosis outbreaks occurring since 1990. The contamination of produce in both the pre-harvest and post-harvest produce environments is challenging to eliminate since produce is consumed as a raw, fresh commodity. Salmonella spp. contamination is possible through contact with the produce in the field as well as in the processing facility. The field contamination of produce infers the ability of Salmonella spp. to survive on the plant surface. The fitness of Salmonella spp. in the plant habitat is limited as opposed to naturally plant-associated bacteria, but survival is possible. The use of intensive farming practices, globalization of food products, high demand for convenience food products, and increased foodborne disease surveillance also have unknown ramifications in the ascending trends of produce-based outbreaks. A better understanding of the ecology of Salmonella spp. in the plant environment as well as the processing, food handling, and surveillance factors affecting the incidence of foodborne outbreaks will provide a comprehensive view of the etiology and epidemiology of produce-associated foodborne outbreaks. An understanding of the outbreaks and the factors facilitating produce contamination will allow for the development of intervention procedures and strategies to reduce the risk of produce contamination by Salmonella spp.

  18. Prevalence, serotype distribution, and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolated from food products in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amajoud, Nadia; Bouchrif, Brahim; El Maadoudi, Mohammed; Skalli Senhaji, Nadia; Karraouan, Bouchra; El Harsal, Abdeltif; El Abrini, Jamal

    2017-02-28

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common foodborne diseases worldwide. The irrational use of antibiotics in medicine and in animal feed has greatly promoted the emergence and spread of resistant strains of non-typhoidal Salmonella. A total of 464 food products were collected in Tetouan from January 2010 to December 2012. The isolation and identification of Salmonella were performed according to Moroccan standard 08.0.116. All isolates were serotyped and were then tested for antibiotic resistance using the disk diffusion method. The microbiological analysis showed that 10.3% of food samples were contaminated with Salmonella. Eleven serotypes were identified: Kentucky 22.9% (11/48), Agona 16.7% (8/48), Reading 12.5% (6/48), Corvallis 8.3% (4/48), Saintpaul 8.3% (4/48), Typhimurium 6.2% (3/48), Montevideo 6.2% (3/48), Enteritidis 4.2% (2/48), and 2% (1/48) for each of Israel, Hadar, and Branderup. Drug susceptibility testing showed that 39.6% of Salmonella were resistant to at least one antibiotic and 60.4% were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. The highest percentage of resistance was found to the following antimicrobial agents: nalidixic acid (27.1%), sulfonamides (25%), amoxicillin (12.5%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 12.5%, trimethoprim (10.4%), cephalothin (4.2%), and chloramphenicol (2.1%). This study revealed a relatively high prevalence of Salmonella in food products in Tetouan and a large percentage of drug-resistant strains. Hygienic measures should be rigorously implemented, and monitoring resistance of Salmonella is required to reduce the risks related to the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria.

  19. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-04

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  20. Prevalence of Salmonella typhi and intestinal parasites among food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Abstract. Background: Food borne diseases are a global public health problem. Food handlers play a major role for the transmission of food borne diseases. Objectives: This study was aimed at exploring the prevalence of intestinal parasites, S. typhi carrier rate and risk factors among food handlers at Bahir Dar town.

  1. Prevalence of Salmonella typhi and intestinal parasites among food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Food borne diseases are a global public health problem. Food handlers play a major role for the transmission of food borne diseases. Objectives: This study was aimed at exploring the prevalence of intestinal parasites, S. typhi carrier rate and risk factors among food handlers at Bahir Dar town. Methods: A ...

  2. An Outbreak of Aeromonas hydrophila Food Poisoning in Deptsang Village, Samdrup Jongkhar, Bhutan, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsheten, Tsheten; Tshering, Dorji; Gyem, Kinley; Dorji, Sangay; Wangchuk, Sonam; Tenzin, Tenzin; Norbu, Lungten; Jamtsho, Tshering

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak investigation was carried out to determine the cause and confirm the source of food poisoning in Deptsang village for implementing prevention and control measures. We conducted a retrospective cohort study for the outbreak investigation. Stool specimens were collected from cases to perform culture and antibiogram. The team also inspected the environment and hygiene practices in both the construction site and the entire community. The association between the exposure to carcass meat and their outcome of acute gastroenteritis was assessed by risk ratio. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Fifty-five villagers consumed the carcass meat during lunch and dinner resulting in 33 cases. Multi-drug resistant Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated from stool specimens of cases, which were susceptible to chloramphenicol only. A risk ratio of 2.1 was found between those people who consumed the carcass meat and those who did not consume the carcass meat (P<0.001). The current outbreak of food poisoning was caused by the consumption of carcass meat contaminated with A. hydrophila. Provision of health education with emphasis on food hygiene is needed in remote areas to prevent such outbreaks in the future.

  3. Comparison of Subtyping Methods for Differentiating Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates Obtained from Food Animal Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Steven L.; White, David G.; McDermott, Patrick F.; Walker, Robert D.; Rhodes, Bobbie; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Simjee, Shabbir; Zhao, Shaohua

    2006-01-01

    Molecular characterization (e.g., DNA-based typing methods) of Salmonella isolates is frequently employed to compare and distinguish clinical isolates recovered from animals and from patients with food-borne disease and nosocomial infections. In this study, we compared the abilities of different phenotyping and genotyping methods to distinguish isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from different food animal sources. One hundred twenty-eight S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from cattle, pigs, chickens, and turkeys or derived food products were characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), repetitive element PCR (Rep-PCR), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), plasmid profiling, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Among the 128 Salmonella isolates tested, we observed 84 Rep-PCR profiles, 86 PFGE patterns, 89 MLST patterns, 36 plasmid profiles, and 38 susceptibility profiles. The molecular typing methods, i.e., PFGE, MLST, and Rep-PCR, demonstrated the best discriminatory power among Salmonella isolates. However, no apparent correlation was evident between the results of one molecular typing method and those of the others, suggesting that a combination of multiple methods is needed to differentiate S. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates that genetically cluster according to one particular typing method. PMID:17021084

  4. PCR-Based Method for the Detection of Toxic Mushrooms Causing Food-Poisoning Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Chie; Masayama, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Mizuka; Sakuma, Daisuke; Kajimura, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    In this study, species-specific identification of five toxic mushrooms, Chlorophyllum molybdites, Gymnopilus junonius, Hypholoma fasciculare, Pleurocybella porrigens, and Tricholoma ustale, which have been involved in food-poisoning incidents in Japan, was investigated. Specific primer pairs targeting internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were designed for PCR detection. The specific amplicons were obtained from fresh, cooked, and simulated gastric fluid (SGF)-treated samples. No amplicons were detected from other mushrooms with similar morphology. Our method using one-step extraction of mushrooms allows rapid detection within 2.5 hr. It could be utilized for rapid identification or screening of toxic mushrooms.

  5. [Food poisoning following consumption of canned meat prepared by a butcher (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M J; Bijker, P G

    1976-04-01

    A case of food poisoning possibly caused by the ingestion of canned meat is reported. Large numbers of micro-organisms (approximately 10(7)/gram), mainly Enterobacteriaceae and streptococci, were isolated from the contents of three cans. The contents of another can contained approximately 10(5) Bacillus spp. per gram. The meat preserves had been prepared in a butcher's shop and heated in a "cooking pot", the steam holes of which had been stopped up and the lid of which had been made heavier in order to reach a temperature above 100 degrees C. Inadequate sterilization and errors in processing are suggested as possible causes.

  6. Enzyme immunoassay for detection of Salmonella in low-moisture foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Klatt, M J; Robison, B J; Mattingly, J A; Gabis, D A; Silliker, J H

    1987-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed in 15 laboratories to evaluate a modification of the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) method for detection of Salmonella in foods (46.B21-46.B29). The modified EIA requires 18-24 h pre-enrichment, 6-8 h selective enrichment, and 14-18 h M-broth post-enrichment prior to performing the assay, which requires 1-2 h. Total assay time is 40-52 h. The modified method was compared with the standard culture method for detection of Salmonella in 5 low-moisture foods: nonfat dry milk, milk chocolate, meat and bone meal, dry whole egg, and ground pepper. The modified method has been adopted official first action for use with low-moisture foods.

  7. Refrigerant poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Severe abdominal pain Vomiting Burns of the food pipe (esophagus) Vomiting blood Blood in the stool HEART ... effect of the poison Washing of the skin (irrigation), perhaps every few hours for several days Skin ...

  8. Sources and risk factors for contamination, survival, persistence, and heat resistance of Salmonella in low-moisture foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, Richard; Enache, Elena; Stone, Warren; Black, Darryl G; Elliott, Philip H

    2010-10-01

    Sources and risk factors for contamination, survival, persistence, and heat resistance of Salmonella in low-moisture foods are reviewed. Processed products such as peanut butter, infant formula, chocolate, cereal products, and dried milk are characteristically low-water-activity foods and do not support growth of vegetative pathogens such as Salmonella. Significant food safety risk might occur when contamination takes place after a lethal processing step. Salmonella cross-contamination in low-moisture foods has been traced to factors such as poor sanitation practices, poor equipment design, and poor ingredient control. It is well recognized that Salmonella can survive for long periods in low-moisture food products. Although some die-off occurs in low-moisture foods during storage, the degree of reduction depends on factors such as storage temperature and product formulation. The heat resistance of Salmonella is affected by many factors, mostly by strain and serotypes tested, previous growth and storage conditions, the physical and chemical food composition, test media, and the media used to recover heat-damaged cells. Salmonella heat resistance generally increases with reducing moisture. Care must be taken when applying published D- and z-values to a specific food process. The product composition and heating medium and conditions should not be significantly different from the product and process parameters used by the processors.

  9. Prevalence and Antibiogram Profile of Salmonellae in Intensively ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    high socio-economic impact (Metawe and Tulip,. 2004; Foley et al., 2008). It is a leading cause of food poisoning and foodborne illnesses in humans and therefore, a major public health concern (Shah and Korejo, 2012). In poultry, salmonellae give rise to pullorum diseases and fowl typhoid, resulting in increased mortality ...

  10. Food poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vomiting Get plenty of rest You can drink oral rehydration mixtures to replace fluids and minerals lost through vomiting and diarrhea. Oral rehydration powder can be purchased from a pharmacy. Be ...

  11. Toxin and species identification of toxic octopus implicated into food poisoning in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Jung; Lin, Chun-Lan; Chen, Chien-Hung; Hsieh, Cheng-Hong; Jen, Hsiao-Chin; Jian, Shi-Jie; Hwang, Deng-Fwu

    2014-12-01

    A food poisoning incident due to ingestion of unknown octopus occurred in Taipei in December, 2010. The serum and urine from victims (male 38 and 43 years old) were collected, determined the toxicity, and identified tetrodotoxin (TTX) by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). It was found that only urine contained the trace of TTX. Then, two retained specimen (one without blue ring in the skin and another with small blue ring in the skin) were collected from victims and examined for the toxicity and toxin. Meanwhile, 6 specimens of octopus without blue ring in the skin and 4 specimens of octopus with blue ring in the skin were re-collected from the market. Both retained octopus samples were found to contain TTX. However, re-collected market's octopus without blue ring in the skin did not show to contain TTX the and was identified as Octopus aegina by using the analysis of cytochrome b gene (Cyt b) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI). Only octopus with blue ring in the skin contained TTX and was identified as Hapalochlaena fasciata by using the analysis of Cyt b and COI. Therefore, this octopus food poisoning was caused by toxic octopus H. fasciata and the causative agent was TTX. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. "The Dose Makes the Poison": Informing Consumers About the Scientific Risk Assessment of Food Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearth, Angela; Cousin, Marie-Eve; Siegrist, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intensive risk assessment is required before the approval of food additives. During this process, based on the toxicological principle of "the dose makes the poison,ˮ maximum usage doses are assessed. However, most consumers are not aware of these efforts to ensure the safety of food additives and are therefore sceptical, even though food additives bring certain benefits to consumers. This study investigated the effect of a short video, which explains the scientific risk assessment and regulation of food additives, on consumers' perceptions and acceptance of food additives. The primary goal of this study was to inform consumers and enable them to construct their own risk-benefit assessment and make informed decisions about food additives. The secondary goal was to investigate whether people have different perceptions of food additives of artificial (i.e., aspartame) or natural origin (i.e., steviolglycoside). To attain these research goals, an online experiment was conducted on 185 Swiss consumers. Participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental group, which was shown a video about the scientific risk assessment of food additives, or the control group, which was shown a video about a topic irrelevant to the study. After watching the video, the respondents knew significantly more, expressed more positive thoughts and feelings, had less risk perception, and more acceptance than prior to watching the video. Thus, it appears that informing consumers about complex food safety topics, such as the scientific risk assessment of food additives, is possible, and using a carefully developed information video is a successful strategy for informing consumers. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  13. The survival of salmonellas on finger-tips and transfer of the organisms to foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pether, J V; Gilbert, R J

    1971-12-01

    The survival of salmonellas on the finger-tips is considered with reference to the ease with which they can be transferred to food by handling.Escherichia coli and several Salmonella serotypes were shown to survive on the finger-tips for various periods of time, for example, S. anatum could be recovered 3 hr. after artificially contaminating them with between 500 and 2000 organisms. S. anatum could also be recovered from the finger-tips after contaminating them with more than 6000 organisms followed by a 15 sec. hand-wash 10 min. later. Similarly, the survivors from minimal inocula of less than 100 S. anatum/finger-tip were, after 10 min., still capable of infecting samples of corned beef and ham. E. coli was isolated from the finger-tips of 13 of 110 butchers soon after they had left the meat line at a meat products factory, but was not detected on the finger-tips of 100 volunteers at the Central Public Health Laboratory.The implications of the present findings to the spread of salmonellas from raw to cooked foods, and the relevance of this to outbreaks of Salmonella infection in the general population and in hospitals, are discussed.

  14. The Moroccan Food Snail, Helix aspersa, as a Source of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Wallace H.; Wilson, Clyde R.; Romero, Aida; Poelma, Paul L.

    1975-01-01

    A total of 270 samples, nine lots of 30 samples each, of imported Moroccan food snails was examined for the presence of Salmonella. Eighty-four samples (an overall incidence of 31.11%) and all nine lots contained Salmonella. No significant difference (P > 0.25) in the number of positive samples was observed by using either selenite cystine broth or tetrathionate broth when the samples had been pre-enriched in lactose broth. When used as direct selective enrichments with samples not pre-enriched in lactose broth, tetrathionate broth was significantly (P < 0.05) more productive than selenite cystine broth. The overall detection of Salmonella-positive samples by direct enrichment was significantly greater (P < 0.001) than by pre-enrichment. A variety of uncommon serotypes representative of several somatic groups was isolated. This study reports the occurrence and incidence, and the concomitant human health potential, of Salmonella in one species of live, imported food snails. PMID:1115505

  15. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular epidemiology of Salmonella Rissen from animals, food products, and patients in Thailand and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Bangtrakulnonth, Aroon; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat

    2008-01-01

    isolates were recovered from humans, uncooked food, and ready-to-eat food. Danish isolates were obtained from humans (with and without a history of travel to Thailand prior to the infection), Danish pig or pork products, imported pig or pork products, turkeys, and animal feed. A total of 63 unique Xba......Recently we reported increases in both the number of Salmonella infections due to Salmonella Rissen in Thailand and the isolation of this serovar from pork products in Thailand. The objectives of the present study were to determine the genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella...... Rissen isolates recovered from humans, food products, and animals in Denmark and Thailand. Additionally, risk factors due to travel and consumption of specific food products were analyzed and evaluated. A total of 112 Salmonella Rissen isolates were included in this study from Thailand and Denmark. Thai...

  16. Italian experience in Salmonella enteritidis 1978-1988: characterization of isolates from food and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, M; Filetici, E; Anastasio, M P; Marcozzi, M D; Gramenzi, M P; Aureli, P

    1991-04-01

    Salmonella enteritidis accounted for 5.45% of the 118.685 Salmonella isolates from man and for 2.65% of the 3.315 Salmonella isolates from food in Italy in the eleven year period 1978 to 1988. In the years 1978-1982 no S. enteritidis strain was isolated from eggs and poultry; in the years 1983-1988 the 53% of S. enteritidis isolates from food were from eggs and poultry. In 1989 S. enteritidis accounted for 744 isolates from man and 22 from food of which 80% were from eggs and poultry (partial data). In that year 18 outbreaks caused by S. enteritidis were reported to the National Centre of Enteric Pathogens in Rome. Characteristics of 81 S. enteritidis isolates were examined of which 27 were from sporadic cases involving humans and 40 from outbreaks in humans; 14 isolates were from food, all but one connected with the outbreaks. All the isolates studied were sensitive to the antibiotics tested; plasmid profile analysis showed a predominant profile pattern in both epidemic and non-epidemic strains; lysine decarboxylase was present in all the strains tested. Although in at least three epidemics a common supplier of eggs was proved, the source was not identified. Unfortunately it was not possible to determine the phage type of isolates because of the unavailability of specific phages.

  17. Evaluation of Modification of the 3M™ Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) Salmonella Method (2013.09) for the Detection of Salmonella in Selected Foods: Collaborative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Patrick; Fisher, Kiel; Boyle, Megan; Huffman, Travis; Benzinger, M Joseph; Bedinghaus, Paige; Flannery, Jonathon; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Benesh, DeAnn; David, John

    2014-01-01

    The 3M(™) Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) Salmonella utilizes isothermal amplification of nucleic acid sequences with high specificity, efficiency, rapidity and bioluminescence to detect amplification of Salmonella spp. in food, food-related, and environmental samples after enrichment. A method modification and matrix extension study of the previously approved AOAC Official Method(SM) 2013.09 was conducted, and approval of the modification was received on March 20, 2014. Using an unpaired study design in a multilaboratory collaborative study, the 3M MDA Salmonella method was compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA/FSIS) Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) 4.05 (2011), Isolation and Identification of Salmonella from Meat, Poultry, Pasteurized Egg, and Catfish Products for raw ground beef and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Chapter 5, Salmonella reference method for wet dog food following the current AOAC guidelines. A total of 20 laboratories participated. For the 3M MDA Salmonella method, raw ground beef was analyzed using 25 g test portions, and wet dog food was analyzed using 375 g test portions. For the reference methods, 25 g test portions of each matrix were analyzed. Each matrix was artificially contaminated with Salmonella at three inoculation levels: an uninoculated control level (0 CFU/test portion), a low inoculum level (0.2-2 CFU/test portion), and a high inoculum level (2-5 CFU/test portion). In this study, 1512 unpaired replicate samples were analyzed. Statistical analysis was conducted according to the probability of detection (POD). For the low-level raw ground beef test portions, the following dLPOD (difference between the LPODs of the reference and candidate method) values with 95% confidence intervals were obtained: -0.01 (-0.14, +0.12). For the low-level wet dog food test portions, the following dLPOD with 95% confidence intervals were

  18. Efficient and Specific Detection of Salmonella in Food Samples Using a stn-Based Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterotoxin (stn) gene exhibits high homology among S. enterica serovars and S. bongori. A set of 6 specific primers targeting the stn gene were designed for detection of Salmonella spp. using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method. The primers amplified target sequences in all 102 strains of 87 serovars of Salmonella tested and no products were detected in 57 non-Salmonella strains. The detection limit in pure cultures was 5 fg DNA/reaction when amplified at 65°C for 25 min. The LAMP assay could detect Salmonella in artificially contaminated food samples as low as 220 cells/g of food without a preenrichment step. However, the sensitivity was increased 100-fold (~2 cells/g) following 5 hr preenrichment at 35°C. The LAMP technique, with a preenrichment step for 5 and 16 hr, was shown to give 100% specificity with food samples compared to the reference culture method in which 67 out of 90 food samples gave positive results. Different food matrixes did not interfere with LAMP detection which employed a simple boiling method for DNA template preparation. The results indicate that the LAMP method, targeting the stn gene, has great potential for detection of Salmonella in food samples with both high specificity and high sensitivity. PMID:26543859

  19. Real-time PCR Detection of Food-borne Pathogenic Salmonella spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malorny, B.; Mäde, D.; Löfström, Charlotta

    2013-01-01

    -limiting gastrointestinal disease in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Within the last decade, numerous real-time PCR assays have been developed for rapid detection of salmonellae in potentially contaminated food or feed. Some of them were extensively validated and are useful for diagnostic laboratories. Furthermore......, effective sample preparation prior to the analytical real-time PCR assay avoids inhibitory substances disturbing the PCR and contributes to a high sensitivity. We discuss appropriate sample preparation methods including enrichment procedures for various food items and analytical real-time PCR assays...... for the detection of Salmonella and give a state-of-the-art summary what targets are used and how valid the assays are to apply as diagnostic tool. Furthermore, recommendations for selection of an appropriate real-time PCR method are presented....

  20. Sources and distribution of Salmonella serotypes isolated from food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    isolated from food animals, slaughterhouse personnel and retail meat products in Ethiopia: 1997-2002. Bayleyegn Molla, Daniel Alemayehu , Woubit Salah. Abstract. “Background: Foods of animal origin are considered to be the major sources of. foodbome salmonellosis. A periodic surveillance of the sources, distribution ...

  1. Food contamination with salmonella and human health in Kinshasa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-10-31

    Oct 31, 2015 ... is one of the most consumed foods in the. Democratic Republic of Congo in general and the city of Kinshasa in particular. However, meat is the most perishable of all staple foods since it contains sufficient nutrients needed to support the growth of microorganisms (Huda et al., 2010). In the. Democratic ...

  2. Prevalence and Characterization of Monophasic Salmonella Serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- of Food Origin in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Huang, Jiahui; Guo, Weipeng; Cai, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- is a monophasic variant of Salmonella Typhimurium, which has recently been recognized as an emerging cause of infection worldwide. This bacterium has also ranked among the four most frequent serovars causing human salmonellosis in China. However, there are no reports on its contamination in Chinese food. Serotyping, polymerase chain reaction, antibiotic resistance, virulotyping, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) assays were used to investigate the prevalence of this serological variant in food products in China, and to determine phenotypic and genotypic difference of monophasic isolates and Salmonella Typhimurium isolated over the same period. Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- was prevalent in various food sources, including beef, pork, chicken, and pigeon. The study also confirmed the high prevalence (53.8%) of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline in Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:-, which was higher than that in Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates in our study were different from Salmonella Typhimurium isolates by the absence of three plasmid-borne genes (spvC, pefA, and rck) and the presence of gipA in all isolates. All Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates demonstrated MLST pattern ST34. Genomic deletions within the fljBA operon and surrounding genes were only found in Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates, with all isolates containing a deletion of fljB. However, hin and iroB were identified in all Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates. Three different deletion profiles were observed and two of them were different from the reported Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- clones from Spain, America, and Italy, which provided some new evidence on the independent evolution of the multiple successful monophasic clones from Salmonella Typhimurium ancestors. This study is the first report of Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- in food products from China. The data are more

  3. Prevalence and Characterization of Monophasic Salmonella Serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- of Food Origin in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojuan Yang

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- is a monophasic variant of Salmonella Typhimurium, which has recently been recognized as an emerging cause of infection worldwide. This bacterium has also ranked among the four most frequent serovars causing human salmonellosis in China. However, there are no reports on its contamination in Chinese food. Serotyping, polymerase chain reaction, antibiotic resistance, virulotyping, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST assays were used to investigate the prevalence of this serological variant in food products in China, and to determine phenotypic and genotypic difference of monophasic isolates and Salmonella Typhimurium isolated over the same period. Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- was prevalent in various food sources, including beef, pork, chicken, and pigeon. The study also confirmed the high prevalence (53.8% of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline in Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:-, which was higher than that in Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates in our study were different from Salmonella Typhimurium isolates by the absence of three plasmid-borne genes (spvC, pefA, and rck and the presence of gipA in all isolates. All Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates demonstrated MLST pattern ST34. Genomic deletions within the fljBA operon and surrounding genes were only found in Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates, with all isolates containing a deletion of fljB. However, hin and iroB were identified in all Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- isolates. Three different deletion profiles were observed and two of them were different from the reported Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- clones from Spain, America, and Italy, which provided some new evidence on the independent evolution of the multiple successful monophasic clones from Salmonella Typhimurium ancestors. This study is the first report of Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:- in food products from China. The data are

  4. Tips to Reduce Your Risk of Getting a Salmonella Infection from Dry Pet Food

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-24

    Salmonella is a germ, or type of bacteria, that's commonly spread through contaminated food, water, or contact with infected animals. This includes pets like dogs and cats who can appear healthy, even when carrying these germs.  Created: 8/24/2010 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) and the Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases (DFWED).   Date Released: 8/24/2010.

  5. Characterization of Salmonella spp. from wastewater used for food production in Morogoro, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mhongole, Ofred J.; Mdegela, Robinson H.; Lughano J. M. Kusiluk

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater use for crop irrigation and aquaculture is commonly practiced by communities situated close to wastewater treatment ponds. The objective of this study was to characterize Salmonella spp. and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among isolates from wastewater and Tilapia fish. A ...... for treatment of diseases in humans. Wastewater may, therefore, contaminate pristine surface water bodies and foodstuffs including fish and irrigated crops as well as food handlers....

  6. Determination of operating characteristic, retesting, and testing amount probabilities associated with testing for the presence of Salmonella in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Foster D; Lee, Jung K

    2011-01-01

    The relatively small perceived probability associated with retesting a food for the presence of Salmonella at low levels is often considered as one of the reasons that a confirmatory or check-analysis tends to disagree in practice with the results of an original test. Given a retesting process where a retest is only performed to confirm an original positive Salmonella test, the probability that both the original and retest will test positive for Salmonella has been traditionally determined by some as the product of the probabilities of a positive Salmonella test for the original and retest samples. When examining the probabilities associated with the retesting process, we found that our results disagreed with those based on intuitions apparently held by others concerning how these probabilities should be calculated. For Salmonella testing, operating characteristic values were computed to demonstrate the protections afforded by the Salmonella sampling plans presented in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual and to obtain the probability of a positive Salmonella test. The geometric distribution was examined for possible utility in determining the probabilities associated with testing amounts, i.e., the number of Salmonella tests needed to obtain a positive test.

  7. Determination of histamine in milkfish stick implicated in food-borne poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chen Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An incident of food-borne poisoning causing illness in 37 victims due to ingestion of fried fish sticks occurred in September 2014, in Tainan city, southern Taiwan. Leftovers of the victims' fried fish sticks and 16 other raw fish stick samples from retail stores were collected and tested to determine the occurrence of histamine and histamine-forming bacteria. Two suspected fried fish samples contained 86.6 mg/100 g and 235.0 mg/100 g histamine; levels that are greater than the potential hazard action level (50 mg/100 g in most illness cases. Given the allergy-like symptoms of the victims and the high histamine content in the suspected fried fish samples, this food-borne poisoning was strongly suspected to be caused by histamine intoxication. Moreover, the fish species of suspected samples was identified as milkfish (Chanos chanos, using polymerase chain reaction direct sequence analysis. In addition, four of the 16 commercial raw milkfish stick samples (25% had histamine levels greater than the US Food & Drug Administration guideline of 5.0 mg/100 g for scombroid fish and/or products. Ten histamine-producing bacterial strains, capable of producing 373–1261 ppm of histamine in trypticase soy broth supplemented with 1.0% L-histidine, were identified as Enterobacter aerogenes (4 strains, Enterobacter cloacae (1 strain, Morganella morganii (2 strains, Serratia marcescens (1 strain, Hafnia alvei (1 strain, and Raoultella orithinolytica (1 strain, by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing with polymerase chain reaction amplification.

  8. The SPR detection of Salmonella enteritidis in food using aptamers as recongnition elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, W. T.; Du, X. W.; Pan, M. F.; Wang, J. P.

    2017-09-01

    In this experiment, a fast, accurate, non-destructive, unmarked and simple-operation detection method for Salmonella enteritidis in food was established by the BI-3000 plasma resonance biosensor (SPR). This article establishes a method of using nucleic acid aptamer as immune recognition element in SPR which can be employed to detect Salmonella enteritidis in food for the first time. The experimental conditions were screened and the experimental scheme was validated and applied. The best flow rate was 5μL/min, the best concentration of the aptamers was 180mM, and the best regenerating solution was the 20mM NaOH. This method had almost no cross-reactivity. Besides, we established a standard curve of Salmonella enteritidis and SPR signal, with the detection limit of 2 cfu/mL. Finally, we tested the samples of chicken, pork, shrimp and fish purchased from supermarkets. The method has the advantages of short time, low detection limit and easy operation, which can be used for a large number of food samples.

  9. [Food borne outbreak of a Salmonella enteritidis epidemic in a large pharmaceutical industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, H K; Ehrhard, I; Rösen-Wolff, A; Sonntag, H G; Pratsch, J; Wirth, A; Krüger, D; Knollmann-Schanbacher, I; Kühn, H; Treiber-Klötzer, C

    1993-03-01

    In summer 1991 an outbreak of a Salmonella enteritidis epidemic involving about 600 cases of gastroenteritis occurred at one of the leading pharmaceutical companies in southwestern Germany. The main source was a cold fruit soup, in addition Salmonella were isolated from meat strips and a curd cheese which were used for a salad dressing. A total of 2300 contaminated food portions were served resulting in an attack rate of about 25%. The possible origin could have been an asymptomatic Salmonella-positive member of the kitchen personnel who was the only one who was involved with the preparation of all the incriminated foods. A further spread of the epidemic and especially the possible contamination of pharmaceuticals was avoided by the timely and adequate reaction of the company's occupational medical service. This case exemplifies how classical crisis management, "increased initiative on one's own for prevention of infections in all areas of food processing" (Steuer) and finally the cooperation of the company with different institutions of the public health authorities contribute to the control of such a catastrophic scenario.

  10. Rapid detection of Salmonella in pet food: design and evaluation of integrated methods based on real-time PCR detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Priya; Friberg, Maria; Vanlandingham, V; Kozak, K; Manolis, Amanda; Brevnov, Maxim; Crowley, Erin; Bird, Patrick; Goins, David; Furtado, Manohar R; Petrauskene, Olga V; Tebbs, Robert S; Charbonneau, Duane

    2012-02-01

    Reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination in pet food is critical for both companion animals and humans, and its importance is reflected by the substantial increase in the demand for pathogen testing. Accurate and rapid detection of foodborne pathogens improves food safety, protects the public health, and benefits food producers by assuring product quality while facilitating product release in a timely manner. Traditional culture-based methods for Salmonella screening are laborious and can take 5 to 7 days to obtain definitive results. In this study, we developed two methods for the detection of low levels of Salmonella in pet food using real-time PCR: (i) detection of Salmonella in 25 g of dried pet food in less than 14 h with an automated magnetic bead-based nucleic acid extraction method and (ii) detection of Salmonella in 375 g of composite dry pet food matrix in less than 24 h with a manual centrifugation-based nucleic acid preparation method. Both methods included a preclarification step using a novel protocol that removes food matrix-associated debris and PCR inhibitors and improves the sensitivity of detection. Validation studies revealed no significant differences between the two real-time PCR methods and the standard U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (chapter 5) culture confirmation method.

  11. Survival of Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus in mexican red salsa in a food service setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Wendy; Hsu, Wei-Yea; Simonne, Amarat H

    2010-06-01

    Mexican red salsa is one of the most common side dishes in Mexican cuisine. According to data on foodborne illnesses collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, salsa was associated with 70 foodborne illness outbreaks between 1990 and 2006. Salsa ingredients such as tomatoes, cilantro, and onions often have been implicated in foodborne illness outbreaks. Mexican-style restaurants commonly prepare a large batch of red salsa, store it at refrigeration temperatures, and then serve it at room temperature. Salmonella is one of the top etiologies in foodborne illness outbreaks associated with salsa, and our preliminary studies revealed the consistent presence of Staphylococcus aureus in restaurant salsa. In the present study, we evaluated the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis and S. aureus inoculated into restaurant-made salsa samples stored at ambient (20 degrees C) and refrigeration (4 degrees C) temperatures. These test temperature conditions represent best-case and worst-case scenarios in restaurant operations. Salmonella survived in all samples stored at room temperature, but S. aureus populations significantly decreased after 24 h of storage at room temperature. No enterotoxin was detected in samples inoculated with S. aureus at 6.0 log CFU/g. Both microorganisms survived longer in refrigerated samples than in samples stored at room temperature. Overall, both Salmonella and S. aureus survived a sufficient length of time in salsa to pose a food safety risk.

  12. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella in ready-to-eat food in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabedo, L; Picart i Barrot, L; Teixidó i Canelles, A

    2008-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella are pathogenic bacteria that can contaminate food products during or after processing. Ready-to-eat (RTE) food does not undergo any treatment to ensure its safety before consumption, and therefore risk of foodborne disease must be considered if these pathogens are present in the food. To evaluate the prevalence of these pathogens in RTE food, 140 RTE fish product samples, 501 RTE meat product samples, 462 RTE dairy samples, and 123 RTE dishes and desserts, providing a total of 1,226 samples, were collected from retail stores and food industry and analyzed for the presence of L. monocytogenes. A total of 1,379 samples consisting of 187 RTE fish products and 569 RTE meat products, 484 RTE dairy products, and 139 RTE dishes and desserts were collected and analyzed for the presence of Salmonella. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 20% of frozen Atlantic bonito small pies, 7.9% of smoked salmon samples, 11.1% of the pork luncheon meat samples, 6.2% of frozen chicken croquettes, 16.9% of cured dried sausage samples, 12.5% of cooked ham samples, and 20% of cooked turkey breast samples. L. monocytogenes was also found to be present in 1.3% of fresh salty cheese samples and 15.1% of frozen cannelloni samples. Salmonella was isolated from 1.2% of smoked salmon samples, 1.5% of frozen chicken croquettes, 2% of cooked ham samples, and 11.1% of cured dried sausage samples. Overall, occurrence of these pathogens in RTE foods was similar to that previously reported in the literature.

  13. Human Salmonella infections linked to contaminated dry dog and cat food, 2006-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, Casey Barton; Ferraro, Aimee; Deasy, Marshall; Dato, Virginia; Moll, Mària; Sandt, Carol; Rea, Nancy K; Rickert, Regan; Marriott, Chandra; Warren, Kimberly; Urdaneta, Veronica; Salehi, Ellen; Villamil, Elizabeth; Ayers, Tracy; Hoekstra, R M; Austin, Jana L; Ostroff, Stephen; Williams, Ian T

    2010-09-01

    Human Salmonella infections associated with dry pet food have not been previously reported. We investigated such an outbreak of Salmonella Schwarzengrund and primarily affecting young children. Two multistate case-control studies were conducted to determine the source and mode of infections among case-patients with the outbreak strain. Study 1 evaluated household exposures to animals and pet foods, and study 2 examined risk factors for transmission among infant case-patients. Environmental investigations were conducted. Seventy-nine case-patients in 21 states were identified; 48% were children aged 2 years or younger. Case-households were significantly more likely than control households to report dog contact (matched odds ratio [mOR]: 3.6) and to have recently purchased manufacturer X brands of dry pet food (mOR: 6.9). Illness among infant case-patients was significantly associated with feeding pets in the kitchen (OR: 4.4). The outbreak strain was isolated from opened bags of dry dog food produced at plant X, fecal specimens from dogs that ate manufacturer X dry dog food, and an environmental sample and unopened bags of dog and cat foods from plant X. More than 23 000 tons of pet foods were recalled. After additional outbreak-linked illnesses were identified during 2008, the company recalled 105 brands of dry pet food and permanently closed plant X. Dry dog and cat foods manufactured at plant X were linked to human illness for a 3-year period. This outbreak highlights the importance of proper handling and storage of pet foods in the home to prevent human illness, especially among young children.

  14. wksl3, a New Biocontrol Agent for Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium in Foods: Characterization, Application, Sequence Analysis, and Oral Acute Toxicity Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hyun-Wol; Kim, Jae-Won; Jung, Tae-Sung; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2013-01-01

    Of the Salmonella enterica serovars, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium are responsible for most of the Salmonella outbreaks implicated in the consumption of contaminated foods in the Republic of Korea. Because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella in foods and food processing environments, bacteriophages have recently surfaced as an alternative biocontrol tool. In this study, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (wksl3) that could specifically infect S. Enteritidi...

  15. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of biogenic amines in fish implicated in food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, D F; Chang, S H; Shiua, C Y; Chai, T

    1997-05-23

    A rapid, sensitive and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure for the determination of nine biogenic amines in fish by improved benzoylation with benzoyl chloride was developed. The benzoylation of amines with benzoyl chloride at 30 degrees C for 40 min was the optimal condition to eliminate the influence of interfering peaks during analysis. The calibration curve for each amine was linear within the range of 0.02-4 microg. The amine recovery from fish meat was better by extraction with 6% trichloroacetic acid than with 1 M HClO4. The application of this method to detect amines in a fried marlin fillet implicated in a food poisoning incident indicated that a high level (84.1 mg/100 g) of histamine was present in the sample.

  16. Determination of biogenic amines in fish implicated in food poisoning by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, S C; Chou, S S; Chang, P C; Hwang, D F

    2000-12-01

    A micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) method for the simultaneous determination of seven biogenic amines in fish was developed. The peaks of all components were successfully separated within 11.5 min. MECC was performed with 0.06 M sodium deoxycholate in 0.02 M borate buffer (pH 9.2)-methanol (95:5, v/v) solvent. The average recoveries for all components ranged from 84.4 to 100.3%. The application of this method to detect amines in fried marlin fillet implicated in a food poisoning incident indicated that a high level (56.24 mg/100 g) of histamine was present in the sample. Another 10 fish samples collected from markets were also analyzed and did not contain detectable levels of histamine (<2.5 mg/100 g).

  17. Plant fertilizer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant fertilizers and household plant foods are used to improve plant growth. Poisoning can occur if someone swallows these products. Plant fertilizers are mildly poisonous if small amounts are swallowed. ...

  18. Modeling the influence of temperature, water activity and water mobility on the persistence of Salmonella in low-moisture foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farakos, S M Santillana; Frank, J F; Schaffner, D W

    2013-09-02

    Salmonella can survive in low-moisture foods for long periods of time. Reduced microbial inactivation during heating is believed to be due to the interaction of cells and water, and is thought to be related to water activity (a(w)). Little is known about the role of water mobility in influencing the survival of Salmonella in low-moisture foods. The aim of this study was to determine how the physical state of water in low-moisture foods influences the survival of Salmonella and to use this information to develop mathematical models that predict the behavior of Salmonella in these foods. Whey protein powder of differing water mobilities was produced by pH adjustment and heat denaturation, and then equilibrated to aw levels between 0.19±0.03 and 0.54±0.02. Water mobility was determined by wide-line proton-NMR. Powders were inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella, vacuum-sealed and stored at 21, 36, 50, 60, 70 and 80°C. Survival data was fitted to the log-linear, the Geeraerd-tail, the Weibull, the biphasic-linear and the Baranyi models. The model with the best ability to describe the data over all temperatures, water activities and water mobilities (f(test)survival kinetics for Salmonella. The influence of temperature, aw and water mobility on the survival of Salmonella was evaluated using multiple linear regression. Secondary models were developed and then validated in dry non-fat dairy and grain, and low-fat peanut and cocoa products within the range of the modeled data. Water activity significantly influenced the survival of Salmonella at all temperatures, survival increasing with decreasing a(w). Water mobility did not significantly influence survival independent of a(w). Secondary models were useful in predicting the survival of Salmonella in various low-moisture foods providing a correlation of R=0.94 and an acceptable prediction performance of 81%. The % bias and % discrepancy results showed that the models were more accurate in predicting

  19. Outbreak of Staphylococcal food poisoning due to SEA-producing Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, Sophia; Tichaczek-Dischinger, Petra S; Rau, Jörg; Sihto, Henna-Maria; Lehner, Angelika; Adam, Maja; Stephan, Roger

    2013-09-01

    In 2008, 150 people gathered for a wedding celebration in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Three hours after ingestion of a variety of foods including pancakes filled with minced chicken, several guests exhibited symptoms of acute gastroenteritis such as vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and ague. Twelve guests were reported to have fallen ill, with nine of these seeking medical care in hospitals. At least four patients were admitted to the hospital and received inpatient treatment, among them a 2-year-old child and a woman in the 4th month of pregnancy. Within 24 h of the event, an investigative team collected a variety of samples including refrigerated leftovers, food in the storage unit of the caterer, nasal swabs of the caterer, as well as 21 environmental swabs. Five stool samples from patients were provided by the hospitals. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were gathered from eight samples, among them nasal swabs of the caterer, food samples, and one stool sample. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy was used for species identification and for primary clustering of the isolates in a similarity tree. The isolates were further characterized by spa typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and a DNA microarray was used to determine the presence/absence of genes involved in virulence and antimicrobial resistance. We were able to match an enterotoxigenic strain from the stool sample of a patient to isolates of the same strain obtained from food and the nasal cavity of a food handler. The strain produced the enterotoxin SEA and the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, and was also found to exhibit the genes encoding enterotoxins SEG and SEI, as well as the enterotoxin gene cluster egc. This is one of only a few studies that were able to link a staphylococcal food poisoning outbreak to its source.

  20. Validation of test portion pooling for Salmonella spp. detection in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás Fornés, David; McMahon, Wendy; Moulin, Julie; Klijn, Adrianne

    2017-03-20

    Pathogen monitoring programs play a crucial role in the verification of the effectiveness of implemented hygiene control measures. Sampling and testing procedures included in pathogen monitoring involve the analysis of multiple test portions where all samples must be negative for the presence of pathogens for a certain test portion size. Many food safety programs require increased testing due to the risks that a pathogen may be present. Analyzing more than one test portion could prove to be expensive and labor intensive. When more than one test portion for a specified food item is to be tested, the test portions could be combined to form a pooled test portion to reduce laboratory workload, costs of reagents and further confirmatory steps, but only when evidence is available that pooling does not affect on the number of false negative results for different matrices. This study has been performed to demonstrate the equivalence of test portion pooling for Salmonella detection with five different methods using cultural, ELISA and Real Time PCR technologies. Twenty-three (23) different food items including confectionary products, meal components, infant formula, pet food and powdered beverages were validated. Other complementary parameters like impact of minimum and maximum incubation time for pre-enrichment, temperature profile, pH and Salmonella concentration after the pre-enrichment and background flora have also been considered in the study. The results showed that pooling test portions up to 375g for Salmonella detection is valid for the methods that were tested. Relative level of detection (RLOD50) values for 22 of the food items tested were acceptable (i.e. lower than 2.5) when comparing the reference sample size (25g) against the alternative pooled sample size (375g), provided the enrichment broth was pre-warmed and maximum incubation time is respected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Epidemiological significance of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo and the potential role of feed for their entry into the food chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanov Dubravka S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal feed is the first link in the food chain and one of the possible source of Salmonella for food producing animals and consequently, humans consuming products of animal origin. The assessment of the importance and role of Salmonella organisms commonly detected in animal feed in epidemic outbreaks of salmonellosis is highly intricate. This is mainly due to the fact that isolates are rarely identified (typed to the serovar level, thus, the relevant data on both animal feed and food of animal origin are lacking. In the framework of the 2-year project granted by the Ministry of Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia, all Salmonella isolates originating from animal feed were typed to the serovar level in the National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella. Eighteen different serovars have been identified, whereas 15% of all isolates included serovar Montevideo. Frequent isolation of S. ser. Montevideo from animal feed originating from feed mills in our epizootic area (South Bačka and Srem district, encouraged our attempt to summarize and present the available data on the importance of Montevideo serovar in the outbreaks of clinical salmonellosis in humans and to review the reports on individual epidemiological studies aimed at detecting infection sources and establishing relevant facts on emerging antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella. Moreover, this article emphasizes the need and importance of an extensive Salmonella monitoring program at national level, which would encompass all links of the food chain including animal feed and feed processing plants as well.

  2. Evaluation of VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) immunoassay method with Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) medium for detection of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Wendy A; Schultz, Ann M; Johnson, Ronald L

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to compare the VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) with Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) method for detection of Salmonella in foods to the current standard method presented in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) and the culture method presented in AOAC's Official Methods of Analysis. The VIDAS SLM with RV method uses tetrathionate broth in combination with RV medium in place of selenite cystine broth for selective enrichment, thereby eliminating the hazardous waste issue for laboratories. Twenty five laboratories participated in the evaluation, each testing one or more of 8 test products: nonfat dry milk, dried egg, soy flour, lactic casein, milk chocolate, raw ground pork, raw ground turkey, and raw peeled shrimp. Results of the study showed no significant differences in the numbers of confirmed positive samples with the VIDAS SLM with RV procedure and the BAM/AOAC culture procedure. The VIDAS SLM with RV method was effective for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods. It is recommended that AOAC INTERNATIONAL modify the VIDAS Salmonella SLM procedure to include the RV method.

