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Sample records for salmonella enterica isolates

  1. A novel Salmonella serovar isolated from Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus nestlings in Sweden: Salmonella enterica enterica serovar Pajala (Salmonella Pajala

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    Jorge Hernández

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel Salmonella serovar was isolated from Peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus nestlings in northern Sweden in 2006. Three isolates of the same clone was retrieved from three falcon siblings and characterized as Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica: O-phase 13, 23:-: e, n, z 15 and the H-phase was not present. We propose the geographical name Salmonella enterica, sub-species enterica serovar Pajala to this novel Salmonella.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica strains isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-11-30

    Nov 30, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance profile of. Salmonella enterica isolated from raw beef, mutton and intestines sold in Ouagadougou; Burkina Faso. Methodology and Results: A total of 450 samples from raw meat of beef (n=175), mutton ...

  3. Characterization of Salmonella enterica Ituri isolated from diseased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... Salmonella enterica Ituri is an uncommon serotype associated with poultry disease. One of the serotype isolated from a poultry disease in Nigeria was characterized by serotyping and screening for the presence of Salmonella genomic island 1(SGI1) as a possible factor responsible for its involvement.

  4. Characterization of Salmonella enterica Ituri isolated from diseased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salmonella enterica Ituri is an uncommon serotype associated with poultry disease. One of the serotype isolated from a poultry disease in Nigeria was characterized by serotyping and screening for the presence of Salmonella genomic island 1(SGI1) as a possible factor responsible for its involvement in a poultry disease ...

  5. Reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Salmonella enterica isolates from travelers, Finland.

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    Lindgren, Marianne M; Kotilainen, Pirkko; Huovinen, Pentti; Hurme, Saija; Lukinmaa, Susanna; Webber, Mark A; Piddock, Laura J V; Siitonen, Anja; Hakanen, Antti J

    2009-05-01

    We tested the fluoroquinolone susceptibility of 499 Salmonella enterica isolates collected from travelers returning to Finland during 2003-2007. Among isolates from travelers to Thailand and Malaysia, reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility decreased from 65% to 22% (p = 0.002). All isolates showing nonclassical quinolone resistance were from travelers to these 2 countries.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of 64 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Enteritidis Isolates from Mice in US

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    A ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Kentucky ST198 has rapidly and extensively disseminated globally to become a major food-safety and public health concern. Here, we report a complete genome sequence of a CipR S. Kentucky ST198 strain PU131 isolated from a ...

  7. ß-Lactamases in Salmonella enterica isolated in Australia.

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    Micalizzi, Gino

    2013-03-31

    Understanding the antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella enterica is important both from a clinical treatment and a public health perspective. The emergence of extended spectrum ß-lactamases (ESßLs) and AmpC ß-lactamases in S. enterica is important, as this will limit treatment options and could provide a strain with a significant selective advantage. The aim of the study was to screen isolates of S. enterica, including isolates that had previously shown antibiotic resistance, to gauge the extent of ß-lactamase activity in S. enterica in Australia. Phenotypic detection involved screening in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute double disk synergy test guidelines and assessing susceptibility to cefoxitin. Presumptive positives were then screened using a MAST® AmpC and ESßL detection set. S. enterica isolates that were consecutively received in the laboratory (n=624), or had previously exhibited some antibiotic resistance (n=351), were screened for ß-lactamase activity. None of the isolates in the second group were included in the first. ß-lactamase activity was detected in nine of the consecutively received isolates; one with demonstrated ESßL activity and eight others with demonstrated AmpC ß-lactamase. ß-lactamase activity was detected in 16 of the isolates that had previously demonstrated some antibiotic resistance; three with demonstrated ESßL activity and 13 others with demonstrated AmpC ß-lactamase activity. S. enterica serovar Stanley is a serovar that is frequently acquired overseas and this serovar had the highest proportion of isolates that demonstrated ß-Lactamase activity in consecutively sampled isolates (4.95%), reflecting the emergence of an epidemic clone within South East Asia. While antibiotic resistance is being detected in Salmonella isolates, the data indicates that there is limited awareness of, or screening for, ß-lactamases in S. enterica. This study will help to overcome these deficiencies and provide

  8. Serotyping and RAPD profiles of Salmonella enterica isolates from Mauritius.

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    Khoodoo, M H R; Issack, M I; Jaufeerally-Fakim, Y

    2002-01-01

    The genus Salmonella is a common agent of gastroenteritis in Mauritius, generating more cases of the disease during summer than during winter. The aims of this study were to assess the genetic diversity of isolates of Salmonella enterica by RAPD fingerprinting, and to establish the relationship between human and chicken isolates. Twenty-six isolates were obtained from hospital laboratories and commercial poultry producers locally. The RAPD profiles, biochemical and serological analyses showed that two of the chicken isolates were mistakenly identified as Salmonella. The genetic diversity of the remaining 24 isolates (five chicken and 19 human), confirmed as Salmonella, was analysed using four arbitrary primers, OPA-10, OPR-03, OPI-06 and OPJ-09, chosen from an initial set of 10 decamers. Seventy RAPD markers were generated in four individual DNA profiles. Cluster analysis (UPGMA) performed using the NTSYS-pc V 1.8 computer software, confirmed that some strains of Salmonella isolated from chicken were genetically similar to those isolated from humans. Furthermore, a 1 kbp band amplified using primer OPA-10 was specific for the Salmonella genus as it was not amplified in any of the control bacteria.

  9. Isolation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (O:4,5:i and Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium from free-living domestic pigeons (Columba livia

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    R.C. Rocha-e-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the isolation of Salmonella enterica in organs of free-living domestic pigeons. In the clinic examination, the presence of feces in the peri-cloacal and abdominal regions were observed, as well as symptoms such as cachexy, incoordination and opisthotonos. Before any therapeutic protocol was applied the bird died and a necropsy was then performed for the removal of spleen, liver, kidney and intestine for bacteriological examination and antibiotic sensitivity test. Salmonella enterica subsp.enterica (O:4,5:i- and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium were isolated from the liver and intestine and the sensitivity test demonstrated that these strains are sensitive to several antibiotics.

  10. Quinolone susceptibility and genetic characterization of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles.

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    De Silva, B C J; Hossain, Sabrina; Wimalasena, S H M P; Pathirana, H N K S; Wendt, Mitchell; Heo, Gang-Joon

    2017-06-01

    Turtle-borne Salmonella enterica owns significance as a leading cause in human salmonellosis. The current study aimed to determine the quinolone susceptibility and the genetic characteristics of 21 strains of S. enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles. Susceptibility of four antimicrobials including nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin was examined in disk diffusion and MIC tests where the majority of the isolates were susceptible to all tested quinolones. In genetic characterization, none of the isolates were positive for qnr or aac(6')-Ib genes and no any target site mutations could be detected in gyrA, gyrB, and parC quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDR). In addition, neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree derived using gyrA gene sequences exhibited two distinct clads comprising; first, current study isolates, and second, quinolone-resistant isolates of human and animal origin. All results suggest that studied strains of S. enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles are susceptible to quinolones and genetically more conserved with regards to gyrA gene region.

  11. [Antibiotic resistance and virulence factors in clinical Salmonella enterica isolates].

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    de Toro, María; Seral, Cristina; Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Torres, Carmen; Castillo, F Javier; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    The increase of Salmonella enterica isolates multi-resistant to different antibiotics, including β-lactams and fluoroquinolones, is a problem of clinical importance. The dissemination of Salmonella Typhimurium resistant to ampicillin (AMP)-chloramphenicol (CHL)-streptomycin (STR)-sulphonamides and (SUL)-tetracycline (TET), that harbour the Salmonella Genomic Island type 1 (SGI1), and the acquisition of transferable genetic material have favoured the multi-resistance in this genus. A total of 114 clinical S.enterica isolates were studied (period 2009-2010). The susceptibility to 20 antibiotics was determined by disc diffusion and microdilution. The antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and the integrons were analysed by PCR, and sequencing in the AMP(R) isolates. In all the blaPSE-1-positive isolates, the clonal relationship was determined by PFGE, as well as the presence of SGI1 and 29 virulence genes by PCR. Eighteen different serotypes were found among the 114 isolates studied, Typhimurium (61%) and Enteritidis (16%) being the most prevalent. High percentages of resistance to SUL (68%), TET (58%), AMP (55%) and STR (46%) were observed. The great majority (92%) of 63 AMP(R) isolates were multi-resistant, with the AMP-STR-TET-SUL phenotype (19 isolates) being the most frequent one and associated with the blaTEM-1b+strA-strB+tet(B)+sul2 genotype. Class 1 integrons (7 different structures) were observed in 48% AMP(R) isolates, highlighting the blaOXA-1+aadA1 structure (8 isolates), one empty integron and non-classical integrons (5 isolates). The blaPSE-1 gene was detected inside the classical SGI1 structure in 13 clonally-related isolates that showed the same virulence profile. The high percentage of multi-resistant S.enterica isolates, especially associated to S.Typhimurium, to the AMP, STR, TET and SUL phenotype, and to the blaTEM-1b+strA-strB+tet(B)+sul2 genotype, shows an important risk of possible failures in the treatment of serious infections caused by this

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strain SPE101, Isolated from a Chronic Human Infection.

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    Iriarte, Andrés; Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Silva, Claudia; Betancor, Laura; Astocondor, Lizeth; Cestero, Juan J; Ochoa, Theresa; García, Coralith; Puente, José L; Chabalgoity, José A; García-Del Portillo, Francisco

    2017-07-20

    We report a 4.99-Mb draft genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis strain SPE101, isolated from feces of a 5-month-old breast-fed female showing diarrhea associated with severe dehydration and malnutrition. The infection prolonged for 6 months despite antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2017 Iriarte et al.

  13. Multilocus Sequence Typing of the Clinical Isolates of Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Tehran Hospitals

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    Reza Ranjbar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most important serovars of Salmonella enterica and is associated with human salmonellosis worldwide. Many epidemiological studies have focused on the characteristics of Salmonella Typhimurium in many countries as well as in Asia. This study was conducted to investigate the genetic characteristics of Salmonella Typhimurium using multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Methods: Clinical samples (urine, blood, and stool were collected from patients, who were admitted to 2 hospitals in Tehran between April and September, 2015. Salmonella Typhimurium strains were identified by conventional standard biochemical and serological testing. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the Salmonella Typhimurium isolates against 16 antibiotics was determined using the disk diffusion assay. The clonal relationship between the strains of Salmonella Typhimurium was analyzed using MLST. Results: Among the 68 Salmonella isolates, 31% (n=21 were Salmonella Typhimurium. Of the total 21 Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, 76% (n=16 were multidrug-resistant and showed resistance to 3 or more antibiotic families. The Salmonella Typhimurium isolates were assigned to 2 sequence types: ST19 and ST328. ST19 was more common (86%. Both sequence types were further assigned to 1 eBURST group. Conclusion: This is the first study of its kind in Iran to determine the sequence types of the clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium in Tehran hospitals using MLST. ST19 was detected as the major sequence type of Salmonella Typhimurium.

  14. Comparison of Subtyping Methods for Differentiating Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates Obtained from Food Animal Sources

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    Foley, Steven L.; White, David G.; McDermott, Patrick F.; Walker, Robert D.; Rhodes, Bobbie; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Simjee, Shabbir; Zhao, Shaohua

    2006-01-01

    Molecular characterization (e.g., DNA-based typing methods) of Salmonella isolates is frequently employed to compare and distinguish clinical isolates recovered from animals and from patients with food-borne disease and nosocomial infections. In this study, we compared the abilities of different phenotyping and genotyping methods to distinguish isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from different food animal sources. One hundred twenty-eight S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from cattle, pigs, chickens, and turkeys or derived food products were characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), repetitive element PCR (Rep-PCR), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), plasmid profiling, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Among the 128 Salmonella isolates tested, we observed 84 Rep-PCR profiles, 86 PFGE patterns, 89 MLST patterns, 36 plasmid profiles, and 38 susceptibility profiles. The molecular typing methods, i.e., PFGE, MLST, and Rep-PCR, demonstrated the best discriminatory power among Salmonella isolates. However, no apparent correlation was evident between the results of one molecular typing method and those of the others, suggesting that a combination of multiple methods is needed to differentiate S. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates that genetically cluster according to one particular typing method. PMID:17021084

  15. Novel Temperate Phages of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and subsp. diarizonae and Their Activity against Pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica Isolates.

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    Lenka Mikalová

    Full Text Available Forty strains of Salmonella enterica (S. enterica subspecies salamae (II, arizonae (IIIa, diarizonae (IIIb, and houtenae (IV were isolated from human or environmental samples and tested for bacteriophage production. Production of bacteriophages was observed in 15 S. enterica strains (37.5% belonging to either the subspecies salamae (8 strains or diarizonae (7 strains. Activity of phages was tested against 52 pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica isolates and showed that phages produced by subsp. salamae had broader activity against pathogenic salmonellae compared to phages from the subsp. diarizonae. All 15 phages were analyzed using PCR amplification of phage-specific regions and 9 different amplification profiles were identified. Five phages (SEN1, SEN4, SEN5, SEN22, and SEN34 were completely sequenced and classified as temperate phages. Phages SEN4 and SEN5 were genetically identical, thus representing a single phage type (i.e. SEN4/5. SEN1 and SEN4/5 fit into the group of P2-like phages, while the SEN22 phage showed sequence relatedness to P22-like phages. Interestingly, while phage SEN34 was genetically distantly related to Lambda-like phages (Siphoviridae, it had the morphology of the Myoviridae family. Based on sequence analysis and electron microscopy, phages SEN1 and SEN4/5 were members of the Myoviridae family and phage SEN22 belonged to the Podoviridae family.

  16. Variable carbon catabolism among Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates.

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    Lay Ching Chai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi is strictly a human intracellular pathogen. It causes acute systemic (typhoid fever and chronic infections that result in long-term asymptomatic human carriage. S. Typhi displays diverse disease manifestations in human infection and exhibits high clonality. The principal factors underlying the unique lifestyle of S. Typhi in its human host during acute and chronic infections remain largely unknown and are therefore the main objective of this study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain insight into the intracellular lifestyle of S. Typhi, a high-throughput phenotypic microarray was employed to characterise the catabolic capacity of 190 carbon sources in S. Typhi strains. The success of this study lies in the carefully selected library of S. Typhi strains, including strains from two geographically distinct areas of typhoid endemicity, an asymptomatic human carrier, clinical stools and blood samples and sewage-contaminated rivers. An extremely low carbon catabolic capacity (27% of 190 carbon substrates was observed among the strains. The carbon catabolic profiles appeared to suggest that S. Typhi strains survived well on carbon subtrates that are found abundantly in the human body but not in others. The strains could not utilise plant-associated carbon substrates. In addition, α-glycerolphosphate, glycerol, L-serine, pyruvate and lactate served as better carbon sources to monosaccharides in the S. Typhi strains tested. CONCLUSION: The carbon catabolic profiles suggest that S. Typhi could survive and persist well in the nutrient depleted metabolic niches in the human host but not in the environment outside of the host. These findings serve as caveats for future studies to understand how carbon catabolism relates to the pathogenesis and transmission of this pathogen.

  17. Resistance phenotypes and genotypes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica isolates from feed, pigs, and carcasses in Brazil.

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    Lopes, Graciela Volz; Pissetti, Caroline; da Cruz Payão Pellegrini, Débora; da Silva, Luis Eduardo; Cardoso, Marisa

    2015-02-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica plays a role as a foodborne pathogen worldwide. The consumption of contaminated pork has been associated with human salmonellosis and the increase in antimicrobial resistance among Salmonella from pigs and pork products is a concern. A total of 225 Salmonella isolates from feed mills, the lairage environment, and the intestinal contents of pigs and carcasses were investigated for their antimicrobial susceptibility. A MIC for ciprofloxacin was screened by agar dilution, and antimicrobial resistance genes were investigated by PCR assays. Among the tested isolates, 171 (76%) showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent, and 91 (40.4%) were multiresistant. Resistance occurred most frequently to tetracycline (54.5%), sulfonamides (39.6%), and streptomycin (33.7%). Thirty-two (94.1%) nalidixic acid-resistant isolates exhibited decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. The resistance genes found were blaTEM (ampicillin), tet(A) (tetracycline), tet(B) (tetracycline/minocycline), sul1, sul2, and sul3 (sulfonamides), catA1 (chloramphenicol), floR (florfenicol/chloramphenicol), strA and strB (streptomycin), aph(3')-Ia (kanamycin), aac(3)-IIa and aac(3)-IVa (apramycin/gentamicin), aadA variant (streptomycin/spectinomycin), and dfrA1 (trimethoprim). Salmonella isolates from pig feces and carcasses displayed a higher frequency of resistance to most antimicrobials tested than isolates from feed mills. Common resistance gene profiles were found in isolates from the lairage and the intestinal content of pigs and carcasses, demonstrating that resistance genes selected on farms may be found in pork.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium Circulating Among Healthy Chickens of Bangladesh

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    Md. Shafiullah Parvej

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella is considered as a global problem ranking first among food borne diseases. All motile Salmonella of poultry origin are zoonotic and readily transmit to human via meat and eggs but reports on non - typhoidal Salmonella serovars circulating in layer chickens is very limited in South-East Asian countries including Bangladesh. Salmonella serovars isolated from apparently healthy chickens were characterized in the present study. Of 170 samples (cloacal swab 150 and feed 20 collected from commercial layer farms, motile Salmonella was isolated 4% (6/150 and 50% (10/20 respectively by cultural, biochemical, motility test and by detection of hisJ gene. About 5% (8/170 samples possessed serovar-specific gene fimA, suggesting that isolates were Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing demonstrated that the isolated serovars were multidrug resistant. Therefore apparently healthy layer chickens harbour and transmit S. Typhimurium to the environment, although little is alarming since it has zoonotic significance and the isolates were resistant to commonly used first line of antibiotic in Salmonella infection.

  19. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Isolates Isolated in the United States from a Multistate Outbreak of Human Salmonella Infections.

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    Hoffmann, Maria; Luo, Yan; Lafon, Patricia C; Timme, Ruth; Allard, Marc W; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Zhao, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is recognized as one of the most common bacterial agents of foodborne illness. We report draft genomes of four Salmonella serovar Heidelberg isolates associated with the recent multistate outbreak of human Salmonella Heidelberg infections linked to kosher broiled chicken livers in the United States in 2011. Isolates 2011K-1259 and 2011K-1232 were recovered from humans, whereas 2011K-1724 and 2011K-1726 were isolated from chicken liver. Whole genome sequence analysis of these isolates provides a tool for studying the short-term evolution of these epidemic clones and can be used for characterizing potentially new virulence factors.

  20. First isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli from wild birds in Italy

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    Laura Mancini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli (S. Napoli is an emerging serovar in Italy. It accounts for 2-4% of all serovars isolated from human infections. The zoonotic origin of this serovar is still unknown and this makes difficult to apply any control intervention. We report here the isolation of S. Napoli from a river nightingale (Cettia cetti, Temminck 1820 which represents the first description of this serovar from wild birds. This finding adds knowledge to the ecology of S. Napoli and addresses further studies aimed to assess the epidemiologic link between S. Napoli isolated from wild birds, food, environmental sources and human infections.

  1. Molecular Characterisation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolated from Typhoidial Humans

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    Arunava Das

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is the major causative agent for typhoidial fever around the globe among human population reported till date. Present research work was carried out for detection and molecular characterisation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolated from humans with Typhoidial fever by biochemical, phenotypical and virulence gene based polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques. The isolated strains were also investigated for antibiotic susceptibility patterns as a control measure. Methodology and Results: A total of 16 clinical samples were collected from the same numbers of patients (7 males and 9 females from Coimbatore, Erode and Salem districts of Tamil Nadu and were processed via broth enrichment methods for isolation and identification of the causative agent S. enterica serovar Typhi. Microbiological and biochemical investigations revealed the presence of S. Typhi from 16 samples. The biotyping of the isolates showed that all the isolates belonged to biotype IV. The PCR analysis confirmed the presence of invA (Invasion gene, 244bp, tyv (Tyveloseepimerase gene, 615 bp, fliC-d (Phage-1 flagellin gene for d-antigen, 750 bp and viaB (Vi antigen gene, 439bp in all 16 clinical samples. The antibiotic susceptibility test that was carried out among the isolates against 12 antimicrobial agents, showed 100 % resistance to only ampicillin and 100 % sensitivity to carbenicillin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, gentamycin, kanamycin and tetracycline.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: This study confirmed the association of virulent strains of S. enterica serovar Typhi from Typhoidial fever among human population and suggested that PCR based diagnostic could be very useful for the rapid detection of S. Typhi isolates. Present study emphasized the use of antibiotic like chloramphenicol or in combination with other antibiotics for the effective control of S. Typhi.

  2. Repeated isolation of Salmonella enterica Goverdhan, a very rare serovar, from Danish poultry surveillance samples

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    Pedersen, Karl; Sørensen, Gitte; Szabo, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    We report here the appearance of a very rare serovar of Salmonella, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Goverdhan, in routine Salmonella surveillance samples from Danish poultry production. S. Goverdhan was found on nine occasions: in one broiler breeder farm in October 2010, four broiler farms a...

  3. Dissemination of clonal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates causing salmonellosis in Mauritius.

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    Issack, Mohammad I; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Ramsamy, Veemala D; Svendsen, Christina A; Pornruangwong, Srirat; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in Mauritius, where it has also been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness. However, little is known about its molecular epidemiology in the country. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the clonality and source of Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius by studying human, food, and poultry isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration determination. Forty-nine isolates collected between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed, including 25 stool isolates from foodborne illness outbreaks and sporadic gastroenteritis cases, four blood isolates, one postmortem colon isolate, 14 food isolates, and five poultry isolates. All isolates were pansusceptible to the 16 antibiotics tested, except for two isolates that were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Overall characterization of the isolates by PFGE digested with XbaI and BlnI resulted in eight different patterns. The largest of the clusters in the composite dataset consisted of 20 isolates, including two raw chicken isolates, four poultry isolates, and nine human stool isolates from two outbreaks. A second cluster consisted of 18 isolates, of which 12 originated from human blood and stool samples from both sporadic and outbreak cases. Six food isolates were also found in this cluster, including isolates from raw and grilled chicken, marlin mousse, and cooked pork. One poultry isolate had a closely related PFGE pattern. The results indicate that one clone of Salmonella Typhimurium found in poultry has been causing outbreaks of foodborne illness in Mauritius and another clone that has caused many cases of gastrointestinal illness and bacteremia in humans could also be linked to poultry. Thus, poultry appears to be a major reservoir for Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius. Initiating on-farm control strategies and measures against future dissemination may

  4. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

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    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  5. PCR Method To Identify Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhi, Paratyphi A, and Paratyphi B among Salmonella Isolates from the Blood of Patients with Clinical Enteric Fever▿

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    Levy, Haim; Diallo, Souleymane; Tennant, Sharon M.; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Lagos, Rosanna; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2008-01-01

    PCR methodology was developed to identify Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi, Paratyphi A, and Paratyphi B. One multiplex PCR identifies serogroup D, A, and B and Vi-positive strains; another confirms flagellar antigen “d,” “a,” or “b.” Blinded testing of 664 Malian and Chilean Salmonella blood isolates demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. PMID:18367574

  6. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance of Human Nontyphoidal Isolates of Salmonella enterica from Crete, Greece

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    Sofia Maraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns to 20 different antimicrobials of 150 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from stools of diarrhoeal patients on the island of Crete over the period January 2011-December 2012. Among the S. enterica serotypes recovered, Enteritidis was the most prevalent (37.3%, followed by Typhimurium (28.7% and Newport (8.7%. No resistance was detected to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and cotrimoxazole were 9.3%, 4%, 2%, 15.3%, and 8.7%, respectively. Resistance to ≥4 antibiotics was primarily observed for serotypes Typhimurium and Hadar. Enteritidis remains the predominant serotype in Crete. Although low resistance to most antimicrobials was detected, continued surveillance of susceptibility is needed due to the risk of resistance.

  7. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Investigation of H2S-Negative Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis Isolates in China.

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    Jing Xie

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis is a highly invasive pathogen of swine that frequently causes serious outbreaks, in particular in Asia, and can also cause severe invasive disease in humans. In this study, 21 S. Choleraesuis isolates, detected from 21 patients with diarrhea in China between 2010 and 2011, were found to include 19 H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolates and two H2S-positive isolates. This is the first report of H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolated from humans. The majority of H2S-negative isolates exhibited high resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, tetracycline, ticarcillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, but only six isolates were resistant to norfloxacin. In contrast, all of the isolates were sensitive to cephalosporins. Fifteen isolates were found to be multidrug resistant. In norfloxacin-resistant isolates, we detected mutations in the gyrA and parC genes and identified two new mutations in the parC gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, multilocus sequence typing (MLST, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR analysis were employed to investigate the genetic relatedness of H2S-negative and H2S-positive S. Choleraesuis isolates. PFGE revealed two groups, with all 19 H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolates belonging to Group I and H2S-positive isolates belonging to Group II. By MLST analysis, the H2S-negative isolates were all found to belong to ST68 and H2S-positive isolates belong to ST145. By CRISPR analysis, no significant differences in CRISPR 1 were detected; however, one H2S-negative isolate was found to contain three new spacers in CRISPR 2. All 19 H2S-negative isolates also possessed a frame-shift mutation at position 760 of phsA gene compared with H2S-positive isolates, which may be responsible for the H2S-negative phenotype. Moreover, the 19 H2S-negative isolates have similar PFGE patterns and same mutation site in the phsA gene, these

  8. Mobilization properties of small ColE1-like plasmids carrying kanamycin resistance gene isolated from Salmonella enterica serotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Previously we isolated and characterized various groups of small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica isolates. These plasmids all carried the aph(3)-I gene encoding the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase responsible for the kanam...

  9. Increased detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolates from poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Veldman, K.T.; Smith, H.E.; Mevius, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    To gain more information on the genetic basis of the rapid increase in the number of isolates exhibiting non-wild type Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) for cefotaxime observed since 2003, beta-lactamase genes of 22 Salmonella enterica and 22 Escherichia coli isolates from broilers in 2006

  10. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marietto-Gonçalves, Guilherme Augusto; de Almeida, Sílvia Maria; de Lima, Edna Tereza; Okamoto, Adriano Sakai; Pinczowski, Pedro; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio

    2010-03-01

    Avian salmonellosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Salmonella that can cause three distinct diseases in birds: pullorum diseases, fowl typhoid, and paratyphoid infection. Various wildlife species are susceptible to infections by Salmonella, regardless of whether they live in captivity or freely in the wild. The present study verified the presence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in three captive specimens of Amazona aestiva. The study involved a total of 103 birds undergoing rehabilitation to prepare for living in the wild, after having been captured from animal traffickers and delivered to the Centrofauna Project of the Floravida Institute in Sao Paulo, Brazil. This is the first report of Salmonella Enteritidis isolation in A. aestiva that originated from capture associated with animal trafficking; Salmonella was detected during the study by the serologic method of rapid serum agglutination on a plate with bacterial isolate. The antimicrobial profile exam of the isolated samples demonstrated sensitivity to ampicillin, cefaclor, ciprofloxacin, and cloranfenicol. The three samples also presented resistance to more than four antibiotics. The presence of the genes invA and spvC was verified by PCR technique and was associated with virulence and absence of class 1 integron, a gene related to antimicrobial resistance. The commercial antigen for pullorum disease was shown to be a useful tool for rapid detection in the screening of Salmonella of serogroup D1 in Psittaciformes. New studies on Salmonella carriage in birds involved in trafficking must be performed to better understand their participation in the epidemiologic cycle of salmonellosis in humans and other animals.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a rare waterborne lytic phage of Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiwale, Sangeeta S; Bankar, Ashok V; Tagunde, Sujata N; Zinjarde, Smita; Ackermann, Hans W; Kapadnis, B P

    2013-05-01

    A lytic phage of Salmonella serovar Paratyphi B, named φSPB, was isolated from surface waters of the Pavana River in India. Phage φSPB is a member of the Podoviridae family and is morphologically similar to the 7-11 phages of the C3 morphotype of tailed phages, characterized by a very long, cigar-shaped head. The head measured approximately 153 × 57 nm, and the tail size was 12 × 7 nm. The phage was stable over a wide range of pH (4-9) and temperature (4-40 °C). The adsorption rate constant was 4.7 × 10(-10). Latent and eclipse periods were 10 and 15 min, respectively, and the burst size was 100 plaque-forming units/infected cell after 25 min at 37 °C. The phage DNA was 59 kb in size. Ten major proteins were observed on SDS-PAGE, although some of these proteins could be bacterial contaminants. This is the first report of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B phage of C3 morphotype from India that has many unique features, such as high replication potential, short replication time, and stability over a wide range of pH and temperature, making it a promising biocontrol agent against the drug-resistant strains of Salmonella Paratyphi B.

  12. Distribution and Characterization of Salmonella enterica Isolates from Irrigation Ponds in the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhiyao; Gu, Ganyu; Ginn, Amber; Giurcanu, Mihai C; Adams, Paige; Vellidis, George; van Bruggen, Ariena H C; Danyluk, Michelle D; Wright, Anita C

    2015-07-01

    Irrigation water has been implicated as a likely source of produce contamination by Salmonella enterica. Therefore, the distribution of S. enterica was surveyed monthly in irrigation ponds (n = 10) located within a prime agricultural region in southern Georgia and northern Florida. All ponds and 28.2% of all samples (n = 635) were positive for Salmonella, with an overall geometric mean concentration (0.26 most probable number [MPN]/liter) that was relatively low compared to prior reports for rivers in this region. Salmonella peaks were seasonal; the levels correlated with increased temperature and rainfall (P ponds, sample types, and seasons were examined for resistance to 15 different antibiotics; most strains were resistant to streptomycin (98.9%), while 20% were multidrug resistant (MDR) for 2 to 6 antibiotics. DiversiLab repetitive extragenic palindromic-element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) revealed genetic diversity and showed 43 genotypes among 191 isolates, as defined by >95% similarity. The genotypes did not partition by pond, season, or sample type. Genetic similarity to known serotypes indicated Hadar, Montevideo, and Newport as the most prevalent. All ponds achieved the current safety standards for generic Escherichia coli in agricultural water, and regression modeling showed that the E. coli level was a significant predictor for the probability of Salmonella occurrence. However, persistent populations of Salmonella were widely distributed in irrigation ponds, and the associated risks for produce contamination and subsequent human exposure are unknown, supporting continued surveillance of this pathogen in agricultural settings. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates recovered from blood and stool specimens in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendriksen Rene S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteremia due to Salmonella spp. is a life-threatening condition and is commonly associated with immune compromise. A 2009 observational study estimated risk factors for the ten most common non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS serovars isolated from Thai patients between 2002–2007. In this study, 60.8% of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates (n = 1517 were recovered from blood specimens and infection with Salmonella serovar Enteritidis was a statistically significant risk factor for bacteremia when compared to other NTS serovars. Based on this information, we characterized a subset of isolates collected in 2008 to determine if specific clones were recovered from blood or stool specimens at a higher rate. Twenty blood isolates and 20 stool isolates were selected for antimicrobial resistance testing (MIC, phage typing, PFGE, and MLVA. Result Eight antibiogrammes, seven MLVA types, 14 XbaI/BlnI PFGE pattern combinations, and 11 phage types were observed indicating considerable diversity among the 40 isolates characterized. Composite analysis based on PFGE and MLVA data revealed 22 genotypes. Seven of the genotypes containing two or more isolates were from both stool and blood specimens originating from various months and zones. Additionally, those genotypes were all further discriminated by phage type and/or antibiogramme. Ninety percent of the isolates were ciprofloxacin resistant. Conclusions The increased percentage of bloodstream infections as described in the 2009 observational study could not be attributed to a single clone. Future efforts should focus on assessing the immune status of bacteriaemic patients and identifying prevention and control measures, including attribution studies characterizing non-clinical (animal, food, and environmental isolates.

  14. Thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from vegetable feed ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Isabel R; Vázquez, Jose A; Guerra, Nelson P; Pastrana, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Cattle feed is at the beginning of the food chain in the 'farm-to-fork' model and might serve as a source of contamination with pathogenic bacteria. Heat treatment is one of the most effective methods utilized to ensure the microbial safety of feeds. In this work, the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from vegetable feed ingredients was investigated in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and in cattle feed. Mean D values calculated in PBS ranged from 34.08 to 5.70 min at 55 °C, decreasing to 0.37 and 0.22 min at 65 °C for E. coli and S. enterica, respectively. No relationship was found between thermoresistance and source of isolation. D values in feed were calculated from the adjustment of two nonlinear models to the inactivation data. Thermal resistance of E. coli and S. enterica in cattle feed showed similar results to liquid medium; however, a fivefold increment of S. aureus thermoresistance in feed was observed. Our results also revealed an increase of microbial thermoresistance with the mean feed particle diameter. These results provide relevant information for improvement in the safety of cattle feed regarding its process conditions (i.e. time, temperature and particle size). © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. VNTR molecular typing of salmonella enterica serovar typhi isolates in Kathmandu valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Acharya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Typhoid fever continues to be a worldwide health problem, especially in developing countries. Effective epidemiological surveillance is needed to monitor the presence and spread of disease. Materials and Methods: Variable number tandem repeats (VNTR was performed for Salmonella enterica serovar typhi by multiplex-PCR in 28 Nepalese isolates of sporadic typhoid fever. Results: From all 28 total isolates, we could identify 12 VNTR profiles among the isolates, signifying multiple variants in circulation within the region. Conclusion: The VNTR-based typing assay for serovar typhi isolates can be used during an outbreak of enteric fever. The typing could eventually form the basis of an effective epidemiological surveillance system for developing rational strategies to control typhoid fever. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i3.6026 JPN 2012; 2(3: 220-223

  16. Differential phenotypic diversity among epidemic-spanning Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis isolates from humans or animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Lucía; Betancor, Laura; Martinez, Arací; Giossa, Gerardo; Bryant, Clare; Maskell, Duncan; Chabalgoity, Jose A

    2010-10-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellae are major causes of food-borne disease worldwide. In Uruguay, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was the most commonly isolated serovar throughout the last decade, with a marked epidemic period between 1995 and 2004. In a previous study, we conducted comparative genomics of 29 epidemic-spanning S. Enteritidis field isolates, and here we evaluated the pathogenic potential of the same set of isolates using several phenotypic assays. The sample included 15 isolates from human gastroenteritis, 5 from invasive disease, and 9 from nonhuman sources. Contrary to the genetic homogeneity previously observed, we found great phenotypic variability among these isolates. One-third of them were defective in at least one assay, namely, 10 isolates were defective in motility, 8 in invasion of Caco-2 cells, and 10 in survival in egg albumen. Twelve isolates were tested for invasiveness in 3-day-old chickens, and five of these were significantly less invasive than the reference strain. The two oldest preepidemic isolates were reduced in fitness in all assays, providing a plausible explanation for the previous negligible incidence of S. Enteritidis in Uruguay and supporting the view that the introduction or emergence of a more virulent strain was responsible for the marked rise of this serovar. Further, we found differences in fitness among the isolates which depended on the source of isolation. A total of 1 out of 14 isolates from human gastroenteritis, but 6 out of 13 isolates from other sources, was impaired in at least two assays, suggesting enhanced fitness among strains able to cause intestinal disease in humans.

  17. Characterisation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates from wild birds in northern England from 2005 – 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Pinna Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have shown that a number of serovars of Salmonella enterica may be isolated from wild birds, and it has been suggested that wild birds may play a role in the epidemiology of human and livestock salmonellosis. However, little is known about the relationship between wild bird S. enterica strains and human- and livestock- associated strains in the United Kingdom. Given the zoonotic potential of salmonellosis, the main aim of this study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. enterica infections in wild birds in the north of England and, in particular, to determine if wild bird isolates were similar to those associated with disease in livestock or humans. Results Thirty two Salmonella enterica isolates were collected from wild birds in northern England between February 2005 and October 2006, of which 29 were S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium; one S. Newport, one S. Senftenberg, and one isolate could not be classified by serotyping. Further analysis through phage typing and macro-restriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that wild passerine deaths associated with salmonellosis were caused by closely-related S. Typhimurium isolates, some of which were clonal. These isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested, capable of invading and persisting within avian macrophage-like HD11 cells in vitro, and contained a range of virulence factors associated with both systemic and enteric infections of birds and mammals. However, all the isolates lacked the sopE gene associated with some human and livestock disease outbreaks caused by S. Typhimurium. Conclusion The wild bird isolates of S. enterica characterised in this investigation may not represent a large zoonotic risk. Molecular characterisation of isolates suggested that S. Typhimurium infection in wild passerines is maintained within wild bird populations and the causative strains may be host-adapted.

  18. Rapid detection and characterization of Salmonella enterica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for molecular typing of Salmonella enterica serovars in Egypt. During the summer of 2010, a total of 1075 samples were collected from cattle, sheep and poultry farms to be subjected for isolation of Salmonella (290 rectal swabs from cattle, 335 rectal swabs from sheep ...

  19. Influence of Temperature, Source, and Serotype on Biofilm Formation of Salmonella enterica Isolates from Pig Slaughterhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Francesca; Fois, Federica; Consolati, Simonetta Gianna; Mazza, Roberta; Mazzette, Rina

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative assessment of in vitro biofilm formation by 40 Salmonella enterica isolates isolated in pig abattoirs from animal and environmental sources (surfaces in contact and not in contact with meat) and classified in eight seroytpes was carried out by using a microtiter plate assay with spectrophotometric reading (optical density at 620 nm). Biofilm-forming ability was statistically correlated with the temperature of incubation (22 and 35°C), the source of the isolates, and the antimicrobial resistance profile. After incubation at 35°C, 9 isolates (22.5%) were classified as weak biofilm producers. After incubation at 22°C, 25 isolates (62.5%) were classified as weak producers and 3 (7.5%) as moderate producers. The quantity of biofilm formed after incubation at 22°C was significantly higher (P slaughterhouses. At 35°C, isolates detected from surfaces in contact with meat showed significantly higher (P < 0.1) optical density values compared to isolates from other samples, highlighting the risk of cross-contamination for carcasses and offal. No correlation was detected between quantity of biofilm and serotype or between biofilm formation and resistance to antimicrobials.

  20. Genomic and phenotypic variation in epidemic-spanning Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancor, Laura; Yim, Lucia; Fookes, Maria; Martinez, Araci; Thomson, Nicholas R; Ivens, Alasdair; Peters, Sarah; Bryant, Clare; Algorta, Gabriela; Kariuki, Samuel; Schelotto, Felipe; Maskell, Duncan; Dougan, Gordon; Chabalgoity, Jose A

    2009-11-18

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) has caused major epidemics of gastrointestinal infection in many different countries. In this study we investigate genome divergence and pathogenic potential in S. Enteritidis isolated before, during and after an epidemic in Uruguay. 266 S. Enteritidis isolates were genotyped using RAPD-PCR and a selection were subjected to PFGE analysis. From these, 29 isolates spanning different periods, genetic profiles and sources of isolation were assayed for their ability to infect human epithelial cells and subjected to comparative genomic hybridization using a Salmonella pan-array and the sequenced strain S. Enteritidis PT4 P125109 as reference. Six other isolates from distant countries were included as external comparators.Two hundred and thirty three chromosomal genes as well as the virulence plasmid were found as variable among S. Enteritidis isolates. Ten out of the 16 chromosomal regions that varied between different isolates correspond to phage-like regions. The 2 oldest pre-epidemic isolates lack phage SE20 and harbour other phage encoded genes that are absent in the sequenced strain. Besides variation in prophage, we found variation in genes involved in metabolism and bacterial fitness. Five epidemic strains lack the complete Salmonella virulence plasmid. Significantly, strains with indistinguishable genetic patterns still showed major differences in their ability to infect epithelial cells, indicating that the approach used was insufficient to detect the genetic basis of this differential behaviour. The recent epidemic of S. Enteritidis infection in Uruguay has been driven by the introduction of closely related strains of phage type 4 lineage. Our results confirm previous reports demonstrating a high degree of genetic homogeneity among S. Enteritidis isolates. However, 10 of the regions of variability described here are for the first time reported as being variable in S. Enteritidis. In particular, the oldest

  1. Genomic and phenotypic variation in epidemic-spanning Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariuki Samuel

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis has caused major epidemics of gastrointestinal infection in many different countries. In this study we investigate genome divergence and pathogenic potential in S. Enteritidis isolated before, during and after an epidemic in Uruguay. Results 266 S. Enteritidis isolates were genotyped using RAPD-PCR and a selection were subjected to PFGE analysis. From these, 29 isolates spanning different periods, genetic profiles and sources of isolation were assayed for their ability to infect human epithelial cells and subjected to comparative genomic hybridization using a Salmonella pan-array and the sequenced strain S. Enteritidis PT4 P125109 as reference. Six other isolates from distant countries were included as external comparators. Two hundred and thirty three chromosomal genes as well as the virulence plasmid were found as variable among S. Enteritidis isolates. Ten out of the 16 chromosomal regions that varied between different isolates correspond to phage-like regions. The 2 oldest pre-epidemic isolates lack phage SE20 and harbour other phage encoded genes that are absent in the sequenced strain. Besides variation in prophage, we found variation in genes involved in metabolism and bacterial fitness. Five epidemic strains lack the complete Salmonella virulence plasmid. Significantly, strains with indistinguishable genetic patterns still showed major differences in their ability to infect epithelial cells, indicating that the approach used was insufficient to detect the genetic basis of this differential behaviour. Conclusion The recent epidemic of S. Enteritidis infection in Uruguay has been driven by the introduction of closely related strains of phage type 4 lineage. Our results confirm previous reports demonstrating a high degree of genetic homogeneity among S. Enteritidis isolates. However, 10 of the regions of variability described here are for the first time reported as

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile, treatment outcome and serotype distribution of clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica: a 2-year study from Kerala, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harichandran D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Harichandran, Kavitha Radhakrishnan Dinesh Department of Microbiology, Amrita School of Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham University, Kochi, Kerala, India Background/purpose: Typhoid and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death in parts of Asia, being associated with poor sanitation and consumption of unsafe food and water. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged to traditional first-line drugs, namely, the fluoroquinolones, as well as to third-generation cephalosporins, posing challenges to treatment. Azithromycin has proven to be an effective alternative for treatment of uncomplicated typhoid fever. The purpose of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility, clinical outcome and serotype distribution pattern of clinical isolates belonging to Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica. Methodology: All clinical isolates of S. enterica obtained from blood, sterile body fluids, as well as stool and urine samples at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Kerala, India, between August 2011 and July 2013 were included in the study and processed based on standard microbiology protocols. Results: A total of 118 isolates of Salmonella were obtained during the study period. Out of these, 79 were of S. Typhi (66.95%, followed by isolates of S. Paratyphi A (22; 18.64% and S. Typhimurium 12 (10.17%. Five isolates could not be identified further. There was 100% susceptibility to ceftriaxone in all S. enterica subspecies. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was 32.91% for S. Typhi and 40.90% for S. Paratyphi A as determined by the disk diffusion method. The susceptibility profile of S. Typhi isolates to different antimicrobials was as follows: chloramphenicol (94.93%, ampicillin (77.21%, cotrimoxazole (75.94% and azithromycin (78.48%. For S. Typhi, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of ciprofloxacin required to inhibit the growth

  3. Genetic diversity of human isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeri, S A; Yasin, R M; Koh, Y T; Puthucheary, S D; Thong, K L

    2003-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine clonal relationship and genetic diversity of the human strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolated from 1995 to 2002 from different parts of Malaysia. Antimicrobial susceptibility test, plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were applied to analyse 65 human isolates of S. Enteritidis obtained over an eight year period from different parts of Malaysia. Four nonhuman isolates were included for comparison. A total of 14 distinct XbaI-pulsed-field profiles (PFPs) were observed, although a single PFP X1 was predominant and this particular clone was found to be endemic in Malaysia. The incidence of drug resistant S. Enteritidis remained relatively low with only 37% of the strains analysed being resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. All except one resistant strain carried at least one plasmid ranging in size from 3.7 to 62 MDa giving nine plasmid profiles. The three isolates from raw milk and one from well-water had similar PFPs to that of the human isolates. Salmonella Enteritidis strains were more diverse than was previously thought. Fourteen subtypes were noted although one predominant clone persisted in Malaysia. The combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, plasmid profiling and antibiograms provided additional discrimination to the highly clonal strains of S. Enteritidis. This is the first report to assess the genotypes of the predominant clinical S. Enteritidis in different parts of the country. As S. Enteritidis is highly endemic in Malaysia, the data generated would be useful for tracing the source during outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the study area.

  4. Dissemination of clonal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates causing salmonellosis in Mauritius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issack, M. I.; Migura, Lourdes Garcia; Ramsamy, Veemala D.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in Mauritius, where it has also been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness. However, little is known about its molecular epidemiology in the country. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate...