  3. National surveillance of Salmonella enterica in food-producing animals in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kijima Mayumi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A total of 518 fecal samples collected from 183 apparently healthy cattle, 180 pigs and 155 broilers throughout Japan in 1999 were examined to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella. The isolation rates were 36.1% in broilers, 2.8% in pigs and 0.5% in cattle. S. enterica Infantis was the most frequent isolate, found in 22.6% of broiler fecal samples. Higher resistance rates were observed against oxytetracycline (82.0%, dihydrostreptomycin (77.9%, kanamycin (41.0% and trimethoprim (35.2%. Resistance rates to ampicillin, ceftiofur, bicozamycin, chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid were S. enterica Senftenberg was found in the isolates obtained from one broiler fecal sample. This is the first report of cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella directly isolated from food animal in Japan.

  4. Improved hydrophobic grid membrane filter method, using EF-18 agar, for detection of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entis, P

    1990-01-01

    A collaborative study was carried out in 30 laboratories to validate improvements to the official final action hydrophobic grid membrane filter (HGMF) screening method for Salmonella in foods, 985.42, by comparing the performance of the improved HGMF method against that of the AOAC/BAM conventional culture method. Six products were included in the collaborative study: milk chocolate, raw deboned poultry meat, black pepper, soy flour, egg yolk powder, and nonfat dry milk. The raw deboned poultry meat was naturally contaminated with Salmonella, and the remaining 5 products were each inoculated in advance with low levels of individual Salmonella serotypes. The AOAC/BAM method produced 11 false negative results and the improved HGMF method produced 18 false negative results. The improved HGMF Salmonella method has been approved interim official first action for all foods to replace the HGMF official final action method, 985.42.

  5. International spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Schwarzengrund in food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Lockett, Jana

    2007-01-01

    We compared 581 Salmonella enterica serotype Schwarzengrund isolates from persons, food, and food animals in Denmark, Thailand, and the United States by antimicrobial drug susceptibility and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Resistance, including resistance to nalidixic acid......, was frequent among isolates from persons and chickens in Thailand, persons in the United States, and food imported from Thailand to Denmark and the United States. A total of 183 PFGE patterns were observed, and 136 (23.4%) isolates had the 3 most common patterns. Seven of 14 isolates from persons in Denmark...... had patterns found in persons and chicken meat in Thailand; 22 of 390 human isolates from the United States had patterns found in Denmark and Thailand. This study suggests spread of multidrug-resistant S. Schwarzengrund from chickens to persons in Thailand, and from imported Thai food products...

  6. 78 FR 42526 - Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog Food; Withdrawal of...) entitled ``Sec. 690.700 Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog Food.'' This CPG is obsolete. DATES: The.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: FDA issued the CGP entitled ``Sec. 690.700 Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog Food...

  7. Modelling food safety and economic consequences of surveillance and control stratigegies for Salmonella in pigs and pork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baptista, Filipa M.; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Alban, Liza R.

    2011-01-01

    Targets for maximum acceptable levels of Salmonella in pigs and pork are to be decided. A stochastic simulation model accounting for herd and abattoir information was used to evaluate food safety and economic consequences of different surveillance and control strategies, based among others...... on Danish surveillance data. An epidemiological module simulated the Salmonella carcass prevalence for different scenarios. Cost-effectiveness analysis was used to compare the costs of the different scenarios with their expected effectiveness. Herd interventions were not found sufficient to attain...... Salmonella carcass prevalence...

  8. Adverse Effects of Plant Food Supplements and Plants Consumed as Food: Results from the Poisons Centres-Based PlantLIBRA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüde, Saskia; Vecchio, Sarah; Sinno-Tellier, Sandra; Dopter, Aymeric; Mustonen, Harriet; Vucinic, Slavica; Jonsson, Birgitta; Müller, Dieter; Veras Gimenez Fruchtengarten, Ligia; Hruby, Karl; De Souza Nascimento, Elizabeth; Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Restani, Patrizia; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Plant food supplements (PFS) are products of increasing popularity and wide-spread distribution. Nevertheless, information about their risks is limited. To fill this gap, a poisons centres-based study was performed as part of the EU project PlantLIBRA. Multicentre retrospective review of data from selected European and Brazilian poisons centres, involving human cases of adverse effects due to plants consumed as food or as ingredients of food supplements recorded between 2006 and 2010. Ten poisons centres provided a total of 75 cases. In 57 cases (76%) a PFS was involved; in 18 (24%) a plant was ingested as food. The 10 most frequently reported plants were Valeriana officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Paullinia cupana, Melissa officinalis, Passiflora incarnata, Mentha piperita, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Ilex paraguariensis, Panax ginseng, and Citrus aurantium. The most frequently observed clinical effects were neurotoxicity and gastro-intestinal symptoms. Most cases showed a benign clinical course; however, five cases were severe. PFS-related adverse effects seem to be relatively infrequent issues for poisons centres. Most cases showed mild symptoms. Nevertheless, the occurrence of some severe adverse effects and the increasing popularity of PFS require continuous active surveillance, and further research is warranted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Prevalence and Characterization of Monophasic Salmonella Serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- of Food Origin in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojuan Yang; Qingping Wu; Jumei Zhang; Jiahui Huang; Weipeng Guo; Shuzhen Cai

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:- is a monophasic variant of Salmonella Typhimurium, which has recently been recognized as an emerging cause of infection worldwide. This bacterium has also ranked among the four most frequent serovars causing human salmonellosis in China. However, there are no reports on its contamination in Chinese food. Serotyping, polymerase chain reaction, antibiotic resistance, virulotyping, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) assays were used t...

  10. EURL-Salmonella 8th interlaboratory comparison study Food 2016 : Detection of Salmonella in minced chicken me

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers AFA; Mooijman KA; VDL; Z&O

    2018-01-01

    In 2016, it was shown that all 34 National Reference Laboratories (NRLs), 30 of which are located in the European Union, were able to detect high and low levels of Salmonella in minced chicken meat. Three NRLs reported Salmonella in one 'blank' minced meat sample. This was probably caused by the

  11. Investigation of a Staphylococcal Food Poisoning Outbreak from a Chantilly Cream Dessert, in Umbria (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercoli, Laura; Gallina, Silvia; Nia, Yacine; Auvray, Frédéric; Primavilla, Sara; Guidi, Fabrizia; Pierucci, Benedetta; Graziotti, Catia; Decastelli, Lucia; Scuota, Stefania

    2017-07-01

    On August 28, 2015, a staphylococcal food poisoning outbreak occurred in Umbria, Italy, affecting 24 of the 42 customers who had dinner at a local restaurant. About 3 h after ingesting a variety of foods, the customers manifested gastrointestinal symptoms. Within 24 h of notification from the hospital emergency department, Sanitary Inspectors of the local Public Health Unit performed an epidemiological investigation. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among the customers. Food and environmental samples were collected. Due to the rapid onset of symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea), the food samples were analyzed for the presence of toxigenic bacteria and their toxins; nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from the waiters and cooks. Among the food tested, high levels of coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) (3.4 × 108 CFU/g) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (2.12 ng SEA/g) were only detected in the Chantilly cream dessert. CPS were also detected on the surface of a kitchen table (10 CFU/swab), and five food handlers were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. In total, five enterotoxigenic S. aureus isolates were recovered from three food handlers, a kitchen surface, and the Chantilly cream dessert. These isolates were further characterized by biotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection of eleven enterotoxin encoding genes (sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, sei, sej, sep, and ser) and three genes involved in antibiotic resistance (mecA, mecC, and mupA). Three sea-positive strains, isolated from the dessert, environment, and one of the cooks, had the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile and belonged to the human biotype, suggesting that the contamination causing the outbreak most likely originated from a food handler. Moreover, improper storage of the dessert, at room temperature for about 5 h, permitted microbial growth and SEA production. This study underlines the importance of

  12. Inhibitory effects of nisin against Clostridium perfringens food poisoning and nonfood-borne isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udompijitkul, Pathima; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2012-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A is the causative agent of C. perfringens type A food poisoning (FP) and nonfood-borne (NFB) human gastrointestinal diseases. Due to its ability to form highly resistant endospores, it has become a great concern to the meat industry to produce meat free of C. perfringens. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial effect of nisin against C. perfringens FP and NFB isolates. No inhibitory effect of nisin was observed against germination of spores of both FP and NFB isolates in laboratory medium. However, nisin effectively arrested outgrowth of germinated spores of C. perfringens in rich medium. Interestingly, germinated spores of NFB isolates possessed higher resistance to nisin than that of FP isolates. Furthermore, nisin exhibited inhibitory effect against vegetative growth of both FP and NFB isolates in laboratory medium, with vegetative cells of NFB isolates showing higher resistance than that of FP isolates. However, the antimicrobial activity of nisin against C. perfringens was significantly decreased in a meat model system. In conclusion, although nisin showed inhibitory effect against spore outgrowth and vegetative cells of C. perfringens FP and NFB isolates in laboratory conditions, no such effect was observed against C. perfringens spores inoculated into a meat model system. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Molecular typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolate responsible for staphylococcal poisoning incident in homemade food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrino Macori

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In October 2012, two persons fell ill with symptoms consistent with staphylococcal food poisoning after eating home-canned tuna fish and tomatoes. Laboratory investigation detected the enterotoxins in the home-canned tuna and molecular analysis of the isolated Staphylococcus aureus confirmed it carried toxin genes. Qualitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzime linked fluorescent assay methods and quantitative assay identified the enterotoxins in the food leftovers, specifically staphylococcal enterotoxins type A (SEA and D (SED, respectively 0.49 and 2.04 ng/g. The laboratory results are discussed considering the relation to the fish in oil, survival and heat resistance of S. aureus, and presumptive microbial contamination due to improper handling during home-canning procedures. This is the first reported cluster of foodborne illnesses due to staphylococcal enterotoxins in tuna in Italy. In this study, we reported cases described and analysed for their spa-type. Showing a high heterogeneity of isolates, spa-type t13252 is correlated in a node of the minimum spanning tree and it has never been reported as responsible for foodborne outbreak. This case underlines the importance of risk communication and dissemination of home-canning guidelines to reduce the incidence of foodborne outbreaks caused by homemade conserves.

  14. Molecular Typing of Staphylococcus Aureus Isolate Responsible for Staphylococcal Poisoning Incident in Homemade Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellio, Alberto; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Gallina, Silvia; Adriano, Daniela; Zuccon, Fabio; Chiesa, Francesco; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Casalinuovo, Francesco; Decastelli, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    In October 2012, two persons fell ill with symptoms consistent with staphylococcal food poisoning after eating home-canned tuna fish and tomatoes. Laboratory investigation detected the enterotoxins in the home-canned tuna and molecular analysis of the isolated Staphylococcus aureus confirmed it carried toxin genes. Qualitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzime linked fluorescent assay methods and quantitative assay identified the enterotoxins in the food leftovers, specifically staphylococcal enterotoxins type A (SEA) and D (SED), respectively 0.49 and 2.04 ng/g. The laboratory results are discussed considering the relation to the fish in oil, survival and heat resistance of S. aureus, and presumptive microbial contamination due to improper handling during home-canning procedures. This is the first reported cluster of foodborne illnesses due to staphylococcal enterotoxins in tuna in Italy. In this study, we reported cases described and analysed for their spa-type. Showing a high heterogeneity of isolates, spa-type t13252 is correlated in a node of the minimum spanning tree and it has never been reported as responsible for foodborne outbreak. This case underlines the importance of risk communication and dissemination of home-canning guidelines to reduce the incidence of foodborne outbreaks caused by homemade conserves. PMID:27800449

  15. Staphylococcus aureus food-poisoning outbreak associated with the consumption of ice-cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, A; Contzen, M; Hartelt, K; Kleiser, A; Maassen, S; Rau, J; Kraushaar, B; Layer, F; Strommenger, B

    2014-09-18

    In April 2013, a food poisoning outbreak caused by staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in ice-cream occurred in Freiburg, Germany, among the 31 participants of a christening party. Of the 13 cases, seven were hospitalized or obtained ambulatory treatment. Different types of ice-cream, which was freshly produced at the hotel where the party took place, were found to contain SE and high amounts of coagulase positive staphylococci. Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from ice-cream and human cases were of the same spa-type (t127), harboured the sea gene and displayed identical phenotypic resistance-, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy- (FT-IR) and microarray-profiles. Despite the strong microbiological and epidemiological evidence of ice-cream being the incriminated food vehicle of the outbreak, a common source of S. aureus from the ice-cream could not be deduced. As none of the employees carried the outbreak strain, either the equipment used for the production of the ice-cream or a contaminated ingredient is the most likely introduction source. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Interdigitated microelectrode based impedance biosensor for detection of salmonella enteritidis in food samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G.; Morgan, M.; Hahm, B. K.; Bhunia, A.; Mun, J. H.; Om, A. S.

    2008-03-01

    Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks continue to occur, and S. enteritidis-related outbreaks from various food sources have increased public awareness of this pathogen. Conventional methods for pathogens detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Some immunological rapid assays are developed, but these assays still require prolonged enrichment steps. Recently developed biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. To develop the biosensor, an interdigitated microelectrode (IME) was fabricated by using semiconductor fabrication process. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized based on avidin-biotin binding on the surface of the IME to form an active sensing layer. To increase the sensitivity of the sensor, three types of sensors that have different electrode gap sizes (2 μm, 5 μm, 10 μm) were fabricated and tested. The impedimetric biosensor could detect 103 CFU/mL of Salmonella in pork meat extract with an incubation time of 5 minutes. This method may provide a simple, rapid and sensitive method to detect foodborne pathogens.

  17. Ceftriaxone-Resistant Nontyphoidal Salmonella from Humans, Retail Meats, and Food Animals in the United States, 1996-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Martha; Reynolds, Jared; Karp, Beth E; Tate, Heather; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Plumblee, Jodie R; Hoekstra, Robert M; Whichard, Jean M; Mahon, Barbara E

    2017-02-01

    Ceftriaxone resistance in Salmonella is a serious public health threat. Ceftriaxone is commonly used to treat severe Salmonella infections, especially in children. Identifying the sources and drivers of ceftriaxone resistance among nontyphoidal Salmonella is crucial. The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) tracks antimicrobial resistance in foodborne and other enteric bacteria from humans, retail meats, and food animals. We examined NARMS data reported during 1996-2013 to characterize ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections in humans. We used Spearman rank correlation to examine the relationships between the annual percentage of ceftriaxone resistance among Salmonella isolates from humans with isolates from retail meats and food animals. A total of 978 (2.9%) of 34,100 nontyphoidal Salmonella isolates from humans were resistant to ceftriaxone. Many (40%) ceftriaxone-resistant isolates were from children younger than 18 years. Most ceftriaxone-resistant isolates were one of three serotypes: Newport (40%), Typhimurium (26%), or Heidelberg (12%). All were resistant to other antimicrobials, and resistance varied by serotype. We found statistically significant correlations in ceftriaxone resistance between human and ground beef Newport isolates (r = 0.83), between human and cattle Typhimurium isolates (r = 0.57), between human and chicken Heidelberg isolates (r = 0.65), and between human and turkey Heidelberg isolates (r = 0.67). Ceftriaxone resistance among Salmonella Newport, Typhimurium, and Heidelberg isolates from humans strongly correlates with ceftriaxone resistance in isolates from ground beef, cattle, and poultry, respectively. These findings support other lines of evidence that food animals are important reservoirs of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella that cause human illness in the United States.

  18. Salmonella: Salmonellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Trine; Maurischat, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella remains one of the most important zoonotic pathogenic bacteria and is the causative agents of salmonellosis. The aim of this article is to give an overview of Salmonella and salmonellosis, starting by describing the characteristics of the microorganism Salmonella, including biochemical...... properties, physiology, classification, and nomenclature. Thereafter, the epidemiology of the organism is introduced, including the routes of transmission. Finally, the disease salmonellosis, the virulence mechanisms, and the occurrence in different types of food are described....

  19. Rapid detection of Salmonella in food and feed by coupling loop-mediated isothermal amplification with bioluminescent assay in real-time

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qianru; Domesle, Kelly J; Wang, Fei; Ge, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Background Salmonella is among the most significant pathogens causing food and feed safety concerns. This study examined the rapid detection of Salmonella in various types of food and feed samples by coupling loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with a novel reporter, bioluminescent assay in real-time (BART). Performance of the LAMP-BART assay was compared to a conventional LAMP and the commercially available 3M Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) Salmonella. Results The LAMP-BART assay ...

  20. Occurrence of Campylobacter, Salmonella, Yersinia enterocolitica and Listeria monocytogenes in some retail food products in Novi Sad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajković-Pavlović, Ljiljana B; Popović, Milka B; Novaković, Budimka D; Gusman-Pasterko, Vera P; Jevtić, Marija R; Mirilov, Jelena M

    2007-12-01

    The official reporting system in the Province of Vojvodina (PV) indicates that cases of human salmonellosis were partly covered by complete epidemiological investigation including laboratory analysis of the suspected food. Intestinal campylobacteriosis and yersiniosis and four cases of septicemias caused by Listeria monocytogenes were not fully epidemiologically investigated. Actual country legislation on food safety does not include provisions for a routine control of the above mentioned pathogens except for Salmonella. In the PV, there are no other sources of data that contribute to risk assessment of the above food-borne diseases. A pilot investigation, performed in Novi Sad, indicated that 8.17% out of the total number of 257 retail food samples (90 of fresh meat and 167 of ready-to-eat food) had been contaminated with one of the tested bacteria Campylobacter or Salmonella or Listeria monocytogenes. Yersinia enterocolitica was not detected in any of the tested samples. Fresh poultry meat and other fresh meats were the dominant sources of the detected pathogens compared to samples of ready-to-eat food (p 0.05). Salmonella was detected in 3.3% samples of fresh poultry meat. Listeria monocytogenes was detected in 5.0% samples of fresh poultry and in 3.3% samples of other fresh meat, the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). One sample (0.6%) of ready to eat food was contaminated with Campylobacter and one (0.6%) with Salmonella.

  1. Development of a PCR test system for specific detection of Salmonella Paratyphi B in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ligong; Yu, Qian; Bie, Xiaomei; Lu, Zhaoxin; Lv, Fengxia; Zhang, Chong; Kong, Xiaohan; Zhao, Haizhen

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi B is a globally distributed human-specific pathogen causing paratyphoid fever. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and reliable polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for its detection in food. The SPAB_01124 gene was found to be unique to S. Paratyphi B using comparative genomics. Primers for fragments of the SPAB_01124 gene and the Salmonella-specific invA gene were used in combination to establish a multiplex PCR assay that showed 100% specificity across 45 Salmonella strains (representing 34 serotypes) and 18 non-Salmonella strains. The detection limit was 2.2 CFU mL(-1) of S. Paratyphi B after 12-h enrichment in pure culture. It was shown that co-culture with S. Typhimurium or Escherichia coli up to concentrations of 3.6 × 10(5)  CFU and 3.3 × 10(4)  CFU, respectively, did not interfere with PCR detection of S. Paratyphi B. In artificially contaminated milk, the assay could detect as few as 62 CFU mL(-1) after 8 h of enrichment. In conclusion, comparative genomics was found to be an efficient approach to the mining of pathogen-specific target genes, and the PCR assay that was developed from this provided a rapid, specific, and sensitive method for detection of S. Paratyphi B. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of applied biosystems MicroSEQ real-time PCR system for detection of Salmonella spp. in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Priya; Cao, Yanxiang; Wong, Lily; Furtado, Manohar R; Petrauskene, Olga V; Tebbs, Robert S

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR methods for detecting foodborne pathogens offer the advantages of simplicity and quick time-to-results compared to traditional culture methods. In this study, the MicroSEQ real-time PCR system was evaluated for detection of Salmonella spp. in 10 different food matrixes following the AOAC Research Institute's Performance Tested Method validation program. In addition, the performance of the MicroSEQ system was evaluated for the detection of Salmonella in peanut butter as a part of the Emergency Response Validation Program sponsored by the AOAC Research Institute. The system was compared to the ISO 6579 reference method using a paired-study design for detecting Salmonella spp. in raw ground beef, raw chicken, raw shrimp, Brie cheese, shell eggs, cantaloupe, chocolate, black pepper, dry infant formula, and dry pet food. For the peanut butter study, the system was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual procedures using an unpaired-study design. No significant difference in performance was observed between the MicroSEQ Salmonella spp. detection system and the corresponding reference methods for all 11 food matrixes. The MicroSEQ system detected all Salmonella strains tested, while showing good discrimination against detection of an exclusivity panel of 30 strains, with high accuracy.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF THE RISK OF RAW MILK CONSUMPTION RELATED TO STAPHYLOCOCCAL FOOD POISONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Helena Walter Santana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the risks of staphylococcal food poisoning due to the consumption of raw milk. Fifty-one farms in Londrina (PR and 50 in Pelotas (RS were analyzed, to determinethe population of coagulase-positive staphylococci (UFC/ mL, as well as to verify the ability of producing Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A (SEA by immunodifusion (OSP, the presence of the gene for the production of SEA (PCR in the cultures, and the research of enterotoxin (SEA to SEE in milk samples using ELISA commercial kit. Considering the 101 farms analyzed, 19 (18.8% presented coagulase-positive staphylococci count above 105 UFC/mL. For the evaluation of the enterotoxigenic ability (SEA by the OSP technique, six cultures coagulase-positive (5.5% were positive to the test and identified as S. aureus. From the coagualse-negative sample, one (5.5% was OSP positive. For the evaluation of the presence of the gene for EEA synthesis, 51 cultures of staphylococci were tested. From this total, 14 (27.45% presented the gene, and from that, only 5 (9.81% cultures were capable of expressing it in the technique of the OSP. The morphologiccharacteristic of the evaluated cultures that had enterotoxigenic capacity, from the 14 (33,3% cultures that presented the gene for EEA production, 05 (11.9% were characterized as typical cultures of S.aureus in Baird Parker agar. All the 12 milk samples studied for the presence of EEA to EEE in milk were negative. Thus, it can be concluded that there is extensive contamination of raw milk for staphylococci coagulase, however, most of the isolated strains were not enterotoxigenic or did not express such a characteristic. Only 9.81% of the tested colonies expressed the gene and effectivelyproduced SEA. None of the samples had sufficient counts to produce detectable amounts of SEA. The milk samples did not present risk to cause staphylococcal food poisoning if consumed in natura until the collection moment.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar Agona European outbreak associated with a food company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolay, N; Thornton, L; Cotter, S; Garvey, P; Bannon, O; McKeown, P; Cormican, M; Fisher, I; Little, C; Boxall, N; De Pinna, E; Peters, T M; Cowden, J; Salmon, R; Mason, B; Irvine, N; Rooney, P; O'Flanagan, D

    2011-08-01

    We investigated an international outbreak of Salmonella Agona with a distinct PFGE pattern associated with an Irish Food company (company X) producing pre-cooked meat products sold in various food outlet chains in Europe. The outbreak was first detected in Ireland. We undertook national and international case-finding, food traceback and microbiological investigation of human, food and environmental samples. We undertook a matched case-control study on Irish cases. In total, 163 cases in seven European countries were laboratory-confirmed. Consumption of food from food outlet chains supplied by company X was significantly associated with being a confirmed case (mOR 18·3, 95% CI 2·2-149·2) in the case-control study. The outbreak strain was isolated from the company's pre-cooked meat products and production premises. Sufficient evidence was gathered to infer the vehicles of infection and sources of the outbreak and to justify the control measures taken, which were plant closure and food recall.

  5. Mitigation of Salmonella on Pet Food Kibbles by Using Liquid and Powdered 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylbutyric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Anne R; Fuller, John C; Centrella, William; Marshall, Douglas L; Deliephan, Aiswariya; Jones, Cassandra K

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, several pet food recalls have been attributed to Salmonella contamination. In addition to the negative impacts on animal health, Salmonella-contaminated pet foods have been linked to infection in humans. With that in mind, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has set forth a zero-tolerance policy for Salmonella in pet foods. Typically, pet foods are extruded or processed at high temperatures that are sufficient to reduce pathogenic bacteria. However, the possibility for postextrusion contamination still exists. One potential method to reduce the risk of postextrusion contamination of pet foods with Salmonella is through the addition of a chemical additive coating. The objective of this research was to evaluate the ability of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB), in either free acid (HMBFA) or calcium salt (CaHMB) form, to reduce postextrusion contamination of dry extruded dog kibble with Salmonella. Three trials were conducted with HMBFA and CaHMB coated onto the kibbles at levels of 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.9, and 1.5% (w/w). The coated kibbles were then inoculated with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Enteritidis (ATCC 13076), with enumeration done on days 0, 1, 2, 7, and 14 postinoculation. Subsamples on each day were serially diluted, spread plated to xylose lysine deoxycholate agar, and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Salmonella colonies were then counted and log CFU per gram was calculated. The 1.5% HMBFA reduced counts by 4.9 ± 0.2 log units on day 1, whereas the positive control only decreased 2.2 ± 0.1 log units (P < 0.0001). The 1.5% CaHMB level decreased counts by 7.1 ± 0.04 log units by day 7 compared with the control decrease of 2.1 ± 0.1 log units (P < 0.0001). All HMBFA and CaHMB treatments resulted in the elimination of detectable Salmonella counts by day 14 (P < 0.0001 versus controls). In conclusion, HMB coating was effective at reducing Salmonella artificially inoculated to dog kibbles in a model of postextrusion contamination.

  6. Outbreak of food borne Salmonella among guests of a wedding ceremony: The role of cultural factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S Aljoudi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In response to a large number of cases of gastroenteritis reporting to Sulyyel hospital, an outbreak investigation was conducted to identify its source, to assess its extent and to make recommendations on the prevention of such outbreaks in the future. Material and Methods: A case was defined as any individual who developed diarrhea with any of the following symptoms: Abdominal pain, fever or vomiting within three days of eating at the wedding ceremony. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to identify food items and circumstances responsible for this outbreak. Results: A total of 283 individuals were interviewed, 88 of whom developed gastroenteritis, most commonly manifested by diarrhea (100%, abdominal pain (94.3% and fever (86.4%. The majority of persons interviewed were Saudis (89.1% and 21.6% were males. The median incubation period was 20.6 ΁ 2.77 hours and the epidemic curve suggested a common point source outbreak. Out of 9 food items and drinks served at the wedding ceremony, 3 food items were significantly associated with illness: meat ranked first (RR=16.7, 95% CI=2.37-115.8, followed by rice (RR=13.6 95% CI=1.95-93.61, and restaurant made sweets (RR=1.9, 95% CI=1.35-2.58. Out of 62 stool samples collected from cases, 40 (64.5 % grew Salmonella group C non-typhoid. Conclusion: Salmonella was considered the causative agent of this food-borne outbreak. Meat and rice served at the wedding party were the food items incriminated. Time, temperature misuse, inadequate heat treatment, and unhygienic handling were the most important factors causing this outbreak.

  7. Evaluation of the MicroSEQ™ Salmonella spp. Detection Kit with the PrepSEQ™ Rapid Spin Sample Preparation Kit for Detection of Salmonella spp. in Dry Pet Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Flannery, Jonathan; Bastin, Benjamin; Bird, Patrick; Crowley, Erin Sutphin; Benzinger, M Joseph; Agin, James R; Goins, David; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    A method modification validation study was conducted to validate the Applied Biosystems MicroSEQ™ Salmonella spp. Detection Kit for the detection of Salmonella spp. in 375 g samples of dried pet food. The MicroSEQ assay protocol, using the Applied Biosystems PrepSEQ™ Rapid Spin DNA Sample Preparation Kit, was compared to the reference method detailed in the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM; Chapter 5, Salmonella) for detection of Salmonella spp. For each method, 20 replicates were analyzed at a low contamination level of 0.2-2 CFU/test portion, five replicates were analyzed at a high level of contamination of 2-5 CFU/test portion, and five control replicates were also analyzed at 0 CFU/test portion (uninoculated). Statistical analysis was conducted using the Probability of Detection statistical test to determine the ability of the MicroSEQ Salmonella spp. Detection Kit to detect Salmonella from 375 g samples of dried pet food in comparison to the FDA-BAM reference method. The results demonstrated that the MicroSEQ Salmonella spp. Detection Kit was able to accurately detect Salmonella spp. present in dry pet food after an enrichment time of 20 h.

  8. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella strains isolated in ready-to-eat foods in Eastern Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Doménech Antich, Eva Mª; Jiménez Belenguer, Ana Isabel; Amoros, José Antonio; Ferrús Pérez, Mª Antonia; Escriche Roberto, Mª Isabel

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Antimicrobial resistance is a major global public health concern and a food safety issue considered in the framework of Horizon 2020. Bearing this in mind, the current study determined the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella strains isolated in ready-to-eat food sampled in industry and retail between 2006 and 2012 by the Official Food Control Services of the Valencian administration (Spain). The presence of L. monocytogenes was analysed in a total of 2864 ...

  9. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    KAUST Repository

    García, Ana V.

    2014-04-04

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. 2014 Garca and Hirt.

  10. Outbreak of Salmonella Wandsworth and Typhimurium infections in infants and toddlers traced to a commercial vegetable-coated snack food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotir, Mark J; Ewald, Gwen; Kimura, Akiko C; Higa, Jeffrey I; Sheth, Anandi; Troppy, Scott; Meyer, Stephanie; Hoekstra, R Michael; Austin, Jana; Archer, John; Spayne, Mary; Daly, Elizabeth R; Griffin, Patricia M

    2009-12-01

    Human outbreaks of Salmonella infection have been attributed to a variety of food vehicles. Processed snack foods are increasingly consumed by children. In May 2007, state and local health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated human infections from Salmonella Wandsworth, an extremely rare serotype. Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used to identify outbreak-associated illnesses. Food history questionnaires and open-ended interviews were used to generate exposure hypotheses. A nationwide case-control study was conducted to epidemiologically implicate a source. Public health laboratories cultured implicated product from patient homes and retail stores. Sixty-nine patients from 23 states were identified; 93% were aged 10 months to 3 years. Eighty-one percent of child patients had bloody diarrhea; 6 were hospitalized. No deaths were reported. The case-control study strongly associated illness with a commercial puffed vegetable-coated ready-to-eat snack food (mOR = 23.3, P = 0.0001), leading to a nationwide recall. Parents of 92% of interviewed case-children reported that children consumed the food during the week before their illness began; 43% reported daily consumption. Salmonella Wandsworth, 3 additional Salmonella serotypes and Chronobacter (formerly Enterobacter) sakazaki were all cultured from this product, leading to the identification of 18 human outbreak-related Salmonella Typhimurium illnesses. This report documents a nationwide outbreak associated with a commercial processed ready-to-eat snack food. Cases occurred primarily in infants and toddlers, many of whom frequently consumed the food. Measures are needed to ensure that ingredients added to ready-to-eat foods after the final lethal processing step are free of pathogens.

  11. Lectin-based food poisoning: a new mechanism of protein toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Miyake

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ingestion of the lectins present in certain improperly cooked vegetables can result in acute GI tract distress, but the mechanism of toxicity is unknown. In vivo, gut epithelial cells are constantly exposed to mechanical and other stresses and consequently individual cells frequently experience plasma membrane disruptions. Repair of these cell surface disruptions allows the wounded cell to survive: failure results in necrotic cell death. Plasma membrane repair is mediated, in part, by an exocytotic event that adds a patch of internal membrane to the defect site. Lectins are known to inhibit exocytosis. We therefore tested the novel hypothesis that lectin toxicity is due to an inhibitory effect on plasma membrane repair. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Repair of plasma membrane disruptions and exocytosis of mucus was assessed after treatment of cultured cell models and excised segments of the GI tract with lectins. Plasma membrane disruptions were produced by focal irradiation of individual cells, using a microscope-based laser, or by mechanical abrasion of multiple cells, using a syringe needle. Repair was then assessed by monitoring the cytosolic penetration of dyes incapable of crossing the intact plasma membrane. We found that cell surface-bound lectins potently inhibited plasma membrane repair, and the exocytosis of mucus that normally accompanies the repair response. CONCLUSIONS: Lectins potently inhibit plasma membrane repair, and hence are toxic to wounded cells. This represents a novel form of protein-based toxicity, one that, we propose, is the basis of plant lectin food poisoning.

  12. Rapid detection of Salmonella in food and feed by coupling loop-mediated isothermal amplification with bioluminescent assay in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianru; Domesle, Kelly J; Wang, Fei; Ge, Beilei

    2016-06-17

    Salmonella is among the most significant pathogens causing food and feed safety concerns. This study examined the rapid detection of Salmonella in various types of food and feed samples by coupling loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with a novel reporter, bioluminescent assay in real-time (BART). Performance of the LAMP-BART assay was compared to a conventional LAMP and the commercially available 3M Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) Salmonella. The LAMP-BART assay was 100 % specific among 178 strains (151 Salmonella and 27 non-Salmonella) tested. The detection limits were 36 cells per reaction in pure culture and 10(4) to 10(6) CFU per 25 g in spiked food and feed samples without enrichment, which were comparable to those of the conventional LAMP and 3M MDA Salmonella but 5-10 min faster. Ground turkey showed a strong inhibition on 3M MDA Salmonella, requiring at least 10(8) CFU per 25 g for detection. The correlation between Salmonella cell numbers and LAMP-BART signals was high (R (2) = 0.941-0.962), suggesting good quantification capability. After 24 h enrichment, all three assays accurately detected 1 to 3 CFU per 25 g of Salmonella among five types of food (cantaloupe, ground beef, ground turkey, shell eggs, and tomato) and three types of feed (cattle feed, chicken feed, and dry dog food) examined. However, 10(1) CFU per 25 g was required for cattle feed when tested by 3M MDA Salmonella. The Salmonella LAMP-BART assay was rapid, specific, sensitive, quantitative, and robust. Upon further validation, it may become a valuable tool for routine screening of Salmonella in various types of food and feed samples.

  13. Hospital outbreak of Salmonella virchow possibly associated with a food handler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, H; Pharoah, P; Walsh, B; Davison, C; Barrie, D; Threlfall, E J; Chambers, S

    2000-04-01

    A foodborne outbreak of salmonella infection at a private hospital in London in 1994 was found to be associated with eating turkey sandwiches prepared by a food handler. One patient, nine staff, and a foodhandler's baby were confirmed to have Salmonella enterica serotype virchow, phage type 26 infection. The attack rate was estimated to be 5% among the approximately 200 patients and staff at risk. A food handler reportedly became ill days after, but her baby days before, the first hospital case. Although it appeared to be a single outbreak, antibiogram analysis, supplemented by plasmid profile typing, demonstrated that there were two strains of S. virchow involved, one with resistance to sulphonamides and trimethoprim and a second sensitive to these antimicrobial drugs. Mother and child had different strains. The investigation demonstrated the importance of full phenotypic characterization of putative outbreak strains including antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Outbreaks of foodborne infection in hospitals are preventable and are associated with high attack rates and disruption of services. There is a need for good infection control policies and training of all staff involved in patient care as well as in catering services. Consultants in Communicable Disease (CCDCs) should include private hospitals in their outbreak control plans. Good working relations between Infection Control Doctors (ICDs) in the private health sector and their local CCDCs are important if outbreaks are to be properly investigated. Copyright 2000 The Hospital Infection Society.

  14. The occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of salmonellae isolated from commercially available canine raw food diets in three Canadian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, R; Reid-Smith, R; Ribble, C; Popa, M; Vandermeer, M; Aramini, J

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella isolated from commercially available canine raw food diets in Canada. A total of 166 commercial frozen raw food diet samples were purchased from randomly selected local pet stores in three Canadian cities for a period of 8 months. All samples were evaluated for the presence of Salmonella, serotyped and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. There was an overall Salmonella prevalence of 21%; chicken was an ingredient for 67% of the Salmonella-positive diets. Eighteen different Salmonella serotypes were recovered, and resistance was observed to 12 of the 16 antimicrobials tested, with the majority of Ontario isolates exhibiting resistance to ampicillin and Calgary isolates to tetracycline. This study demonstrates the potential risk of raw food diets, especially for immunocompromised individuals, and stresses the need for implementing regulatory guidelines for the production of these diets in order to help control and ideally eliminate the bacterial risks associated with their use and consumption.

  15. Interlaboratory validation of a real-time PCR 24-hour rapid method for detection of Salmonella in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Van Khanh, T; Lin, Wen; Ruby, Richard M

    2009-05-01

    The efficacy of a 24-h Salmonella real-time, or quantitative, PCR (qPCR) detection method was assessed through a collaborative effort involving eight Federal and state laboratories. Eleven foods including mashed potatoes, soft cheese, chili powder, chocolate, eggs, sprouts, apple juice, fish, shrimp, ground beef, and ground chicken were tested. For each food, seven blind samples were distributed to each participant for testing. These included six samples equivalently inoculated with 1 to 5 CFU/25 g of various serotypes of Salmonella (Gaminara, Weltevreden, Heidelberg, Senftenberg, Enteritidis, Newport, Typhimurium, and Kentucky for each food) and 10 to 50 CFU/25 g of the competitor Enterobacter cloacae. The seventh sample was inoculated with 10 to 50 CFU/25 g of the competitor, E. cloacae, only. These samples were tested for Salmonella by using four methods in parallel: (i) 24-h qPCR method detecting Salmonella from modified buffered peptone water enrichment medium; (ii) 48-h qPCR method detecting Salmonella from a secondary selective enrichment broth; (iii) modified Bacteriological Analytical Manual method; and (iv) VIDAS, an immunoassay system. The results of the statistical analysis showed there was no significant (P > or = 0.05) difference between either of the qPCR methods and the modified Bacteriological Analytical Manual method for 10 of 11 foods. For the one exception, sprouts, detection by qPCR required 48 h. Both qPCR methods showed a detection limit of 0.08 to 0.2 CFU/g. These results provide a solid basis for using this 24-h qPCR rapid screening method to detect Salmonella in foods.

  16. Effect of Food Residues in Biofilm Formation on Stainless Steel and Polystyrene Surfaces by Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Poultry Houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba María Paz-Méndez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella spp. is a major food-borne pathogen around the world. The ability of Salmonella to produce biofilm is one of the main obstacles in reducing the prevalence of these bacteria in the food chain. Most of Salmonella biofilm studies found in the literature used laboratory growth media. However, in the food chain, food residues are the principal source of nutrients of Salmonella. In this study, the biofilm formation, morphotype, and motility of 13 Salmonella strains belonging to three different subspecies and isolated from poultry houses was evaluated. To simulate food chain conditions, four different growth media (Tryptic Soy Broth at 1/20 dilution, milk at 1/20 dilution, tomato juice, and chicken meat juice, two different surfaces (stainless steel and polystyrene and two temperatures (6 °C and 22 °C were used to evaluate the biofilm formation. The morphotype, motility, and biofilm formation of Salmonella was temperature-dependent. Biofilm formation was significantly higher with 1/20 Tryptic Soy Broth in all the surfaces and temperatures tested, in comparison with the other growth media. The laboratory growth medium 1/20 Tryptic Soy Broth enhanced biofilm formation in Salmonella. This could explain the great differences in biofilm formation found between this growth medium and food residues. However, Salmonella strains were able to produce biofilm on the presence of food residues in all the conditions tested. Therefore, the Salmonella strain can use food residues to produce biofilm on common surfaces of the food chain. More studies combining more strains and food residues are necessary to fully understand the mechanism used by Salmonella to produce biofilm on the presence of these sources of nutrients.

  17. Evaluation of abbreviated enzyme immunoassay method for detection of Salmonella in low-moisture foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Klatt, M J; Robison, B J; Mattingly, J A

    1988-01-01

    A modified enzyme immunoassay method (EIA) utilizing an 18 h pre-enrichment, a 6-8 h selective enrichment, and a 14 h M-broth post-enrichment is compared to the standard culture method (AOAC/BAM) on selected low-moisture foods. Tested samples included 238 inoculated, 30 naturally contaminated, and 30 uninoculated foods. By EIA, 235 samples were positive (optical densities greater than 0.2 at 405 nm), 233 of which were confirmed culturally. By the culture methods, 221 samples were positive. The EIA method was more productive in detecting salmonellae in inoculated samples of dry cheese powder, chocolate, and nonfat dry milk, whereas the culture method gave better recovery from naturally contaminated meat and bone meal. The modified EIA could be completed in 40 h and required no centrifugation.

  18. Multiple Food-Animal-Borne Route in Transmission of Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella Newport to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hang; Paudyal, Narayan; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan; Yue, Min

    2018-01-01

    Characterization of transmission routes of Salmonella among various food-animal reservoirs and their antibiogram is crucial for appropriate intervention and medical treatment. Here, we analyzed 3728 Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (S. Newport) isolates collected from various food-animals, retail meats and humans in the United States between 1996 and 2015, based on their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) toward 27 antibiotics. Random Forest and Hierarchical Clustering statistic was used to group the isolates according to their MICs. Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis was used to identify the appropriate antibiotic and its cut-off value between human- and animal-population. Two distinct populations were revealed based on the MICs of individual strain by both methods, with the animal population having significantly higher MICs which correlates to antibiotic-resistance (AR) phenotype. Only ∼9.7% (267/2763) human isolates could be attributed to food–animal origins. Furthermore, the isolates of animal origin had less diverse antibiogram than human isolates (P animal and human isolates. Additionally, two typical AR patterns, MDR-Amp and Tet-SDR dominant in bovine- or turkey-population, were identified, indicating that distinct food-animal sources could be involved in human infections. The AR analysis suggested fluoroquinolones (i.e., ciprofloxacin), but not extended-spectrum cephalosporins (i.e., ceftriaxone, cefoxitin), is the adaptive choice for empirical therapy. Antibiotic-resistant S. Newport from humans has multiple origins, with distinct food-animal-borne route contributing to a significant proportion of heterogeneous isolates. PMID:29410657

  19. Elevated-temperature, colorimetric, monoclonal, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for rapid screening of Salmonella in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, K F; Dustman, W A; Curiale, M S; Flowers, R S; Robison, B J

    1994-01-01

    A collaborative study was performed by 30 laboratories in 3 sets of trials to validate a modified colorimetric monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method for Salmonella detection. The modifications to the current methodology included incubation of enrichments and post-enrichments at an elevated temperature, addition of novobiocin to the M-broth post-enrichment, and elimination of the centrifugation and agitation steps. Five artificially contaminated foods (nonfat dry milk, milk chocolate, dried egg, ground black pepper, and soy flour) and 1 naturally contaminated food (raw ground turkey) were analyzed. The artificially contaminated foods were inoculated with individual Salmonella serotypes at a high (10-50 cells/25 g) and low (1-5 cells/25 g) contamination level. Results from the modified ELISA method were compared to the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM)/AOAC culture method. In 2 of the food products, milk chocolate and pepper, a number of laboratories isolated Salmonella from un-inoculated control samples, thus invalidating their data. As a result, there were too few laboratories remaining with valid data, and these foods were repeated. In the completed study, there were 11 false negative results obtained by the modified ELISA method, while there were 28 false negatives produced by the BAM/AOAC procedure. There were 11 ELISA positive assays which could not be confirmed by culture methods. Statistically, there were no differences between the modified, colorimetric, monoclonal ELISA and the reference culture method in all foods except raw turkey, where the ELISA method was more productive. The colorimetric monoclonal enzyme immunoassay (Salmonella-Tek) method for detecting Salmonella in all foods has been adopted first action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  20. In vitro characterization and in vivo properties of Salmonellae lytic bacteriophages isolated from free-range layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Fiorentin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of food poisoning related to Salmonella-contaminated eggs and chicken meat has been frequent in humans. Salmonella Enteritidis (SE and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST are included among the most important paratyphoid salmonellae associated with chicken meat and eggs. Elimination of Salmonella at the pre-harvest stage can play a significant role in preventing the introduction of this pathogen into the food chain and consequently in the reduction of food poisoning in humans. Bactericidal bacteriophages may provide a natural, nontoxic, feasible and non-expensive component of the multi-factorial approach for a pre-harvest control of Salmonella in poultry. Five bacteriophages lytic for SE PT4 and ST were obtained from 107 samples of feces of free-range layers in Brazil. All bacteriophages were characterized in vitro and in vivo, showing head and tail morphology and dsDNA as nucleic acids. Results of "in vivo" studies suggested that bacteriophages do not remain in Salmonella-free birds longer than one day, whereas they multiply in Salmonella-infected birds for longer periods. Besides, selection for phage-resistant SE PT4 did not seem to occur in the short term. Isolated bacteriophages will be investigated for their potential for pre-harvest biocontrol of SE PT4 in poultry.

  1. Precollaborative study of the GeneQuence Salmonella assay using 24-hour enrichment protocols for detection of Salmonella spp. in select foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, Susan; Peng, Xuan; Wendorf, Michael; Mozola, Mark

    2007-01-01

    New enrichment protocols are described for use with a DNA hybridization (DNAH) method for detection of Salmonella spp. in select foods. GeneQuence Salmonella, in its original version, utilized a 3-stage enrichment of minimum 42 h duration. New 2-stage procedures of 24-28 h duration are described for raw poultry, raw beef, pasteurized egg products, milk chocolate, and dry pet food. In the validation study described here, a total of 345 samples were tested by the abbreviated DNAH method in parallel with either the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA/BAM) or U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) reference culture procedures. Results showed an overall sensitivity for the DNAH method of 97.1% (false-negative rate 2.9%). There were no false-positive results by the DNAH method; therefore the specificity was 100%. Overall agreement between the DNAH and reference culture methods was 98.5%. There were no significant differences in performance between the DNAH and reference methods for any of the foods tested as determined by Chi-square analysis. It is recommended that the DNAH method be subjected to AOAC collaborative study.