  5. Clinical and veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis defective in lipopolysaccharide O-chain polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guard-Petter, J.; Parker, C.T. [Agricultural Research Service, Athens, GA (United States). Southeast Poultry Research Lab.; Asokan, K.; Carlson, R.W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    1999-05-01

    Twelve human and chicken isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis belonging to phage types 4, 8, 13a, and 23 were characterized for variability in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Isolates were differentiated into two groups, i.e., those that lacked immunoreactive O-chain, termed rough isolates, and those that had immunoreactive O-chain, termed smooth isolates. Isolates within these groups could be further differentiated by LPS compositional differences as detected by gel electrophoresis and gas liquid chromatography of samples extracted with water, which yielded significantly more LPS in comparison to phenol-chloroform extraction. The rough isolates were of two types, the O-antigen synthesis mutants and the O-antigen polymerization (wzy) mutants. Smooth isolates were also of two types, one producing low-molecular-weight (LMW) LPS and the other producing high-molecular-weight (HMW) LPS. To determine the genetic basis for the O-chain variability of the smooth isolates, the authors analyzed the effects of a null mutation in the O-chain length determinant gene, wzz (cld) of serovar Typhimurium. This mutation results in a loss of HMW LPS; however, the LMW LPS of this mutant was longer and more glucosylated than that from clinical isolates of serovar Enteritidis. Cluster analysis of these data and of those from two previously characterized isogenic strains of serovar Enteritidis that had different virulence attributes indicated that glucosylation of HMW LPS (via oafR function) is variable and results in two types of HMW structures, one that is highly glucosylated and one that is minimally glucosylated. These results strongly indicate that naturally occurring variability in wzy, wzz, and oafR function can be used to subtype isolates of serovar Enteritidis during epidemiological investigations.

  6. Isolation, serotype diversity and antibiogram of Salmonella enterica isolated from different species of poultry in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Ahmad Mir

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Occurrence of high proportion of serovars in our study which can cause serious gastroenteritis in humans is a matter of concern. Salmonella Altona has been detected for the first time in India from poultry. This serotype is known to cause serious outbreaks of gastroenteritis in humans. Multidrug resistant isolates were recovered at high percentage which can be attributed to non-judicious use of antibiotics both in prophylaxis and treatment regimen. This observation draws serious attention as poultry serves as an important source of transmission of these multidrug resistant Salmonella serovars to humans.

  7. Diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from pig farms in Ibadan, Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fashae, Kayode; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2014-01-01

    ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was low (n = 2; 0.9 %). Multiply resistant isolates included Salmonella Kentucky, the most resistant serovar. qnrB19 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Corvallis and one isolate of Salmonella Larochelle, respectively, while qnrS1 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Derby...... of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria. Pooled fresh pen floor fecal samples of pigs collected from 31 pig farms were cultured; the Salmonella isolates were serotyped and their antimicrobial susceptibility was determined. PMQR genes were screened by polymerase chain...... Kingston (n = 13; 5.7 %). The most widely distributed serovars among the farms were Salmonella Give (six farms) and Salmonella Elisaberthville (six farms). Resistance to chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and tetracycline ranged from 11.6 % (n = 26) to 22.8 % (n = 51). Resistance...

  8. Ceftiofur resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg from chicken meat and humans, Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutil, Lucie; Irwin, Rebecca; Finley, Rita; Ng, Lai King; Avery, Brent; Boerlin, Patrick; Bourgault, Anne Marie; Cole, Linda; Daignault, Danielle; Desruisseau, Andrea; Demczuk, Walter; Hoang, Linda; Horsman, Greg B; Ismail, Johanne; Jamieson, Frances; Maki, Anne; Pacagnella, Ana; Pillai, Dylan R

    2010-01-01

    ...) between ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg isolated from retail chicken and incidence of ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella serovar Heidelberg infections in humans across Canada...

  9. International Spread of an Epidemic Population of Salmonella enterica Serotype Kentucky ST198 Resistant to Ciprofloxacin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simon Le Hello; Rene S. Hendriksen; Benoît Doublet; Ian Fisher; Eva Møller Nielsen; Jean M. Whichard; Brahim Bouchrif; Kayode Fashae; Sophie A. Granier; Nathalie Jourdan-Da Silva; Axel Cloeckaert; E. John Threlfall; Frederick J. Angulo; Frank M. Aarestrup; John Wain; François-Xavier Weill

    2011-01-01

    National Salmonella surveillance systems from France, England and Wales, Denmark, and the United States identified the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype...

  10. Identification of novel Salmonella enterica Serovar Thyphimurium DT104-specific prophage and nonprophage chromosomal sequences among serovar Thyphimurium isolates by genomic subtractive hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, A.P.H.M.; Abee, T.; Zwietering, M.H.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Genomic subtractive hybridization was performed between Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 and DT104 to search for novel Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104-specific sequences. The subtraction resulted mainly in the isolation of DNA fragments with sequence similarity to phages. Two

  11. Phenotyping and genetic characterization of Salmonella enterica isolates from Turkey revealing arise of different features specific to geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Sinem; Bulut, Ece; Durul, Bora; Uner, Ilhan; Kur, Mehmet; Avsaroglu, M Dilek; Kirmaci, Hüseyin Avni; Tel, Yasar Osman; Zeyrek, Fadile Y; Soyer, Yesim

    2017-01-16

    192 Food samples (commonly consumed 8 food types), 355 animal samples (animal feces of bovine, ovine, goat and chicken) and 50 samples from clinical human cases in Sanliurfa city, Turkey in a year were collected to determine the Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica mosaic in Turkey. 161 Salmonella isolates represented 17 serotypes, 20 sequence types (STs) and 44 PFGE patterns (PTs). 3 serotypes, S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium and S. Kentucky, were recovered from three different hosts. The highest discriminatory power was obtained by PFGE (SID=0.945), followed by MLST (SID=0.902) and serotyping (SID=0.885) for all isolates. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes (aadA1, aadA2, strA, strB, aphA 1-Iab , bla TEM-1 , bla PSE-1 , tetA) was highly correlated with phenotypic profiles of aminoglycoside, ß-lactam and tetracycline groups (kappa >0.85). From our knowledge, this is the first study reporting spatial and temporal distribution of Salmonella species through phenotypic and genetic approaches over farm to fork chain in Turkey. Thus, our data provided further information for evolution, ecology and transmission of Salmonella in Turkey. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Characterization of integrons and resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolated from meat and dairy products in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2014-10-17

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of illness and death, especially in developing countries. The problem is exacerbated if bacteria attain multidrug resistance. Little is currently known about the extent of antibiotic resistance in foodborne pathogens and the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in Africa. Therefore, the current study was carried out to characterize, at the molecular level, the mechanism of multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Forty-seven out of 69 isolates (68.1%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The incidence of multidrug-resistant isolates was higher in meat products (37, 69.8%) than in dairy products (10, 62.5%). The multidrug-resistant serovars included, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (24 isolates, 34.8%), S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, (15 isolates, 21.8%), S. enterica serovar Infantis (7 isolates, 10.1%) and S. enterica non-typable serovar (1 isolate, 1.4%). The highest resistance was to ampicillin (95.7%), then to kanamycin (93.6%), spectinomycin (93.6%), streptomycin (91.5%) and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (91.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes and 39.1% and 8.7% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. β-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 75.4% of isolates and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 27.5% of isolates. Finally, the florphenicol resistance gene, floR, was identified in 18.8% of isolates. PCR screening identified S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in both meat and dairy products. This is the first study to report many of these resistance genes in dairy products. This study highlights the high incidence of multidrug-resistant S. enterica in

  13. Salmonella enterica in commercial swine feed and subsequent isolation of phenotypically and genotypically related strains from fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Bayleyegn; Sterman, Allyson; Mathews, Jennifer; Artuso-Ponte, Valeria; Abley, Melanie; Farmer, William; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi; Morrow, W E Morgan; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence and genotypic relatedness of Salmonella enterica isolates recovered from feed and fecal samples in commercial swine production units. Of 275 feed samples, Salmonella was detected in 10 feed samples that originated from 8 of 36 (22.2%) barns, with a prevalence of 3.6% (10/275 samples). In fecal samples, a prevalence of 17.2% was found at the early finishing stage (1,180/6,880 samples), with a significant reduction in prevalence (7.4%) when pigs reached market age (392/5,321 samples). Of the 280 Salmonella isolates systematically selected for further characterization, 50% of the feed isolates and 55.3% of the isolates of fecal origin showed similar phenotypes based on antimicrobial resistance patterns and serogrouping. About 44% of the isolates were multidrug resistant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotyping grouped the 46 representative isolates into five genotypic clusters, of which four of the clusters consisted of genotypically related isolates recovered from feed and fecal samples. The occurrence of genotypically related and, in some cases, clonal strains, including multidrug-resistant isolates in commercially processed feed and fecal samples, suggests the high significance of commercial feed as a potential vehicle of Salmonella transmission.

  14. Phage types of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from production animals and humans in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1994-01-01

    S. Typhimurium is one of the 2 most common salmonella serotypes causing human salmonellosis in Denmark. In order to illustrate the significance of different production animals as a source of infection, 1461 isolates were characterized by phage typing. The isolates originated from human patients...

  15. Prevalence of Salmonella Isolates from Chicken and Pig Slaughterhouses and Emergence of Ciprofloxacin and Cefotaxime Co-Resistant S. enterica Serovar Indiana in Henan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bai

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Salmonella from chicken and pig slaughterhouses in Henan, China and antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates to antibiotics was determined. From 283 chicken samples and 240 pig samples collected, 128 and 70 Salmonella isolates were recovered with an isolation rate of 45.2 and 29.2% respectively. The predominant serovars in chicken samples were S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, S. enterica serovar Hadar and S. enterica serovar Indiana, while those in pig samples were S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. enterica serovar Derby and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was 8.6 and 10.0% for isolates from chickens and pigs respectively, whereas resistance to cefotaxime was 5.5 and 8.6%, respectively. Multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agent was markedly higher in pig isolates (57.1% than in chicken isolates (39.8%. Of particular concern was the detection of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates, which pose risk to public health. All 16 S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates detected were resistant to ciprofloxacin, among which 11 were co-resistant to cefotaxime. The S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates accumulated point mutations in quinolone resistance determination regions of gyrA (S83F/D87G or S83F/D87N and parC (T57S/S80R. Two plasmid mediated quinolone resistant determinants were found with aac (6'-Ib-cr and oqxAB in 16 and 12 S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates respectively. Cefotaxime-resistance of S. enterica serovar Indiana was associated with the acquisition of a blaCTX-M-65 gene. The potential risk of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana infection is a significant concern due to limited alternative treatment options. Reduction of Salmonella in chicken and pig slaughterhouses, in particular, ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana will be an important

  16. MLVA polymorphism of Salmonella enterica subspecies isolated from humans, animals, and food in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarthou Jean

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella (S. enterica is the main cause of salmonellosis in humans and animals. The epidemiology of this infection involves large geographical distances, and strains related to an episode of salmonellosis therefore need to be reliably discriminated. Due to the limitations of serotyping, molecular genotyping methods have been developed, including multiple loci variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR analysis (MLVA. In our study, 11 variable number tandem-repeats markers were selected from the S. enterica Typhimurium LT2 genome to evaluate the genetic diversity of 206 S. enterica strains collected in Cambodia between 2001 and 2007. Findings Thirty one serovars were identified from three sources: humans, animals and food. The markers were able to discriminate all strains from 2 to 17 alleles. Using the genotype phylogeny repartition, MLVA distinguished 107 genotypes clustered into two main groups: S. enterica Typhi and other serovars. Four serovars (Derby, Schwarzengrund, Stanley, and Weltevreden were dispersed in 2 to 5 phylogenic branches. Allelic variations within S. enterica serovars was represented using the minimum spanning tree. For several genotypes, we identified clonal complexes within the serovars. This finding supports the notion of endemo-epidemic diffusion within animals, food, or humans. Furthermore, a clonal transmission from one source to another was reported. Four markers (STTR3, STTR5, STTR8, and Sal20 presented a high diversity index (DI > 0.80. Conclusions In summary, MLVA can be used in the typing and genetic profiling of a large diversity of S. enterica serovars, as well as determining the epidemiological relationships of the strains with the geography of the area.

  17. Identification of bapA in Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolated from Wild Animals Kept in Captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Valenzuela, Martin; Cárcamo-Aréchiga, Nora; Cota-Guajardo, Silvia; López-Salazar, Mayra; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith

    2016-01-01

    bapA, previously named stm2689, encodes the BapA protein, which, along with cellulose and fimbriae, constitutes biofilms. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that grow in a matrix of exopolysaccharides and may adhere to living tissues or inert surfaces. Biofilm formation is associated with the ability to persist in different environments, which contributes to the pathogenicity of several species. We analyzed the presence of bapA in 83 strains belonging to 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from wildlife in captivity at Culiacan's Zoo and Mazatlán's Aquarium. Each isolate amplified a product of 667 bp, which corresponds to the expected size of the bapA initiator, with no observed variation between different serovars analyzed. bapA gene was found to be highly conserved in Salmonella and can be targeted for the genus-specific detection of this organism from different sources. Since bapA expression improves bacterial proliferation outside of the host and facilitates resistance to disinfectants and desiccation, the survival of Salmonella in natural habitats may be favored. Thus, the risk of bacterial contamination from these animals is increased. PMID:27379195

  18. Identification of bapA in Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolated from Wild Animals Kept in Captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Cárcamo-Aréchiga, Nora; Cota-Guajardo, Silvia; López-Salazar, Mayra; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith

    2016-01-01

    bapA, previously named stm2689, encodes the BapA protein, which, along with cellulose and fimbriae, constitutes biofilms. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that grow in a matrix of exopolysaccharides and may adhere to living tissues or inert surfaces. Biofilm formation is associated with the ability to persist in different environments, which contributes to the pathogenicity of several species. We analyzed the presence of bapA in 83 strains belonging to 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from wildlife in captivity at Culiacan's Zoo and Mazatlán's Aquarium. Each isolate amplified a product of 667 bp, which corresponds to the expected size of the bapA initiator, with no observed variation between different serovars analyzed. bapA gene was found to be highly conserved in Salmonella and can be targeted for the genus-specific detection of this organism from different sources. Since bapA expression improves bacterial proliferation outside of the host and facilitates resistance to disinfectants and desiccation, the survival of Salmonella in natural habitats may be favored. Thus, the risk of bacterial contamination from these animals is increased.

  19. Virulence characterisation of Salmonella enterica isolates of differing antimicrobial resistance recovered from UK livestock and imported meat samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick eCard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a foodborne zoonotic pathogen of significant public health concern. We have characterised the virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene content of 95 Salmonella isolates from 11 serovars by DNA microarray recovered from UK livestock or imported meat. Genes encoding resistance to sulphonamides (sul1, sul2, tetracycline (tet(A, tet(B, streptomycin (strA, strB, aminoglycoside (aadA1, aadA2, beta-lactam (blaTEM, and trimethoprim (dfrA17 were common. Virulence gene content differed between serovars; S. Typhimurium formed two subclades based on virulence plasmid presence. Thirteen isolates were selected by their virulence profile for pathotyping using the Galleria mellonella pathogenesis model. Infection with a chicken invasive S. Enteritidis or S. Gallinarum isolate, a multidrug resistant S. Kentucky, or a S. Typhimurium DT104 isolate resulted in high mortality of the larvae; notably presence of the virulence plasmid in S. Typhimurium was not associated with increased larvae mortality. Histopathological examination showed that infection caused severe damage to the Galleria gut structure. Enumeration of intracellular bacteria in the larvae 24 hours post-infection showed increases of up to 7 log above the initial inoculum and transmission electron microscopy (TEM showed bacterial replication in the haemolymph. TEM also revealed the presence of vacuoles containing bacteria in the haemocytes, similar to Salmonella containing vacuoles observed in mammalian macrophages; although there was no evidence from our work of bacterial replication within vacuoles. This work shows that microarrays can be used for rapid virulence genotyping of S. enterica and that the Galleria animal model replicates some aspects of Salmonella infection in mammals. These procedures can be used to help inform on the pathogenicity of isolates that may be antibiotic resistant and have scope to aid the assessment of their potential public and animal health risk.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility to azithromycin among Salmonella enterica isolated from the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to emerging resistance to traditional antimicrobial agents such as ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol, azithromycin is increasingly used for the treatment of invasive Salmonella infections. In the present study, 696 isolates of non-Typhi Salmonella collected from human...

  1. Characterization of a multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica give ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salmonella enterica Give is one of the serotypes that have been incriminated in Salmonella infections; sometimes associated with hospitalization and mortalities in humans and animals in some parts of the world. In this work, we characterized one Salmonella Give isolated from cloaca swab of an Agama agama lizard ...

  2. Characterization of a Multidrug Resistant Salmonella Enterica Give ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. Salmonella enterica Give is one of the serotypes that have been incriminated in Salmonella infections; sometimes associated with hospitalization and mortalities in humans and animals in some parts of the world. In this work, we characterized one. Salmonella Give isolated from cloaca swab of an Agama ...

  3. Characterization of Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Stanley, a Serovar Endemic to Asia and Associated with Travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Bortolaia, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley (S. Stanley) is a common serovar in Southeast Asia and was the second most common serovar implicated in human salmonellosis in Thailand in the years 2002 to 2007. In contrast, this serovar is relatively uncommon in Europe. The objective of this study...... isolates. We found some of the S. Stanley isolates isolated from patients in Europe were acquired during travel to Southeast Asia, including Thailand. The presence of multiple plasmid lineages carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporinase-encoding blaCMY-2 gene in S. Stanley isolates from the central...... part of Thailand was confirmed. Our results emphasize that Thai authorities, as well as authorities in other countries lacking prudent use of antimicrobials, should improve the ongoing efforts to regulate antimicrobial use in agriculture and in clinical settings to limit the spread of multidrug...

  4. Comparative genomic analysis and virulence differences in closely related salmonella enterica serotype heidelberg isolates from humans, retail meats, and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Maria; Zhao, Shaohua; Pettengill, James; Luo, Yan; Monday, Steven R; Abbott, Jason; Ayers, Sherry L; Cinar, Hediye N; Muruvanda, Tim; Li, Cong; Allard, Marc W; Whichard, Jean; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W; McDermott, Patrick F

    2014-05-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is one of the top serovars causing human salmonellosis. Recently, an antibiotic-resistant strain of this serovar was implicated in a large 2011 multistate outbreak resulting from consumption of contaminated ground turkey that involved 136 confirmed cases, with one death. In this study, we assessed the evolutionary diversity of 44 S. Heidelberg isolates using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) generated by the 454 GS FLX (Roche) platform. The isolates, including 30 with nearly indistinguishable (one band difference) Xbal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns (JF6X01.0032, JF6X01.0058), were collected from various sources between 1982 and 2011 and included nine isolates associated with the 2011 outbreak. Additionally, we determined the complete sequence for the chromosome and three plasmids from a clinical isolate associated with the 2011 outbreak using the Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) system. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses, we were able to distinguish highly clonal isolates, including strains isolated at different times in the same year. The isolates from the recent 2011 outbreak clustered together with a mean SNP variation of only 17 SNPs. The S. Heidelberg isolates carried a variety of phages, such as prophage P22, P4, lambda-like prophage Gifsy-2, and the P2-like phage which carries the sopE1 gene, virulence genes including 62 pathogenicity, and 13 fimbrial markers and resistance plasmids of the incompatibility (Inc)I1, IncA/C, and IncHI2 groups. Twenty-one strains contained an IncX plasmid carrying a type IV secretion system. On the basis of the recent and historical isolates used in this study, our results demonstrated that, in addition to providing detailed genetic information for the isolates, WGS can identify SNP targets that can be utilized for differentiating highly clonal S. Heidelberg isolates.

  5. Selective enrichment media bias the types of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from mixed strain cultures and complex enrichment broths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the pathogen the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown in one set of standard enrichment media to see if culture bias patterns emerged. Nineteen strains representing four serogroups and ten serotypes were compared in four-strain mixtures in Salmonella-only and in cattle fecal culture enrichment backgrounds using Salmonella enrichment media. One or more strain(s) emerged as dominant in each mixture. No serotype was most fit, but strains of serogroups C2 and E were more likely to dominate enrichment culture mixtures than strains of serogroups B or C1. Different versions of Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) medium gave different patterns of strain dominance in both Salmonella-only and fecal enrichment culture backgrounds. The fittest strains belonged to serogroups C1, C2, and E, and included strains of S. Infantis, S. Thompson S. Newport, S. 6,8:d:-, and S. Give. Strains of serogroup B, which included serotypes often seen in outbreaks such as S. Typhimurium, S. Saintpaul, and S. Schwarzengrund were less likely to emerge as dominant strains in the mixtures when using standard RV as part of the enrichment. Using a more nutrient-rich version of RV as part of the protocol led to a different pattern of strains emerging, however some were still present in very low numbers in the resulting population. These results indicate that outbreak investigations of food and/or other environmental samples should include multiple enrichment protocols to ensure isolation of target strains of Salmonella.

  6. Epidemiological Investigation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kedougou in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pornruangwong, Srirat; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Salmonella enterica serovar Kedougou is among the top 10 serovars reported in northern Thailand. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with Salmonella Kedougou infection in Thailand and to compare the molecular types and antimicrobial resistance with Salmo......Objective: Salmonella enterica serovar Kedougou is among the top 10 serovars reported in northern Thailand. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with Salmonella Kedougou infection in Thailand and to compare the molecular types and antimicrobial resistance.......023), region (northern Thailand; p factors associated with Salmonella Kedougou infection compared to other nontyphoid Salmonella. Of the Salmonella Kedougou isolates of human origin, 84% exhibited resistance to at least three antimicrobial classes...... association, whereas the majority of the animal isolates from United Kingdom clustered separately. Conclusions: This study reveals Salmonella Kedougou as a major cause of human infections in northern Thailand especially during the hot period and suggests a global spread probably due to travel. The clonal...

  7. Acid resistance variability among isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk, P.A.; Jonge, de R.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.; Kieboom, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: Acid resistance could be an indicator of virulence since acid resistant strains are able to better survive the human stomach passage and in macrophages. We studied the acid resistance of several Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 strains isolated from food and humans and identified cellular

  8. Genetic characterisation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from poultry in Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdel-Maksoud

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food-borne diseases pose serious health problems, affecting public health and economic development worldwide.Methods: Salmonella was isolated from samples of chicken parts, skin samples of whole chicken carcasses, raw egg yolks, eggshells and chicken faeces. Resulting isolates were characterised by serogrouping, serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL production. Antibiotic resistance genes and integrons were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR.Results: The detection rates of Salmonella were 60%, 64% and 62% in chicken parts, skin, and faeces, respectively, whereas the egg yolks and eggshells were uniformly negative. Salmonella Kentucky and S. Enteritidis serotypes comprised 43.6% and 2.6% of the isolates, respectively, whilst S. Typhimurium was absent. Variable resistance rates were observed against 16 antibiotics; 97% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 96% to nalidixic acid and tetracycline and 76% to ampicillin. Multidrug resistance was detected in 82% (64/78 of the isolates and ESBL production was detected in 8% (6/78. The β-lactamase blaTEM-1 gene was detected in 57.6% and blaSHV-1 in 6.8% of the isolates, whilst the blaOXA gene was absent. The sul1gene was detected in 97.3% and the sul2 gene in 5.3% of the isolates. Sixty-four of the 78 isolates (82% were positive for the integrase gene (int I from class 1 integrons, whilst int II was absent.Conclusion: This study reveals the presence of an alarming number of multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates in the local poultry markets in Cairo. The high levels of drug resistance suggest an emerging problem that could impact negatively on efforts to prevent and treat poultry and poultry-transmitted human diseases in Egypt.

  9. Contribution of Avian Salmonella enterica Isolates to Human Salmonellosis Cases in Constantine (Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgroud, Rachid; Granier, Sophie A.; Marault, Muriel; Kerouanton, Annaëlle; Lezzar, Abdesslem; Bouzitouna-Bentchouala, Chafia; Brisabois, Anne; Millemann, Yves

    2015-01-01

    An epidemiological investigation was carried out on one hundred Salmonella isolates from broiler farms, slaughterhouses, and human patients in the Constantine region of Algeria, in order to explore the contribution of avian strains to human salmonellosis cases in this region over the same period of time. The isolates were characterized by phenotypic as well as genotypic methods. A large variety of antimicrobial resistance profiles was found among human isolates, while only seven profiles were found among avian isolates. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR), Insertion Sequence 200-PCR (IS200-PCR), and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) resulted in the allocation of the isolates to 16, 20, and 34 different profiles, respectively. The 3 genotyping methods led to complementary results by underlining the clonality of some serovars with the diffusion and persistence of a single clone in the Constantine area as well as stressing the polymorphism present in isolates belonging to other serovars, indicating the diversity of potential reservoirs of nontyphoidal Salmonella. Altogether, our results seem to indicate that nontyphoidal avian Salmonella may play an important role in human salmonellosis in the Constantine region. PMID:26543858

  10. Contribution of Avian Salmonella enterica Isolates to Human Salmonellosis Cases in Constantine (Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Elgroud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological investigation was carried out on one hundred Salmonella isolates from broiler farms, slaughterhouses, and human patients in the Constantine region of Algeria, in order to explore the contribution of avian strains to human salmonellosis cases in this region over the same period of time. The isolates were characterized by phenotypic as well as genotypic methods. A large variety of antimicrobial resistance profiles was found among human isolates, while only seven profiles were found among avian isolates. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR, Insertion Sequence 200-PCR (IS200-PCR, and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE resulted in the allocation of the isolates to 16, 20, and 34 different profiles, respectively. The 3 genotyping methods led to complementary results by underlining the clonality of some serovars with the diffusion and persistence of a single clone in the Constantine area as well as stressing the polymorphism present in isolates belonging to other serovars, indicating the diversity of potential reservoirs of nontyphoidal Salmonella. Altogether, our results seem to indicate that nontyphoidal avian Salmonella may play an important role in human salmonellosis in the Constantine region.

  11. Antibiotic resistances in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica isolated from foods with animal origin Resistencias a antibióticos en Listeria monocytogenes y Salmonella enterica aislados de alimentos de origen animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltasar Balsalobre Hernández

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of antibiotics in both human and animal health and in cattle production has generated resistant microorganisms to common antibiotics. Resistances spread caused by human and animal therapeutic is well known, but we know poorly frecuency of resistant bacteria in foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers. In this paper, sensitivity to nineteen antibiotics was investigated in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal origin, including fresh meat, hamburgers, fresh sausages, boiled ham and new-laid chicken eggs. The plate diffusion method of Bauer-Kirby was used.Listeria monocytogenes strains showed a very high sensitivity to all antibiotics checked, with the exception of one strain tetracycline resistant. In contrast, Salmonella enterica showed a high frecuency of resistances, in special to tetracycline, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, ticarcillin, ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Moreover, multi-resistance was a common phenomenon. Twenty percent of S. enterica strains were resistant to four or more antibiotics. Frecuency of resistances was higher in 4,5,12:i:-, Hadar, Typhimurium and Virchow serotypes.In conclusion, Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers are usually resistant to several antibiotics. The significance of this observation and its potential health risk must be investigated.El uso extensivo de antibióticos para la salud humana y animal así como para mejorar la producción ganadera ha generado un gran número de cepas microbianas resistentes a antibióticos de uso común. Es bien conocida la difusión de resistencias a través de la terapéutica humana y animal, pero desconocemos en qué medida los alimentos de origen animal destinados a consumo humano son portadores de resistencias.En este trabajo, se investigó la sensibilidad a diecinueve antibióticos de cepas de Listeria monocytogenes y Salmonella

  12. ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF ENTEROBACTERIACEAE GENERA AND SALMONELLA SPP., SALMONELLA ENTERICA SER. TYPHIMURIUM AND ENTERITIDIS ISOLATED FROM MILK, CHEESE AND OTHER DAIRY PRODUCTS FROM CONVENTIONAL FARM IN SLOVAKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Kunová

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance was investigated in 67 samples of Enterobacteriaceae genera isolates from milk, cheese and other dairy products in this work. The samples were obtained from conventional farms in Slovakia. Four samples of isolates were positive for Salmonella spp., Salmonella enterica ser. typhimurium and enteritidis. A great proportion of resistant strain from Enterobacteriaceae genera was found. There was detected a high resistance in milk samples to ampicillin (57.14%, to streptomycin and tetracycline (14.28%, to chloramphenicol (9.52%. Bacteria from the cheese samples were resistant to ampicillin (84.0%, to tetracycline (24.0%. In the samples of other dairy products was found resistance to ampicillin (66.66%, to tetracycline (52.38% and to streptomycin (14.28%. Among all samples observed, it was found resistance to ampicillin (69.26%, tetracycline (30.22%, streptomycin (9.52% and to chloramphenicol (3.17%. Resistance to other antibiotics was not detected. From all observed samples we detected Salmonella spp. in 5.97 %, Salmonella spp. was found in dairy samples in 19.04 %. Antibiotic resistance was investigated in 13 colonies of Salmonella spp. as well. The highest resistance was to tetracycline (30.76 %, ampicillin and tigecycline (23.07 %, to piperacillin (15.38 % and chloramphenicol (7.69 %. Resistance to the other monitored antibiotics was not detected. High number of antibiotic resistant Enterobacteriaceae genera and Salmonella spp. was found in milk, cheese and other dairy products from conventional breeding and it is indicating the need for prudent drugs using to diminish development and to avoid spread of antibiotic resistance.

  13. Characterization of Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Stanley, a Serovar Endemic to Asia and Associated with Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hello, Simon; Bortolaia, Valeria; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Pornruangmong, Srirat; Chaichana, Phattharaporn; Svendsen, Christina Aaby; Weill, François-Xavier; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley (S. Stanley) is a common serovar in Southeast Asia and was the second most common serovar implicated in human salmonellosis in Thailand in the years 2002 to 2007. In contrast, this serovar is relatively uncommon in Europe. The objective of this study was to characterize a collection of S. Stanley strains isolated from Thai (n = 62), Danish (n = 39), and French (n = 24) patients to gain a broader understanding of the genetic diversity, population dynamics, and susceptibility to antimicrobials. All isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The molecular mechanisms of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and plasmid-mediated resistance to quinolones were characterized by PCR and sequencing. Plasmid profiling, replicon typing, and microarray analysis were used to characterize the genetic mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in 10 extended-spectrum cephalosporinase-producing isolates. Considerable genetic diversity was observed among the isolates characterized with 91 unique XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, including 17 distinct clusters consisting of two to seven indistinguishable isolates. We found some of the S. Stanley isolates isolated from patients in Europe were acquired during travel to Southeast Asia, including Thailand. The presence of multiple plasmid lineages carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporinase-encoding blaCMY-2 gene in S. Stanley isolates from the central part of Thailand was confirmed. Our results emphasize that Thai authorities, as well as authorities in other countries lacking prudent use of antimicrobials, should improve the ongoing efforts to regulate antimicrobial use in agriculture and in clinical settings to limit the spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates and plasmids among humans and pigs in Thailand and abroad. PMID:22205822

  14. International collaborative study on the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolated from animals, humans, food and the environment in 13 European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldman, Kees; Cavaco, Lina; Mevius, Dik

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was initiated to collect retrospective information on the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolates in Europe and to identify the responsible genes. METHODS: Databases of national reference laboratories...

  15. In Vitro Development of Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, and Indiana Isolates from Food Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Chuan-Zhen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Gu, Xi-Xi; Li, Wan; Yang, Ling; Liu, Ya-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2017-09-01

    Difference in the development of resistance may be associated with the epidemiological spread and drug resistance of different Salmonella enterica serovar strains. In the present study, three susceptible S. enterica serovars, Typhimurium (ST), Enteritidis (SE), and Indiana (SI) strains, were subjected to stepwise selection with increasing ciprofloxacin concentrations. The results indicated that the mutation frequencies of the SI group were 10 1 -10 4 higher and developed resistance to ciprofloxacin more rapidly compared with the ST and SE groups. Ciprofloxacin accumulation in the SI strain was also higher than the other two strains in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance was quite different among the three serovar strains. In SI, increasing AcrAB-TolC efflux pump expression and single or double mutations in gyrA with or without a single parC mutation (T57S) were found in the development of ciprofloxacin resistance. In SE, an increase in the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump regulatory gene ramA gradually decreased as resistant bacteria developed; then resistance resulted from gyrA D87G and gyrB E466D mutations and/or in other active efflux pumps besides AcrAB-TolC. For ST, ramA expression increased rapidly along with gyrA D87 N and/or gyrB S464F mutations. In conclusion, persistent use of ciprofloxacin may aggravate the resistance of different S. enterica serovars and prudent use of the fluoroquinolones is needed. The quicker resistance and higher mutation frequency of the SI isolates present a potential public health threat.

  16. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-03

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104 Isolated from Denmark and Comparison with Isolates from Europe and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Sandvang, D.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2000-01-01

    , spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline. Five isolates from the United Kingdom and Spain were sensitive to all antibiotics examined, whereas four isolates from the United Kingdom and the United States were also resistant to one or more of the antibiotics, namely, gentamicin, neomycin......A total of 136 isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 from Denmark (n = 93), Germany (n = 10), Italy (n = 4), Spain (n = 5), and the United Kingdom (n = 9) were characterized by antimicrobial resistance analysis, plasmid profiling, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......) with the restriction enzymes XbaI and BlnI, and analysis for the presence of integrons and antibiotic resistance genes. The isolates from Denmark were from nine pig herds, while the isolates from other countries were both of animal and of human origin. All but 10 isolates were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol...

  18. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Drug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Isolates from Dairy Cattle and Humans in New York and Washington States Reveals Source and Geographic Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Laura M; Wiedmann, Martin; den Bakker, Henk; Siler, Julie; Warchocki, Steven; Kent, David; Lyalina, Svetlana; Davis, Margaret; Sischo, William; Besser, Thomas; Warnick, Lorin D; Pereira, Richard V

    2017-06-15

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica can be spread from cattle to humans through direct contact with animals shedding Salmonella as well as through the food chain, making MDR Salmonella a serious threat to human health. The objective of this study was to use whole-genome sequencing to compare antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Newport, and Dublin isolated from dairy cattle and humans in Washington State and New York State at the genotypic and phenotypic levels. A total of 90 isolates were selected for the study (37 S Typhimurium, 32 S Newport, and 21 S Dublin isolates). All isolates were tested for phenotypic antibiotic resistance to 12 drugs using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion. AMR genes were detected in the assembled genome of each isolate using nucleotide BLAST and ARG-ANNOT. Genotypic prediction of phenotypic resistance resulted in a mean sensitivity of 97.2 and specificity of 85.2. Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim resistance was observed only in human isolates (P New York State differed from those from Washington State based on the presence/absence of plasmid replicons, as well as phenotypic AMR susceptibility/nonsusceptibility (P Salmonella enterica and associated AMR determinants, which can be transferred to humans through different routes. Previous studies have sought to assess the degree to which AMR livestock- and human-associated Salmonella strains overlap, as well as the spatial distribution of Salmonella's associated AMR determinants, but have often been limited by the degree of resolution at which isolates can be compared. Here, a comparative genomics study of livestock- and human-associated Salmonella strains from different regions of the United States shows that while many AMR genes and phenotypes were confined to human isolates, overlaps between the resistomes of bovine and human-associated Salmonella isolates were observed on numerous occasions, particularly for S Newport. We have also shown that whole

  19. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Biofilm Formation Ability of Clinically Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serotype typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghasemmahdi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria with biofilm formation ability may be a major threat to public health and food safety and sanitation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic resistance patterns and biofilm production characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium isolated from different species of birds. Materials and Methods: The antibiotic resistance patterns of 38 pre-identified isolates were screened by standard Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion method performed on Mueller–Hinton agar to a panel of 17 antibiotics. The extent of biofilm formation was measured by Microtiter plate (MTP-based systems. Results: The highest antimicrobial resistance was detected against nalidixic acid (97%, followed by doxycycline (86%, colistin (84%, streptomycin (84% and tetracycline (84%. All isolates were sensitive to amikacin (100% and 97% and 95% of the isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime and ceftriaxone, respectively. Twenty one different antibiotic resistance patterns were observed among S. typhimurium isolates. According to the results of the microtitre plate biofilm assay, there was a wide variation in biofilm forming ability among S. typhimurium isolates. Most of the isolates (60.52% were not capable of producing biofilm, while 26.31%, 7.89%, and 5.26% isolates were weak, strong and moderate biofilm producers, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that nearly all S. typhimurium isolates revealed a high multiple antibiotic resistant with low biofilm forming capabilities which proposed low association between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance of a major food important pathogen.

  20. Population genetics of multi-drug resistant (MDR) IncA/C plasmid in Salmonella enterica isolated from animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food animals harboring Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica are a potential source for acquisition of zoonotic pathogens. Plasmids (small, self-replicating, extra-chromosomal DNA) are often associated with antimicrobial resistance and plasmids carrying MDR genes have been found to be a maj...

  1. Distribution of prophages and SGI-1 antibiotic-resistance genes among different Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, A.P.H.M.; Beuling, A.M.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Abee, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the authors identified Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) definitive type (DT)104-specific sequences of mainly prophage origin by genomic subtractive hybridization. In the present study, the distribution of the prophages identified, ST104 and ST64B, and the novel

  2. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-03-17

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). Copyright © 2016 Yao et al.

  3. Isolation of Salmonella enterica and serologic reactivity to Leptospira interrogans in opossums (Didelphis virginiana from Yucatán, México Aislamiento de Salmonella enterica y reactividad serológica a Leptospira interrogans en tlacuaches (Didelphis virginiana de Yucatán, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Antonio RUIZ-PIÑA

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Salmonella enterica and serologic evidence of infection by Leptospira interrogans, were detected in the opossum Didelphis virginiana in a semi-urban locality of the Yucatán State, México. Ninety-one opossums were captured during the period April 1996 and May 1998. From a total of 17 feces samples, four Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes (Sandiego, Newport, Anatum, and Minnesota, and one Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae serovar O44:Z4,Z23:- were isolated. Some opossums presented mixed infections. From 81 sera samples, four (4.9% were positive to antibodies to Leptospira serovars pomona and wolfii. Both animals infected with Salmonella enterica and those serologically positive to Leptospira interrogans were captured in peridomestic habitat. Opossums infected with Salmonella enterica, were captured in dry season, and those seropositive to Leptospira interrogans during the rainy season. The implications of infection and reactivity of these zoonotic pathogens in D. virginiana in the Yucatan state are briefly discussed.La presencia de Salmonella enterica y evidencia serológica de infección por Leptospira interrogans fueron detectadas en tlacuaches de la especie Didelphis virginiana capturados en una localidad semi-urbana del estado de Yucatán, México. Se capturaron 91 marsupiales durante el período de abril de 1996 a mayo de 1998. De un total de 17 muestras de heces, se aislaron cuatro serotipos de Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (Sandiego, Newport, Anatum y Minnesota y una Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae serovar O44:Z4,Z23:-. En algunos tlacuaches se registraron infecciones mixtas. De 81 muestras de suero, cuatro (4,9% presentaron reacciones positivas con los serovares pomona y wolffi, ambos pertenecientes al género Leptospira. Los tlacuaches con serología positiva fueron capturados en el hábitat peridomiciliar. Los animales infectados con Salmonella enterica fueron capturados en los períodos de seca y

  4. Chronological Change of Resistance to β-Lactams in Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis Isolated from Broilers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuma, Takehisa; Miyasako, Daisuke; Dahshan, Hesham; Takayama, Tomoko; Nakamoto, Yuko; Shahada, Francis; Akiba, Masato; Okamoto, Karoku

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic surveillance study was conducted in southern Japan to determine the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and characterize the β-lactamase genes and the plasmids harboring these genes in Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis (S. Infantis) isolates from broilers. Between January, 2007 and December, 2008, a total of 1,472 fecal samples were collected and examined at the Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health, Kagoshima University, Japan. In 93 (6.3%) isolates recovered, 33 (35.5%) isolates showed resistance to cefotaxime, an extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC), conferred by TEM-20, TEM-52 and CTX-M-25 extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). In addition to ESC-resistance, eight (8.6%) isolates exhibited resistance to cefoxitin mediated by CMY-2 AmpC β-lactamase. Plasmid analysis and polymerase chain reaction replicon typing revealed the bla TEM-20 and bla CMY-2 genes were associated with IncP plasmids, bla TEM-52 was linked with a non-typable plasmid and bla CTX-M-25 was carried by an IncA/C plasmid. Non-β-lactam resistance to streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and oxytetracycline encoded by the aadA1, sul1, and tet(A) genes, respectively, was found in 86 (92.5%) isolates. Resistance to kanamycin and ofloxacin was exhibited in 12 (12.9%) and 11 (11.8%) isolates, respectively, the former was mediated by aphA1-Iab. These data indicate that S. Infantis isolates producing ESBLs and AmpC β-lactamase have spread among broiler farms in Japan. These data demonstrated that the incidence of ESC-resistant S. Infantis carrying bla TEM-52 remarkably increased and S. Infantis strains harboring bla CMY-2, bla TEM-20, or bla CTX-M-25 genes emerged from broilers in Japan for the first time in 2007 and 2008.

  5. Isolation of QseC-regulated genes in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by transposon mutgagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella, a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths, often asymptomatically colonizes food-producing animals. In fact, >50% of U.S. swine production facilities test positive for Salmonella. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 NCTC13348 c...

  6. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates from food and human samples by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance, plasmid profiling, (GTG5-PCR and ERIC-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fardsanei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has been a primary cause of human salmonellosis in many countries. The major objective of this study was to investigate genetic diversity among Salmonella Enteritidis strains from different origins (food and human by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC -PCR, as well as to assess their plasmid profiling and antimicrobial resistance. A total of 30 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, 15 from food samples (chicken, lamb, beef and duck meats and 15 from clinical samples were collected in Tehran. Identification of isolates as Salmonella was confirmed by using conventional standard biochemical and serological tests. Multiplex-PCR was used for serotyping of isolates to identify Salmonella Enteritidis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing to 16 agents founds drug resistance patterns among Salmonella Enteritidis isolates. No resistance was observed to cephalexin, ceftriaxone, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem or meropenem, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. The highest resistance (96.7% was observed to nitrofurantoin. Seven plasmid profiles (P1–P7 were detected, and a 68-kb plasmid was found in all isolates. Two different primers; ERIC and (GTG5 were used for genotyping, which each produced four profiles. The majority of clinical and food isolates fell into two separate common types (CTs with a similar percentage of 95% by ERIC-PCR. Using primer (GTG5, 29 isolates incorporated in three CTs with 70% of isolates showing a single banding pattern. Limited genetic diversity among human and food isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis may indicate that contaminated foods were possibly the source of human salmonellosis. These results confirmed that ERIC-PCR genotyping has limited discriminatory power for Salmonella Enteritidis of different origin.

  7. The Salmonella enterica Pan-genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobsen, A.; Hendriksen, R. S.; Aaresturp, F. M.; Ussery, D. W.; Friis, C.

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is divided into four subspecies containing a large number of different serovars, several of which are important zoonotic pathogens and some show a high degree of host specificity or host preference. We compare 45 sequenced S. enterica genomes that are publicly available (22

  8. Quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The human restricted bacteria, Salmonella enterica serovar. Typhi is the major cause of typhoid fever (or enteric fever), a characteristic severe systemic illness [1]. In 2010, typhoid fever accounted for an estimated global burden of. 27 million new cases and 200,000 deaths [2]. For over two decades, S. enterica ...

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Salmonella enterica Serotype Infantis Strains Isolated from a Captive Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a Cohabitant Black and White Tegu (Tupinambis merianae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Tatiane A; Coura, Fernanda M; Malta, Marcelo C C; Tinoco, Herlandes P; Pessanha, Angela T; Pereira, Felipe L; Leal, Carlos A G; Heinemann, Marcos B; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Santos, Renato L

    2016-01-21

    The draft genome sequences of two Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis isolates are reported here. One of the strains was isolated from a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) with colitis. The second strain was isolated from a reptile that inhabited the same premises. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated that these isolates were not clonal. Copyright © 2016 Paixão et al.

  10. Automated 5 ' nuclease PCR assay for identification of Salmonella enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Ahrens, Peter; Rådström, P.

    2000-01-01

    A simple and ready-to-go test based on a 5' nuclease (TaqMan) PCR technique was developed for identification of presumptive Salmonella enterica isolates. The results were compared with those of conventional methods. The TaqMan assay was evaluated for its ability to accurately detect 210 S. enterica...... isolates, including 100 problematic "rough" isolates. An internal positive control was designed to use the same Salmonella primers for amplification of a spiked nonrelevant template (116 bp) in the sample tube. The PCR test correctly identified all the Salmonella strains by resulting in positive end...... Salmonella strains tested resulted in positive FAM and TET signals. In addition, it was found that the complete PCR mixture, predispensed in microwell plates, could be stored for up to 3 months at -20 degrees C, Thus, the diagnostic TaqMan assay developed can be a useful and simple alternative method...

  11. Real-time monitoring of Salmonella enterica in free-range geese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Pedersen, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Free-range geese were sampled longitudinally and Salmonella isolates characterized to reveal highly diverging colonization dynamics. One flock was intermittently colonized with one strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from 2 weeks of age, while in another, S. enterica serovar Mbandak...

  12. Differences in biofilm formation of produce and poultry Salmonella enterica isolates and their persistence on spinach plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra; Singh, Manpreet; Macarisin, Dumitru; Sharma, Manan; Shelton, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Spinach plants were irrigated biweekly with water containing 2.1 log CFU Salmonella/100 ml water (the maximum Escherichia coli MPN recommended by the Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement; LGMA), or 4.1 CFU Salmonella/100 ml water to determine Salmonella persistence on spinach leaves. Green Fluorescent protein expressing Salmonella were undetectable by most-probable number (MPN) at 24 h and 7 days following each irrigation event. This study indicates that Salmonella are unlikely to persist on spinach leaves when irrigation water is contaminated at a level below the LGMA standards. In a parallel study, persistence of Salmonella isolated from poultry or produce was compared following biweekly irrigation of spinach plants with water containing 6 log CFU Salmonella/100 ml. Produce Salmonella isolates formed greater biofilms on polystyrene, polycarbonate and stainless steel surfaces and persisted at significantly higher numbers on spinach leaves than those Salmonella from poultry origin during 35 days study. Poultry Salmonella isolates were undetectable (spinach plants 7 days following each irrigation event when assayed by direct plating. This study indicates that Salmonella persistence on spinach leaves is affected by the source of contamination and the biofilm forming ability of the strain. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Colistin Resistance in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Swine in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Savoia Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports about acquired resistance to colistin in different bacteria species are increasing, including E. coli of animal origin, but reports of resistance in wild S. enterica of different serotypes from swine are not found in the literature. Results obtained with one hundred and twenty-six E. coli strains from diseased swine and one hundred and twenty-four S. enterica strains from diseased and carrier swine showed a frequency of 6.3% and 21% of colistin-resistant strains, respectively. When comparing the disk diffusion test with the agar dilution test to evaluate the strains, it was confirmed that the disk diffusion test is not recommended to evaluate colistin resistance as described previously. The colistin MIC 90 and MIC 50 values obtained to E. coli were 0.25 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL, the MIC 90 and MIC 50 to S. enterica were 1 μg/mL and 8 μg/mL. Considering the importance of colistin in control of nosocomial human infections with Gram-negative multiresistant bacteria, and the large use of this drug in animal production, the colistin resistance prevalence in enterobacteriaceae of animal origin must be monitored more closely.

  14. Infectious drug resistance plasmid study in Salmonella enterica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-three Salmonella enterica isolated from domestic animals and lizards in Oyo and Ogun States of Nigeria between April 2005 and August 2007 were studied for infectious drug resistance and possible transfer using Escherichia coli 365K12 resistant to 200 ìg/ml streptomycin as sensitive recipient. Nineteen (79%) of ...

  15. Antimicrobial resistance and extended-spectrum β-lactamases of Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from livestock and processed food in Portugal: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Rui; Henriques, Ana; Sereno, Rui; Mendonça, Nuno; da Silva, Gabriela Jorge

    2015-02-01

    As Salmonella is a common foodborne pathogen, the present study aimed to determine the distribution of Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated during 2011-2012 from poultry, swine, cattle, and processed food in Portugal, and to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility and the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Results were also compared with data obtained before the implementation of the National Control Program in Poultry and the ban of antimicrobial agents in animal feed in the European Union (EU). A total of 14 serotypes were identified, from 258 isolates recovered, with Salmonella Typhimurium (32.6%, n=84) and Salmonella Enteritidis (10.1%, n=26) being the most common. Salmonella Enteritidis in poultry was less frequent than in previous studies, which might be associated with the implementation of the National Control Program for Salmonella in poultry. Nevertheless, other serotypes seem to occupy this biological niche, and may be more common in human salmonellosis in the future. The majority of isolates (70.2%, n=181) were resistant to at least one class of antimicrobial agent and exhibited higher frequency of resistance to tetracycline (47.7%, n=123) and ampicillin (36.0%, n=93), with Salmonella Typhimurium being the more resistant serotype. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was shown in 8% (n=21) of isolates, a lower value compared to data obtained before 2004. ESBLs producers Salmonella Typhimurium bla(CTX-M-1) and Salmonella Enteritidis bla(SHV-12) were isolated from swine and poultry, respectively. The bla(CTX-M-1) and bla(SHV-12) genes were carried on conjugative plasmids of IncHI2replicon types and IncI1, respectively. This was the first report of a bla(CTX-M-1) in Salmonella Typhimurium in Portugal. Overall, the results revealed changes in animal origin Salmonella serotypes, mainly emerging serotypes, in frequency of resistance, and in occurrence of ESBLs-producing Salmonella. The control measures taken by the EU seem to have some impact on the

  16. Complete genomic sequences of two outbreak strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson associated with cilantro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH -99A2345) are clinical isolates from 1999, putatively related to an outbreak in California from contaminated cilantro. We report the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S. Thompson...

  17. The characterization of Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from the scalder tank water of a commercial poultry processing plant: Recovery of a multidrug-resistant Heidelberg strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, Michael J; Ingram, Kimberly D; Gamble, John; Guard, Jean; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Hinton, Arthur; Hiett, Kelli L

    2015-03-01

    The recent multistate outbreak of a multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Heidelberg strain from commercial poultry production highlights the need to better understand the reservoirs of these zoonotic pathogens within the commercial poultry production and processing environment. As part of a larger study looking at temporal changes in microbial communities within the major water tanks within a commercial processing facility, this paper identifies and characterizes Salmonella enterica isolated from the water in a final scalder tank at 3 times during a typical processing day: prior to the birds entering the tank (start), halfway through the processing day (mid), and after the final birds were scalded (end). Over 3 consecutive processing days, no Salmonella were recovered from start-of-day water samples, while a total of 56 Salmonella isolates were recovered from the mid-day and end-of-day scalder water samples. Traditional and newer PCR-based serotyping methods eventually identified these isolates as either group C3 S. Kentucky (n=45) and group B S. Heidelberg (n=11). While none of the S. Kentucky isolates possessed any resistances to the antimicrobials tested, all S. Heidelberg isolates were found to be multidrug resistant to 5 specific antimicrobials representing 3 antimicrobial classes. Due to the potential public health impact of S. Heidelberg and the recent nationwide poultry-associated outbreak of multidrug-resistant S. Heidelberg, future studies should focus on understanding the transmission and environmental growth dynamics of this serotype within the commercial poultry processing plant environment. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  18. Isolation and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Shigella spp. from meat and dairy products in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2014-01-03

    Foodborne pathogens are a major threat to food safety, especially in developing countries where hygiene and sanitation facilities are often poor. Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Shigella spp. are among the major causes of outbreaks of foodborne diseases. This large-scale study investigated the prevalence of these foodborne pathogens in meat (beef and chicken) and dairy products collected from street vendors, butchers, retail markets and slaughterhouses in Egypt. A total of 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) were analyzed using culture and PCR based methods. S. enterica, E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella spp. were detected in 69 (4.3%), 54 (3.4%) and 27 (1.7%) samples respectively. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, S. enterica serovar Infantis and non-typable serovars were detected in 28 (1.8%), 22 (1.4%), 16 (1.0%) and 3 (0.1%) samples respectively. All E. coli O157:H7 isolates were positive for stx1 and/or stx2 virulence toxin genes. Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei and Shigella dysenteriae were detected in 18 (1.2%), 7 (0.4%) and 2 (0.1%) samples respectively. The incidences of S. enterica and Shigella spp. were higher in meat products (53; 6.6% and 16; 2.0%, respectively) than in dairy products (16; 2.0% and 11; 1.4%, respectively), while, E. coli O157:H7 was higher in dairy products (29; 3.6%) than in meat products (25; 3.1%). The incidence of foodborne pathogens in meat and dairy products was determined in a large-scale survey in Africa. © 2013.

  19. Subtyping Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis isolates from different sources by using sequence typing based on virulence genes and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenyun; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Ribot, Efrain M; Knabel, Stephen J; Dudley, Edward G

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne salmonellosis in the United States. Two major food vehicles for S. Enteritidis are contaminated eggs and chicken meat. Improved subtyping methods are needed to accurately track specific strains of S. Enteritidis related to human salmonellosis throughout the chicken and egg food system. A sequence typing scheme based on virulence genes (fimH and sseL) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)-CRISPR-including multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (designated CRISPR-MVLST)-was used to characterize 35 human clinical isolates, 46 chicken isolates, 24 egg isolates, and 63 hen house environment isolates of S. Enteritidis. A total of 27 sequence types (STs) were identified among the 167 isolates. CRISPR-MVLST identified three persistent and predominate STs circulating among U.S. human clinical isolates and chicken, egg, and hen house environmental isolates in Pennsylvania, and an ST that was found only in eggs and humans. It also identified a potential environment-specific sequence type. Moreover, cluster analysis based on fimH and sseL identified a number of clusters, of which several were found in more than one outbreak, as well as 11 singletons. Further research is needed to determine if CRISPR-MVLST might help identify the ecological origins of S. Enteritidis strains that contaminate chickens and eggs.

  20. Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Monophasic Variant 4,12:i:- Isolated from Asymptomatic Wildlife in a Catalonian Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-López, Rafael A; Vidal, Anna; Obón, Elena; Martín, Marga; Darwich, Laila

    2015-07-01

    Wildlife can act as long-term asymptomatic reservoirs for zoonotic bacteria, such as Salmonella. The prevalence and antimicrobial-susceptibility profiles of Salmonella spp. were assessed in 263 cases in wildlife from 22 animal orders from a wildlife rehabilitation center in Catalonia (NE Spain), September 2013-May 2014. Eleven of 263 tested animals were positive for Salmonella spp., representing an overall prevalence of 4.2%. Prevalences by taxonomic categories were 2% in mammals, 4.7% in birds, and 4.5% in reptiles. By species, one each of European hedgehog (Erinaceus europeus; from a sample of n = 26), Eurasian Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo; n = 2), Barn Owl (Tyto alba; n = 3), Tawny Owl (Strix aluco; n = 20), Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus; n = 1), Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus; n = 1), and Hoopoe (Upupa epops; n = 2), and two each Common Kestrels (Falco tinnunculus; n = 16) and pond sliders (Trachemys scripta; n = 25) were positive for Salmonella. By serotyping, seven of eleven isolates were classified as S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and five of seven belonged to the monophasic variant 4,12:i:-. All the monophasic variants were isolated from birds (4/5 in raptors) and showed a multidrug-resistance (MDR) profile to at least ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and tetracycline (R-type ASSuT), and up to 12 antibiotics. The large proportion of S. Typhimurium monophasic MDR strains detected in wildlife never treated with antibiotics, especially in raptors, adds more complexity to the epidemiologic control of one of the most frequent serovars involved in human and livestock infection.

  1. Multidrug-resistance and presence of class 1 integrons in clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, circulating in Armenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedrakyan, Anahit M.; Arakelova, K. A.; Zakaryan, Magdalina K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was detection of class 1 integrons and their contribution to the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes in strains of subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis. S. Enteritidis strains (n = 29) were isolated from patients with salmonellosis at “Nork” Clinical Hospital of Infectious...... Diseases, Yerevan, Republic of Armenia. High prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) phenotypes was revealed and isolates with MDR phenotypes which are rare in the S. Enteritidis serotype were observed. Class 1 integrons were detected in 27,6% of isolates, with the prevalence of a variable region of 1000...

  2. Salmonella enterica diversity in central Californian coastal waterways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Sarah P; González-Escalona, Narjol; Son, Insook; Melka, David C; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most important bacterial enteric pathogens worldwide. However, little is known about its distribution and diversity in the environment. The present study explored the diversity of 104 strains of Salmonella enterica isolated over 2 years from 12 coastal waterways in central California. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing were used to probe species diversity. Seventy-four PFGE patterns and 38 sequence types (STs) were found, including 18 newly described STs. Nineteen of 25 PFGE patterns were indistinguishable from those of clinical isolates in PulseNet. The most common ST was consistent with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and other frequently detected STs were associated with the serovars Heidelberg and Enteritidis; all of these serovars are important etiologies of salmonellosis. An investigation into S. enterica biogeography was conducted at the level of ST and subspecies. At the ST and subspecies level, we found a taxon-time relationship but no taxon-area or taxon-environmental distance relationships. STs collected during wet versus dry conditions tended to be more similar; however, STs collected from waterways adjacent to watersheds with similar land covers did not tend to be similar. The results suggest that the lack of dispersal limitation may be an important factor affecting the diversity of S. enterica in the region.

  3. Polymorphism of genes encoding PmrAB in colistin-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolated from poultry and swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Alberto; Porrero, M Concepción; Téllez, Sonia; Palomo, Gonzalo; García, María; Domínguez, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    To detect the occurrence of low susceptibility to colistin (polymyxin E), a last-resort antimicrobial, among enterobacteria isolated from samples of animal origin (poultry and swine) and to find out the molecular basis of colistin resistance. Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli were isolated from eggs and swine samples. Bacterial strains were screened for colistin resistance by using MIC determinations interpreted according to EUCAST recommendations. pmrAB genes were amplified by PCR from bacterial isolates and their sequences were characterized. Nine colistin-resistant strains were detected in a collection of 739 enterobacteria (S. enterica and E. coli) isolated from animal samples taken in different environments. Sequences encoding the PmrAB two-component sensor-regulator from two colistin-resistant E. coli strains isolated from swine faeces presented three non-synonymous polymorphisms, producing the variants 39S → I and 81R → S of PmrA and 161V → G of PmrB, among which the involvement of mutations in PmrA-81 and PmrB-161 in resistance to the antimicrobial had been previously shown. No variation at the protein level was detected after analysis of PmrAB sequences from seven colistin-resistant S. enterica strains. E. coli strains carrying mutations in PmrAB that confer resistance to polymyxins, which might have evolved in vivo and have been rarely detected, are described for the first time in enterobacteria isolated from animals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Virulence factors of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the major etiologic agents of human food-borne gastrointestinal infections. Efforts to control the number of serovar Enteritidis infections have had a limited success, in part because of the lack of knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that

  5. Molecular characterisation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from Gomel region, Belarus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapalski, D.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Hasman, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    an infection outside hospitals in the Gomel region of Belarus. Thirty-one isolates were highly similar according to PFGE and MLVA typing, were multidrug-resistant, including resistance to ceftiofur, and harboured the bla(CTX-M-5) gene. These results indicate that a common source may have been responsible...

  6. Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance Profile between Salmonella Spp., Salmonella Enterica Ser. Typhimurium and Enteritidis and Escherichia Coli Isolated from Rectal Swabs of Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Hleba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was comparing of antibiotic resistance profile between Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli isolated from rectal swabs of chicken from conventional breeding. For the antibiotic susceptibility testing disk diffusion method was used. The both tested bacteria were exposed against thirteen antibiotics: ampicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, doripenem, meropenem, levofloxacin, ofloxacin, amikacin, gentamycin, tygecycline, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. For the identification of these strains, we used Chromogenic coliform agar, Triple sugar iron agar and biochemical test (ENTEROtest 24. We identified Salmonella spp. by used MicroSEQ® Salmonella spp. Detection Kit for identification of this strain in Step ONE Real Time PCR. In this study, we determined that Salmonella spp. was more resistant like Escherichia coli. The highest resistance had isolates of Salmonella spp. to levofloxacin (100% and to ofloxacin (100%. Also to ampicillin was resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates about 83%. Only in case of piperacillin was resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates lower (50% like in Escherichia coli isolates (66.6%. The both strains were 100 % sensitive to doripenem, meropenem, amikacin, gentamycin and tygecycline. Antibiotic resistance is a biological danger. Bacteria, which we study, are considered to reservoirs of resistant genes and they are facultative and obligate pathogens. If these pathogen bacteria cause diseases those these diseases are difficult to treat.

  7. Genomic characterization of an extensively-drug resistance Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana strain harboring blaNDM-1 gene isolated from a chicken carcass in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Peng, Zixin; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Hu, Yujie; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenhui; Fanning, Séamus; Li, Fengqin

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to genetically characterize the antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana C629 isolated from a chicken carcass in China in 2014. Antimicrobial susceptibility against a panel of 23 antimicrobial agents was carried out on Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana C629 and assessed according to CLSI standards. Whole-genome sequencing of this isolate was conducted to obtain the complete genome of S. Indiana. Salmonella Indiana C629 expressed an XDR phenotype being resistant to more than 20 antimicrobial agents, including imipenem and meropenem. From the analysis of the resistance mechanisms, two mutations were identified in subunit A of DNA gyrase within the quinolone resistance determining region, in addition to the acquisition of mobile efflux pumps encoding oqxA/B/R. Additionally, four beta-lactamases resistance genes (blaCTX-M-65, blaTEM-1, blaOXA-1, and blaNDM-1), five aminoglycosides resistance genes (aac(3)-IV, aac(6')-Ib-cr, aadA2, aadA5, and aph(4)-Ia), two phenicol resistance genes (catB3 and floR), and five trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance genes (sul1/2/3 and dfrA12/17) were also identified. A total of 191 virulence genes were identified. Among them, 57 belonged to type-three secretion system (T3SS) encoding genes, 55 belonged to fimbrial adherence encoding genes, and 39 belonged to flagella-encoding genes CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that multi-resistance mechanisms consistent with an XDR-phenotype, along with various virulence encoding genes of a S. Indiana strain in China These findings highlight the importance of cooperation among different sectors in order to monitor the spread of resistant pathogens among food animal, foods of animal origin and human beings that might further take measures to protect consumers' health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovars Indiana and Enteritidis from Chickens in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Beier, Ross C.; Wu, Guojuan; Hou, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    A total of 310 Salmonella isolates were isolated from 6 broiler farms in Eastern China, serotyped according to the Kauffmann-White classification. All isolates were examined for susceptibility to 17 commonly used antimicrobial agents, representative isolates were examined for resistance genes and class I integrons using PCR technology. Clonality was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). There were two serotypes detected in the 310 Salmonella strains, which included 133 Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates and 177 Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates. Antimicrobial sensitivity results showed that the isolates were generally resistant to sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, tetracycline, doxycycline and trimethoprim, and 95% of the isolates sensitive to amikacin and polymyxin. Among all Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates, 108 (81.2%) possessed the blaTEM, floR, tetA, strA and aac (6')-Ib-cr resistance genes. The detected carriage rate of class 1 integrons was 66.5% (206/310), with 6 strains carrying gene integron cassette dfr17-aadA5. The increasing frequency of multidrug resistance rate in Salmonella was associated with increasing prevalence of int1 genes (rs = 0.938, P = 0.00039). The int1, blaTEM, floR, tetA, strA and aac (6')-Ib-cr positive Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates showed five major patterns as determined by PFGE. Most isolates exhibited the common PFGE patterns found from the chicken farms, suggesting that many multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana prevailed in these sources. Some isolates with similar antimicrobial resistance patterns represented a variety of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana genotypes, and were derived from a different clone. PMID:24788434

  9. Identification and characterization of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Derby isolates carrying a new aadA26 gene cassette in a class 1 integron obtained at pig slaughterhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Graciela Volz; Michael, Geovana Brenner; Cardoso, Marisa; Schwarz, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (S.) serovar Derby is one of the most prevalent serovars in pigs. Twenty-seven multiresistant S. Derby isolates, obtained at two pig slaughterhouses in Southern Brazil, were investigated for their molecular relationships, genotypic resistance and presence of class 1 and 2 integrons. All isolates shared the same XbaI-macrorestriction pattern and showed a common resistance genotype with resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin (aadA variant), sulphonamides (sul1) and tetracycline [tet(A)]. They carried chromosome-located class 1 integrons with a new aadA gene variant, designated aadA26, as part of a gene cassette. The sequence of the flanking regions of this integron and the amplification of the merA gene may indicate the location of the class 1 integron into a Tn21-related transposon. The close relationships among these isolates and isolates from an earlier study suggest the persistence of a resistant clone of S. Derby in the pig production chain in Southern Brazil. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. SEROTYPES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA ISOLATED FROM PORK, CHICKEN MEAT AND LETTUCE, BANGKOK AND CENTRAL THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyomdecha, Nattamon; Mungkornkaew, Narissara; Samosornsuk, Worada

    2016-01-01

    Food of animal origins, particularly pork and chicken meat, has long been recognized as major sources of human salmonellosis. There have been recent reports of human salmonellosis outbreaks due to consumption of leafy green vegetables such as lettuce. In this study, 120 (40 pork, 40 chicken meat and 40 lettuce) samples were randomly collected from retail markets in Bangkok and central Thailand during June to August 2015 for Salmonella serotype identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Salmonella was found in 82%, 62% and 20% of pork, chicken meat and lettuce samples, respectively. The top 5 most common Salmonella serotypes were Panama (15%), Schwarzengrund (12%), Rissen, Anatum, and Stanley (11% each), Albany (9%), and Indiana (8%). A high percentage of Salmonella isolated from food of animal origin were resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs, including ampicillin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. From antibiogram pattern analysis, the most common serotypes constituted isolates that were multidrug resistant. The study indicates that Salmonella was still present in various kinds of food and that certain serotypes have become predominant, a phenomenon not previously reported in Thailand.

  11. Typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis isolates from 51 outbreaks in Germany between 1974 and 2009 by a novel phage-typing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T; Braun, P G; Fehlhaber, K; Prager, R; Pfeifer, Y; Rabsch, W

    2014-01-01

    We developed a new phage-typing method and evaluated its application in combination with XbaI macrorestriction analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) as a useful tool for the long-term epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis. In this study, we investigated 1008 S. Infantis isolates recovered from humans, various animal species and food products from 1973 to 2009. The typing scheme is based on 17 typing phages, defining 61 different patterns within the strain collection. The experiments showed that phage typing is a reliable method for differentiation of outbreaks and sporadic clinical cases as well as for elucidation of chains of transmission. The combined analysis of phage typing and PFGE revealed the existence of epidemic clones with a high stability over time like PT29/XB27 which was identified in nosocomial salmonellosis, community outbreaks as well as in broiler chickens from 2002 to 2009.

  12. Detection of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana from Naturally Contaminated Chick Feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benahmed, Faiza; Wang, Hua; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Gopinath, Gopal R; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Hanes, Darcy E; Hammack, Thomas S; Rasmussen, Mark; Davidson, Maureen K

    2017-10-04

    Because some significant outbreaks of human salmonellosis have been traced to contaminated animal feed, the rapid and efficient detection of Salmonella in feed is essential. However, the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) culture method that uses lactose broth as a preenrichment medium has not reliably supported the results of real-time PCR assays for certain foods. We evaluated the BAM culture method and a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay using two preenrichment media, modified buffered peptone water and lactose broth, to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana in naturally contaminated chick feed. After 24 h of incubation, the qPCR method was as sensitive as the culture method when modified buffered peptone water was used as the preenrichment medium but less sensitive than culture when lactose broth was used. After 48 h of incubation, detection of Salmonella Cubana by qPCR and by culture in either preenrichment medium was equivalent. We also compared the performance of the traditional serotyping method, which uses pure cultures of Salmonella grown on blood agar, to two molecular serotyping methods. The serotyping method based on whole genome sequencing also requires pure cultures, but the PCR-based molecular serotyping method can be done directly with the enriched culture medium. The PCR-based molecular serotyping method provided simple and rapid detection and identification of Salmonella Cubana. However, whole genome sequencing allows accurate identification of many Salmonella serotypes and highlights variations in the genomes, even in tight genomic clusters. We also compared the genome of the chick feed isolate with 58 Salmonella Cubana strains in GenBank and found that the chick feed isolate was very closely related to an isolate from a foodborne outbreak involving alfalfa sprouts.

  13. Whole genome sequencing analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden isolated from human stool and contaminated food samples collected from the Southern coastal area of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baisheng; Yang, Xingfen; Tan, Hailing; Ke, Bixia; He, Dongmei; Wang, Haiyan; Chen, Qiuxia; Ke, Changwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2018-02-02

    Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden is the most common non-typhoid Salmonella found in South and Southeast Asia. It causes zoonoses worldwide through the consumption of contaminated foods and seafood, and is considered as an important food-borne pathogen in China, especially in the Southern coastal area. We compared the whole genomes of 44 S. Weltevreden strains isolated from human stool and contaminated food samples from Southern Coastal China, in order to investigate their phylogenetic relationships and establish their genetic relatedness to known international strains. ResFinder analysis of the draft genomes of isolated strains detected antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes in only eight isolates, equivalent to minimum inhibitory concentration assay, and only a few isolates showed resistance to tetracycline, ciprofloxacin or ampicillin. In silico MLST analysis revealed that 43 out of 44 S. Weltevreden strains belonged to sequence type 365 (CC205), the most common sequence type of the serovars. Phylogenetic analysis of the 44 domestic and 26 international isolates suggested that the population of S. Weltevreden could be segregated into six phylogenetic clusters. Cluster I included two strains from food and strains of the "Island Cluster", indicating potential inter-transmission between different countries and regions through foods. The predominant S. Weltevreden isolates obtained from the samples from Southern coastal China were found to be phylogenetically related to strains from Southern East Asia, and formed clusters II-VI. The study has demonstrated that WGS-based analysis may be used to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of this bacterium as part of a food-borne disease surveillance program. The methods used are also more widely applicable to other geographical regions and areas and could therefore be useful for improving our understanding of the international spread of S. Weltevreden on a global scale. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  14. [Molecular epidemiology, antimicrobial resistance and characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi B clinical isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Gülçin; Ozgumus, Osman Birol; Kolayli, Fetiye; Kamburoglu, Ahu; Besli, Yeşim; Dinc, Uğur; Tosun, Ilknur; Aydin, Faruk

    2014-04-01

    Although Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi B is the less frequently isolated serotype worldwide and in Turkey, it is the most common serotype in our hospital, with a marked increase in 2007. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility and the extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) profile, and molecular epidemiology of S. Paratyphi B isolates detected in our hospital microbiology laboratory. Seventy isolates identified as S. Paratyphi B from 109 Salmonella isolates obtained from clinical specimens from different patients between October 2005 and December 2012, were included in the study. In addition to conventional methods, isolates were identified using the Phoenix automated microbiology system (Becton Dickinson, USA). Serotyping of the isolates was performed on the basis of slide agglutination and the Kauffmann-White scheme. The antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates was determined using the BD Phoenix' automated system and disk diffusion test. ESBL enzymes were investigated using the combined disk test, isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis. The molecular epidemiology of the 51 isolates obtained between October 2005 and August 2008 was examined with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the XbaI enzyme. S. Paratyphi B isolates were obtained from 70 specimens (46 blood, 16 fecal, 4 bone marrow, 2 urine and 2 wound) each from different patients. Resistance to nalidixic acid was determined in 18.6%, resistance to ampicillin, cefotaxime and cefepime in 2.9% and to ceftazidime and co-trimoxazole in 1.4% of the isolates. ESBL production was detected only in two isolates; in one TEM-1 was accompanied by CTX-M-15 and in the other isolate CTX-M-3 was found. Forty-six of the 51 isolates (90%) were found to be genetically related by PFGE and were placed in cluster A. The distribution of the isolates in cluster A revealed six subtypes as A1 (n= 7), A2 (n= 11), A3 (n= 7), A4 (n= 18), A5 (n

  15. International Spread of an Epidemic Population of Salmonella enterica Serotype Kentucky ST198 Resistant to Ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Hello, Simon; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Doublet, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    National Salmonella surveillance systems from France, England and Wales, Denmark, and the United States identified the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky displaying high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin. A total of 489 human cases were...... be implemented by national and international authorities to limit the spread of this strain....

  16. Interactions of Salmonella enterica with lettuce leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupitski, Y; Pinto, R; Brandl, M T; Belausov, E; Sela, S

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the interactions of Salmonella enterica with abiotic and plant surfaces and their effect on the tolerance of the pathogen to various stressors. Salmonella strains were tested for their ability to form biofilm in various growth media using a polystyrene plate model. Strong biofilm producers were found to attach better to intact Romaine lettuce leaf tissue compared to weak producers. Confocal microscopy and viable count studies revealed preferential attachment of Salmonella to cut-regions of the leaf after 2 h at 25 degrees C, but not for 18 h at 4 degrees C. Storage of intact lettuce pieces contaminated with Salmonella for 9 days at 4 degrees C resulted only in small changes in population size. Exposure of lettuce-associated Salmonella cells to acidic conditions (pH 3.0) revealed increased tolerance of the attached vs planktonic bacteria. Biofilm formation on polystyrene may provide a suitable model to predict the initial interaction of Salmonella with cut Romaine lettuce leaves. Association of the pathogen with lettuce leaves facilitates its persistence during storage and enhances its acid tolerance. Understanding the interactions between foodborne pathogens and lettuce might be useful in developing new approaches to prevent fresh produce-associated outbreaks.

  17. Genomic relationships between selected phage types of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium defined by ribotyping, IS200 typing and PFGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. E.; Skov, M. N.; Angen, Øystein

    1997-01-01

    The genomic relationship between isolates representing 17 definitive phage types (DTs) of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium (S. typhimurium) were analysed using three different typing methods: IS200 typing using the restriction enzymes EcoRI and Pvull, ribotyping using Smal...

  18. Effects of natural mutations in the ramRA locus on invasiveness of epidemic fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Etienne; Baucheron, Sylvie; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Nishino, Kunihiko; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2013-03-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is increasing worldwide among Salmonella species. Among the mechanisms involved, increased efflux via the tripartite AcrAB-TolC efflux system is mainly modulated through control of expression via the ramRA regulatory locus gene products. Interestingly, in some reference strains these have also been experimentally shown to regulate cell invasion-related genes of the type III secretion system 1 (T3SS-1). In this study, we investigated whether natural mutations occurring in this locus in FQ-resistant S. enterica serovar Typhimurium epidemic clones resulted in the same effects. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and cell invasion assays were used to study 3 clinical FQ-resistant S. Typhimurium isolates representative of the DT104 and DT204 epidemic clones. For comparison, 3 control reference quinolone-susceptible strains were included. As previously shown, the investigated mutations altering RamR or its DNA-binding site increased expression of efflux genes dependently on ramA. However, the decreased expression of T3SS-1 genes previously reported was not always observed and seemed to be dependent on the genetic background of the FQ-resistant isolate. Indeed, a ramA-dependent decreased invasion of intestinal epithelial cells was only observed for a particular clinical ramR mutant. ramRA mutations occurring in clinical FQ-resistant S. Typhimurium isolates may negatively modulate their invasiveness but this is strain-dependent.

  19. Salmonella enterica: isolamento e soroprevalência em suínos abatidos no Rio Grande do Sul Salmonella enterica: isolation and seroprevalence in swines slaughtered in Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schwarz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a prevalência de Salmonella spp. em suínos ao abate e compararam-se os resultados obtidos no isolamento e na sorologia de modo a determinar a fase mais importante de infecção (granja ou transporte/espera pré-abate em relação ao número de suínos portadores encontrados ao abate. Foram avaliados 40 rebanhos de três diferentes empresas do sul do Brasil, com colheitas de sangue e linfonodos mesentéricos de 20 animais por lote. O soro foi submetido ao ELISA produzido com antígeno somático de Salmonella Typhimurium. A frequência de isolamento variou de 62,5% a 85,0%, enquanto a soroprevalência de 73,8% a 83,2% nos três sistemas amostrados. Os sorovares mais prevalentes foram Agona, Typhimurium e Panama. A infecção dos animais ocorreu nas granjas produtoras de suínos nestes sistemas de produção, pois os lotes apresentaram elevada soroprevalência ao abate. Concluiu-se que o controle da infecção por Salmonella spp. no sul do Brasil deve iniciar-se pela implementação de medidas de profilaxia nas granjas de produção de suínos.The prevalence of Salmonella in slaughtered swines was evaluated and the results of serology and Salmonella isolation were compared to determine the most important stage of the infection (on-farm or transport and pre-slaughter in relation to the number of carrier animals found at slaughter. Forty herds from three different swine raisers of the southern region of Brazil were sampled at slaughter. Blood and mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from 20 swines of each herd. Serum samples were submitted to ELISA including somatic antigens of S. Typhimurium. Salmonella was isolated from 62.5% to 85.0% of the animals, while seroprevalence varied from 73.8% to 83.2% in the three swine raisers. Serovar Agona, Typhimurium, and Panama were the most prevalent among the Salmonella isolates. Isolation and serological results demonstrated that Salmonella infection occurred during the on-farm stage, since a

  20. Comparative genome analysis of IncHI2 VIM-1 carbapenemase-encoding plasmids of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolated from a livestock farm in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgenhauer, Linda; Ghosh, Hiren; Guerra, Beatriz; Yao, Yancheng; Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Fischer, Jennie; Helmuth, Reiner; Imirzalioglu, Can; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2017-02-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae are not any more isolated only from human settings, but also from livestock. We reported for the first time the presence of VIM-1 carbapenemases in a livestock farm in Germany. The VIM-1 resistance gene found in these farms was located on IncHI2 plasmids. In order to be able to analyse these plasmids in more detail, two different plasmids from a single farm (pRH-R27 from Salmonella enterica and pRH-R178 from Escherichia coli) were completely sequenced and analysed for the presence of antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. The plasmids showed to harbour blaVIM-1, aacA4, aadA1, sul1, qacEΔ (encoded in an In110 class 1 integron), as well as blaACC-1, strA/strB, and catA1 genes together with resistance to heavy metals (ter-, mer-, sil-, ars-, rcn-, and pco). Comparison with other IncHI2 plasmid revealed that while pRH-R27 is a mosaic IncHI2 plasmid with both high homology to the plasmid pSTm-A54650 and R478, both isolated from humans, pRH-R178 is a deletion derivative of pRH-R27, presumably caused by several IS-mediated deletions indicating genetic evolution of plasmids in this environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Osteomyelitis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar derby in boa constrictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Suyene O; Casagrande, Renata A; Guerra, Priscila R; Cruz, Cláudio E F; Veit, Evandro; Cardoso, Marisa R I; Driemeier, David

    2014-09-01

    After demonstrating chronic weight loss, prostration, and muscle flaccidness, a captive-bred 9-mo-old boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor) died and was submitted for necropsy. Along the spinal column there were multiple, yellowish white, macroscopic nodules of 1-5 mm in diameter in the ventral side of the vertebral body and in the intervertebral spaces. Severe multifocal necrotizing osteomyelitis associated with granulomatous inflammation was the main histologic finding in the vertebral column. In the liver, there was discrete but similar granulomatous changes. Positive anti-Salmonella immunostaining was observed in the spinal column and in the liver. Salmonella enterica serovar Derby was isolated from fragments of the spinal column. These bacteria are important cause of disease in captive reptiles.

  2. Forty Years of Salmonella enterica Dublin in People

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-05

    Dr. Reid Harvey, a CDC epidemiologist, discusses Salmonella enterica Dublin in People.  Created: 10/5/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/5/2017.

  3. MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates are resistant to antibiotics that influence their swimming and swarming motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motile bacteria utilize one or more strategies for movement, such as darting, gliding, sliding, swarming, swimming, and twitching. The ability to move is considered a virulence factor in many pathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella encodes acquired factors t...

  4. Fitness of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson in the Cilantro Phyllosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Brandl, Maria T.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    The epiphytic fitness of Salmonella enterica was assessed on cilantro plants by using a strain of S. enterica serovar Thompson that was linked to an outbreak resulting from cilantro. Salmonella serovar Thompson had the ability to colonize the surface of cilantro leaves, where it was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at high densities on the veins and in natural lesions. The population sizes of two common colonizers of plant surfaces, Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas chl...

  5. Genome-wide methylation patterns in Salmonella enterica Subsp. enterica Serovars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary Pirone-Davies

    Full Text Available The methylation of DNA bases plays an important role in numerous biological processes including development, gene expression, and DNA replication. Salmonella is an important foodborne pathogen, and methylation in Salmonella is implicated in virulence. Using single molecule real-time (SMRT DNA-sequencing, we sequenced and assembled the complete genomes of eleven Salmonella enterica isolates from nine different serovars, and analysed the whole-genome methylation patterns of each genome. We describe 16 distinct N6-methyladenine (m6A methylated motifs, one N4-methylcytosine (m4C motif, and one combined m6A-m4C motif. Eight of these motifs are novel, i.e., they have not been previously described. We also identified the methyltransferases (MTases associated with 13 of the motifs. Some motifs are conserved across all Salmonella serovars tested, while others were found only in a subset of serovars. Eight of the nine serovars contained a unique methylated motif that was not found in any other serovar (most of these motifs were part of Type I restriction modification systems, indicating the high diversity of methylation patterns present in Salmonella.

  6. Genome-wide methylation patterns in Salmonella enterica Subsp. enterica Serovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone-Davies, Cary; Hoffmann, Maria; Roberts, Richard J; Muruvanda, Tim; Timme, Ruth E; Strain, Errol; Luo, Yan; Payne, Justin; Luong, Khai; Song, Yi; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A; Korlach, Jonas; Evans, Peter S; Allard, Marc W

    2015-01-01

    The methylation of DNA bases plays an important role in numerous biological processes including development, gene expression, and DNA replication. Salmonella is an important foodborne pathogen, and methylation in Salmonella is implicated in virulence. Using single molecule real-time (SMRT) DNA-sequencing, we sequenced and assembled the complete genomes of eleven Salmonella enterica isolates from nine different serovars, and analysed the whole-genome methylation patterns of each genome. We describe 16 distinct N6-methyladenine (m6A) methylated motifs, one N4-methylcytosine (m4C) motif, and one combined m6A-m4C motif. Eight of these motifs are novel, i.e., they have not been previously described. We also identified the methyltransferases (MTases) associated with 13 of the motifs. Some motifs are conserved across all Salmonella serovars tested, while others were found only in a subset of serovars. Eight of the nine serovars contained a unique methylated motif that was not found in any other serovar (most of these motifs were part of Type I restriction modification systems), indicating the high diversity of methylation patterns present in Salmonella.

  7. Risk factors for clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on Dutch dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Wilpshaar, H.; Frankena, K.; Bartels, C.; Barkema, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for outbreaks in 1999 of clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on dairy farms were studied in a matched case–control study with 47 case farms and 47 control farms. All 47 case farms experienced a clinical outbreak of salmonellosis which was confirmed

  8. Herd-level diagnosis for Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar Dublin infection in bovine dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Barkema, H.W.; Schans, van de J.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Verhoeff, J.

    2002-01-01

    Herd-level sensitivities of bacteriological and serological methods were compared in 79 bovine dairy herds, recently infected with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin. All farms experienced clinical signs of salmonellosis for the first time and had no history of vaccination against

  9. Is the Evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Linked to Restriction-Modification Systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roer, Louise; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are highly diverse foodborne pathogens that are subdivided into more than 1,500 serovars. The diversity is believed to result from mutational evolution, as well as intra- and interspecies recombination that potentially could be influenced by restriction...... to the conjugational mode of horizontal gene transfer in Salmonella. Thus, we conclude that other factors must be involved in shaping the evolution of bacteria....

  10. Characterization of the novel T4-like Salmonella enterica bacteriophage STP4-a and its endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Li, Mengzhe; Lin, Hong; Wang, Jingxue; Jin, Yanqiu; Han, Feng

    2016-02-01

    While screening for new antimicrobial agents for multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica, the novel lytic bacteriophage STP4-a was isolated and characterized. Phage morphology revealed that STP4-a belongs to the family Myoviridae. Bacterial challenge assays showed that different serovars of Salmonella enterica were susceptible to STP4-a infection. The genomic characteristics of STP4-a, containing 159,914 bp of dsDNA with an average GC content of 36.86 %, were determined. Furthermore, the endolysin of STP4-a was expressed and characterized. The novel endolysin, LysSTP4, has hydrolytic activity towards outer-membrane-permeabilized S. enterica and Escherichia coli. These results provide essential information for the development of novel phage-based biocontrol agents against S. enterica.

  11. Genome analysis and CRISPR typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Virchow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Petty, Nicola K; Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Szubert, Jan M; Savill, John; Beatson, Scott A

    2014-05-21

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Virchow has been recognized as a significant health burden in Asia, Australia and Europe. In addition to its global distribution, S. Virchow is clinically significant due to the frequency at which it causes invasive infections and its association with outbreaks arising from food-borne transmission. Here, we examine the genome of an invasive isolate of S. Virchow SVQ1 (phage type 8) from an outbreak in southeast Queensland, Australia. In addition to identifying new potential genotyping targets that could be used for discriminating between S. Virchow strains in outbreak scenarios, we also aimed to carry out a comprehensive comparative analysis of the S. Virchow genomes. Genome comparisons between S. Virchow SVQ1 and S. Virchow SL491, a previously published strain, identified a high degree of genomic similarity between the two strains with fewer than 200 single nucleotide differences. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) regions were identified as a highly variable region that could be used to discriminate between S. Virchow isolates. We amplified and sequenced the CRISPR regions of fifteen S. Virchow isolates collected from seven different outbreaks across Australia. We observed three allelic types of the CRISPR region from these isolates based on the presence/absence of the spacers and were able to discriminate S. Virchow phage type 8 isolates originating from different outbreaks. A comparison with 27 published Salmonella genomes found that the S. Virchow SVQ1 genome encodes 11 previously described Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPI), as well as additional genomic islands including a remnant integrative conjugative element that is distinct from SPI-7. In addition, the S. Virchow genome possesses a novel prophage that encodes the Type III secretion system effector protein SopE, a key Salmonella virulence factor. The prophage shares very little similarity to the SopE prophages found in other

  12. [Report on Salmonella isolates in livestock, food and feed, received at the German national reference laboratory for Salmonella during 2004-2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Alexandra; Dorn, Christina; Schroeter, Andreas; Szabo, Istvan; Jaber, Manuela; Berendonk, Gabriele; Brom, Martha; Ledwolorz, Johanna; Helmuth, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The German National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella receives Salmonella isolates from diverse laboratories in Germany. Most of the Salmonella strains originated from livestock and food.This report summarizes the studies of the German National Reference Laboratory on the prevalence of Salmonella ssp. in livestock, food and feed for the years 2004-2008. In the past five years, the National Reference Laboratory received 23,949 Salmonella isolates with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis as the most prevalent serovars. In addition, we summarize the incidence of emerging serovars, such as S. enterica serovar Paratyphi B (d-tartrate positive), the monophasic variant of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. enterica subspecies (subsp.) enterica serovar 1,4,[5],12:i:-) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar 1,4,12:d:-.

  13. Novel Insertion Sequence- and Transposon-Mediated Genetic Rearrangements in Genomic Island SGI1 of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky▿

    OpenAIRE

    Doublet, Benoît; Praud, Karine; Bertrand, Sophie; Collard, Jean-Marc; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) is an integrative mobilizable element that harbors a multidrug resistance (MDR) gene cluster. Since its identification in epidemic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 strains, variant SGI1 MDR gene clusters conferring different MDR phenotypes have been identified in several S. enterica serovars and classified as SGI1-A to -O. A study was undertaken to characterize SGI1 from serovar Kentucky strains isolated from travelers returning from Africa. Sev...

  14. Development and comparison of a generic multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis with PFGE for typing of Salmonella entericasubsp. enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Marianne Kirstine; Torpdahl, Mia; Pedersen, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Aims Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica causes salmonellosis in humans and animals. Serovar specific multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is widely used for Salmonella surveillance; however, isolates have to be serotyped prior to MLVA typing and only the most common...

  15. Dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant clones of Salmonella enterica among domestic animals, wild animals, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Gonzalo; Campos, Maria Jorge; Ugarte, María; Porrero, María Concepción; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Borge, Carmen; Vadillo, Santiago; Domínguez, Lucas; Quesada, Alberto; Píriz, Segundo

    2013-02-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. This work focuses on the identification of Salmonella enterica clonal strains which, presenting a wide distribution potential, express resistance determinants that compromise effectiveness of the antimicrobial therapy. The screening was performed on 506 Salmonella enterica isolates from animals and humans, which were characterized by serovar and phage typing, genome macrorestriction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and detection of phenotypic and genotypic traits for antimicrobial resistance. A Salmonella Enteritidis strain with strong quinolone resistance is spread on three host environments carrying one of the four variants found for the GyrA protein: (1) Asp87Tyr, the major polymorphism found in 39 Salmonella isolates from human origin and six from poultry; (2) Ser83Phe, with four isolates from human origin and one from white stork (Ciconia ciconia); and (3) Asp87Asn or (4) Asp87Gly, with two isolates each from human origins. Several Salmonella Typhimurium strains that presented int1 elements and the classically associated pentaresistance (ACSSuT) phenotype were found distributed between two host environments: domestic animals and humans, domestics and wild animals, or wild fauna plus humans. This study points out the importance of monitoring gut microbiota and its antimicrobial resistance from wildlife, in parallel to livestock animals and humans, especially for animal species that are in close contact with people.