  2. Rapid Detection of Salmonella enterica in Food Using a Compact Disc-Shaped Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Furutani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid detection of food-borne pathogens is essential to public health and the food industry. Although the conventional culture method is highly sensitive, it takes at least a few days to detect food-borne pathogens. Even though polymerase chain reaction (PCR can detect food-borne pathogens in a few hours, it is more expensive and unsatisfactorily sensitive relative to the culture method. We have developed a method to rapidly detect Salmonella enterica by using a compact disc (CD-shaped device that can reduce reagent consumption in conventional PCR. The detection method, which combines culture and PCR, is more rapid than the conventional culture method and is more sensitive and cheaper than PCR. In this study, we also examined a sample preparation method that involved collecting bacterial cells from food. The bacteria collected from chicken meat spiked with S. enterica were mixed with PCR reagents, and PCR was performed on the device. At a low concentration of S. enterica, the collected S. enterica was cultured before PCR for sensitive detection. After cultivation for 4 h, S. enterica at 1.7 × 104 colony-forming units (CFUs·g−1 was detected within 8 h, which included the time needed for sample preparation and detection. Furthermore, the detection of 30 CFUs·g−1 of S. enterica was possible within 12 h including 8 h for cultivation.

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of food animal isolates of Salmonella with reduced sensitivity to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kevin J; Poppe, Cornelius

    2002-01-01

    Reports of nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica showing reduced sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (RSC) have increased rapidly during the past decade. Infection in humans with Salmonella possessing RSC may compromise the effectiveness of ciprofloxacin therapy. Nineteen among 4,357 Salmonella strains isolated from food animals in Canada from 1998 to 1999 showed RSC; 17 were from turkeys and 2 from chickens. All were resistant to nalidixic acid and sulfisoxazole and possessed RSC at a level of 0.125-0.5 microg/ml. PCR-RFLP of the gyrA quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) with Hinfl revealed that S. Bredeney and S. Heidelberg isolates possessed a mutation in this region. Single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis showed that S. Schwarzengrund and S. Senftenberg isolates also possessed a point mutation in the QRDR. DNA sequencing confirmed the findings and showed that all isolates possessed a base substitution in the gyrA QRDR. Sequencing revealed no mutations in the gyrB and silent wobble mutations in the parC QRDR. Reserpine, a known efflux pump inhibitor, did not effect the MICs for ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and tetracycline. The mar operon could be induced in all isolates at 37 degrees C and in 18 of 19 at 30 degrees C; induction resulted in a two- to four-fold increase in the MIC of ciprofloxacin. In 14 of the 19 isolates, the mutation rate was two-fold or higher than in a ciprofloxacin sensitive S. Bredeney and S. Typhimurium LT2 control strain. Examination of clonal relatedness using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and plasmid profiles indicated that some degree of clonal dispersion may have occurred, but the majority of isolates may have arisen from de novo mutations.

  4. Choose your menu wisely: cuisine-associated food-poisoning risks in restaurants in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, F J; Rawal, N; Little, C L

    2012-06-01

    The food service sector continues to be the most common setting for reported foodborne disease outbreaks in England and Wales. Using restaurant-associated foodborne outbreaks reported in England and Wales from 1992 to 2009, cuisine-specific risk factors were examined. Of 677 restaurant outbreaks, there were 11 795 people affected, 491 hospitalizations, and seven deaths; and Chinese, Indian, British and Italian cuisines were the most commonly implicated (26%, 16%, 13% and 10%, respectively). Salmonella spp. accounted for most outbreaks of all cuisine types, and particularly Chinese (76%, 133/175) and Italian (55%, 38/69). Poultry meat was the most frequently implicated food vehicle in outbreaks associated with Indian (30%), Chinese (21%), and British (18%) cuisines while for Italian cuisine, desserts and cakes were more frequently implicated (33%). Rice dishes were also a common outbreak food vehicle in those restaurants serving Chinese (22%) and Indian (16%) cuisine. Cross-contamination was the biggest contributory factor associated with Chinese (46%), British (33%) and Indian (30%) cuisines whereas inadequate cooking (38%) and use of raw shell eggs in lightly cooked or uncooked food (35%) were more often associated with Italian cuisine. Over the surveillance period, the proportion of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 outbreaks in restaurants serving Chinese cuisine significantly decreased (Prestaurants by cuisine type, specific evidence of food control failures can be used to target foodborne illness reduction strategies.

  5. Prevalence of beta-lactamases among ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolated from food animals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Inger; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2004-01-01

    The genetic background for beta-lactamase-mediated resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics was examined by PCR and sequencing in 160 ampicillin-resistant isolates (109 Escherichia coli and 51 Salmonella) obtained from healthy and diseased food animals in Denmark. Sequencing revealed three different...... activity against extended-spectrum beta-lactams....

  6. Characterization of blaCMY-2 plasmids in Salmonella and Escherichia coli isolates from food animals in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura C; Weir, Emily K; Poppe, Cornelis; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Boerlin, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    One hundred thirty-four bla(CMY-2) plasmids from Salmonella and Escherichia coli strains from animals and food in Canada were characterized. Five plasmid groups were identified based on replicon type and restriction profiles. Three groups contained E. coli plasmids only. IncA/C plasmids included most multiresistant plasmids and all those of bovine origin.

  7. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica food and animal isolates from Colombia: identification of a qnrB19-mediated quinolone resistance marker in two novel serovars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczmarczyk, M.; Martins, M.; McCusker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ninety-three Salmonella isolates recovered from commercial foods and exotic animals in Colombia were studied. The serotypes, resistance profiles and where applicable the quinolone resistance genes were determined. Salmonella Anatum (n=14), Uganda (19), Braenderup (10) and Newport (10) were the most...... hitherto unrecognized in various Salmonella serovars in Colombia. We also report unusual high-level quinolone resistance in the absence of any DNA gyrase mutations in serovars S. Carrau, Muenchen and Uganda....

  8. Contaminated commercial dehydrated food as source of multiple Salmonella serotypes outbreak in a municipal kennel in Tuscany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Marco; Stefanelli, Simonetta; Bilei, Stefano; Tolli, Rita; Bertolotti, Luigi; Marconi, Paola; Giurlani, Stefano; De Lucia, Pier Giorgio; Ruggeri, Gianfranco; Pagani, Ambrogio

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a large outbreak of canine salmonellosis in a municipal kennel in Tuscany. During the outbreak, 174 samples of 'diarrhetic' and 'normal' faeces and two batches of commercial dehydrated dog food were cultured for pathogenic bacteria. The results of 25, out of a total of 41 dogs (60.9%) revealed at least one faecal sample as being positive for Salmonella; incidence per sampling ranged from 12.5% to 34%. Nine of 10 samples of dehydrated food were positive. Ten totally different serotypes were isolated from dry food and faeces: the results of the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis referred to similarity between the Salmonella Montevideo, Muenster and Worthington isolates recovered from both the food and canine faecal samples.

  9. Contaminated commercial dehydrated food as source of multiple Salmonella serotypes outbreak in a municipal kennel in Tuscany

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    Marco Selmi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a large outbreak of canine salmonellosis in a municipal kennel in Tuscany. During the outbreak, 174 samples of ‘diarrhetic’ and ‘normal’ faeces and two batches of commercial dehydrated dog food were cultured for pathogenic bacteria. The results of 25, out of a total of 41 dogs (60.9% revealed at least one faecal sample as being positive for Salmonella; incidence per sampling ranged from 12.5% to 34%. Nine of 10 samples of dehydrated food were positive. Ten totally different serotypes were isolated from dry food and faeces: the results of the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis referred to similarity between the Salmonella Montevideo, Muenster and Worthington isolates recovered from both the food and canine faecal samples.

  10. Evaluation of VIDas immuno-concentration Salmonella/VIDAS salmonella immunoassay method for detection of Salmonella in selected foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Wendy A; Schultz, Ann M; Curiale, Michael S; Johnson, Ronald L

    2002-01-01

    The VIDAS Immuno-concentration Salmonella ICS)/VIDAS Salmonella (SLM) immunoassay method for the detection of Salmonella was compared to the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM)/AOAC culture method in a collaborative study. Thirty-two laboratories participated in the evaluation. Each laboratory tested one or more of the 6 test products: milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, dried whole egg, soy flour, ground black pepper, and ground raw turkey. The 2 methods were in agreement for 1,266 of the 1,440 samples. Of the 174 samples not in agreement, 69 were VIDAS CS/SLM-positive and BAM/AOAC-negative and 105 were VIDAS ICS/SLM-negative and BAM/AOAC-positive.

  11. Evaluation of VIDAs Immuno-concentration Salmonella assay Plus selective plate method (Hektoen enteric, bismuth sulfite, Salmonella identification) for detection of Salmonella in selected foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Wendy A; Schultz, Ann M; Curiale, Michael S; Johnson, Ronald L

    2002-01-01

    The VIDAS Immuno-concentration Salmonella (ICS) plus selective plate method (Hektoen enteric, bismuth sulfite, Salmonella identification) method for the detection of Salmonella was compared to the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM)/AOAC culture method in a collaborative study. Thirty-two laboratories participated in the evaluation. Each laboratory tested one or more of the 6 test products: milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, dried whole egg, soy flour, ground black pepper, and ground raw turkey. The 2 methods were in agreement for 1,283 of the 1,440 test samples. Of the 157 test samples not in agreement, 82 were VIDAS ICS plus selective plate-positive and BAM/AOAC-negative, and 75 were VIDAS ICS plus selective plate-negative and BAM/AOAC-positive.

  12. Identification and Characterization of a New Enterotoxin Produced by Clostridium perfringens Isolated from Food Poisoning Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Nakama, Akiko; Kai, Akemi; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    There is a strain of Clostridium perfringens, W5052, which does not produce a known enterotoxin. We herein report that the strain W5052 expressed a homologue of the iota-like toxin components sa and sb of C. spiroforme, named Clostridium perfringens iota-like enterotoxin, CPILE-a and CPILE-b, respectively, based on the results of a genome sequencing analysis and a systematic protein screening. In the nicotinamide glyco-hydrolase (NADase) assay the hydrolysis activity was dose-dependently increased by the concentration of rCPILE-a, as judged by the mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the actin monomer of the lysates of Vero and L929 cells were radiolabeled in the presence of [32P]NAD and rCPILE-a. These findings indicated that CPILE-a possesses ADP-ribosylation activity. The culture supernatant of W5052 facilitated the rounding and killing of Vero and L929 cells, but the rCPILE-a or a non-proteolyzed rCPILE-b did not. However, a trypsin-treated rCPILE-b did. Moreover, a mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b enhanced the cell rounding and killing activities, compared with that induced by the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b alone. The injection of the mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b into an ileum loop of rabbits evoked the swelling of the loop and accumulation of the fluid dose-dependently, suggesting that CPILE possesses enterotoxic activity. The evidence presented in this communication will facilitate the epidemiological, etiological, and toxicological studies of C. perfringens food poisoning, and also stimulate studies on the transfer of the toxins’ gene(s) among the Genus Clostridium. PMID:26584048

  13. Identification and Characterization of a New Enterotoxin Produced by Clostridium perfringens Isolated from Food Poisoning Outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Irikura

    Full Text Available There is a strain of Clostridium perfringens, W5052, which does not produce a known enterotoxin. We herein report that the strain W5052 expressed a homologue of the iota-like toxin components sa and sb of C. spiroforme, named Clostridium perfringens iota-like enterotoxin, CPILE-a and CPILE-b, respectively, based on the results of a genome sequencing analysis and a systematic protein screening. In the nicotinamide glyco-hydrolase (NADase assay the hydrolysis activity was dose-dependently increased by the concentration of rCPILE-a, as judged by the mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the actin monomer of the lysates of Vero and L929 cells were radiolabeled in the presence of [32P]NAD and rCPILE-a. These findings indicated that CPILE-a possesses ADP-ribosylation activity. The culture supernatant of W5052 facilitated the rounding and killing of Vero and L929 cells, but the rCPILE-a or a non-proteolyzed rCPILE-b did not. However, a trypsin-treated rCPILE-b did. Moreover, a mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b enhanced the cell rounding and killing activities, compared with that induced by the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b alone. The injection of the mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b into an ileum loop of rabbits evoked the swelling of the loop and accumulation of the fluid dose-dependently, suggesting that CPILE possesses enterotoxic activity. The evidence presented in this communication will facilitate the epidemiological, etiological, and toxicological studies of C. perfringens food poisoning, and also stimulate studies on the transfer of the toxins' gene(s among the Genus Clostridium.

  14. Isolation, antibiogram and pathogenicity of Salmonella spp. Recovered from slaughtered food animals in Nagpur region of Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kalambhe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the prevalence, antibiogram and pathogenicity of Salmonella spp. in the common food animals slaughtered for consumption purpose at government approved slaughter houses located in and around Nagpur region during a period of 2010-2012. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 samples comprising 50 each of blood and meat from each slaughtered male cattle, buffaloes, pigs and goats were collected. Isolation was done by pre-enrichment in buffered peptone water and enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis broth with subsequent selective plating onto xylose lysine deoxycholate agar. Presumptive Salmonella colonies were biochemically confirmed and analyzed for pathogenicity by hemolysin production and Congo red dye binding assay (CRDA. An antibiotic sensitivity test was performed to assess the antibiotic resistance pattern of the isolates. Results: A total of 10 isolates of Salmonella spp. from meat (3 from cattle, 1 from buffaloes and 6 from pigs with an overall prevalence of 5% among food animals was recorded. No isolation was reported from any blood samples. Pathogenicity assays revealed 100% and 80% positivity for CRDA and hemolytic activity, respectively. Antimicrobial sensitivity test showed multi-drug resistance. The overall resistance of 50% was noted for trimethoprim followed by ampicillin (20%. A maximum sensitivity (80% was reported to gentamycin followed by 40% each to ampicillin and trimethoprim, 30% to amikacin and 10% to kanamycin. Conclusion: The presence of multidrug resistant and potentially pathogenic Salmonella spp. in slaughtered food animals in Nagpur region can be a matter of concern for public health.

  15. Incentive systems for food quality control with repeated deliveries: Salmonella control in pork production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, R.P.; Backus, G.B.C.; Gaag, van der M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic principal-agent analysis of incentive systems for Salmonella control. The European Union will require Salmonella testing from 2008. On the basis of the producer's performance history in controlling Salmonella, the incentive systems analysed determine quality premiums to

  16. The evaluation of a PCR-based method for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes from environmental samples and various food matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Chen, Kai-Shun; Ewing, Laura; Wang, Hua; Agpaoa, Maria C; Huang, Mei-Chiung J; Dickey, Erin; Du, Jamie M; Williams-Hill, Donna M; Hamilton, Brittany; Micallef, Shirley A; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E; George, Ashish; Joseph, Sam W; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobson, Andrew P; Tall, Ben D; Kothary, Mahendra H; Dudley, Kim; Hanes, Darcy E

    2012-09-01

    The most commonly used method for serotyping Salmonella spp. is based on the Kaufmann-White scheme, and is composed of serological reactions using antibodies to LPS agglutinins. The multiplex PCR used in this investigation was established by Kim et al. to serotype the 30 most common clinical Salmonella serotypes, as determined by CDC. The PCR assay consists of two five-plex reactions and a single two-plex PCR reaction, based on six genetic loci from Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and four loci from S. enterica serotype Typhi. In this investigation, we further evaluated the method for serotyping Salmonella spp. using a reference collection, environmental samples collected from a Mid-Atlantic region tomato farm study, four food matrices spiked with different Salmonella serotypes and a proficiency test. The PCR assay was first evaluated using DNA isolated from pure cultures of isolates obtained from various clinical and environmental samples, and then DNA isolated from broth cultures of food matrices of "Red round" and Roma tomatoes, Romaine lettuce, green onions and Serrano peppers spiked with serotypes Newport, Typhimurium, Javiana and Saintpaul, respectively. The results showed that the PCR assay correctly serotyped Salmonella spp. from the clinical, environmental, spiked food matrices, and proficiency test samples. These findings are significant because the PCR assay was successful in the identification of Salmonella in the spiked samples in a broth culture containing other non-salmonella organism. This method may be a useful resource for the food safety community. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Salmonella Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FDA) USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Follow Salmonella RSS Diagnosis and Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How Can Salmonella Infections Be Diagnosed? Diagnosing salmonellosis requires testing a ...

  18. A Comparison of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella from Humans and Food Animals Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandt, Carol H.; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Tewari, Deepanker; Ostroff, Stephen; Joyce, Kevin; M’ikanatha, Nkuchia M.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important foodborne diseases affecting humans. To characterize the relationship between Salmonella causing human infections and their food animal reservoirs, we compared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from ill humans in Pennsylvania and from food animals before retail. Human clinical isolates were received from 2005 through 2011 during routine public health operations in Pennsylvania. Isolates from cattle, chickens, swine and turkeys were recovered during the same period from federally inspected slaughter and processing facilities in the northeastern United States. We found that subtyping Salmonella isolates by PFGE revealed differences in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and, for human Salmonella, differences in sources and invasiveness that were not evident from serotyping alone. Sixteen of the 20 most common human Salmonella PFGE patterns were identified in Salmonella recovered from food animals. The most common human Salmonella PFGE pattern, Enteritidis pattern JEGX01.0004 (JEGX01.0003ARS), was associated with more cases of invasive salmonellosis than all other patterns. In food animals, this pattern was almost exclusively (99%) found in Salmonella recovered from chickens and was present in poultry meat in every year of the study. Enteritidis pattern JEGX01.0004 (JEGX01.0003ARS) was associated with susceptibility to all antimicrobial agents tested in 94.7% of human and 97.2% of food animal Salmonella isolates. In contrast, multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents) was observed in five PFGE patterns. Typhimurium patterns JPXX01.0003 (JPXX01.0003 ARS) and JPXX01.0018 (JPXX01.0002 ARS), considered together, were associated with resistance to five or more classes of antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides and tetracycline (ACSSuT), in 92% of human and 80% of food

  19. Ecology and modelling of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in cattle manure and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semenov, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    The number of food poisoning cases caused by enteropathogens has increased in recent years. A significant part of the outbreaks associated with the consumption of raw vegetables has been attributed to Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bovine manure

  20. A foodborne outbreak of Salmonella infection due to overproduction of egg-containing foods for a festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, N; Domínguez, A; Company, M; Pérez, M; Pardos, J; Llobet, T; Usera, M A; Salleras, L

    2005-10-01

    A large outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in Catalonia in June 2002 with 1435 cases and 117 hospitalizations. Consumption of a hard pastry with vanilla cream was strongly associated with illness. Stool samples from cases and food-handlers were analysed. The premises of the food manufacturer were inspected and food samples were taken for microbiological analysis. Salmonella serotype Enteriditis was isolated from 154 cases, three food-handlers and nine food samples. Outbreak-associated strains showed a coincident phage type, antibiotype and pulse-field gel electrophoresis pattern. Inadequate handling of foods containing eggs occurred because the establishment exceeded its safe food production capacity to meet demand for the pastry, which was consumed on the day of a traditional festival. Excessive production of foods for holidays or special events represents a potential public health threat.

  1. Detection of Salmonella species in a variety of foods by the DuPont Bax system real-time PCR assay for Salmonella: first action 2013.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, F Morgan; Andaloro, Bridget; Fallon, Dawn; Corrigan, Nisha; Varkey, Stephen; DeMarco, Daniel; Farnum, Andrew; Tadler, Monica; Hoelzer, Steven; Weller, Julie; Davis, Eugene; Rohrbeck, Jeffrey; Tice, George; Bird, Patrick; Crowley, Erin; Flannery, Jonathan; Fisher, Kiel; Huffman, Travis; Boyle, Megan; Benzinger, M Joseph; Bedinghaus, Paige; Goetz, Katie; Judd, William; Agin, Jim; Goins, David

    2014-01-01

    A multilaboratory study was conducted to evaluate the ability of the DuPont BAX System Real-Time PCR Assay for Salmonella to detect the target species in a variety of foods and environmental surfaces. Internal validation studies were performed by DuPont Nutrition & Health on 24 different sample types to demonstrate the reliability of the test method among a wide variety of sample types. Two of these matrixes-pork and turkey frankfurters and pasteurized, not-from-concentrate orange juice without pulp-were each evaluated in 14 independent laboratories as part of the collaborative study to demonstrate repeatability and reproducibility of the internal laboratory results independent of the end user. Frankfurter samples were evaluated against the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service reference method as a paired study, while orange juice samples were evaluated against the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reference method as an unpaired study, using a proprietary media for the test method. Samples tested in this study were artificially inoculated with a Salmonella strain at levels expected to produce low (0.2-2.0 CFU/test portion) or high (5 CFU/test portion) spike levels on the day of analysis. For each matrix, the collaborative study failed to show a statistically significant difference between the candidate method and the reference method using the probability of detection statistical model.

  2. IMPACT OF FOOD AND FOLATE SUPPLEMENTATION DURING Salmonella TYPHI INFECTION IN Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagavathi Sundaram Sivamaruthi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is an instructive and suitable model for studying pathogenesis of almost all human pathogens. Salmonella Typhi is gram-negative facultative intracellular anaerobe that causes several pathetic infections. Necessary enriched nutrient ingestion during pathological conditions may reduce the harshness of the infection. We investigated the impact of folate and food supplementation during S. Typhi infection on the model system, C. elegans. Our data indicated that folate supplementation (10 µg increases the lifespan of S. Typhi infected C. elegans up to 20%. In combination with laboratory food source E. coli OP50, folate increases the infected the worm’s lifespan to 40%. The wild type C. elegans infected by S. Typhi died with the LT50 of 60 ± 12 h. The LT50 of S. Typhi infected folt-1 mutant strain VC959 was 96 ± 6 h. However, the folate supplemented mutant worms exhibited an extended life with LT50 of 120 ± 6 h. The short time exposure and pharyngeal pumping studies confirmed that folt-1 mutant worm exhibited increased survival rate during pathogenic course at significant level when compared to wild-type. Our data revealed that folt-1 plays a significant role in host defense system against S. Typhi infection and the folate supplementation in combination with food increases the host survival during S. Typhi infection.

  3. [Multiplex PCR strategy for the simultaneous identification of Staphylococcus aureus and detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins in isolates from food poisoning outbreaks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzio, Aníbal A; Tedeschi, Fabián A; Zalazar, Fabián E

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is the most frequent type of food poisoning around the world. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins cause significant loss of water in the intestinal lumen, followed by vomiting and diarrhea. To report a fast, reliable and inexpensive strategy based on multiplex PCR for the simultaneous identification of S. aureus and detection of five classical S. aureus enterotoxin genes ( sea, seb, sec, sed, see ) in Staphylococcus spp. strains isolated from food poisoning outbreaks. We analyzed isolates from 12 food poisoning outbreaks occurred in Santa Fe province (Argentina). Isolation and phenotypic characterization were carried out by standard procedures. Genotypic analysis was performed by multiplex PCR, using primers for nuc , sea-see and 16S rRNA genes simultaneously. Of all the strains tested, 58% were found to carry toxigenic genes. Sea and seb toxins were found at the same percentage (29%) while sec, sed and see genes were found in a lower and identical proportion (14%). We did not find more than one different type of S. aureus enterotoxin in the isolates analyzed. The multiplex PCR strategy designed in this work has enabled us to identify strains of S. aureus and detect -at the same time- their enterotoxigenic ability. At present, our efforts are devoted to the detection of genes encoding enterotoxins other than the classical ones, in order to know their impact on staphylococcal food poisoning, as well as to investigate their relevance to our country's public health.

  4. Inactivation of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Enterococcus faecium NRRL B-2354 in a selection of low moisture foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachon, Grzegorz; Peñaloza, Walter; Gibbs, Paul A

    2016-08-16

    The aims of this study were to obtain data on survival and heat resistance of cocktails of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and the surrogate Enterococcus faecium (NRRL B-2354) in four low moisture foods (confectionery formulation, chicken meat powder, pet food and savoury seasoning) during storage before processing. Inoculated samples were stored at 16°C and cell viability examined at day 0, 3, 7 and 21. At each time point, the heat resistance at 80°C was determined. The purpose was to determine a suitable storage time of inoculated foods that can be applied in heat resistance studies or process validations with similar cell viability and heat resistance characteristics. The main inactivation study was carried out within 7days after inoculation, the heat resistance of each bacterial cocktail was evaluated in each low moisture food heated in thermal cells exposed to temperatures between 70 and 140°C. The Weibull model and the first order kinetics (D-value) were used to express inactivation data and calculate the heating time to achieve 5 log reduction at each temperature. Results showed that the pathogens Salmonella and L. monocytogenes and the surrogate E. faecium NRRL B-2354, can survive well (maximum reduction 0.05). The inactivation kinetics of the pathogens and surrogate at temperatures between 70 and 140°C, were different between each organism and product. E. faecium NRRL B-2354 was a suitable Salmonella surrogate for three of the low moisture foods studied, but not for the sugar-containing confectionery formulation. Heating low moisture food in moisture-tight environments (thermal cells) to 111.2, 105.3 or 111.8°C can inactivate 5 log of Salmonella, L. monocytogenes or E. faecium NRRL B-2354 respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Salmonella enteritidis infections associated with foods purchased from mobile lunch trucks--Alberta, Canada, October 2010-February 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    During October 2010-February 2011, an outbreak of 91 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections in Alberta, Canada, was investigated by a local public health department (Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone). Index cases initially were linked through a common history of consumption of food purchased from mobile food-vending vehicles (lunch trucks) operating at worksites in Alberta. Further investigation implicated one catering company that supplied items for the lunch trucks and other vendors. In 85 cases, patients reported consumption of food prepared by the catering company in the 7 days before illness. Six patients were employees of the catering company, and two food samples collected from the catering company were positive for SE. Foods likely were contaminated directly or indirectly through the use of illegally sourced, SE-contaminated eggs at the implicated catering facility and by catering employees who were infected with SE. Public health interventions put into place to control the outbreak included screening employees for Salmonella, excluding those infected from food-handling duties, and training employees in safe food-handling procedures. No further outbreak cases were identified after full implementation of the interventions. This investigation highlights the potential for lunch trucks to be a source of foodborne illness and the need for robust regulatory compliance monitoring of lunch trucks and their food suppliers.

  6. A study of Salmonella Spp. contamination in egg of ducks and turkeys, consumed in Fars province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali Ghorbani ranjbary

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Salmonella is a short rod shape, gram-negative, non-encapsulated, aerobic and anaerobic options that cause food poisoning in humans. Raw food of animal origin, particularly meat and eggs of birds have important role in the transfer of this disease. Since duck and turkey eggs are very important in the transmission of Salmonellosis and consuming of local and non-industrial eggs of ducks and turkeys in this area is common, the present study was performed to clarify the prevalence of salmonella contamination. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 300 native duck and turkey eggs were collected and transferred to the lab. In laboratory after sampling from surface of the eggs shell were disinfected with 80% ethanol and contents of 5 duck and turkey eggs, sparately mixed in special dishes. After 24 hr incubation at 37°C with a swab in selenite - F broth were inoculated. Samples were transferred to Salmonella - Shigella agar from selenite-f environment. After incubation in 37°C, colonies suspected to Salmonella were evaluated. Suspicious colonies in the TSI and lysine decarboxylase environments were inoculated. And bacteria that had reactions related to Salmonella, were studied by PCR with specific primers for Salmonella and serotypes of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Results: A total of 300 eggs of ducks and turkeys ,7 cases (2.3% were contaminated with Salmonella, and from 7 unclean egg s shell , 1 case of turkey egg shell (0.66% was infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. And 6 duck eggs shell (4% were infected, that all of the serotypes were Salmonella Typhimurium. Conclusion: Regarding the present study, and other researches, it can be concluded that the Salmonella infection in the duck and turkey eggs were less than poultry eggs and it seems that vertical transmission of Salmonella in the turkeys and ducks was less than poultry.

  7. High occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Salmonella in broiler carcasses from poultry slaughterhouses in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Jung, Hae-In; Kuk, Min; Kim, Young-Ji; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne Salmonella has become a major public health problem. Consumption of undercooked poultry contaminated with Salmonella can induce food poisoning in humans. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and antibiotic resistance patterns of Salmonella spp. isolated from 120 chicken carcasses produced in 6 poultry slaughterhouses in South Korea. A total of 11 samples (9.2%) were found contaminated with Salmonella: 5 isolates were serotyped as Salmonella Bellevue strain (slaughterhouse C) and 6 isolates were serotyped as Salmonella Enteritidis strain (slaughterhouse E). Salmonella Bellevue isolates were resistant to five antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole), while Salmonella Enteritidis isolates were resistant to nine antibiotics (ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefazolin, cephalothin, amikacin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and tetracycline). All cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis isolates exhibited the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype and carried the gene encoding CTX-M-15, the most prevalent ESBL enzyme worldwide. Based on molecular subtyping performed using the automated rep-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system (DiversiLab), the isolates showing ≥ 95 similarity in their rep-PCR banding patterns were classified into 5 pulsotypes. Given that cephalosporins are the drugs of choice for invasive Salmonella infections, the high incidence of ESBL-producing strains in chicken should emphasize the necessity of regular monitoring of the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant ESBL-positive Salmonella strains in poultry meat.

  8. Pathogenicity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from Egg Shells and the Layer Farm Environment in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Andrea R.; Davos, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, the egg industry is periodically implicated during outbreaks of Salmonella food poisoning. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and other nontyphoidal Salmonella spp., in particular, are a major concern for Australian public health. Several definitive types of Salmonella Typhimurium strains, but primarily Salmonella Typhimurium definitive type 9 (DT9), have been frequently reported during egg-related food poisoning outbreaks in Australia. The aim of the present study was to generate a pathogenicity profile of nontyphoidal Salmonella isolates obtained from Australian egg farms. To achieve this, we assessed the capacity of Salmonella isolates to cause gastrointestinal disease using both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Data from in vitro experiments demonstrated that the invasion capacity of Salmonella serovars cultured to stationary phase (liquid phase) in LB medium was between 90- and 300-fold higher than bacterial suspensions in normal saline (cultured in solid phase). During the in vivo infection trial, clinical signs of infection and mortality were observed only for mice infected with either 103 or 105 CFU of S. Typhimurium DT9. No mortality was observed for mice infected with Salmonella serovars with medium or low invasive capacity in Caco-2 cells. Pathogenicity gene profiles were also generated for all serovars included in this study. The majority of serovars tested were positive for selected virulence genes. No relationship between the presence or absence of virulence genes by PCR and either in vitro invasive capacity or in vivo pathogenicity was detected. Our data expand the knowledge of strain-to-strain variation in the pathogenicity of Australian egg industry-related Salmonella spp. PMID:25362057

  9. Pathogenicity of Salmonella strains isolated from egg shells and the layer farm environment in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Andrea R; Davos, Dianne; Chousalkar, K K

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, the egg industry is periodically implicated during outbreaks of Salmonella food poisoning. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and other nontyphoidal Salmonella spp., in particular, are a major concern for Australian public health. Several definitive types of Salmonella Typhimurium strains, but primarily Salmonella Typhimurium definitive type 9 (DT9), have been frequently reported during egg-related food poisoning outbreaks in Australia. The aim of the present study was to generate a pathogenicity profile of nontyphoidal Salmonella isolates obtained from Australian egg farms. To achieve this, we assessed the capacity of Salmonella isolates to cause gastrointestinal disease using both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Data from in vitro experiments demonstrated that the invasion capacity of Salmonella serovars cultured to stationary phase (liquid phase) in LB medium was between 90- and 300-fold higher than bacterial suspensions in normal saline (cultured in solid phase). During the in vivo infection trial, clinical signs of infection and mortality were observed only for mice infected with either 10(3) or 10(5) CFU of S. Typhimurium DT9. No mortality was observed for mice infected with Salmonella serovars with medium or low invasive capacity in Caco-2 cells. Pathogenicity gene profiles were also generated for all serovars included in this study. The majority of serovars tested were positive for selected virulence genes. No relationship between the presence or absence of virulence genes by PCR and either in vitro invasive capacity or in vivo pathogenicity was detected. Our data expand the knowledge of strain-to-strain variation in the pathogenicity of Australian egg industry-related Salmonella spp. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Incidence of Nontyphoidal Salmonella in Food-Producing Animals, Animal Feed, and the Associated Environment in South Africa, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwedere, Kudakwashe; Rauff, Dionne; De Klerk, Grietjie; Keddy, Karen H; Dziva, Francis

    2015-11-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellosis continues to pose a global threat to human health, primarily by causing food-borne illnesses, and food-producing animals are the principal reservoirs of many pathogenic serovars. To identify key control points and generate information that may enable future estimation of the transmission routes between the environment, animals, and humans, we examined data on Salmonella isolates in South Africa. Samples were obtained from livestock and poultry on farms, meat at abattoirs, raw materials at feed mills, animal feed, and environmental sources (eg, poultry houses, abattoirs, feed mills, water) from 2012 to 2014 in compliance with each establishment's protocols conforming to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) (ISO/TS 17728, ISO 18593:2004 and ISO 17604:2003) standards. Isolation and serotyping of Salmonella were performed according to the scope of accreditation of the respective laboratories conforming to ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard techniques. Salmonella was isolated from 9031 of 180 298 (5.0%) samples, and these isolates were distributed among 188 different serovars. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most frequent isolate, with 1944 of 180 298 (21.5%) originating from poultry on farms, poultry meat, and poultry houses, followed by Salmonella Havana, with 677 of 180 298 (7.5%), mostly from environmental samples. Serovars that are uncommonly associated with human disease (Salmonella Idikan, Salmonella Salford, and Salmonella Brancaster) were isolated at higher frequencies than Salmonella Typhimurium, a common cause of human illness. Environmental samples accounted for 3869 of 9031 (42.8%) samples positive for Salmonella. We describe the frequent isolation of Salmonella of a wide variety of serovars, from an array of animal feeds, food animals, and food animal environment. As prevention of human salmonellosis requires the effective control of Salmonella in food animals, these data can be used to facilitate Salmonella control in

  11. Interaction between Food-borne Pathogens (Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes) and a Common Soil Flagellate (Cercomonas sp.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Wolff, Anders; Madsen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    understood. In this study, we investigated the interactions between a common soil flagellate, Cercomonas sp., and three different bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes). Rapid growth of flagellates was observed in co-culture with C. jejuni and S....... The results of this study suggest that Cercomonas sp. and perhaps other soil flagellates may play a role for the survival of food-borne pathogens on plant surfaces and in soil....

  12. Salmonella survival and differential expression of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated genes in a low-water-activity food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Golden, D A; Critzer, F J

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in expression of fatty acid biosynthesis genes and survival of different serotypes of Salmonella when incubated in a low-water-activity (aw ) food over a 14-day period. Stationary cells of five strains of Salmonella enterica belonging to 3 different serovars (Typhimurium ATCC 2486, Enteritidis H4267, Tennessee ARI-33, Tennessee S13952 and Tennessee K4643) were inoculated into granular sugar (aW   = 0·50) and held aerobically over a 14-day period at 25°C. Survival was determined by enumerating colonies on TSA and XLT-4 plates at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days. Correspondingly, gene expression was evaluated for three selected genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and modification (fabA, fabD and cfa). After 14 days of incubation, the population was reduced from 2·29 to 3·36 log for all five strains. Salmonella Tennessee ARI-33 and Salm. Tennessee K4643 displayed greater survival than Salm. Typhimurium and Salm. Enteritidis. The increased expression of the cfa gene (involved in cyclopropane fatty acid biosynthesis) over 14 days was found associated with strains with a lower survival rate. The fabA gene (involved in unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis) was observed up-regulated for all strains for at least one sampling time and for Salm. Tennessee ARI-33 for all time points tested, suggesting its potential role in enhancing Salmonella survival in low aw foods. Numerous outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with low-water-activity foods have been reported. Therefore, the adaptive mechanisms utilized by Salmonella to survive in low-water-activity foods for prolonged periods of time need to be better understood. The results in this study showed that low-water-activity environments increase expression of gene fabA, which is involved in unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis of Salmonella, while the increased expression of cfa, associated with cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis, was associated with decreased

  13. Optimization of the reactional medium and a food impact study for a colorimetric in situ Salmonella spp. detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junillon, Thomas; Mosticon, David; Mallen, Benoît; Baril, Florent; Morand, Lucie; Michel, Déborah; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-02

    Foodborne pathogens are still a major concern for public health authorities. In this paper, we describe the optimization of a previously reported method which combines a highly specific capture of targeted food pathogens with an intracellular staining method. The reaction medium was optimized to simultaneously allow specific enrichment of Salmonella and maximize the staining of the target pathogen. This in situ colorimetric concept was evaluated with a broad range of food samples artificially contaminated with low levels of stressed Salmonella to mimic natural contamination conditions. This direct detection method compared favorably to a commercially available immunoassay system (Vidas® UP Salmonella), for cooked meat, dry milk powder and egg products. Globally 88% agreement was obtained between the two methods with a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 100% for the tested method. Main discordances were obtained with food matrices having high levels of competitive Gram negative microflora. These observations show that the design of an adapted culture medium is necessary to enhance the specific in situ capture and revelation system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Attachment behaviour of Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella Typhimurium P6 on food contact surfaces for food transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abban, Stephen; Jakobsen, Mogens; Jespersen, Lene

    2012-09-01

    The role of cargo container lining materials aluminium, a fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) and stainless steel in bacterial cross contamination during transport was assessed. For this, attachment and detachment of Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella Typhimurium P6 on the three surfaces in the absence or presence of residues were evaluated. Observations were correlated with water contact angles of the materials (hydrophobicity) and roughness profile (R(a)). Attachment of the organisms was negatively correlated to the hydrophobicity of the three materials with r = -0.869 and -0.861 for E. coli K12 and S. Typhimurium P6 respectively. Correlation with roughness average was poor; r = -0.425 and -0.413 respectively for E. coli K12 and S. Typhimurium P6. Presence of residue caused significant reduction (p food residue and soils affect the extent and amount of bacteria attaching to abiotic surfaces by altering the surface contact properties for the bacteria. Physicochemical properties like hydrophobicity appear to be a better basis for material selection for hygienic design of containers, than the traditional use of R(a). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clenbuterol residues in non-liver containing meat as a cause of collective food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporano, V; Grasso, L; Esposito, M; Oliviero, G; Brambilla, G; Loizzo, A

    1998-06-01

    beta 2-adrenergic agonists, particularly clenbuterol, are illegally used as growth promoters to obtain lean in meat. Their administration in feedlots can constitute a severe risk for animal welfare and exposes consumers to involuntary drug consumption at pharmacological active concentrations. Reported poisoning episodes have been associated with the consumption of beef liver where clenbuterol residues concentrate. In August 1996, 62 persons asked for medical help at the emergency rooms of 2 hospitals near the city of Caserta (Italy). Their clinical profile was characteristic of previously occurring clenbuterol intoxication, which reported superventricular extrasystoles and atrial fibrillation. All patients had non-liver beef meat consumption 10-30 min to 2-3 h before symptoms developed. An ELISA screening test specific for clenbuterol confirmed the drug's presence. Definitive confirmation of clenbuterol and determination of the drug content in meat samples were obtained by GC-MS, using 2 different derivatization. Concentrations in the meats ranged from 0.8 to 7.4 mg/kg. These analytical data provided evidence of the seriousness of the poisoning and helped the National Health System identify other possible misinterpreted cases. This case demonstrates that clenbuterol poisoning can also occur after consumption of beef meat other than liver.

  16. Evaluation of VIDAS UP Salmonella (SPT) assay for the detection of Salmonella in a variety of foods and environmental samples: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Patrick; Fisher, Kiel; Boyle, Megan; Huffman, Travis; Juenger, Marc; Benzinger, M Joseph; Bedinghaus, Paige; Flannery, Jonathan; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Johnson, Ronald L

    2013-01-01

    The VIDAS UP Salmonella (SPT) uses recombinant phage proteins to detect Salmonella species in human and animal food products and production environmental samples after 18-26 h of enrichment. The VIDAS SPT assay is performed with the automated VIDAS or mini-VIDAS instruments. The VIDAS SPT method was compared in a multilaboratory collaborative study to the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service-Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (USDA/FSIS-MLG) 4.05 (2011) Isolation and Identification of Salmonella from Meat, Poultry, Pasteurized Egg and Catfish Products reference method following the current AOAC guidelines. A total of 15 laboratories representing government, academia, and industry throughout the United States participated. One matrix, raw ground beef, was analyzed using two different test portion sizes, 25 and 375 g. Each test portion was artificially contaminated with Salmonella at three inoculation levels, an uninoculated control level (0 CFU/test portion), a low inoculum level (0.2-2 CFUltest portion), and a high inoculum level (2-5 CFU/test portion). In this study, 1656 unpaired replicate samples were analyzed. Of those unpaired replicates, 476 were presumptive positive by the VIDAS method, with 475 confirmed positive by the traditional confirmation procedures and 476 confirmed positive by an alternative confirmation procedure. There were 411 confirmed positive replicates by the USDA/FSIS-MLG reference method. Statistical analysis was conducted according to the probability of detection (POD). For the low-level 375 g test portions, the following dLPOD values, with 95% confidence intervals, were obtained: 0.01 (-0.12, +0.15) for samples confirmed following the traditional confirmation; 0.02 (-0.18, +0.2) for samples confirmed following traditional confirmation on IBISA and ASAP; and 0.03 (-0.18, +0.24) for samples confirmed following the alternative confirmation on IBISA and ASAP. For the low-level 25 g test portions, the following d

  17. EU Interlaboratory comparison study Food-I Bacteriological detection of Salmonella in minced beef

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers AFA; Veenman C; van de Kassteele J; Mooijman KA; LZO

    2007-01-01

    De Europese Nationale Referentie Laboratoria (NRLs) voor Salmonella hebben in een ringonderzoek hoge en lage concentraties Salmonella aangetoond in rundergehakt. Hiermee hebben ze laten zien dat ze voldoen aan de gestelde eisen. De Modified Semi-solid Rappaport Vassiliadis (MSRV), een

  18. Evaluation of the 3M™ Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) 2 - Salmonella for the Detection of Salmonella spp. in Select Foods and Environmental Surfaces: Collaborative Study, First Action 2016.01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Patrick; Flannery, Jonathan; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James R; Goins, David; Monteroso, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    The 3M™ Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) 2 - Salmonella uses real-time isothermal technology for the rapid and accurate detection of Salmonella spp. from enriched select food, feed, and food-process environmental samples. The 3M MDA 2 - Salmonella was evaluated in a multilaboratory collaborative study using an unpaired study design. The 3M MDA 2 - Salmonella was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual Chapter 5 reference method for the detection of Salmonella in creamy peanut butter, and to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook Chapter 4.08 reference method "Isolation and Identification of Salmonella from Meat, Poultry, Pasteurized Egg and Catfish Products and Carcass and Environmental Samples" for the detection of Salmonella in raw ground beef (73% lean). Technicians from 16 laboratories located within the continental United States participated. Each matrix was evaluated at three levels of contamination: an uninoculated control level (0 CFU/test portion), a low inoculum level (0.2-2 CFU/test portion), and a high inoculum level (2-5 CFU/test portion). Statistical analysis was conducted according to the probability of detection (POD) statistical model. Results obtained for the low inoculum level test portions produced difference in collaborator POD values of 0.03 (95% confidence interval, -0.10 to 0.16) for raw ground beef and 0.06 (95% confidence interval, -0.06 to 0.18) for creamy peanut butter, indicating no statistically significant difference between the candidate and reference methods.

  19. Multidrug Resistant Salmonella typhi in Asymptomatic Typhoid Carriers among Food Handlers in Namakkal District, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar B

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to screen Salmonella typhi in asymptomatic typhoid carriers and to find out drug resistance and ability of the strains to transmit drug resistance to other bacteria. Methods: Cultural characters, biochemical tests, antibiotic sensitivity test (disc diffusion, agarose gel electrophoresis, and conjugation protocols were done. Thirty five stool samples were collected from the suspected food handlers for the study. Results: Among 35 samples, (17.14% yielded a positive result. Out of these 4 (20.0% were women and 2 (13.33% were men. The isolates were tested with a number of conventional antibiotics viz, amikacin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, co-trimaxazole, rifampicin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, ofloxacin and tetracycline. Five isolates were having the multidrug resistant character. Four (66.66% multidrug resistant isolates were found to have plasmids, while one (16.66% multidrug resistant isolate had no plasmid and the chromosome encoded the resistance. Only one strain (16.66% showed single antibiotic resistance in the study and had no plasmid DNA. The molecular weights of the plasmids were determined and found to be 120 kb.The mechanism of spreading of drug resistance through conjugation process was analyzed. In the conjugation studies, the isolates having R+ factor showed the transfer of drug resistance through conjugation, which was determined by the development of antibiotic resistance in the recipients. Conclusion: This study shows that drug resistant strains are able to transfer genes encoding drug resistance.