  16. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica food and animal isolates from Colombia: identification of a qnrB19-mediated quinolone resistance marker in two novel serovars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczmarczyk, M.; Martins, M.; McCusker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ninety-three Salmonella isolates recovered from commercial foods and exotic animals in Colombia were studied. The serotypes, resistance profiles and where applicable the quinolone resistance genes were determined. Salmonella Anatum (n=14), Uganda (19), Braenderup (10) and Newport (10) were the most...... hitherto unrecognized in various Salmonella serovars in Colombia. We also report unusual high-level quinolone resistance in the absence of any DNA gyrase mutations in serovars S. Carrau, Muenchen and Uganda....

  17. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible.

  18. Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008–2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible. PMID:25988406

  19. Antimicrobial activity of sweet basil and thyme against salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in egg-based pasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Jasmina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is known as one of the most common pathogenic bacteria causing salmonellosis in humans. Raw materials of animal origin (eggs, chicken meat are frequent vectors that transmit this bacterium. Since eggs are used for the production of pasta, due to insufficient thermal treatment during pasta drying, they can be a potential risk to consumer health. Different essential oils of herbs can be used to reduce present pathogenic microorganisms. This paper compares a decrease in the number of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (D ATCC 13076 and Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks of salmonellosis in egg-based pasta under the influence of thyme and sweet basil essential oils. The results indicate that the utilized oils were more effective against the epidemic strain than the ATCC strain. In addition, thyme oil caused a more significant inhibition of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis during the production process.

  20. OXA-48 carbapenemase-producing Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolate of sequence type 198 in a patient transferred from Libya to Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Salome N; Perreten, Vincent; Johannes, Sönke; Droz, Sara; Bodmer, Thomas; Endimiani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a case of OXA-48-producing Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky of sequence type 198 (ST198) from perianal screening cultures of a patient transferred from Libya to Switzerland. The blaOXA-48 gene was carried by Tn1999.2 and located on an ∼60-kb IncL/M plasmid. This Salmonella strain also possessed the blaVEB-8, aac(6)-Ib, tet(A), sul1, and mphA resistance genes and substitutions in GyrA (Ser83Phe and Asp87Asn) and ParC (Ser80Ile). This finding emphasizes that prompt screening strategies are essential to prevent the dissemination of carbapenemase producers imported from countries where they are endemic.

  1. Accuracy and sensitivity of commercial PCR-based methods for detection of Salmonella enterica in feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Sevinc; Andersson, M Gunnar; Häggblom, Per

    2010-05-01

    The present study compared the performance of commercial PCR-based Salmonella enterica detection methods (BAX System Q7, the iQ-Check Salmonella II kit, and the TaqMan Salmonella enterica detection kit) with culture-based methods (modified semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis [MSRV] and NMKL71) in spiked and naturally contaminated samples of feed mill scrapings (FMS), palm kernel meal (PKM), pelleted feed (PF), rape seed meal (RSM), soybean meal (SM), and wheat grain (WG). When results from the various feeds were compared, the number of Salmonella enterica CFU/25 g required to produce a positive were as follows: PKM > FMS = WG > RSM = SM = PF. These data are similar to those developed in earlier studies with culture-based Salmonella detection methods. PCR-based methods were performed similarly to culture-based methods, with respect to sensitivity and specificity. However, many PCR positives could not be confirmed by Salmonella isolation and for that reason the evaluated methods were found to be suitable only when rapid results were paramount. Nevertheless, PCR-based methods cannot presently replace culture-based methods when typing information is required for tracing studies or epidemiological investigations. The observed difference in detection levels is a potential problem when prevalence data are compared as well as when feed ingredients are tested for conformance with microbiological criteria. This paper also presents a statistical model that describes the detection probability when different levels (CFU) of Salmonella contamination are present in feed materials.

  2. Identification of specific gene sequences conserved in contemporary epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Su; Besser, Thomas E; Hancock, Dale D; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Call, Douglas R

    2006-11-01

    Genetic elements specific to recent and contemporary epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica were identified using comparative genomic analysis. Two epidemic multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) and cephalosporin-resistant MDR Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, and an epidemic pansusceptible strain, Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT160, were subjected to Salmonella gene microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses. Their genome contents were compared with those of coexisting sporadic strains matched by serotype, geographic and temporal distribution, and host species origin. These paired comparisons revealed that epidemic strains of S. enterica had specific genes and gene regions that were shared by isolates of the same subtype. Most of these gene sequences are related to mobile genetic elements, including phages, plasmids, and plasmid-like and transposable elements, and some genes may encode proteins conferring growth or survival advantages. The emergence of epidemic MDR strains may therefore be associated with the presence of fitness-associated genetic factors in addition to their antimicrobial resistance genes.

  3. Prophage Integrase Typing Is a Useful Indicator of Genomic Diversity in Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Colavecchio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a bacterial species that is a major cause of illness in humans and food-producing animals. S. enterica exhibits considerable inter-serovar diversity, as evidenced by the large number of host adapted serovars that have been identified. The development of methods to assess genome diversity in S. enterica will help to further define the limits of diversity in this foodborne pathogen. Thus, we evaluated a PCR assay, which targets prophage integrase genes, as a rapid method to investigate S. enterica genome diversity. To evaluate the PCR prophage integrase assay, 49 isolates of S. enterica were selected, including 19 clinical isolates from clonal serovars (Enteritidis and Heidelberg that commonly cause human illness, and 30 isolates from food-associated Salmonella serovars that rarely cause human illness. The number of integrase genes identified by the PCR assay was compared to the number of integrase genes within intact prophages identified by whole genome sequencing and phage finding program PHASTER. The PCR assay identified a total of 147 prophage integrase genes within the 49 S. enterica genomes (79 integrase genes in the food-associated Salmonella isolates, 50 integrase genes in S. Enteritidis, and 18 integrase genes in S. Heidelberg. In comparison, whole genome sequencing and PHASTER identified a total of 75 prophage integrase genes within 102 intact prophages in the 49 S. enterica genomes (44 integrase genes in the food-associated Salmonella isolates, 21 integrase genes in S. Enteritidis, and 9 integrase genes in S. Heidelberg. Collectively, both the PCR assay and PHASTER identified the presence of a large diversity of prophage integrase genes in the food-associated isolates compared to the clinical isolates, thus indicating a high degree of diversity in the food-associated isolates, and confirming the clonal nature of S. Enteritidis and S. Heidelberg. Moreover, PHASTER revealed a diversity of 29 different types of

  4. Molecular Characterization of Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporinase-Producing Salmonella enterica Serovar Choleraesuis Isolates from Patients in Thailand and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirichote, P.; Hasman, Henrik; Pulsrikarn, C.

    2010-01-01

    on susceptibility patterns, the ESC-producing isolates were more closely related than non-ESC-producing isolates. Microarray, PCR, plasmid profiling, and replicon typing revealed that the 13 ESC-producing isolates harbored either bla(CMY-2) containing incA/C or bla(CTX-M-14) containing incFIIA, inc...

  5. Salmonella enterica: Survival, Colonization, and Virulence Differences among Serovars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Andino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data indicate that prevalence of specific serovars of Salmonella enterica in human foodborne illness is not correlated with their prevalence in feed. Given that feed is a suboptimal environment for S. enterica, it appears that survival in poultry feed may be an independent factor unrelated to virulence of specific serovars of Salmonella. Additionally, S. enterica serovars appear to have different host specificity and the ability to cause disease in those hosts is also serovar dependent. These differences among the serovars may be related to gene presence or absence and expression levels of those genes. With a better understanding of serovar specificity, mitigation methods can be implemented to control Salmonella at preharvest and postharvest levels.

  6. Salmonella enterica: Survival, Colonization, and Virulence Differences among Serovars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, A.; Hanning, I.

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate that prevalence of specific serovars of Salmonella enterica in human foodborne illness is not correlated with their prevalence in feed. Given that feed is a suboptimal environment for S. enterica, it appears that survival in poultry feed may be an independent factor unrelated to virulence of specific serovars of Salmonella. Additionally, S. enterica serovars appear to have different host specificity and the ability to cause disease in those hosts is also serovar dependent. These differences among the serovars may be related to gene presence or absence and expression levels of those genes. With a better understanding of serovar specificity, mitigation methods can be implemented to control Salmonella at preharvest and postharvest levels. PMID:25664339

  7. Prevalence of Salmonella enterica in poultry and eggs in Uruguay during an epidemic due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancor, L; Pereira, M; Martinez, A; Giossa, G; Fookes, M; Flores, K; Barrios, P; Repiso, V; Vignoli, R; Cordeiro, N; Algorta, G; Thomson, N; Maskell, D; Schelotto, F; Chabalgoity, J A

    2010-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is frequently associated with food-borne disease worldwide. Poultry-derived products are a major source. An epidemic of human infection with S. Enteritidis occurred in Uruguay, and to evaluate the extent of poultry contamination, we conducted a nationwide survey over 2 years that included the analysis of sera from 5,751 birds and 12,400 eggs. Serological evidence of infection with Salmonella group O:9 was found in 24.4% of the birds. All positive sera were retested with a gm flagellum-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and based on these results, the national prevalence of S. Enteritidis infection was estimated to be 6.3%. Salmonellae were recovered from 58 of 620 pools made up of 20 eggs each, demonstrating a prevalence of at least 1 in every 214 eggs. Surprisingly, the majority of the isolates were not S. Enteritidis. Thirty-nine isolates were typed as S. Derby, 9 as S. Gallinarum, 8 as S. Enteritidis, and 2 as S. Panama. Despite the highest prevalence in eggs, S. Derby was not isolated from humans in the period of analysis, suggesting a low capacity to infect humans. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis of S. Derby and S. Enteritidis revealed more than 350 genetic differences. S. Derby lacked pathogenicity islands 13 and 14, the fimbrial lpf operon, and other regions encoding metabolic functions. Several of these regions are present not only in serovar Enteritidis but also in all sequenced strains of S. Typhimurium, suggesting that these regions might be related to the capacity of Salmonella to cause food-borne disease.

  8. [Salmonella enterica: an ally in the therapy of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Navarro, Hilda; Hernández-Cueto, Daniel Dimitri; Vilchis-Estrada, Ariel; Bermúdez-Pulido, David César; Antonio-Andrés, Gabriela; Luria-Pérez, Rosendo

    Salmonella enterica, a species of facultative anaerobic bacteria, has demonstrated success as a live-attenuated bacterial vector for vaccination. S. enterica has also demonstrated promise as a therapeutic agent against cancer. Pre-clinical and clinical trials have shown that S. enterica is localized in both solid and semi-solid tumors as well as in metastatic tumors. Moreover, S. enterica reduces resistance to treatment with other agents. In this review we present the novel therapeutic anti-cancer approaches that use S. enterica both for its ability as a delivery system for heterologous moieties against cancer and for its direct anti-cancer properties. Copyright © 2014 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DANISH ISOLATES OF SALMONELLA-ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS BY PHAGE TYPING AND PLASMID PROFILING - 1980-1990

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Hansen, H. B.

    1994-01-01

    flocks, quarantined imported poultry, environmental samples from hatchery units, and from bovines. Phage type (PT) 1 was found to be the most common type among isolates of poultry origin (57.6%) followed by PT4 (28.8%). Isolates belonging to PT8 were found exclusively in imported birds. Phage typing...

  10. Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis based on Population Structure of Prevalent Lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Prerak T.; den Bakker, Henk C.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tolar, Beth; Trees, Eija; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Frye, Jonathan G.; Porwollik, Steffen; Weimer, Bart C.; Wiedmann, Martin; Weinstock, George M.; Fields, Patricia I.; McClelland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. Its low genetic diversity, measured by fingerprinting methods, has made subtyping a challenge. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize 125 S. enterica Enteritidis and 3 S. enterica serotype Nitra strains. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were filtered to identify 4,887 reliable loci that distinguished all isolates from each other. Our whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism typing approach was robust for S. enterica Enteritidis subtyping with combined data for different strains from 2 different sequencing platforms. Five major genetic lineages were recognized, which revealed possible patterns of geographic and epidemiologic distribution. Analyses on the population dynamics and evolutionary history estimated that major lineages emerged during the 17th–18th centuries and diversified during the 1920s and 1950s. PMID:25147968

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Outbreak Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Thompson Associated with Cilantro

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Craig T.; Huynh, Steven; Gorski, Lisa; Cooper, Kerry K.; Miller, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH-99A2345) are associated with a 1999 outbreak in contaminated cilantro. We report here the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S.?Thompson strains. These genomes are distinct and provide additional data for our understanding of S. enterica.

  12. National surveillance of Salmonella enterica in food-producing animals in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kijima Mayumi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A total of 518 fecal samples collected from 183 apparently healthy cattle, 180 pigs and 155 broilers throughout Japan in 1999 were examined to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella. The isolation rates were 36.1% in broilers, 2.8% in pigs and 0.5% in cattle. S. enterica Infantis was the most frequent isolate, found in 22.6% of broiler fecal samples. Higher resistance rates were observed against oxytetracycline (82.0%, dihydrostreptomycin (77.9%, kanamycin (41.0% and trimethoprim (35.2%. Resistance rates to ampicillin, ceftiofur, bicozamycin, chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid were S. enterica Senftenberg was found in the isolates obtained from one broiler fecal sample. This is the first report of cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella directly isolated from food animal in Japan.

  13. Transmission and Retention of Salmonella enterica by Phytophagous Hemipteran Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Arias, José Pablo; Groves, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Several pest insects of human and livestock habitations are known as vectors of Salmonella enterica; however, the role of plant-feeding insects as vectors of S. enterica to agricultural crops remains unexamined. Using a hemipteran insect pest-lettuce system, we investigated the potential for transmission and retention of S. enterica. Specifically, Macrosteles quadrilineatus and Myzus persicae insects were fed S. enterica-inoculated lettuce leaf discs or artificial liquid diets confined in Parafilm sachets to allow physical contact or exclusively oral ingestion of the pathogen, respectively. After a 24-h acquisition access period, insects were moved onto two consecutive noninoculated leaf discs or liquid diets and allowed a 24-h inoculation access period on each of the two discs or sachets. Similar proportions of individuals from both species ingested S. enterica after a 24-h acquisition access period from inoculated leaf discs, but a significantly higher proportion of M. quadrilineatus retained the pathogen internally after a 48-h inoculation access period. S. enterica was also recovered from the honeydew of both species. After a 48-h inoculation access period, bacteria were recovered from a significantly higher proportion of honeydew samples from M. quadrilineatus than from M. persicae insects. The recovery of S. enterica from leaf discs and liquid diets postfeeding demonstrated that both species of insects were capable of transmitting the bacteria in ways that are not limited to mechanical transmission. Overall, these results suggest that phytophagous insects may serve as potential vectors of S. enterica in association with plants. PMID:24973069

  14. Effect of Food Residues in Biofilm Formation on Stainless Steel and Polystyrene Surfaces by Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Poultry Houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba María Paz-Méndez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella spp. is a major food-borne pathogen around the world. The ability of Salmonella to produce biofilm is one of the main obstacles in reducing the prevalence of these bacteria in the food chain. Most of Salmonella biofilm studies found in the literature used laboratory growth media. However, in the food chain, food residues are the principal source of nutrients of Salmonella. In this study, the biofilm formation, morphotype, and motility of 13 Salmonella strains belonging to three different subspecies and isolated from poultry houses was evaluated. To simulate food chain conditions, four different growth media (Tryptic Soy Broth at 1/20 dilution, milk at 1/20 dilution, tomato juice, and chicken meat juice, two different surfaces (stainless steel and polystyrene and two temperatures (6 °C and 22 °C were used to evaluate the biofilm formation. The morphotype, motility, and biofilm formation of Salmonella was temperature-dependent. Biofilm formation was significantly higher with 1/20 Tryptic Soy Broth in all the surfaces and temperatures tested, in comparison with the other growth media. The laboratory growth medium 1/20 Tryptic Soy Broth enhanced biofilm formation in Salmonella. This could explain the great differences in biofilm formation found between this growth medium and food residues. However, Salmonella strains were able to produce biofilm on the presence of food residues in all the conditions tested. Therefore, the Salmonella strain can use food residues to produce biofilm on common surfaces of the food chain. More studies combining more strains and food residues are necessary to fully understand the mechanism used by Salmonella to produce biofilm on the presence of these sources of nutrients.

  15. Ultrasound improves chemical reduction of natural contaminant microbiota and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica on strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Rosário, Denes Kaic Alves; da Silva Mutz, Yhan; Peixoto, Jaqueline Moreira Curtis; Oliveira, Syllas Borburema Silva; de Carvalho, Raquel Vieira; Carneiro, Joel Camilo Souza; de São José, Jackline Freitas Brilhante; Bernardes, Patrícia Campos

    2017-01-16

    New sanitization methods have been evaluated to improve food safety and food quality and to replace chlorine compounds. However, these new methods can lead to physicochemical and sensory changes in fruits and vegetables. The present study evaluated the effects of acetic acid, peracetic acid, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate isolated or combined with 5min of ultrasound treatment (40kHz, 500W) on strawberry quality over 9days of storage at 8°C. The strawberry natural contaminant microbiota (molds and yeasts, mesophilic aerobic and lactic acid bacteria), physicochemical quality (pH, total titratable acidity, total soluble solids, vitamin C, and color), sensory quality (triangle test) and inactivation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica intentionally inoculated onto strawberries were analyzed. Ultrasound increased the effect of all chemical compounds in the reduction of aerobic mesophilic, molds and yeasts. The best treatment for those groups of microorganisms was ultrasound combined with peracetic acid (US+PA) that reduced 1.8 and 2.0logcfu/g during 9days of storage. Bactericidal effect of peracetic acid was also improved by ultrasound inactivation of S. enterica, reaching a decimal reduction of 2.1logcfu/g. Moreover, synergistic effects were observed in contaminant natural microbiota inactivation for all tested compounds during storage, without any major physicochemical or sensory alteration to the strawberries. Therefore, ultrasound treatment can improve the effect of sanitizers that are substitutes of chlorine compounds without altering the quality of strawberries during storage. Acetic acid (PubChem CID: 176); Peracetic acid (PubChem CID: 6585); Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (PubChem CID: 18372154). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Serovariedades de Salmonella enterica subespecie enterica en porcinos de faena y su resistencia a los antimicrobianos Serovars of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica and its antimicrobial resistance in slaughterhouse pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Ibar

    2009-09-01

    possible reservoir of resistance. From a total of 386 samples from four porcine slaughterhouses of Buenos Aires and Santa Fe Provinces (Argentina, 93 (24,1% Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains were identified, 52 (55,9% from cecal contents and 41 (44,1% from ileocecal lymph nodes. Thirteen serovars of S. enterica were found, the most prevalent were: S. Schwarzengrund, S. Heidelberg, S. subspecie I 6,8:e,h:-, S. Derby and S. Bredeney. Fifteen antimicrobials by the agar dilution method were tested: amikacin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, cephalotin, cefotaxime, enrofloxacin, fosfomycin, polimixin-B, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, nitrofurantoin, and nalidixic acid. According to the CIM determination, 73% Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains were sensible to all the antimicrobials tested. Antimicrobial resistance was observed to tetracycline in 24 (25,8% of 93 strains, to chloramphenicol in 22 (23,7%, to streptomycin in 22 (23,7%, to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 20 (21,5%, to ampicillin in 18 (19,4%, to nitrofurantoin in 3 (3,2% and to nalidixic acid in 3 (3,2%. Some isolates of S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg, S. Derby, S. Orion showed multidrug resistance and carried the class 1 integrase gene. The highest percentage of resistance corresponded to the antimicrobials currently used in veterinary and porcine farms.

  17. Detection of plasmid mediated colistin resistance (MCR-1) in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolated from poultry and swine in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Alberto; Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Iglesias, M Rocío; Porrero, M Concepción; Martínez, Remigio; Florez-Cuadrado, Diego; Campos, María J; García, María; Píriz, Segundo; Sáez, José Luis; Domínguez, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Recent findings suggest that use of colistin as a last resort antibiotic is seriously threatened by the rise of a new plasmid mediated mechanism of resistance (MCR-1). This work identifies, for the first time in Southern Europe, the gene mcr-1 in nine strains from farm animals (poultry and swine) corresponding to five Escherichia coli and four Salmonella enterica, among which three belong to serovar Typhimurium and one to Rissen. The MCR-1 was found encoded by a plasmid highly mobilizable by conjugation to the E. coli J53 strain. Two E. coli strains carried two determinants, mcr-1 plus pmrA or pmrB mutations, known to confer colistin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blehert, David S.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; ,

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  19. Cloning and expression of a Vi mimotope of Salmonella enterica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... A recombinant His-Vi protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was successfully constructed and cloned into an expression vector ... recombinant protein can be used to detect specific anti-Vi antibody produced by typhoid patients. Overall, the His-Vi ... E-mail: khchua@um.edu.my. Tel.:603-. 79676607.

  20. A novel multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Salmonella enterica and Shigella species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radhika

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica and Shigella species are commonly associated with food and water borne infections leading to gastrointestinal diseases. The present work was undertaken to develop a sensitive and reliable PCR based detection system for simultaneous detection of Salmonella enterica and Shigella at species level. For this the conserved regions of specific genes namely ipaH1, ipaH, wbgZ, wzy and invA were targeted for detection of Shigella genus, S. flexneri, S. sonnei, S. boydii and Salmonella enterica respectively along with an internal amplification control (IAC. The results showed that twenty Salmonella and eleven Shigella spp., were accurately identified by the assay without showing non-specificity against closely related other Enterobacteriaceae organisms and also against other pathogens. Further evaluation of multiplex PCR was undertaken on 50 natural samples of chicken, eggs and poultry litter and results compared with conventional culture isolation and identification procedure. The multiplex PCR identified the presence of Salmonella and Shigella strains with a short pre-enrichment step of 5 h in peptone water and the same samples were processed by conventional procedures for comparison. Therefore, this reported multiplex PCR can serve as an alternative to the tedious time-consuming procedure of culture and identification in food safety laboratories.

  1. A novel multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Salmonella enterica and Shigella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, M; Saugata, Majumder; Murali, H S; Batra, H V

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica and Shigella species are commonly associated with food and water borne infections leading to gastrointestinal diseases. The present work was undertaken to develop a sensitive and reliable PCR based detection system for simultaneous detection of Salmonella enterica and Shigella at species level. For this the conserved regions of specific genes namely ipaH1, ipaH, wbgZ, wzy and invA were targeted for detection of Shigella genus, S. flexneri, S. sonnei, S. boydii and Salmonella enterica respectively along with an internal amplification control (IAC). The results showed that twenty Salmonella and eleven Shigella spp., were accurately identified by the assay without showing non-specificity against closely related other Enterobacteriaceae organisms and also against other pathogens. Further evaluation of multiplex PCR was undertaken on 50 natural samples of chicken, eggs and poultry litter and results compared with conventional culture isolation and identification procedure. The multiplex PCR identified the presence of Salmonella and Shigella strains with a short pre-enrichment step of 5 h in peptone water and the same samples were processed by conventional procedures for comparison. Therefore, this reported multiplex PCR can serve as an alternative to the tedious time-consuming procedure of culture and identification in food safety laboratories.

  2. Potential use of molecular-typing methods for the identification and characterization of salmonella enterica serotypes isolated in the poultry production chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Baratto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella is widespread in nature and can be found in all links of the poultry production chain. Due to its high impact on meat processing, techniques for the rapid detection and reproducible characterization of Salmonella serotypes in foods are needed. The present study investigated the potential of molecular profiling to identify and differentiate 15 Salmonella serotypes isolated from the poultry production chain, based on 5 primers by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR, amplification of rDNA internal spacer analysis (RISA, and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA of 16S-23S rRNA internal spacer region (ISR cleaved with Alu I and Hha I restriction enzymes. Three isolates of each serotype were analyzed for the identification of similar and different profiles. Dendrograms were constructed from molecular profiles using the UPGMA method (unweighted pair-group method for the arithmetic averages and the software program WinBoot. The present study indicates the usefulness of RISA and ARDRA of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (ISR for systematic, epidemiological, and diagnostic purposes. Since these techniques can be used for the differentiation of serotypes, they are highly promising for the characterization of Salmonella serotypes and intra-serotypes. Data indicate that these techniques may be used to produce more consistent, reliable, and reproducible results in the identification and epidemiological study (traceability of Salmonella in the poultry industry.

  3. Molecular typing, antibiotic resistance, virulence gene and biofilm formation of different Salmonella enterica serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Yousra; Mehr, Ines; Ouzari, Hadda; Khessairi, Amel; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica isolates representing commonly isolated serotypes in Tunisia were analyzed using genotyping and phenotyping methods. ERIC and ITS-PCR applied to 48 Salmonella spp. isolates revealed the presence of 12 and 10 different profiles, respectively. The distribution of profiles among serotypes demonstrated the presence of strains showing an identical fingerprinting pattern. All Salmonella strains used in this study were positive for the sdiA gene. Three Salmonella isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Enteritidis and Amsterdam were negative for the invA gene. The spvC gene was detected in thirteen isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Gallinarum and Montevideo. Antibiotic resistance was frequent among the recovered Salmonella isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Zanzibar and Derby. The majority of these isolates exhibited resistance to at least two antibiotic families. Four multidrug-resistant isolates were recovered from food animals and poultry products. These isolates exhibited not only resistance to tetracycline, sulphonamides, and ampicillin, but also have shown resistance to fluoroquinolones. Common resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin in two S. Anatum and S. Zanzibar strains isolated from raw meat and poultry was also obtained. Furthermore, wastewater and human isolates exhibited frequent resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. Of all isolates, 33.5% were able to form biofilm.

  4. Investigation of an outbreak of human salmonellosis caused by Salmonella enterica ssp enterica serovar Infantis by use of pulsed field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    1996-01-01

    been tentatively traced back to a single pig slaughterhouse. A total of 135 isolates from various sources produced 21 different PFGE patterns with the restriction endonuclease XbaI. All human isolates from the outbreak belonged to a single type, the 'EPI-type', whereas human isolates recovered before......Analysis of chromosomal DNA restriction patterns produced by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to investigate an outbreak of human salmonellosis caused by Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Infantis (S. Infantis) involving more than 500 registered human cases. The outbreak had...

  5. Persistence of a Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT12 clone in a piggery and in agricultural soil amended with Salmonella-contaminated slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baloda, Suraj B.; Christensen, Lise; Trajcevska, Silvija

    2001-01-01

    ) and subclinical isolates from the same farm (collected in 1996 and later) showed identical patterns, indicating long-term persistence of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT12 clone in the herd environment. Furthermore, when Salmonella-contaminated slurry was disposed of on the agricultural soil (a...... common waste disposal practice), the pathogen was isolated up to 14 days after the spread, indicating potentially high risks of transmission of the pathogen in the environment, animals, and humans....

  6. Genotypic characterisation by PFGE of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis phage types 1, 4, 6, and 8 isolated from animal and human sources in three European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laconcha, I.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Rementeria, A.

    2000-01-01

    A total of 101 strains of Salmonella Enteritidis phage types (PT) 1, 4, 6, and 8 from Denmark, England and Spain were studied by PFGE to elucidate genetic relationships among strains isolated from animal, human and environmental sources between 1983 and 1997. Analysis with Xba I, Bin I and Spe I...... profile A10-A10-A1 was predominant and specific for this phage type. It is concluded that PFGE, in combination with phage typing, represents a suitable tool for the epidemiological typing of Salmonella Enteritidis strains which could be used for investigations or surveillance of the international spread...

  7. Prevalence and diversity of Salmonella enterica in water, fish and lettuce in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, Oumar; Nyholm, Outi; Siitonen, Anja; Bonkoungou, Isidore Juste O; Traoré, Alfred S; Barro, Nicolas; Haukka, Kaisa

    2015-07-31

    This study investigated the prevalence, serotypes and antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of Salmonella enterica in environment in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. A total of 476 samples, consisting of 36 samples of tap water, 51 samples of well water, 87 samples of channel water, 44 samples of reservoir water, 238 samples of fish, and 20 samples of lettuce were examined using standard bacteriological procedures for Salmonella. Salmonella were isolated from 98 samples. Salmonella were rare in drinking water, since they were not found at all from the tap water, and only in 2 % of well water. Salmonella were more common in the water of reservoir of Tanghin (15 %), reservoir of Yamtenga (20 %), and in the water channels in the city (from 20 to 31 %). Salmonella were commonly isolated from the fish (24 %) caught from the reservoir of Tanghin and from the lettuce (50 %) irrigated with water from Tanghin. The Salmonella isolates were found to represent 50 different serotypes. The 11 most common serotypes were Salmonella Bredeney and S. Colindale (both 8.2 %), S. Muenster (6.1 %), S. Korlebu (5.1 %), S. Eastbourne and S. Poona (both 4.1 %), and S. Agona, S. Derby, S. Drac, S. Senftenberg, S. Waycross (each 3.1 %), accounting for 51.3 % of all the isolates. In general, the Salmonella strains were sensitive to the antimicrobials tested, but two strains were resistant to streptomycin and many more intermediate to streptomycin or sulphonamide. This study highlights the common prevalence of Salmonella and the high diversity of Salmonella serotypes in aquatic environment in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Therefore, various human activities linked to water and consumption of water-related products, such as fish and lettuce, can lead to human Salmonella infections.

  8. Correlation of conversion of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis phage type 1, 4, or 6 to phage type 7 with loss of lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Madsen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of pairs of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates from different poultry flocks showed that phage type (PT) 7 may be derived from PT 1, 4, and 6. The conversion appeared to be associated with loss of lipopolysaccharide. It is concluded that PT 7 may be of little value...... as an epidemiological marker of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis....

  9. A CRISPR-based MLST Scheme for Understanding the Population Biology and Epidemiology of Salmonella Enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-26

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is the most common cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States. With Army...pathogen for outbreak investigations. We have also been investigating whether CRISPR in Salmonella protects the bacteria against foreign DNA as described...in other systems, or whether it has alternative functions. Here, we report that CRISPR can be used to subtype Salmonella enterica serovariants

  10. Fitness of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson in the cilantro phyllosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Maria T; Mandrell, Robert E

    2002-07-01

    The epiphytic fitness of Salmonella enterica was assessed on cilantro plants by using a strain of S. enterica serovar Thompson that was linked to an outbreak resulting from cilantro. Salmonella serovar Thompson had the ability to colonize the surface of cilantro leaves, where it was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at high densities on the veins and in natural lesions. The population sizes of two common colonizers of plant surfaces, Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas chlororaphis, were 10-fold higher than that of the human pathogen on cilantro incubated at 22 degrees C. However, Salmonella serovar Thompson achieved significantly higher population levels and accounted for a higher proportion of the total culturable bacterial flora on cilantro leaves when the plants were incubated at warm temperatures, such as 30 degrees C, after inoculation, indicating that the higher growth rates exhibited by Salmonella serovar Thompson at warm temperatures may increase the competitiveness of this organism in the phyllosphere. The tolerance of Salmonella serovar Thompson to dry conditions on plants at 60% relative humidity was at least equal to that of P. agglomerans and P. chlororaphis. Moreover, after exposure to low humidity on cilantro, Salmonella serovar Thompson recovered under high humidity to achieve its maximum population size in the cilantro phyllosphere. Visualization by CLSM of green fluorescent protein-tagged Salmonella serovar Thompson and dsRed-tagged P. agglomerans inoculated onto cilantro revealed that the human pathogen and the bacterial epiphyte formed large heterogeneous aggregates on the leaf surface. Our studies support the hypothesis that preharvest contamination of crops by S. enterica plays a role in outbreaks linked to fresh fruits and vegetables.

  11. Epidemiological analysis of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovars Hadar, Brancaster and Enteritidis from humans and broiler chickens in Senegal using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antibiotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, E; Perrier Gros-Claude, J D; Rivoal, K; Rose, V; Tall, F; Mead, G C; Salvat, G

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella Hadar, Salmonella Brancaster and Salmonella Enteritidis are the main Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovars isolated from poultry in Senegal. Our objective was to analyse the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibioresistance patterns of strains belonging to these serovars and to assess the significance of broiler-chicken meat as a source of human infection. A total of 142 Salmonella isolates were analysed: 79 were isolated from Senegalese patients with sporadic diarrhoea (11 S. Hadar, nine S. Brancaster and 59 S. Enteritidis) and 63 from poultry (30 S. Hadar, 17 S. Brancaster and 16 S. Enteritidis). The PFGE of XbaI- and SpeI-digested chromosomal DNA gave 20 distinct profiles for S. Hadar, nine for S. Brancaster and 22 for S. Enteritidis. Each serovar was characterized by a major pulsotype which was X3S1 in 42% of S. Hadar, X8S1 in 53.8% of S. Brancaster and X1S2 in 43% of S. Enteritidis isolates. Human and poultry isolates of Salmonella had common PFGE patterns. Antibiosensitivity tests showed multiresistance (more than two drugs) was encountered in 14.5% of S. Hadar and in 5% of S. Enteritidis isolates. Resistance to quinolones was considered to be of particular importance and 14.5% of S. Hadar isolates were found to be resistant to nalidixic acid. CONLCUSIONS: The sharing of similar PFGE profiles among isolates from humans and poultry provided indirect evidence of Salmonella transmission from contaminated broiler meat. But most of the Salmonella isolates remained drug sensitive. Efforts are needed to eliminate Salmonella from poultry meat intended for human consumption. This study has also highlighted the importance of continuous surveillance to monitor antimicrobial resistance in bacteria associated with animals and humans.

  12. [Molecular subtyping of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in a post epidemic period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos R, Mayerling; Araya R, Pamela; Fernández R, Alda; Tognarelli, Javier; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández O, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has become one of the main agents causing food borne diseases worldwide. This agent is transmitted mainly by contaminated meat and poultry. To determine the genetic subtypes of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, circulating in Chile between 2001 and 2003, a post epidemic period. One hundred ninety three isolates coming from human samples, prepared foods and animal products for human consumption, were analyzed by pulsed field electrophoresis, using PulseNet standardized protocol. Thirteen subtypes of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis were identified, that had between 0 and 13 bands. A predominant subtype was identified in 172 strains (88%) that came from human isolates, prepared foods and animal products for human consumption. Other four subtypes, found in prepared foods and animal products for human consumption, were also found in human isolates. Most subtypes were tightly interrelated Subtypes II, VIII and XI were also found in the 1994 epidemic. Subtyping of bacterial strains by pulsed field electrophoresis is useful for the surveillance of food borne diseases.

  13. A comparative study of thermal and acid inactivation kinetics in fruit juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg grown at acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2009-11-01

    Acid and heat inactivation in orange and apple juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (i.e., Spanish Type Culture Collection) 443 (CECT 443) (Salmonella Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg CECT 4384 (Salmonella Senftenberg) grown in buffered brain heart infusion (pH 7.0) and acidified brain heart infusion up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic, and hydrochloric acids was evaluated. Acid adaptation induced an adaptive response that increased the subsequent resistance to extreme pH conditions (pH 2.5) and to heat, although the magnitude of these responses differed between the two isolates and fruit juices. The acid resistance in orange juice for acid-adapted cells (D-values of 28.3-34.5 min for Salmonella Senftenberg and 30.0-39.2 min for Salmonella Typhimurium) resulted to be about two to three times higher than that corresponding to non-acid-adapted cells. In apple juice, acid-adapted Salmonella Senftenberg cells survived better than those of Salmonella Typhimurium, obtaining mean D-values of 114.8 +/- 12.3 and 41.9 +/- 2.5 min, respectively. The thermotolerance of non-acid-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in orange (D(58)-value: 0.028 min) and apple juices (D(58)-value: 0.10 min) was approximately double for acid-adapted cells. This cross-protection to heat was more strongly expressed in Salmonella Senftenberg. D(58)-values obtained for non-acid-adapted cells in orange (0.11 min) and apple juices (0.19 min) increased approximately 10 and 5 times, respectively, after their growth in acidified media. The conditions prevailing during bacterial growth and heat treatment did not significantly influence the z-values observed (6.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Typhimurium and 7.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Senftenberg). The enhanced acid resistance found for both isolates could enable them to survive for prolonged time periods in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the risk of illness. Further, it

  14. Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella enterica transmission associated with starling-livestock interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, James C; Hyatt, Doreene R; Ellis, Jeremy W; Pipkin, David R; Mangan, Anna M; Russell, Michael; Bolte, Denise S; Engeman, Richard M; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Linz, George M

    2015-08-31

    Bird-livestock interactions have been implicated as potential sources for bacteria within concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO). European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in particular are known to contaminate cattle feed and water with Salmonella enterica through their fecal waste. We propose that fecal waste is not the only mechanisms through which starlings introduce S. enterica to CAFO. The goal of this study was to assess if starlings can mechanically move S. enterica. We define mechanical movement as the transportation of media containing S. enterica, on the exterior of starlings within CAFO. We collected 100 starlings and obtained external wash and gastrointestinal tract (GI) samples. We also collected 100 samples from animal pens. Within each pen we collected one cattle fecal, feed, and water trough sample. Isolates from all S. enterica positive samples were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All sample types, including 17% of external starling wash samples, contained S. enterica. All sample types had at least one antimicrobial resistant (AMR) isolate and starling GI samples harbored multidrug resistant S. enterica. The serotypes isolated from the starling external wash samples were all found in the farm environment and 11.8% (2/17) of isolates from positive starling external wash samples were resistant to at least one class of antibiotics. This study provides evidence of a potential mechanism of wildlife introduced microbial contamination in CAFO. Mechanical movement of microbiological hazards, by starlings, should be considered a potential source of bacteria that is of concern to veterinary, environmental and public health. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Application of multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), phage typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing to subtype Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from pig farms, pork slaughterhouses and meat producing plants in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, D M; O'Grady, D; Fanning, S; Cormican, M; Delappe, N; Egan, J; Mannion, C; Fanning, J; Gutierrez, M

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common zoonotic pathogen encountered in Irish pigs and the pork industry and its characterisation using highly discriminatory typing methods is necessary for epidemiological studies, outbreak investigation and control. Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), phage typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were applied to characterise 301 S. typhimurium isolates of porcine origin isolated from farms, slaughterhouses and pork meat producing plants in Ireland over a four-year period. 154 MLVA patterns were obtained compared to 19 phage types and 38 AMR patterns, and MLVA was particularly useful for discriminating isolates of the same phage type, e.g. DT104 and DT104b, or isolates that were Untypable or in the category of "react with phage but does not conform to a recognised phage type" (RDNC) by the phage typing method. Cluster analysis of MLVA profiles using a minimum spanning tree (MST) demonstrated two major clusters (I and II), which showed to have a clear association with phage types, cluster I associated to phage types DT104, U302 and DT120 and cluster II associated to DT193 and U288. The results of this present study showed that MLVA is highly discriminatory and permitted the identification of identical profiles among isolates obtained at different points of the pork food chain. The same MLVA profile was observed in some cases among isolates with different phage types. While this can be explained by the fact that some phage types are closely related, it also indicates that combining phage typing and MLVA enhances strain typing of S. typhimurium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    KAUST Repository

    García, Ana V.

    2014-04-04

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. 2014 Garca and Hirt.

  17. FAKTOR VIRULENSI Salmonella enterica SEROVAR TYPHI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvy Khrisna Pranamartha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Demam tifoid disebabkan oleh bakteri Salmonella typhi, dengan gejala umum berupa demam tinggi dan nyeri perut. Tifoid adalah penyakit infeksi yang disebabkan oleh bakteri Salmonella typhi, yang masuk ke dalam tubuh melalui mulut dan saluran cerna.1 Untuk bisa memahami patogenesis dari demam tifoid sampai ke tingkat selular dan molekular, ada 5 hal penting yang harus digaris bawahi, yaitu: 1.\tTipe 3 Sistem Sekresi (T3SS 2.\tVirulence Genes dari Salmonella yang mengkode 5 SIP (Salmonella Invasion Protein SIP A, B, C, D, dan E. 3.\tToll R2 dan toll R3 yang merupakan lapisan luar dari makrofag. 4.\tSistem imun lumen usus sampai ke organ dalam 5.\tFungsi endotelial sel dalam inflamasi. Infeksi Salmonella dapat berakibat fatal kepada bayi, balita, ibu hamil dan kandungannya serta orang lanjut usia. Hal ini disebabkan karena kekebalan tubuh mereka yang menurun. Virulensi salmonella tidak lepas dari peranan SPI, yang terletak di dalam kromosom dan plasmid bakteri. Dimana SPI 1 dan SPI 2 telah dikaji cukup mendalam karena keterkaitannya dengan T3SS, dan berperan sangat penting pada invasi awal serta siklus hidup intrasel dari bakteri Salmonella. Kontaminasi Salmonella dapat dicegah dengan mencuci tangan dan menjaga kebersihan makanan yang dikonsumsi. Selalu menjaga kebersihan lingkungan hidup kita agar terhindar dari kontaminasi dengan bakteri Salmonella typhi. Agar mewaspadai sejak dini pencegahan dan pengobatan penyakit typhus. Studi mendalam perlu dilakukan agar kita mampu lebih memahami proses kompleks antara patogen dan sel inang. Mengingat dari 15 SPI yang sudah diketahui, hanya SPI 1 dan SPI 2 yang sudah dikaji secara mendalam. Kata Kunci: Salmonella, Salmonella Invasion Protein, Typhi.

  18. drug resistant strains of Salmonella enterica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background : The emergence of strains of S.enterica with multiple drug resistance (MDR) is of great concern worldwide.The extracts of flowers of Thonningia sanguinea are used in traditional medicine in Ivory Coast to treat diarrhoeal diseases including salmonellosis. Previous studies had shown inhibition of the MDR strain ...

  19. Quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    over Asia and Africa) emerged from Southeast Asia and then spread to other regions of the world [13]. Travellers also played a significant role in spreading the resistant. Salmonella Typhi, especially to the developed world [16,. 17]. The quinolone-resistant Salmonella Typhi is not only prevalent in hospital settings but also in ...

  20. Increasing quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, K.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has remained sensitive to most antibiotics. However, national surveillance data from Denmark show that quinolone resistance in S. Enteritidis has increased from 0.8% in 1995 to 8.5% in 2000. These data support concerns that the current use...... of quinolone in food animals leads to increasing resistance in S. Enteritidis and that action should be taken to limit such use....

  1. An outbreak of multidrug-resistant, quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbak, K.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    Background Food-borne salmonella infections have become a major problem in industrialized countries. The strain of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium known as definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is usually resistant to five drugs: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides...

  2. Hydrogen-Stimulated Gene Expression by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in a Carbon Limited Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can utilize molecular hydrogen for growth and amino acid transport during anaerobic growth in a carbon limited environment. In this study we identified hydrogen-stimulated gene expression changes contributing to Salmonella survival. Methods: Micr...

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strains Implicated in Infections of Avian and Human Hosts

    KAUST Repository

    An, Ran

    2018-01-24

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a wide-host-range pathogen. Occasionally, it is involved in invasive infections, leading to a high mortality rate. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of four S Enteritidis strains obtained from human and avian hosts that had been involved in bacteremia, gastroenteritis, and primary infections.

  4. Survival and transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in an outdoor organic pig farming environment

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, A.N.; Dalsgaard, A.; Stockmarr, A.; Nielsen, E.M.; Baggesen, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    It was investigated how organic rearing conditions influence the Salmonella enterica infection dynamics in pigs and whether Salmonella persists in the paddock environment. Pigs inoculated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium were grouped with Salmonella-negative tracer pigs. Bacteriological and serological testing indicated that organic pigs were susceptible to Salmonella infections, as 26 of 46 (56%) tracer pigs turned culture positive. An intermittent and mainly low-level excretion of Sa...

  5. Identification by PCR of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars associated with invasive infections among febrile patients in Mali.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Tennant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients.We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali.We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2 strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:- strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains.We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries.

  6. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-), Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. Principal Findings We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2) strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:-) strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. Conclusion We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries. PMID:20231882

  7. Salmonella enterica prevalence in finishing pigs at slaughter plants in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Alpigiani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Finishing pigs carrying Salmonella enterica are believed to be the main source of carcass contamination at the beginning of slaughtering. The aim of this study was to assess the S. enterica carrier status of finishing pigs at herd level by sampling pooled faeces on farm and mesenteric lymph nodes at slaughter in the North East of Italy. Environmental faecal samples belonging to 30 batches of pigs were collected on farm. At slaughter, mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from five randomly selected pigs per batch. S. enterica was isolated from 16 lymph nodes out of 150 (10.6% and from seven out of 30 (23.3% faecal samples. Four batches (13.3% were positive to S. enterica both in lymph nodes and in faeces. The number of batches positive to S. enterica either in lymph nodes or in faeces was 13 out of 30 (43.3%. The most prevalent serovars from lymph nodes were S. Derby (25.0% and S. Typhimurium monophasic variant 1, 4,[5],12:i:- (18.6%, which were also isolated from faecal material (14.3 and 42.8% respectively. Contaminated faecal material or lymph nodes could be a primary source of carcass contamination at slaughter during evisceration. S. enterica contamination is widespread on pig farms and carrier pigs pass undetected the inspection visits at slaughter, entering the food chain. Therefore, in order to control S. enterica in pigs, the need to quantify possible risk factors at slaughter and develop effective management strategies on farm is of paramount importance to ensure food safety.