  20. Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak associated with a contaminated food container in a school in Sichuan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L G; Zhou, X Y; Lan, Z; Li, L; Li, Z; Chen, W; Wang, J Y; Zhang, L J

    2016-01-01

    On 13 June 2013, a fever and diarrhoea outbreak occurred in a boarding school in Sichuan Province. We conducted a field investigation and compared food exposure of 81 case students and 104 control students (years 7 and 8) in order to identify the source of infection. There were 401 cases identified (399 students and two cooks). The attack rates were 23-46% in nursery, primary, and secondary schools, but 0% in the high school. Eighty-five percent of case students, consumed cowpea salad compared to 60% of control students at lunch on 12 June (odds ratio 3·1, 95% confidence interval 1·3-7·8). The cowpeas were stored at room temperature for 3 h in a bucket previously used to store raw ingredients. The bucket was cleaned using water without a disinfectant. There were two buckets of cowpea, one for the high-school students and another for the other students. This Salmonella outbreak was likely caused by the cowpea salad due to cross-contamination via a storage bucket.

  1. MLVA polymorphism of Salmonella enterica subspecies isolated from humans, animals, and food in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarthou Jean

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella (S. enterica is the main cause of salmonellosis in humans and animals. The epidemiology of this infection involves large geographical distances, and strains related to an episode of salmonellosis therefore need to be reliably discriminated. Due to the limitations of serotyping, molecular genotyping methods have been developed, including multiple loci variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR analysis (MLVA. In our study, 11 variable number tandem-repeats markers were selected from the S. enterica Typhimurium LT2 genome to evaluate the genetic diversity of 206 S. enterica strains collected in Cambodia between 2001 and 2007. Findings Thirty one serovars were identified from three sources: humans, animals and food. The markers were able to discriminate all strains from 2 to 17 alleles. Using the genotype phylogeny repartition, MLVA distinguished 107 genotypes clustered into two main groups: S. enterica Typhi and other serovars. Four serovars (Derby, Schwarzengrund, Stanley, and Weltevreden were dispersed in 2 to 5 phylogenic branches. Allelic variations within S. enterica serovars was represented using the minimum spanning tree. For several genotypes, we identified clonal complexes within the serovars. This finding supports the notion of endemo-epidemic diffusion within animals, food, or humans. Furthermore, a clonal transmission from one source to another was reported. Four markers (STTR3, STTR5, STTR8, and Sal20 presented a high diversity index (DI > 0.80. Conclusions In summary, MLVA can be used in the typing and genetic profiling of a large diversity of S. enterica serovars, as well as determining the epidemiological relationships of the strains with the geography of the area.

  2. Highly resistant Salmonella Newport-MDRAmpC transmitted through the domestic US food supply: a FoodNet case-control study of sporadic Salmonella Newport infections, 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Jay K; Marcus, Ruthanne; Stenzel, Sara A; Hanna, Samir S; Gettner, Sharmeen; Anderson, Bridget J; Hayes, Tameka; Shiferaw, Beletshachew; Crume, Tessa L; Joyce, Kevin; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Voetsch, Andrew C; Angulo, Frederick J

    2006-07-15

    A new multidrug-resistant (MDR) strain of Salmonella serotype Newport, Newport-MDRAmpC, has recently emerged. We sought to identify the medical, behavioral, and dietary risk factors for laboratory-confirmed Salmonella Newport infection, including that with Newport-MDRAmpC. A 12-month population-based case-control study was conducted during 2002-2003 in 8 sites of the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), with 215 case patients with Salmonella Newport infection and 1154 healthy community control subjects. Case patients with Newport-MDRAmpC infection were more likely than control subjects to have taken an antimicrobial agent to which Newport-MDRAmpC is resistant during the 28 days before the onset of diarrheal illness (odds ratio [OR], 5.0 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.6-16]). Case patients with Newport-MDRAmpC infection were also more likely to have eaten uncooked ground beef (OR, 7.8 [95% CI, 1.4-44]) or runny scrambled eggs or omelets prepared in the home (OR, 4.9 [95% CI, 1.3-19]) during the 5 days before the onset of illness. International travel was not a risk factor for Newport-MDRAmpC infection but was a strong risk factor for pansusceptible Salmonella Newport infection (OR, 7.1 [95% CI, 2.0-24]). Case patients with pansusceptible infection were also more likely to have a frog or lizard in their household (OR, 2.9 [95% CI, 1.1-7.7]). Newport-MDRAmpC infection is acquired through the US food supply, most likely from bovine and, perhaps, poultry sources, particularly among persons already taking antimicrobial agents.

  3. Salmonella Enteritidis in meat, poultry, and pasteurized egg products regulated by the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service, 1998 through 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patricia L; Naugle, Alecia L; Jackson, Charlene R; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Rose, Bonnie E; Pritchard, Katrine M; Levine, Priscilla; Saini, Parmesh K; Schroeder, Carl M; Dreyfuss, Moshe S; Tan, Regina; Holt, Kristin G; Harman, Jane; Buchanan, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    The U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) tests for Salmonella in meat, poultry, and egg products through three regulatory testing programs: the Pathogen Reduction-Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (PR-HACCP) program, the ready-to-eat program for meat and poultry products, and the pasteurized egg products program. From 1998 through 2003, 293,938 samples collected for these testing programs were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella enterica serotypes. Of these samples, 12,699 (4.3%) were positive for Salmonella, and 167 (1.3%) of the positive samples (0.06% of all samples) contained Salmonella Enteritidis. The highest incidence of Salmonella Enteritidis was observed in ground chicken PR-HACCP samples (8 of 1,722 samples, 0.46%), and the lowest was found in steer-heifer PR-HACCP samples (0 of 12,835 samples). Salmonella Enteritidis isolates were characterized by phage type, pulsed-field gel electrophoretic pattern, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Phage typing of 94 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates identified PT13 (39 isolates) and PT8 (36 isolates) as the most common types. One isolate from a ready-to-eat ham product was characterized as PT4. Electrophoretic analysis of 148 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates indicated genetic diversity among the isolates, with 28 unique XbaI electrophoretic patterns identified. Of these 148 isolates, 136 (92%) were susceptible to each of 16 antimicrobials tested. Two isolates were resistant to ampicillin alone, and 10 isolates were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. Isolation of Salmonella Enteritidis from FSIS-regulated products emphasizes the need for continued consumer education on proper food handling and cooking practices and continued work to decrease the prevalence of Salmonella in meat, poultry, and pasteurized egg products.

  4. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from food and human samples by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance, plasmid profiling, (GTG5-PCR and ERIC-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fardsanei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of human salmonellosis in many countries. The major objective of this study was to investigate genetic diversity among Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different origins (food and human by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC -PCR, as well as to assess their plasmid profiling and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 30 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, 15 from food samples (chicken, lamb, beef and duck meats and 15 from clinical samples were collected in Tehran. Identification of isolates as Salmonella was confirmed by using conventional standard biochemical and serological tests. Multiplex-PCR was used for serotyping of isolates to identify Salmonella Enteritidis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 16 agents founds drug resistance patterns among Salmonella Enteritidis isolates. No resistance was observed to cephalexin, ceftriaxone, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem or meropenem, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. The highest resistance (96.7% was observed to nitrofurantoin. Seven plasmid profiles (P1–P7 were detected, and a 68-kb plasmid was found in all isolates. Two different primers; ERIC and (GTG5 were used for genotyping, which each produced four profiles. The majority of clinical and food isolates fell into two separate common types (CTs with a similar percentage of 95% by ERIC-PCR. Using primer (GTG5, 29 isolates incorporated in three CTs with 70% of isolates showing a single banding pattern. Limited genetic diversity among human and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis may indicate that contaminated foods were possibly the source of human salmonellosis. These results confirmed that ERIC-PCR genotyping has limited discriminatory power for Salmonella Enteritidis of different origin.

  5. Advanced high-power pulsed light device to decontaminate food from pathogens: effects on Salmonella typhimurium viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksiene, Z; Gudelis, V; Buchovec, I; Raudeliuniene, J

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an advanced high-power pulsed light device for decontamination of food matrix and to evaluate its antibacterial efficiency. Key parameters of constructed device-emitted light spectrum, pulse duration, pulse power density, frequency of pulses, dependence of emitted spectrum on input voltage, irradiation homogenicity, possible thermal effects as well as antimicrobial efficiency were evaluated. Antimicrobial efficiency of high-power pulsed light technique was demonstrated and evaluated by two independent methods - spread plate and Miles-Misra method. Viability of Salmonella typhimurium as function of a given light dose (number of pulses) and pulse frequency was examined. According to the data obtained, viability of Salmonella typhimurium reduced by 7 log order after 100 light pulses with power density 133 W cm(-2). In addition, data indicate, that the pulse frequency did not influence the outcome of pathogen inactivation in the region 1-5 Hz. Moreover, no hyperthermic effect was detected during irradiation even after 500 pulses on all shelves with different distance from light source and subsequently different pulse power density (0-252 W cm(-2)). Newly constructed high-power pulsed light technique is effective nonthermal tool for inactivation of Salmonella typhimurium even by 7 log order in vitro. Novel advanced high-power pulsed light device can be a useful tool for development of nonthermal food decontamination technologies.

  6. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  7. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil eChousalkar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonise reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonise the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% Typhimurium, 14.1% Mbandaka compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66% however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of

  8. [Seafood poisonings. Part II. Fish poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Mietka-Ciszowska, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Fish plays a significant role in human life, mainly as part of a balanced healthy diet and a good source of many of nutrients. However, contact with fish may be harmful or even life-threatening to man. Toxic effects, that fish exerts toward men (ichthyotoxism), result from envenomations by poison. ous fish equipped in venom apparatus (ichthyoacanthotoxism), direct contact with venom produced by skin glandules (ichthyocrinotoxism), or consuming fish containing toxins for nutritional purposes (ichthyosarcotoxism). In the present review, different fish-borne food poisonings are presented including their etiology, pathogenesis, symptomatology and treatment. In fact, the majority of fish poisonings are intoxications with toxins primary produced by bacteria, cyanobacteria and algae. These are consumed and accumulated in the food chain by herbivorous and predatory fish, that in turn may be a cause of poisonings in humans.

  9. Rapid detection of Salmonella in foods using a combination of SPRINT TM,MSRV TM and Salmonella Latex TestTM Detecção rápida de Salmonella em alimentos empregando uma combinação de SPRINT®, MSRV® e Salmonella Latex Test®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maria Lafayette Neves Gelinski

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for rapid detection of Salmonella in foods, based on the combination of SPRINT TM, MSRV TM and Salmonella Latex TestTM, was evaluated. SPRINT TM is a system to reduce the preenrichment and selective enrichment steps to 24 hours. MSRV TM is a semi-solid selective media for detection of motile Salmonella. Salmonella Latex TestTM is a rapid latex agglutination test for Salmonella. Using the three systems in combination, the total time for detection of Salmonella in a food sample is 48h. Evaluations were performed in artificially contaminated ready-to-eat baby-foods and raw Brazilian sausages (lingüiça containing no added microorganisms. The BAM conventional culture procedure was used as reference method. The study with baby foods indicated that the new procedure had good sensitivity (89% and specificity (100%, without cross-reactions with Enterobacteriaceae. However, when applied to naturally contaminated foods, the performance was poor: chi square (x² = 5.062, α> 0. 05 and Kappa-Cohen agreement (K = 0.171, p=0.089 indexes indicated that the differences between results given by the two procedures were significant and the correlation between them was low.Avaliou-se um novo procedimento para detecção rápida de Salmonella em alimentos, baseado na combinação entre SPRINT®, MSRV® e Salmonella Latex Test® . SPRINT® é um sistema para reduzir as etapas de pré-enriquecimento e enriquecimento seletivo para 24 h. MSRV® é um meio seletivo semi-sólido para detecção de salmonelas móveis. Salmonella Latex Test® é um teste rápido de aglutinação de látex. A combinação dos três sistemas permite que a detecção de Salmonella em alimentos possa ser feita em apenas 48 h. O procedimento foi avaliado em alimentos infantis prontos para consumo, experimentalmente contaminados com Salmonella exclusivamente e com uma mistura de Salmonella e várias espécies de Enterobacteriaceae e também em cem amostras de lingüiças de porco

  10. Overview of Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newspaper Paint (water color or water-based) Perfumes Petroleum jelly Plant food (household) Polyethylene glycols, such as ... reduces the severity of poisonings, particularly with acetaminophen , aspirin , or ibuprofen . The identifying marks printed on pills ...

  11. Bioelectronic Nose Using Odorant Binding Protein-Derived Peptide and Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor for the Assessment of Salmonella Contamination in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Manki; Kim, Daesan; Kang, Jinkyung; Lim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Ko, Hwi Jin; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Tai Hyun

    2016-12-06

    Salmonella infection is the one of the major causes of food borne illnesses including fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and nausea. Thus, early detection of Salmonella contamination is important for our healthy life. Conventional detection methods for the food contamination have limitations in sensitivity and rapidity; thus, the early detection has been difficult. Herein, we developed a bioelectronic nose using a carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) functionalized with Drosophila odorant binding protein (OBP)-derived peptide for easy and rapid detection of Salmonella contamination in ham. 3-Methyl-1-butanol is known as a specific volatile organic compound, generated from the ham contaminated with Salmonella. We designed and synthesized the peptide based on the sequence of the Drosophila OBP, LUSH, which specifically binds to alcohols. The C-terminus of the synthetic peptide was modified with three phenylalanine residues and directly immobilized onto CNT channels using the π-π interaction. The p-type properties of FET were clearly maintained after the functionalization using the peptide. The biosensor detected 1 fM of 3-methyl-1-butanol with high selectivity and successfully assessed Salmonella contamination in ham. These results indicate that the bioelectronic nose can be used for the rapid detection of Salmonella contamination in food.

  12. Occupational and dietary exposures of humans to cyanide poisoning from large-scale cassava processing and ingestion of cassava foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, P N; Okorowkwo, C O; Maduagwu, E N

    2002-07-01

    The biochemical and toxicological effects of occupational and dietary exposure of humans to cyanide poisoning from large-scale cassava processing and ingestion of cassava foods were investigated using spectrophotometric and enzymatic methods. Analysis of urinary and serum thiocyanate (cyanide metabolite) from workers in cassava processing industries, who were 'frequent' [those who eat cassava food(s) at least once a day] and 'infrequent' [those who eat cassava food(s) only occasionally] consumers of cassava-based diets, was carried out with the aid of questionnaries. The mean urinary thiocyanate level of the cassava processors (mean+/-S.D.; 153.50+/-25.21 micromo1/l) was 2.2 and 2.6 times higher than that of frequent (70.1+/-21.8 micromo1/l) and infrequent (mean+/-S.D.; 59.30+/-17.0 micromo1/l) cassava consumers, respectively. The mean serum thiocyanate levels rose to 126.73+/-12.4 micromo1/l for the former and 68.4+/-18.3 and 54.7+/-13.2 micromo1/l, respectively, for the latter. An increase in plasma activity by 10% above normal of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was observed in 40% of the cassava processors, whereas it was within normal range in all consumers. The activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALK.PHOS) were within the normal value in all cases studied. The blood glucose level of 50% of the cassava processors was 100 mg/ml or above while that of the consumers was in the range of 68-85 mg/100 ml. The total protein, serum albumin and creatinine levels were in the range for normal values for the processors and consumers. The health implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. [Investigation of pathogenic phenotypes and virulence determinants of food-borne Salmonella enterica strains in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Deniz; Şen, Ece

    2015-10-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars with the consumption of contaminated food, is one of the leading food-borne disease that makes microbial food safety an important public health issue. This study was performed in order to determine the antibiotic resistance, serotyping, plasmid profiles and pathogenicity potentials of food-borne Salmonella isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model system in Edirne province, located at Thrace region of Turkey. In this study, 32 Salmonella isolates, of which 26 belonged to Infantis, four to Enteritidis, one to Telaviv and one to Kentucky serovars, isolated from chicken carcasses were used. Antibiotic resistance profiles were determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. A new C.elegans nematode animal model system was used to determine the pathogenicity potential of the isolates. The antibiotic resistance profiles revealed that one (3.1%) isolate was resistant to gentamicin, two (6.2%) to ciprofloxacin, three (9.4%) to ampicillin, 18 (56.3%) to kanamycin, 19 (60.8%) to neomycin, 25 (78.1%) to tetracycline, 25 (78.1%) to trimethoprim, 26 (81.25%) to nalidixic acid, 27 (84.4%) to streptomycin and 32 (100%) to sulfonamide. All of the 32 strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and ampicillin/sulbactam. High levels of resistance to streptomycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim, sulfonamide, kanamycin and neomycin was determined. According to the plasmid analysis, six isolates (18.75%) harboured 1-3 plasmids with sizes between 1.2 and 42.4 kb. In C.elegans nematode animal model system, the time (in days) required to kill 50% (TD50) of nematodes was calculated for each experimental group. TD50 values of the nematode group fed with S.Typhimurium ATCC 14028 that was used as the positive control and another group fed with E.coli OP50 as the negative control were 4.2 ± 0.5 days and 8.0 ± 0.02 days, respectively. TD50 of the groups fed with Salmonella isolates ranged

  14. Development of a sensitive and specific qPCR assay in conjunction with propidium monoazide for enhanced detection of live Salmonella spp. in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Although a variety of methodologies are available for detection of Salmonella, sensitive, specific, and efficient methods are urgently needed for differentiation of live Salmonella cells from dead cells in food and environmental samples. Propidium monoazide (PMA) can preferentially penetrate the compromised membranes of dead cells and inhibit their DNA amplification, however, such inhibition has been reported to be incomplete by some studies. In the present study, we report an efficient qPCR assay targeting a conserved region of the invA gene of Salmonella in conjunction with PMA treatment for detection of DNA from live Salmonella cells in food samples. Results We investigated the relationship between amplicon length and inhibitory effect of PMA treatment to prevent DNA amplification from dead cells while allowing for DNA amplification from live cells, and found that the two factors are well correlated with each other. An amplicon that is 130 bp in length was determined to be optimal for PMA treatment and was selected for further PMA-qPCR assay development. A PMA-qPCR assay was established by utilizing this amplicon and adopting a modified PMA-treatment procedure. The PMA-qPCR assay provided excellent inhibition of DNA amplification from dead cells (a 17-CT-value, or 128,000-fold reduction) while only a slight DNA amplification difference (0.5 CT value) was noted between the PMA-treated and untreated live cells. This assay has been validated through stringent inclusivity and exclusivity studies using a large number of (n = 167) Salmonella, including all strains of SARA and SARB collections, and non-Salmonella strains (n = 36). This PMA-qPCR assay is capable of detecting live Salmonella cells in live/dead cell mixtures, or 30 CFU/g live Salmonella cells from enriched spiked spinach samples as early as 4 h. Conclusions A 130-bp amplicon in invA gene was demonstrated to be optimal for PMA treatment for selective detection of live Salmonella cells

  15. Buffer capacity of food components influences the acid tolerance response in Salmonella Typhimurium during simulated gastric passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Sidsel; Buschhardt, Tasja; Hansen, Tina Beck

    2014-01-01

    Food composition, buffer capacity, and fat and protein content have been shown to effect the gastric acid survival of pathogens (Waterman & Small 1998). In this study, simple food-model substances with different buffer capacities were investigated for their ability to support survival of stationary...... major stationary phase ATR regulators, we found an approx. four-fold increase in expression of ompR and an approx. three-fold increase of rpoS in saline and buffered saline, respectively, after 15 min of gastric acid challenge. The relative expression of these genes, were significantly lower in Brain...... Heart Infusion Broth having a higher buffer capacity. We suggest this to be associated with a varying ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to mount a stationary phase acid tolerance response (ATR) depending on the buffer capacity of the food vehicle....

  16. Next day Salmonella spp. detection method based on real-time PCR for meat, dairy and vegetable food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Gonzalez-García, Patricia; Delibato, Elisabetta; De Medici, Dario; García-Gimeno, Rosa Maria; Valero, Antonio; Hernandez, Marta

    2014-08-01

    The microbiological standard for detection of Salmonella relies on several cultural steps and requires more than 5 days for final confirmation, and as consequence there is a need for an alternative rapid methodology for its detection. The aim of this study was to compare different detection strategies based on real-time PCR for a rapid and sensitive detection in an ample range of food products: raw pork and poultry meat, ready to eat lettuce salad and raw sheep milk cured cheese. Three main parameters were evaluated to reduce the time and cost for final results: the initial sample size (25 and 50 g), the incubation times (6, 10 and 18 h) and the bacterial DNA extraction (simple boiling of the culture after washing the bacterial pellet, the use of the Chelex resin, and a commercial silica column). The results obtained demonstrate that a combination of an incubation in buffered peptone water for 18 h of a 25 g-sample coupled to a DNA extraction by boiling and a real-time PCR assay detected down to 2-4 Salmonella spp.CFU per sample in less than 21 h in different types of food products. This RTi-PCR-based method is fully compatible with the ISO standard, providing results more rapidly and cost-effectively. The results were confirmed in a large number of naturally contaminated food samples with at least the same analytical performance as the reference method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Extreme Heat Resistance of Food Borne Pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium on Chicken Breast Fillet during Cooking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Aarieke E I; van Asselt, Esther D; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the decimal reduction times of bacteria present on chicken fillet in boiling water. The experiments were conducted with Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli. Whole chicken breast fillets were inoculated with the pathogens, stored overnight...... cooking enlarged the heat resistance of the food borne pathogens. Additionally, a high challenge temperature or fast heating rate contributed to the level of heat resistance. The data were used to assess the probability of illness (campylobacteriosis) due to consumption of chicken fillet as a function...

  18. PREVALENCE OF DRUG RESISTANCE AND VIRULENCE FEATURES IN Salmonella spp. ISOLATED FROM FOODS ASSOCIATED OR NOT WITH SALMONELLOSIS IN BRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Ruth Estela Gravato; Ristori, Christiane Asturiano; Ikuno, Alice A.; Barbosa, Maria Luisa; Jakabi, Miyoko; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is the most common etiological agent of cases and outbreaks of foodborne diarrheal illnesses. The emergence and spread of Salmonella spp., which has become multi-drug resistant and potentially more pathogenic, have increased the concern with this pathogen. In this study, 237 Salmonella spp., associated or not with foodborne salmonellosis in Brazil, belonging mainly to serotype Enteritidis, were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and the presence of the virulence genes spvC, invA, sefA and pefA. Of the isolates, 46.8% were sensitive to all antimicrobials and 51.9% were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent was observed in 10.5% of the strains. The highest rates of resistance were observed for streptomycin (35.9%) and nalidixic acid (16.9%). No strain was resistant to cefoxitin, cephalothin, cefotaxime, amikacin, ciprofloxacin and imipenem. The invA gene was detected in all strains. Genes spvC and pefA were found in 48.1% and 44.3% of strains, respectively. The gene sefA was detected in 31.6% of the strains and only among S. Enteritidis. Resistance and virulence determinants were detected in Salmonella strains belonging to several serotypes. The high rates of antibiotic-resistance in strains isolated from poultry products demonstrate the potential risk associated with the consumption of these products and the need to ensure good food hygiene practices from farm to table to reduce the spread of pathogens relevant to public health. PMID:25351537

  19. PREVALENCE OF DRUG RESISTANCE AND VIRULENCE FEATURES IN Salmonella spp. ISOLATED FROM FOODS ASSOCIATED OR NOT WITH SALMONELLOSIS IN BRAZIL

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    Ruth Estela Gravato Rowlands

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella is the most common etiological agent of cases and outbreaks of foodborne diarrheal illnesses. The emergence and spread of Salmonella spp., which has become multi-drug resistant and potentially more pathogenic, have increased the concern with this pathogen. In this study, 237 Salmonella spp., associated or not with foodborne salmonellosis in Brazil, belonging mainly to serotype Enteritidis, were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and the presence of the virulence genes spvC, invA, sefA and pefA. Of the isolates, 46.8% were sensitive to all antimicrobials and 51.9% were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent was observed in 10.5% of the strains. The highest rates of resistance were observed for streptomycin (35.9% and nalidixic acid (16.9%. No strain was resistant to cefoxitin, cephalothin, cefotaxime, amikacin, ciprofloxacin and imipenem. The invA gene was detected in all strains. Genes spvC and pefA were found in 48.1% and 44.3% of strains, respectively. The gene sefA was detected in 31.6% of the strains and only among S. Enteritidis. Resistance and virulence determinants were detected in Salmonella strains belonging to several serotypes. The high rates of antibiotic-resistance in strains isolated from poultry products demonstrate the potential risk associated with the consumption of these products and the need to ensure good food hygiene practices from farm to table to reduce the spread of pathogens relevant to public health.

  20. Harmonised monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter isolates from food animals in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Many Member States of the European Union (EU) currently monitor antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic agents, including Salmonella and Campylobacter. According to Directive 2003/99/EC, Member States shall ensure that the monitoring provides comparable data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance. The European Commission asked the European Food Safety Authority to prepare detailed specifications for harmonised schemes for monitoring antimicrobial resistance. The objective of these specifications is to lay down provisions for a monitoring and reporting scheme for Salmonella in fowl (Gallus gallus), turkeys and pigs, and for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in broiler chickens. The current specifications are considered to be a first step towards a gradual implementation of comprehensive antimicrobial resistance monitoring at the EU level. These specifications propose to test a common set of antimicrobial agents against available cut-off values and a specified concentration range to determine the susceptibility of Salmonella and Campylobacter. Using isolates collected through programmes in which the sampling frame covers all epidemiological units of the national production, the target number of Salmonella isolates to be included in the antimicrobial resistance monitoring per Member State per year is 170 for each study population (i.e., laying hens, broilers, turkeys and slaughter pigs). The target number of Campylobacter isolates to be included in the antimicrobial resistance monitoring per Member State per year is 170 for each study population (i.e., broilers). The results of the antimicrobial resistance monitoring are assessed and reported in the yearly national report on trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Availability, brands, labelling and Salmonella contamination of raw pet food in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, S; Churchill, J; Olsen, K E; Bender, J B

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to characterize the commercially available raw meat pet food diets in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area by (i) determining the number and types of available diets; (ii) assessing pet food stores and brand labels for the provision of precautionary statements regarding the risk of foodborne illness from raw meat; (ii) assessing the labels for Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) required content and nutrient-related information; and (iv) culturing purchased diets for the presence of Salmonella. Sixty raw meat diets were purchased, representing 11 different brands from eight different stores. Diets were readily available in the form of raw-frozen, dehydrated or freeze-dried varieties from different protein sources, such as lamb, beef, chicken or duck. All stores promoted raw meat diets; however, none provided foodborne illness warnings. Brands varied greatly in their precautionary statements; none of the diets underwent feeding trials; and nutritional adequacy substantiation was through formulation only. The first five ingredients tended to consist of meat, organ meat (by-products), vegetables, grains and ground bones. Currently, it is required that pet foods have an AAFCO nutritional adequacy statement and provide a guaranteed analysis table. Three brands did not meet these FDA requirements. Thirty-one (51.7%) of the 60 raw meat diets underwent some degree of processing including dehydration, freeze-drying or high-pressure pasteurization. Four of the 60 raw diets (7%) tested positive for Salmonella. Analysis of raw meat pet food labels indicated a lack of foodborne illness warnings. Based on these findings, we recommend that warning statements similar to those required by the United States Department of Agriculture and placed on labels of raw meat intended for human consumption be provided on the labels of raw meat pet food diets. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. A novel small acid soluble protein variant is important for spore resistance of most Clostridium perfringens food poisoning isolates.

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    Jihong Li

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is a major cause of food poisoning (FP in developed countries. C. perfringens isolates usually induce the gastrointestinal symptoms of this FP by producing an enterotoxin that is encoded by a chromosomal (cpe gene. Those typical FP strains also produce spores that are extremely resistant to food preservation approaches such as heating and chemical preservatives. This resistance favors their survival and subsequent germination in improperly cooked, prepared, or stored foods. The current study identified a novel alpha/beta-type small acid soluble protein, now named Ssp4, and showed that sporulating cultures of FP isolates producing resistant spores consistently express a variant Ssp4 with an Asp substitution at residue 36. In contrast, Gly was detected at Ssp4 residue 36 in C. perfringens strains producing sensitive spores. Studies with isogenic mutants and complementing strains demonstrated the importance of the Asp 36 Ssp4 variant for the exceptional heat and sodium nitrite resistance of spores made by most FP strains carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNA binding studies showed that Ssp4 variants with an Asp at residue 36 bind more efficiently and tightly to DNA than do Ssp4 variants with Gly at residue 36. Besides suggesting one possible mechanistic explanation for the highly resistant spore phenotype of most FP strains carrying a chromosomal cpe gene, these findings may facilitate eventual development of targeted strategies to increase killing of the resistant spores in foods. They also provide the first indication that SASP variants can be important contributors to intra-species (and perhaps inter-species variations in bacterial spore resistance phenotypes. Finally, Ssp4 may contribute to spore resistance properties throughout the genus Clostridium since ssp4 genes also exist in the genomes of other clostridial species.

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar Ohio septic arthritis and bone abscess in an immunocompetent patient: a case report

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    Kato Hideaki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Non-typhi Salmonella species cause severe extra-intestinal focal infection after occult bacteremia. Although the number of cases of non-typhi salmonellosis is increasing worldwide among patients with immunocompromising conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, infection is uncommon in immunocompetent subjects. We report a case of septic arthritis and bone abscess due to a rare non-typhi Salmonella organism that developed after a prolonged asymptomatic period. Case presentation A 44-year-old Japanese immunocompetent man presented with acute-onset left knee pain and swelling. He had no history of food poisoning, and his most recent travel to an endemic area was 19 years ago. Salmonella enterica serovar Ohio was identified from samples of bone abscess and joint tissue. Arthrotomy and necrotic tissue debridement followed by intravenous ceftriaxone was successful. Conclusions Non-typhi Salmonella species only rarely cause extra-intestinal focal infections in immunocompetent patients. Our case suggests that non-typhi Salmonella species can cause severe focal infections many years after the occult bacteremia associated with food poisoning.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance and extended-spectrum β-lactamases of Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from livestock and processed food in Portugal: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Rui; Henriques, Ana; Sereno, Rui; Mendonça, Nuno; da Silva, Gabriela Jorge

    2015-02-01

    As Salmonella is a common foodborne pathogen, the present study aimed to determine the distribution of Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated during 2011-2012 from poultry, swine, cattle, and processed food in Portugal, and to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility and the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Results were also compared with data obtained before the implementation of the National Control Program in Poultry and the ban of antimicrobial agents in animal feed in the European Union (EU). A total of 14 serotypes were identified, from 258 isolates recovered, with Salmonella Typhimurium (32.6%, n=84) and Salmonella Enteritidis (10.1%, n=26) being the most common. Salmonella Enteritidis in poultry was less frequent than in previous studies, which might be associated with the implementation of the National Control Program for Salmonella in poultry. Nevertheless, other serotypes seem to occupy this biological niche, and may be more common in human salmonellosis in the future. The majority of isolates (70.2%, n=181) were resistant to at least one class of antimicrobial agent and exhibited higher frequency of resistance to tetracycline (47.7%, n=123) and ampicillin (36.0%, n=93), with Salmonella Typhimurium being the more resistant serotype. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was shown in 8% (n=21) of isolates, a lower value compared to data obtained before 2004. ESBLs producers Salmonella Typhimurium bla(CTX-M-1) and Salmonella Enteritidis bla(SHV-12) were isolated from swine and poultry, respectively. The bla(CTX-M-1) and bla(SHV-12) genes were carried on conjugative plasmids of IncHI2replicon types and IncI1, respectively. This was the first report of a bla(CTX-M-1) in Salmonella Typhimurium in Portugal. Overall, the results revealed changes in animal origin Salmonella serotypes, mainly emerging serotypes, in frequency of resistance, and in occurrence of ESBLs-producing Salmonella. The control measures taken by the EU seem to have some impact on the

  5. Characterization of Salmonella isolates from municipal sewage, patients, foods, and animals in Greece using antimicrobial susceptibility testing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis

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    Theofilos Papadopoulos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We aimed to compare Salmonella isolates from different sources using molecular and phenotypic methods, targeting better possibility of understanding the epidemiology of this organism in the Greek context with emphasis in municipal wastewater. Materials and Methods: In this study, we used pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE in combination with antimicrobial susceptibility testing to analyze a total of 88 Salmonella Enterica isolates from municipal sewage (n=25, humans (n=36, animals (n=24, and foods (n=3 in Greece. Results: The higher resistance rates were found to the following antimicrobials: streptomycin (59.1%, tetracycline (47.7%, nalidixic acid (46.6%, ampicillin (37.5%, and oxolinic acid (35.2%. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was not observed; 22 isolates (25% were sensitive to all 9 antimicrobials, 36%, 25% and 12% of human, animal and wastewater origin, respectively, showing a significant difference. Salmonella ser. Hadar was the serovar with the highest resistance rates followed by Salmonella ser. Anatum and Salmonella ser. Typhimurium; Salmonella ser. Infantis strains were almost pansusceptible. Cluster analysis did not reveal close genetic relationship between human animal food and wastewater strains belonging to the same serovars. In most of the cases, distinct clusters were observed between human and non-human isolates indicating diversity and no epidemiological connection. Conclusion: This study indicates that municipal wastewater would be of interest to further monitor the community’s prevalence of subclinical or non-reported S. Enterica infections.

  6. Males of a strongly polygynous species consume more poisonous food than females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Carolina; Bautista, Luis Miguel; García-París, Mario; Blanco, Guillermo; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence of a possible case of self-medication in a lekking bird, the great bustard Otis tarda. Great bustards consumed blister beetles (Meloidae), in spite of the fact that they contain cantharidin, a highly toxic compound that is lethal in moderate doses. In addition to anthelminthic properties, cantharidin was effective against gastrointestinal bacteria that cause sexually-transmitted diseases. Although both sexes consumed blister beetles during the mating season, only males selected them among all available insects, and ingested more and larger beetles than females. The male-biased consumption suggests that males could use cantharidin to reduce their parasite load and increase their sexual attractiveness. This plausibly explains the intense cloaca display males perform to approaching females, and the meticulous inspection females conduct of the male's cloaca, a behaviour only observed in this and another similar species of the bustard family. A white, clean cloaca with no infection symptoms (e.g., diarrhoea) is an honest signal of both, resistance to cantharidin and absence of parasites, and represents a reliable indicator of the male quality to the extremely choosy females. Our results do not definitely prove, but certainly strongly suggest that cantharidin, obtained by consumption of blister beetles, acts in great bustards as an oral anti-microbial and pathogen-limiting compound, and that males ingest these poisonous insects to increase their mating success, pointing out that self-medication might have been overlooked as a sexually-selected mechanism enhancing male fitness.

  7. Males of a strongly polygynous species consume more poisonous food than females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bravo

    Full Text Available We present evidence of a possible case of self-medication in a lekking bird, the great bustard Otis tarda. Great bustards consumed blister beetles (Meloidae, in spite of the fact that they contain cantharidin, a highly toxic compound that is lethal in moderate doses. In addition to anthelminthic properties, cantharidin was effective against gastrointestinal bacteria that cause sexually-transmitted diseases. Although both sexes consumed blister beetles during the mating season, only males selected them among all available insects, and ingested more and larger beetles than females. The male-biased consumption suggests that males could use cantharidin to reduce their parasite load and increase their sexual attractiveness. This plausibly explains the intense cloaca display males perform to approaching females, and the meticulous inspection females conduct of the male's cloaca, a behaviour only observed in this and another similar species of the bustard family. A white, clean cloaca with no infection symptoms (e.g., diarrhoea is an honest signal of both, resistance to cantharidin and absence of parasites, and represents a reliable indicator of the male quality to the extremely choosy females. Our results do not definitely prove, but certainly strongly suggest that cantharidin, obtained by consumption of blister beetles, acts in great bustards as an oral anti-microbial and pathogen-limiting compound, and that males ingest these poisonous insects to increase their mating success, pointing out that self-medication might have been overlooked as a sexually-selected mechanism enhancing male fitness.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance pattern of Salmonella serotypes isolated from food items and personnel in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewdu, Endrias; Cornelius, Poppe

    2009-02-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility test of 98 isolates of Salmonella was assayed from September 2003 to February 2004 using the guidelines of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS).The result revealed that 32.7% of Salmonella isolates were resistant to one or more of the 24 antimicrobials tested. Generally resistance for 13 different antimicrobial drugs was recognized. The most common resistance was to streptomycin (24/32, 75%), ampicillin (19/32, 59.4%), tetracycline (15/32, 46.9%), spectinomycin (13/32, 40.6%) and sulfisoxazole (13/32, 40.6%). All the three Salmonella Kentucky isolates showed resistance to at least 8 antimicrobials. Out of the 12 Salmonella Braenderup isolates, 10 (83.3%) showed multidrug resistance to ampicillin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and trimethoprim. Among the 8 S. Hadar isolates 7 (86.5%) showed antimicrobial resistance. All the 6 S. Dublin isolates were resistant to carbadox (100%). All the 6 S. Haifa isolates were resistant for at least ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline. Up to ten different antimicrobial resistances pattern was observed. Multiple antimicrobial drug resistance was observed in 23 Salmonella isolates (23.5%). The level of antimicrobial resistance was significantly higher for isolates from chicken carcass (18/29, 62.1%) and pork isolates (5/22, 22.7%) (p = 0.003). The findings of the present study ascertain that significant proportion Salmonella isolates have developed resistance for routinely prescribed antimicrobial drugs and poses considerable health hazards to the consumers unless prudent control measures are instituted.

  9. Low-temperature survival of Salmonella spp. in a model food system with natural microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Amit; Singh, Manpreet

    2012-03-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture requires chilled poultry carcass temperature to be below 4°C (40°F) to inhibit the growth of Salmonella and improve shelf life. Post-process temperature abuse of chicken leads to proliferation of existing bacteria, including Salmonella, which can lead to the increased risk of human infections. While models predicting Salmonella growth at abusive temperatures are developed using sterile media or chicken slurry, there are limited studies of Salmonella growth in the presence of background microflora at 4-10°C. Experiments in this study were conducted to determine the growth of Salmonella Typhimurium and Heidelberg at 4-10°C in brain heart infusion broth (BHI) and non-sterile chicken slurry (CS). Nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and S. Heidelberg (3 log CFU/mL) were inoculated separately in CS and sterile BHI in a 12-well microtiter plate and incubated at 4°C, 7°C, and 10°C, following which samples were taken every 24 h for up to 6 days. Samples from each well (n=5) were spread plated on XLT4 agar+nalidixic acid and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Bacterial populations were reported as CFU/mL. No significant differences (p>0.05) were observed in the survival of both strains in CS and BHI over the period of 6 days at all temperatures except S. Heidelberg at 7°C. Survival populations of both strains at 4°C were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) than at 7°C and 10°C in both media types. S. Heidelberg showed a maximum growth of 2 logs in BHI at 10°C among all the treatments. Growth patterns and survival of Salmonella at near refrigeration temperatures during carcass chilling can be useful to develop models to predict Salmonella growth post-processing and during storage, hence assisting processors in improving process controls.

  10. Evaluating Pediococcus acidilactici and Enterococcus faecium NRRL B-2354 as Thermal Surrogate Microorganisms for Salmonella for In-Plant Validation Studies of Low-Moisture Pet Food Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Erdogan; Bautista, Derrick A

    2015-05-01

    Pediococcus acidilactici ATCC 8042 and Enterococcus faecium NRRL B-2354 were investigated as potential surrogates for Salmonella serovars using thermal death time kinetics in products such as dry pet foods. The D-values of P. acidilactici ATCC 8042, E. faecium NRRL B-2354, and a cocktail of seven Salmonella serovars associated with low-moisture products were determined in a preservative-free dry pet food product at moisture levels of 9.1, 17.9, and 27.0% and heated between 76.7 and 87.8°C. The D-values were calculated by least squares linear regression. The D-values of P. acidilactici ATCC 8042 were higher than those for the Salmonella serovar cocktail but lower than those for E. faecium NRRL 2354. At 9.1% moisture, D-values of 6.54, 11.51, and 11.66 min at 76.7°C, 2.66, 3.22, and 4.08 min at 82.2°C, and 1.07, 1.29, and 1.69 min at 87.8°C were calculated for Salmonella serovars, P. acidilactici ATCC 8042, and E. faecium NRRL B-2354, respectively. The data suggest that the thermal inactivation characteristics of P. acidilactici ATCC 8042 can be utilized as a surrogate to predict the response of Salmonella in dry pet food products that are thermally processed at <90°C.

  11. Detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis using real time PCR, immunocapture assay, PNA FISH and standard culture methods in different types of food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, C; Cerqueira, L; Azevedo, N F; Vieira, M J

    2013-01-15

    Several methods for the rapid and specific detection of Salmonella in food samples have been described. Here, we compare 4 of those methods in terms of assay time, procedure complexity, detection limit, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Milk, eggs and mayonnaise samples were artificially contaminated with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis cell concentrations ranging from 1×10(-2) to 1×10(2) CFU per 25 g or ml of food. Samples were then pre-enriched and analyzed by either: i) real-time PCR, using the iQ-Check Salmonella kit; ii) immunocapture, using the RapidChek SELECT Salmonella; iii) a peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method and iv) the traditional bacteriological method ISO 6579:2002. All methods were able to detect Salmonella in the different types of food matrixes and presented a similar detection level of 1CFU per 25 g or ml of food sample. The immunocapture and the PNA FISH methods proved to be very reliable, as their results were 100% in agreement with the ISO method. However, real-time PCR presented a significant number of false positives, which resulted in a specificity of 55.6% (CI 95%, 31.3-77.6) and an accuracy of 82.2% (CI 95%, 63.2-91.4) for this method. Sensitivity was 100% since no false negative results were observed. In conclusion, the implementation of these molecular techniques, mainly the immunocapture and PNA-FISH methods, provides a reliable and less time-consuming alternative for the detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. EU Interlaboratory comparison study Food-II Bacteriological detection of Salmonella in minced beef

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers AFA; Veenman C; van de Kassteele J; Mooijman KA; LZO

    2008-01-01

    Van de 30 Europese Nationale Referentie Laboratoria (NRLs) waren er 29 in staat hoge en lage concentraties Salmonella in rundergehakt aan te tonen. Vijf laboratoria hadden hiervoor een herkansing nodig. Een laboratorium kon ook tijdens deze herkansing niet voldoende presteren. Momenteel wordt

  13. EU Interlaboratory comparison study food VII : Detection of Salmonella in whole liquid chicken egg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers AFA; Mooijman KA; VLD; I&V

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, it was shown that all 36 National Reference Laboratories (NRLs) in the European Union were able to detect high and low levels of Salmonella in whole liquid chicken egg. One NRL reported positive results for two blank whole liquid egg samples, a possible explanation may be

  14. Histamine fish poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nosić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine fish poisoning is a chemical intoxication associated with intake of fishes with high histamine content. Histamine is developed in fish tissue post mortem due to bacterial decarboxilation of free amino-acid histidine. This paper deals with causes of histamine development in fish meat and with histamine influence on human health. Prevention of histamine fish poisoning would also be discussed. The case histories of histamine food poisoning in our country and in the world would be described. Histamine levels used in Regulation would be presented.

  15. Real-time PCR detection of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods: a comparison between the biomolecolar method and traditional microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Quaranta

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the presence of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods by comparing the performance and sensitivity of BIO-RAD commercial Kits based on real-time PCR detection with traditional culture (ISO procedures. Materials and methods: Sixty-five samples of ready-to-eat foods were analysed as described above. In order to verify the validity of both culture and biomolecolar methods and to compare the sensitivity of real-time PCR versus conventional culture (ISO procedures, five food samples were artificially contaminated with the Salmonella enteritidis ATCC strain by using scalar concentration from 103 to 10-1 cfu/g while one food sample was artificially contaminated with the Listeria monocytogenes ATCC strain. Finally, statistical analyses of the results were performed using the statistics “K” to confirm the agreement between the compared methods.

    Results: Both procedures showed the absence of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the processed samples; results in agreement appeared both for the five food samples artificially contaminated with Salmonella enteritidis ATCC strain and for the food sample artificially contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes ATCC strain. The sensitivity of the biomolecolar test was 1 cfu/g. Therefore full agreement between the two methods was detected, with a K value of 1.

    Conclusions: The real-time PCR system appears to be extremely useful in the rapid screening of food samples, allowing for the rapid identification of Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes.

  16. Optical immunosensors for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis from food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Arun K.; Geng, Tao; Lathrop, Amanda; Valadez, Angela; Morgan, Mark T.

    2004-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella are two major foodborne pathogens of significant concern. Two optical evanescent wave immunosensors were evaluated for detection: Antibody-coupled fiber-optic biosensor and a surface plasmon resonant (SPR) immunosensor. In the fiber-optic sensor, polyclonal antibodies for the test organisms were immobilized on polystyrene fiber wave -guides using streptavidin - biotin chemistry. Cyanine 5 -labeled monoclonal antibodies C11E9 (for L. monocytogenes) and SF-11 (for Salmonella Enteritidis) were used to generate a specific fluorescent signal. Signal acquisition was performed by launching a laser-light (635 nm) from an Analyte-2000. This immunosensor was able to detect 103 - 109 cfu/ml of L. monocytogenes or 106-109 cfu/ml of Salmonella Enteritidis and the assays were conducted at near real-time with results obtained within one hour of sampling. The assays were specific and showed signal even in the presence of other microorganisms such as E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis or Salmonella Typhimurium. In the SPR system, IAsys instrument (resonant mirror sensor) was used. Monoclonal antibody-C11E9 was directly immobilized onto a carboxylate cuvette. Whole Listeria cells at various concentrations did not yield any signal while surface protein extracts did. Crude protein extracts from L. monocytogenes and L. innocua had average binding responses of around 150 arc sec (0.25 ng/mm2), which was significantly different from L. grayi, L. ivanovii, or L. welshimeri with average responses of <48 arc sec. Both fiber-optic and SPR sensors show promise in near real-time detection of foodborne L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis.

  17. Conditioned food aversion to control poisoning by Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa in goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant often ingested by livestock in Brazil. Three experiments were conducted to determine if conditioned food aversion was effective in reducing goats’ consumption of I. carnea. In the fi rst experiment, 10 mildly intoxicated goats that had been eating I. carnea were avert...

  18. Investigation of an outbreak of food poisoning in a resource-limited ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An acute onset of gastrointestinal symptoms among people who had attended and eaten at a burial ceremony generated a lot of public concern as indicated by subsequent media reports. We, therefore, set out to investigate this outbreak with the aim of assessing its magnitude and identifying the implicated food item.

  19. Altered virulence potential of Salmonella Enteritidis cultured in different foods: A cumulative effect of differential gene expression and immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sangeeta; Sahoo, Prakash Kumar; Ryan, Daniel; Das, Jugal Kishore; Chakraborty, Eesha; Mohakud, Nirmal Kumar; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2016-08-02

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the most common causes of food borne illness. Bacterial growth environment plays an important role in regulating gene expression thereby affecting the virulence profile of the bacteria. Different foods present diverse growth conditions which may affect the pathogenic potential of the bacteria. In the present study, the effect of food environments on the pathogenic potential of S. Enteritidis has been evaluated. S. Enteritidis was grown in different foods e.g. egg white, peanut butter and milk, and virulent phenotypes were compared to those grown in Luria Bertani broth. In-vivo experiments in C57BL/6 mice revealed S. Enteritidis grown in egg white did not induce significant (panalysis revealed SPI-1 effectors were downregulated in bacteria grown in egg white. Interestingly, bacteria grown in egg white showed reversal of phenotype upon change in growth media to LB. Additionally, bacteria grown in milk and peanut butter showed different degrees of virulence in mice as compared to those grown in LB media. Thus, the present study demonstrates that, S. Enteritidis grown in egg white colonizes systemic sites without causing colitis in a mouse model, while bacteria grown in milk and peanut butter show different pathogenicity profiles suggesting that food environments significantly affect the pathogenicity of S. Enteritidis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Survival and growth of food poisoning bacteria following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, G R; Glenister, D A; Brocklehurst, T F; Lund, B M

    1989-11-01

    Following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties with and without sorbic acid, obtained directly from the manufacturer, strains of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and other E. coli survived but failed to multiply during storage at 7, 10 or 25 degrees C. In the absence of sorbic acid spoilage due to Pseudomonas fluorescens occurred after storage for 5-13 days at 7 or 10 degrees C and 1-2 days at 25 degrees C. Salmonella enteritidis, S. hadar, S. saint-paul, S. typhimurium and S. virchow survived but failed to multiply at 10 degrees C and, in the case of most strains, at 20 or 25 degrees C. S. typhimurium multiplied 100-fold in one batch of cottage cheese with peppers and onion in the absence of sorbic acid during storage at 25 degrees C for 2 days; spoilage of this batch occurred due to yeasts or yeasts and moulds after storage for 4-8 days at 10 degrees C and 0-2 days at 20 or 25 degrees C. Following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties, prepared in the laboratory and which did not contain sorbic acid, as contaminants of the added protein or vegetable ingredients the numbers of Staphylococcus aureus declined during storage at 10 and 20 degrees C, the numbers of Bacillus cereus and S. typhimurium increased at both temperatures, and the numbers of Yersinia enterocolitica increased at 10 degrees C, but declined at 20 degrees C. Spoilage occurred due to the growth of moulds and P. fluorescens after storage for 5-14 days at 10 degrees C, and due to P. fluorescens after storage for up to 2 days at 20 degrees C. In products inoculated in a similar way but which contained sorbic acid (500-530 mg/kg), the numbers of S. aureus and B. cereus declined and in most products the numbers of S. typhimurium and Y. enterocolitica remained constant. In cottage cheese with chicken, however, the numbers of Y. enterocolitica increased 100-fold during storage of the product for 14 days at 10 degrees and the numbers of S. typhimurium increased 100-fold during storage for 2 days

  1. [Mercury poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication. Copyright © 2010 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Food-borne disease outbreak of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning due to toxic mussel consumption: the first recorded outbreak in china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tingrui; Xu, Xuqing; Wei, Jinjiao; Chen, Jiang; Miu, Renchao; Huang, Liming; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Yun; Yan, Rui; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Biyao; He, Fan

    2013-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken in response to an outbreak of suspected shellfish poisoning in Zhejiang Province, China. The objectives of this project were to confirm the outbreak and to identify the aetiology, source and mode of transmission. A probable case was defined as an individual with diarrhea (≥3 times/day) plus at least one of the following symptoms: fever (≥37.5°C), vomiting, or abdominal pain after consuming seafood between May 23(rd) and May 28(th), 2011. Using a case-control study design, we compared exposures to suspected seafood items and cooking methods between 61 probable cases and 61 controls. Over 220 suspected or probable cases of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) were identified (incidence of 18 cases per 100,000). The case control study revealed that 100% of cases and 18% of controls had eaten mussels during the exposure period (OR = ∞, χ(2) = 84.72,P = 0.000). The number of mussels consumed was related to DSP risk (P = 0.004, χ2 test for trend). Consumption of other seafood items was not associated with disease. The frequency of diarrhea and vomiting were positively correlated with the number of mussels consumed (r = 0.424 and r = 0.562, respectively). The frequency of vomiting and the incubation period were significantly correlated with the total time the mussels were boiled (r = 0.594 and r = -0.336, respectively). Mussels from 3 food markets and one family contained Okadaic acid (OA) and Dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1). This outbreak was attributed to the consumption of mussels contaminated by DSP-toxins (OA and DTX-1) which are produced by different species of dinoflagellates (toxic microalgae) from the genus Dinophysis or Prorocentrum. Suspension of mussel sales and early public announcements were highly effective in controlling the outbreak, although oversight of seafood quality should be a priority to prevent future contamination and outbreaks.

  3. Food-borne disease outbreak of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning due to toxic mussel consumption: the first recorded outbreak in china.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingrui Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This investigation was undertaken in response to an outbreak of suspected shellfish poisoning in Zhejiang Province, China. The objectives of this project were to confirm the outbreak and to identify the aetiology, source and mode of transmission. METHODS: A probable case was defined as an individual with diarrhea (≥3 times/day plus at least one of the following symptoms: fever (≥37.5°C, vomiting, or abdominal pain after consuming seafood between May 23(rd and May 28(th, 2011. Using a case-control study design, we compared exposures to suspected seafood items and cooking methods between 61 probable cases and 61 controls. RESULTS: Over 220 suspected or probable cases of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP were identified (incidence of 18 cases per 100,000. The case control study revealed that 100% of cases and 18% of controls had eaten mussels during the exposure period (OR = ∞, χ(2 = 84.72,P = 0.000. The number of mussels consumed was related to DSP risk (P = 0.004, χ2 test for trend. Consumption of other seafood items was not associated with disease. The frequency of diarrhea and vomiting were positively correlated with the number of mussels consumed (r = 0.424 and r = 0.562, respectively. The frequency of vomiting and the incubation period were significantly correlated with the total time the mussels were boiled (r = 0.594 and r = -0.336, respectively. Mussels from 3 food markets and one family contained Okadaic acid (OA and Dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1. CONCLUSIONS: This outbreak was attributed to the consumption of mussels contaminated by DSP-toxins (OA and DTX-1 which are produced by different species of dinoflagellates (toxic microalgae from the genus Dinophysis or Prorocentrum. Suspension of mussel sales and early public announcements were highly effective in controlling the outbreak, although oversight of seafood quality should be a priority to prevent future contamination and outbreaks.

  4. Burden of Food-Related Illness Caused by Resistant Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp.: Harbingers of Multistate Outbreaks in 2012 and 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many countries, Salmonella and Shigella species are frequently found to cause gastroenteritis outbreaks. Objectives: We describe nationwide data on infections with Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. in Iran. Materials and methods: During a two-year period (2012 to 2013, rectal-swab samples were analyzed for the presence of bacteria. Sensitivity of the bacterial isolates to antimicrobial agents was tested according to clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: Twenty-nine states reported 249 outbreaks of foodborne illnesses. In total, 1055 patients (604 males and 451 females, age range: 60 years were enrolled in this study, of whom 18 died. Seventy-four culture-confirmed cases of infection with Salmonella spp. were identified, of which 10.8%, 6.8%, 68.9%, and 13.5% corresponded to Salmonella serotype A, B, C, or D respectively. Similarly, Shigella spp. were responsible for 118 cases of the foodborne illnesses; among them, Shigella sonnei (with 105 cases, 89% was the leading serovar. Ciprofloxacin (100% was the most effective antibacterial agent against Salmonella spp. followed by amikacin. Nalidixic acid and gentamycin were the least effective antibacterial agents against Salmonella spp. Similarly, Shigella spp. were also highly sensitive to ciprofloxacin (100%, whereas tetracycline and ampicillin were the least effective antibacterial agents against Shigella spp. Conclusions: These are the first recognized and confirmed outbreaks of foodborne illnesses in Iran. Salmonella and Shigella infections represent a considerable disease burden in our country. Therefore, efforts to reduce transmission of these pathogens via food and other routes must be implemented on a national scale. It is noteworthy that the outbreaks of Shigella and Salmonella infections in our country also pose a threat of antibiotic resistance.

  5. A lab-on-a-chip system with integrated sample preparation and loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid and quantitative detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Quyen, Than Linh; Hung, Tran Quang; Chin, Wai Hoe; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong

    2015-04-21

    Foodborne disease is a major public health threat worldwide. Salmonellosis, an infectious disease caused by Salmonella spp., is one of the most common foodborne diseases. Isolation and identification of Salmonella by conventional bacterial culture or molecular-based methods are time consuming and usually take a few hours to days to complete. In response to the demand for rapid on line or on site detection of pathogens, in this study, we describe for the first time an eight-chamber lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with integrated magnetic bead-based sample preparation and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for rapid and quantitative detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples. The whole diagnostic procedures including DNA isolation, isothermal amplification, and real-time detection were accomplished in a single chamber. Up to eight samples could be handled simultaneously and the system was capable to detect Salmonella at concentration of 50 cells per test within 40 min. The simple design, together with high level of integration, isothermal amplification, and quantitative analysis of multiple samples in short time, will greatly enhance the practical applicability of the LOC system for rapid on-site screening of Salmonella for applications in food safety control, environmental surveillance, and clinical diagnostics.

  6. Ethanol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  7. Alcohol Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unconscious or can't be awakened is at risk of dying. Alcohol poisoning is an emergency If you suspect that ... a short period of time, the greater your risk of alcohol poisoning. One drink is defined as: 12 ounces ( ...

  8. Poison Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play On ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help ...

  9. Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH POISONOUS PLANTS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Photo courtesy ... U.S. Department of Agriculture Many native and exotic plants are poisonous to humans when ingested or if ...

  10. Starch poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooking starch poisoning; Laundry starch poisoning ... Cooking and laundry starch are both made from vegetable products, most commonly: Corn Potatoes Rice Wheat Both are usually considered nonpoisonous (nontoxic), but ...

  11. Cologne poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ingredients in cologne can be poisonous: Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) Isopropyl alcohol (isopropanol) There may be other poisonous ... D, Hovda KE. Methanol, ethylene glycol, and other toxic alcohols. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, ...

  12. Methanol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reverse the effect of the poison (fomepizole or ethanol) Tube through the nose to remove remaining poison, ... Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015:chap 29. White SR. Toxic alcohols. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, ...

  13. Copper poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 75. Holland MG. Pulmonary toxicology. ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 9. Jones AL, Dargan PI. ...

  14. Insecticide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 76. Borron SW. Pyrethins, repellants, ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 77. Cannon RD, Ruha A- ...

  15. Prevalence of intestinal parasites, salmonella and shigella among apparently health food handlers of Addis Ababa University student's cafeteria, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklilu, Addis; Kahase, Daniel; Dessalegn, Mekonnen; Tarekegn, Negatu; Gebremichael, Saba; Zenebe, Seyfe; Desta, Kassu; Mulugeta, Gebru; Mamuye, Yeshiwodim; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2015-01-24

    Food contamination may occur at any point during its journey through production, processing, distribution, and preparation. The risk of food getting contaminated depends largely on the health status of the food handlers, their personal hygiene, knowledge and practice of food hygiene. Food borne diseases are a public health problem in developed and developing countries like Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted among food handlers in Addis Ababa student's cafeteria from January to May 2013. Structured questionnaire was used to collect socio demographic data and associated risk factors. Stool specimens were examined for bacteria and intestinal parasites following standard procedures. Biochemical tests were done to identify the species of bacterial isolates. Sensitivity testing was done using Kirby- Baur disk diffusion method. A total of 172 food handlers were enrolled in the study. The majority of study participants were females 134 (77.9%). About 78 (45.3%) of food handlers were found to be positive for different intestinal parasites with the most abundant parasite of Entameoba histolytica/dispar 68 (70.8%) followed by Giardia lamblia 18 (18.8%), Taenia species 5 (5.2%), Ascaris lumbricoides 2 (2.1%), hookworm 2 (2.1%) and Trichuris trichiura 1 (1.1%). Stool cultures revealed 3.5% of Salmonella isolates (Sero-grouping on Salmonella isolate was not done), while Shigella species was not isolated from any of the stool samples obtained from Food handlers. All isolates of Salmonella were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin but resistant to ampicillin, clindamycin, and erythromycin. The present study revealed a high prevalence of intestinal parasite in asymptomatic (apparently health) food handlers. Such infected food handlers can contaminate food, drinks and could serve as source of infection to consumers via food chain.

  16. Antibiotic Resistance in Salmonella from Retail Foods of Animal Origin and Its Association with Disinfectant and Heavy Metal Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wenwen; Quan, Yuan; Yang, Shengzhi; Guo, Lijuan; Zhang, Xiuli; Liu, Shuliang; Chen, Shujuan; Zhou, Kang; He, Li; Li, Bei; Gu, Yunfu; Zhao, Shaohua; Zou, Likou

    2017-10-17

    This study aims to demonstrate the antibiotic resistance and its association with disinfectant and heavy metal resistance in 152 Salmonella isolates recovered from retail foods of animal origins. Susceptibility testing demonstrated that 92.8% isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and the resistance was highest to oxytetracycline (80.9%), followed by trimethoprim (64.5%), amoxicillin (28.9%), ampicillin (28.3%), levofloxacin (21.7%), ciprofloxacin (16.4%), and gentamicin (10.5%), respectively. The blaTEM and tetA genes (44.7%) were commonly present. The qacF and qacEΔ1 genes were detected in 18.4% and 8.6% of all isolates. The Cu-resistance genes pcoR, pcoC, and pcoA were the most prevalent (20.4-40.8%), followed by Hg-resistance gene merA (17.8%) and As-resistance genes arsB (6.6%). The antibiotic resistance was highly associated with disinfectant or certain heavy metal resistance genes. Most notably, the association among Cu-resistance genes (pcoC, pcoR), disinfectant resistance genes (qacF, qacEΔ1), and tetracycline and sulfonamide resistance genes (tet, sul) was significant (p resistant Salmonella and using disinfectants for decontamination or metals in livestock may provide a pressure for coselecting strains with acquired resistance to other antimicrobials.

  17. Detection of Salmonella in dry foods using refrigerated pre-enrichment and enrichment broth cultures: interlaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aoust, J Y; Sewell, A M; Greco, P

    1993-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was performed in 11 laboratories to validate the use of pre-enrichment and tetrathionate brilliant green (TBG35) and selenite cystine (SC35) enrichment cultures refrigerated 72 h at 2-5 degrees C for greater analytical flexibility in the detection of Salmonella in dry foods. Productivities of refrigerated pre-enrichment and enrichment cultures were compared with that of the AOAC/Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) procedure using 4 food types: whole egg powder, milk chocolate, animal feed, and instantized skim milk powder. Uninoculated and inoculated samples were included in each food group. There was complete agreement between the results obtained by the standard AOAC/BAM procedure and the 2 refrigeration procedures. Of 660 samples tested, the AOAC/BAM procedure identified 393 contaminated samples that were readily detected from the corresponding refrigerated pre-enrichment cultures and from the combined productivity of homologous refrigerated TBG35 and SC35 cultures. Refrigeration (72 h) of pre-enrichment or enrichment cultures for greater analytical flexibility and laboratory productivity in the examination of dry foods is under review for adoption by AOAC International.

  18. Update: recall of dry dog and cat food products associated with human Salmonella Schwarzengrund infections--United States, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-07

    On May 16, 2008, CDC reported on a 2006-2007 multistate outbreak of infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Schwarzengrund that was associated with dry dog food. At the time of that report, a total of 70 cases had been reported from 19 states, with the last case identified on October 1, 2007. Subsequently, an additional case was identified on December 29, 2007. Epidemiologic and environmental investigations have suggested the source of the outbreak was dry pet food produced by one manufacturer, Mars Petcare US. This report updates the previous CDC report, provides additional epidemiologic findings, and describes additional actions taken by public health agencies and the manufacturer. In 2008, eight more cases have been reported, bringing the total number of cases in the outbreak to 79. On September 12, 2008, the company announced a nationwide voluntary recall of all dry dog and cat food products produced during a 5-month period at one Pennsylvania plant. Dry pet food has a 1-year shelf life. Contaminated products identified in recalls might still be in the homes of purchasers and could cause illness. Persons who have these products should not use them to feed their pets but should discard them or return them to the store.

  19. Effect of the local microenvironment on survival and thermal inactivation of Salmonella in low- and intermediate-moisture multi-ingredient foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiping; Fu, Xiaowen; Bima, Yige; Koontz, John; Megalis, Christina; Yang, Fei; Fleischman, Gregory; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Multi-ingredient foods having low- or intermediate-moisture characteristics may pose a special challenge to process design and validation. Ingredients of these foods can create local microenvironments that may have a distinct impact on pathogen survival and processing requirements. In this study, two model systems, each consisting of 80% commercial peanut butter (P) and 20% nonfat dry milk powder (M), were formulated to be identical in composition, but different in the source of the Salmonella contamination as originating in either the ingredient P or M. Immediately after inoculation, Salmonella showed a 2.0-log reduction when M was the contaminated ingredient compared with a 0.6-log reduction when P was the contaminated ingredient. This pattern of survival was consistent with the single-ingredient control containing only M (2.5-log reduction) or only P (0.7-log reduction), suggesting that the immediate proximity of cells is determined by the contaminated ingredient in the model system. After 5 weeks of storage, the survival rates of Salmonella in the two systems remained different, i.e.a 4- and 2-log reduction resulted in the system with M or P as the contaminated ingredient, respectively. Furthermore, thermal inactivation efficacies also differed significantly between the two systems. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the nonhomogeneous distribution of water, lipid, and protein, indicating that varied local microenvironments were present and likely affected the behavior of the pathogen. The impact of the microenvironment on inactivation and survival of Salmonella was further confirmed in a butter cookie formulation in which Salmonella was inoculated via four different ingredients. This study shows that the local microenvironment in low- and intermediate-moisture foods affects Salmonella survival and thermal inactivation. The ingredient source of the contamination should be taken into account for process design and validation to ensure the

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Veriflow®Salmonella Species to USDA and FDA Culture-Based Methods for the Detection ofSalmonellaspp. in Food and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Amrita; Joelsson, Adam C; Terkhorn, Shawn P; Brown, Ashley S; Gaudioso, Zara E; Siciliano, Nicholas A

    2017-09-01

    Veriflow® Salmonella species (Veriflow SS) is a molecular-based assay for the presumptive detection of Salmonella spp. from environmental surfaces (stainless steel, sealed concrete, plastic, and ceramic tile), dairy (2% milk), raw meat (20% fat ground beef), chicken carcasses, and ready-to-eat (RTE) food (hot dogs). The assay utilizes a PCR detection method coupled with a rapid, visual, flow-based assay that develops in 3 min post-PCR amplification and requires only an 18 h enrichment for maximum sensitivity. The Veriflow SS system eliminates the need for sample purification, gel electrophoresis, or fluorophore-based detection of target amplification and does not require complex data analysis. This Performance Tested MethodSM validation study demonstrated the ability of the Veriflow SS method to detect low levels of artificially inoculated or naturally occurring Salmonella spp. in eight distinct environmental and food matrixes. In each reference comparison study, probability of detection analysis indicated that there was no significant difference between the Veriflow SS method and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook Chapter 4.06 and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual Chapter 5 reference methods. A total of 104 Salmonella strains were detected in the inclusivity study, and 35 nonspecific organisms went undetected in the exclusivity study. The study results show that the Veriflow SS method is a sensitive, selective, and robust assay for the presumptive detection of Salmonella spp. sampled from environmental surfaces (stainless steel, sealed concrete, plastic, and ceramic tile), dairy (2% milk), raw meat (20% fat ground beef), chicken carcasses, and RTE food (hot dogs).

  1. Screening and Detecting Salmonella in Different Food Matrices in Southern Tunisia Using a Combined Enrichment/Real-Time PCR Method: Correlation with Conventional Culture Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siala, Mariam; Barbana, Amina; Smaoui, Salma; Hachicha, Salma; Marouane, Chema; Kammoun, Sana; Gdoura, Radhouane; Messadi-Akrout, Férièle

    2017-01-01

    A combined enrichment/ newly developed invA TaqMan® real-time PCR (qPCR) method as a screening assay to detect Salmonella spp. in 500 naturally food matrices is evaluated. DNA template for qPCR was extracted from an overnight pre-enriched sample in buffered peptone water using lysis-guanidine isothiocyanate method. Heterologous internal amplification control (IAC) was incorporated during qPCR assays and co-amplified with the invA gene of the target pathogen. InvA qPCR exhibited 100% specificity when testing 94 Salmonella strains (inclusivity) and 32 non-Salmonella strains (exclusivity). The qPCR showed a consistent detection of two copies of the invA gene/PCR reaction, a good intra- and inter-run reproducibility with a good PCR efficiency (89.6%). QPCR was sensitive and showed Salmonella detection at 8.5 × 100 CFU mL-1 of artificially spiked poultry meat -BWP solution in less than 40 cycles. When analyzing 500 different food matrices and comparing the results with the ISO 6579:2002 conventional culture method, the sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 76.6%, respectively. QPCR showed Salmonella spp. DNA in raw poultry meat 27/45 (60%), milk 31/93 (33.3%), raw red meat 5/13 (38.5%), and fish 11/46 (23.9%) samples. The prevalence of Salmonella spp. in cakes, dairy, cooked meals, charcuterie products using qPCR was 11/14 (26.8%), 5/22 (22.7%), 32/150 (21.3%), and 5/20 (25%), respectively, compared to 0% as demonstrated by culture. S. Anatum was the most common serovar found associated with red meat compared to S. kentucky isolated from fish and poultry meat. In conclusion, our study is the first to use a combined enrichment/invA qPCR method as a screening assay to detect Salmonella DNA in different types of commercialized food in Southern Tunisia. QPCR results indicate that Salmonella contamination is common in milk and in other types of food samples.

  2. Identification and characterization of novel Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands encoding staphylococcal enterotoxins originating from staphylococcal food poisoning isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y; Kubota, H; Sato'o, Y; Ono, H K; Kato, R; Sadamasu, K; Kai, A; Kamata, Y

    2015-06-01

    Horizontal transfer of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) plays an important role in acquiring pathogenicity. This study aimed to identify novel SaPIs encoding staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) and to characterize their SE productivity and replication process. Four novel SaPIs (SaPITokyo12413, SaPITokyo11212, SaPITokyo12571 and SaPITokyo12381) were determined using the SaPI scanning method. These SaPIs were composed of mosaic structures containing reported sequences. Four strains harbouring novel SaPIs produced significant amounts of SEs to cause staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP). With focus on the interaction between the replication initiator protein (Rep) and the replication origin (ori sites) that are proposed to be important for the replication of SaPIs, each Rep was prepared and their two functions were confirmed: binding activity to ori sites and helicase activity. These activities were present in the Reps of SaPITokyo11212, SaPITokyo12571 and SaPITokyo12381, but were both absent in the Rep of SaPITokyo12413. All four novel SaPIs could give sufficient toxicity to Staph. aureus to cause SFP. However, SaPITokyo12413 may be restricted in its replication capacity, suggesting that it lacks transfer ability unlike the other SaPIs. This is the first report to identify four novel SE-encoding SaPIs and to examine their toxicity and replication capacity. Because SaPIs deeply participate in SE acquisition, it is important to elucidate their characteristics for understanding Staph. aureus virulence and speculating regarding its evolution as a pathogen. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Antimicrobial Resistant Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in Houseflies Infesting Fish in Food Markets in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwansa M. Songe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea is one of the most common diseases and is a leading cause of death in developing countries. This is often caused by contaminated food. Poor food hygiene standards are exacerbated by the presence of flies which can transmit a variety of infectious microorganisms, particularly through animal source foods. This fact becomes especially important in developing countries like Zambia, where fish is a highly valued source of protein. Our interest in this study was to identify if the flies that beset food markets in Zambia carry important pathogenic bacteria on their bodies, and subsequently if these bacteria carry resistance genes to commonly used antibiotics, which would indicate problems in eradicating these pathogens. The present study took into account fish vendors’ and consumers’ perception of flies and interest in interventions to reduce their numbers. We conducted semi-structured interviews with (1 traders (comprised of randomly selected males and females and (2 consumers (including randomly selected males and females. Thereafter, we collected flies found on fish in markets in Mongu and Lusaka districts of Zambia. For the entire study, a total of 418 fly samples were analyzed in the laboratory and Salmonella spp. and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli were isolated from the flies. Further laboratory screening revealed that overall, 17.2% (72/418 (95% CI; 43.2%–65.5% of total samples analyzed contained Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL-producing E. coli. These significant findings call for a strengthening of the antibiotic administering policy in Zambia and the development of sustainable interventions to reduce fly numbers in food markets and improve food safety and hygiene.

  4. Analysis of a survey database of pet food-induced poisoning in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbeiha, Wilson K; Agnew, Dalen; Maxie, Grant; Hoff, Brent; Page, Connie; Curran, Paul; Powers, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    Following the outbreak of pet food-induced nephrotoxicity in March 2007, a voluntary online survey of all AAVLD-accredited laboratories, commercial laboratories, and veterinary clinics across North America was conducted. There was no information on toxicity of melamine or factors affecting the disease outcome following exposure to melamine in pets. Data were collected from affected pets to learn about the disease outcome and the affected pet population. The web-based electronic survey used the online tool, Survey Monkey™. Data were collected between April 5 and October 31, 2007. Four hundred fifty-one cases of 586 reported cases met the criteria for inclusion in the study. Most reported cases were from California, Texas, Michigan, Florida, and Ontario. Of the 451 cases, 424 were reported as affected. Of these, 278 cases (65.6%) were cats and 146 (34.4%) were dogs. A total of 278 pets (171 cats and 107 dogs) were reported to have died (a ratio of 1.6:1). However, within species, there was a higher percentage of deceased dogs (73.3%) than cats (61.5%). Of the affected pet population, older male cats with preexisting disease conditions were more likely to be deceased. Analysis of the pets in this large database of naturally affected pets yielded interesting findings. It showed that more cats than dogs were affected and also that preexisting renal diseases and old age predicted the most severe outcome (death or euthanasia) than any other factors.

  5. Cyanide and the human brain: perspectives from a model of food (cassava) poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshala-Katumbay, Desire D; Ngombe, Nadege N; Okitundu, Daniel; David, Larry; Westaway, Shawn K; Boivin, Michael J; Mumba, Ngoyi D; Banea, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Threats by fundamentalist leaders to use chemical weapons have resulted in renewed interest in cyanide toxicity. Relevant insights may be gained from studies on cyanide mass intoxication in populations relying on cyanogenic cassava as the main source of food. In these populations, sublethal concentrations (up to 80 μmol/l) of cyanide in the blood are commonplace and lead to signs of acute toxicity. Long-term toxicity signs include a distinct and irreversible spastic paralysis, known as konzo, and cognition deficits, mainly in sequential processing (visual-spatial analysis) domains. Toxic culprits include cyanide (mitochondrial toxicant), thiocyanate (AMPA-receptor chaotropic cyanide metabolite), cyanate (protein-carbamoylating cyanide metabolite), and 2-iminothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (seizure inducer). Factors of susceptibility include younger age, female gender, protein-deficient diet, and, possibly, the gut functional metagenome. The existence of uniquely exposed and neurologically affected populations offers invaluable research opportunities to develop a comprehensive understanding of cyanide toxicity and test or validate point-of-care diagnostic tools and treatment options to be included in preparedness kits in response to cyanide-related threats. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. EFSA BIOHAZ Panel (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the risk posed by pathogens in food of non-animal origin. Part 2 (Salmonella and Norovirus in leafy greens eaten raw as salads)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    and will also give an indication of the degree to which GAP, GHP, GMP or HACCP programs have been implemented. A Food Safety Criterion for Salmonella in leafy greens could be used as a tool to communicate to producers and processors that Salmonella should not be present in the product. Studies on the prevalence...

  7. Padronização de um teste imunoenzimático para detecção de Salmonella em alimentos Standardization of an enzyme immunoassay for detection of Salmonella in foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Baptista dos Reis

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A metodologia convencional utilizada para detecção de Salmonella em alimentos é trabalhosa, apresenta custo elevado e os resultados definitivos somente estão disponíveis após 96 horas. Vários métodos rápidos têm sido propostos, sendo os testes imunoenzimáticos os mais empregados. Este estudo relata o desenvolvimento de um teste imunoenzimático para detecção de Salmonella em alimentos, empregando-se um anti-soro policlonal monovalente contendo aglutininas f,g,s, não absorvido, e um anti-soro polivalente absorvido contendo as aglutininas e,h; 1,6; i; 1,2; f,g,s e m,t. A eficiência foi comparada com a da metodologia de cultivo tradicional. O teste imunoenzimático foi empregado para a detecção de Salmonella em amostras de alimentos infantis experimentalmente inoculadas com este patógeno e com outras enterobactérias, em diferentes proporções. O teste imunoenzimático revelou-se significativamente mais sensível que o método de cultivo. Esse mesmo teste, utilizando-se o anti-soro f,g,s não absorvido com antígenos heterólogos revelou concordância de 89,6% com o método de cultivo e sensibilidade de 100,0%. Por outro lado, empregando-se o anti-soro polivalente absorvido, a concordância com o método de cultivo foi de 81,3% embora a sensibilidade tenha se mantido no mesmo nível. O desempenho do teste imunoenzimático empregando-se um desses dois anti-soros indica um grande potencial de aplicação como método de triagem na detecção de Salmonella em alimentos.The conventional method for detection of Salmonella in foods is cumbersome, it is not cost-effective and results are available only after 96h. Many alternative rapid methods have been already proposed and enzyme immunoassays are the most common. This study reports the standardization of a new enzyme immunoassay for detection of Salmonella in foods, based on a policlonal non-absorbed antiserum containing f,g,s aglutinins and a pool of policlonal absorbed antisera

  8. Development and evaluation of DNA and RNA real-time assays for food analysis using the hilA gene of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Evonne M; Burgess, Catherine M; O'Regan, Edel; McGuinness, Sheila; Barry, Thomas; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was the development of DNA and RNA real-time PCR methods for detection of food-borne Salmonella sp. as rapid alternatives to the traditional cultural method (ISO 6579, 2004) in fresh meat carcasses and processed meat samples. These PCR methods were based on the hilA sequence, with primers and hybridisation probes designed against this gene target. The primers and probes were evaluated for their efficiency and dynamic range and subsequently the specificity of the assay was tested using 106 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains and 30 non-salmonellae strains. An internal amplification control (IAC) was also developed for incorporation. The optimum copy number of IAC was determined to be 500 copies per reaction. A complementary enrichment protocol was adapted from the existing standard ISO 6579:2004 and consisted of enrichment in Buffered Peptone Water (BPW) 22 ± 2 h and a second selective enrichment for 6 h in Rappaport Vassiliadis with Soya (RVS). The DNA and RNA-based real-time PCR protocols, were applied to meat samples inoculated with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains, including swabs from meat carcasses and minced beef samples which were heat treated or frozen. The developed methods have the potential as useful alternatives to the standard ISO 6579:2004 method for the detection of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica on carcass swabs and raw meat using hilA as a target. The DNA assay is a useful tool for the screening of meat samples in the abattoir within 3 days of slaughter or in a food production process and the RNA-based assay has the potential to detect viable Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica in ready-to-eat products. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamics of Salmonella Shedding and Welfare of Hens in Free-Range Egg Production Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gole, Vaibhav C.; Woodhouse, Rebecca; Caraguel, Charles; Moyle, Talia; Rault, Jean-Loup; Sexton, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The current study investigated the effect of environmental stressors (i.e., weather changes) on Salmonella shedding in free-range production systems and the correlations with behavioral and physiological measures (i.e., fecal glucocorticoid metabolites). This involved longitudinal and point-in-time surveys of Salmonella shedding and environmental contamination on four commercial free-range layer farms. The shedding of Salmonella was variable across free-range farms and in different seasons. There was no significant effect of season on the Salmonella prevalence during this investigation. In this study, the combined Salmonella most probable number (MPN) counts in environmental (including feces, egg belt, dust, nest box, and ramp) samples were highest in samples collected during the summer season (4th sampling, performed in February). The predominant serovars isolated during this study were Salmonella enterica serovar Mbandaka and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage types 135 and 135a. These two phage types were involved in several egg product-related Salmonella outbreaks in humans. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) results indicated that MLVA types detected from human food poisoning cases exhibited MLVA patterns similar to the strains isolated during this study. All Salmonella isolates (n = 209) were tested for 15 different genes involved in adhesion, invasion, and survival of Salmonella spp. We also observed variations for sopA, ironA, and misL. There were no positive correlations between fecal corticosterone metabolite (FCM) and Salmonella prevalence and/or shedding in feces. Also, there were no positive correlations between Salmonella prevalence and Salmonella count (log MPN) and any of the other welfare parameters. IMPORTANCE In this study, the welfare of laying hens and Salmonella shedding were compared over a prolonged period of time in field conditions. This study investigated the long-term shedding of Salmonella

  10. Dynamics of Salmonella Shedding and Welfare of Hens in Free-Range Egg Production Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gole, Vaibhav C; Woodhouse, Rebecca; Caraguel, Charles; Moyle, Talia; Rault, Jean-Loup; Sexton, Margaret; Chousalkar, Kapil

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigated the effect of environmental stressors (i.e., weather changes) on Salmonella shedding in free-range production systems and the correlations with behavioral and physiological measures (i.e., fecal glucocorticoid metabolites). This involved longitudinal and point-in-time surveys of Salmonella shedding and environmental contamination on four commercial free-range layer farms. The shedding of Salmonella was variable across free-range farms and in different seasons. There was no significant effect of season on the Salmonella prevalence during this investigation. In this study, the combined Salmonella most probable number (MPN) counts in environmental (including feces, egg belt, dust, nest box, and ramp) samples were highest in samples collected during the summer season (4th sampling, performed in February). The predominant serovars isolated during this study were Salmonella enterica serovar Mbandaka and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage types 135 and 135a. These two phage types were involved in several egg product-related Salmonella outbreaks in humans. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) results indicated that MLVA types detected from human food poisoning cases exhibited MLVA patterns similar to the strains isolated during this study. All Salmonella isolates ( n = 209) were tested for 15 different genes involved in adhesion, invasion, and survival of Salmonella spp. We also observed variations for sopA , ironA , and misL There were no positive correlations between fecal corticosterone metabolite (FCM) and Salmonella prevalence and/or shedding in feces. Also, there were no positive correlations between Salmonella prevalence and Salmonella count (log MPN) and any of the other welfare parameters. IMPORTANCE In this study, the welfare of laying hens and Salmonella shedding were compared over a prolonged period of time in field conditions. This study investigated the long-term shedding of Salmonella serovars in

  11. 75 FR 48973 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella... availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During... ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation'' (the...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A RAPID DIAGNOSTIC KIT FOR DETECTION OF SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS IN FOOD USING INDIRECT COAGGLUTINATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyanda Arnafia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, simple, cheap, sensitive, and specific assay for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis in food. The kit-prototype was developed by using indirect coagglutination technique with three main components, namely Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, rabbit IgG anti-chicken Fc IgY and chicken IgY anti-S. Enteritidis. Isa Brown layer chickens were used to produce specific antibodies against S. Enteritidis. Monospecific antisera were prepared by absorption method. Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I was coupled with rabbit IgG anti-chicken Fc IgY and monospecific antisera anti-S. Enteritidis. Kit-prototype was compared with multiplex polymerase chain reaction to determine sensitivity and specificity of kit-prototype. Artificially inoculated food sample was used to determine the limit of detection of kit-prototype in a food sample. Indirect coagglutination kit-prototype was able to differentiate positive control from negative control without self-agglutination reaction. This assay has a high specificity to S. Enteritidis without significant cross-reactivity towards other bacteria. Kit-prototype was able to detect 108 CFU/mL of S. Enteritidis in the buffer and 1 CFU/mL of S. Enteritidis in a food sample after selective enrichment procedure. The application of this kit was able to give a fast result (reaction can be observed in 10 sec, to be applied in a sample without extraction in the preparation of antigen and to reduce detection time of S. Enteritidis in food until 4 days.

  13. wksl3, a New biocontrol agent for Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis and typhimurium in foods: characterization, application, sequence analysis, and oral acute toxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wol; Kim, Jae-Won; Jung, Tae-Sung; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2013-03-01

    Of the Salmonella enterica serovars, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium are responsible for most of the Salmonella outbreaks implicated in the consumption of contaminated foods in the Republic of Korea. Because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella in foods and food processing environments, bacteriophages have recently surfaced as an alternative biocontrol tool. In this study, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (wksl3) that could specifically infect S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, and several additional serovars. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phage wksl3 belongs to the family Siphoviridae. Complete genome sequence analysis and bioinformatic analysis revealed that the DNA of phage wksl3 is composed of 42,766 bp with 64 open reading frames. Since it does not encode any phage lysogeny factors, toxins, pathogen-related genes, or food-borne allergens, phage wksl3 may be considered a virulent phage with no side effects. Analysis of genetic similarities between phage wksl3 and four of its relatives (SS3e, vB_SenS-Ent1, SE2, and SETP3) allowed wksl3 to be categorized as a SETP3-like phage. A single-dose test of oral toxicity with BALB/c mice resulted in no abnormal clinical observations. Moreover, phage application to chicken skin at 8°C resulted in an about 2.5-log reduction in the number of Salmonella bacteria during the test period. The strong, stable lytic activity, the significant reduction of the number of S. Enteritidis bacteria after application to food, and the lack of clinical symptoms of this phage suggest that wksl3 may be a useful agent for the protection of foods against S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium contamination.

  14. Pattern of shedding of small, round-structured virus particles in stools of patients of outbreaks of food-poisoning from raw oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruki, K; Seto, Y; Murakami, T; Kimura, T

    1991-01-01

    The pattern of shedding of the small, round-structured virus (SRSV) particles in the stools of patients who suffered from food-poisoning due to raw oysters was investigated. The duration and concentration of fecal shedding of the SRSV particles were studied by electron microscopic examinations of stool specimens obtained during the course of illness to see a relation of viral shedding to day of illness. It was found that the fecal shedding of the SRSV particles occurred within five days of illness; thereafter, the concentration of the SRSV particles in feces rapidly decreased within a few days during the course of illness.

  15. Food-poisoning outbreak and fatality following ingestion of sea turtle meat in the rural community of Ndrondroni, Mohéli Island, Comoros, December 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ali Mbaé, Saindou; Mlindassé, Mohamed; Mihidjaé, Saindou; Seyler, Thomas

    2016-09-15

    On 24-December-2012 newspapers reported food-poisoning cases in Ndrondroni, Comoros. The authors conducted an investigation and a case-control study to identify the source and control the outbreak. They identified eight cases. A 6-month breastfed infant died. The results suggest consumption of Eretmochelys imbricata caused the outbreak. A bio-toxin ingested by the turtle might be the source. The local authorities informed the population on the danger of turtle-meat consumption. Cooking does not destroy the toxin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficacy of biocides used in the modern food industry to control salmonella enterica, and links between biocide tolerance and resistance to clinically relevant antimicrobial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condell, Orla; Iversen, Carol; Cooney, Shane; Power, Karen A; Walsh, Ciara; Burgess, Catherine; Fanning, Séamus

    2012-05-01

    Biocides play an essential role in limiting the spread of infectious disease. The food industry is dependent on these agents, and their increasing use is a matter for concern. Specifically, the emergence of bacteria demonstrating increased tolerance to biocides, coupled with the potential for the development of a phenotype of cross-resistance to clinically important antimicrobial compounds, needs to be assessed. In this study, we investigated the tolerance of a collection of susceptible and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica strains to a panel of seven commercially available food-grade biocide formulations. We explored their abilities to adapt to these formulations and their active biocidal agents, i.e., triclosan, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, and benzalkonium chloride, after sequential rounds of in vitro selection. Finally, cross-tolerance of different categories of biocidal formulations, their active agents, and the potential for coselection of resistance to clinically important antibiotics were investigated. Six of seven food-grade biocide formulations were bactericidal at their recommended working concentrations. All showed a reduced activity against both surface-dried and biofilm cultures. A stable phenotype of tolerance to biocide formulations could not be selected. Upon exposure of Salmonella strains to an active biocidal compound, a high-level of tolerance was selected for a number of Salmonella serotypes. No cross-tolerance to the different biocidal agents or food-grade biocide formulations was observed. Most tolerant isolates displayed changes in their patterns of susceptibility to antimicrobial compounds. Food industry biocides are effective against planktonic Salmonella. When exposed to sublethal concentrations of individual active biocidal agents, tolerant isolates may emerge. This emergence was associated with changes in antimicrobial susceptibilities.

  17. Efficacy of Biocides Used in the Modern Food Industry To Control Salmonella enterica, and Links between Biocide Tolerance and Resistance to Clinically Relevant Antimicrobial Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condell, Orla; Iversen, Carol; Cooney, Shane; Power, Karen A.; Walsh, Ciara; Burgess, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Biocides play an essential role in limiting the spread of infectious disease. The food industry is dependent on these agents, and their increasing use is a matter for concern. Specifically, the emergence of bacteria demonstrating increased tolerance to biocides, coupled with the potential for the development of a phenotype of cross-resistance to clinically important antimicrobial compounds, needs to be assessed. In this study, we investigated the tolerance of a collection of susceptible and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica strains to a panel of seven commercially available food-grade biocide formulations. We explored their abilities to adapt to these formulations and their active biocidal agents, i.e., triclosan, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, and benzalkonium chloride, after sequential rounds of in vitro selection. Finally, cross-tolerance of different categories of biocidal formulations, their active agents, and the potential for coselection of resistance to clinically important antibiotics were investigated. Six of seven food-grade biocide formulations were bactericidal at their recommended working concentrations. All showed a reduced activity against both surface-dried and biofilm cultures. A stable phenotype of tolerance to biocide formulations could not be selected. Upon exposure of Salmonella strains to an active biocidal compound, a high-level of tolerance was selected for a number of Salmonella serotypes. No cross-tolerance to the different biocidal agents or food-grade biocide formulations was observed. Most tolerant isolates displayed changes in their patterns of susceptibility to antimicrobial compounds. Food industry biocides are effective against planktonic Salmonella. When exposed to sublethal concentrations of individual active biocidal agents, tolerant isolates may emerge. This emergence was associated with changes in antimicrobial susceptibilities. PMID:22367085

  18. Exposure of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium to Three Humectants Used in the Food Industry Induces Different Osmoadaptation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Sarah; Rogers, Lisa; Händler, Kristian; McClure, Peter; Amézquita, Alejandro; Hinton, Jay C D; Fanning, Séamus

    2015-10-01

    Common salt (NaCl) is frequently used by the food industry to add flavor and to act as a humectant in order to reduce the water content of a food product. The improved health awareness of consumers is leading to a demand for food products with reduced salt content; thus, manufacturers require alternative water activity-reducing agents which elicit the same general effects as NaCl. Two examples include KCl and glycerol. These agents lower the water activity of a food matrix and also contribute to limit the growth of the microbiota, including foodborne pathogens. Little is currently known about how foodborne pathogens respond to these water activity-lowering agents. Here we examined the response of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 4/74 to NaCl, KCl, and glycerol at three time points, using a constant water activity level, compared with the response of a control inoculum. All conditions induced the upregulation of gluconate metabolic genes after 6 h of exposure. Bacteria exposed to NaCl and KCl demonstrated the upregulation of the osmoprotective transporter mechanisms encoded by the proP, proU, and osmU (STM1491 to STM1494) genes. Glycerol exposure elicited the downregulation of these osmoadaptive mechanisms but stimulated an increase in lipopolysaccharide and membrane protein-associated genes after 1 h. The most extensive changes in gene expression occurred following exposure to KCl. Because many of these genes were of unknown function, further characterization may identify KCl-specific adaptive processes that are not stimulated by NaCl. This study shows that the response of S. Typhimurium to different humectants does not simply reflect reduced water activity and likely involves systems that are linked to specific humectants. Copyright © 2015 Finn et al.