  8. International spread of an epidemic population of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198 resistant to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hello, Simon; Hendriksen, Rene S; Doublet, Benoît; Fisher, Ian; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Whichard, Jean M; Bouchrif, Brahim; Fashae, Kayode; Granier, Sophie A; Jourdan-Da Silva, Nathalie; Cloeckaert, Axel; Threlfall, E John; Angulo, Frederick J; Aarestrup, Frank M; Wain, John; Weill, François-Xavier

    2011-09-01

    National Salmonella surveillance systems from France, England and Wales, Denmark, and the United States identified the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky displaying high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin. A total of 489 human cases were identified during the period from 2002 (3 cases) to 2008 (174 cases). These isolates belonged to a single clone defined by the multilocus sequence type ST198, the XbaI-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis cluster X1, and the presence of the Salmonella genomic island 1 variant SGI1-K. This clone was probably selected in 3 steps in Egypt during the 1990s and the early 2000s and has now spread to several countries in Africa and, more recently, in the Middle East. Poultry has been identified as a potential major vehicle for infection by this clone. Continued surveillance and appropriate control measures should be implemented by national and international authorities to limit the spread of this strain.

  9. Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis based on Population Structure of Prevalent Lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Xiangyu; Desai, Prerak T.; den Bakker, Henk C.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. Its low genetic diversity, measured by fingerprinting methods, has made subtyping a challenge. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize 125 S. enterica Enteritidis and 3 S. enterica...

  10. Genomic Dissection of Travel-Associated Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates Originating from the Philippines: a One-Off Occurrence or a Threat to Effective Treatment of Typhoid Fever?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Mikoleit, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    One unreported case of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was identified, whole-genome sequence typed, among other analyses, and compared to other available genomes of S. Typhi. The reported strain was similar to a previously published strain harbo...

  11. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Myristica fragrans seed (nutmeg) extract and its antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Senthilkumar; Sivaji, Ilakkia; Kandasamy, Selvam; Duraisamy, Senbagam; Kumar, Nachimuthu Senthil; Gurusubramanian, Guruswami

    2017-06-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has received increasing attention due its effective mode of action, eco-friendly preparation methodology, and less cytotoxicity. In the present study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from aqueous seed extract of Myristica fragrans (nutmeg) were characterized. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed the presence of bioactive components acts as effective in reducing and capping agents for converting AgNO3 to AgNPs. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the biologically reduced reaction mixture showed the surface plasmon peak at 420 nm, which is the characteristic peak of AgNPs. The functional molecules present in the M. fragrans seed extract and their interaction with the AgNPs were identified by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the face-centered cubic crystalline structure of metallic silver nanoparticle and diameter was calculated using Scherrer's equation. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) image showed spherical shaped particles with an average size of 25 nm. The scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) confirmed the presence of elemental silver. The antibacterial activity of biosynthesized AgNPs was evaluated against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) according to agar well diffusion, MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration), and IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50%). The results confirm that bacterial growth was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Further, the cytotoxic effect of biosynthesized AgNPs on rat spleenocytes was analyzed. Thus, it is suggested that the nutmeg-biosynthesized AgNPs could be a lead drug and used effectively to control the MDR S. Typhi, thereby reducing public health issues and environmental pollution.

  12. Virulence Characterization of Salmonella enterica by a New Microarray: Detection and Evaluation of the Cytolethal Distending Toxin Gene Activity in the Unusual Host S. Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Figueiredo; Roderick Card; Carla Nunes; Manal AbuOun; Bagnall, Mary C.; Javier Nunez; Nuno Mendonça; Anjum, Muna F.; Gabriela Jorge da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic foodborne pathogen that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans. We assessed the virulence potential of one-hundred and six Salmonella strains isolated from food animals and products. A high through-put virulence genes microarray demonstrated Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPI) and adherence genes were highly conserved, while prophages and virulence plasmid genes were variably present. Isolates were grouped by serotype, and virulence plasmids separated S. T...

  13. Acquisition of extended-spectrum cephalosporin- and colistin-resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Newport by pilgrims during Hajj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Dia, Ndèye Méry; Gautret, Philippe; Benkouiten, Samir; Belhouchat, Khadidja; Drali, Tassadit; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe; Memish, Ziad; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    Gatherings like the Hajj involving many people who travel from different parts of the world represent a risk for the acquisition and dissemination of infectious diseases. In this study, acquisition of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella spp. in 2013 Hajj pilgrims from Marseille, France, was investigated. In total, 267 rectal swabs were collected from 129 participants before their departure and after their return from the pilgrimage as well as during the pilgrimage from patients with diarrhoea. Samples were screened for the presence of Salmonella using quantitative real-time PCR and culture. Whole-genome sequencing was performed to characterise one of the isolates, and the mechanism leading to colistin resistance was investigated. Six post-Hajj samples and one sample collected during a diarrhoea episode in Hajj were positive for Salmonella by real-time PCR, with five Salmonella enterica belonging to several serotypes recovered by culture, whereas no pre-Hajj sample was positive. Two of the isolates belonged to the epidemic Newport serotype, were resistant to cephalosporins, gentamicin and colistin, and harboured the bla(CTX-M-2) gene and a 12-nucleotide deletion in the pmrB gene leading to colistin resistance. This study shows that pilgrims acquired Salmonella bacteria, including a novel MDR clone, during the Hajj pilgrimage. This calls for more improved public health surveillance during Hajj because Salmonella is one of the most common diarrhoea-causing bacteria worldwide. Therefore, returning pilgrims could disseminate MDR bacteria worldwide upon returning to their home countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Methodologies for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Subtyping: Gold Standards and Alternatives▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattiau, Pierre; Boland, Cécile; Bertrand, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    For more than 80 years, subtyping of Salmonella enterica has been routinely performed by serotyping, a method in which surface antigens are identified based on agglutination reactions with specific antibodies. The serotyping scheme, which is continuously updated as new serovars are discovered, has generated over time a data set of the utmost significance, allowing long-term epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella in the food chain and in public health control. Conceptually, serotyping provides no information regarding the phyletic relationships inside the different Salmonella enterica subspecies. In epidemiological investigations, identification and tracking of salmonellosis outbreaks require the use of methods that can fingerprint the causative strains at a taxonomic level far more specific than the one achieved by serotyping. During the last 2 decades, alternative methods that could successfully identify the serovar of a given strain by probing its DNA have emerged, and molecular biology-based methods have been made available to address phylogeny and fingerprinting issues. At the same time, accredited diagnostics have become increasingly generalized, imposing stringent methodological requirements in terms of traceability and measurability. In these new contexts, the hand-crafted character of classical serotyping is being challenged, although it is widely accepted that classification into serovars should be maintained. This review summarizes and discusses modern typing methods, with a particular focus on those having potential as alternatives for classical serotyping or for subtyping Salmonella strains at a deeper level. PMID:21856826

  15. Prevalence, Distribution, and Diversity of Salmonella enterica in a Major Produce Region of California▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Lisa; Parker, Craig T.; Liang, Anita; Cooley, Michael B.; Jay-Russell, Michele T.; Gordus, Andrew G.; Atwill, E. Robert; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    A survey was initiated to determine the prevalence of Salmonella enterica in the environment in and around Monterey County, CA, a major agriculture region of the United States. Trypticase soy broth enrichment cultures of samples of soil/sediment (n = 617), water (n = 252), wildlife (n = 476), cattle feces (n = 795), and preharvest lettuce and spinach (n = 261) tested originally for the presence of pathogenic Escherichia coli were kept in frozen storage and later used to test for the presence of S. enterica. A multipathogen oligonucleotide microarray was employed to identify a subset of samples that might contain Salmonella in order to test various culture methods to survey a larger number of samples. Fifty-five of 2,401 (2.3%) samples yielded Salmonella, representing samples obtained from 20 different locations in Monterey and San Benito Counties. Water had the highest percentage of positives (7.1%) among sample types. Wildlife yielded 20 positive samples, the highest number among sample types, with positive samples from birds (n = 105), coyotes (n = 40), deer (n = 104), elk (n = 39), wild pig (n = 41), and skunk (n = 13). Only 16 (2.6%) of the soil/sediment samples tested positive, and none of the produce samples had detectable Salmonella. Sixteen different serotypes were identified among the isolates, including S. enterica serotypes Give, Typhimurium, Montevideo, and Infantis. Fifty-four strains were sensitive to 12 tested antibiotics; one S. Montevideo strain was resistant to streptomycin and gentamicin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the isolates revealed over 40 different pulsotypes. Several strains were isolated from water, wildlife, or soil over a period of several months, suggesting that they were persistent in this environment. PMID:21378057

  16. Hemophagocytic macrophages harbor Salmonella enterica during persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca N Nix

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subspecies can establish persistent, systemic infections in mammals, including human typhoid fever. Persistent S. enterica disease is characterized by an initial acute infection that develops into an asymptomatic chronic infection. During both the acute and persistent stages, the bacteria generally reside within professional phagocytes, usually macrophages. It is unclear how salmonellae can survive within macrophages, cells that evolved, in part, to destroy pathogens. Evidence is presented that during the establishment of persistent murine infection, macrophages that contain S. enterica serotype Typhimurium are hemophagocytic. Hemophagocytic macrophages are characterized by the ingestion of non-apoptotic cells of the hematopoietic lineage and are a clinical marker of typhoid fever as well as certain other infectious and genetic diseases. Cell culture assays were developed to evaluate bacterial survival in hemophagocytic macrophages. S. Typhimurium preferentially replicated in macrophages that pre-phagocytosed viable cells, but the bacteria were killed in macrophages that pre-phagocytosed beads or dead cells. These data suggest that during persistent infection hemophagocytic macrophages may provide S. Typhimurium with a survival niche.

  17. Hatchery-borne Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee infections in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J.P.; Brown, D.J.; Madsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    of S. enterica serovar Tennessee isolates from Danish broilers (1992 to 1995), the suspected hatchery and strains from various other sources included for comparison was initiated in order to trace the source of infection of the broilers. In general, strains of S. enterica ser. Tennessee showed only...... minor genotypic variation. Three different ribotypes were demonstrated when EcoRI was used for digestion of DNA. Two types were obtained by the use of HindIII. Nine different plasmids and seven different plasmid profiles were demonstrated. A 180 kb plasmid was, however, only demonstrated in isolates...

  18. Ingress of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium into tomato leaves through hydathodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganyu Gu

    Full Text Available Internal contamination of Salmonella in plants is attracting increasing attention for food safety reasons. In this study, three different tomato cultivars "Florida Lanai", "Crown Jewel", "Ailsa Craig" and the transgenic line Sp5 of "Ailsa Craig" were inoculated with 1 µl GFP-labeled Salmonella Typhimurium through guttation droplets at concentrations of 10(9 or 10(7 CFU/ml. Survival of Salmonella on/in tomato leaves was detected by both direct plating and enrichment methods. Salmonella cells survived best on/in the inoculated leaves of cultivar "Ailsa Craig" and decreased fastest on/in "Florida Lanai" leaves. Increased guttation in the abscisic acid over-expressing Sp5 plants may have facilitated the entrance of Salmonella into leaves and the colonization on the surface of tomato leaves. Internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in tomato leaves through guttation drop inoculation was confirmed by confocal laser microscopy. For the first time, convincing evidence is presented that S. enterica can enter tomato leaves through hydathodes and move into the vascular system, which may result in the internal translocation of the bacteria inside plants.

  19. Prevalence of enterobacteriaceae in Tupinambis merianae (Squamata: Teiidae from a captive facility in Central Brazil, with a profile of antimicrobial drug resistance in Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa de Moraes Carvalho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the presence of enterobacteriaceae in Tegu Lizards (Tupinambis merianaefrom a captive facility in central Brazil. From a total of 30 animals, 10 juveniles and 20 adults (10 males, 10 females, 60 samples were collected, in two periods separated by 15 days. The samples were cultivated in Xylose-lysine-deoxycholate agar (XLT4 and MacConkey agar. The Salmonella enterica were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 78 bacteria was isolated, of wich 27 were from juveniles of T. merianae, 30 from adult males and 21 from adult females. Salmonella enterica was the most frequent bacteria followed by Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter sakasakii, Kluivera sp., Citrobacter amalonaticus, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter diversus, Yersinia frederiksenii, Serratia odorifera, and Serratia liquefaciens. Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae and houtenae showed resistance to cotrimoxazole, and serum Salmonella enterica Worthington showed resistance to tetracycline and gentamicin. Salmonella enterica Panama and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae showed intermediate sensitivity to cotrimoxazole. In addition to Enterobacteriaceae in the Tegu lizard, pathogenic serotypes of S. enterica also occur, and their antimicrobial resistance was confirmed.

  20. Comparison of Danish Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT9a and PT11 from Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) and Humans by Plasmid Profiling and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauerby, B.; Pedersen, K.; Dietz, H. H.; Madsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    During the years 1994 to 1998, 10 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 11 (PT11) and 6 PT9a strains were isolated from Danish hedgehogs, together with 7 strains that did not yield phage susceptibility patterns conforming with any known phage type (routine dilution no conformity [RDNC]). From 1995 to 1998, five Danish patients were reported infected with serovar Enteritidis PT11 and two with PT9a. All serovar Enteritidis PT11, PT9a, and RDNC isolates from hedgehogs and humans were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid profiling, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of plasmids. By use of S1 nuclease and HindIII, the PT11 and PT9a isolates had identical plasmid profiles and RFLP patterns, which differed from the RDNC profiles. The PFGE profiles were identical for all serovar Enteritidis PT11 and PT9a strains from hedgehogs, four of five human strains of serovar Enteritidis PT11, and two human strains of serovar Enteritidis PT9a, irrespective of restriction enzyme, whereas the last human strain deviated slightly when NotI was used but not when XbaI or SpeI was used. The results indicate that serovar Enteritidis PT9a and PT11 are closely related and that PT11 and PT9a from Danish hedgehogs and humans belong to the same clonal lineage. PMID:11015375

  1. Effect of Food Residues in Biofilm Formation on Stainless Steel and Polystyrene Surfaces by Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Poultry Houses

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Méndez, Alba María; Lamas, Alexandre; Vázquez, Beatriz; Miranda, José Manuel; Cepeda, Alberto; Franco, Carlos Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella spp. is a major food-borne pathogen around the world. The ability of Salmonella to produce biofilm is one of the main obstacles in reducing the prevalence of these bacteria in the food chain. Most of Salmonella biofilm studies found in the literature used laboratory growth media. However, in the food chain, food residues are the principal source of nutrients of Salmonella. In this study, the biofilm formation, morphotype, and motility of 13 Salmonella strains belonging to three dif...

  2. Incidence and growth of Salmonella enterica on the peel and pulp of avocado (Persea americana) and custard apple (Annona squamosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Ana Carolina B; Crucello, Juliana; Moreira, Rafael C; Silva, Beatriz S; Sant'Ana, Anderson S

    2016-10-17

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and to estimate the growth kinetic parameters (maximum growth rate, μ; lag time, λ; and maximum population, κ) of Salmonella on the peel and pulp of avocado (Perseaamericana var. americana) and custard apple (Annona squamosa L.) as affected by temperature (10-30°C). The incidence of Salmonella was assessed on the peel and pulp of the fruits (n=200 of each fruit), separately, totalizing 800 analyses. Only three samples of custard apple pulp were positive for Salmonella enterica and the three isolates recovered belonged to serotype S. Typhimurium. Salmonella was not recovered from avocado and custard apple peels and from avocado pulp. Generally, the substrate (pulp or peel) of growth did not affect μ values of S. enterica (p>0.05). Very similar μ values were found for S. enterica inoculated in custard apple and avocado. S. enterica presented the highest λ in the peel of the fruits. The growth of S. enterica resulted in larger λ in custard apple in comparison to avocado. For example, the λ of S. enterica in the pulp of custard apple and avocado were 47.0±0.78h and 10.0±3.78h, respectively. The lowest values of κ were obtained at the lower storage temperature conditions (10°C). For instance, κ values of 3.7±0.06log CFU/g and 2.9±0.03log CFU/g were obtained from the growth of S. enterica in avocado and custard apple pulps at 10°C (ppeel of the fruits (ppeel led to a κ value of 4.6±0.23log CFU/g (ppeel and pulp of low acid tropical fruits, such as avocado and custard apple. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Christopher R; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A; Adams, Natalie L; Fisher, Ian S T; Grant, Kathie A; Peters, Tansy M; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H; Adak, Goutam K

    2014-07-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales.

  4. Food Grade Pimenta Leaf Essential Oil Reduces the Attachment of Salmonella enterica Heidelberg (2011 Ground Turkey Outbreak Isolate on to Turkey Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divek V. T. Nair

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella attached to the poultry skin is a major source of carcass contamination during processing. Once attached to the poultry skin, it is difficult to detach and inactivate Salmonella by commonly used antimicrobial agents since the pathogen is entrapped deeply in the feather follicles and the crevices on the skin. Essential oils could be natural, safe, and effective alternatives to synthetic antimicrobial agents during commercial and organic processing setup. The present study evaluated the efficacy of pimenta (Pimenta officinalis Lindl. leaf essential oil (PEO, and its nanoemulsion in reducing Salmonella Heidelberg attachment on to turkey (Meleagris gallopavo skin during simulated scalding (65°C and chilling (4°C steps in poultry processing. A multidrug resistant S. Heidelberg isolate from the 2011 ground turkey outbreak in the United States was used in the study. Results showed that PEO and the nanoemulsion resulted in significant reduction of S. Heidelberg attachment on turkey skin. Turkey skin samples treated with 1.0% PEO for 5 min resulted in >2 log10 CFU/sq. inch reduction of S. Heidelberg at 65 and 4°C, respectively (n = 6; P < 0.05. Similarly, skin samples treated with 1.0% pimenta nanoemulsion (PNE for 5 min resulted in 1.5- and 1.8- log10 CFU/sq. inch reduction of S. Heidelberg at 65 and 4°C, respectively (n = 6; P < 0.05. In addition, PEO and PNE were effective in reducing S. Heidelberg on skin during short-term storage at 4 and 10°C (temperature abuse (n = 6; P < 0.05. No Salmonella was detected in the dipping solution containing 0.5 or 1.0% PEO or PNE, whereas a substantial population of the pathogen survived in the control dipping solution. The results were validated using scanning electron -, and confocal - microscopy techniques. PEO or PNE could be utilized as an effective antimicrobial agent to reduce S. Heidelberg attachment to turkey skin during poultry processing.

  5. Genomic variation in Salmonella enterica core genes for epidemiological typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Rundsten, Carsten Friis

    2012-01-01

    time. The core genes-the genes that are conserved in all (or most) members of a genus or species-are potentially good candidates for investigating genomic variation in phylogeny and epidemiology. Results: We identify a set of 2,882 core genes clusters based on 73 publicly available Salmonella enterica...... confidence. The core genes can be divided into two categories: a few highly variable genes and a larger set of conserved core genes, with low variance. For the most variable core genes, the variance in amino acid sequences is higher than for the corresponding nucleotide sequences, suggesting...

  6. The Salmonella enterica Pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Annika; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    there is an abundance of accessory genes, including the Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs), transposable elements, phages, and plasmid DNA. We visualize conservation in the genomes in relation to chromosomal location and DNA structural features and find that variation in gene content is localized in a selection...... of variable genomic regions or islands. These include the SPIs but also encompass phage insertion sites and transposable elements. The islands were typically well conserved in several, but not all, isolates—a difference which may have implications in, e.g., host specificity....

  7. Multilocus sequence typing as a replacement for serotyping in Salmonella enterica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Achtman

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica is traditionally subdivided into serovars by serological and nutritional characteristics. We used Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST to assign 4,257 isolates from 554 serovars to 1092 sequence types (STs. The majority of the isolates and many STs were grouped into 138 genetically closely related clusters called eBurstGroups (eBGs. Many eBGs correspond to a serovar, for example most Typhimurium are in eBG1 and most Enteritidis are in eBG4, but many eBGs contained more than one serovar. Furthermore, most serovars were polyphyletic and are distributed across multiple unrelated eBGs. Thus, serovar designations confounded genetically unrelated isolates and failed to recognize natural evolutionary groupings. An inability of serotyping to correctly group isolates was most apparent for Paratyphi B and its variant Java. Most Paratyphi B were included within a sub-cluster of STs belonging to eBG5, which also encompasses a separate sub-cluster of Java STs. However, diphasic Java variants were also found in two other eBGs and monophasic Java variants were in four other eBGs or STs, one of which is in subspecies salamae and a second of which includes isolates assigned to Enteritidis, Dublin and monophasic Paratyphi B. Similarly, Choleraesuis was found in eBG6 and is closely related to Paratyphi C, which is in eBG20. However, Choleraesuis var. Decatur consists of isolates from seven other, unrelated eBGs or STs. The serological assignment of these Decatur isolates to Choleraesuis likely reflects lateral gene transfer of flagellar genes between unrelated bacteria plus purifying selection. By confounding multiple evolutionary groups, serotyping can be misleading about the disease potential of S. enterica. Unlike serotyping, MLST recognizes evolutionary groupings and we recommend that Salmonella classification by serotyping should be replaced by MLST or its equivalents.

  8. Clonal persistence of Salmonella enterica serovars Montevideo, Tennessee, and Infantis in feed factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunić, Bojana; Milanov, Dubravka; Velhner, Maja; Pajić, Marko; Pavlović, Ljiljana; Mišić, Dušan

    2016-06-30

    Novel molecular techniques applied in biotechnology research have provided sound evidence on clonal persistence of distinct serovars of Salmonella in feed factory environments, over long periods of time (months, even years), which can be responsible for repeated in-house contamination of final products. In this study, we examined the possibility of clonal persistence of isolates of three Salmonella serovars that have been repeatedly identified in animal feed samples from three feed factories throughout a two-year period. The isolates Salmonella enterica serovars Tennessee (n = 7), Montevideo (n = 8), and Infantis (n = 4) were tested for genetic diversity using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multicellular behavior patterns by applying the Congo red agar test. SpeI and XbaI macro-restriction profiles indicated that isolates S. Montevideo and S. Infantis were identical, whereas isolates of S. Tennessee demonstrated greater genetic diversity, although the genetic differences did not exceed 10%. All Salmonella serovars demonstrated the ability to produce predominant matrix compounds essential for biofilm formation, curli fimbriae and cellulose. The identification of identical clones of S. Montevideo and S. Infantis, as well as the minor genetic diversity of S. Tennessee, which have been repeatedly isolated from animal feed in three production plants throughout a two-year period, indirectly suggests the possibility of their persistence in feed factory environments. Their ability to express the key biofilm matrix components further supports this hypothesis.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of the Two Porcine Salmonella Typhimurium Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal METİNER

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to detect the presence of the Salmonella species in swine with diarrhea, and to investigate their antimicrobial resistance and extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL and/or AmpC β-lactamase production. For this purpose, stool samples from three commercial pig farms in Istanbul and Tekirdag were collected and processed for Salmonella isolation by culture and isolates were identified by biochemical activity tests. Salmonella isolates were confirmed by PCR then serotyped. Antimicrobial resistance and ESBL and AmpC production of the isolates were determined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI standard. In the study, two hundred and thirty eight stool samples were examined. Salmonella spp. were obtained from 2 samples, and the isolation rate was determined as 0.8%. Both of the isolates were defined as Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (serotype 1, 4, [5], 12: I: 1, 2 by serotyping. Both of them were resistant to cefaclor, cloxacillin and lincomycin (100%. Multidrug resistance (resistance ≥3 antimicrobials observed in all isolates. ESBL and AmpC production were not detected in any of the isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of S. Typhimurium in pigs with diarrhea in Turkey. This study also represents the first report of multi-drug resistant S. Typhimurium isolates from pig stools in Turkey.

  10. wksl3, a New Biocontrol Agent for Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium in Foods: Characterization, Application, Sequence Analysis, and Oral Acute Toxicity Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hyun-Wol; Kim, Jae-Won; Jung, Tae-Sung; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2013-01-01

    Of the Salmonella enterica serovars, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium are responsible for most of the Salmonella outbreaks implicated in the consumption of contaminated foods in the Republic of Korea. Because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella in foods and food processing environments, bacteriophages have recently surfaced as an alternative biocontrol tool. In this study, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (wksl3) that could specifically infect S. Enteritidi...

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and sequence analysis of DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Richa; Thakare, Ritesh; Amrin, N; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Chopra, Sidharth; Dhole, Tapan Nirodhechand

    2016-08-01

    We describe the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of 100 typhoidal Salmonella isolates recovered from blood cultures and also investigate the association of decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility with mutations in the genes coding for DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in 55 isolates. The study was conducted between January 2013 and December 2015 at a tertiary care centre in north India. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and E-test. Genotypic characterization included the screening of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE by PCR. DNA sequence analysis was done for 55 isolates. Out of 100 isolates recovered 80 were S. Typhi, 18 were Paratyphi A and two were Paratyphi B. Eighty two percent (66/80) of S. Typhi and 15/18 S. Paratyphi A showed decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility. The most common mutation in gyrA led to a change at codon 83 of serine to phenylalanine (n=37) or tyrosine (n=12). Five S. Typhi isolates that were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MICs of 12, 16, 24 and 32 μg/ml) had a second mutation at codon 87 in the gyrA gene changing aspartate to asparagine. There is a need to urgently review the use of fluoroquinolones for the management of enteric fever in endemic areas. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Emergence of pulsed electric fields resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarzazu, N; Cebrián, G; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Mañas, P

    2013-09-02

    In this investigation we selected and isolated a culture derived from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 with stable increased resistance to pulsed electric fields (PEF) after repeated rounds of PEF treatment and outgrowth of survivors. The resulting culture showed a higher resistance to PEF treatments under different treatment conditions. The acquisition of PEF resistance was only observed in stationary phase cells. The cytoplasmic membrane of the resistant variant showed a higher resilience against PEF treatments, since a lower permeabilization degree was observed after PEF treatments, in comparison to the parental strain. Resistance to PEF was also accompanied by a higher tolerance to acidic pH, hydrogen peroxide and ethanol, but not to heat. The occurrence of a PEF resistant variant in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 emphasizes the need to further study the mechanisms of inactivation and resistance by PEF for an adequate design of safe treatments. © 2013.

  13. The evolutionary history and diagnostic utility of the CRISPR-Cas system within Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Pettengill

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary studies of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and their associated (cas genes can provide insights into host-pathogen co-evolutionary dynamics and the frequency at which different genomic events (e.g., horizontal vs. vertical transmission occur. Within this study, we used whole genome sequence (WGS data to determine the evolutionary history and genetic diversity of CRISPR loci and cas genes among a diverse set of 427 Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica isolates representing 64 different serovars. We also evaluated the performance of CRISPR loci for typing when compared to whole genome and multilocus sequence typing (MLST approaches. We found that there was high diversity in array length within both CRISPR1 (median = 22; min = 3; max = 79 and CRISPR2 (median = 27; min = 2; max = 221. There was also much diversity within serovars (e.g., arrays differed by as many as 50 repeat-spacer units among Salmonella ser. Senftenberg isolates. Interestingly, we found that there are two general cas gene profiles that do not track phylogenetic relationships, which suggests that non-vertical transmission events have occurred frequently throughout the evolutionary history of the sampled isolates. There is also considerable variation among the ranges of pairwise distances estimated within each cas gene, which may be indicative of the strength of natural selection acting on those genes. We developed a novel clustering approach based on CRISPR spacer content, but found that typing based on CRISPRs was less accurate than the MLST-based alternative; typing based on WGS data was the most accurate. Notwithstanding cost and accessibility, we anticipate that draft genome sequencing, due to its greater discriminatory power, will eventually become routine for traceback investigations.

  14. A comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomolnaya Lydia M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial food borne illnesses worldwide. A major source of infection for humans is consumption of chicken or egg products that have been contaminated with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, however our knowledge regarding colonization and persistence factors in the chicken is small. Results We compared intestinal and systemic colonization of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant CBA/J mice during infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028, one of the most commonly studied isolates. We also studied the distribution of wild type serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028 and an isogenic invA mutant during competitive infection in the cecum of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and 8-week-old CBA/J mice. We found that although the systemic levels of serotype Typhimurium in both infected animal models are low, infected mice have significant splenomegaly beginning at 15 days post infection. In the intestinal tract itself, the cecal contents are the major site for recovery of serotype Typhimurium in the cecum of 1-week-old chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. Additionally we show that only a small minority of Salmonellae are intracellular in the cecal epithelium of both infected animal models, and while SPI-1 is important for successful infection in the murine model, it is important for association with the cecal epithelium of 1-week-old chicks. Finally, we show that in chicks infected with serotype Typhimurium at 1 week of age, the level of fecal shedding of this organism does not reflect the level of cecal colonization as it does in murine models. Conclusion In our study, we highlight important differences in systemic and intestinal colonization levels between chick and murine serotype Typhimurium infections, and provide evidence that suggests that the role of SPI-1 may not be the same during colonization of both animal models.

  15. Genomic and Phenotypic Analyses Reveal the Emergence of an Atypical Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Variant in China

    KAUST Repository

    Abd El Ghany, Moataz

    2016-05-25

    Human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Senftenberg are often associated with exposure to poultry flocks, farm environments, or contaminated food. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates has raised public health concerns. In this study, comparative genomics and phenotypic analysis were used to characterize 14 Salmonella Senftenberg clinical isolates recovered from multiple outbreaks in Shenzhen and Shanghai, China, between 2002 and 2011. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses identified two phylogenetically distinct clades of S. Senftenberg, designated SC1 and SC2, harboring variations in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) and SPI-2 and exhibiting distinct biochemical and phenotypic signatures. Although the two variants shared the same serotype, the SC2 isolates of sequence type 14 (ST14) harbored intact SPI-1 and -2 and hence were characterized by possessing efficient invasion capabilities. In contrast, the SC1 isolates had structural deletion patterns in both SPI-1 and -2 that correlated with an impaired capacity to invade cultured human cells and also the year of their isolation. These atypical SC1 isolates also lacked the capacity to produce hydrogen sulfide. These findings highlight the emergence of atypical Salmonella Senftenberg variants in China and provide genetic validation that variants lacking SPI-1 and regions of SPI-2, which leads to impaired invasion capacity, can still cause clinical disease. These data have identified an emerging public health concern and highlight the need to strengthen surveillance to detect the prevalence and transmission of nontyphoidal Salmonella species.

  16. Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporin-Resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg Strains, the Netherlands1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Yvon; Dierikx, Cindy M.; Brouwer, Michael S.M.; Kant, Arie; Wit, Ben; Heymans, Raymond; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Mevius, Dik J.

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strains (JF6X01.0022/XbaI.0251, JF6X01.0326/XbaI.1966, JF6X01.0258/XbaI.1968, and JF6X01.0045/XbaI.1970) have been identified in the United States with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Our examination of isolates showed introduction of these strains in the Netherlands and highlight the need for active surveillance and intervention strategies by public health organizations. PMID:27314180

  17. Prevalence of Salmonella enterica and the hygienic indicator Escherichia coli in raw meat at markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagambèga, Assèta; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja; Traoré, Alfred S; Barro, Nicolas

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the hygienic status and prevalence of Salmonella and Escherichia coli in retail meat sold at open markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. A total of 150 samples of beef meat (n = 45), beef intestine (n = 45), mutton (n = 30), and chicken (n = 30) were collected from four local markets for investigation. The prevalence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica was 9.3%, and six serotypes, all previously unreported in Burkina Faso, were identified: Derby, Tilene, Hato, Bredeney, Agona, and Senftenberg. Most of the Salmonella isolates were sensitive to the 12 antimicrobial drugs tested. The prevalence of E. coli was 100% in all the meat types. An assessment of hygiene practices for the production, transportation, display, and vending of the meat revealed unhygienic conditions. Meat sellers had a low education level and poor knowledge of foodborne pathogens and their transmission routes. The findings showed that foodstuff handlers were in dire need of education about safe food handling practices.

  18. Laboratory surveillance of Salmonella enterica from human clinical cases in Colombia 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Edna Catering; Díaz-Guevara, Paula; Moreno, Jaime; Bautista, Adriana; Montaño, Lucy; Realpe, María Elena; Della Gaspera, Anabella; Wiesner, Magdalena

    Salmonella is an enteropathogen acquired through contaminated food or water. In Colombia, Salmonella spp. is included in the national surveillance of Acute Diarrhoeal Diseases and typhoid fever initiated in 1997. This report shows the phenotype and genotype results obtained from 2005 to 2011. A total of 4010 isolates of Salmonella enterica were analysed by serotyping with Kauffmann-White-LeMinor, antimicrobial resistance patterns, and pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A total of 93 serovars were identified, of which, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Typhi, Dublin, Panama, Derby, Braenderup, Saintpaul, and Uganda were prominent. The highest levels of resistance were found for tetracycline and nalidixic acid. Susceptibility was observed in 52.4% (2101/4010) of the isolates. Multi-resistance was recorded in 54.9% of Typhimurium isolates, with 81 different combinations. Using PFGE, 51.9% (2083/4010) isolates were analysed in 34 serovars, and 828 electrophoretic patterns were obtained. From these, 8 patterns were found in at least two Latin-American countries. The surveillance of Salmonella spp. provides information on the serovar distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and clonal distribution in Colombia, as well as information to treat this disease and control the spread of antimicrobial bacterial resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of non-pathogenic bacterial biofilms on the surface of stainless steel which are inhibitory to Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonbin; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2018-02-01

    Non-pathogenic bacterial biofilms were developed on the surface of stainless steel possessing desiccation tolerance and antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enterica. Three bacteria exhibiting strong antimicrobial activities against S. enterica were isolated from various soils, foods, and food-contact surfaces. Isolates were identified as Pseudomonas extremorientalis (strain Lettuce-28), Paenibacillus peoriae (strain Lettuce-7), and Streptomyces cirratus (strain Geumsan-207). These bacteria grew rapidly and formed biofilms within 24 h on the surface of stainless steel coupons (SSCs) immersed in laboratory media (tryptic soy broth or Bennet's broth) at 25 °C. Cells in biofilms had enhanced tolerance to desiccation (exposure to 43% atmospheric relative humidity [RH]) and retained antimicrobial activity against S. enterica. Populations of S. enterica deposited on SSCs containing biofilm formed by Ps. extremorientalis strain Lettuce-28, for example, decreased by > 2.5 log CFU/coupon within 24 h at 25 °C and 43% RH, while the number of cells inoculated on SSCs lacking biofilm decreased by 1.5 log CFU/coupon. Antimicrobial activities of the three antagonistic bacteria against S. enterica persisted in desiccated biofilms. This study provides insights to developing strategies to inactivate Salmonella and perhaps other foodborne pathogens on abiotic surfaces using non-pathogenic antagonistic bacteria. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Antibody- and TRIM21-dependent intracellular restriction of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakebrandt, Nikolas; Lentes, Sabine; Neumann, Heinz; James, Leo C; Neumann-Staubitz, Petra

    2014-11-01

    TRIM21 ('tripartite motif-containing protein 21', Ro52) is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic Fc receptor, which has a potent role in protective immunity against nonenveloped viruses. TRIM21 mediates intracellular neutralisation of antibody-coated viruses, a process called ADIN (antibody-dependent intracellular neutralisation). Our results reveal a similar mechanism to fight bacterial infections. TRIM21 is recruited to the intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica in epithelial cells early in infection. TRIM21 does not bind directly to S. enterica, but to antibodies opsonising it. Most importantly, bacterial restriction is dependent on TRIM21 as well as on the opsonisation state of the bacteria. Finally, Salmonella and TRIM21 colocalise with the autophagosomal marker LC3, and intracellular defence is enhanced in starved cells suggesting an involvement of the autophagocytic pathway. Our data extend the protective role of TRIM21 from viruses to bacteria and thereby strengthening the general role of ADIN in cellular immunity. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of a PCR serotyping assay, Check&Trace assay for Salmonella, and Luminex Salmonella serotyping assay for the characterization of Salmonella enterica identified from fresh and naturally contaminated cilantro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, J; Ewing, L; Jarvis, K; Dudley, K; Grim, C; Gopinath, G; Flamer, M-L; Auguste, W; Jayaram, A; Elmore, J; Lamont, M; McGrath, T; Hanes, D E

    2014-09-01

    Salmonella enterica isolated from fresh cilantro samples collected through the USDA/AMS Microbiological Data Program (MDP) were used to compare a PCR serotyping assay against the Check&Trace assay and the Luminex (BioPlex) Salmonella serotyping assay. The study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the three methods for serotyping Salmonella from both enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures. In this investigation, Salmonella spp. serotyping was conducted using 24 h enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures from cilantro samples, with the PCR serotyping assay. Conversely, the Check&Trace and Luminex for Salmonella assays required pure cultures for Salmonella serotyping. The cilantro samples contained S. enterica serovar Montevideo, Newport, Saintpaul, and Tennessee, identified by the PCR serotyping assay and Check&Trace for Salmonella, but the Luminex assay only identified two of the four serotypes of the cilantro samples. The anticipated impact from this study is that the PCR serotyping assay provides a time- and cost-effective means for screening, identifying and serotyping Salmonella using DNA extracted from 24 h enrichment cilantro samples. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis traced to cream cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Tai Goh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper describes the epidemiological, microbiological and environmental investigations conducted during an outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in Singapore.Methods: A case-control study was undertaken to identify the vehicle of transmission. Microbiological testing was performed on faecal, food and environmental samples. Isolates of Salmonella were further characterized by phage typing and ribotyping.Results: There were 216 gastroenteritis cases reported from 20 November to 4 December 2007. The causative agent was identified as Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis for 14 out of 20 cases tested. The vehicle of transmission was traced to cream cakes produced by a bakery and sold at its retail outlets (P < 0.001, OR = 143.00, 95% Cl = 27.23–759.10. More than two-thirds of the 40 Salmonella strains isolated from hospitalized cases, food samples and asymptomatic food handlers were of phage type 1; the others reacted but did not conform to any phage type. The phage types correlated well with their unique antibiograms. The ribotype patterns of 22 selected isolates tested were highly similar, indicating genetic relatedness. The dendrogram of the strains from the outbreak showed distinct clustering and correlation compared to the non-outbreak strains, confirming a common source of infection.Discussion: The cream cakes were likely contaminated by one of the ingredients used in the icing. Cross-contamination down the production line and subsequent storage of cakes at ambient temperatures for a prolonged period before consumption could have resulted in the outbreak.

  3. Characterization of Salmonella isolated from captive and free-living snakes in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Stenkat, Julia; Szabo, Istvan; Ortlieb, Falk; Blindow, Irmgard; Neul, Ann-Kathrin; Pees, Michael; Schmidt, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Reptiles are well-known reservoirs of Salmonella spp. and cases of reptile-associated salmonellosis (RAS) are increasing since reptiles are becoming more popular as pets. In the present study, the presence, distribution and prevalence of serovars of Salmonella was investigated in captive snakes (n = 87) and in free-living snakes (n = 87) in Germany. A total of 43 S. enterica-isolates were recovered from organ samples and cloacal swabs, predominantly belonging to the subspecies diarizonae (IIIb) (n = 27), enterica (I) (n = 7) and houtenae (IV) (n = 6). S. enterica subsp. enterica (I) serovar Paratyphi B (n = 4) and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae (IIIb) serovar 47:l,v:z (n = 3) were the most frequently isolated serotypes. Nevertheless, the fact that most serotypes were only represented by a single isolate points out the high diversity of Salmonella present among snakes. Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae (IIIb) serotype 40:i:z53, which was isolated twice from two free-living Eurasian adders (Vipera berus) captured at different locations, has not been previously described. Our results confirm the role of both free-living and captive snakes as reservoirs of S. enterica in Germany.

  4. Selection of small-colony variants of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium in nonphagocytic eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, David A; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; Martínez-Moya, Marina; Casadesús, Josep; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2003-07-01

    Salmonella enterica strains are enteropathogenic bacteria that survive and proliferate within vacuolar compartments of epithelial and phagocytic cells. Recently, it has been reported that fibroblast cells are capable of restricting S. enterica serovar Typhimurium intracellular growth. Here, we show that prolonged residence of bacteria in the intracellular environment of fibroblasts results in the appearance of genetically stable small-colony variants (SCV). A total of 103 SCV isolates, obtained from four independent infections, were subjected to phenotypic analysis. The following phenotypes were observed: (i) delta-aminolevulinic acid auxotrophy; (ii) requirement for acetate or succinate for growth in glucose minimal medium; (iii) auxotrophy for aromatic amino acids; and (iv) reduced growth rate under aerobic conditions not linked to nutrient auxotrophy. The exact mutations responsible for the SCV phenotype in three representative isolates were mapped in the lpd, hemL, and aroD genes, which code for dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate-1-semyaldehyde aminotransferase, and 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase, respectively. The lpd, hemL, and aroD mutants had intracellular persistence rates in fibroblasts that were 3 to 4 logs higher than that of the parental strain and decreased susceptibility to aminoglycoside antibiotics. All three of these SCV isolates were attenuated in the BALB/c murine typhoid model. Complementation with lpd(+), hem(+), and aroD(+) genes restored the levels of intracellular persistence and antibiotic susceptibility to levels of the wild-type strain. However, virulence was not exhibited by any of the complemented strains. Altogether, our data demonstrate that similar to what it has been reported for SCV isolates of other pathogens, S. enterica SCV display enhanced intracellular persistence in eucaryotic cells and are impaired in the ability to cause overt disease. In addition, they also suggest that S. enterica SCV may be favored in vivo.

  5. Salmonella enterica serotype Oranienburg infections associated with consumption of locally produced Tyrolean cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerberger, F; Kreidl, P; Dierich, M.P.; Klingsbichel, E; Jenewein, D; Mader, C; Khaschabi, D; Schonbauer, M; Berghold, C

    2000-11-01

    Sixteen culture confirmed cases of enteric infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Oranienburg were detected between August 10 and September 29 1999 in Tyrol (Austria). Ten of them suffered bloody diarrhoea and six were asymptomatic carriers. Intervie

  6. DISSEMINATION OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEQUENCE TYPES AMONG ASEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY COUNTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchanee, Prapas; Boonkhot, Phacharaporn; Kittiwan, Nattinee; Tadee, Pakpoom; Chotinun, Suwit

    2015-07-01

    Food-borne illness caused by Salmonella enterica remains a public health problem and results in economic loss worldwide. With the up-coming establish- ment of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) allowing unrestricted move- ment of labor and goods, there is a higher risk of pathogen transmission among the AEC countries. This study characterized and investigated the spatial and temporal associations of S. enterica strains isolated in AEC countries during 1940- 2012 compared with those isolated in northern-Thailand during 2011-2013. Of the 173 S. enterica strains examined, 68 sequence types (STs) and 32 clonal complexes (CCs) were identified by multi loci sequence typing. Twenty-one strains belonged to four sequence types new to AEC countries, and they constituted only two CCs. A number of strains originated from various countries with multiple hosts, were highlighted. There was evidence of strains circulating in the AEC region well over a decade. Such information will be important in formulating biosecurity measures, as well as in educating regarding the risk of disease transmission in AEC.

  7. Survival and transmission of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium in an outdoor organic pig farming environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Nygaard; Dalsgaard, Anders; Stockmarr, Anders

    2006-01-01

    showed that pigs reared under organic conditions were susceptible to Salmonella infections (just like conventional pigs) and that Salmonella persisting in the paddock environment could pose an infection risk. A driving force for these infections seemed to be pigs with a high Salmonella excretion level......It was investigated how organic rearing conditions influence the Salmonella enterica infection dynamics in pigs and whether Salmonella persists in the paddock environment. Pigs inoculated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium were grouped with Salmonella-negative tracer pigs. Bacteriological...... and serological testing indicated that organic pigs were susceptible to Salmonella infections, as 26 of 46 (56%) tracer pigs turned culture positive. An intermittent and mainly low-level excretion of Salmonella (

  8. LeuO is a global regulator of gene expression in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillon, Shane C.; Espinosa, Elena; Hokamp, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We report the first investigation of the binding of the Salmonella enterica LeuO LysR‐type transcription regulator to its genomic targets in vivo. Chromatin‐immunoprecipitation‐on‐chip identified 178 LeuO binding sites on the chromosome of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. These site...

  9. Complete genome sequence of a multiple drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkhill, J.; Dougan, G.; James, K.D.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi) is the aetiological agent of typhoid fever, a serious invasive bacterial disease of humans with an annual global burden of approximately 16 million cases, leading to 600,000 fatalities(1). Many S. enterica serovars actively invade the mucosal surface o...... plasmid of Yersinia pestis....