  19. Salmonella in sesame seed products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Stefan O; Piechotowski, Isolde; Kimmig, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In the context of an international outbreak of multiresistant Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 that was correlated to the consumption of halvah ("helva," an Asian candy made from sesame seed), we examined several sesame seed products for the occurrence of Salmonella. Of 117 ready-to-eat food items containing sesame, we isolated salmonellae from 11 (9.4%) samples. In addition to finding Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in the halvah involved in the outbreak, we also isolated different Salmonella Typhimurium strains out of halvah from other manufacturers and countries of origin, as well as Salmonella Offa, Salmonella Tennessee, and Salmonella Poona from sesame paste (tahini) and sesame seed, which is sold for raw consumption in cereals.

  20. Assessing the cross contamination and transfer rates of Salmonella enterica from chicken to lettuce under different food-handling scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Sadhana; Zhu, Libin; Jaroni, Divya

    2010-09-01

    Cross contamination of foodborne pathogens from raw meats to ready-to-eat foods has caused a number of foodborne outbreaks. The cross contamination and transfer rates of Salmonella enterica from chicken to lettuce under various food-handling scenarios were determined. The following scenarios were tested: in scenario 1, cutting board and knife used to cut chicken (10(6) CFU/g) were also used for cutting lettuce, without washing; in scenario 2, cutting board and knife were washed with water separately after cutting chicken, and subsequently used for cutting lettuce; and in scenario 3, cutting board and knife were thoroughly washed with soap and hot water after cutting chicken, and before cutting lettuce. In each scenario, cutting board, knife, chicken and lettuce were sampled for population of S. enterica. For scenario 1, both before and after cutting lettuce, the cutting board and knife each had about 2 logs CFU/cm(2) of S. enterica, respectively. The cut lettuce had about 3 logs CFU/g of S. enterica. In scenario 2, fewer organisms (0.5-2.4 logs CFU/g or cm(2)) were transferred. The transfer rates in both scenarios ranged from 0.02 to 75%. However, in scenario 3, lettuce, cutting board or knife, after washing and cutting lettuce. This shows that the FDA recommended practice for cleaning cutting boards is effective in removing S. enterica and preventing cross contamination. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of lysozyme against bacteria involved in food spoilage and food-borne disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughey, V L; Johnson, E A

    1987-09-01

    Egg white lysozyme was demonstrated to have antibacterial activity against organisms of concern in food safety, including Listeria monocytogenes and certain strains of Clostridium botulinum. We also found that the food spoilage thermophile Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum was highly susceptible to lysozyme and confirmed that the spoilage organisms Bacillus stearothermophilus and Clostridium tyrobutyricum were also extremely sensitive. Several gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens isolated from food poisoning outbreaks, including Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, and Yersinia enterocolitica, were all resistant. The results of this study suggest that lysozyme may have selected applications in food preservation, especially when thermophilic sporeformers are problems, and as a safeguard against food poisoning caused by C. botulinum and L. monocytogenes.

  2. Puffer fish poisoning.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, J

    1998-01-01

    Regarded by many as a delicacy, puffer fish (Lagocephalus scleratus) is a lethal source of food poisoning with a high mortality. It contains tetrodotoxin which can cause death by muscular paralysis, respiratory depression, and circulatory failure. A case of mild intoxication is reported and the literature reviewed.

  3. The Salmonella effector protein SpvC, a phosphothreonine lyase is functional in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Christina; Fraiture, Malou; Hernàndez-Reyes, Casandra; Akum, Fidele N; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chen, Ying; Pateyron, Stephanie; Colcombet, Jean; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Hirt, Heribert; Brunner, Frédéric; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is one of the most prominent causes of food poisoning and growing evidence indicates that contaminated fruits and vegetables are an increasing concern for human health. Successful infection demands the suppression of the host immune system, which is often achieved via injection of bacterial effector proteins into host cells. In this report we present the function of Salmonella effector protein in plant cell, supporting the new concept of trans-kingdom competence of this bacterium. We screened a range of Salmonella Typhimurium effector proteins for interference with plant immunity. Among these, the phosphothreonine lyase SpvC attenuated the induction of immunity-related genes when present in plant cells. Using in vitro and in vivo systems we show that this effector protein interacts with and dephosphorylates activated Arabidopsis Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase 6 (MPK6), thereby inhibiting defense signaling. Moreover, the requirement of Salmonella SpvC was shown by the decreased proliferation of the ΔspvC mutant in Arabidopsis plants. These results suggest that some Salmonella effector proteins could have a conserved function during proliferation in different hosts. The fact that Salmonella and other Enterobacteriaceae use plants as hosts strongly suggests that plants represent a much larger reservoir for animal pathogens than so far estimated.

  4. The Salmonella effector protein SpvC, a phosphothreonine lyase is functional in plant cells

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Christina

    2014-10-17

    Salmonella is one of the most prominent causes of food poisoning and growing evidence indicates that contaminated fruits and vegetables are an increasing concern for human health. Successful infection demands the suppression of the host immune system, which is often achieved via injection of bacterial effector proteins into host cells. In this report we present the function of Salmonella effector protein in plant cell, supporting the new concept of trans-kingdom competence of this bacterium. We screened a range of Salmonella Typhimurium effector proteins for interference with plant immunity. Among these, the phosphothreonine lyase SpvC attenuated the induction of immunity-related genes when present in plant cells. Using in vitro and in vivo systems we show that this effector protein interacts with and dephosphorylates activated Arabidopsis Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase 6 (MPK6), thereby inhibiting defense signaling. Moreover, the requirement of Salmonella SpvC was shown by the decreased proliferation of the ΔspvC mutant in Arabidopsis plants. These results suggest that some Salmonella effector proteins could have a conserved function during proliferation in different hosts. The fact that Salmonella and other Enterobacteriaceae use plants as hosts strongly suggests that plants represent a much larger reservoir for animal pathogens than so far estimated.

  5. Evaluation of the GeneQuence DNA hybridization method in conjunction with 24-hour enrichment protocols for detection of Salmonella spp. in select foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozola, Mark A; Peng, Xuan; Wendorf, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A multilaboratory study was conducted to compare performance of the GeneQuence DNA hybridization (DNAH) method incorporating new 24 h enrichment protocols and reference culture procedures for detection of Salmonella spp. in select foods. Six food types (raw ground turkey, raw ground beef, dried whole egg, milk chocolate, walnuts, and dry pet food) were tested by the DNAH method and by the culture methods of either the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) or the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA/BAM). Fifteen laboratories participated in the study. Four of the foods tested (raw ground turkey, dried whole egg, milk chocolate, and dry pet food), showed no statistically significant differences in performance between the DNAH method and the reference procedure as determined by Chi square analysis. Sensitivity rates for the DNAH method ranged from 92 to 100%. The DNAH method, with the specific enrichment protocol evaluated, was found to be ineffective for detection of Salmonella spp. in walnuts. For raw ground beef, results from one trial showed a statistically significant difference in performance, with more positives obtained by the reference method. However, evidence suggests that the difference in the number of positives was likely due to lack of homogeneity of the test samples rather than to DNAH method performance.

  6. Chicken and Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Preparedness & Response Environmental Health Healthy Living Injury, Violence & Safety Life Stages & Populations Travelers’ Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ...

  7. Cold plasma rapid decontamination of food contact surfaces contaminated with Salmonella biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross-contamination of fresh produce and other foods from persistent pathogen reservoirs is a known risk factor in processing environments. Industry requires a rapid, waterless, zero-contact, chemical-free method for removing pathogens from food-contact surfaces. Cold plasma was tested for its abili...

  8. A national outbreak of Salmonella serotype Tennessee infections from contaminated peanut butter: a new food vehicle for salmonellosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Anandi N; Hoekstra, Mike; Patel, Nehal; Ewald, Gwen; Lord, Cathy; Clarke, Carmen; Villamil, Elizabeth; Niksich, Katherine; Bopp, Cheryl; Nguyen, Thai-An; Zink, Donald; Lynch, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella serotype Tennessee is a rare cause of the estimated 1 million cases of salmonellosis occurring annually in the United States. In January 2007, we began investigating a nationwide increase in Salmonella Tennessee infections. We defined a case as Salmonella Tennessee infection in a patient whose isolate demonstrated 1 of 3 closely related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and whose illness began during the period 1 August 2006 through 31 July 2007. We conducted a case-control study in 22 states and performed laboratory testing of foods and environmental samples. We identified 715 cases in 48 states; 37% of isolates were from urine specimens. Illness was associated with consuming peanut butter more than once a week (matched odds ratio [mOR], 3.5 [95% confidence interval {95% CI}, 1.4-9.9]), consuming Brand X peanut butter (mOR, 12.1 [95% CI, 3.6-66.3]), and consuming Brand Y peanut butter (mOR, 9.1 [95% CI, 1.0-433]). Brands X and Y were produced in 1 plant, which ceased production and recalled products on 14 February 2007. Laboratories isolated outbreak strains of Salmonella Tennessee from 34 Brands X and Y peanut butter jars and 2 plant environmental samples. This large, widespread outbreak of salmonellosis is the first linked to peanut butter in the United States; a nationwide recall resulted in outbreak control. Environmental contamination in the peanut butter plant likely caused this outbreak. This outbreak highlights the risk of salmonellosis from heat-processed foods of nonanimal origin previously felt to be low risk for Salmonella contamination.

  9. Evaluation of Rapid Molecular Detection Assays for Salmonella in Challenging Food Matrices at Low Inoculation Levels and Using Difficult-to-Detect Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Gina; Roof, Sherry; Post, Laurie; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Assays for detection of foodborne pathogens are generally initially evaluated for performance in validation studies carried out according to guidelines provided by validation schemes (e.g., AOAC International or the International Organization for Standardization). End users often perform additional validation studies to evaluate the performance of assays in specific matrices (e.g., specific foods or raw material streams of interest) and with specific pathogen strains. However, these types of end-user validations are typically not well defined. This study was conducted to evaluate a secondary end user validation of four AOAC-validated commercial rapid detection assays (an isothermal nucleic acid amplification, an immunoassay, and two PCR-based assays) for their ability to detect Salmonella in two challenging matrices (dry pet food and dark chocolate). Inclusivity was evaluated with 68 diverse Salmonella strains at low population levels representing the limit of detection (LOD) for each assay. One assay detected all strains at the LOD, two assays detected multiple strains only at 10 times the LOD, and the fourth assay failed to detect two strains (Salmonella bongori and S. enterica subsp. houtenae) even at 1,000 times the LOD; this assay was not further evaluated. The three remaining assays were subsequently evaluated for their ability to detect five selected Salmonella strains in food samples contaminated at fractional levels. Unpaired comparisons revealed no significant difference between the results for each given assay and the results obtained with the reference assay. However, analysis of paired culture-confirmed results revealed assay false-negative rates of 4 to 26% for dry pet food and 12 to 16% for dark chocolate. Overall, our data indicate that rapid assays may have high false-negative rates when performance is evaluated under challenging conditions, including low-moisture matrices, strains that are difficult to detect, injured cells, and low inoculum

  10. Efficacy of vacuum steam pasteurization for inactivation of Salmonella PT 30, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Enterococcus faecium on low moisture foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manoj K; Asa, Gladys; Sherwood, Julie; Graber, Kari; Bergholz, Teresa M

    2017-03-06

    Low moisture foods such as nuts, spices, and seeds have been implicated in several outbreaks due to Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7 contamination. Such foods may be consumed raw, and can be used as ingredients in other food products. While numerous thermal inactivation studies have been conducted for Salmonella on nuts, studies on other seeds and grains are minimal. Product water activity can influence the thermal resistance of pathogens, where thermal resistance increases as water activity decreases, leading to a requirement for higher temperatures and longer exposure times to achieve significant reduction of pathogen numbers. Vacuum steam pasteurization uses steam under vacuum, which can be operated at temperatures above and below 100°C. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of vacuum steam pasteurization for inactivation of pathogens on whole flaxseed, quinoa, sunflower kernels, milled flaxseed and whole black peppercorns. The use of E. faecium as a potential surrogate for Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 in vacuum steam pasteurization was also evaluated. Pasteurization for 1min at 75°C yielded average log reductions of 5.48±1.22, 5.71±0.40 and 5.23±0.61 on flaxseed, 4.29±0.92, 5.89±0.26 and 2.39±0.83 on quinoa, and 4.01±0.74, 5.40±0.83 and 2.99±0.92 on sunflower kernels for Salmonella PT 30, E. coli O157:H7 and E. faecium, respectively. Similarly, on milled flaxseed and black peppercorns average log reductions of 3.02±0.79 and 6.10±0.64CFU/g were observed for Salmonella PT 30 after 1min of treatment at 75°C but, on average, >6.0 log reductions were observed after pasteurization at 85°C. Our data demonstrate that vacuum steam pasteurization can be effectively used to reduce pathogens on these low moisture foods at temperature as low as 75 and 85°C, and that E. faecium may be used as a potential surrogate for Salmonella PT 30 and E. coli O157:H7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of an outbreak of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Hadar food illness in the Abruzzi region of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Di Giannatale

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study was made of 22 strains of Salmonella Hadar isolated from victims of an outbreak of food illness in the Abruzzi region of Italy in 2000 and 21 strains of the same serotype isolated from poultry meat and human stool samples in the Abruzzi and Molise regions between 2000 and 2001. The aim of the investigation was to provide an epidemiological interpretation of the food illness outbreak to establish the degree of similarity between the S. Hadar strains isolated from victims of the outbreak and those isolated from poultry meat (identified but unconfirmed as the possible source of infection and from other human samples received in the laboratory. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD were used to identify the genotypes and antimicrobial resistance patterns were determined. PFGE analysis of the restriction patterns obtained with XbaI and BlnI led to the identification of 12 pulsotypes in three groups. RAPD did not provide any information, as it was unable to differentiate between the strains isolated from food illness victims with gastroenteritis. Antimicrobial resistance tests revealed multiple resistance patterns and no strains were found to be resistant to ciprofloxacin or to the other quinolones tested. The poultry strains were found to be resistant to nalidixic acid, while the resistance in human strains was 31.8%. A combined analysis of resistance patterns and pulsotypes revealed four resistance patterns; the pattern associated with the outbreak was not correlated with the others present in the same period. This work suggests that a study of the relationship between different strains of the same serovar requires the implementation of different analytical methods

  12. Mushroom poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguven, M; Yilmaz, O; Deveci, M; Aksu, N; Dursun, F; Pelit, M; Cebeci, N

    2007-09-01

    We aimed to review characteristics of mushrooms and mushroom poisoning and compare clinical picture, laboratory data, treatment modalities and prognostic factors in children with amanita intoxication and non-amanita mushroom poisoning. We analyzed 39 pediatric patients through 1994-2004, retrospectively from the patient files and evaluated the patients in two groups as patients with amanita intoxication and patients with non-amanita mushroom poisoning. All of the cases were admitted to the hospital in autumn. Twenty three (59%) of the patients were female and 16 (41%) were male. Mean age of the patients was 8.05 +/- 2.10 years. Amanita phalloides toxin was detected in the serum in 8 patients. Eleven (28%) of the cases were strongly suggestive of amanita poisoning but alpha amanitin level could not be studied. The average time of appearance of symptoms after mushroom consumption, duration of symptoms, hospital stay, serum AST, ALT, PT and creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with amanita poisoning (pamanita poisoning (30%), totally 7 patients died of hepatic coma. The average time of admission to hospital, mean AST, ALT, creatinine and PT values at 3rd day were significantly higher in patients who died of hepatic coma. Prognosis was better in case of early admittance to hospital in patients with amanita poisoning. Early diagnosis and treatment in mushroom poisoning can be life saving. Public awareness is very important in prevention of intoxication as well as encouraging early admission to hospitals.

  13. Prevalence of enterotoxins and toxin gene profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from a bakery involved in a second staphylococcal food poisoning occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, J; Tallent, S; Melka, D; Keys, C; Bennett, R

    2014-09-01

    The study objective was to characterize and analyse the distribution of enterotoxins and genes encoding enterotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus strains recovered from the 601 environment and ingredient samples obtained during multiple inspections of a bakery implicated in two separate staphylococcal food poisoning incidents. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were evaluated using serological assays for identification of classical staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) SEA-SEE and polymerase chain reaction for the detection of newly described SE and SE-like enterotoxin genes seg-seu. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis identified thirteen pattern types. During these investigations, a total of 585 environmental swabs and 16 raw ingredient samples were collected by investigators, 85 of which were confirmed to contain Staph. aureus; of those isolates, 95·3% (81/85) harboured enterotoxin genes and 4·7% (4/85) carried newly described SE and SE-like enterotoxin genes in the absence of classical enterotoxins. Our research demonstrates the prevalence and diversity of classical SEs and the probable underestimated impact of nonclassical SE and SE-like enterotoxins role in domestic staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks. Given the abundance of SEs and SE-like toxins, these findings illustrate the utilization of PCR for enterotoxin gene identification and its significance in outbreak investigations. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Recalls of spices due to bacterial contamination monitored by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration: the predominance of Salmonellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Vibha; Ailes, Elizabeth; Wolyniak, Cecilia; Angulo, Frederick J; Klontz, Karl C

    2006-01-01

    From 1980 to 2000, the annual per capita consumption of spices in the United States increased by 60% (from 1.0 to 1.6 kg per person per year). Although spices are known to harbor various molds, fungi, and bacteria, relatively few reports have documented this group of foods as the cause of human illness. In recent years, however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has noted an increased number of recalls of dried spices due to bacterial contamination. Accordingly, we reviewed spice recalls that took place in the United States from fiscal years 1970 to 2003. During the study period, the FDA monitored 21 recalls involving 12 spice types contaminated with bacterial pathogens; in all but one instance, the recalled spices contained Salmonella. Paprika was the spice most often involved in the recalls. A wide variety of countries were the source of the recalled spices. Using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Salmonella Surveillance System, we were unable to discern any increases in the reported incidence of laboratory-confirmed salmonellosis in states that received spices contaminated with selected rare Salmonella serotypes. A variety of effective methods exist to disinfect spices, procedures that have attained increased importance given the frequent use of spices in ready-to-eat foods and the potential for contaminated spices to cause widespread outbreaks.

  15. The antibiotic resistance characteristics of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica isolated from food-producing animals, retail meat and humans in South East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Thi Thu Hao; Nguyen, Hoang Nam Kha; Smooker, Peter M; Coloe, Peter J

    2012-03-15

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global problem. It is most prevalent in developing countries where infectious diseases remain common, the use of antibiotics in humans and animals is widespread, and the replacement of older antibiotics with new generation antibiotics is not easy due to the high cost. Information on antibiotic resistance phenotypes and genotypes of Salmonella spp. in food animals and humans in different countries and geographic regions is necessary to combat the spread of resistance. This will improve the understanding of antibiotic resistance epidemiology, tracing of new emerging pathogens, assisting in disease treatment, and enhancing prudent use of antibiotics. However, the extent of antibiotic resistance in food-borne pathogens and humans in many developing countries remains unknown. The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of antibiotic resistance of non-typhoid Salmonella spp. in food-producing animals, retail meat and humans from South East Asia. It is focused on resistance characteristics of traditional and "critically important" antibiotics in this region, and the emergence of multidrug resistant strains and genetic elements that contribute to the development of multidrug resistance, including integrons and the Salmonella Genomic Island (SGI). Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Genomics of Salmonella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Rocio; McClelland, Michael; Santiviago, Carlos A.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    Progress in the study of Salmonella survival, colonization, and virulence has increased rapidly with the advent of complete genome sequencing and higher capacity assays for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Although many of these techniques have yet to be used to directly assay Salmonella growth on foods, these assays are currently in use to determine Salmonella factors necessary for growth in animal models including livestock animals and in in vitro conditions that mimic many different environments. As sequencing of the Salmonella genome and microarray analysis have revolutionized genomics and transcriptomics of salmonellae over the last decade, so are new high-throughput sequencing technologies currently accelerating the pace of our studies and allowing us to approach complex problems that were not previously experimentally tractable.

  17. Salmonella in selected foods by VIDAS immuno-concentration Salmonella plus selective plate method (Hektoen enteric, xylose lysine desoxycholate, bismuth sulfite): collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Wendy A; Schultz, Ann M; Curiale, Michael S; Johnson, Ronald L

    2002-01-01

    The VIDAS Immuno-concentration Salmonella (ICS) plus selective plate method (Hektoen enteric, xylose lysine desoxycholate, bismuth sulfite) method for the detection of Salmonella was compared to the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM)/AOAC culture method in a collaborative study. Thirty-two laboratories participated in the evaluation. Each laboratory tested one or more of the 6 test products: milk chocolate, nonfat dry milk, dried whole egg, soy flour, ground black pepper, and ground raw turkey. The 2 methods were in agreement for 1,297 of the 1,455 samples. Of the 158 samples not in agreement, 82 were VIDAS ICS plus selective plate-positive and BAM/AOAC-negative, and 76 were VIDAS ICS plus selective plate-negative and BAM/AOAC-positive.

  18. Estudio Sobre Portadores Cronicos de Salmonellas en Manipuladores de Alimentos de la Ciudad de Iquitos (Study of Chronic Salmonella Carriers in Food Handlers in the City of Iquitos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Haidlers in the City of Iquitos) 62770 3M162770A87 I AQ.12G DA313964 11. TITLE (Include Security Claixtilcation) Estudio sabre por-tadores cronicos...until eaflausted. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE All other editions are obsolete. UNCL.ASSIFIED " ESTUDIO SOBRE PORTADORES CRONICOS DE SALMONELLAS...dicicmbic 19896 a solicitar su Carne Sanitario, haclendo un total dc IO.tXI sujctos, dichos marnpuladorcs procedieron dc los diferentcs mercados v c%tdhkct

  19. 78 FR 68461 - Guidance for Industry: Studies To Evaluate the Utility of Anti-Salmonella Chemical Food Additives...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... revise GFI 80 because science, technology, and FDA policy have changed since this guidance was last... ingredients Salmonella-negative. We intend to expand the scope of this guidance to address other categories of.... What intended technical effects can we expect to see in FAPs submitted to FDA for anti-Salmonella use...

  20. Distribution of Salmonella in Humans, Production Animal Operations and a Watershed in a FoodNet Canada Sentinel Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, L; Pintar, K; Cook, A; McEwen, S; Friendship, R; Kelton, D; Pollari, F

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella is an important human pathogen, and production animals as well as water are known potential sources. This study helped provide insight into the epidemiology of Salmonella by comparing Salmonella strains found in humans to those detected in production animals and water in the same geographic area and time frame. Salmonella was found in 55% of broiler, 30% of swine, 13% of dairy, and 10% of beef manure samples and 23% of water samples. At the farm level, Salmonella was found on 93% of broiler, 81% of swine, 32% of beef and 30% of dairy farms. Salmonella strains of importance to public health were found in all sources tested; however, they appeared to be more common in the broilers. A number of the farms in this study were mixed farms, in that they had more than one production animal species on the farm. At both the sample and farm levels, beef-only farms had a significantly lower Salmonella prevalence (5% and 7%, respectively) than beef farms with additional production animal species (e.g. poultry) (12% and 42%, respectively) (P ≤ 0.05). Additionally, a number of mixed farms had more than one commodity sampled for this study and similar Salmonella strains by phage type and PFGE were found in the poultry and the other sampled commodity on the farm. This information can help inform the evidence base needed to help target interventions and modify best practices in production agriculture. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Food and feed components for gut health-promoting adhesion of E. coli Salmonella enterica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.; Galletti, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A host runs less risk of contracting a gastrointestinal infection when enteropathogenic bacteria adhere to dietary fibers instead of to epithelial cell receptors. The aim of this study was to test the binding capacity of food and feed components for intestinal bacteria from various hosts

  2. Identification of in vivo-induced genes during infection of chickens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Zhicheng; Lin, Zhijie; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-06-01

    Chickens are an important source of food worldwide and are often infected with food-poisoning serovars of Salmonella enterica, frequently Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), without exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Ivi (in vivo induced) genes identified using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) are expressed only during bacterial infection and have the potential value of identifying epidemic strains and antigens which can form the basis for sub-unit vaccine development. We applied IVIAT to SE strain 50041 and identified 42 ivi genes. Eight representative ivi genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR as being expressed only in vivo within 48 h of infection compared with that of in vitro-cultured. Although our results indicated that the identified ivi genes are expressed only in vivo, further research is needed to elucidate the exact roles of these genes during infection and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrochemical Biosensors for Rapid Detection of Foodborne Salmonella: A Critical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinti, Stefano; Volpe, Giulia; Piermarini, Silvia; Delibato, Elisabetta; Palleschi, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella has represented the most common and primary cause of food poisoning in many countries for at least over 100 years. Its detection is still primarily based on traditional microbiological culture methods which are labor-intensive, extremely time consuming, and not suitable for testing a large number of samples. Accordingly, great efforts to develop rapid, sensitive and specific methods, easy to use, and suitable for multi-sample analysis, have been made and continue. Biosensor-based technology has all the potentialities to meet these requirements. In this paper, we review the features of the electrochemical immunosensors, genosensors, aptasensors and phagosensors developed in the last five years for Salmonella detection, focusing on the critical aspects of their application in food analysis. PMID:28820458

  4. Presence of salmonella enteritidis in poultry products and its impact on public health Presencia de Salmonella serovariedad Enteritidis en productos de origen avícola y su repercusión en salud pública

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Mantilla Anaya

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella enterica, sub-species enterica serovar Enteritidis or Salmonella enteritidis, when it is artificially named as being a species (1, is one of the most common causes of human gastroenteritis in cases of food poisoning; some authors consider it to be the most important agent on a world-wide basis. Outbreaks are associated with the intake of different kinds of food, but poultry products are most commonly involved. This agent‘s transmission occurs as a consequence of inadequately cooked chicken and eggs or during cross-contamination with other food. Salmonella Enteritidis and other serovars which produce food poisoning in humans, occasionally cause clinical disease in poultry (avian parathyphosis or loss of weight-gain, and can generate asymptomatic carriers, which can contribute to the transmission (transovarial, during laying or storage. Globalisation, the open market and the poultry industry‘s growth have increased the intake and distribution of chicken, eggs and their subproducts and, therefore, the possibility of Salmonella spp transmission. Considering the public health importance of this agent, epidemiological studies contributing to the control and prevention of this zoonosis must be carried out. La salmonella serovariedad enteriditis (salmonella enterica subespecie enterica serovariedad Enteritidis, o Salmonella enteritidis cuando se la nombra artificialmente como especie (1 es una de las causas más comunes de gastroenteritis por intoxicación de origen alimentario en humanos, considera da por algunos autores como la más importante en todo el mundo. La presentación de brotes puede involucrar el consumo de diversos alimentos, pero los productos de origen avícola son los más frecuentemente implicados. La transmisión del microorganismo es consecuencia de la cocción inadecuada del pollo y los huevos o de la contaminación cruzada con otros alimentos. La Salmonella Enteritidis y otras

  5. Menthol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menthol is used to add peppermint flavor to candy and other products. It is also used in certain skin lotions and ointments. This article discusses menthol poisoning from swallowing pure menthol. This article is ...

  6. Chlorine poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine is a chemical that prevents bacteria from growing. Chlorine poisoning occurs when someone swallows or breathes in (inhales) chlorine. This article is for information only. Do NOT use it to ...

  7. Acetone poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002480.htm Acetone poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetone is a chemical used in many household products. ...

  8. Paradichlorobenzene poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts are usually swallowed. References Holland MG. Occupational toxicology. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Pesticides Read more Poisoning Read more NIH MedlinePlus Magazine ...

  9. Gasoline poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002806.htm Gasoline poisoning To use the sharing features on this ... This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing gasoline or breathing in its fumes. This article is ...

  10. Detergent poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids, including benzalkonium chloride Simple soap Symptoms Detergent poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in acid level of blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the body organs ...

  11. Yew poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poison is in most parts of the yew plant, but the highest amount is in the seeds. ... or irregular or fast heartbeat Blue-colored lips Breathing difficulty ... Muscle weakness Nausea and vomiting Stomach pain Diarrhea

  12. Prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and associated risk factors of Shigella and Salmonella among food handlers in Arba Minch University, South Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammedaman Mama

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of safe food improves health of the people that contributes to productivity and provides an effective platform for development and poverty alleviation. On the other hand, unsafe food handling and processing can serve as a vehicle for the transmission of a variety of disease causing agents. The risk of food getting contaminated depends largely on the health status of the food handlers, their personal hygiene, knowledge and practice of food hygiene. Food borne diseases are therefore a public health problem in developed and developing countries which is also true for Ethiopia. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and associated risk factors of Shigella and Salmonella among food handlers in Arba Minch University, South Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among food handlers in Arba Minch University students’ cafeteria from April- June, 2015. Structured questionnaire was used to collect socio demographic data and associated risk factors. Stool sample was collected and examined for pathogens following standard procedures. Biochemical tests were done to identify the species of pathogens and sensitivity test was done using Kirby- Baur disk diffusion technique. Results A total of 376 food handlers were enrolled in the study with the response rate of 100% for data collected by questionnaire. About 7.4% were aged less than 20 years with majority (63.3% lay in the working age group of 21-35 years. However, a total of 345 food handlers participated for stool examination of whom, stool cultures revealed 6.9% of Salmonella and 3% Shigella isolates. Finger nail status (AOR=0.033, hand washing practice after toilet (AOR= 0.006 and touching food with bare hands (AOR= p < 0.001 were independent predictors of infectious enteric diseases among the food handlers. All isolated pathogens were resistant to amoxicillin (100%, followed by clarithromycin

  13. Prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and associated risk factors of Shigella and Salmonella among food handlers in Arba Minch University, South Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mama, Mohammedaman; Alemu, Getaneh

    2016-11-21

    The availability of safe food improves health of the people that contributes to productivity and provides an effective platform for development and poverty alleviation. On the other hand, unsafe food handling and processing can serve as a vehicle for the transmission of a variety of disease causing agents. The risk of food getting contaminated depends largely on the health status of the food handlers, their personal hygiene, knowledge and practice of food hygiene. Food borne diseases are therefore a public health problem in developed and developing countries which is also true for Ethiopia. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and associated risk factors of Shigella and Salmonella among food handlers in Arba Minch University, South Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted among food handlers in Arba Minch University students' cafeteria from April- June, 2015. Structured questionnaire was used to collect socio demographic data and associated risk factors. Stool sample was collected and examined for pathogens following standard procedures. Biochemical tests were done to identify the species of pathogens and sensitivity test was done using Kirby- Baur disk diffusion technique. A total of 376 food handlers were enrolled in the study with the response rate of 100% for data collected by questionnaire. About 7.4% were aged less than 20 years with majority (63.3%) lay in the working age group of 21-35 years. However, a total of 345 food handlers participated for stool examination of whom, stool cultures revealed 6.9% of Salmonella and 3% Shigella isolates. Finger nail status (AOR=0.033), hand washing practice after toilet (AOR= 0.006) and touching food with bare hands (AOR= p food handlers. All isolated pathogens were resistant to amoxicillin (100%), followed by clarithromycin (41%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (35%). The present study showed high prevalence of enteropathogens among the study participants

  14. Antibiotic resistances in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica isolated from foods with animal origin Resistencias a antibióticos en Listeria monocytogenes y Salmonella enterica aislados de alimentos de origen animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltasar Balsalobre Hernández

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of antibiotics in both human and animal health and in cattle production has generated resistant microorganisms to common antibiotics. Resistances spread caused by human and animal therapeutic is well known, but we know poorly frecuency of resistant bacteria in foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers. In this paper, sensitivity to nineteen antibiotics was investigated in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal origin, including fresh meat, hamburgers, fresh sausages, boiled ham and new-laid chicken eggs. The plate diffusion method of Bauer-Kirby was used.Listeria monocytogenes strains showed a very high sensitivity to all antibiotics checked, with the exception of one strain tetracycline resistant. In contrast, Salmonella enterica showed a high frecuency of resistances, in special to tetracycline, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, ticarcillin, ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Moreover, multi-resistance was a common phenomenon. Twenty percent of S. enterica strains were resistant to four or more antibiotics. Frecuency of resistances was higher in 4,5,12:i:-, Hadar, Typhimurium and Virchow serotypes.In conclusion, Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers are usually resistant to several antibiotics. The significance of this observation and its potential health risk must be investigated.El uso extensivo de antibióticos para la salud humana y animal así como para mejorar la producción ganadera ha generado un gran número de cepas microbianas resistentes a antibióticos de uso común. Es bien conocida la difusión de resistencias a través de la terapéutica humana y animal, pero desconocemos en qué medida los alimentos de origen animal destinados a consumo humano son portadores de resistencias.En este trabajo, se investigó la sensibilidad a diecinueve antibióticos de cepas de Listeria monocytogenes y Salmonella

  15. Detecção de Listeria, Salmonella e Klebsiella em serviço de alimentação hospitalar Detection of Listeria, Salmonella and Klebsiella in a hospital food service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uelinton Manoel Pinto

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A presença de Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella sp. e Klebsiella sp. em dietas enterais e em ambientes, utensílios e equipamentos de preparo de alimentos em serviço de alimentação hospitalar, foi o objetivo desta pesquisa. MÉTODOS: A contaminação de ambientes, utensílios e equipamentos de preparo de alimentos em serviço de alimentação hospitalar por Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella sp. e Klebsiella sp. foi avaliada em 50 amostras coletadas pela técnica de swab. Quatro amostras de dietas enterais também foram analisadas. Colônias típicas de bactérias do gênero Listeria foram isoladas de dieta enteral em ágar Oxford e a identificação da espécie L. monocytogenes foi feita por testes bioquímicos e imunológicos. RESULTADOS: A presença de Salmonella foi detectada em dieta enteral e identificada como S. rissen por sorologia. Pela relevância como agente causador de infecções hospitalares, bactérias do gênero Klebsiella foram pesquisadas e isoladas em ágar seletivo MacConkey-inositol-carbenicilina. K. pneumoniae foi encontrada em equipamento e utensílio e K. oxytoca em ambiente, equipamento e dieta enteral. Os isolados de L. monocytogenes apresentaram resistência apenas ao antibiótico cefoxitina e os do gênero Klebsiella foram resistentes a ampicilina e amoxilina. S. rissen foi sensível aos 13 antibióticos avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: A contaminação de 11% das amostras analisadas com pelo menos um dos patógenos, alerta para a necessidade de implantação de um rigoroso sistema de controle de qualidade nas áreas de manipulação dos alimentos, a fim de aumentar a segurança alimentar dos pacientes hospitalizados.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the research was to investigate the presence of Listeria, Salmonella and Klebsiella on samples of enteral diets and utensils, surfaces and equipments involved in food preparation in a hospital food service. METHODS: Fifty samples collected from utensils, surfaces and

  16. Attachment behaviour of Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella Typhimurium P6on food contact surfaces for food transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abban, Stephen; Jakobsen, Mogens; Jespersen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    . Typhimurium P6 respectively. Correlation with roughness average was poor; r = -0.425 and -0.413 respectively for E. coli K12 and S. Typhimurium P6. Presence of residue caused significant reduction (p bacteria attached to all materials, but made attached bacteria significantly more...... difficult to detach by either of two rinsing systems from all three surfaces. Explanation for these observations could be made in part from scanning electron micrographs which showed significantly more bacteria sitting on patches of residue when it was introduced to the surfaces, compared to the bare...... material sections of the same surfaces. We report these observations for the first time for aluminium and the FRP material and in part for stainless steel. The S. Typhimurium P6 strain also had significantly higher level of attachment than the E. coli K12 strain. Our findings show that food residue...

  17. Multiple transmissible genes encoding fluoroquinolone and third-generation cephalosporin resistance co-located in non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from food-producing animals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong-Xia; Song, Li; Liu, Ji; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Ren, Yan-Na; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Jing-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Hong; Webber, Mark A; Ogbolu, David O; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Piddock, Laura J V

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genes conferring resistance to fluoroquinolones and extended-spectrum β-lactams in non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) from food-producing animals in China. In total, 31 non-duplicate NTS were obtained from food-producing animals that were sick. Isolates were identified and serotyped and the genetic relatedness of the isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested chromosomal DNA. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methodology. The presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and fluoroquinolone resistance genes was established by PCR and sequencing. Genes encoded on transmissible elements were identified by conjugation and transformation. Plasmids were typed by PCR-based replicon typing. The occurrence and diversity of numerous different transmissible genes conferring fluoroquinolone resistance [qnrA, qnrD, oqxA and aac(6')-Ib-cr] and ESBLs (CTX-M-27 and CTX-M-14), and which co-resided in different isolates and serovars of Salmonella, were much higher than in European countries. Furthermore, different plasmids encoded fluoroquinolone resistance (ca. 6 kb) and β-lactam resistance (ca. 63 kb) and these co-resided in isolates with mutations in topoisomerase genes (gyrA and parC) giving very resistant Salmonella. The presence of multidrug-resistant bacteria in food-producing animals in countries that export foodstuffs suggests that global transfer of antibiotic resistances from country to country on food is possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Diazonium-based impedimetric aptasensor for the rapid label-free detection of Salmonella typhimurium in food sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheryan, Zahra; Raoof, Jahan-Bakhsh; Golabi, Mohsen; Turner, Anthony P F; Beni, Valerio

    2016-06-15

    Fast and accurate detection of microorganisms is of key importance in clinical analysis and in food and water quality monitoring. Salmonella typhimurium is responsible for about a third of all cases of foodborne diseases and consequently, its fast detection is of great importance for ensuring the safety of foodstuffs. We report the development of a label-free impedimetric aptamer-based biosensor for S. typhimurium detection. The aptamer biosensor was fabricated by grafting a diazonium-supporting layer onto screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPEs), via electrochemical or chemical approaches, followed by chemical immobilisation of aminated-aptamer. FTIR-ATR, contact angle and electrochemical measurements were used to monitor the fabrication process. Results showed that electrochemical immobilisation of the diazonium-grafting layer allowed the formation of a denser aptamer layer, which resulted in higher sensitivity. The developed aptamer-biosensor responded linearly, on a logarithm scale, over the concentration range 1 × 10(1) to 1 × 10(8)CFU mL(-1), with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1 × 10(1) CFU mL(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 6 CFU mL(-1). Selectivity studies showed that the aptamer biosensor could discriminate S. typhimurium from 6 other model bacteria strains. Finally, recovery studies demonstrated its suitability for the detection of S. typhimurium in spiked (1 × 10(2), 1 × 10(4) and 1 × 10(6) CFU mL(-1)) apple juice samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bacteriophage-induced reduction in Salmonella Enteritidis counts in the crop of broiler chickens undergoing preslaughter feed withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto Marietto; Donato, Tais Cremasco; Baptista, Ana Angelita Sampaio; Corrêa, Isadora Mainieri de Oliveira; Garcia, Keila Carolina Ornellas Dutka; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella food poisoning is a public health problem. Feed withdrawal from broiler chickens before slaughter can favor the multiplication of Salmonella in the cecum and crop of contaminated animals and subsequently lead to contamination of carcasses in the processing plant. In the present study, a cocktail of lytic bacteriophages isolated from sewage water was orally administered to 45-d-old broiler chickens 1 h after they received an oral dose of 10(7) cfu/mL Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis. Immediately after phage administration and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 h thereafter, groups of chicken were killed. Ceca and crops were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella. At 3 h posttreatment, there were 10(3) cfu/g and 10(1) cfu/g of cecal and crop suspension, respectively. At 6 h after treatment, the number of Salmonella was 10(3) cfu/g in the cecal suspension, but below the detection limit in the crops. Our results suggest that bacteriophage therapy may be able to reduce the contamination of chicken carcasses by reducing the preslaughter load of Salmonella in the birds.

  20. The dark side of the salad: Salmonella typhimurium overcomes the innate immune response of Arabidopsis thaliana and shows an endopathogenic lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Adam; Carreri, Alessandro; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Hirt, Heribert

    2008-05-28

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium contaminated vegetables and fruits are considerable sources of human infections. Bacteria present in raw plant-derived nutrients cause salmonellosis, the world wide most spread food poisoning. This facultative endopathogen enters and replicates in host cells and actively suppresses host immune responses. Although Salmonella survives on plants, the underlying bacterial infection mechanisms are only poorly understood. In this report we investigated the possibility to use Arabidopsis thaliana as a genetically tractable host system to study Salmonella-plant interactions. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) marked bacteria, we show here that Salmonella can infect various Arabidopsis tissues and proliferate in intracellular cellular compartments. Salmonella infection of Arabidopsis cells can occur via intact shoot or root tissues resulting in wilting, chlorosis and eventually death of the infected organs. Arabidopsis reacts to Salmonella by inducing the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades and enhanced expression of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. The induction of defense responses fails in plants that are compromised in ethylene or jasmonic acid signaling or in the MKK3-MPK6 MAPK pathway. These findings demonstrate that Arabidopsis represents a true host system for Salmonella, offering unique possibilities to study the interaction of this human pathogen with plants at the molecular level for developing novel drug targets and addressing current safety issues in human nutrition.

  1. The dark side of the salad: Salmonella typhimurium overcomes the innate immune response of Arabidopsis thaliana and shows an endopathogenic lifestyle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Schikora

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium contaminated vegetables and fruits are considerable sources of human infections. Bacteria present in raw plant-derived nutrients cause salmonellosis, the world wide most spread food poisoning. This facultative endopathogen enters and replicates in host cells and actively suppresses host immune responses. Although Salmonella survives on plants, the underlying bacterial infection mechanisms are only poorly understood. In this report we investigated the possibility to use Arabidopsis thaliana as a genetically tractable host system to study Salmonella-plant interactions. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP marked bacteria, we show here that Salmonella can infect various Arabidopsis tissues and proliferate in intracellular cellular compartments. Salmonella infection of Arabidopsis cells can occur via intact shoot or root tissues resulting in wilting, chlorosis and eventually death of the infected organs. Arabidopsis reacts to Salmonella by inducing the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades and enhanced expression of pathogenesis related (PR genes. The induction of defense responses fails in plants that are compromised in ethylene or jasmonic acid signaling or in the MKK3-MPK6 MAPK pathway. These findings demonstrate that Arabidopsis represents a true host system for Salmonella, offering unique possibilities to study the interaction of this human pathogen with plants at the molecular level for developing novel drug targets and addressing current safety issues in human nutrition.

  2. Survival or growth of inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on yellow onions (Allium cepa) under conditions simulating food service and consumer handling and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Vanessa M; Zhao, Irene Y; Schaffner, Donald W; Danyluk, Michelle D; Harris, Linda J

    2015-01-01

    Whole and diced yellow onions (Allium cepa) were inoculated with five-strain cocktails of rifampin-resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Salmonella and stored under conditions to simulate food service or consumer handling. The inoculum was grown in broth (for both whole and diced onion experiments) or on agar plates (for whole onion experiments). Marked circles (3.3 cm in diameter) on the outer papery skin of whole onions were spot inoculated (10 μl in 10 drops) at 7 log CFU per circle, and onions were stored at 4°C, 30 to 50 % relative humidity, or at ambient conditions (23°C, 30 to 50 % relative humidity). Diced onions were inoculated at 3 log CFU/g and then stored in open or closed containers at 4°C or ambient conditions. Previously inoculated and ambient-stored diced onions were also mixed 1:9 (wt/wt) with refrigerated uninoculated freshly diced onions and stored in closed containers at ambient conditions. Inoculated pathogens were recovered in 0.1 % peptone and plated onto selective and nonselective media supplemented with 50 μg/ml rifampin. Both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella populations declined more rapidly on onion skins when the inoculum was prepared in broth rather than on agar. Agar-prepared E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella declined by 0.4 and 0.3 log CFU per sample per day, respectively, at ambient conditions; at 4°C the rates of reduction were 0.08 and 0.06 log CFU per sample per day for E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella, respectively. Populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella did not change over 6 days of storage at 4°C in diced onions. Lag times of 6 to 9 h were observed with freshly inoculated onion at ambient conditions; no lag was observed when previously inoculated and uninoculated onions were mixed. Growth rates at ambient conditions were 0.2 to 0.3 log CFU/g/h for E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in freshly inoculated onion and 0.2 log CFU/g/h in mixed product. Diced onions support pathogen growth and should be kept refrigerated.