  10. Physiological and molecular response of Lactuca sativa to colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerks, M.M.; Gent-Pelzer, van M.P.E.; Franz, E.; Zijlstra, C.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the physiological and molecular interactions between the human-pathogenic organism Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin and the commercially available mini Roman lettuce cv. Tamburo. The association of S. enterica serovar Dublin with lettuce plants was first determined, which

  11. Comparative genome analysis of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 and Salmonella Gallinarum 287/91 provides insights into evolutionary and host adaptation pathways

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomson, Nicholas R; Clayton, Debra J; Windhorst, Daniel; Vernikos, Georgios; Davidson, Susanne; Churcher, Carol; Quail, Michael A; Stevens, Mark; Jones, Michael A; Watson, Michael; Barron, Andy; Layton, Abigail; Pickard, Derek; Kingsley, Robert A; Bignell, Alex; Clark, Louise; Harris, Barbara; Ormond, Doug; Abdellah, Zahra; Brooks, Karen; Cherevach, Inna; Chillingworth, Tracey; Woodward, John; Norberczak, Halina; Lord, Angela; Arrowsmith, Claire; Jagels, Kay; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Sanders, Mandy; Whitehead, Sally; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Maskell, Duncan; Humphrey, Tom; Roberts, Mark; Barrow, Paul A; Dougan, Gordon; Parkhill, Julian

    2008-01-01

    We have determined the complete genome sequences of a host-promiscuous Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 isolate P125109 and a chicken-restricted Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum isolate 287/91...

  12. RECOVERY IN VIVO OF NONCULTURABLE SUBPOPULATION OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudin I.P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. As one of mesophilic, easily cultivated species of pathogenic bacteria, Salmonella enterica transformed into viable but nonculturable (VNC state in response to environmental stresses, including action of biocides. The cells in this state, preserve the integrity of membranes and metabolism of some, but not detected by conventional methods of cultivation. Some researchers suggest that the evolutionary significance of this phenomenon is part of an adaptive response aimed at long-term survival of bacteria in adverse conditions; others argue that it is the result of stochastic cellular damage, in which nonculturable cells are in a state of gradual death. In any case, the phenomenon of existence VNC pathogens if they retain the ability to restore its growth in vivo is a significant problem in medicine, pharmaceutical, veterinary, food industry. VNC subpopulation of S. enterica was obtained under action of ethanol. In this paper was investigated in vivo resuscitation VNC S. enterica using intraperitoneal injection of mice. Materials and methods. Obtaining of stressful S. enterica populations. Bacteria were grown to exponential phase in broth Luria–Bertani (LB. To 1.0 ml sample suspension diluted to 1.5 × 106 cells/ml was added 1.0 ml of ethanol at a concentration of 40 % (v/v. After exposure of 10 to 600 minutes in the suspension were added 8.0 ml of phosphate buffered saline (FBS, washed by centrifugation (4500 g for 5 minutes and serially diluted at a ratio of 1:10 (v/v samples were stained with LIVE/DEAD BacLight (produced by "Invitrogen", USA, filtrated on membrane filters for fluorescence microscopy and parallel plated on LB agar cup to determine colony-forming units (CFU per ml. In vivo resuscitation VNC S. enterica was made following way. Three groups of animals were inoculated by intraperitoneal injection: 1 103 culturable cells (0.1 ml suspension containing 104 CFU / ml; 2 103 VNC cells (0.1 ml suspension containing 104 cells

  13. Trends of Multiple Drug Resistance in Salmonella Enterica Serovar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This study assessed the trends in antibiotic resistance in 235 Salmonella typhi stains isolated by standard procedures from blood and/stool samples of hospitalized patients from 1997 to 2003. All the isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing using the following antibiotics: chloramphenicol, ...

  14. ramR mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198

    OpenAIRE

    Baucheron, Sylvie; Le Hello, Simon; Doublet, Benoît; Giraud, Etienne; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2013-01-01

    International audience; A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n = 27), covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this effl...

  15. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and the pathogenesis of typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Gordon; Baker, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the cause of typhoid, is host restricted to humans. S. Typhi has a monophyletic population structure, indicating that typhoid in humans is a relatively new disease. Antimicrobial usage is reshaping the current S. Typhi global population and may be driving the emergence of a specific haplotype, H58, that is well adapted to transmission in modern settings and is able to resist antimicrobial killing more efficiently than other S. Typhi. Evidence gathered through genomics and functional studies using the mouse and in vitro cell systems, together with clinical investigations, has provided insight into the mechanisms that underpin the pathogenesis of human typhoid and host restriction. Here we review the latest scientific advances in typhoid research and discuss how these novel approaches are changing our understanding of the disease.

  16. Development of stable reporter system cloning luxCDABE genes into chromosome of Salmonella enterica serotypes using Tn7 transposon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Mark L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis may be a food safety problem when raw food products are mishandled and not fully cooked. In previous work, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella enterica serotypes using a plasmid-based reporting system that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products in short term studies. In this study, we report the use of a Tn7-based transposon system for subcloning of luxCDABE genes into the chromosome of eleven Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from the broiler production continuum. Results We found that the lux operon is constitutively expressed from the chromosome post-transposition and the lux cassette is stable without external pressure, i.e. antibiotic selection, for all Salmonella enterica serotypes used. Bioluminescence expression is based on an active electron transport chain and is directly related with metabolic activity. This relationship was quantified by measuring bioluminescence against a temperature gradient in aqueous solution using a luminometer. In addition, bioluminescent monitoring of two serotypes confirmed that our chicken skin model has the potential to be used to evaluate pathogen mitigation strategies. Conclusions This study demonstrated that our new stable reporting system eliminates bioluminescence variation due to plasmid instability and provides a reliable real-time experimental system to study application of preventive measures for Salmonella on food products in real-time for both short and long term studies.

  17. The type species of the genus Salmonella Lignieres 1900 is Salmonella enterica (ex Kauffmann and Edwards 1952) Le Minor and Popoff 1987, with the type strain LT2T, and conservation of the epithet enterica in Salmonella enterica over all earlier epithets that may be applied to this species. Opinion 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The Judicial Commission of the International Committee for Systematics of Prokaryotes has decided that the type species of the genus Salmonella Lignieres 1900 is Salmonella enterica (ex Kauffmann and Edwards 1952) Le Minor and Popoff 1987 and that the type strain of this species is strain LT2T. In addition, the epithet enterica in Salmonella enterica is conserved over all earlier epithets that may be applied to this species.

  18. The anti-infective activity of punicalagin against Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghui; Feng, Yuqing; Xu, Yunfeng; Wu, Qian; Han, Qi'an; Liang, Xiujun; Yang, Baowei; Wang, Xin; Xia, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Punicalagin, a major bioactive component of pomegranate peel, has been proven to have antioxidant, antiviral, anti-apoptosis, and hepatoprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-infective activity of punicalagin in a mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were initially challenged with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and then treated with punicalagin. Food and water consumption and body weight were recorded daily. On day 8 post infection, the mice were sacrificed to examine pathogen counts in tissues, hematological parameters, cytokine levels, and histological changes. Compared to mice only infected with S. typhimurium, punicalagin-treated mice had more food consumption and less weight loss. A higher survival rate and lower counts of viable S. typhimurium in feces, liver, spleen, and kidney were found in the punicalagin-treated mice. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-γ in serum and the spleen and TNF-α in serum, the spleen and the liver were reduced by punicalagin. Moreover, more neutrophils and higher neutrophil-to-mononuclear cell ratios in the punicalagin-treated mice were observed. Histological examination showed that punicalagin protected cells in the liver and spleen from hemorrhagic necrosis. It is concluded that punicalagin has a beneficial effect against S. typhimurium infection in mice. The anti-infective properties, together with other nutritionally beneficial effects, make punicalagin a promising supplement in human food or animal feeds to prevent disease associated with S. typhimurium.

  19. Biofilm formation by multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium phage type DT104 and other pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Wei, Cheng-i

    2007-01-01

    The biofilm-forming capability of Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium and Heidelberg, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from humans, animal farms, and retail meat products was evaluated by using a microplate assay. The tested bacterial species showed interstrain variation in their capabilities to form biofilms. Strong biofilm-forming strains of S. enterica serotypes, E. coli O157: H7, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and A. baumannii were resistant to at least four of the tested antibiotics. To understand their potential in forming biofilms in food-processing environments, the strong biofilm formers grown in beef, turkey, and lettuce broths were further investigated on stainless steel and glass surfaces. Among the tested strains, Salmonella Typhimurium phage type DT104 (Salmonella Typhimurium DT104) isolated from retail beef formed the strongest biofilm on stainless steel and glass in beef and turkey broths. K. pneumoniae, L. monocytogenes, and P. aeruginosa were also able to form strong biofilms on the tested surface materials. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 developed a biofilm on stainless steel in beef and turkey broths through (i) initial attachment to the surface, (ii) formation of microcolonies, and (iii) biofilm maturation. These findings indicated that Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 alongwith other bacterial pathogens could be a source of cross-contamination during handling and processing of food.

  20. Genomic evidence reveals numerous Salmonella enterica serovar Newport reintroduction events in Suwannee watershed irrigation ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoguang; Jackson, Scott A; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Huanli; Tall, Ben D; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Jay-Russell, Michele; Vellidis, George; Elkins, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Our previous work indicated a predominance (56.8%) of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport among isolates recovered from irrigation ponds used in produce farms over a 2-year period (B. Li et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 80:6355-6365, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02063-14). This observation provided a valuable set of metrics to explore an underaddressed issue of environmental survival of Salmonella by DNA microarray. Microarray analysis correctly identified all the isolates (n = 53) and differentiated the S. Newport isolates into two phylogenetic lineages (S. Newport II and S. Newport III). Serovar distribution analysis showed no instances where the same serovar was recovered from a pond for more than a month. Furthermore, during the study, numerous isolates with an indistinguishable genotype were recovered from different ponds as far as 180 km apart for time intervals as long as 2 years. Although isolates within either lineage were phylogenetically related as determined by microarray analysis, subtle genotypic differences were detected within the lineages, suggesting that isolates in either lineage could have come from several unique hosts. For example, strains in four different subgroups (A, B, C, and D) possessed an indistinguishable genotype within their subgroups as measured by gene differences, suggesting that strains in each subgroup shared a common host. Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment. These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce. Copyright © 2015 Li et al.

  1. Detection of Salmonella enterica in Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) of Chilean Patagonia: evidences of inter-species transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougnac, C; Pardo, C; Meza, K; Arredondo, C; Blank, O; Abalos, P; Vidal, R; Fernandez, A; Fredes, F; Retamal, P

    2015-04-01

    Patagonia in southern South America is among the few world regions where direct human impact is still limited but progressively increasing, mainly represented by tourism, farming, fishing and mining activities. The sanitary condition of Patagonian wildlife is unknown, in spite of being critical for the assessment of anthropogenic effects there. The aim of this study was the characterization of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from wild colonies of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) located in Magdalena Island and Otway Sound, in Chilean Patagonia. Eight isolates of Salmonella were found, belonging to Agona and Enteritidis serotypes, with an infection rate of 0·38%. Resistance to ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftiofur and tetracycline antimicrobials were detected, and some of these strains showed genotypic similarity with Salmonella strains isolated from humans and gulls, suggesting inter-species transmission cycles and strengthening the role of penguins as sanitary sentinels in the Patagonian ecosystem.

  2. Hemorrhagic colitis associated with Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis infection in a captive western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Tatiane A; Malta, Marcelo C C; Soave, Semíramis A; Tinoco, Herlandes P; Costa, Maria E L T; Pessanha, Angela T; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Coura, Fernanda M; Costa, Luciana F; Turchetti, Andreia P; Lobato, Francisco C F; Melo, Marilia M; Heinemann, Marcos B; Santos, Renato L

    2014-04-01

    Enteric diseases are among the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in gorillas, and it is often caused by bacteria. A thirteen-year-old captive female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) developed hemorrhagic diarrhea. Despite the treatment, the animal died 7 days after the onset of clinical signs. The animal was submitted to a thorough pathological and microbiological evaluation. Pathologic examination revealed a severe acute hemorrhagic colitis, neutrophilic splenitis, glomerulitis, and interstitial pneumonia. Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis was isolated from a mesenteric lymph node. A diagnosis of hemorrhagic colitis associated with Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis was established. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Mutant prevention concentration (MPC) of ciprofloxacin against Salmonella enterica of epidemic and poultry origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rafaela; Magnani, Marciane; Souza, Roberta Barreiros; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo; Oliveira, Tereza Cristina Rocha Moreira

    2011-02-01

    Salmonella isolates resistant or with reduced susceptibility to quinolones increased in recent years. The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is a new alternative that can prevent the selection and multiplication of resistant Salmonella spp. strains. The MPC of ciprofloxacin (CipMPC) was evaluated for 312 Salmonella enterica strains of epidemic and poultry origin susceptible and resistant to nalidixic acid (NAL). The CipMPC for NAL-susceptible strains were in the range from 0.002 to 4 μg/ml and for NAL-resistant strains, it ranged from 0.004 to 16 μg/ml. The average MPC/MIC ratio for NAL-resistant strains was higher than NAL susceptible. S. Enteritidis showed the highest CipMPC and the highest MPC/MIC ratio also for NAL-resistant strains and with mutations in gyrA. Serovar Corvallis, a NAL-resistant strain without mutations, and of poultry origin showed the highest CipMPC value. The lowest value was observed for epidemic NAL-susceptible strains serovars Typhimurium and London. The average MPC/MIC ratio for strains with mutations in Aspartate 87 was higher than that mutated in Serine 83. The results show the importance of MPC in determining the correct dosage of Cip for treatment of Salmonella spp.

  4. Cross-Contamination and Biofilm Formation by Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis on Various Cutting Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Stéfani T A; Rossi, Bruna F; Bonsaglia, Erika C R; Castilho, Ivana G; Hernandes, Rodrigo T; Fernandes, Ary; Rall, Vera L M

    2018-02-01

    Cross-contamination is one of the main factors related to foodborne outbreaks. This study aimed to analyze the cross-contamination process of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from poultry to cucumbers, on various cutting board surfaces (plastic, wood, and glass) before and after washing and in the presence and absence of biofilm. Thus, 10 strains of Salmonella Enteritidis were used to test cross-contamination from poultry to the cutting boards and from thereon to cucumbers. Moreover, these strains were evaluated as to their capacity to form biofilm on hydrophobic (wood and plastic) and hydrophilic materials (glass). We recovered the 10 isolates from all unwashed boards and from all cucumbers that had contacted them. After washing, the recovery ranged from 10% to 100%, depending on the board material. In the presence of biofilm, the recovery of salmonellae was 100%, even after washing. Biofilm formation occurred more on wood (60%) and plastic (40%) than glass (10%) boards, demonstrating that bacteria adhered more to a hydrophobic material. It was concluded that the cutting boards represent a critical point in cross-contamination, particularly in the presence of biofilm. Salmonella Enteritidis was able to form a biofilm on these three types of cutting boards but glass showed the least formation.

  5. Bacteremia caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Shio-Shin; Wang, Jen-Yu; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2006-10-01

    Since 1995, there has been a steady increase in the number of reported cases of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) sepsis in Taiwan. Representative Taiwanese survey data from 1996 to 2004 revealed that these adult patients with S. Choleraesuis bacteremia presented with primary bacteremia (57%, especially immunocompromised hosts), mycotic aneurysm (16%), and fever (86%) predominantly. S. Choleraesuis septicemia demonstrated a higher invasion index (with secondary involved sites) than other Salmonella spp. In swine experiments, the inoculation dose of 10(3) colony forming units S. Choleraesuis was cleared without apparent sequelae. Transmission of specific strains (with mutations of GyrA and parC, subsequently resistance to fluoroquinolones) from swine, and the acquisition of genes (CMY-2, AmpC complex) encoding beta-lactamases (with resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins) have been implicated in the evolution of multiresistant phenotypes of S. Choleraesuis. The virulence plasmid of S. Choleraesuis (pSCV), and other genes mediating adhesion to the epithelial cell membrane of the gastrointestinal tract, were considered important pathogenic factors for S. Choleraesuis. Vaccines for domestic animals combined with effective controls on antibiotic use offer the greatest potential to control the increasing impact of S. Choleraesuis on humans.

  6. Typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Saintpaul: an outbreak investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Christensen, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    recovered from production animals. Presence of the O:5 factor and absence of plasmids in human and porcine isolates pointed to pork as the source of infection, whereas human isolates and all Danish isolates from turkeys had the same ribotype, indicating that turkey was the infection source. A possible......During the summer of 1993 an outbreak of human salmonellosis caused by Salmonella serovar Saintpaul occurred in Denmark. A total of 35 isolates originating from pigs, turkeys and imported foodstuffs, and 10 human isolates were compared following their characterization by agglutination of the O:5...

  7. Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky flagella are required for broiler skin adhesion and Caco-2 cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella strains are the main source of pathogenic bacterial contamination in the poultry industry. Recently, Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky has been recognized as the most prominent serovar on carcasses in poultry-processing plants. Previous studies showed that flagella are one...

  8. Emergence and clonal dissemination of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causing salmonellosis in Mauritius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issack, Mohammad I.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Hyytiae-Trees, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: For decades, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has been among the most prevalent serovars reported worldwide. However, it was rarely encountered in Mauritius until 2007; since then the number of non-typhoidal Salmonella serogroup O:9 (including serovar Enteritidis) increased. ...

  9. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajikawa, A.; Satoh, E.; Leer, R.J.; Yamamoto, S.; Igimi, S.

    2007-01-01

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization

  10. Swarm motility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is inhibited by compounds from fruit peel extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadwar, G; Chauhan, K R; Bhagavathy, G V; Murphy, C; Smith, A D; Bhagwat, A A

    2015-04-01

    Controlling spread of human pathogens on fresh produce is a top priority for public health reasons. Isolation of compounds from agricultural waste that would control spread of human pathogens was explored using Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. In the environment, micro-organisms migrate as a 'community' especially when they move on moist surfaces. This type of motility is characterized as swarming motility. We examined extracts from agricultural waste such as soya bean husk, peels of orange, pineapple, avocado and pomegranate for antiswarming activity. Avocado and pineapple peels showed moderate (~40%) inhibition of swarming motility while pomegranate peel extract had high antiswarming activity (~85% inhibition) and was examined in further detail. Although the pomegranate peel extract was acidic, swarm-inhibitory activity was not due to low pH and the peel extract did not inhibit growth of Salmonella. Among the key swarm motility regulatory genes, class II (fliF, fliA, fliT and fliZ) and class III (fliC and fliM) regulators were downregulated upon exposure to pomegranate peel extract. Pomegranate peels offer great potential as a bioactive repellent for pathogenic micro-organisms on moist surfaces. Controlling the spread of food-borne pathogens in moist environments is an important microbial food safety issue. Isolation of compounds from agricultural waste (such as fruit peels) that would control spread of human pathogens was explored using Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Pomegranate peels offer great potential as a bioactive repellent for pathogenic micro-organisms. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. PCR-RFLP Analysis of a fliC Gene Fragment in Avian Salmonella Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Ebrahimvandi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella are a genus of zoonotic bacteria of worldwide economic and health importance. Members of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica are mainly associated with warm-blooded vertebrates and are usually transmitted by ingestion of food or watercontaminated by infected feces. Objectives: The aim of this study was to apply a PCR-RFLP method based on the fliC gene to identify the serotypes of Salmonella isolates from Karaj, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 Salmonella isolates were serotyped by specific antisera. For the PCR-RFLP method based on the fliC gene, extracted DNA was used as the template for amplifying the fliC gene (1500 bp using specific primers. PCR products were subjected to digestion using HhaI restriction endonuclease. Results: This study determined 30 serotypes as Salmonella durban (56.6%, Salmonella uno (23.3%, Salmonella enteritidis (3.3%, Salmonella tinda (3.3%, Salmonella mjimweme (3.3%, Salmonella Thompson (3.3%, Salmonella sIIO8 (3.3 % and Salmonella sIIO7 (3.3%. Observations indicated that HhaI is able to discriminate Salmonella tinda and Salmonella thompson, yet Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella durban and Salmonella mjimweme had the same pattern with this enzyme. Also Salmonella sIIO8, Salmonella sIIO7 and Salmonella uno showed the same pattern. Thus, regarding the size and the number of resulting fragments from this enzyme, four patterns were obtained for HhaI. Conclusion: A large number of Salmonella serotypes need to be analyzed by the PCR-RFLP method and different enzymes must be used to give reliable results.

  12. The antibiotic resistance characteristics of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica isolated from food-producing animals, retail meat and humans in South East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Thi Thu Hao; Nguyen, Hoang Nam Kha; Smooker, Peter M; Coloe, Peter J

    2012-03-15

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global problem. It is most prevalent in developing countries where infectious diseases remain common, the use of antibiotics in humans and animals is widespread, and the replacement of older antibiotics with new generation antibiotics is not easy due to the high cost. Information on antibiotic resistance phenotypes and genotypes of Salmonella spp. in food animals and humans in different countries and geographic regions is necessary to combat the spread of resistance. This will improve the understanding of antibiotic resistance epidemiology, tracing of new emerging pathogens, assisting in disease treatment, and enhancing prudent use of antibiotics. However, the extent of antibiotic resistance in food-borne pathogens and humans in many developing countries remains unknown. The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of antibiotic resistance of non-typhoid Salmonella spp. in food-producing animals, retail meat and humans from South East Asia. It is focused on resistance characteristics of traditional and "critically important" antibiotics in this region, and the emergence of multidrug resistant strains and genetic elements that contribute to the development of multidrug resistance, including integrons and the Salmonella Genomic Island (SGI). Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Chicken mannose-binding lectin function in relation to antibacterial activity towards Salmonella enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich-Lynge, Sofie Louise; Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann

    2015-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a C-type serum lectin of importance in innate immunity. Low serum concentrations of MBL have been associated with greater susceptibility to infections. In this study, binding of purified chicken MBL (cMBL) to Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (S. enterica......) serotypes B, C1 and D was investigated by flow cytometry, and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was used for comparison. For S. enterica the C1 serotypes were the only group to exhibit binding to cMBL. Furthermore, functional studies of the role of cMBL in phagocytosis and complement activation were...... performed. Spiking with cMBL had a dose-dependent effect on the HD11 phagocytic activity of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Montevideo, and a more pronounced effect in a carbohydrate competitive assay. This cMBL dose dependency of opsonophagocytic activity by HD11 cells was not observed for S. aureus...

  14. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various extended-spectrum

  15. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; Essen-Zandbergen, Van Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various

  16. Three New Lactobacillus plantarum Strains in the Probiotic Toolbox against Gut Pathogen Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Potočnjak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of probiotic bacteria have been widely explored. However, fermented foods and digestive system of humans and animals are an inexhaustible source of new potentially probiotic microorganisms. In this study we present three new Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from different dairy products: cow′s cheese, sheep′s cheese and whey. In order to determine the antibacterial activity of yet unexplored L. plantarum strains against Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, in vitro competition and co-culture tests were done. Furthermore, adhesion of these strains to Caco-2 cells and their influence on the adhesion of Salmonella were tested. Results showed the potential probiotic activity of isolated strains. L. plantarum strains survived in the presence of 1 % bile salts, they possessed acidification ability, antibacterial activity and significantly attenuated the growth of S. Typhimurium in brain heart infusion broth. All tested L. plantarum strains were able to adhere to Caco-2 cells and significantly impair the adhesion of S. Typhimurium. All three L. plantarum strains exhibited signifi cant probiotic potential and anti-Salmonella activity; therefore, further testing on in vivo models should follow.

  17. Plant pathogen-induced water-soaking promotes Salmonella enterica growth on tomato leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potnis, Neha; Colee, James; Jones, Jeffrey B; Barak, Jeri D

    2015-12-01

    Plant pathogen infection is a critical factor for the persistence of Salmonella enterica on plants. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of S. enterica on diseased tomato plants by using four diverse bacterial spot Xanthomonas species that differ in disease severities. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and X. gardneri infection fostered S. enterica growth, while X. perforans infection did not induce growth but supported the persistence of S. enterica. X. vesicatoria-infected leaves harbored S. enterica populations similar to those on healthy leaves. Growth of S. enterica was associated with extensive water-soaking and necrosis in X. euvesicatoria- and X. gardneri-infected plants. The contribution of water-soaking to the growth of S. enterica was corroborated by an increased growth of populations on water-saturated leaves in the absence of a plant pathogen. S. enterica aggregates were observed with bacterial spot lesions caused by either X. euvesicatoria or X. vesicatoria; however, more S. enterica aggregates formed on X. euvesicatoria-infected leaves as a result of larger lesion sizes per leaf area and extensive water-soaking. Sparsely distributed lesions caused by X. vesicatoria infection do not support the overall growth of S. enterica or aggregates in areas without lesions or water-soaking; S. enterica was observed as single cells and not aggregates. Thus, pathogen-induced water-soaking and necrosis allow S. enterica to replicate and proliferate on tomato leaves. The finding that the pathogen-induced virulence phenotype affects the fate of S. enterica populations in diseased plants suggests that targeting of plant pathogen disease is important in controlling S. enterica populations on plants. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Horizontal gene transfer of a ColV plasmid has resulted in a dominant avian clonal type of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Johnson

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica continues to be a significant cause of foodborne gastrointestinal illness in humans. A wide variety of Salmonella serovars have been isolated from production birds and from retail poultry meat. Recently, though, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Kentucky has emerged as one of the prominent Salmonella serovars isolated from broiler chickens. Recent work suggests that its emergence apparently coincides with its acquisition of a ColV virulence plasmid. In the present study, we examined 902 Salmonella isolates belonging to 59 different serovars for the presence of this plasmid. Of the serovars examined, the ColV plasmid was found only among isolates belonging to the serovars Kentucky (72.9%, Typhimurium (15.0% and Heidelberg (1.7%. We demonstrated that a single PFGE clonal type of S. Kentucky harbors this plasmid, and acquisition of this plasmid by S. Kentucky significantly increased its ability to colonize the chicken cecum and cause extraintestinal disease. Comparison of the completed sequences of three ColV plasmids from S. Kentucky isolated from different geographical locales, timepoints and sources revealed a nearly identical genetic structure with few single nucleotide changes or insertions/deletions. Overall, it appears that the ColV plasmid was recently acquired by a single clonal type S. Kentucky and confers to its host enhanced colonization and fitness capabilities. Thus, the potential for horizontal gene transfer of virulence and fitness factors to Salmonella from other enteric bacteria exists in poultry, representing a potential human health hazard.

  19. Survival of Salmonella enterica in poultry feed is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Ana; Pendleton, Sean; Zhang, Nan; Chen, Wei; Critzer, Faith; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Feed components have low water activity, making bacterial survival difficult. The mechanisms of Salmonella survival in feed and subsequent colonization of poultry are unknown. The purpose of this research was to compare the ability of Salmonella serovars and strains to survive in broiler feed and to evaluate molecular mechanisms associated with survival and colonization by measuring the expression of genes associated with colonization (hilA, invA) and survival via fatty acid synthesis (cfa, fabA, fabB, fabD). Feed was inoculated with 1 of 15 strains of Salmonella enterica consisting of 11 serovars (Typhimurium, Enteriditis, Kentucky, Seftenburg, Heidelberg, Mbandanka, Newport, Bairely, Javiana, Montevideo, and Infantis). To inoculate feed, cultures were suspended in PBS and survival was evaluated by plating samples onto XLT4 agar plates at specific time points (0 h, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h, 4 d, and 7 d). To evaluate gene expression, RNA was extracted from the samples at the specific time points (0, 4, 8, and 24 h) and gene expression measured with real-time PCR. The largest reduction in Salmonella occurred at the first and third sampling time points (4 h and 4 d) with the average reductions being 1.9 and 1.6 log cfu per g, respectively. For the remaining time points (8 h, 24 h, and 7 d), the average reduction was less than 1 log cfu per g (0.6, 0.4, and 0.6, respectively). Most strains upregulated cfa (cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis) within 8 h, which would modify the fluidity of the cell wall to aid in survival. There was a weak negative correlation between survival and virulence gene expression indicating downregulation to focus energy on other gene expression efforts such as survival-related genes. These data indicate the ability of strains to survive over time in poultry feed was strain dependent and that upregulation of cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis and downregulation of virulence genes were associated with a response to desiccation stress.

  20. Ecology of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica in the primary vegetable production chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, E.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increased concern that plants might be more important as a carrier for human enteric pathogens like E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovars than previously thought. This review summarizes the knowledge available on the ecology of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica in the

  1. The evaluation of a PCR-based method for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes from environmental samples and various food matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Chen, Kai-Shun; Ewing, Laura; Wang, Hua; Agpaoa, Maria C; Huang, Mei-Chiung J; Dickey, Erin; Du, Jamie M; Williams-Hill, Donna M; Hamilton, Brittany; Micallef, Shirley A; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E; George, Ashish; Joseph, Sam W; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobson, Andrew P; Tall, Ben D; Kothary, Mahendra H; Dudley, Kim; Hanes, Darcy E

    2012-09-01

    The most commonly used method for serotyping Salmonella spp. is based on the Kaufmann-White scheme, and is composed of serological reactions using antibodies to LPS agglutinins. The multiplex PCR used in this investigation was established by Kim et al. to serotype the 30 most common clinical Salmonella serotypes, as determined by CDC. The PCR assay consists of two five-plex reactions and a single two-plex PCR reaction, based on six genetic loci from Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and four loci from S. enterica serotype Typhi. In this investigation, we further evaluated the method for serotyping Salmonella spp. using a reference collection, environmental samples collected from a Mid-Atlantic region tomato farm study, four food matrices spiked with different Salmonella serotypes and a proficiency test. The PCR assay was first evaluated using DNA isolated from pure cultures of isolates obtained from various clinical and environmental samples, and then DNA isolated from broth cultures of food matrices of "Red round" and Roma tomatoes, Romaine lettuce, green onions and Serrano peppers spiked with serotypes Newport, Typhimurium, Javiana and Saintpaul, respectively. The results showed that the PCR assay correctly serotyped Salmonella spp. from the clinical, environmental, spiked food matrices, and proficiency test samples. These findings are significant because the PCR assay was successful in the identification of Salmonella in the spiked samples in a broth culture containing other non-salmonella organism. This method may be a useful resource for the food safety community. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis infection associated with pet guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Michael L; Heffernan, Richard T; Wright, Jennifer G; Klos, Rachel F; Monson, Timothy; Khan, Sofiya; Trees, Eija; Sabol, Ashley; Willems, Robert A; Flynn, Raymond; Deasy, Marshall P; Jones, Benjamen; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella causes about one million illnesses annually in the United States. Although most infections result from foodborne exposures, animal contact is an important mode of transmission. We investigated a case of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) sternal osteomyelitis in a previously healthy child who cared for two recently deceased guinea pigs (GPs). A case was defined as SE pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) XbaI pattern JEGX01.0021, BlnI pattern JEGA26.0002 (outbreak strain) infection occurring during 2010 in a patient who reported GP exposure. To locate outbreak strain isolates, PulseNet and the US Department of Agriculture National Veterinary Service Laboratories (NVSL) databases were queried. Outbreak strain isolates underwent multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Traceback and environmental investigations were conducted at homes, stores, and breeder or broker facilities. We detected 10 cases among residents of eight states and four NVSL GP outbreak strain isolates. One patient was hospitalized; none died. The median patient age was 9.5 (range, 1-61) years. Among 10 patients, two purchased GPs at independent stores, and three purchased GPs at different national retail chain (chain A) store locations; three were chain A employees and two reported GP exposures of unknown characterization. MLVA revealed four related patterns. Tracebacks identified four distributors and 92 sources supplying GPs to chain A, including one breeder potentially supplying GPs to all case-associated chain A stores. All environmental samples were Salmonella culture-negative. A definitive SE-contaminated environmental source was not identified. Because GPs can harbor Salmonella, consumers and pet industry personnel should be educated regarding risks.

  3. The consequences of a sudden demographic change on the seroprevalence pattern, virulence genes, identification and characterisation of integron-mediated antibiotic resistance in the Salmonella enterica isolated from clinically diarrhoeic humans in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K M; Hassan, W M M; Mohamed, R A H

    2014-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify and characterise integrons and integrated resistance gene cassettes among eight multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella serovars isolated from humans in Egypt. Virulotyping by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the detection of the presence of virulence genes. Integron PCR was used to detect the presence of class 1 in the MDR strains. The associated individual resistance gene cassettes were identified using specific PCRs. The isolated serovars were Salmonella Grampian (C1; 2/5), Larose (C1; 1/5), Hato (B; 1/5) and Texas (B; 1/5). Among the Salmonella serovars, five Salmonella isolates showed the highest resistance to amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, lincomycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin and trimethoprim (100%), followed by neomycin, norfloxacin and tetracycline (80%), while the lowest resistance was recorded to colistin sulphate and ciprofloxacin in percentages of 20 and 40%, respectively. The invA, avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD and sopB genes were detected in all isolates (100%), while the spvC and gipA genes were totally (100%) absent from all isolates. The remaining three virulence genes were diversely distributed as follows: the bcfC gene was detected in all isolates except Salmonella Hato (80%); the sodC1 gene was detected only in Salmonella Grampian and Salmonella Texas (60%); and the sopE1 gene was detected only in Salmonella Grampian, Hato and Texas (60%). Class 1 integrons were detected in 90% of the MDR isolates, comprising serovars Muenster, Florian, Noya, Grampian, Larose, Hato and Texas. Of the class 1 integron-positive isolates, 45% harboured Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) either right junction or right and left junction having an A-C-S-T phenotype. Of the class 1 integron-positive isolates, 44% harboured integron gene cassette aadA2, while 11% harboured the floR gene present in multidrug resistance flanked by two integrons of SGI1. The results of the present study indicate that

  4. Mapping the Regulatory Network for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Smith

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1 encodes proteins required for invasion of gut epithelial cells. The timing of invasion is tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network. The transcription factor (TF HilD is the master regulator of this process and senses environmental signals associated with invasion. HilD activates transcription of genes within and outside SPI-1, including six other TFs. Thus, the transcriptional program associated with host cell invasion is controlled by at least 7 TFs. However, very few of the regulatory targets are known for these TFs, and the extent of the regulatory network is unclear. In this study, we used complementary genomic approaches to map the direct regulatory targets of all 7 TFs. Our data reveal a highly complex and interconnected network that includes many previously undescribed regulatory targets. Moreover, the network extends well beyond the 7 TFs, due to the inclusion of many additional TFs and noncoding RNAs. By comparing gene expression profiles of regulatory targets for the 7 TFs, we identified many uncharacterized genes that are likely to play direct roles in invasion. We also uncovered cross talk between SPI-1 regulation and other regulatory pathways, which, in turn, identified gene clusters that likely share related functions. Our data are freely available through an intuitive online browser and represent a valuable resource for the bacterial research community.

  5. A multiplex single nucleotide polymorphism typing assay for detecting mutations that result in decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Song, Yajun

    2010-08-01

    OBJECTIVES: Decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones has become a major problem for the successful therapy of human infections caused by Salmonella enterica, especially the life-threatening typhoid and paratyphoid fevers. METHODS: By using Luminex xTAG beads, we developed a rapid, reliable and cost-effective multiplexed genotyping assay for simultaneously detecting 11 mutations in gyrA, gyrB and parE of S. enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A that result in nalidixic acid resistance (Nal(R)) and\\/or decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. RESULTS: This assay yielded unambiguous single nucleotide polymorphism calls on extracted DNA from 292 isolates of Salmonella Typhi (Nal(R) = 223 and Nal(S) = 69) and 106 isolates of Salmonella Paratyphi A (Nal(R) = 24 and Nal(S) = 82). All of the 247 Nal(R) Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A isolates were found to harbour at least one of the target mutations, with GyrA Phe-83 as the most common one (143\\/223 for Salmonella Typhi and 18\\/24 for Salmonella Paratyphi A). We also identified three GyrB mutations in eight Nal(S) Salmonella Typhi isolates (six for GyrB Phe-464, one for GyrB Leu-465 and one for GyrB Asp-466), and mutations GyrB Phe-464 and GyrB Asp-466 seem to be related to the decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility phenotype in Salmonella Typhi. This assay can also be used directly on boiled single colonies. CONCLUSIONS: The assay presented here would be useful for clinical and reference laboratories to rapidly screen quinolone-resistant isolates of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A, and decipher the underlying genetic changes for epidemiological purposes.

  6. Efecto in vitro de la acetamida furánica bromada sobre aislados de Salmonella enterica de aves

    OpenAIRE

    Osmaida Estrada Cutiño; Ana Carvajal; Pedro Rubio Nistal; Lucía Fuentes Jiménez; Mariano Arean Silvera; Manuel Almeida Saavedra; Osvaldo Vallejo Magallanes; Waldo Ramírez Sánchez; Ivan Garcia Zaldívar; Vladimir Barrios González

    2014-01-01

    Dentro del género Salmonella, la especie Salmonella enterica, subsp enterica es una de las de mayor interés por su efecto patógeno sobre los animales. El trabajo se realizó con el objetivo de evaluar el efecto in vitro de la acetamida furánica bromada (AFB) sobre Salmonella enterica aviar. La AFB se obtuvo en el Centro de Bioactivos Químicos de la Universidad Central de las Villas, Cuba. La actividad antimicrobiana del producto sobre los aislados de Salmonella entérica se determinó por el mét...

  7. Analysis of the clonal relationship among clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis by different typing methods Análisis de la relación clonal entre aislamientos clínicos de Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis mediante diferentes métodos de tipificación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Merino

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Infantis has been the second most common serovar in Argentina in the last two years, being isolated mostly from paediatric hospitalised patients. In order to determine the clonal relationship among Salmonella Infantis strains, we examined 15 isolates from paediatric patient faeces in Argentina (12 geographically related and 3 geographically non-related by using antimicrobial susceptibility, plasmid profiling, repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC PCR, and low-frequency restriction analysis of chromosomal DNA by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Four Spanish strains were included as controls of clonal diversity in molecular techniques. Antibiotype and plasmid profile was not useful as epidemiological tools. PFGE and REP-PCR were able to discriminate between Argentinean and Spanish isolates of Salmonella Infantis allowing to detect genetically related strains in three different cities. This finding indicates that a possible spread of a clone of this serovar in the North-eastern Region of Argentina has taken place in 1998.Salmonella Infantis ha sido el segundo serovar más común en la Argentina en los últimos dos años, siendo aislada principalmente, a partir de pacientes pediátricos hospitalizados. La relación clonal entre 15 aislamientos de Salmonella Infantis obtenidos de heces de pacientes pediátricos en Argentina se estudió mediante la susceptibilidad antimicrobiana, el perfil plasmídico, amplificación por reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR de las secuencias repetitivas REP y ERIC, y electroforesis de ADN total en campo pulsátil (PFGE. Cuatro cepas españolas fueron incluidas como control de diversidad clonal. El antibiotipo y el perfil plasmídico no fueron herramientas útiles en la tipificación. PFGE y REP-PCR fueron capaces de discriminar entre las cepas argentinas y españolas de Salmonella Infantis, permitiendo detectar cepas gen

  8. Genomic Signature of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates Related to a Massive Outbreak in Zambia between 2010 and 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    ). The isolates belonged to MLST ST1 and a new variant of the haplotype, H58B. Most isolates contained a chromosomally translocated region containing seven antimicrobial resistance genes, catA1, blaTEM-1, dfrA7, sul1, sul2, strA, and strB, and fragments of the incompatibility group Q1 (IncQ1) plasmid replicon...

  9. Phylogenomic analysis identifies gene gains that define Salmonella enterica subspecies I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienau, E Kurt; Blazar, Jeffrey M; Wang, Charles; Brown, Eric W; Stones, Robert; Musser, Steven; Allard, Marc W

    2013-01-01

    Comparative methods for analyzing whole genome sequence (WGS) data enable us to assess the genetic information available for reconstructing the evolutionary history of pathogens. We used the comparative approach to determine diagnostic genes for Salmonella enterica subspecies I. S. enterica subsp. I strains are known to infect warm-blooded organisms regularly while its close relatives tend to infect only cold-blooded organisms. We found 71 genes gained by the common ancestor of Salmonella enterica subspecies I and not subsequently lost by any member of this subspecies sequenced to date. These genes included many putative functional phenotypes. Twenty-seven of these genes are found only in Salmonella enterica subspecies I; we designed primers to test these genes for use as diagnostic sequence targets and data mined the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA) database for draft genomes which carried these genes. We found that the sequence specificity and variability of these amplicons can be used to detect and discriminate among 317 different serovars and strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies I.

  10. An outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in goitered gazelle (Gazella subgutrosa subgutrosa) and a Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Tiffany M; Wünschmann, Arno; Morningstar-Shaw, Brenda; Pantlin, Gayle C; Rasmussen, James M; Thompson, Rachel L

    2011-12-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis enteritis occurred in two juvenile goitered gazelles and an adult Malayan tapir over a period of 5 wk at the Minnesota Zoo. Diagnosis was made postmortem on one gazelle and one tapir, and a second gazelle was diagnosed via fecal culture. The death of the tapir was attributed to S. enterica serovar Choleraesuis septicemia, while salmonellosis was considered to be a contributing factor besides ostertagiasis for the death of one goitered gazelle and for the diarrhea of another goitered gazelle. A third gazelle became ill in the same time period, but Salmonella infection was not confirmed by culture. All exhibited the clinical signs of profuse, watery diarrhea. The gazelles developed a protein-losing enteropathy, and the tapir showed signs of sepsis and endotoxemia. Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed the Salmonella isolates to be indistinguishable from each other. One year prior to this outbreak, Salmonella sp. was cultured from a Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons) housed in the same building as the tapir. After further investigation into the outbreak, spread of this pathogen was speculated to be associated with human movement across animal areas.

  11. Expression of hilA in response to mild acid stress in Salmonella enterica is serovar and strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gil, Francisco; Le Bolloch, Alexandre; Pendleton, Sean; Zhang, Nan; Wallis, Audra; Hanning, Irene

    2012-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of foodborne illness with poultry and poultry products being primary sources of infection. The 2 most common S. enterica serovars associated with human infection are Typhimurium and Enteritidis. However, Kentucky and Heidelburg and the 2 most prevalent serovars isolated from poultry environments. Given the prevalence of other serovars in poultry products and environments, research is needed to understand virulence modulation in response to stress in serovars other than Typhimurium and Enteritidis. Thus, the objective of this research was to compare hilA gene expression (a master regulator of the virulence pathogenicity island) in response to acid stress among different strains and serovars of Salmonella. A total of 11 serovars consisting of 15 strains of S. enterica were utilized for these experiments. Cultures were suspended in tryptic soy broth (TSB) adjusted to pH 7.2, 6.2, or 5.5 with HCl or acetic acid. Total RNA was extracted from cultures at specific time points (0, 2, 4, and 24 h). Gene expression of hilA was measured with quantitative reverse transcriptase real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Growth and pH were measured throughout the 24 h time frame. Regulation of hilA in response to acid stress varied by serovar and strain and type of acid. The results of these experiments indicate that hilA regulation may have some impact on virulence and colonization of S. enterica. However, these results warrant further research to more fully understand the significance of hilA regulation in response to mild acid stress in S. enterica. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Role of soil, crop debris, and a plant pathogen in Salmonella enterica contamination of tomato plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeri D Barak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the U.S., tomatoes have become the most implicated vehicle for produce-associated Salmonellosis with 12 outbreaks since 1998. Although unconfirmed, trace backs suggest pre-harvest contamination with Salmonella enterica. Routes of tomato crop contamination by S. enterica in the absence of direct artificial inoculation have not been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work examined the role of contaminated soil, the potential for crop debris to act as inoculum from one crop to the next, and any interaction between the seedbourne plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and S. enterica on tomato plants. Our results show S. enterica can survive for up to six weeks in fallow soil with the ability to contaminate tomato plants. We found S. enterica can contaminate a subsequent crop via crop debris; however a fallow period between crop incorporation and subsequent seeding can affect contamination patterns. Throughout these studies, populations of S. enterica declined over time and there was no bacterial growth in either the phyllosphere or rhizoplane. The presence of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria on co-colonized tomato plants had no effect on the incidence of S. enterica tomato phyllosphere contamination. However, growth of S. enterica in the tomato phyllosphere occurred on co-colonized plants in the absence of plant disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: S. enterica contaminated soil can lead to contamination of the tomato phyllosphere. A six week lag period between soil contamination and tomato seeding did not deter subsequent crop contamination. In the absence of plant disease, presence of the bacterial plant pathogen, X. campestris pv. vesicatoria was beneficial to S. enterica allowing multiplication of the human pathogen population. Any event leading to soil contamination with S. enterica could pose a public health risk with subsequent tomato production, especially in areas prone to bacterial spot disease.

  13. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strategies for Host Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Anderson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens must sense and respond to newly encountered host environments to regulate the expression of critical virulence factors that allow for niche adaptation and successful colonization. Among bacterial pathogens, non-typhoidal serovars of Salmonella enterica, such as serovar Typhimurium (S. Tm, are a primary cause of foodborne illnesses that lead to hospitalizations and deaths worldwide. S. Tm causes acute inflammatory diarrhea that can progress to invasive systemic disease in susceptible patients. The gastrointestinal tract and intramacrophage environments are two critically important niches during S. Tm infection, and each presents unique challenges to limit S. Tm growth. The intestinal tract is home to billions of commensal microbes, termed the microbiota, which limits the amount of available nutrients for invading pathogens such as S. Tm. Therefore, S. Tm encodes strategies to manipulate the commensal population and side-step this nutritional competition. During subsequent stages of disease, S. Tm resists host immune cell mechanisms of killing. Host cells use antimicrobial peptides, acidification of vacuoles, and nutrient limitation to kill phagocytosed microbes, and yet S. Tm is able to subvert these defense systems. In this review, we discuss recently described molecular mechanisms that S. Tm uses to outcompete the resident microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract. S. Tm directly eliminates close competitors via bacterial cell-to-cell contact as well as by stimulating a host immune response to eliminate specific members of the microbiota. Additionally, S. Tm tightly regulates the expression of key virulence factors that enable S. Tm to withstand host immune defenses within macrophages. Additionally, we highlight the chemical and physical signals that S. Tm senses as cues to adapt to each of these environments. These strategies ultimately allow S. Tm to successfully adapt to these two disparate host environments. It is

  14. The locus of heat resistance (LHR) mediates heat resistance in Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Ryan G; Walker, Brian D; Yang, Xianqin; McMullen, Lynn M; Gänzle, Michael G

    2017-06-01

    Enterobacteriaceae comprise food spoilage organisms as well as food-borne pathogens including Escherichia coli. Heat resistance in E. coli was attributed to a genomic island called the locus of heat resistance (LHR). This genomic island is also present in several other genera of Enterobacteriaceae, but its function in the enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica and Enterobacter cloacae is unknown. This study aimed to determine the frequency of the LHR in food isolates of E. coli, and its influence on heat resistance in S. enterica and Enterobacter spp. Cell counts of LHR-positive strains of E. coli, S. enterica and E. cloacae were reduced by less than 1, 1, and 4 log (cfu/mL), respectively, after exposure to 60 °C for 5 min, while cell counts of LHR-negative strains of the same species were reduced by more than 7 log (cfu/mL). Introducing an exogenous copy of the LHR into heat-sensitive enteropathogenic E. coli and S. enterica increased heat resistance to a level that was comparable to LHR-positive wild type strains. Cell counts of LHR-positive S. enterica were reduced by less than 1 log(cfu/mL) after heating to 60 °C for 5 min. Survival of LHR-positive strains was improved by increasing the NaCl concentration from 0 to 4%. Cell counts of LHR-positive strains of E. coli and S. enterica were reduced by less than 2 log (cfu/g) in ground beef patties cooked to an internal core temperature of 71 °C. This study indicates that LHR-positive Enterobacteriaceae pose a risk to food safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. ramR mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucheron, Sylvie; Le Hello, Simon; Doublet, Benoît; Giraud, Etienne; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2013-01-01

    A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n = 27), covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this efflux system. Ciprofloxacin resistance in serovar Kentucky ST198 is thus currently mainly due to multiple target gene mutations.

  16. ramR Mutations Affecting Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Epidemic Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky ST198

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eCloeckaert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n=30, covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this efflux system. Ciprofloxacin resistance in serovar Kentucky ST198 is thus currently mainly due to multiple target gene mutations.

  17. Multiplex PCR-Based Serogrouping and Serotyping of Salmonella enterica from Tonsil and Jejunum with Jejunal Lymph Nodes of Slaughtered Swine in Metro Manila, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kamela Charmaine S; Rivera, Windell L

    2015-05-01

    Food poisoning outbreaks and livestock mortalities caused by Salmonella enterica are widespread in the Philippines, with hogs being the most commonly recognized carriers of the pathogen. To prevent and control the occurrence of S. enterica infection in the country, methods were used in this study to isolate and rapidly detect, differentiate, and characterize S. enterica in tonsils and jejuna with jejunal lymph nodes of swine slaughtered in four locally registered meat establishments (LRMEs) and four meat establishments accredited by the National Meat Inspection Services in Metro Manila. A total of 480 samples were collected from 240 animals (120 pigs from each type of meat establishment). A significantly higher proportion of pigs were positive for S. enterica in LRMEs (60 of 120) compared with meat establishments accredited by the National Meat Inspection Services (38 of 120). More S. enterica-positive samples were found in tonsils compared with jejuna with jejunal lymph nodes in LRMEs, but this difference was not significant. A PCR assay targeting the invA gene had sensitivity that was statistically similar to that of the culture method, detecting 93 of 98 culture-confirmed samples. Multiplex PCR-based O-serogrouping and H/Sdf I typing revealed four S. enterica serogroups (B, C1, D, and E) and six serotypes (Agona, Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Typhimurium, and Weltevreden), respectively, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the PCR products. This study was the first to report detection of S. enterica serotype Agona in the country.

  18. Development and evaluation of DNA and RNA real-time assays for food analysis using the hilA gene of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Evonne M; Burgess, Catherine M; O'Regan, Edel; McGuinness, Sheila; Barry, Thomas; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was the development of DNA and RNA real-time PCR methods for detection of food-borne Salmonella sp. as rapid alternatives to the traditional cultural method (ISO 6579, 2004) in fresh meat carcasses and processed meat samples. These PCR methods were based on the hilA sequence, with primers and hybridisation probes designed against this gene target. The primers and probes were evaluated for their efficiency and dynamic range and subsequently the specificity of the assay was tested using 106 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains and 30 non-salmonellae strains. An internal amplification control (IAC) was also developed for incorporation. The optimum copy number of IAC was determined to be 500 copies per reaction. A complementary enrichment protocol was adapted from the existing standard ISO 6579:2004 and consisted of enrichment in Buffered Peptone Water (BPW) 22 ± 2 h and a second selective enrichment for 6 h in Rappaport Vassiliadis with Soya (RVS). The DNA and RNA-based real-time PCR protocols, were applied to meat samples inoculated with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains, including swabs from meat carcasses and minced beef samples which were heat treated or frozen. The developed methods have the potential as useful alternatives to the standard ISO 6579:2004 method for the detection of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica on carcass swabs and raw meat using hilA as a target. The DNA assay is a useful tool for the screening of meat samples in the abattoir within 3 days of slaughter or in a food production process and the RNA-based assay has the potential to detect viable Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica in ready-to-eat products. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular and epidemiologic analysis of a county-wide outbreak caused by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis traced to a bakery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Po-Liang

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increase in the number of attendees due to acute gastroenteritis and fever was noted at one hospital emergency room in Taiwan over a seven-day period from July to August, 2001. Molecular and epidemiological surveys were performed to trace the possible source of infection. Methods An epidemiological investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of the outbreak. Stool and blood samples were collected according to standard protocols per Center for Disease Control, Taiwan. Typing of the Salmonella isolates from stool, blood, and food samples was performed with serotyping, antibiotypes, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE following XbaI restriction enzyme digestion. Results Comparison of the number of patients with and without acute gastroenteritis (506 and 4467, respectively during the six weeks before the outbreak week revealed a significant increase in the number of patients during the outbreak week (162 and 942, respectively (relative risk (RR: 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.22–1.70, P value Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis was isolated from the stool samples of 28 of 32 individuals and from a recalled bread sample. All S. Enteritidis isolates were of the same antibiogram. PFGE typing revealed that all except two of the clinical isolates and the bread isolates were of the same DNA macrorestriction pattern. Conclusions The egg-covered bread contaminated with S. Enteritidis was confirmed as the vehicle of infection. Alertness in the emergency room, surveillance by the microbiology laboratory, prompt and thorough investigation to trace the source of outbreaks, and institution of appropriate control measures provide effective control of community outbreaks.

  20. Molecular and epidemiologic analysis of a county-wide outbreak caused by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis traced to a bakery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Po-Liang; Hwang, In-Jane; Tung, Ya-Lina; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Lin, Chun-Lu; Siu, LK

    2004-01-01

    Background An increase in the number of attendees due to acute gastroenteritis and fever was noted at one hospital emergency room in Taiwan over a seven-day period from July to August, 2001. Molecular and epidemiological surveys were performed to trace the possible source of infection. Methods An epidemiological investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of the outbreak. Stool and blood samples were collected according to standard protocols per Center for Disease Control, Taiwan. Typing of the Salmonella isolates from stool, blood, and food samples was performed with serotyping, antibiotypes, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) following XbaI restriction enzyme digestion. Results Comparison of the number of patients with and without acute gastroenteritis (506 and 4467, respectively) during the six weeks before the outbreak week revealed a significant increase in the number of patients during the outbreak week (162 and 942, respectively) (relative risk (RR): 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22–1.70, P value bakery and were distributed to six different traditional Chinese markets., Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) was isolated from the stool samples of 28 of 32 individuals and from a recalled bread sample. All S. Enteritidis isolates were of the same antibiogram. PFGE typing revealed that all except two of the clinical isolates and the bread isolates were of the same DNA macrorestriction pattern. Conclusions The egg-covered bread contaminated with S. Enteritidis was confirmed as the vehicle of infection. Alertness in the emergency room, surveillance by the microbiology laboratory, prompt and thorough investigation to trace the source of outbreaks, and institution of appropriate control measures provide effective control of community outbreaks. PMID:15541186

  1. Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis causing mixed infections in febrile children in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García V

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanesa García,1 Inácio Mandomando,2,3 Joaquim Ruiz,4 Silvia Herrera-León,5 Pedro L Alonso,3,4 M Rosario Rodicio1 1Departamento de Biología Funcional, Área de Microbiología, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; 2Centro de Investigação em Saúde de Manhiça, 3Instituto Nacional de Saúde, Ministério da Saúde, Maputo, Mozambique; 4ISGlobal, Barcelona Centre for International Health Research, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 5Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain Background and purpose: Invasive nontyphoidal salmonellosis, mostly caused by serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis of Salmonella enterica, has emerged as a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was the clinical and microbiological characterization of nontyphoidal salmonellosis episodes affecting febrile children in Mozambique. Patients and methods: The clinical records of the patients were evaluated, and S. enterica isolates were characterized with regard to serovar, phage type, antimicrobial resistance (phenotype/responsible genes, plasmid content, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing. Results: Fifteen S. Typhimurium and 21 S. Enteritidis isolates were recovered from blood samples of 25 children, the majority with underlying risk factors. With regard to phage typing, most isolates were either untypeable or reacted but did not conform, revealing that a number of previously unrecognized patterns are circulating in Mozambique. Most isolates were multidrug-resistant, with nearly all of the responsible genes located on derivatives of serovar-specific virulence plasmids. ST313 and ST11 were the predominant sequence types associated with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, respectively, and the uncommon ST1479 was also detected in S. Enteritidis. A distinct XbaI fragment of ~350 kb was associated with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of

  2. Assessing the ability of Salmonella enterica to translocate Type III effectors into plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica, a human enteric pathogen, has the ability to multiply and survive endophytically in plants, and mutations in genes encoding the type III secretion system (T3SS) or its effectors (T3Es) may contribute to this colonization. Two reporter plasmids for T3E translocation into plant ce...

  3. Effects of Pseudomonas chlororaphis and gaseous chlorine dioxide on the survival of Salmonella enterica on tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Produce contamination incited by Salmonella enterica serovars on tomatoes and various outbreaks of Salmonellisis have been reported periodically. Post-harvest intervention measures applied to limit produce contamination will improve food and consumer safety. The aim of this reserach was to evaluat...

  4. Multiple environmental stress tests show no common phenotypes shared among contemporary epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Su; Besser, Thomas E; Hancock, Dale D; Call, Douglas R

    2007-05-01

    Phenotypic traits of coexisting epidemic and nonepidemic strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Newport were compared. Different stress conditions were relatively more or less favorable for the epidemic strains. Transcriptional analysis identified specific upregulated genes during defined stress conditions, but there were no common traits shared by epidemic serovars.

  5. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, T David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304546313; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain

  6. Occurrence of integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes among Salmonella enterica from Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peirano, G.; Agersø, Yvonne; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance genes and role of integrons among 135 anti microbial-resistant Salmonella enterica from Brazil. Methods: The presence of antimicrobial resistance genes, class 1 and 2 integrons and gene cassettes was analysed by PCR and sequencing...

  7. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three mutants on the smoo...

  8. Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica Serotypes and Food Commodities, United States, 1998- 2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-09

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ study, Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica Serotypes and Food Commodities, United States, 1998- 2008.  Created: 9/9/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/9/2013.

  9. Genetic and phenotypic evidence of the Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis human-animal interface in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio eRetamal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a worldwide zoonotic agent that has been recognized as a very important food-borne bacterial pathogen, mainly associated with consumption of poultry products. The aim of this work was to determine genotypic and phenotypic evidence of S. Enteritidis transmission among seabirds, poultry and humans in Chile. Genotyping was performed using PCR-based virulotyping, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. Pathogenicity-associated phenotypes were determined with survival to free radicals, acidic pH, starvation, antimicrobial resistance, and survival within human dendritic cells. As result of PCR and PFGE assays, some isolates from the three hosts showed identical genotypic patterns, and through MLST it was determined that all of them belong to sequence type 11. Results of phenotypic assays showed diversity of survival capabilities among isolates. When results were analyzed according to bacterial host, statistical differences were identified in starvation and dendritic cells survival assays. In addition, isolates from seabirds showed the highest rates of resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline and ampicillin. Overall, the very close genetic and phenotypic traits shown by isolates from humans, poultry and seabirds suggest the inter-species transmission of S. Enteritidis bacteria between hosts, likely through anthropogenic environmental contamination that determines infection of seabirds with bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for other susceptible organism, including humans.

  10. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A

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    Sylvie eBaucheron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e. in gyrA, gyrB, or parC correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications.

  11. Salmonella enterica: un aliado en la terapia contra el cáncer

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    Hilda Chávez-Navarro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica es una especie de bacterias anaeróbicas facultativas que han sido empleadas con gran éxito como vector bacteriano vivo atenuado con fines vacunales. Recientemente se ha documentado que S. enterica tiene propiedades importantes para ser considerada como agente terapéutico contra el cáncer. Estudios preclínicos y clínicos han demostrado que S. enterica coloniza tumores sólidos, semisólidos y metástasis, además de que contribuye a disminuir la resistencia a los tratamientos. En esta revisión se aborda la capacidad de S. enterica atenuada para eliminar células tumorales y su empleo como vector bacteriano vivo acarreador de moléculas heterólogas contra el cáncer.

  12. "Multiplex PCR" identification of the atypical and monophasic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype 1,4,[5],12:i:- in São Paulo State, Brazil: frequency and antibiotic resistance patterns Identificação por "Multiplex PCR" do sorotipo monofásico e atípico Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica sorotipo 1,4,[5],12:i:-, no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil: freqüência e resistência antimicrobiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana T. Tavechio

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella spp. are the etiologic agents of salmonellosis, a worldwide spread zoonoses causing foodborne outbreaks and clinical diseases. By serological identification, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype 1,4,[5],12:i:- accounted for 8.8% of human and 1.6% of nonhuman Salmonella strains isolated in São Paulo State, during 1991-2000. A total of 28.6% of them amplified a fragment corresponding to H:1,2 (flagellar phase two through PCR analysis and were further assigned as S. Typhimurium. Antimicrobial resistance was detected in 36.3% of the 369 PCR-negative strains tested, including the multiresistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, tetracycline, and streptomycin.Salmonella spp. é o agente etiológico da salmonelose, zoonose mundialmente distribuída e responsável por surtos de doenças transmitidas por alimentos e doenças clínicas. Sorologicamente, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica sorotipo 1,4,[5],12:i:- correspondeu a 8,8% e 1,6% das cepas de Salmonella de origem humana e não-humana, respectivamente, isoladas no Estado de São Paulo, no decênio 1991-2000. Aproximadamente 28,6% destas cepas amplificaram o fragmento correspondente a H:1,2 (fase flagelar dois em testes de PCR e foram, então, identificadas como S. Typhimurium. Das 369 cepas negativas em PCR, 36,3% apresentou resistência antimicrobiana, incluindo multirresistência a ampicilina, cloranfenicol, sulfonamidas, tetraciclina e estreptomicina.

  13. Systemic and mucosal immunity induced by attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing ORF7 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young Woo; Kim, Seong Bum; Rahman, Masudur; Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Lee, Byung Min; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Ki In; Hong, Jin Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Eo, Seong Kug

    2011-07-01

    Oral administration of attenuated Salmonella vaccine may provide valuable advantages such as low cost, easy preparation, and safety. Attenuated Salmonella vaccines also serve as carriers of foreign antigens and immunomodulatory cytokines. Presently, an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain was used as a carrier for open reading frame 7 (ORF7) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a swine pathogen of significant global economic importance. Initially, an attenuated S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing ORF7 gene derived from PRRSV Korean isolate was constructed. Following oral administration of a single dose of the attenuated Salmonella vaccine expressing PRRSV ORF7, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses specific for ORF7 were induced at both systemic and mucosal sites including spleen, mesenteric lymph node, Peyer's patch, and laminar propria, as evaluated by determining serum ORF7-specific IgG and mucosal IgA responses, as well as Th1- and Th2-type cytokine production from antigen-stimulated T cells. The induced humoral responses were sustained for at least 12weeks post-immunization. In particular, the immunized mice displayed immune responses to both the foreign ORF7 antigen and Salmonella itself. The results indicate the value of attenuated S. enterica serovar Typhimurium as an oral carrier of PRRSV antigenic proteins to induce effective systemic and mucosal immunity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and fimbrial genotype distribution of poultry Salmonella isolates in China (2006 to 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jiansen; Zhang, Jinqiu; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Chunhong; Yu, Yan; Liu, Xuexian; Kelly, Patrick; Xu, Bu; Wang, Chengming

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a total of 323 Salmonella enterica strains were isolated from 3,566 rectal swab samples of 51 poultry farms in seven regions of 12 provinces of China between 2006 and 2012. The prevalences of Salmonella sp. carriage were 12.4% in geese (66 positive/533 samples), 10.4% in turkeys (32/309), 9.8% in chickens (167/1,706), 6.8% in ducks (41/601), and 4.1% in pigeons (17/417), respectively. These isolates belonged to 20 serovars, in which the most frequent serovars were S. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Pullorum (herein, S. Pullorum) (55 isolates, 17.0%), S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (50 isolates, 15.5%), and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis (39 isolates, 12.1%). Overall, S. Typhimurium was the most commonly detected serovar; among the individual species, S. Pullorum was most commonly isolated from chickens, S. Enteritidis was most common in ducks, S. Typhimurium was most common in geese and pigeons, and S. enterica serovar Saintpaul was most common in turkeys. PCR determination of 20 fimbrial genes demonstrated the presence of bcfD, csgA, fimA, stdB, and sthE genes and the absence of staA and stgA genes in these isolates, and other loci were variably distributed, with frequency values ranging from 11.8 to 99.1%. These 323 Salmonella isolates were subdivided into 41 different fimbrial genotypes, and of these isolate, 285 strains (88.2%) had 12 to 14 fimbrial genes. Our findings indicated that the Salmonella isolates from different poultry species were phenotypically and genetically diverse and that some fimbrial genes are more frequently associated with serovars or serogroups.

  15. Co-occurrence of ACSSuT and cephalosporin resistance phenotypes is mediated by int1-associated elements in nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica from human infections in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Maria Jorge; Palomo, Gonzalo; Hormeño, Lorena; Ugarte, María; Porrero, María Concepción; Herrera-León, Silvia; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Quesada, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    A screening of antimicrobial resistance and its genetic determinants has been performed on 300 Salmonella enterica isolates collected during 2004-2008 from human infections in Spain. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis were the major serotypes, which were found with similar frequencies covering 80% of the bacterial collection. Salmonella Typhimurium isolates frequently shared low susceptibility to antimicrobials of the penta-resistance phenotype (ACSSuT) and/or cephalosporin resistance. The ACSSuT profile was found closely linked to int1-associated gene cassettes, with major elements carrying DNA fragments of 1.0 Kb (aadA2 gene) plus 1.2 Kb (blaPSE-1 gene) or 2.0 Kb (aadA1 and blaOXA-1 genes). Among these, ACSSuT and cephalosporin resistances were associated in Salmonella Typhimurium isolates expressing the blaOXA gene. β-lactamase activities were also detected from isolates carrying blaTEM, blaCMY, or blaSHV, although only the two last genes expressed extended-spectrum β-lactamases. The clonal analysis of S. enterica strains suggests that both horizontal and vertical transfer mechanisms are involved in the wide dissemination of their antimicrobial resistance.

  16. Reinterpreting a community outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in the light of molecular typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastasi Antonino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In November 2005, a large outbreak due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis was observed within children who had eaten their meals at 53 school cafeterias in Florence and the surrounding area. A total of 154 isolates of S. Enteritidis were recovered from human cases between November 2005 and January 2006. All strains were assigned phage type 8 (PT8 and a common XbaI pulsotype. This paper reports the findings of a molecular epidemiological investigation performed on 124 strains of S. Enteritidis isolated in the years 2005 and 2006 in Florence and the surrounding area, including the epidemic isolates. Methods One hundred twenty-four human isolates of S. Enteritidis identified in the period January 2005 – December 2006 were submitted to molecular typing by single enzyme – amplified fragment length polymorphism (SE-AFLP. Results Molecular subtyping by SE-AFLP yielded five different profiles. In the pre-epidemic phase, type A included 78.4% of isolates, whereas only three (8.1% belonged to type C. All isolates, but one, of the epidemic phase were indistinguishable and attributed to type C. In the post-epidemic period, a polymorphic pattern of SE-AFLP types was again recognized but type C accounted for 73.3% of the isolates during the first six months of 2006, whereas during the remaining six months type A regained the first place, including 52.0% of the isolates. Conclusion The epidemic event was attributed to the emergence and clonal expansion of a strain of S. Enteritidis PT8-SE-AFLP type C. Circulation of the epidemic clone was much more extensive than the surveillance and traditional laboratory data demonstrated.

  17. Genetic lineages of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky spreading in pet reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zając, Magdalena; Wasyl, Dariusz; Hoszowski, Andrzej; Le Hello, Simon; Szulowski, Krzysztof

    2013-10-25

    The purpose of the study was to define genetic diversity of reptilian Salmonella enterica serovar (S.) Kentucky isolates and their epidemiological relations to the ones from poultry, food, and environmental origin in Poland. Between 2010 and 2012 twenty-four S. Kentucky isolates derived from snakes (N=8), geckos (N=7), chameleons (N=4), agamas (N=1), lizard (N=1), and environmental swabs taken from reptile exhibition (N=3) were identified. They were characterized with antimicrobial minimal inhibitory concentration testing, XbaI-PFGE and MLST typing. The profiles compared to S. Kentucky available in BioNumerics local laboratory database (N=40) showed 67.3% of relatedness among reptile isolates. Three genetic lineages were defined. The first lineage gathered 20 reptile isolates with 83.4% of similarity and wild-type MICs for all antimicrobials tested but streptomycin in single case. The remaining three reptilian and one post-exhibition environment S. Kentucky isolates were clustered (87.2%) with isolates originating from poultry, mainly turkey, food, and environment and presented variable non-wild type MICs to numerous antimicrobials. The third S. Kentucky lineage was composed of two isolates from feed (96.3%). The results suggest diverse sources and independent routes of infection. Most of the isolates belonged to reptile-associated clones spread both horizontally and vertically. Simultaneously, PFGE profiles and MLST type indistinguishable from the ones observed in poultry point out carnivore reptiles as possible vector of infection with multidrug and high-level ciprofloxacin resistant (MIC≥8 mg/L) S. Kentucky. Public awareness and education are required to prevent potential reptile-associated S. Kentucky infections in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biocontrol of the internalization of Salmonella enterica and Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli in mung bean sprouts with an endophytic Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhenyu; Mustapha, Azlin; Lin, Mengshi; Zheng, Guolu

    2017-06-05

    Internalization of Salmonella enterica and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in seed sprouts poses a health risk to consumers, and the conventional sanitization methods are not always effective to reduce this risk. This study initiated a biocontrol approach to limit the internalization using endophytic Bacillus subtilis strains, which were isolated from the inner tissue of mung bean seeds or lettuce stems. By using the deferred agar method, 12 strains of B. subtilis out of 94 putative Bacillus isolates displayed inhibitory activity against at least one of the pathogenic indicators, S. enterica Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and E. coli O157:H7 505B. Two B. subtilis isolates (LCA1 and M24) showed a broad inhibitory spectrum against multiple strains of S. enterica and EHEC, Staphylococcus aureus sp., Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 700603, and Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, while the laboratory B. subtilis strain 168 was only moderately inhibitory against L. monocytogenes. To facilitate the tracking of the three B. subtilis strains (LCA1, M24, and 168) in the mung bean sprouts, the three strains were genetically engineered to carry the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat), generating the strains LCA1-cat, M24-cat, and 168-cat, respectively. Data of the study using the cat-tagged strains demonstrated that both the two vegetable-associated and the laboratory B. subtilis strains could internalize in mung bean sprouts during the sprouting, but the latter displayed about 1.2 lg CFU/g of seeds lower in internalization. Overall, the presence of the three B. subtilis strains could significantly reduce the internalization of S. enterica or EHEC cocktail in mung bean sprouts during the sprouting. Among them, LCA1 showed the greatest inhibition against the EHEC cocktails with a reduction of about 2.0lg CFU/g of seeds by the end of sprouting (day 5), while 168 had the smallest reduction at about 0.6lg CFU/g of seeds. In addition, the three strains demonstrated a similar

  19. ESTUDIO DE INOCUIDAD DE Salmonella enterica, SUBESPECIE enterica, SEROTIPO ENTERITIDIS, VAR. DANYSZ, LISINA NEGATIVA EN POLLOS PARRILLEROS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez A., Natalia; Práctica privada.; Icochea D’A., Eliana; Laboratorio de Patología Aviar, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.; Calle E., Sonia; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.; Noé M., Norma; Laboratorio de Medicina Veterinaria Preventiva, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.

    2012-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica, serotipe Enteritidis, var Danysz, negative lysine is used as a component in a product for biological control of rodents. The present study evaluated the innocuosness of the strain in 120 1-day old Cobb Vantress broiler chicks of both sexes. They were divided into 3 groups: Group A was fed at 5, 6 and 7 days of age with a commercial broiler feed containing 20% of the rat poison, Group B received 1 ml containing 108 CFU of the bacteria in the crop at 8 days of age, and ...

  20. Longitudinal prevalence, faecal shedding and molecular characterisation of Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella enterica in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rongchang; Jacobson, Caroline; Gardner, Graham; Carmichael, Ian; Campbell, Angus J D; Ryan, Una

    2014-11-01

    Faecal excretion of Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella enterica in sheep in Australia was determined using a quantitative multiplex PCR (qPCR) targeting the Campylobacter spp. purine biosynthesis gene (PurA) and the S. enterica outer membrane protein (ompF). The mutiplex qPCR was specific and Campylobacter spp. and S. enterica were each detected with a sensitivity of 5 organisms/µL faecal DNA extract. This multiplex qPCR was used to determine the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter spp. and S. enterica in 3412 faecal samples collected from 1189 lambs on eight farms across South Australia (n = 2 farms), New South Wales (n = 1), Victoria (n = 2) and Western Australia (n = 3) at three sampling periods (weaning, post-weaning and pre-slaughter). The overall prevalences of Campylobacter spp. and S. enterica were 13.3% and 5.0%, respectively, with the highest prevalence for Campylobacter spp. in South Australia and the highest prevalence for S. enterica in New South Wales. Campylobacter jejuni was the only Campylobacter sp. identified from a subset of 120 positive samples sequenced at the 16S locus. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was the only serovar of S. enterica identified from a subset of 120 positive samples sequenced at the ompF locus. Across all states, Campylobacter spp. had the highest median bacterial concentration in faeces at weaning and post-weaning (medians of 3.4 × 10(6) and 1.1 × 10(5), respectively), whereas S. enterica had the highest median bacterial concentration at pre-slaughter (1.8 × 10(5)/g faeces). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Orquiepididimite em carneiro por Salmonella enterica sub-diarizonae: primeiro caso na América do Sul Orchiepididymitis in ram by Salmonella enterica sub diarizonae: first case in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.C.C. Celeghini

    2013-02-01

    the ultrasound circular structures anechoic/hypoechoic in the epididymal cauda were observed, and in the parenchyma of testicles some points of hyperechogenic image, suggesting calcification lesions and the entire right testicle was surrounded by hypoechoic image, indicative of edema. One of those structures of the right epididymal cauda was aspirated and a purulent exsudate was found, which was sent to microbiological exam, was isolated and identified Salmonella enterica subespécie diarizonae. The ram was submitted to orchiepididectomy, and the organ was characterized macroscopically by fibrous adhesions between scrotum layers, coexistence of epididymal abscesses and testicular degeneration. The Salmonella enterica subspecie diarizonae must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of ovine genital infections.

  2. Characterisation of recently emerged multiple antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 and other multiresistant phage types from Danish pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1998-01-01

    A total of 670 isolates of Salmonella enterica were isolated from Danish pig herds, phage typed and tested for susceptibility to amoxycillin + clavulanate, ampicillin, colistin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim + sulphadiazine. S...... enterica serovar typhimurium (S typhimurium) isolates resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline and three isolates of S typhimurium DT104, two from 1994 and one from 1995, were further tested for resistance against chloramphenicol and sulphonamide and analysed by pulsed-field gel...... electrophoresis (PFGE) using the restriction enzyme Xba I, Overall, 66 per cent of the 670 isolates were sensitive to all the antimicrobial agents tested. Eleven isolates of S typhimurium were resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline and also resistant to other antibiotics in different resistance...

  3. Ecology and modelling of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in cattle manure and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semenov, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    The number of food poisoning cases caused by enteropathogens has increased in recent years. A significant part of the outbreaks associated with the consumption of raw vegetables has been attributed to Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bovine manure

  4. Internalisation potential of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus in lettuce seedlings and mature plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Taryn-Ann; du Plessis, Erika; Duvenage, Stacey; Korsten, Lise

    2013-06-01

    The internalisation potential of Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium in lettuce was evaluated using seedlings grown in vermiculite in seedling trays as well as hydroponically grown lettuce. Sterile distilled water was spiked with one of the four human pathogenic bacteria (10(5) CFU/mL) and used to irrigate the plants. The potential for pathogen internalisation was investigated over time using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and viable plate counts. Additionally, the identities of the pathogens isolated from internal lettuce plant tissues were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction with pathogen-specific oligonucleotides. Internalisation of each of the human pathogens was evident in both lettuce seedlings and hydroponically grown mature lettuce plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of S. aureus internalisation in lettuce plants. In addition, the levels of background microflora in the lettuce plants were determined by plate counting and the isolates identified using matrix-assisted laser ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-TOF). Background microflora assessments confirmed the absence of the four pathogens evaluated in this study. A low titre of previously described endophytes and soil inhabitants, i.e., Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, Lysinibacillus fusiformis, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus hominis were identified.

  5. Herd prevalence of Salmonella enterica infections in Danish slaughter pigs determined by microbiological testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Bager, Flemming

    1996-01-01

    As a part of a nationwide programme to survey and control salmonella in pig herds, a microbiological survey of 1363 pig herds was performed in Denmark. A total of 13 468 slaughter pigs were examined at slaughter by culture of 5 g of caecal contents. Overall, 30 different serotypes of Salmonella...... the most frequent (49.1%). Salmonella enterica was found in 302 herds (22.2%), S. Typhimurium was found in 61.1% of these. 279 (23.1%) large herds (producing more than 2600 slaughter pigs per year) were found to be salmonella positive compared with 23 (14.7 %) small herds (annual production of 500 to 550...... slaughter pigs). Practical constraints in the study design did not allow for a firm conclusion on the interplay among herd size, geographical location and occurrence of salmonella. In 284 of 302 infected herds (94.0%) only one serotype was detected, Infections with two different serovars were seen in 18...

  6. Prevalence, characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica in pigs at slaughter in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonardi, Silvia; Bassi, Luca; Brindani, Franco; D'Incau, Mario; Barco, Lisa; Carra, Elena; Pongolini, Stefano

    2013-05-15

    In 2005-2008, 1152 samples (451 faecal samples, 451 carcass swabs and 250 tonsils) were collected from 451 finishing pigs slaughtered in three abattoirs of northern Italy. In two abattoirs, 34 scalding water samples were collected. The aim of this study was to investigate the faecal and palatine tonsil carriage rate of Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica in pigs at slaughter and the degree of carcass contamination by these bacteria. Typing of the isolates, virulence characterization and antimicrobial testing were also performed. S. enterica was isolated from 21.5% of the faecal samples, 10.9% of the carcasses and 10.4% of the tonsils, but not from scalding water. Nineteen different serovars were identified among 172 S. enterica isolates. The prevalent serovars were Derby (41.3%), Rissen (12.2%), Typhimurium (11%), 4,[5],12:i:- (8.7%) and Give (4.1%). S. enterica ser. Typhimurium and S. enterica ser. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates were phage-typed and PT DT120 was the most common (23.5%). Y. enterocolitica was detected in 17.1% of the faecal samples, 2.4% of the carcasses, 10.8% of the tonsils and 11.8% of the scalding water samples. A total of 119 isolates were found, four of them in water. Of the 115 Y. enterocolitica isolates of pig origin, 24 (20.9%) were 4/O:3 and 4 (3.5%) were 2/O:9. Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 represented 85.7% of the pathogenic isolates found in all types of samples and 100% of those found in tonsils. In 4/O:3 isolates the most common virulence-associated genes were ystA (100%), inv (95.8%), ail (87.5%) and yadA (54.2%). In 2/O:9 isolates the prevalent genes were ail (100%), inv (100%) and ystA (100%), followed by ystB (25.0%). The majority (75.7%) of Y. enterocolitica isolates was biotype 1A, belonging to 13 serotypes (O:3; O:5; O:4,32-4,33; O:6,30-6,31; O:7,8-8; O:7,8-8-8,19; O:7,13; O:8; O:9; O:13; O:16-16,29; O:41,42-41,43; O:52). The most common virulence genes in 1A isolates were inv (95.4%) and ystB (72.4%). The antimicrobial

  7. [Study on the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Pomona].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Baowei; Hu, Xueming; Wang, Chuanqing; Hou, Qi; Huang, Zheng; Jin, Huiming; Xiao, Wenjia; Li, Xiaohong; Ran, Lu; Kan, Biao; Shi, Xianming; Lin, Mei; Wang, Mingliu; Xu, Xuebin

    2014-07-01

    To study the epidemiological characteristics and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Pomona (S. Pomona). Antimicrobial susceptible testing (AST) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) methods were used to analyze on S. Pomona strains that were isolated from diarrhea cases through the diarrhea network monitoring program, environment and food samples in Shanghai as well as from reptiles in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. 4 553 clinic Salmonella (S.) strains were isolated from the Shanghai network laboratories from 2005 to 2012. The top 10 serotypes would include 20 serotypes all belonged to A-F groups, while S. Pomona was next to S. Wandsworth, according to the non- A-F groups. Young children seemed to be susceptible to S. Pomona, and might cause bloody stools and super-infection. The top 10 serotypes from 1 805 foodborne Salmonella strains were significantly more extensive than those from the human S. Pomona strains, followed by those rare serotypes which were mostly isolated from turtle, sea-shellfish and reptiles. Antibiotic resistance of S. Pomona strains from other sources were significantly more severe than those from human samples, and belonged to A and B clones by means of PFGE. Clone A strains were non-epidemic strains which showed multi-drug resistance (MDR) to antimicrobials. Clone B was the main epidemic-causing strain that not resistant to drugs, which consisting B- I from young-age-groups and B-II were from the seniors. B-I strains were homologous to those from shellfish, tortoises and lizards, while B-II strains only showing homology to those from shellfish. One S. Pomona strain-MDR, isolated from human was homologous to 8 antimicrobials. S. Pomona was a quite common serotype among those rare serotypes, which showed higher pathogenicity to infants while genetic evolution might take place when comparing them with the strains isolated from the clinics in 2005. Surveillance programs should be intensified along with the early

  8. Estudio genético y molecular de mecanismos de resistencia a bilis en salmonella enterica

    OpenAIRE

    Urdaneta Páez, Verónica Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Este trabajo centra su investigación en las respuestas adaptativas de Salmonella enterica frente a situaciones de estrés. S. enterica tiene un ciclo de vida complejo y es capaz de sobrevivir y crecer en numerosos ambientes que incluyen, entre otros, una variedad de hospedadores animales así como múltiples entornos naturales. La versatilidad de esta especie bacteriana viene dada por su capacidad de desencadenar una respuesta apropiada a la variedad de señales ambientales que puede encontrar. M...

  9. Induction of resistant mutants of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi under ciprofloxacin selective pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushila Dahiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (hereafter S. Typhi is an important public health problem in India. There has been an increase in the number of reported clinical failures to ciprofloxacin treatment but the data on possible mechanism of failure are limited. One mechanism that has been widely reported and found associated with ciprofloxacin resistance, is the mutations in target genes in QRDR (quinolone resistance determining region. It is hypothesized that mutations in DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV result in therapeutic failure under selective pressure of antibiotic while the patient is on treatment. We undertook in vitro sequential selection studies to expose the clinical isolates of S. Typhi to different concentration of ciprofloxacin to study the role of antibiotic selective pressure in the development of mutations in QRDR. Methods: Total 26 clinical isolates were divided in to two parts: part I included six isolates obtained from three patients with relapse of enteric fever and part II included 20 isolates with different ciprofloxacin MIC levels. For in vitro induction of mutation experiment, five S. Typhi isolates were selected which included three NAS (nalidixic acid sensitive and 2 NAR (nalidixic acid resistant S. Typhi. These isolates were grown under increasing concentrations of ciprofloxacin and mutations acquired in QRDR of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE were investigated by sequencing. Results: For the isolates included in the part I of the study, it was found that the MIC to ciprofloxacin increased in the isolates obtained during the relapse of enteric fever as compare to the first isolate. All isolates had single mutation in gyrA gene at S83 without additional mutation in the second isolate. In the second part of the study, the nine isolates with varying MICs to ciprofloxacin also had single mutation in gyrA gene at S83 and another six had triple mutations

  10. Rapid Detection of Salmonella enterica in Food Using a Compact Disc-Shaped Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Furutani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid detection of food-borne pathogens is essential to public health and the food industry. Although the conventional culture method is highly sensitive, it takes at least a few days to detect food-borne pathogens. Even though polymerase chain reaction (PCR can detect food-borne pathogens in a few hours, it is more expensive and unsatisfactorily sensitive relative to the culture method. We have developed a method to rapidly detect Salmonella enterica by using a compact disc (CD-shaped device that can reduce reagent consumption in conventional PCR. The detection method, which combines culture and PCR, is more rapid than the conventional culture method and is more sensitive and cheaper than PCR. In this study, we also examined a sample preparation method that involved collecting bacterial cells from food. The bacteria collected from chicken meat spiked with S. enterica were mixed with PCR reagents, and PCR was performed on the device. At a low concentration of S. enterica, the collected S. enterica was cultured before PCR for sensitive detection. After cultivation for 4 h, S. enterica at 1.7 × 104 colony-forming units (CFUs·g−1 was detected within 8 h, which included the time needed for sample preparation and detection. Furthermore, the detection of 30 CFUs·g−1 of S. enterica was possible within 12 h including 8 h for cultivation.

  11. Detection of low numbers of healthy and sub-lethally injured Salmonella enterica in chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasson, Vicky; Baert, Leen; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2011-02-28

    The capacity to detect low levels of healthy and sub-lethally injured Salmonella enterica cells in chocolate by two alternative rapid detection methods iQ-Check(TM)Salmonella II real-time PCR (Bio-Rad) and VIDAS® Easy SLM (BioMérieux) was assessed and compared with ISO 6579:2005. Chocolate, a low moisture food known to support the survival of Salmonella, was challenged as food matrix. Buffered peptone water (BPW) did not support the recovery of low levels of sub-lethally injured S. enterica independent of the detection method, while BPW supplemented with milk powder enabled detection by the three examined methods. However, inhibition of real-time PCR was observed since for one out of three repetitions of chocolate inoculated with a low number of sub-lethally injured S. enterica cells, no PCR signal was obtained. Therefore, attention should be paid to the enrichment step to avoid false negative results due to the presence of especially sub-lethally injured Salmonella cells in chocolate. An appropriate sample preparation (such as enrichment media and conditions for incubation) remains the key factor for reliable detection including sub-lethally injured cells and should be evaluated, if necessary optimized, for each detection assay. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinically and Microbiologically Derived Azithromycin Susceptibility Breakpoints for Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Dolecek, Christiane; Karkey, Abhilasha; Gupta, Ruchi; Turner, Paul; Dance, David; Maude, Rapeephan R.; Ha, Vinh; Tran, Chinh Nguyen; Thi, Phuong Le; Be, Bay Pham Van; Phi, La Tran Thi; Ngoc, Rang Nguyen; Ghose, Aniruddha; Dongol, Sabina; Campbell, James I.; Thanh, Duy Pham; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; Moore, Catrin E.; Sona, Soeng; Gaind, Rajni; Deb, Monorama; Anh, Ho Van; Van, Sach Nguyen; Tinh, Hien Tran; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dondorp, Arjen; Thwaites, Guy; Faiz, Mohamed Abul; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Newton, Paul; Basnyat, Buddha; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Baker, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Azithromycin is an effective treatment for uncomplicated infections with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and serovar Paratyphi A (enteric fever), but there are no clinically validated MIC and disk zone size interpretative guidelines. We studied individual patient data from three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antimicrobial treatment in enteric fever in Vietnam, with azithromycin used in one treatment arm, to determine the relationship between azithromycin treatment response and the azithromycin MIC of the infecting isolate. We additionally compared the azithromycin MIC and the disk susceptibility zone sizes of 1,640 S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A clinical isolates collected from seven Asian countries. In the RCTs, 214 patients who were treated with azithromycin at a dose of 10 to 20 mg/ml for 5 to 7 days were analyzed. Treatment was successful in 195 of 214 (91%) patients, with no significant difference in response (cure rate, fever clearance time) with MICs ranging from 4 to 16 μg/ml. The proportion of Asian enteric fever isolates with an MIC of ≤16 μg/ml was 1,452/1,460 (99.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 98.9 to 99.7) for S. Typhi and 207/240 (86.3%; 95% CI, 81.2 to 90.3) (P azithromycin disk identified S. Typhi isolates with an MIC of ≤16 μg/ml with a sensitivity of 99.7%. An azithromycin MIC of ≤16 μg/ml or disk inhibition zone size of ≥13 mm enabled the detection of susceptible S. Typhi isolates that respond to azithromycin treatment. Further work is needed to define the response to treatment in S. Typhi isolates with an azithromycin MIC of >16 μg/ml and to determine MIC and disk breakpoints for S. Paratyphi A. PMID:25733500

  13. Protective immunity conferred by a DNA adenine methylase deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine when delivered in-water to sheep challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, V L; Heithoff, D M; Mahan, M J; Walker, K H; Hornitzky, M A; Gabor, L; Thomson, P C; Thompson, A; House, J K

    2011-04-27

    Stimulation of acquired immunity to Salmonella in livestock is not feasible in neonates (which can be infected within 24h of birth) and is challenging in feedlots, which typically source animals from diverse locations and vendors. Induction of innate immune mechanisms through mass vaccination of animals upon arrival to feedlots is an alternative approach. Transport, environmental conditions, changes in social grouping, and further handling during feedlot assembly are significant stressors. These factors, as well as concurrent exposure to a diversity of pathogens, contribute to the risk of disease. We have shown that oral immunization of calves with a modified live Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strain, which lacks the DNA adenine methylase gene (S. Typhimurium dam), attenuates the severity of clinical disease, reduces fecal shedding, and promotes clearance of salmonellae following virulent homologous and heterologous challenge. This study examines the safety and efficacy of a S. Typhimurium dam vaccine in sheep via oral delivery in drinking water (ad libitum), as a means to effectively vaccinate large groups of animals. Adult merino sheep were vaccinated in drinking water -28 days, -7 days and 24h pre and 24h post-virulent Salmonella Typhimurium challenge which was administered via the oral route. Significant attenuation of clinical disease (temperature, appetite, and attitude) and reduction in mortality and virulent Salmonella Typhimurium fecal shedding and tissue colonization was observed in animals that received the vaccine 28 and 7 days pre-challenge. Further, vaccination did not pose a risk to stock previously infected with virulent salmonellae as mortalities and clinical disease in sheep vaccinated prior to or following virulent challenge did not differ significantly from the non-vaccinated controls. The capacity of S. Typhimurium dam vaccines delivered in drinking water to protect livestock from virulent Salmonella challenge offers an

  14. Analysis of the contribution of bacteriophage ST64B to in vitro virulence traits of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fresno, Ana Herrero; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the publicly available genomes of the virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains SL1344, 14028s and D23580 to that of the virulence-attenuated isolate LT2 revealed the absence of a full sequence of bacteriophage ST64B in the latter. Four selected ST64B...... in in vitro assays used to predict virulence association. No difference in invasion of the Int407 human cell line was observed between the wild-type and mutated strains, but the isolate carrying the whole ST64B prophage was found to have a slightly better survival in blood. The study showed a high prevalence...... and a strong association between the prophage ST64B and isolates of S. Typhimurium collected from blood, and may indicate that such strains constitute a selected subpopulation within this serovar. Further studies are indicated to determine whether the slight increase in blood survival observed in the strain...