  3. Detection of Salmonella in Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Flemming; Mansdal, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Cost-effective and rapid monitoring of Salmonella in the meat production chain can contribute to food safety. The objective of this study was to validate an easy-to-use pre-PCR sample preparation method based on a simple boiling protocol for screening of Salmonella in meat and carcass swab samples...

  4. Inhibition of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on spinach and identification of antimicrobial substances produced by a commercial Lactic Acid Bacteria food safety intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cálix-Lara, Thelma F; Rajendran, Mahitha; Talcott, Stephen T; Smith, Stephen B; Miller, Rhonda K; Castillo, Alejandro; Sturino, Joseph M; Taylor, T Matthew

    2014-04-01

    The microbiological safety of fresh produce is of concern for the U.S. food supply. Members of the Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) have been reported to antagonize pathogens by competing for nutrients and by secretion of substances with antimicrobial activity, including organic acids, peroxides, and antimicrobial polypeptides. The objectives of this research were to: (i) determine the capacity of a commercial LAB food antimicrobial to inhibit Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on spinach leaf surfaces, and (ii) identify antimicrobial substances produced in vitro by the LAB comprising the food antimicrobial. Pathogens were inoculated on freshly harvested spinach, followed by application of the LAB antimicrobial. Treated spinach was aerobically incubated up to 12 days at 7 °C and surviving pathogens enumerated via selective/differential plating. l-Lactic acid and a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) were detected and quantified from cell-free fermentates obtained from LAB-inoculated liquid microbiological medium. Application of 8.0 log10 CFU/g LAB produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella populations on spinach of 1.6 and 1.9 log10 CFU/g, respectively. It was concluded the LAB antimicrobial inhibited foodborne pathogens on spinach during refrigerated storage, likely the result of the production of metabolites with antimicrobial activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. to survive in a desiccation model system and in dry foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Reiji; Matsumoto, Masakado; Sakae, Kenji; Miyazaki, Yutaka

    2005-11-01

    In order to determine desiccation tolerances of bacterial strains, the survival of 58 diarrheagenic strains (18 salmonellae, 35 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [STEC], and 5 shigellae) and of 15 nonpathogenic E. coli strains was determined after drying at 35 degrees C for 24 h in paper disks. At an inoculum level of 10(7) CFU/disk, most of the salmonellae (14/18) and the STEC strains (31/35) survived with a population of 10(3) to 10(4) CFU/disk, whereas all of the shigellae (5/5) and the majority of the nonpathogenic E. coli strains (9/15) did not survive (the population was decreased to less than the detection limit of 10(2) CFU/disk). After 22 to 24 months of subsequent storage at 4 degrees C, all of the selected salmonellae (4/4) and most of the selected STEC strains (12/15) survived, keeping the original populations (10(3) to 10(4) CFU/disk). In contrast to the case for storage at 4 degrees C, all of 15 selected strains (5 strains each of Salmonella spp., STEC O157, and STEC O26) died after 35 to 70 days of storage at 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C. The survival rates of all of these 15 strains in paper disks after the 24 h of drying were substantially increased (10 to 79 times) by the presence of sucrose (12% to 36%). All of these 15 desiccated strains in paper disks survived after exposure to 70 degrees C for 5 h. The populations of these 15 strains inoculated in dried foods containing sucrose and/or fat (e.g., chocolate) were 100 times higher than those in the dried paper disks after drying for 24 h at 25 degrees C.

  6. Whole genome sequencing analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden isolated from human stool and contaminated food samples collected from the Southern coastal area of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baisheng; Yang, Xingfen; Tan, Hailing; Ke, Bixia; He, Dongmei; Wang, Haiyan; Chen, Qiuxia; Ke, Changwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2018-02-02

    Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden is the most common non-typhoid Salmonella found in South and Southeast Asia. It causes zoonoses worldwide through the consumption of contaminated foods and seafood, and is considered as an important food-borne pathogen in China, especially in the Southern coastal area. We compared the whole genomes of 44 S. Weltevreden strains isolated from human stool and contaminated food samples from Southern Coastal China, in order to investigate their phylogenetic relationships and establish their genetic relatedness to known international strains. ResFinder analysis of the draft genomes of isolated strains detected antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes in only eight isolates, equivalent to minimum inhibitory concentration assay, and only a few isolates showed resistance to tetracycline, ciprofloxacin or ampicillin. In silico MLST analysis revealed that 43 out of 44 S. Weltevreden strains belonged to sequence type 365 (CC205), the most common sequence type of the serovars. Phylogenetic analysis of the 44 domestic and 26 international isolates suggested that the population of S. Weltevreden could be segregated into six phylogenetic clusters. Cluster I included two strains from food and strains of the "Island Cluster", indicating potential inter-transmission between different countries and regions through foods. The predominant S. Weltevreden isolates obtained from the samples from Southern coastal China were found to be phylogenetically related to strains from Southern East Asia, and formed clusters II-VI. The study has demonstrated that WGS-based analysis may be used to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of this bacterium as part of a food-borne disease surveillance program. The methods used are also more widely applicable to other geographical regions and areas and could therefore be useful for improving our understanding of the international spread of S. Weltevreden on a global scale. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  7. Childhood poisoning: a community hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, S H; Wall, J B

    1977-06-01

    We reviewed medical records of 53 children who ingested poison and were treated as inpatients and 107 who were treated as outpatients in a Southeastern community hospital. Findings included a much higher incidence of petroleum distillate poisoning than is found nationally, and a low frequency of aspirin ingestions. Data on packaging of the poisons indicate that one third was stored in food containers. Of the products encountered, 33% currently require safety packaging but were found in obsolete containers.

  8. Salmonella Osteomyelitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAnearney, S; McCall, D

    2015-01-01

    .... Salmonella as an aetiological agent in osteomyelitis is essentially rare and salmonella osteomyelitis in itself is predominantly seen in patients with haemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease or thalassemia...

  9. [Seafood poisonings. Part I. Shellfish and crustacean poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Mietka-Ciszowska, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Seafood is a valuable source of nutrients, therefore, it constitutes an important part of diet in some geographical regions. The consumption of some shellfish and crustacean species may be a cause of food poisonings in humans, mainly due to simultaneous ingestion of biotoxins produced by algae, cyanobacteria, and bacteria. These toxins are accumulated in higher links of a food chain, i.e. mollusks and crustaceans, that consume toxins filtering phytoplankton. In the present paper the etiology, pathogenesis, symptomatology and treatment of some shellfish poisonings are presented.

  10. Salmonella in meats, water, fruit and vegetables as disclosed from testing undertaken by Food Business Operators in Ireland from 2005 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Food Business Operators (FBO) are responsible for the safety of the food they produce and in Ireland those under the regulatory control of the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine are required to provide summary data on microbiological tests undertaken as part of their food safety controls. These data are provided to the National Reference Laboratory through the 25 private laboratories undertaking the testing. Results Over the five-year period Salmonella sp. was isolated from 0.7% of the 254,000 raw meat or raw meat products tested with the annual prevalence ranging from 0.5 to 1.1%. Poultry meats were consistently more contaminated than other meats with higher recovery rates in turkey (3.3%), duck (3.3%), and chicken (2.5%) compared with meats of porcine (1.6%), ovine (0.2%) and bovine origin (0.1%). Salmonella sp. was also isolated from 58 (0.06%) of the 96,115 cooked or partially cooked meat and meat products tested during the reporting period with the annual percentage positive samples ranging from 0.01 to 0.16%. A total of 50 different serotypes were recovered from raw meats over this period with the greatest diversity found in poultry samples (n = 36). Four serotypes, Kentucky, Typhimurium, Agona and Derby accounted for over 70% of all isolates detected on FBO testing over the period 2005 to 2009. Conclusions Capturing microbiological data generated by Food Business Operators allows the regulatory sector access to a substantial amount of valuable data with the minimum financial outlay. PMID:22999014

  11. Salmonella in meats, water, fruit and vegetables as disclosed from testing undertaken by Food Business Operators in Ireland from 2005 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duggan Sharon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Food Business Operators (FBO are responsible for the safety of the food they produce and in Ireland those under the regulatory control of the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine are required to provide summary data on microbiological tests undertaken as part of their food safety controls. These data are provided to the National Reference Laboratory through the 25 private laboratories undertaking the testing. Results Over the five-year period Salmonella sp. was isolated from 0.7% of the 254,000 raw meat or raw meat products tested with the annual prevalence ranging from 0.5 to 1.1%. Poultry meats were consistently more contaminated than other meats with higher recovery rates in turkey (3.3%, duck (3.3%, and chicken (2.5% compared with meats of porcine (1.6%, ovine (0.2% and bovine origin (0.1%. Salmonella sp. was also isolated from 58 (0.06% of the 96,115 cooked or partially cooked meat and meat products tested during the reporting period with the annual percentage positive samples ranging from 0.01 to 0.16%. A total of 50 different serotypes were recovered from raw meats over this period with the greatest diversity found in poultry samples (n = 36. Four serotypes, Kentucky, Typhimurium, Agona and Derby accounted for over 70% of all isolates detected on FBO testing over the period 2005 to 2009. Conclusions Capturing microbiological data generated by Food Business Operators allows the regulatory sector access to a substantial amount of valuable data with the minimum financial outlay.

  12. Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei Attenuate Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Typhimurium Colonization and Virulence Gene Expression In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Muyyarikkandy, Muhammed Shafeekh; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), and Salmonella Heidelberg (SH) have been responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. Salmonella colonization in chicken is characterized by initial attachment to the cecal epithelial cells (CEC) followed by dissemination to the liver, spleen, and oviduct. Since cecal colonization is critical to Salmonella transmission along the food chain continuum, reducing this intestinal association c...

  13. Salmonella in foods: new enrichment procedure for TECRA Salmonella Visual Immunoassay using a single rv(R10) only, TT only, or dual rv(R10) and TT selective enrichment broths (AOAC official method 998.09): collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Denise; Dailianis, Angela E; Hill, Louise; Curiale, Michael S; Gangar, Vidhya

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to compare a new enrichment procedure for the TECRA Salmonella Visual Immunoassay (TSVIA) with the reference method given in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (7th Ed.). Three food types (milk powder, pepper, and soy flour) were analyzed in Australia and 3 food types (milk chocolate, dried egg, and raw turkey) were analyzed in the United States. Thirty-eight collaborators participated in the study. The TECRA method was evaluated using both Rappaport-Vassiliadis R10 (RV(R10)) and tetrathionate (TT) broths for selective enrichment. M broth cultures arising from each of the 2 selective enrichment broths were tested in the TSVIA using 2 individual wells, one for each selective broth, and a single well to test the pooled selective enrichment broths. The results for the pooled enrichment broths were reported elsewhere. This study presents the results for the use of single enrichment broths, i.e., RV(R10) only or TT only, with the TSVIA. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were observed for the pairwise comparison of the proportion of positive samples for either RV(R10) or TT used as a single enrichment broth for the TSVIA with that for the reference method.

  14. Poison centre network saves lives | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-27

    Oct 27, 2010 ... Snakebites, food poisoning, exposure to toxic chemicals: all are potentially fatal if the correct antidote isn't identified and applied — fast. Since 1988, INTOX, a computer-based program involving a global network of poison centres, has been providing those life-saving capabilities in minutes.

  15. Evaluation of the effectiveness of ozone as a sanitizer for fish experimentally contaminated with Salmonella sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle de Bem Luiz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonellosis is a major public health problem related to food contamination and ensuing food poisoning. Brazilian resolution RDC nº 12/2001 of the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA established the absence of Salmonella in 25 g of fish for consumption. However, the significant increase in the occurrence of fish contamination by Salmonella and other pathogenic bacteria shows that the currently applied strategies are not sufficient and that, in addition to the implementation of good health practices, the application of new sanitizer technologies in the fish industry is also necessary. In this context, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of ozone in an aqueous medium as a sanitizer for Salmonella contaminated fish. The experiment was carried out using a completely randomized design with eight treatments and five replicates, giving a total of 40 experimental units. Each sample consisted of three fishes, totalizing 120 fishes. The treatments consisted of different combinations of temperature and water-dissolved ozone (O3 concentrations (21 °C × 0.35 ppm; 20 °C × 0.45 ppm; 21 °C × 0.60 ppm; 20 °C × 0.80 ppm; 19 °C × 1.7 ppm; 6 × 5.1 ppm; 4 °C × 7.2 ppm; and 2 °C × 9.1 ppm. Colossoma macropomum (Tambaqui samples were experimentally infected with Salmonella typhymurium (ATCC 14028 and immersed in water with the different treatments. After three minutes, the fish samples were collected and subjected to qualitative Salmonella analyses. The ozone tests were not efficient in eradicating Salmonella under the experimental conditions presented here, indicating the need for the identification of effective sanitizers in order to meet the determinations of Brazilian law.

  16. DETEKSI Salmonella PADA NASI GORENG YANG DISEDIAKAN OLEH RESTORAN KERETA API KELAS EKONOMI [Detection of Salmonella on Fried Rice Served in Restaurant of Economic Class Train

    OpenAIRE

    Srianta; Elisa Rinihapsari

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella is a group of infective pathogenic bacteria for human being that cause many food borne disease outbreaks. Human, animal and some animal-based food products are whicle for Salmonella. Public transportation i.e. train/railway, often serve foods that potentially contaminated with Salmonella. Study on Salmonella detection on fried rice served in economic class train restaurant is necessary for controlling its safety and quality. Standard method was used to detect Salmonella on fried ri...

  17. Staphylococcal food poisoning from cream-filled cake in a metropolitan area of South-Eastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Maria Lúcia

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve people became ill with vomiting and diarrhoea approximately four hours after eating cake with a cream filling at a birthday party and on the day following. The cake had been prepared by a food handler who had long experience in preparing foods for such functions. Staphylococcus aureus that produced enterotoxin A was isolated from the nose, the fingernails, and a healed infection on the neck of the food handler, and from the cake. Enterotoxin A was detected in the remaining portion of the cake. The cake, while still warm, had been refrigerated for one hour after it was prepared before it was removed for the party; it was refrigerated after the party. The cake was large (6 kg and hence it was not adequately cooled in the hour during wich it was refrigerated before the party. The conclusion is that the cake was accidentally contaminated by the food handler and inadequately cooled before it was eaten.

  18. Extreme Heat Resistance of Food Borne Pathogens Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Typhimurium on Chicken Breast Fillet during Cooking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.E.I.; Asselt, van E.D.; Zwietering, M.H.; Nauta, M.J.; Jonge, de R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the decimal reduction times of bacteria present on chicken fillet in boiling water. The experiments were conducted with Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli. Whole chicken breast fillets were inoculated with the pathogens, stored overnight

  19. Microarray-based detection of antibiotic resistance and virulence factor genes in Salmonella spp. isolated from food-producing animals and processed food

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Rui Filipe Ramos

    2016-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências Farmacêuticas, na especialidade de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, apresentada à Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Coimbra Salmonella enterica é uma bactéria patogénica de origem alimentar que infecta seres humanos pelo mundo inteiro. Nalguns casos, as infeções por Salmonella requerem tratamento com antibióticos. A resistência a agentes antimicrobianos é um problema global e leva ao insucesso do tratamento de infeções bacterianas. Alguns estudos têm s...

  20. Outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning among children and staff at a Swiss boarding school due to soft cheese made from raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, Sophia; Weder, Delphine; Bridy, Claude; Huguenin, Marie-Claude; Robert, Luce; Hummerjohann, Jörg; Stephan, Roger

    2015-05-01

    On October 1, 2014, children and staff members at a Swiss boarding school consumed Tomme, a soft cheese produced from raw cow milk. Within the following 7h, all 14 persons who ingested the cheese fell ill, including 10 children and 4 staff members. Symptoms included abdominal pain and violent vomiting, followed by severe diarrhea and fever. We aim to present this food poisoning outbreak and characterize the causative agent. The duration of the incubation period was dependent of the age of the patient: 2.5h in children under 10 yr of age, 3.5h in older children and teenagers, and 7h in adults. The soft cheese exhibited low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) A (>6ng of SEA/g of cheese) and high levels of staphylococcal enterotoxin D (>200ng of SED/g of cheese). Counts of 10(7) cfu of coagulase-positive staphylococci per gram of cheese were detected, with 3 different Staphylococcus aureus strains being present at levels >10(6) cfu/g. The 3 strains were characterized using spa typing and a DNA microarray. An enterotoxin-producing strain exhibiting sea and sed was identified as the source of the outbreak. The strain was assigned to spa type tbl 3555 and clonal complex 8, and it exhibited genetic criteria consistent with the characteristics of a genotype B strain. This genotype comprises bovine Staph. aureus strains exclusively associated with very high within-herd prevalence of mastitis and has been described as a major contaminant in Swiss raw milk cheese. It is therefore highly likely that the raw milk used for Tomme production was heavily contaminated with Staph. aureus and that levels further increased due to growth of the organism and physical concentration effects during the cheese-making process. Only a few staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks involving raw milk products have been described. Still, in view of this outbreak and the possible occurrence of other foodborne pathogens in bovine milk, consumption of raw milk and soft cheese produced from raw

  1. 76 FR 16425 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella Species... availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Testing for Salmonella Species in Human Foods and... and other persons who are covered by FDA's final rule ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell...

  2. 78 FR 42451 - Animal Feeds Contaminated With Salmonella Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 500 Animal Feeds Contaminated With Salmonella... Administration (FDA or Agency) is revoking an advisory opinion on animal feeds contaminated with Salmonella... enforcement strategy articulated in a final compliance policy guide (CPG) on Salmonella in food for animals...

  3. Salmonella Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Salmonella Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Salmonella Infections Print A ... Last? Can Salmonella Infections Be Prevented? What Is Salmonella ? Salmonella is a kind of bacteria , with many ...

  4. Evidence of metabolic switching and implications for food safety from the phenome(s) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 cultured at selected points across the pork production food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; McCabe, Evonne M; O'Leary, Denis; Duffy, Geraldine; Fanning, Séamus

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 is a recognized food-borne pathogen that displays a multidrug-resistant phenotype and that is associated with systemic infections. At one extreme of the food chain, this bacterium can infect humans, limiting the treatment options available and thereby contributing to increased morbidity and mortality. Although the antibiotic resistance profile is well defined, little is known about other phenotypes that may be expressed by this pathogen at key points across the pork production food chain. In this study, 172 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104/DT104b isolated from an extensive "farm-to-fork" surveillance study, focusing on the pork food chain, were characterized in detail. Isolates were cultured from environmental, processing, retail, and clinical sources, and the study focused on phenotypes that may have contributed to persistence/survival in these different niches. Molecular subtypes, along with antibiotic resistance profiles, tolerance to biocides, motility, and biofilm formation, were determined. As a basis for human infection, acid survival and the ability to utilize a range of energy sources and to adhere to and/or invade Caco-2 cells were also studied. Comparative alterations to biocide tolerance were observed in isolates from retail. l-Tartaric acid and d-mannose-1-phosphate induced the formation of biofilms in a preselected subset of strains, independent of their origin. All clinical isolates were motile and demonstrated an enhanced ability to survive in acidic conditions. Our data report on a diverse phenotype, expressed by S. Typhimurium isolates cultured from the pork production food chain. Extending our understanding of the means by which this pathogen adapts to environmental niches along the "farm-to-fork" continuum will facilitate the protection of vulnerable consumers through targeted improvements in food safety measures.

  5. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  6. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  7. Stem bark extract and fraction of Persea americana (Mill.) exhibits bactericidal activities against strains of bacillus cereus associated with food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinpelu, David A; Aiyegoro, Olayinka A; Akinpelu, Oluseun F; Okoh, Anthony I

    2014-12-30

    The study investigates the in vitro antibacterial potentials of stem bark extracts of Persea americana on strains of Bacillus cereus implicated in food poisoning. The crude stem bark extracts and butanolic fraction at a concentration of 25 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL, respectively, exhibited antibacterial activities against test isolates. The zones of inhibition exhibited by the crude extract and the fraction ranged between 10 mm and 26 mm, while the minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged between 0.78 and 5.00 mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentrations ranged between 3.12 mg/mL-12.5 mg/mL and 1.25-10 mg/mL for the extract and the fraction, respectively. The butanolic fraction killed 91.49% of the test isolates at a concentration of 2× MIC after 60 min of contact time, while a 100% killing was achieved after the test bacterial cells were exposed to the butanolic fraction at a concentration of 3× MIC after 90 min contact time. Intracellular protein and potassium ion leaked out of the test bacterial cells when exposed to certain concentrations of the fraction; this is an indication of bacterial cell wall disruptions by the extract's butanolic fraction and, thus, caused a biocidal effect on the cells, as evident in the killing rate test results.

  8. Stem Bark Extract and Fraction of Persea americana (Mill. Exhibits Bactericidal Activities against Strains of Bacillus cereus Associated with Food Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Akinpelu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the in vitro antibacterial potentials of stem bark extracts of Persea americana on strains of Bacillus cereus implicated in food poisoning. The crude stem bark extracts and butanolic fraction at a concentration of 25 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL, respectively, exhibited antibacterial activities against test isolates. The zones of inhibition exhibited by the crude extract and the fraction ranged between 10 mm and 26 mm, while the minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged between 0.78 and 5.00 mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentrations ranged between 3.12 mg/mL–12.5 mg/mL and 1.25–10 mg/mL for the extract and the fraction, respectively. The butanolic fraction killed 91.49% of the test isolates at a concentration of 2× MIC after 60 min of contact time, while a 100% killing was achieved after the test bacterial cells were exposed to the butanolic fraction at a concentration of 3× MIC after 90 min contact time. Intracellular protein and potassium ion leaked out of the test bacterial cells when exposed to certain concentrations of the fraction; this is an indication of bacterial cell wall disruptions by the extract’s butanolic fraction and, thus, caused a biocidal effect on the cells, as evident in the killing rate test results.

  9. A study of the enterotoxigenicity of coagulase-negative and coagulase-positive staphylococcal isolates from food poisoning outbreaks in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Jamaira Fereira; do Carmo, Luiz Simeão; Tong, Lawrence C; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Cummings, Christiano; Dos Santos, Deise Aparecida; Cerqueira, Mônica Maria Oliveira Pinho; Cantini, Alvaro; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Jett, Marti

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify enterotoxin genes from isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci and coagulase-positive staphylococci obtained from dairy products, responsible for 16 outbreaks of food poisoning. From the pool of 152 staphylococcal isolates, 15 coagulase-negative and 15 coagulase-positive representatives were selected for this study. The 15 coagulase-negative isolates were tested for the presence of coa and femA genes, which are known to be characteristic of Staphylococcus aureus. After testing for enterotoxin genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the 30 selected isolates were tested for the presence of toxin by immunoassay. Seven of the coagulase-negative isolates amplified the coa gene and were subsequently reclassified as coagulase-positive. Twenty-one of 30 selected isolates had staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and most of these produced toxin as well. The most frequently encountered enterotoxin genes were sea and seb. Among eight coagulase-negative isolates, five had enterotoxin genes, all of which were found to have detectable toxin by immunoassay. The results from this study demonstrate that coagulase-negative as well as coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from dairy products are capable of genotypic and phenotypic enterotoxigenicity. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that PCR is a sensitive and specific method for screening outbreak isolates regardless of coagulase expression.

  10. Prevalence and antimicrobial profiles of Salmonella serovars from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and antimicrobial profiles of Salmonella serovars from ... Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed with 17 antimicrobial agents ... for specific Salmonella control program to be instituted as part of a national food safety strategy.

  11. Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIOSH NIOSH Fast Facts: Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants Language: English Español (Spanish) Kreyol Haitien (Hatian Creole) ... outdoors is at risk of exposure to poisonous plants, such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison ...

  12. Synergistic antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy of nisin in combination with p-coumaric acid against food-borne bacteria Bacillus cereus and Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, A; Chattopadhyay, R R

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate possible antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy of a bacteriocin, nisin with two essential oil components linalool and p-coumaric acid in combination against food-borne bacteria Bacillus cereus and Salmonella typhimurium. Their inhibition effects on planktonic cells and preformed biofilms were evaluated using microbroth dilution and checkerboard titration methods. Nisin/p-coumaric acid combination showed synergistic effects against planktonic cells of both the studied bacteria, whereas nisin/linalool combination showed synergistic activity against B. cereus and additive effect against S. typhimurium. In preformed biofilms, nisin by itself failed to show >50% antibiofilm efficacy against both the studied bacteria, but in combination with linalool and p-coumaric acid, it exerted >50% antibiofilm efficacy. On the basis of fractional inhibitory concentration indices values, nisin/p-coumaric acid combination exhibited synergistic antibiofilm activity, whereas nisin/linalool combination showed additive effects against preformed biofilms of studied bacteria. The results provide evidence that p-coumaric acid due to its synergistic interactions with nisin against planktonic cells and biofilms of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative food-borne bacteria enhanced the antibacterial spectrum of nisin, which subsequently may facilitate their use in the food industry. In the present work, synergistic interactions between a bacteriocin, nisin and essential oil component p-coumaric acid on planktonic cells as well as on biofilms of Gram-positive and Gram-negative food-borne bacteria have been reported. The results of this study provide evidence that nisin/p-coumaric acid combination can be considered as a promising source for development of more potent broad spectrum antimicrobial blend for food preservation, which subsequently may facilitate their use in the food industry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the

  13. ASSESSMENT OF BENZOPHENANTHRIDINE AND PROTOPINE ALKALOIDS IN BROILER CHALLENGED AND NOT BY SALMONELLA HEIDELBERG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PFG Previato do Amaral

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Salmonellosis is a globally important zoonosis, and Salmonella Heidelberg is one of the most prevalent serovars in poultry production worldwide, as well as in food poisoning cases. Antimicrobial drugs were previously widely used to face health challenges in animal production; however, since their ban as performance enhancers, many alternative strategies have been proposed. One of these strategies is the use of plant extracts, such as those containing the alkaloids benzophenanthridine and protopine. These compounds have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulation, and nutritional effects. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the supply of a product containing benzophenanthridine and protopine (Sangrovit(rWS 100 g/1000 L of drinking water to broilers during different rearing periods 1-21, 1-6 and 6-21 days of age challenged or not with Salmonella Heidelberg at six days of age. There was no effect of the product on the performance, jejunal morphometry, cecal goblet cell counts, or control of Salmonella spp. in broilers challenged or not with Salmonella Heidelberg. However, the group receiving the alkaloids from 1 to 21 days of age, compared with the control group, presented a numerical difference of 28 points in productive efficiency index, which directly impacts live production cost of live broiler, representing savings of R$ 0.11/kg of meat produced.

  14. Validation of DNA and RNA real-time assays for food analysis using the hilA gene of Salmonella enterica serovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Evonne M; Burgess, Catherine M; Walsh, Des; O'Regan, Edel; McGuinness, Sheila; Barry, Thomas; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    In Europe, alternative methods for the detection of food-borne pathogens can be used instead of the standard ISO/CEN reference protocol, if validated according to the protocol outlined in ISO 16140, 2003. In this study, the performance of two novel methods for the detection of Salmonella sp. using real-time PCR technology in tandem with an adapted two-step enrichment protocol were assessed and validated against a reference culture method, ISO 6579, 2004. The DNA and RNA real-time PCR assays amplified a 270 bp region of the hilA gene of Salmonella enterica serovars, and incorporated an internal amplification control (IAC) which was co-amplified with the hilA gene to monitor potential PCR inhibitors and ensure successful amplification. The inclusivity and exclusivity of the hilA primer set was examined for both the DNA and RNA methods and detected the 30 S. enterica serovars but not the 30 non-salmonellae strains. The inoculation of meat carcass swabs with five different S. enterica serovars at five different inocula, indicated both PCR methods were able to detect between 1 and 10 CFU per carcass swab. The real-time DNA PCR assay performed as well as the traditional cultural method in detecting Salmonella sp. in artificially contaminated salad, chocolate, fish and cheese samples. The relative accuracy, relative sensitivity and relative specificity of the DNA PCR real-time method were determined to be 98.5, 98.1 and 100%, respectively. The DNA method was further validated in a collaborative inter-laboratory trial according to ISO 16140, 2003. The validated methods provide an accurate means for the rapid detection and tracking of S. enterica serovars giving equivalent results to the standard method within three days, thus providing an alternative testing method to the reference microbiological method. The real-time PCR methodology not only offers significant time-saving advantages compared to traditional methods, it can also be applied to a wide range of samples types

  15. [Epidemiological investigation for outbreak of food poisoning caused by Bacillus cereus among the workers at a local company in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kum-Bal; Lim, Hyun-Sul; Lee, Kwan; Ha, Gyoung-Yim; Jung, Kwang-Hyun; Sohn, Chang-Kyu

    2011-03-01

    In July 2 2010, a diarrhea outbreak occurred among the workers in a company in Gyeungju city, Korea. An epidemiological investigation was performed to clarify the cause and transmission route of the outbreak. We conducted a questionnaire survey among 193 persons, and we examined 21 rectal swabs and 6 environmental specimens. We also delegated the Daegu Bukgu public health center to examine 3 food service employees and 5 environmental specimens from the P buffet which served a buffet on June 30. The patient case was defined as a worker of L Corporation and who participated in the company meal service and who had diarrhea more than one time. We also collected the underground water filter of the company on July 23. The attack rate of diarrhea among the employees was 20.3%. The epidemic curve showed that a single exposure peaked on July 1. The relative risk of attendance and non-attendance by date was highest for the lunch of June 30 (35.62; 95% CI, 2.25 to 574.79). There was no specific food that was statistically regarded as the source of the outbreak. Bacillus cereus was cultured from two of the rectal swabs, two of the preserved foods and the underground water filter. We thought the exposure date was lunch of June 30 according the latency period of B. cereus. We concluded the route of transmission was infection of dishes, spoons and chopsticks in the lunch buffet of June 30 by the underground water. At the lunch buffet, 50 dishes, 40 spoons, and chopsticks were served as cleaned and wiped with a dishcloth. We thought the underground water contaminated the dishes, spoons, chopsticks and the dishcloth. Those contaminated materials became the cause of this outbreak.

  16. 78 FR 42526 - Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 690.800 Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 690.800 Salmonella in Food for... ``Compliance Policy Guide Sec. 690.800 Salmonella in Food for Animals'' (the CPG). The CPG provides guidance to FDA staff on Salmonella-contaminated food for animals. DATES: Submit either electronic or written...

  17. Bactericidal activities of health-promoting, food-derived powders against the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel; Henika, Philip R; Levin, Carol E

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the relative bactericidal activities (BA(50) ) of 10 presumed health-promoting food-based powders (nutraceuticals) and, for comparison, selected known components against the following foodborne pathogens: Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. The relative activities were evaluated using quantitative bactericidal activity [(BA(50) value, defined as the percentage of the sample in the assay mixture that resulted in a 50% decrease in colony forming units]. The BA(50) values were determined by fitting the data to a sigmoidal curve by regression analysis using concentration-antimicrobial response data. Antimicrobial activity is indicated by a low BA(50) value; meaning less material is needed to kill 50% of the bacteria. Olive pomace, olive juice powder, and oregano leaves were active against all 4 pathogens, suggesting that they behave as broad-spectrum antimicrobials. All powders exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. The following powders showed exceptionally high activity against S. aureus (as indicated by the low BA(50) values shown in parentheses): apple skin extract (0.002%); olive pomace (0.008%); and grape seed extract (0.016%). Listeria bacteria were also highly susceptible to apple skin extract (0.007%). The most active substances provide candidates for the evaluation of antimicrobial effectiveness in human food and animal feed. Plant-derived health-promoting food supplements, high in bioactive compounds, are candidates for use as antimicrobials in food. Journal of Food Science © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists® No claim to original US government works.

  18. Source attribution of human Salmonella cases in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlström, H.; Andersson, Y.; Plym-Forshell, L.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the sources of sporadic domestic Salmonella cases in Sweden and to evaluate the usefulness of a source-attribution model in a country in which food animals are virtually free from Salmonella. The model allocates human sporadic domestic Salmonella cases...... to different sources according to distribution of Salmonella subtypes in the different sources. Sporadic domestic human Salmonella cases (n=1086) reported between July 2004 and June 2006 were attributed to nine food-animal and wildlife sources. Of all Salmonella cases, 82% were acquired abroad and 2.9% were...... associated with outbreaks. We estimated that 6.4% were associated with imported food, 0.5% with food-producing animals, and 0.6% with wildlife. Overall, 7.7% could not be attributed to any source. We concluded that domestic food-producing animals are not an important source for Salmonella in humans in Sweden...

  19. An image classification approach to analyze the suppression of plant immunity by the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, Marek; Neupane, Balram; Madhogaria, Satish; Koch, Wolfgang; Cremers, Daniel; Hirt, Heribert; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2012-07-19

    The enteric pathogen Salmonella is the causative agent of the majority of food-borne bacterial poisonings. Resent research revealed that colonization of plants by Salmonella is an active infection process. Salmonella changes the metabolism and adjust the plant host by suppressing the defense mechanisms. In this report we developed an automatic algorithm to quantify the symptoms caused by Salmonella infection on Arabidopsis. The algorithm is designed to attribute image pixels into one of the two classes: healthy and unhealthy. The task is solved in three steps. First, we perform segmentation to divide the image into foreground and background. In the second step, a support vector machine (SVM) is applied to predict the class of each pixel belonging to the foreground. And finally, we do refinement by a neighborhood-check in order to omit all falsely classified pixels from the second step. The developed algorithm was tested on infection with the non-pathogenic E. coli and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and used to study the interaction between plants and Salmonella wild type and T3SS mutants. We proved that T3SS mutants of Salmonella are unable to suppress the plant defenses. Results obtained through the automatic analyses were further verified on biochemical and transcriptome levels. This report presents an automatic pixel-based classification method for detecting "unhealthy" regions in leaf images. The proposed method was compared to existing method and showed a higher accuracy. We used this algorithm to study the impact of the human pathogenic bacterium Salmonella Typhimurium on plants immune system. The comparison between wild type bacteria and T3SS mutants showed similarity in the infection process in animals and in plants. Plant epidemiology is only one possible application of the proposed algorithm, it can be easily extended to other detection tasks, which also rely on color information, or even extended to other features.

  20. An image classification approach to analyze the suppression of plant immunity by the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schikora Marek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enteric pathogen Salmonella is the causative agent of the majority of food-borne bacterial poisonings. Resent research revealed that colonization of plants by Salmonella is an active infection process. Salmonella changes the metabolism and adjust the plant host by suppressing the defense mechanisms. In this report we developed an automatic algorithm to quantify the symptoms caused by Salmonella infection on Arabidopsis. Results The algorithm is designed to attribute image pixels into one of the two classes: healthy and unhealthy. The task is solved in three steps. First, we perform segmentation to divide the image into foreground and background. In the second step, a support vector machine (SVM is applied to predict the class of each pixel belonging to the foreground. And finally, we do refinement by a neighborhood-check in order to omit all falsely classified pixels from the second step. The developed algorithm was tested on infection with the non-pathogenic E. coli and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and used to study the interaction between plants and Salmonella wild type and T3SS mutants. We proved that T3SS mutants of Salmonella are unable to suppress the plant defenses. Results obtained through the automatic analyses were further verified on biochemical and transcriptome levels. Conclusion This report presents an automatic pixel-based classification method for detecting “unhealthy” regions in leaf images. The proposed method was compared to existing method and showed a higher accuracy. We used this algorithm to study the impact of the human pathogenic bacterium Salmonella Typhimurium on plants immune system. The comparison between wild type bacteria and T3SS mutants showed similarity in the infection process in animals and in plants. Plant epidemiology is only one possible application of the proposed algorithm, it can be easily extended to other detection tasks, which also rely on color information, or

  1. Comparative phenotypic and genotypic analyses of Salmonella Rissen that originated from food animals in Thailand and United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornsukarom, S; Patchanee, P; Erdman, M; Cray, P F; Wittum, T; Lee, J; Gebreyes, W A

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen has been recognized as one of the most common serovar among humans and pork production systems in different parts of the world, especially Asia. In the United States, this serovar caused outbreaks but its epidemiologic significance remains unknown. The objectives of this study were to compare the phenotypic (antimicrobial susceptibility) and genotypic attributes of Salmonella Rissen isolated in Thailand (Thai) and the United States (US). All the Thai isolates (n = 30) were recovered from swine faecal samples. The US isolates (n = 35) were recovered from swine faecal samples (n = 29), cattle (n = 2), chicken (n = 2), dog (n = 1) and a ready-to-eat product (n = 1). The antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method with a panel of 12 antimicrobials. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to determine the genotypic diversity of isolates. All Thai isolates showed multidrug resistance (MDR) with the most frequent antibiotic resistance shown against ampicillin (100%), sulfisoxazole (96.7%), tetracycline (93.3%), streptomycin (90%) and chloramphenicol (30%). About half of the isolates of USA origin were pan-susceptible and roughly 30% were resistant to only tetracycline (R-type: Te). Salmonella Rissen isolated from Thailand and the USA in this study were found to be clonally unrelated. Genotypic analyses indicated that isolates were clustered primarily based on the geographic origin implying the limited clonality among the strains. Clonal relatedness among different host species within the same geography (USA) was found. We found genotypic similarity in Thai and US isolates in few instances but with no epidemiological link. Further studies to assess propensity for increased inter-regional transmission and dissemination is warranted. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. SALMONELLA SPECIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    e. Biochemical screening and serological tests for Salmonellae. Identification of Salmonella species was done biochemically. Triple sugar Iron (TSI) agar motility, urease and citrate utilization tests were also used to screen the isolates before serologic testing was performed. (Cheesbrough, 2002; Perilla, 2003). Triple sugar ...

  3. Salmonella Control Programs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Hald, Tine; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo

    2003-01-01

    We describe Salmonella control programs of broiler chickens, layer hens, and pigs in Denmark. Major reductions in the incidence of foodborne human salmonellosis have occurred by integrated control of farms and food processing plants. Disease control has been achieved by monitoring the herds...... and flocks, eliminating infected animals, and diversifying animals (animals and products are processed differently depending on Salmonella status) and animal food products according to the determined risk. In 2001, the Danish society saved U.S.$25.5 million by controlling Salmonella. The total annual...... Salmonella control costs in year 2001 were U.S.$14.1 million (U.S.$0.075/kg of pork and U.S.$0.02/kg of broiler or egg). These costs are paid almost exclusively by the industry. The control principles described are applicable to most industrialized countries with modern intensive farming systems....

  4. Pesticide Poisoning of Honeybees: A Review of Symptoms, Incident Classification, and Causes of Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiljanek Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 2000s, the problem of pesticide poisoning of honeybees seemed to be almost solved. The number of cases has decreased in comparison to the 1970s. The problem of acute honeybee poisoning, however, has not disappeared, but instead has transformed into a problem of poisoning from ‘traditional’ pesticides like organophosphorus pesticides or pyrethroids, to poisoning from additional sources of ‘modern’ systemic neonicotinoids and fipronil. In this article, the biological activity of pesticides was reviewed. The poisoning symptoms, incident definitions, and monitoring systems, as well as the interpretation of the analytical results, were also reviewed. The range of pesticides, and the detected concentrations of pesticides in poisoned honeybee samples, were reviewed. And, for the first time, cases of poisoning related to neonicotinoids were reviewed. The latter especially is of practical importance and could be helpful to analysts and investigators of honeybee poisoning incidents. It is assumed that secondary poisoning induced by plant collected materials contaminated with systemic pesticides occurs. Food stored in a hive and contaminated with systemic pesticides consumed continuously by the same generation of winter bees, may result in sub-lethal intoxication. This leads to abnormal behaviour identified during acute intoxication. The final result is that the bees discontinue their social role in the honeybee colony super organism, and colony collapse disorder (CCD takes place. The process described above refers primarily to robust and strong colonies that were able to collect plenty of food due to effective plant protection.

  5. Observations on procedures for thawing and spit-roasting frozen dressed chickens, and post-cooking care and storage: with particular reference to food-poisoning bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D

    1972-09-01

    A comparison was made of four methods of thawing frozen chickens and an average thaw time for each method was determined.Fully and partially thawed chickens, inoculated with salmonellas, Clostridium welchii and Staphylococcus aureus were cooked in a spit-roasting oven at different temperatures for different lengths of time. The chickens were examined freshly cooked and after storage under various conditions.Spit roasting fully thawed chickens until the outer skin was golden brown was sufficient heat-treatment to kill salmonellas and Staph. aureus but Cl. welchii could survive. Salmonellas could also survive if the chickens were not fully thawed before cooking.Incorrect storage after cooking was shown to encourage the growth of pathogens.The incidence of intestinal pathogens in frozen dressed chickens and environmental hazards in spit-roasting establishments were also studied. Of raw chickens examined 35% contained salmonellas (9 serotypes), 63% contained Cl. welchii and 63% Staph. aureus.

  6. Aconite poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2009-04-01

    Aconitine and related alkaloids found in the Aconitum species are highly toxic cardiotoxins and neurotoxins. The wild plant (especially the roots and root tubers) is extremely toxic. Severe aconite poisoning can occur after accidental ingestion of the wild plant or consumption of an herbal decoction made from aconite roots. In traditional Chinese medicine, aconite roots are used only after processing to reduce the toxic alkaloid content. Soaking and boiling during processing or decoction preparation will hydrolyze aconite alkaloids into less toxic and non-toxic derivatives. However, the use of a larger than recommended dose and inadequate processing increases the risk of poisoning. A Medline search (1963-February 2009) was conducted. Key articles with information on the use of aconite roots in traditional medicine, active (toxic) ingredients, mechanisms of toxicity, toxicokinetics of Aconitum alkaloids, and clinical features and management of aconite poisoning were reviewed. The cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity of aconitine and related alkaloids are due to their actions on the voltage-sensitive sodium channels of the cell membranes of excitable tissues, including the myocardium, nerves, and muscles. Aconitine and mesaconitine bind with high affinity to the open state of the voltage-sensitive sodium channels at site 2, thereby causing a persistent activation of the sodium channels, which become refractory to excitation. The electrophysiological mechanism of arrhythmia induction is triggered activity due to delayed after-depolarization and early after-depolarization. The arrhythmogenic properties of aconitine are in part due to its cholinolytic (anticholinergic) effects mediated by the vagus nerve. Aconitine has a positive inotropic effect by prolonging sodium influx during the action potential. It has hypotensive and bradycardic actions due to activation of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Through its action on voltage-sensitive sodium channels in the

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Several Essential Oils towards Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella paratyphi B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Mazhar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant essential oils are natural products extracted from plants and because of their antimicrobial properties can be used as natural additives in foods. They are also useful for decontamination of food-borne pathogens and can be a safe additive in foods. The antimicrobial activities of essential oils belonging to Saturiea hortensis, Thymus vulgaris, Mentha polegium, Cuminum cyminum, Lavandula officinalis and Mentha viridis L. (spearmint were investigated at different concentrations (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10%v/v against Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella paratyphi B by using the agar well diffusion method. Essential oils showed inhibitory effect on Salmonella spp. in the agar well diffusion assay. In addition, the capability of essential oils for decontamination of minced row beef, ground beef, minced raw chicken and minced raw fish inoculated with Salmonella spp. at 0.1 and 0.5%v/v were assessed. Reduction of the Salmonella spp. population was observed following the inoculation of the cultures with 0.1 and 0.5%v/v essential oils.

  8. Detection and Characterization of Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia Strains from Human, Animal, and Food Samples in San Luis, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Isabel Favier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia species was investigated in humans, animals, and foods in San Luis, Argentina. A total of 453 samples were analyzed by culture and PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibility of all the strains was studied, the genomic relationships among isolates of the same species were determined by PFGE, and the potencial virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains was analyzed. Yersinia species showed higher prevalence (9/453, 2.0%, 95% CI, 0.7–3.3% than STEC (4/453, 0.9%, 95% CI, 0–1.8% and Salmonella spp. (3/453, 0.7%, 95% CI, 0–1.5%. Y. enterocolitica and Y. intermedia were isolated from chicken carcasses (6/80, 7.5%, 95% CI, 1.5–13.5% and porcine skin and bones (3/10, 30%, 95% CI, 0–65%. One STEC strain was recovered from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2% and STEC stx1/stx2 genes were detected in bovine stools (3/129, 2.3%, 95% CI, 0–5.0%. S. Typhimurium was isolated from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2% while one S. Newport and two S. Gaminara strains were recovered from one wild boar (1/3, 33%, 95% CI, 0–99%. The knowledge of prevalence and characteristics of these enteropathogens in our region would allow public health services to take adequate preventive measures.

  9. Synergistic antimicrobial effect of nisin and p-cymene on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in vitro and on ready-to-eat food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2010-01-01

    Foods contaminated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi are a major cause of typhoid fever, leading to public health problems and economic losses worldwide. Nisin and rho-cymene were tested in this study for their antimicrobial activity against S. Typhi at 4 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Nisin and rho-cymene, when used separately, did not inhibit the bacterium at either temperature. A synergistic antimicrobial effect between both compounds was observed when they were used simultaneously. This synergism was greater at 37 degrees C than at 4 degrees C. The lowest concentrations of nisin and rho-cymene required for complete inhibition of S. Typhi at 37 degrees C were 0.3 ppm and 1.5 ppm, respectively, and 0.3 ppm and 2.5 ppm at 4 degrees C. The potential of nisin and rho-cymene to control an S. Typhi population on ready-to-eat Thai-style pork sausage was also examined. The compounds were able to eliminate the contaminating bacterium with concentrations depending on the bacterial cell number on the food.

  10. Biocontrol of the Food-Borne Pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica Serovar Poona on Fresh-Cut Apples with Naturally Occurring Bacterial and Yeast Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverentz, Britta; Conway, William S.; Janisiewicz, Wojciech; Abadias, Maribel; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Camp, Mary J.

    2006-01-01

    Fresh-cut apples contaminated with either Listeria monocytogenes or Salmonella enterica serovar Poona, using strains implicated in outbreaks, were treated with one of 17 antagonists originally selected for their ability to inhibit fungal postharvest decay on fruit. While most of the antagonists increased the growth of the food-borne pathogens, four of them, including Gluconobacter asaii (T1-D1), a Candida sp. (T4-E4), Discosphaerina fagi (ST1-C9), and Metschnikowia pulcherrima (T1-E2), proved effective in preventing the growth or survival of food-borne human pathogens on fresh-cut apple tissue. The contaminated apple tissue plugs were stored for up to 7 days at two different temperatures. The four antagonists survived or grew on the apple tissue at 10 or 25°C. These four antagonists reduced the Listeria monocytogenes populations and except for the Candida sp. (T4-E4), also reduced the S. enterica serovar Poona populations. The reduction was higher at 25°C than at 10°C, and the growth of the antagonists, as well as pathogens, increased at the higher temperature. PMID:16461659

  11. Risk-based control of food-borne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica in the Italian fermented sausages Cacciatore and Felino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataragas, M; Bellio, A; Rovetto, F; Astegiano, S; Decastelli, L; Cocolin, L

    2015-05-01

    Fermentation is the most important killing step during production of fermented meats to eliminate food-borne pathogens. The objective was to evaluate whether the food-borne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica may survive during the production of two Italian fermented sausages. Sausage batter was inoculated with five strains of L. monocytogenes or S. enterica (ca. 10(5)-10(6) cfu/g) and their kinetic behavior was monitored during production. Both pathogens survived relatively well (in Cacciatore L. monocytogenes and S. enterica inactivation was ca. 0.38±0.23 and 1.10±0.24 log cfu/g, respectively; in Felino was ca. 0.39±0.25 and 1.62±0.38 log cfu/g, respectively) due to the conditions prevailing during production (slow dehydration rate, small reduction of water activity and fermentation temperature mainly below 20 °C during the first 48 h of fermentation). Quantitative analysis of data originating from challenge tests provide critical information on which combinations of the process parameters would potentially lead to better control of the pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential for transfer of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Senftenberg from contaminated food waste derived compost and anaerobic digestate liquid to lettuce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Suzannah; Gaffney, Michael T; Fanning, Seamus; Burgess, Catherine M

    2016-10-01

    The diversion of food wastes from landfill to sustainable disposal methods, such as composting and anaerobic digestion, has led to an increase in the soil amendment products that are now commercially available and which are derived from both of these processes. The use of such products as soil amendments during the production of ready-to-eat (RTE) crops is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of three well-recognised bacterial pathogens of importance to public health, namely Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Senftenberg and Listeria monocytogenes, to become internalised in lettuce plants from peat growing media amended with contaminated food waste derived compost and anaerobic digestion liquid. The results demonstrated both S. Senftenberg and E. coli O157:H7 are capable of internalisation at lower inoculation levels, compared to previous studies. The internalisation was visualised through confocal microscopy. Internalisation of L. monocytogenes did not occur, however significant levels of L. monocytogenes contamination occurred on the non-sterilised plant surface. Assessing the internalisation potential for each of these pathogens, through the compost and anaerobic digestate matrices, allows for better risk assessment of the use of these products in a horticultural setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Poisoned after Dinner: Dolma with Datura Stramonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezihat Rana DISEL

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Datura stramonium, which is also known as Thorn Apple or Jimson Weed, is an alkaloid containing plant that is entirely toxic. The active toxic constituents of the plant are atropine, scopolamine and hyoscyamine. It has been abused worldwide for hundreds of years because of its hallucinogenic properties. Previous reports have shown that herbal medication overdose and accidental food contamination are ways it can cause poisoning. Herein we present a family that had three of its members poisoned after eating a traditional meal “dolma” made of datura flowers. None had fatal complications and all were discharged healthy. Datura stromonium may be used accidentally as a food ingredient. Since its poisonous effects are not known, people should be informed and warned about the effects of this plant. Key words: Anticholinergic effects, Datura stramonium, plant poisoning, rhabdomyolysis

  14. Extended Spectrum Beta-lactam Resistance among Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella is an important food bourn pathogen capable of infecting both humans and animals. One of the most effective treatments for Salmonella infections is beta-lactam antibiotics, particularly extended spectrum beta-lactams; however, Salmonella resistant to these antibiotics have been recovered ...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salmonella spp. serological reagents. 866.3550... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3550 Salmonella spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Salmonella spp. serological reagents are devices that...

  16. 76 FR 81513 - Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis... availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During... with certain provisions contained in FDA's final rule ``Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell...

  17. Resistance of broiler outbred lines to infection with Salmonella enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, N.M.; Janss, L.L.G.; Putirulan, F.F.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Salmonella infections originating from poultry are one of the major causes of food-borne disease. For the control of salmonella in poultry a multifactorial approach is more likely to be effective, and the genetic resistance of poultry breeds to salmonella infections may be a valuable contribution.

  18. Sphagnan--a pectin-like polymer isolated from Sphagnum moss can inhibit the growth of some typical food spoilage and food poisoning bacteria by lowering the pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalheim, T; Ballance, S; Christensen, B E; Granum, P E

    2009-03-01

    Investigate if the antibacterial effect of sphagnan, a pectin-like carbohydrate polymer extracted from Sphagnum moss, can be accounted for by its ability to lower the pH. Antibacterial activity of sphagnan was assessed and compared to that of three other acids. Sphagnan in its acid form was able to inhibit growth of various food poisoning and spoilage bacteria on low-buffering solid growth medium, whereas sphagnan in its sodium form at neutral pH had no antibacterial activity. At similar acidic pH, sphagnan had comparable antibacterial activity to that of hydrochloric acid and a control rhamnogalacturonan pectin in its acid form. Sphagnan in its acid form is a weak macromolecular acid that can inhibit bacterial growth by lowering the pH of environments with a low buffering capacity. It has previously been suggested that sphagnan is an antimicrobial polysaccharide in the leaves of Sphagnum moss with a broad range of potential practical applications. Our results now show that sphagnan in its acid form can indeed inhibit bacterial growth, but only of acid-sensitive species. These findings represent increased knowledge towards our understanding on how sphagnan or Sphagnum moss might be used in practical applications.

  19. [Analysis of main risk factors causing foodborne diseases in food catering business].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yong-xiang; Liu, Xiu-mei; Bao, Yi-dan

    2011-06-01

    To study main risk factors that cause foodborne diseases in food catering business. Data from references and investigations conducted in food catering units were used to establish models which based on @Risk 4.5 with Monte Carlo method referring to food handling practice model (FHPM) to make risk assessment on factors of food contamination in food catering units. The Beta-Poisson models on dose-response relationship to Salmonella (developed by WHO/FAO and United States Department of Agriculture) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (developed by US FDA) were used in this article to analyze the dose-response relationship of pathogens. The average probability of food poisoning by consuming Salmonella contaminated cooked meat under refrigeration was 1.96 × 10(-4) which was 1/2800 of the food under non-refrigeration (the average probability of food poisoning was 0.35 at room temperature 25°C). The average probability by consuming 6 hours stored meat under room temperature was 0.11 which was 16 times of 2 hours storage (6.79 × 10(-3)). The average probability by consuming contaminated meat without fully cooking was 1.71 × 10(-4) which was 100 times of consuming fully cooked meat (1.88 × 10(-6)). The probability growth of food poisoning by consuming Vibrio parahaemolyticus contaminated fresh seafood was proportional with contamination level and prevalence. The primary contamination level, storage temperature and time, cooking process and cross contamination are important factors of catering food safety.

  20. Varnish poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood in the stool Burns in the food pipe (esophagus) Severe abdominal pain Vomiting Vomiting blood KIDNEYS ... to remove burned skin Washing of the skin (irrigation). Perhaps every few hours for several days.

  1. Lacquer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Burns and possible holes of the esophagus (food pipe) Vomiting, possibly bloody HEART AND BLOOD Collapse Low ... the stomach ( gastric lavage ). Washing of the skin (irrigation). Perhaps every few hours for several days.

  2. 21 CFR 118.4 - Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. 118.4 Section 118.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....4 Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) prevention measures. You must follow the SE prevention measures set...

  3. EFSA BIOHAZ Panel (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the risk posed by pathogens in food of non-animal origin. Part 2 (Salmonella in melons)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    to indicate the degree to which GAP, GHP, GMP or Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) programmes have been implemented. There are Food Safety Criteria for the absence of Salmonella in 25g samples placed on the market during their shelf life of ready-to-eat pre-cut melon and watermelon...... of whole melons or watermelons for this bacteriumcould be limited to instances where other factors indicate breaches in GAP, GHP, GMP or HACCP programmes....

  4. EFSA BIOHAZ Panel (EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the risk posed by pathogens in food of non-animal origin. Part 2 (Salmonella Yersinia, Shigella and Norovirus in bulb and stem vegetables, and carrots)

    OpenAIRE

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    2014-01-01

    Bulb and stem vegetables as well as carrots may be minimally processed to obtain ready-to-eat products, and these steps include selection, washing, cleaning, cutting, packaging and storage. Risk factors for the contamination of bulb and stem vegetables as well as carrots with Salmonella, Yersinia, Shigella and Norovirus were considered in the context of the whole food chain. Available estimates of their occurrence in these vegetables were evaluated together with mitigation options relating to...

  5. 76 FR 41186 - Salmonella Verification Sampling Program: Response to Comments on New Agency Policies and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food Safety and Inspection Service Salmonella Verification Sampling Program: Response to Comments on New Agency Policies and Clarification of Timeline for the Salmonella Initiative... changes in the FSIS Salmonella Verification Program and outlined a new voluntary Salmonella Initiative...

  6. Survival Kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on a Plastic Surface at Low Relative Humidity and on Low-Water Activity Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokunan, Hidekazu; Koyama, Kento; Hasegawa, Mayumi; Kawamura, Shuso; Koseki, Shigenobu

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the survival kinetics of Salmonella enterica and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli under various water activity (aw) conditions to elucidate the net effect of aw on pathogen survival kinetics and to pursue the development of a predictive model of pathogen survival as a function of aw. Four serotypes of S. enterica (Stanley, Typhimurium, Chester, and Oranienburg) and three serotypes of enterohemorrhagic E. coli ( E. coli O26, E. coli O111, and E. coli O157:H7) were examined. These bacterial strains were inoculated on a plastic plate surface at a constant relative humidity (RH) (22, 43, 58, 68, or 93% RH, corresponding to the aw) or on a surface of almond kernels (aw 0.58), chocolate (aw 0.43), radish sprout seeds (aw 0.58), or Cheddar cheese (aw 0.93) at 5, 15, or 25°C for up to 11 months. Under most conditions, the survival kinetics were nonlinear with tailing regardless of the storage aw, temperature, and bacterial strain. For all bacterial serotypes, there were no apparent differences in pathogen survival kinetics on the plastic surface at a given storage temperature among the tested RH conditions, except for the 93% RH condition. Most bacterial serotypes were rapidly inactivated on Cheddar cheese when stored at 5°C compared with their inactivation on chocolate, almonds, and radish sprout seeds. Distinct trends in bacterial survival kinetics were also observed between almond kernels and radish sprout seeds, even though the aws of these two foods were not significantly different. The survival kinetics of bacteria inoculated on the plastic plate surface showed little correspondence to those of bacteria inoculated on food matrices at an identical aw. Thus, these results demonstrated that, for low-aw foods and/or environments, aw alone is insufficient to account for the survival kinetics of S. enterica and enterohemorrhagic E. coli .

  7. Characterization and horizontal transfer of class 1 integrons in Salmonella strains isolated from food products of animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hecheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Chen, Miaorui; Su, Yongyu; Li, Lin; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Yan, He; Shi, Lei

    2011-10-03

    A total of 81 Salmonella isolates from retail meats and seafood in Hebei province, China, were assayed for the presence of and horizontal transfer of class 1 integrons. By the PCR screening for the integrons, class 1 integron was detected from strains in serotypes of Derby, Indiana, London and Choleraesuis, which were isolated from pork, chicken or seafood; however, two isolates contained the empty integron that lacked the resistance cassette, a potential hotspot for development of the multidrug resistance. In contrast, two other isolates had the antibiotic resistance gene cassettes within the class 1 integron, which were dfrA1-aadA1 and aadB-cmlA, respectively. The conjugation experiments demonstrated the plasmid-mediated transfer of the class 1 integrons. Furthermore, each of the integrons was transmitted to Streptococcus mutans via natural gene transformation. These findings suggest the possible transfer of class 1 integrons from foodborne pathogens to human residential bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rhubarb leaves poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002876.htm Rhubarb leaves poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rhubarb leaves poisoning occurs when someone eats pieces of leaves ...

  9. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  10. Poisoning - fish and shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poisonings are heat stable, so no amount of cooking will prevent you from becoming poisoned if you ... R. Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Disease, Updated Edition . 8th ...

  11. Poisoning first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... containers, even if they are labeled. Most nonfood substances are poisonous if taken in large doses. If you are concerned that industrial poisons might be polluting nearby land or water, report your concerns to ...

  12. Hair dye poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002703.htm Hair dye poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair dye poisoning occurs when someone swallows dye or tint ...

  13. Bug spray poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that mosquitos spread. Some of these are malaria, dengue fever, and West Nile virus. Other less effective ... you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. ...

  14. Prevention of Salmonella contamination of finished soybean meal used for animal feed by a Norwegian production plant despite frequent Salmonella contamination of raw soy beans, 1994–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Wierup, Martin; Kristoffersen, Thor

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonella contaminated animal feed is a major source for introducing Salmonella into the animal derived food chain. Because soybeans frequently are contaminated with Salmonella, soybean meal used as animal feed material, a by-product of a “crushing plant” which produces oil from soybeans, can be important source of Salmonella in the animal feed. We report the successful control of Salmonella from 1994 to 2012 in a Norwegian crushing plant producing soybean meal from imported soy b...

  15. EDITORIAL POISONING PATTERN Human poisoning with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    Bioaccumulation of methylmercury then occurred in fish which were eventually eaten by humans. Thallium poisoning is characterized by alopecia often seen one to two weeks later when the patient is about to be discharged from hospital. Thus, in chronic poisoning, it is difficult to establish definitive cause-effect relationship.

  16. A Case Report of Puffer Fish Poisoning in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Y. S.; Quek, L. S.; Lim, E. K.; Ngo, A.

    2013-01-01

    Although many Asians regard puffer fish as a delicacy since ancient times, puffer fish (Lageocephalus scitalleratus) is also a well-known source of possibly lethal food poisoning. The fish is gaining popularity in Singapore and can be found in quite a few restaurants now. Puffer fish contains tetrodotoxin (TTX), a potent poison affecting the neural pathway. Puffer fish poisoning may cause a constellation of symptoms, such as giddiness, numbness and tingling sensation of the mouth, paresthesia...

  17. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important ...

  18. Poison Ivy Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leaves and can grow as a bush or tree. Unlike poison ivy and poison oak, it doesn't grow in a three-leaf-per-stem pattern. Poison ivy rash is a type of allergic contact dermatitis caused by an oily resin called urushiol. It's found in the leaves, stems ...

  19. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  20. Lead poisoning: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  1. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  2. Global Screening of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Genes for Desiccation Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Rabindra K.; Kwon, Young M.

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella spp., one of the most common foodborne bacterial pathogens, has the ability to survive under desiccation conditions in foods and food processing facilities for years. This raises the concerns of Salmonella infection in humans associated with low water activity foods. Salmonella responds to desiccation stress via complex pathways involving immediate physiological actions as well as coordinated genetic responses. However, the exact mechanisms of Salmonella to resist desiccation stres...

  3. In Vitro Development of Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, and Indiana Isolates from Food Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Chuan-Zhen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Gu, Xi-Xi; Li, Wan; Yang, Ling; Liu, Ya-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2017-09-01

    Difference in the development of resistance may be associated with the epidemiological spread and drug resistance of different Salmonella enterica serovar strains. In the present study, three susceptible S. enterica serovars, Typhimurium (ST), Enteritidis (SE), and Indiana (SI) strains, were subjected to stepwise selection with increasing ciprofloxacin concentrations. The results indicated that the mutation frequencies of the SI group were 10 1 -10 4 higher and developed resistance to ciprofloxacin more rapidly compared with the ST and SE groups. Ciprofloxacin accumulation in the SI strain was also higher than the other two strains in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance was quite different among the three serovar strains. In SI, increasing AcrAB-TolC efflux pump expression and single or double mutations in gyrA with or without a single parC mutation (T57S) were found in the development of ciprofloxacin resistance. In SE, an increase in the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump regulatory gene ramA gradually decreased as resistant bacteria developed; then resistance resulted from gyrA D87G and gyrB E466D mutations and/or in other active efflux pumps besides AcrAB-TolC. For ST, ramA expression increased rapidly along with gyrA D87 N and/or gyrB S464F mutations. In conclusion, persistent use of ciprofloxacin may aggravate the resistance of different S. enterica serovars and prudent use of the fluoroquinolones is needed. The quicker resistance and higher mutation frequency of the SI isolates present a potential public health threat.

  4. Variation in incidence and notification of Campylobacter and Salmonella by general practice in the Thames Valley area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytton, O T; McCarthy, N; Mannes, T

    2015-03-01

    To test whether there is unexplained variation in a) incidence of diagnosed bacterial food poisoning; and b) notification of bacterial food poisoning between general practices. Observational study using routine surveillance data collected between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Poisson regression, and the pseudo-R(2) statistic, was used to test for the unexplained (i.e. after adjustment for measured confounders) variation in incidence between practices. A generalized linear model, and the pseudo-R(2) statistic, was used to test for variation in notifications between practices. Both models were adjusted for demographic factors and organisational factors (Primary Care Trust and Quality and Outcomes Framework score). A total of 5766 incident cases (811 Salmonella and 4955 Campylobacter) were included. The adjusted incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter was 128.3 cases per 100,000 persons per year. The adjusted incidence by general practice ranged from 9.8 to 281 per 100,000 (IQR: 90.2-151) persons per year. The median practice notification rate for Salmonella was 25% (range: 0%-100%), and 14.3% (range: 0%-87.5%) for Campylobacter. The Poisson regression model had a pseudo-R(2) of 0.080 for the total number of Salmonella and Campylobacter cases, after adjustment for Primary Care Trust and practice deprivation, suggesting substantial variation. The Generalized Linear regression model (predicting notification by general practice) had a pseudo-R(2) of 0.040 for Salmonella and Campylobacter, after adjustment for Primary Care Trust and practice deprivation, suggesting substantial unexplained variation. Substantial variation in the diagnosed incidence and notification of Salmonella and Campylobacter by general practice in the Thames Valley area exists. Practice-level factors are likely to account for some of the difference in testing and under-notification. This is important for interpreting data from surveillance systems. Further research is needed to inform

  5. European Food Safety Authority; Analysis of the baseline survey of Salmonella in holdings with breeding pigs, in the EU, 2008; Part B: Analysis of factors potentially associated with Salmonella pen positivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine

    , feed of commercial compound origin or pelleted feed. A tendency towards some Member State group-specific Salmonella serovars was identified, but spatial distribution of other serovars was heterogeneous. S. Typhimurium and S. Derby were widespread and dominant in the EU, in both breeding and production......A European Union-wide Salmonella baseline survey was conducted in 2008 in holdings with breeding pigs. A total of 1,609 randomly selected holdings housing and selling mainly breeding pigs (breeding holdings) and 3,508 holdings housing commercial breeding pigs and mainly selling pigs for fattening...... or slaughter (production holdings) were sampled. In each selected holding, pooled fresh faecal samples were collected from 10 randomly chosen pens of breeding pigs over six months of age, representing the different stages of the breeding herd, and examined for the presence of Salmonella. Analyses at country...

  6. Cold plasma rapid decontamination of food contact surfaces contaminated with Salmonella and Escherichia coli 0157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross-contamination of fresh produce from persistent pathogen reservoirs is a known risk factor in processing environments. Industry requires a waterless, zero-contact, chemical-free method for removing pathogens from food-contact surfaces. Cold plasma was tested for its ability to remove biofilms f...

  7. A Food-borne Outbreak of Gastroenteritis caused by different Salmonella serotypes in two universities,Xiamen, Fujian, China, 2012

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guo, Zhinan; Su, Cheng hao; Huang, Jianwei; Niu, JianJun

    2014-01-01

    .... A case-control study was conducted between the case-students and the asymptomatic control-students who were selected randomly and were frequency matched by class and age, and the source of food or water investigated. 0.25...

  8. Comparison of a novel strategy for the detection and isolation of Salmonella in shell eggs with the Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guodong; Thau, Eve; Brown, Eric W; Hammack, Thomas S

    2013-12-01

    The current FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method for the detection of Salmonella in eggs requires 2 wk to complete. The objective of this project was to improve the BAM method for the detection and isolation of Salmonella in whole shell eggs. A novel protocol, using 1,000 g of liquid eggs for direct preenrichment with 2 L of tryptic soy broth (TSB) followed by enrichment using Rappaport-Vassiliadis and Tetrathionate broths, was compared with the standard BAM method, which requires 96 h room temperature incubation of whole shell egg samples followed by preenrichment in TSB supplemented with FeSO4. Four Salmonella ser. Enteritidis (4 phage types) and one Salmonella ser. Heidelberg isolates were used in the study. Bulk inoculated pooled liquid eggs, weighing 52 or 56 kg (approximately 1,100 eggs) were used in each trial. Twenty 1,000-g test portions were withdrawn from the pooled eggs for both the alternative and the reference methods. Test portions were inoculated with Salmonella at 1 to 5 cfu/1,000 g eggs. Two replicates were performed for each isolate. In the 8 trials conducted with Salmonella ser. Enteritidis, the alternative method was significantly (P Salmonella ser. Heidelberg, combined data from 2 trials showed the alternative method was significantly (P Salmonella from shell eggs based on the following factors: 1) the alternative method is 4 d shorter than the reference method; 2) it uses regular TSB instead of the more complicated TSB supplemented with FeSO4; and 3) it was equivalent or superior to the reference method in 9 out of 10 trials for the detection of Salmonella in shell eggs.

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium variant 5- isolates associated with an outbreak of food-borne disease in Paz de Rio, Boyacá, Colombia, in 2010 = Caracterización fenotípica y genotípica de Salmonella Typhimurium variante 5- asociada a un brote de enfermedad transmitida por alimentos en el municipio de Paz de Río, Boyacá, 2010 = Caracterización fenotípica y genotípica de Salmonella Typhimurium variante 5- asociada a un brote de enfermedad transmitida por alimentos en el municipio de Paz de Río, Boyacá, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Osorio, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimuri-um variant 5- is a pathogen closely related to animals, especially pigeons, which has been also associ- ated in rare cases with sporadic infections in humans. However, epidemiological surveillance systems have enabled the detection of this variant in human out- breaks. Objective: To characterize by means of phenotypic and genotypic techniques the isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium variant 5- associated with an outbreak of food-borne disease in Paz de Rio, Boyacá, Colombia (2010, in order to establish their molecular relationships. Materials and methods: Twelve isolates of Salmonella -spp., were analyzed by biochemical, serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE with Xball Blnl enzymes was used to establish their molecular relationships Results: All isolates were confirmed as Salmonella spp. They were resistant to tetracycline and streptomycin and sensitive to the rest of antibiotics tested. Eleven isolates were identified as Salmonella Typhimurium variant 5- and grouped in COIN10.JPX.X01.0168 pattern using the enzyme Xball two isolates in this group were confirmed using the enzyme Blnl with the COIN10.JPX.A26.0002 pattern. One isolate was identified as Salmonella Typhimurium with COIN10.JPX.X01.0221 pattern with the enzyme Xbal Conclusion: This is the first outbreak in Colombia of foodborne illness epidemiologically associated with isolates of Typhimurium variant 5 -, which Epidemiologic Sur were phenotypically and genetically related.

  10. InstantLabs® Salmonella species detection method: matrix extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neil; Bambusch, Lauren; Le, Thu; Morey, Amit; Hayman, Melinda; Montez, Sergio J

    2014-01-01

    The performance of InstantLabs® Salmonella Species Food Safety Kit to detect Salmonella in four food matrixes was validated against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) reference method 6579:2002. The matrixes (raw ground beef, raw chicken breast, raw ground chicken, and lettuce) were inoculated with low levels of Salmonella (Salmonella. Samples were validated using 375 g (meat) or 25 g (lettuce and poultry) test portions enriched in FASTGRO TM SE at 42±1 °C for 12 h and 10 h, respectively. All samples were confirmed using the ISO reference method, regardless of initial-screen result. The InstantLabs test method was shown to perform as well as or better than the reference method for the detection of Salmonella species in ground beef, chicken breast, ground chicken, and lettuce. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives among the 100 Salmonella serovars and no false positives among the 30 non-Salmonella species examined, respectively.

  11. 21 CFR 500.35 - Animal feeds contaminated with Salmonella microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Animal feeds contaminated with Salmonella... Decisions § 500.35 Animal feeds contaminated with Salmonella microorganisms. (a) Investigations by the Food..., and other animal byproducts intended for use in animal feed may be contaminated with Salmonella...

  12. Isolation of QseC-regulated genes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by transposon mutgagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella, a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths, often asymptomatically colonizes food-producing animals. In fact, >50% of U.S. swine production facilities test positive for Salmonella. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 NCTC13348 c...

  13. Inhibition of Escherichia Coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus. aureus are of great concern to the food industry, especially in foods stored under refrigerated conditions where, unlike most food-borne pathogens are able to multiply. This investigation was conducted to study the inhibitory effect of some spice ...

  14. 21 CFR 2.25 - Grain seed treated with poisonous substances; color identification to prevent adulteration of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grain seed treated with poisonous substances... RULINGS AND DECISIONS Human and Animal Foods § 2.25 Grain seed treated with poisonous substances; color... increasing use of poisonous treatments on seed for fungicidal and other purposes. Such treated seed, if...

  15. EDITORIAL POISONING PATTERN Human poisoning with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    Thus, in chronic poisoning, it is difficult to establish definitive cause-effect ... This is the most stressful period when young people are trying to come into terms ... Typical examples of "Police cases" include suicide, suspected homicide, death.

  16. Multiple antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella serotypes isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella and other zoonotic bacterial pathogens can be transferred from animals to humans through consumption of contaminated food and food products and thus present a public health risk. The increase in Salmonella resistance to the commonly used antimicrobials both in the ...

  17. Septic arthritis of the ankle due to Salmonella enteritidis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dineen, Patrick F

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella septic arthritis in healthy, immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a one-day history of painful swelling of his ankle from which was aspirated pus which subsequently grew Salmonella enteritidis. There was no history of trauma or symptoms consistent with Salmonella enterocolitis. Our patient recovered fully after two weeks on intravenous ceftriaxone and six weeks on oral ciprofloxacin. Salmonella is a notifiable disease in the European Union and the United States of America, and is associated with outbreaks as a result of food contamination. The nature of Salmonella arthritis and its appropriate management are outlined.

  18. An outbreak of multidrug-resistant, quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbak, K.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    Background Food-borne salmonella infections have become a major problem in industrialized countries. The strain of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium known as definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is usually resistant to five drugs: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides...

  19. Poisoned after Dinner: Dolma with Datura Stramonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disel, Nezihat Rana; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kekec, Zeynep; Karanlik, Meryem

    2015-03-01

    Datura stramonium, which is also known as Thorn Apple or Jimson Weed, is an alkaloid containing plant that is entirely toxic. The active toxic constituents of the plant are atropine, scopolamine and hyoscyamine. It has been abused worldwide for hundreds of years because of its hallucinogenic properties. Previous reports have shown that herbal medication overdose and accidental food contamination are ways it can cause poisoning. Herein we present a family that had three of its members poisoned after eating a traditional meal "dolma" made of datura flowers. None had fatal complications and all were discharged healthy. Datura stromonium may be used accidentally as a food ingredient. Since its poisonous effects are not known, people should be informed and warned about the effects of this plant.

  20. Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, John; Frank, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia cause a well-characterized spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from asymptomatic carriage to hemorrhagic colitis and fatal typhoidal fever. These pathogens are responsible for millions of cases of food-borne illness in the U.S. each year, with substantial costs measured in hospitalizations and lost productivity. In the developing world, illness caused by these pathogens is not only more prevalent, but is also associated with a greater case-fatality rate. Classical methods for identification rely on selective media and serology, but newer methods based on mass spectrometry and PCR show great promise for routine clinical testing. PMID:26004640

  1. Pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Salmonella serotypes are a major cause of food-borne diseases worldwide. Animal models other than the mouse have been employed for the study of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections because the murine model is not suitable for the study of Salmonella-induced diarrhea. The microbe has developed mechanisms to exploit the host cell machinery to its own purpose. Bacterial proteins delivered directly into the host cell cytosol cause cytoskeletal changes and interfere with host cell signaling pathways, which ultimately enhance disease manifestation. Recently, marked advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular interactions between Salmonella serotypes and their hosts. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis.

  2. Geographical distribution of salmonella infected pig, cattle and sheep herds in Sweden 1993-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Skog Lars; Lewerin Susanna; Frössling Jenny; Wahlström Helene

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The Swedish salmonella control programme covers the entire production chain, from feed to food. All salmonella serotypes are notifiable. On average, less than 20 cases of salmonella in food-producing animals are reported every year. In some situations, the cases would be expected to cluster geographically. The aim of this study was to illustrate the geographic distribution of the salmonella cases detected in pigs, cattle and sheep. Methods Data on all herds with pigs, catt...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Recipe for Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Recipe for Food Safety Protecting people from deadly Listeria food poisoning Recommend ... environmental investigations, to make food safer. Applying new safety measures for food production, like those included in the Food Safety ...

  4. Salmonella Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indirect contact between reptiles (turtles, iguanas, other lizards, snakes) and infants or immunocompromised persons. Don't work ... help prevent salmonellosis caused by contaminated foods. Better education of food industry workers in basic food safety ...

  5. [Epidemiological studies on salmonella in a particular area ("Walcheren Project"). III. The incidence of salmonella in man, insects, gulls as well as foods scrapings from butcher's blocks, effluents of sewage treatment plants and drains from butcher's shops (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edel, W; Van Schothorst, M; Van Leusden, F M; Kampelmacher, E H

    1977-03-15

    In continuation of previous studies, various materials (meat and meat products, insects, gull droppings, scrapings from butcher's blocks, effluents of sewage treatment plants, drains from butcher's shops and faeces of patients) were examined again at the same time for the presence of Salmonella in a relatively small are (Walcheren) over a period of three months. As was also the case in previous studies, S. typhi murium (27.5 per cent), S. panama (22.2 per cent) and S. brandenburg (9.2 per cent) were the three serotypes most frequently isolated. The three most frequently isolated phage types of S. typhi murium were II 505 (62.1 per cent), II 502 (5.3 per cent) and I 650 (4.2 per cent). The serotypes and phage types were present in nearly all the materials studied which again emphasizes the fact that there are contamination cycles of Salmonella. These studies showed that the route of contamination divides in the butcher's shop. Salmonella ogranisms carried with the meat frome the slaughter-house find their way into the drains on the one hand, and, by meat and meat products, to consumers on the other. Moreover, the high degree of contamination of effluents is not in accordance with the small number of cases of salmonellosis.

  6. Effective inactivation of food pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica by combined treatment of hypericin-based photosensitization and high power pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairyte, K; Lapinskas, S; Gudelis, V; Luksiene, Z

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of Listeria monocytogenes ATC(L3) C 7644 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain DS88 by combined treatment of hypericin (Hyp)-based photosensitization and high power pulsed light (HPPL). Cells were incubated with Hyp (1 × 10(-5) or 1 × 10(-7) mol l(-1)) in PBS and illuminated with a light λ = 585 nm. For the combined treatment, bacteria were, after photosensitization, exposed to 350 pulses of HPPL (UV light dose = 0·023 J cm(-2)). Fluorescence measurements were performed to evaluate optimal time for cell-Hyp interaction. Results indicate that Hyp tends to bind both Listeria and Salmonella. After photosensitization treatment, Listeria population was reduced 7 log, whereas Salmonella was inactivated just 1 log. Electron photomicrograps of Salmonella and Listeria confirmed that photosensitization induced total collapse of the Listeria cell wall, but not that of Salmonella. After combined photosensitization-HPPL treatment, the population of Listeria was diminished by 7 log and Salmonella by 6·7 log. Listeria can be effectively inactivated by Hyp-based photosensitization (7 log), whereas Salmonella is more resistant to photosensitization and can be inactivated just by 1 log in vitro. Combined treatment of photosensitization and pulsed light inactivates effectively (6·7-7 log) both the Gram-positive and the more resistant to photosensitization Gram-negative bacteria. A new approach to combat Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is proposed, combining photosensitization with high power pulsed light. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Childhood lead poisoning: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, K L; Fung, C K; Leung, A Kc

    2017-12-01

    Childhood lead poisoning is a major public health concern in many countries. In 2015, the Hong Kong SAR Government and its citizens faced a major public health crisis due to the presence of lead in the drinking water of a number of public housing estates. Fortunately, no child was diagnosed with lead poisoning that required treatment with chelation. Lead is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring material that exists in air, dust, soil, and water. It is also widely present in industrial products including petrol, paints, ceramics, food cans, candies, cosmetics, traditional remedies, batteries, solder, stained glass, crystal vessels, ammunition, ceramic glazes, jewellry, and toys. It can also be found in human milk. There is no safe blood lead level and it may be impossible to completely eliminate lead from any city. Hence routine measurement of blood lead levels is not considered useful. Acute poisoning, especially with encephalopathy, deserves immediate medical treatment in hospital. Chelation therapy is recommended if blood lead level is 45 μg/dL or higher. For blood levels between 20 and 45 μg/dL, treatment is indicated if the child is symptomatic. For blood levels below 20 μg/dL in otherwise asymptomatic children, the principle of treatment is to provide long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up and counselling. In all cases, immediate removal of the source of lead exposure is vital. Even low levels of lead exposure can significantly impair learning, educational attainment, and neurodevelopment.

  8. Aconite poisoning in camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, W T; Lai, C K; Ching, C K; Tse, K Y; So, Y C; Chan, Y C; Hau, L M; Mak, T W L; Chan, A Y W

    2006-12-01

    The Toxicology Reference Laboratory has confirmed 10 cases of aconite poisoning from March 2004 to May 2006. In four of these 10 cases, the aconite herb was not listed in the written prescription. We report these four cases to highlight the problem of 'hidden' aconite poisoning.

  9. DRUG POISONING IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2008-01-01

    Poisoning by drugs for the nervous system, particularly benzodiazepines, is the most commonform of poisoning by drugs in Slovenia. It would be necessary to report all acutelypoisoned patients to the Register of Intoxications, since we need data about all poisoningin Slovenia to improve their prophylaxis and treatment

  10. Poison ivy - oak - sumac

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Poison ivy, oak, or sumac poisoning is an allergic reaction that results from touching the sap of these plants. The sap may be on the plant, in the ashes of burned plants, on an animal, or on other objects that came in contact ...

  11. Evaluation of a CHROMagar Salmonella Medium for the Isolation of Salmonella Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yesim cekin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Salmonella infections are the leading cause of food-borne infections and can cause gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. Salmonella species is defined as inability to lactose fermentation, using citrate as a carbon source, using lysine as nitrate source and forming Hydrogen sulfide (H2S in TSI agar. However, confirmation of false positive results is time consuming and lead to increased costs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of CHROMagar Salmonella (CHROMagar Microbiology, France which is developed for isolation and detection of Salmonella species. Material and Method: For this purpose, among a total of 148 isolates which were isolated from various clinical specimens and stocked at the Central Laboratory of Akdeniz University Hospital, 65 were Salmonella spp., 10 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were E. coli, 10 were Acinetobacter baumannii, 10 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 18 were Morganella morganii, 11 were Citrobacter spp., 5 were Providencia spp., 4 were Aeromonas spp., 5 were Proteus spp. were included in this study. All of the 65 Salmonella spp. isolates apperared with mauve colonies at the CHROMagar Salmonella. Results: E. coli and Klebsiella pnemoniae species were seen as blue, Providencia species were seen as pale-blue; Morganella morganii species were seen as pale-pink, mauve; and Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were seen as pale. Acinebacter baumannii and Aeromonas spp. species were also seen as mauve colonies. Dicussion: CHROMagar Salmonella medium can detect Salmonella species with %100 sensitivity, however there is a need to biochemical or serological confirmation.

  12. [Twenty-five years' experience in epidemiology and prophylaxis of epidemics at the Centre for Salmonella of Hamburg (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, S; Rohde, R

    1979-04-01

    Salmonella-epidemiology has changed fundamentally since underdeveloped countries have entered international trade and export food-supplies which, due to less stringent controls, are already contaminated either in the countries of origin or in transit. This is shown by numerous case histories of food-poisoning. Multifarious causes of infection from imported food-stuffs are exposed and also the epidemiological consequences from latently infected fat-stock and poultry. Prophylactic measures and advice on preventive treatment are given. The progressive automation in many factories and plants, with aspirations to the highes-degree of efficiency, frequently hides potential sources of infection with a shining facade of chrome and plastic. In the planning and servicing of technical installations, which later may well prove to be a source of infection, sanitary experts are rarely consulted, or if so too late. This paper also emphasises the considerable influence of mass-tourism with the consequent introduction of exotic Salmonella serotypes, and also the potential danger of faeca contamination on motorway rest-stops.

  13. PCR-RFLP Analysis of a fliC Gene Fragment in Avian Salmonella Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Ebrahimvandi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella are a genus of zoonotic bacteria of worldwide economic and health importance. Members of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica are mainly associated with warm-blooded vertebrates and are usually transmitted by ingestion of food or watercontaminated by infected feces. Objectives: The aim of this study was to apply a PCR-RFLP method based on the fliC gene to identify the serotypes of Salmonella isolates from Karaj, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 Salmonella isolates were serotyped by specific antisera. For the PCR-RFLP method based on the fliC gene, extracted DNA was used as the template for amplifying the fliC gene (1500 bp using specific primers. PCR products were subjected to digestion using HhaI restriction endonuclease. Results: This study determined 30 serotypes as Salmonella durban (56.6%, Salmonella uno (23.3%, Salmonella enteritidis (3.3%, Salmonella tinda (3.3%, Salmonella mjimweme (3.3%, Salmonella Thompson (3.3%, Salmonella sIIO8 (3.3 % and Salmonella sIIO7 (3.3%. Observations indicated that HhaI is able to discriminate Salmonella tinda and Salmonella thompson, yet Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella durban and Salmonella mjimweme had the same pattern with this enzyme. Also Salmonella sIIO8, Salmonella sIIO7 and Salmonella uno showed the same pattern. Thus, regarding the size and the number of resulting fragments from this enzyme, four patterns were obtained for HhaI. Conclusion: A large number of Salmonella serotypes need to be analyzed by the PCR-RFLP method and different enzymes must be used to give reliable results.

  14. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-03-17

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). Copyright © 2016 Yao et al.

  15. Salmonella enteritidis and antibiotic resistance patterns: a study on 1950 children with diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Eshraghi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Salmonellosis is a bacterial gasteroenteritis caused by different serovars of Salmonella. In the recent years, Salmonella enterica subspecies. Enterica serovar enteritidis is a major cause of gastroenteritis and food poisoning in the worldwide.  Different genus of salmonella is increasingly being resistant to common antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the antibiotic resistance patterns of Salmonella enterica isolated from medical health centers in Tehran. "n"nMethods: In this descriptive cross- sectional study from April to December 2008, 1950 fecal specimens from children with diarrhea were cultivated to identify Salmonella enteritidis. We used Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI protocol to determine resistance patern of the isolates to 16 different antibiotics. "n"nResults: In this study, out of 26 isolates 14(54% were S. enteritidis, 2(8% S. para B, 6(23% S. para C, 3(11% S. arizonea and 1(4% S. para A. all of them were sensitive to ceftazidime, cephalexin, cefotaxime, ceftiraxone, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, meropenem, gentamicin and colistin sulfate. All of the isolates were resistant to nitrofurantoin whereas 71.4% of them were resistant to nalidixic acid

  16. A multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in Korean ready-to-eat food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nari; Kwon, Kyung Yoon; Oh, Su Kyung; Chang, Hyun-Joo; Chun, Hyang Sook; Choi, Sung-Wook

    2014-07-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in various Korean ready-to-eat foods. The six specific primer pairs for multiplex PCR were selected based on the O157 antigen (rfbE) gene of E. coli O157:H7, the DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB) gene of B. cereus, the toxin regulatory protein (toxR) gene of V. parahaemolyticus, the invasion protein A (invA) gene of Salmonella spp., the hemolysin (hly) gene of L. monocytogenes, and the thermonuclease (nuc) gene of S. aureus. The 16S rRNA gene was targeted as an internal control gene in the presence of bacterial DNA. The specificity and sensitivity assays for multiplex primer pairs were investigated by testing different strains. When this multiplex PCR assay was applied to evaluate the validity of detecting six foodborne pathogens in artificially inoculated several ready-to-eat food samples, the assay was able to specifically simultaneously detect as few as 1 colony-forming unit/mL of each pathogen after enrichment for 12 h. Their presence in naturally contaminated samples also indicates that the developed multiplex PCR assay is an effective and informative supplement for practical use.

  17. A multi-country Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b outbreak associated with eggs from a German producer: 'near real-time' application of whole genome sequencing and food chain investigations, United Kingdom, May to September 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inns, T; Lane, C; Peters, T; Dallman, T; Chatt, C; McFarland, N; Crook, P; Bishop, T; Edge, J; Hawker, J; Elson, R; Neal, K; Adak, G K; Cleary, P

    2015-04-23

    We report an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b (PT14b) in the United Kingdom (UK) between May and September 2014 where Public Health England launched an investigation to identify the source of infection and implement control measures. During the same period, outbreaks caused by a Salmonella Enteritidis strain with a specific multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) profile occurred in other European Union Member States. Isolates from a number of persons affected by the UK outbreak, who had initially been tested by MLVA also shared this particular profile. Cases were defined as any person infected with S. Enteritidis PT14b, resident in England or Wales and without history of travel outside of this geographical area during the incubation period, reported from 1 June 2014 onwards, with a MLVA profile of 2–11–9-7–4-3–2-8–9 or a single locus variant thereof. In total, 287 cases met the definition. Food traceback investigations in the UK and other affected European countries linked the outbreaks to chicken eggs from a German company. We undertook whole genome sequencing of isolates from UK and European cases, implicated UK premises, and German eggs: isolates were highly similar. Combined with food traceback information, this confirmed that the UK outbreak was also linked to a German producer.

  18. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse...

  19. Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and cannot further spread the rash. Tips for Prevention Learn what poison ivy, oak, and sumac plants ... View FDA photos on Flickr FDA Archive Combination Products Advisory ... Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News ...

  20. 76 FR 58813 - Guidance for Industry; Measures to Address the Risk for Contamination by Salmonella Species in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... Contamination by Salmonella Species in Food Containing a Pistachio- Derived Product as an Ingredient... Address the Risk for Contamination by Salmonella Species in Food Containing a Pistachio-Derived Product as...- derived product as an ingredient that there is a risk that Salmonella species may be present in the...