  15. Differences in attachment of Salmonella enterica serovars to cabbage and lettuce leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra; Sharma, Manan

    2010-04-30

    This study investigated the ability of five Salmonella enterica serovars to attach to and colonize intact and cut lettuce (Iceberg, Romaine) and cabbage surfaces. Biofilm formation and attachment of Salmonella serovars to intact and cut leaves were determined. Populations of loosely and strongly attached Salmonella were obtained to calculate the attachment strength (S(R)). Biofilm formation, as determined by microtiter plate assay, varied with strain and growth medium used. Salmonella Tennessee and S. Thompson produced stronger biofilms compared to S. Newport, S. Negev, and S. Braenderup. Biofilm formation was also stronger when Salmonella spp. were grown in diluted TSB (1:10). S. Tennessee, which produced strong biofilms, attached to produce surfaces at significantly higher numbers than the populations of S. Negev. Overall, S. Tennessee displayed more biofilm formation in vitro and attached more strongly to lettuce than other serovars. All Salmonella serovars attached rapidly on intact and cut produce surfaces. Salmonella spp. attached to Romaine lettuce at significantly higher numbers than those attached to Iceberg lettuce or cabbage. Salmonella attached preferentially to cut surface of all produce; however, the difference between Salmonella populations attached to intact and cut surfaces was similar (P>0.05). Salmonella attachment to both intact and cut produce surfaces increased with time. The overall attachment strength of Salmonella was significantly lower on cabbage (0.12) followed by Iceberg (0.23) and Romaine lettuce (0.34). Cabbage, intact or cut, did not support attachment of Salmonella as well as Romaine lettuce. Understanding the attachment mechanisms of Salmonella to produce may be useful in developing new intervention strategies to prevent produce outbreaks. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Tolerance response of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica strains to habituation to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Daniel F. M.; Tavares, Adassa G.; Albuquerque, Allan R.; Sampaio, Fábio C.; Oliveira, Tereza C. R. M.; Franco, Octavio L.; Souza, Evandro L.; Magnani, Marciane

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolates from human outbreaks or from poultry origin were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance to sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lactic acid, acetic acid, and ciprofloxacin after habituation in subinhibitory amounts ( of the minimum inhibitory concentration – (MIC) and of the minimum inhibitory concentration – MIC) of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO) at different time intervals. The habituation of S. enterica to OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by the modulation of MIC values. However, cells habituated to OVEO maintained or increased susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials agents, with up to fourfold double dilution decrease from previously determined MIC values. This study reports for the first time the non-inductive effect of OVEO on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in multidrug-resistant S. enterica strains to antimicrobial agents that are largely used in food preservation, as well as to CIP, the therapeutic drug of salmonellosis. PMID:25566231

  17. Tolerance response of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica strains to habituation to Origanum vulgare L essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eMonte

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolates from human outbreaks or from poultry origin were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl, potassium chloride (KCl, lactic acid (LA, acetic acid (AA and ciprofloxacin (CIP after habituation in subinhibitory amounts (½ of the minimum inhibitory concentration - ½ MIC and ¼ of the minimum inhibitory concentration - ¼ MIC of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO at different time intervals. The habituation of S. enterica to OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by the modulation of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values. However, cells habituated to OVEO maintained or increased susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials agents, with up to four-fold double dilution decrease from previously determined MIC values. This study reports for the first time the non-inductive effect of OVEO on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in multidrug-resistant S. enterica strains to antimicrobial agents that are largely used in food preservation, as well as to CIP, the therapeutic drug of salmonellosis.

  18. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain induces protection in different sites after Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium challenge in gnotobiotic and conventional mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Mendonça

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain isolated from a healthy breast-fed human newborn to reduce the pathological consequences for the host due to an experimental oral infection with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serov. Typhimurium in vivo was determined using gnotobiotic and conventional mice. Conventional mice received 0.1mL probiotic milk (8.0 log colony-forming unit daily for 10 days before the oral pathogenic challenge (5.0 log colony-forming unit. Then probiotic treatment was continued until the end of the experiment. Probiotic treatment in germ-free mice consisted of a single dose of the probiotic milk at the beginning of the experiment and a challenge with S. Typhimurium 10 days later (3.0 log colony-forming unit. A protective effect was observed in both gnotobiotic and conventional animals in terms of histopathologic and morphometric data, but in different anatomical sites. This protection was observed in liver and intestines, respectively, for gnotobiotic and conventional mice. However, S. Typhimurium populations were similar in the feces of both treated and control gnotobiotic mice. We conclude that a protective effect of L. rhamnosus against experimental S. Typhimurium was observed. This protection was not due to the reduction of the population of pathogenic bacteria in the intestine.

  19. A Multischool Outbreak Due to Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli Associated with Elevated Rates of Hospitalizations and Bacteremia, Milan, Italy, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huedo, Pol; Gori, Maria; Amato, Ettore; Bianchi, Roberta; Valerio, Edgardo; Magnoli, Luigi; Pontello, Mirella

    2016-08-01

    A multischool outbreak of salmonellosis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli was investigated in the province of Milan from October to November 2014, following an increase in school absenteeism coinciding with two positive cases. Epidemiological studies detected 47 cases in four primary schools: 46 children and 1 adult woman (51.4% males and 48.6% females, median age 8.9). From these, 14 cases (29.8%) were severe and resulted in hospitalization, including 6 children (12.8%) who developed an invasive salmonellosis. The epidemic curve revealed an abnormally long incubation period, peaking 1 week after the first confirmed case. Twenty-five available isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showing an identical pattern. The isolate belongs to ST474, an ST composed exclusively of Salmonella Napoli human strains isolated in France and Italy. Antibiotic resistance analysis showed resistance to aminoglycosides, correlating with the presence of the aminoglycoside resistance gene aadA25 in its genome. Trace-back investigations strongly suggested contaminated ham as the most likely food vehicle, which was delivered by a common food center on 21 October. Nevertheless, this ingredient could not be retrospectively investigated since it was no longer available at the repository. This represents the largest Salmonella Napoli outbreak ever reported in Italy and provides a unique scenario for studying the outcome of salmonellosis caused by this emerging and potentially invasive nontyphoidal serotype.

  20. Lack of evidence of spill-over of Salmonella enterica between cattle and sympatric Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) from a protected area in Catalonia, NE Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, N; Velarde, R; Porrero, M C; Mentaberre, G; Serrano, E; Mateos, A; Domínguez, L; Lavín, S

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic agent of worldwide importance found in a wide range of wild hosts. However, its prevalence in many popular game species has never been assessed. Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) is the main game caprinae of the Iberian Peninsula and around two thousand individuals are hunted every year for trophy or for home consumption. In this work, 313 Iberian ibexes from the Ports de Tortosa i Beseit National Game Reserve (NE Spain) were tested for Salmonella enterica in faeces, and anti microbial susceptibility was determined. The exact location of shooting or capture was recorded with a GPS device to study the links of Salmonella infection with cattle presence and human proximity. Additionally, samples were taken from cattle grazing inside this reserve (n = 73). Only three Iberian ibexes (0.96%, 95% CI 0.2-2.8) were positive to Salmonella (serotype Enteritidis, Bardo and 35:r:z35), while prevalence was moderate in cattle: 21.92% (95% CI 13.10-33.14, serotype Meleagridis, Anatum, Kedougou and Othmarschen). All isolates were susceptible to the anti microbial agents tested. Moreover, a case of fatal septicaemic salmonellosis in an 11-year-old male Iberian ibex is described where Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis was isolated from the lung, liver and spleen samples. The low prevalence of Salmonella in Iberian ibex and the lack of shared serotypes suggest no association to cattle. Despite this, game meat aimed for human consumption should be examined, and it is strongly recommended that hunters and game keepers manipulate animals and carcasses under maximal hygienic conditions to avoid environmental contamination and human contagion. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Recipes for antimicrobial wine marinades against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel; Henika, P R; Levin, C E; Mandrell, R E

    2007-08-01

    We have evaluated bactericidal activities against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica of several antimicrobial wine recipes, each consisting of red or white wine extracts of oregano leaves with added garlic juice and oregano oil. Dose-response plots were used to determine the percentage of the recipes that resulted in a 50% decrease in colony-forming units (CFU) at 60 min (BA(50)). Studies designed to optimize antibacterial activities of the recipes demonstrated that several combinations of the naturally occurring plant-derived ingredients rapidly inactivated the above mentioned 4 foodborne pathogens. We also showed that (a) incubation temperature affected activities in the following order: 37 degrees C > 21 degrees C > 4 degrees C; (b) varying the initial bacterial concentrations from 10(3) to 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/well did not significantly affect BA(50) values; (c) storage of 3 marinades up to 2 mo did not change their effectiveness against Salmonella enterica; and (d) polyphenolic compounds isolated by chromatography from red wine exhibited exceptional activity at nanogram levels against 2 strains of Bacillus cereus. These observations suggest that antimicrobial wine formulations have the potential to improve the microbiological safety of foods.

  2. Genetic Evolution of the Spanish Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica 4,5,12:i:- Monophasic Variant ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laorden, Lorena; Herrera-León, Silvia; Martínez, Ilargi; Sanchez, Ainhoa; Kromidas, Lefteris; Bikandi, Joseba; Rementeria, Aitor; Echeita, Aurora; Garaizar, Javier

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed a collection of 60 Salmonella enterica 4,5,12:i:- phage type U302 multidrug-resistant monophasic variant strains, isolated in Spain between 2000 and 2007. Most strains showed resistance to ampicillin (A), chloramphenicol (C), sulfamethoxazole (Su), gentamicin (G), streptomycin (S), tetracycline (T), and co-trimoxazole (SxT) (an ACSuGSTSxT resistance pattern). Only one pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) type was detected, with 19 subtypes (Simpson's index of diversity [SID] = 0.89). Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) showed more variability, with 32 profiles (SID = 0.97), but only showed diversity at the STTR5 and STTR6 loci. PCR and sequencing demonstrated all strains contained the same allantoin-glyoxylate pathway deletion. Four types of deletions were detected in the fljAB operon, all starting at the same position, at the STM2758 gene, and followed by an IS26 insertion. Furthermore, a representative set of strains of the four deletion types harbored plasmids with IS26. We propose that a Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium U302 multidrug-resistant (ACSuGSTSxT) strain, defective for the allantoin-glyoxylate pathway and containing IS26 at plasmid pU302L, could be the ancestor of the variant in Spain. PMID:20943866

  3. Immuno-fluorescence based Vi capsular polysaccharide detection for specific recognition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Satish K; Vinayaka, Aaydha C; Rishi, Dharam B; Rishi, Praveen; Suri, C Raman

    2014-09-02

    Typhoid fever is a life threatening bacterial infection that remains a major global health concern. This continued high burden associated with significant morbidity and mortality rate demands specific and rapid detection technique. This work reports a new sandwich type fluorescence immunoassay format using polymyxin B, a cationic receptor molecule, as a binder agent while anti-Vi antibody served as the capturing agent for specifically detecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Anti-Vi IgG antibody raised against Vi-BSA conjugate revealed affinity of 7.779nM(-1) signifying immunodominancy of O-acetyls groups in Vi polysaccharide. The detection limit of the developed assay was around 10(1) cellsmL(-1) of Vi expressing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) equal to 0.97. Positive response obtained for all the tested serovar Typhi clinical isolates as well as the pathogen spiked blood samples recommended specificity and accuracy of Vi antigen as a biomarker during typhoid fever. The intra- and inter-assay precision with Vi spiked samples were satisfactory revealing coefficient of variance (CV%) with a mean of 4.05% and 5.97% respectively. This may be the novel attempt and constructive report on the fluorescence based detection of Vi antigen of serovar Typhi in the epidemic as well as pandemic outbreaks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica biofilm formation using small-molecule adenosine mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jacob A; Marshall, Joanna M; Bhatiya, Aditi; Eguale, Tadesse; Kwiek, Jesse J; Gunn, John S

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms have been widely implicated in chronic infections and environmental persistence of Salmonella enterica, facilitating enhanced colonization of surfaces and increasing the ability of the bacteria to be transmitted to new hosts. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi biofilm formation on gallstones from humans and mice enhances gallbladder colonization and bacterial shedding, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilms facilitate long-term persistence in a number of environments important to food, medical, and farming industries. Salmonella regulates expression of many virulence- and biofilm-related processes using kinase-driven pathways. Kinases play pivotal roles in phosphorylation and energy transfer in cellular processes and possess an ATP-binding pocket required for their functions. Many other cellular proteins also require ATP for their activity. Here we test the hypothesis that pharmacological interference with ATP-requiring enzymes utilizing adenosine mimetic compounds would decrease or inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. Through the screening of a 3,000-member ATP mimetic library, we identified a single compound (compound 7955004) capable of significantly reducing biofilm formation by S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi. The compound was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic toward S. Typhimurium or cytotoxic to mammalian cells. An ATP-Sepharose affinity matrix technique was used to discover potential protein-binding targets of the compound and identified GroEL and DeoD. Compound 7955004 was screened against other known biofilm-forming bacterial species and was found to potently inhibit biofilms of Acinetobacter baumannii as well. The identification of a lead compound with biofilm-inhibiting capabilities toward Salmonella provides a potential new avenue of therapeutic intervention against Salmonella biofilm formation, with applicability to biofilms of other bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance of Salmonella spp. Isolated from Shrimp Farming Freshwater Environment in Northeast Region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fátima C. T.; Sousa, Oscarina V.; Carvalho, Edirsana M. R.; Hofer, Ernesto; Vieira, Regine H. S. F.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the presence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella spp. in a shrimp farming environment in Northeast Region of Brazil. Samples of water and sediments from two farms rearing freshwater-acclimated Litopenaeus vannamei were examined for the presence of Salmonella. Afterwards, Salmonella isolates were serotyped, the antimicrobial resistance was determined by a disk diffusion method, and the plasmid curing was performed for resistant isolates. A total of 30 (16.12%) of the 186 isolates were confirmed to be Salmonella spp., belonging to five serovars: S. serovar Saintpaul, S. serovar Infantis, S. serovar Panama, S. serovar Madelia, and S. serovar Braenderup, along with 2 subspecies: S. enterica serovar houtenae and S. enterica serovar enterica. About twenty-three percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and twenty percent were resistant to at least two antibiotics. Three strains isolated from water samples (pond and inlet canal) exhibited multiresistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and nitrofurantoin. One of them had a plasmid with genes conferring resistance to nitrofurantoin and ampicillin. The incidence of bacteria pathogenic to humans in a shrimp farming environment, as well as their drug-resistance pattern revealed in this study, emphasizes the need for a more rigorous attention to this area. PMID:24455280

  6. Antibiotic Resistance of Salmonella spp. Isolated from Shrimp Farming Freshwater Environment in Northeast Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima C. T. Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella spp. in a shrimp farming environment in Northeast Region of Brazil. Samples of water and sediments from two farms rearing freshwater-acclimated Litopenaeus vannamei were examined for the presence of Salmonella. Afterwards, Salmonella isolates were serotyped, the antimicrobial resistance was determined by a disk diffusion method, and the plasmid curing was performed for resistant isolates. A total of 30 (16.12% of the 186 isolates were confirmed to be Salmonella spp., belonging to five serovars: S. serovar Saintpaul, S. serovar Infantis, S. serovar Panama, S. serovar Madelia, and S. serovar Braenderup, along with 2 subspecies: S. enterica serovar houtenae and S. enterica serovar enterica. About twenty-three percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and twenty percent were resistant to at least two antibiotics. Three strains isolated from water samples (pond and inlet canal exhibited multiresistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and nitrofurantoin. One of them had a plasmid with genes conferring resistance to nitrofurantoin and ampicillin. The incidence of bacteria pathogenic to humans in a shrimp farming environment, as well as their drug-resistance pattern revealed in this study, emphasizes the need for a more rigorous attention to this area.

  7. Thioridazine protects the mouse from a virulent infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Asish; Mukherjee, Sayanti; Chaki, Shaswati

    2010-01-01

    When administered to mice at doses of 100microg/mouse and 200microg/mouse, thioridazine (TDZ) significantly protected animals from the lethality produced by a virulent strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and reduced the number of bacteria retrieved from the spleen, liver and heart...... blood. The protection conferred by TDZ against a virulent Salmonella infection is hypothesised to be due to a reduction in the 55kDa virulence protein of the outer membrane of the organism, as this protein is almost totally absent when the organism is exposed to the phenothiazine. It is further...

  8. Disruption of type III secretion in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by external guide sequences

    OpenAIRE

    McKinney, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Haifeng; Kubori, Tomoko; Galán, Jorge E.; Altman, Sidney

    2004-01-01

    The type III secretion system involved in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invasion of host cells has been disrupted using inducibly expressed oligonucleotide external guide sequences (EGSs) complementary to invB or invC mRNA. These EGSs direct single site cleavage in these mRNAs by endogenous RNase P, and their expression in Salmonella results in invC mRNA and InvC protein depletion, decreased type III secretion and interference with host cell invasion. Comparison of these effects wit...

  9. Impact of Hfq on the intrinsic drug resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuko eHayashi-Nishino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen, and its various serovars cause both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella, leading to increased morbidity and mortality, has further complicated its management. Hfq is an RNA chaperon that mediates the binding of small RNAs to mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. Although Hfq is related to important phenotypes including virulence in Salmonella, its role in the drug resistance of this organism is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Hfq in intrinsic drug resistance of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. hfq mutant was susceptible to acriflavine. Although there is a relationship between the production of the AcrB multidrug efflux pump and Hfq in Escherichia coli, the deletion of the drug efflux acrB did not impair the effect of hfq deletion on Salmonella susceptibility. In contrast, the deletion of another drug efflux gene, smvA, impaired the effect of hfq deletion on acriflavine susceptibility. These results indicate that Hfq regulates the intrinsic drug resistance, and it may influence drug susceptibility by regulating SmvA in Salmonella.

  10. Population Dynamics of Salmonella enterica Serotypes in Commercial Egg and Poultry Production ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Steven L.; Nayak, Rajesh; Hanning, Irene B.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Han, Jing; Ricke, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Fresh and processed poultry have been frequently implicated in cases of human salmonellosis. Furthermore, increased consumption of meat and poultry has increased the potential for exposure to Salmonella enterica. While advances have been made in reducing the prevalence and frequency of Salmonella contamination in processed poultry, there is mounting pressure on commercial growers to prevent and/or eliminate these human pathogens in preharvest production facilities. Several factors contribute to Salmonella colonization in commercial poultry, including the serovar and the infectious dose. In the early 1900s, Salmonella enterica serovars Pullorum and Gallinarum caused widespread diseases in poultry, but vaccination and other voluntary programs helped eradicate pullorum disease and fowl typhoid from commercial flocks. However, the niche created by the eradication of these serovars was likely filled by S. Enteritidis, which proliferated in the bird populations. While this pathogen remains a significant problem in commercial egg and poultry production, its prevalence among poultry has been declining since the 1990s. Coinciding with the decrease of S. Enteritidis, S. Heidelberg and S. Kentucky have emerged as the predominant serovars in commercial broilers. In this review, we have highlighted bacterial genetic and host-related factors that may contribute to such shifts in Salmonella populations in commercial poultry and intervention strategies that could limit their colonization. PMID:21571882

  11. Salmonella serovars and antimicrobial resistance in strains isolated from wild animals in captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Hidalgo, Gabriela; López-Valenzuela, Martin; Juárez-Barranco, Felipe; Montiel-Vázquez, Edith; Valenzuela-Sánchez, Beatriz

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of antibiotic resistance in Salmonella spp. strains from wild animals in captivity at the Culiacan Zoo and the Mazatlan Aquarium in Sinaloa, Mexico. We identified 17 different Salmonella enterica serovars at a prevalence of 19.90% (Culiacan Zoo) and 6.25% (Mazatlan Aquarium). Antibiotic sensitivity tests revealed that, of the 83 strains studied, 100% were multidrug resistant (MDR). The drugs against which the greatest resistance was observed were: penicillin, erythromycin, dicloxacillin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and chloramphenicol. We therefore conclude that MDR is common among Salmonella isolates originating from wild animals in captivity in Sinaloa.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutants of Salmonella enterica Have Increased Sensitivity to Catechins

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Miho; Okamoto, Akira; Ota, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity is one of the well-known biological characteristics of catechins, the main extract of green tea leaves. It is thought that catechins intercalate into the bacterial cell membrane and damage the lipid bilayer. However, the association between catechins and lipopolysaccharides, which consist of an O side chain, core oligosaccharide, and lipid A, has not been previously investigated. In this study, we evaluated the catechin sensitivity of Salmonella enterica mutants that la...

  13. Data for: Millennia of genomic stability within the invasive Para C Lineage of Salmonella enterica

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhemin; Lundstrøm, Inge; Dien, Alicia Tran; Duchêne, Sebastián; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Sergeant, Martin J.; Langridge, Gemma; Fotakis, Anna K.; Nair, Satheesh; Stenøien, Hans K.; Hamre, Stian S.; Casjens, Sherwood; Green, Monica H.; Christophersen, Axel; Quince, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi C causes enteric (paratyphoid) fever in humans. Its presentation can range from asymptomatic infections of the blood stream to gastrointestinal or urinary tract infection or even a fatal septicemia. Paratyphi C is very rare in Europe and North America, except for occasional travelers from South and East Asia or Africa where the disease is more common. However, early 20th century observations in Eastern Europe suggest that Paratyphi C enteric fever may onc...

  14. Comparative virulence genotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of environmental and clinical Salmonella enterica from Cochin, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; Vijayan, J.; Murali, G.; Chandran, P.

    - typhoidal Salmonella enterica to the disease burden is unknown. The evolution of virulence and antimicrobial resistance capabilities of pathogenic bacteria takes place by horizontal acquisition of genes and the aquatic environment is arguably an ideal...%) to cephalothin and cephalexin, 14 (23.5%) to nalidixic acid and 9 (15%) were resistant to chloramphenicol. A study by the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention reported emergence of Newport-MDRAmpC strains resistant ampicillin, chloramphenicol...

  15. Prevalence and diversity of Salmonella enterica in water, fish and lettuce in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Traor?, Oumar; Nyholm, Outi; Siitonen, Anja; Bonkoungou, Isidore Juste O; Traor?, Alfred S; Barro, Nicolas; Haukka, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the prevalence, serotypes and antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of Salmonella enterica in environment in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. A total of 476 samples, consisting of 36 samples of tap water, 51 samples of well water, 87 samples of channel water, 44 samples of reservoir water, 238 samples of fish, and 20 samples of lettuce were examined using standard bacteriological procedures for Salmonel...

  16. Iron-induced virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium at the intestinal epithelial interface can be suppressed by carvacrol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortman, Guus A M; Roelofs, Rian W H M; Swinkels, Dorine W.; De Jonge, Marien I.; Burt, Sara A.; Tjalsma, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Oral iron therapy can increase the abundance of bacterial pathogens, e.g., Salmonella spp., in the large intestine of African children. Carvacrol is a natural compound with antimicrobial activity against various intestinal bacterial pathogens, among which is the highly prevalent Salmonella enterica

  17. Serotypes of Salmonella enterica Present in the Internal Organs of Mice Caught On-farm From 1995 – 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Salmonella enterica is a persistent and pervasive pathogen that impacts the safety of the food supply, especially in regards to poultry and poultry products. The house mouse Mus musculus is a recognized risk factor for introduction on-farm. More information is needed about Salmonella serotypes tha...

  18. Epidemics of invasive Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis and S. enterica Serovar typhimurium infection associated with multidrug resistance among adults and children in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Melita A; Graham, Stephen M; Walsh, Amanda L; Wilson, Lorna; Phiri, Amos; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Zijlstra, Eduard E; Heyderman, Robert S; Hart, C Anthony; Molyneux, Malcolm E

    2008-04-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellae (NTS) have become the most common cause of bacteremia in tropical Africa, particularly among susceptible children and HIV-infected adults. We describe 4956 episodes of NTS bacteremia (2439 episodes in adults and 2517 episodes in children) that occurred in Blantyre, Malawi, during the 7-year period 1998-2004. A total of 75% of the cases of NTS bacteremia were due to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and 21% were due to S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. Epidemic increases in the incidence of NTS bacteremia were seen sequentially, occurring first among cases caused by S. Enteritidis and then among cases caused by S. Typhimurium. Increased incidence of bacteremia was temporally associated with the acquisition of multidrug resistance to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, and chloramphenicol by each serovar and occurred while the incidence of infection due to other common bloodstream pathogens remained constant. These epidemics were observed among adults and children. A seasonal pattern was also seen, with increased incidence during and after the rainy season. The median age of the patients was 32 years among adults and 22 months among children. Acquisition of multidrug-resistant infection was not associated with an increased case-fatality rate among children (22%), and the case-fatality rate among adults showed a significant trend toward decreasing (from 29% to 20%). These data have important implications for the treatment of severe febrile illness in adults and children in tropical Africa. Further understanding of the molecular basis of these epidemics of multidrug-resistant NTS infection, including ongoing whole-genome sequencing of multidrug-resistant isolates, will yield important tools for the study of NTS pathogenesis, transmission, epidemiology, and prevention.

  19. Salmonella isolated from individual reptiles and environmental samples from terraria in private households in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigates Salmonella spp. isolated from privately kept reptiles and from environmental samples such as bedding materials or water from the floor of the enclosures (terraria). It also compares isolation of Salmonella using Modified Semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis (MSRV) medium or selective enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis-Soya (RVS) pepton broth. Cloacal swabs or swabs from the cloacal area were collected from 63 individual reptiles belonging to 14 households. All reptiles were from different terraria and from 62 of these, environmental samples were also collected. Sampling were done by the reptile owners according to written instructions and sent by mail immediately after sampling. All but three samples were analyzed within 24 h after collection. Colonies suspected for Salmonella were tested for agglutination and serotyped using the White-Kauffmann-Le Minor scheme. The relative sensitivity (se) and specificity (sp) for MSRV compared with RVS, and the agreement coefficient kappa (κ) were calculated. Results Salmonella was isolated from 50/63 (80%) terraria, either from the reptiles (31/63; 49%) or from bedding material (39/62; 63%). The most common subspecies was Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica followed by S. enterica subspecies diarizonae. In reptiles, the most common S. enterica subspecies enterica serovars were Java (n = 4) and Fluntern (n = 4), compared with the serovars Tennessee (n = 10) and Fluntern (n = 10) in the environmental samples. The exact same set of Salmonella subspecies and serovars were not isolated from the individual reptiles and the environmental samples from any of the households. Isolation using MSRV yielded more Salmonella isolates 61/113 (54%) than enrichment in RVS 57/125 (46%). The se was 97.9% (95% Confidence Interval 93.9-100), the sp 78.5% (95% CI 68.5-88.5) and the κ 0.74, indicating substantial agreement between the tests. Conclusions Salmonella can be expected to be present in

  20. Salmonella isolated from individual reptiles and environmental samples from terraria in private households in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Veronica O; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Melin, Lennart; Boqvist, Sofia

    2014-01-24

    This study investigates Salmonella spp. isolated from privately kept reptiles and from environmental samples such as bedding materials or water from the floor of the enclosures (terraria). It also compares isolation of Salmonella using Modified Semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis (MSRV) medium or selective enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis-Soya (RVS) pepton broth. Cloacal swabs or swabs from the cloacal area were collected from 63 individual reptiles belonging to 14 households. All reptiles were from different terraria and from 62 of these, environmental samples were also collected. Sampling were done by the reptile owners according to written instructions and sent by mail immediately after sampling. All but three samples were analyzed within 24 h after collection. Colonies suspected for Salmonella were tested for agglutination and serotyped using the White-Kauffmann-Le Minor scheme. The relative sensitivity (se) and specificity (sp) for MSRV compared with RVS, and the agreement coefficient kappa (κ) were calculated. Salmonella was isolated from 50/63 (80%) terraria, either from the reptiles (31/63; 49%) or from bedding material (39/62; 63%). The most common subspecies was Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica followed by S. enterica subspecies diarizonae. In reptiles, the most common S. enterica subspecies enterica serovars were Java (n = 4) and Fluntern (n = 4), compared with the serovars Tennessee (n = 10) and Fluntern (n = 10) in the environmental samples. The exact same set of Salmonella subspecies and serovars were not isolated from the individual reptiles and the environmental samples from any of the households. Isolation using MSRV yielded more Salmonella isolates 61/113 (54%) than enrichment in RVS 57/125 (46%). The se was 97.9% (95% Confidence Interval 93.9-100), the sp 78.5% (95% CI 68.5-88.5) and the κ 0.74, indicating substantial agreement between the tests. Salmonella can be expected to be present in environments where reptiles are

  1. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (PCellulose production and RDAR (red, dry, and rough) were expressed only in aerobiosis. In microaerobiosis, the strains expressed the SAW (smooth and white) morphotype, while in anaerobiosis the colonies appeared small and red. The expression of genes involved in cellulose synthesis (csgD and adrA) and quorum sensing (sdiA and luxS) was reduced in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis in all S. enterica strains tested. This gene expression levels were less reduced in S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis compared to the tested serotypes. There was a relationship between the expression of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 130 Salmonella isolates were obtained from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in the Shandong Province of China. All isolate serotypes were tested according to the Kauf...

  3. Antimicrobial resistance among Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis from broiler carcasses in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, A.; Baltić, T.; Velebit, B.; Babić, M.; Milojević, L.; Đorđević, V.

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella Infantis isolates from poultry carcasses in Serbia. A total of 48 Salmonella isolates were examined for antimicrobial resistance. A panel of 10 antibiotics was selected for testing. Isolates showed resistance to sulfamethoxazole, ceftazidime and cefotaxime (100%). However, the highest number of Salmonella Infantis isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol. The usage of antibiotics in food producing animals could result in antimicrobial resistance pathogenic bacteria especially Salmonella spp. in poultry, which may be transmitted to humans through the food chain and increase risk of treatment failures.

  4. The prevalence of Salmonella enterica in Spanish feed mills and potential feed-related risk factors for contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Gregorio J; Piquer, F Javier; Algarra, Leonor; de Frutos, Cristina; Sobrino, Odón J

    2011-02-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Spain to estimate the prevalence of Salmonella enterica in feed mills and to identify and evaluate potential risk factors associated with feed contamination. A total of 3844 samples were collected from 523 different feed mills using a stratified sampling method. Samples were tested for the presence of Salmonella using conventional culture methods. When the presence of Salmonella was detected, samples were further characterised using serotyping at the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for animal feed. Additional data about the biosecurity and hygiene measures, feed material used and compound feed produced, were collected by official veterinarians using a questionnaire in situ. In 144 of the feed mills visited (28%), Salmonella were present. However, it was only isolated from 4.8% of samples taken from all of the feed mills (3.5% from feed materials, 3.2% from compound feed and 12.5% from dust of the feed mill facilities). Salmonella serovars of public health importance (Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Infantis, Virchow and Hadar), were detected in only 2.7% of feed mills and in 0.3% of the samples studied. Logistic regression was used to investigate potential feed-mill risk factors for the isolation of Salmonella. Feed mill intake pits were demonstrated to have an increased risk of culture-positive dust samples (OR=6.4; 95% CI: 2.7-15.1). The feed material used in the production of compound feed was associated with recovery of Salmonella. Of the feed material used, cotton seeds were identified as having the highest odds of contamination (OR=3.8; 95% CI: 1.7-8.3). Pelleting appears to reduce the chance of contamination because non-pelleted compound feed is 8 times more likely to be contaminated than pelleted compound feed (OR=8.2; 95% CI: 2.5-26.6). The role of the feed itself in the epidemiology of Salmonella seems to be of limited importance as compound feed is not frequently contaminated at the feed mill level. This should not

  5. Prevalence and characterization of Salmonella species isolated from pigs, ducks and chickens in Sichuan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruichao; Lai, Jing; Wang, Yang; Liu, Shuliang; Li, Yun; Liu, Kunyao; Shen, Jianzhong; Wu, Congming

    2013-04-15

    This study aimed to analyze the prevalence of Salmonella isolated from different parts of the food production chain, and to characterize these isolates. A total of 165 Salmonella enterica isolates were identified from 1382 samples taken from conventional farms, abattoirs and retail markets from 2010 to 2011 in Sichuan, China. The Salmonella isolates were assayed for serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility, prevalence of class 1 integrons and β-lactamase genes, and subtyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Among these isolates, S. enterica serotypes Derby (76 isolates, 46%) and Typhimurium (16 isolates, 10%) were the most prevalent, and high antimicrobial resistance rates were observed for tetracycline (77%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (43%), nalidixic acid (41%) and spectinomycin (41%). Class 1 integrons were detected in 21% of these isolates, and contained gene cassettes dfrA12-aadA2, dfrA1-aadA1, dfrA1, blaPSE-1 and dfrA1/aadA2. blaOXA-1 was the most commonly identified β-lactamase gene (n=14), followed by blaTEM-1 (n=6), blaPSE-1 (n=4) and blaCMY-2 (n=1). A S. enterica serotype Indiana isolate derived from chicken from a market was positive for both blaOXA-1 and blaCMY-2, and resistant to nine tested antibiotics. The PFGE patterns were diverse. Our findings indicated that most isolates from different sampling sites were phenotypically and genetically diverse, and Salmonella was widespread and may transmit along the food production chain from farm to market. Isolates with decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins, which are used to fight foodborne Salmonella, pose a serious threat to public health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García, Ana V; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    .... Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system...

  7. TaqMan Salmonella enterica Detection Kit. Performance Tested Method 020803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbs, Robert S; Cao, Yan Y; Balachandran, Priva; Petrauskene, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Peanut butter spiked with Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium was prepared by an independent laboratory and sent to Applied Biosystems to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the TaqMan Salmonella enterica Detection Kit for detecting Salmonella in peanut butter. The samples were spiked at three levels: five no-spike (0 CFU/25 g); 20 low-spike (0.2 CFU/25 g); and 20 high-spike (2 CFU/25 g). They were coded to create a blind set of 45 samples. The samples were processed based on an unpaired test design that included enrichment in buffered peptone water for the candidate method and lactose broth for the reference method. In the candidate method, a 1 mL aliquot of enriched sample was extracted using PrepMan Ultra Sample Preparation Reagent; the sample was amplified on the Applied Biosystems 7500 real-time PCR system, and analyzed for detection of Salmonella using RapidFinder Version 1.0 software. All samples processed by the candidate method were confirmed by culture according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual procedures. Sensitivity, specificity, and Chi-square analysis were calculated by combining candidate method results with those of the reference method that were collected by the independent laboratory. The TaqMan Salmonella enterica Detection Kit showed 40% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and a Chi-square value equal to 1.52. Chi-square analysis indicated the candidate method and the reference method were comparable. Although the candidate method sensitivity was only 40% when compared with the reference method (unpaired samples), the sensitivity was > 100% when the candidate method results were compared with those of the confirmation method (same sample enrichment).

  8. Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis for outbreak studies of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmuth Reiner

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis is known as an important and pathogenic clonal group which continues to cause worldwide sporadic cases and outbreaks in humans. Here a new multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA method is reported for highly-discriminative subtyping of Salmonella Enteritidis. Emphasis was given on the most predominant phage types PT4 and PT8. The method comprises multiplex PCR specifically amplifying repeated sequences from nine different loci followed by an automatic fragment size analysis using a multicolor capillary electrophoresis instrument. A total of 240 human, animal, food and environmental isolates of S. Enteritidis including 23 definite phage types were used for development and validation. Furthermore, the MLVA types were compared to the phage types of several isolates from two recent outbreaks to determine the concordance between both methods and to estimate their in vivo stability. The in vitro stability of the two MLVA types specifically for PT4 and PT8 strains were determined by multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Results Seventy-nine different MLVA types were identified in 240 S. Enteritidis strains. The Simpson's diversity index for the MLVA method was 0.919 and Nei diversity values for the nine VNTR loci ranged from 0.07 to 0.65. Twenty-four MLVA types could be assigned to 62 PT4 strains and 21 types to 81 PT8 strains. All outbreak isolates had an indistinguishable outbreak specific MLVA type. The in vitro stability experiments showed no changes of the MLVA type compared to the original isolate. Conclusion This MLVA method is useful to discriminate S. Enteritidis strains even within a single phage type. It is easy in use, fast, and cheap compared to other high-resolution molecular methods and therefore an important tool for surveillance and outbreak studies for S. Enteritidis.

  9. Antimicrobial Probiotics Reduce Salmonella enterica in Turkey Gastrointestinal Tracts

    OpenAIRE

    Brittany Forkus; Seth Ritter; Michail Vlysidis; Kathryn Geldart; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the arsenal of technologies employed to control foodborne nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), infections have not declined in decades. Poultry is the primary source of NTS outbreaks, as well as the fastest growing meat sector worldwide. With recent FDA rules for phasing-out antibiotics in animal production, pressure is mounting to develop new pathogen reduction strategies. We report on a technology to reduce Salmonella enteritidis in poultry. We engineered probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917, to...

  10. Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Montevideo and Newport in Free-ranging Sea Turtles and Beach Sand in the Caribbean and Persistence in Sand and Seawater Microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, A-K; Antaki, E; Stewart, K; Francis, S; Jay-Russell, M T; Sithole, F; Kearney, M T; Griffin, M J; Soto, E

    2017-09-01

    Salmonellae are Gram-negative zoonotic bacteria that are frequently part of the normal reptilian gastrointestinal flora. The main objective of this project was to estimate the prevalence of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica in the nesting and foraging populations of sea turtles on St. Kitts and in sand from known nesting beaches. Results suggest a higher prevalence of Salmonella in nesting leatherback sea turtles compared with foraging green and hawksbill sea turtles. Salmonella was cultured from 2/9 and identified by molecular diagnostic methods in 3/9 leatherback sea turtle samples. Salmonella DNA was detected in one hawksbill turtle, but viable isolates were not recovered from any hawksbill sea turtles. No Salmonella was detected in green sea turtles. In samples collected from nesting beaches, Salmonella was only recovered from a single dry sand sample. All recovered isolates were positive for the wzx gene, consistent with the O:7 serogroup. Further serotyping characterized serovars Montevideo and Newport present in cloacal and sand samples. Repetitive-element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprint analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the 2014 isolates from turtles and sand as well as archived Salmonella isolates recovered from leatherback sea turtles in 2012 and 2013, identified two distinct genotypes and four different pulsotypes, respectively. The genotyping and serotyping were directly correlated. To determine the persistence of representative strains of each serotype/genotype in these environments, laboratory-controlled microcosm studies were performed in water and sand (dry and wet) incubated at 25 or 35°C. Isolates persisted for at least 32 days in most microcosms, although there were significant decreases in culturable bacteria in several microcosms, with the greatest reduction in dry sand incubated at 35°C. This information provides a better understanding of the epizootiology of Salmonella in free-ranging marine reptiles and the potential

  11. Take the tube: remodelling of the endosomal system by intracellular Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Viktoria; Hensel, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is a facultative intracellular pathogen residing in a unique host cell-derived membrane compartment, termed Salmonella-containing vacuole or SCV. By the activity of effector proteins translocated by the SPI2-endoced type III secretion system (T3SS), the biogenesis of the SCV is manipulated to generate a habitat permissive for intracellular proliferation. By taking control of the host cell vesicle fusion machinery, intracellular Salmonella creates an extensive interconnected system of tubular membranes arising from vesicles of various origins, collectively termed Salmonella-induced tubules (SIT). Recent work investigated the dynamic properties of these manipulations. New host cell targets of SPI2-T3SS effector proteins were identified. By applying combinations of live cell imaging and ultrastructural analyses, the detailed organization of membrane compartments inhabited and modified by intracellular Salmonella is now available. These studies provided unexpected new details on the intracellular environments of Salmonella. For example, one kind of SIT, the LAMP1-positive Salmonella-induced filaments (SIF), are composed of double-membrane tubules, with an inner lumen containing host cell cytosol and cytoskeletal filaments, and an outer lumen containing endocytosed cargo. The novel findings call for new models for the biogenesis of SCV and SIT and give raise to many open questions we discuss in this review. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Dietary rice bran promotes resistance to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ajay

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary rice bran consists of many bioactive components with disease fighting properties; including the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota. Studies point to the important roles of the gut microbiota and the mucosal epithelium in the establishment of protection against enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella. The ability of rice bran to reduce the susceptibility of mice to a Salmonella infection has not been previously investigated. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incorporation of rice bran into the diet would inhibit the colonization of Salmonella in mice through the induction of protective mucosal responses. Results Mice were fed diets containing 0%, 10% and 20% rice bran for one week prior to being orally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We found that mice consuming the 10 and 20% rice bran diets exhibited a reduction in Salmonella fecal shedding for up to nine days post-infection as compared to control diet fed animals (p Lactobacillus spp. in rice bran fed mice (p Salmonella entry into mouse small intestinal epithelial cells. Conclusions Increasing rice bran consumption represents a novel dietary means for reducing susceptibility to enteric infection with Salmonella and potentially via induction of native Lactobacillus spp.

  13. Evaluation of corn oil as an additive in the pre-enrichment step to increase recovery of Salmonella enterica from oregano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Flamer, Marie-Laure; Addy, Nicole; Ewing, Laura; Gopinath, Gopal; Jarvis, Karen; Grim, Chris; Hanes, Darcy E

    2016-08-01

    Phenolic compounds associated with essential oils of spices and herbs possess a variety of antioxidant and antimicrobial properties that interfere with Salmonella detection from fresh and dried products. Finding a compound to neutralize the effect of these antimicrobial compounds, while allowing Salmonella growth during pre-enrichment, is a crucial step in both traditional pathogen isolation and molecular detection from these foods. This study evaluated the effectiveness of corn oil as a component of the pre-enrichment broth to counteract antimicrobial compounds properties and increase the recovery of Salmonella from spices. Oregano samples artificially contaminated with Salmonella enterica were pre-enriched in modified Buffered Peptone Water (mBPW) supplemented with and without 2% (vol/vol) corn oil respectively. Samples were incubated overnight at 37 °C. The results showed that recovery of Salmonella from oregano samples was increased by ≥50% when pre-enriched with corn oil. Serovars were confirmed using a PCR serotyping method. In addition, shot-gun metagenomics analyses demonstrated bacterial diversity and the effect of corn oil on the relative prevalence of Salmonella in the oregano samples. Modifying pre-enrichment broths with corn oil improved the detection and isolation of Salmonella from oregano, and may provide an alternative method for pathogen detection in dried food matrices such as spices. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Presence of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 genes in seafood-associated Salmonella serovars and the role of the sseC gene in survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Patit P; Devegowda, Devananda; Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2011-01-01

    The type III secretion system encoded by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) has a central role in the pathogenesis of systemic infections by Salmonella. Sixteen genes (ssaU, ssaB, ssaR, ssaQ, ssaO, ssaS, ssaP, ssaT, sscB, sseF, sseG, sseE, sseD, sseC, ssaD and sscA) of SPI-2 were targeted for PCR amplification in 57 seafood-associated serovars of Salmonella. The sseC gene of SPI-2 was found to be absent in two isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden, SW13 and SW39. Absence of sseC was confirmed by sequencing using flanking primers. SW13 had only 66 bp sequence of the sseC gene and SW39 had 58 bp sequence of this gene. A clinical isolate, S. Weltevreden--SW3, 10:r:z6--was used to construct a deletion mutant for the sseC gene. Significant reduction in the survival of SW3, 10:r:z6 ΔsseC and natural mutants SW13 and SW39 in HeLa cells suggests that sseC has a crucial role in the intracellular survival of S. Weltevreden. Expression of sseC was upregulated during the intracellular phase of both S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and clinical isolate S. Weltevreden SW3, 10:r:z6, suggesting a crucial role for this gene in the survival of S. Weltevreden inside host cells.

  15. Multiple‐locus variable‐number tandem repeat analysis of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, M. K.; Torpdahl, M.; Campos, J.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella serovar Dublin causes disease in cattle and leads to considerable production losses. In humans, severe invasive disease and high mortality rates are reported. The presently available typing methods provide insufficient discrimination within Salm. Dublin for epidemiological investigatio...

  16. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica Type III Secretion System Effector Proteins as Carriers for Heterologous Vaccine Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Wael Abdel Halim; Xu, Xin; Metelitsa, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella enterica have a high potential as carriers of recombinant vaccines. The type III secretion system (T3SS)-dependent translocation of S. enterica can be deployed for delivery of heterologous antigens to antigen-presenting cells. Here we investigated the efficacy of various effector proteins of the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI2)-encoded T3SS for the translocation of model antigens and elicitation of immune responses. The SPI2 T3SS effector proteins SifA, SteC, SseL, SseJ, and SseF share an endosomal membrane-associated subcellular localization after translocation. We observed that all effector proteins could be used to translocate fusion proteins with the model antigens ovalbumin and listeriolysin into the cytosol of host cells. Under in vitro conditions, fusion proteins with SseJ and SteC stimulated T-cell responses that were superior to those triggered by fusion proteins with SseF. However, in mice vaccinated with Salmonella carrier strains, only fusion proteins based on SseJ or SifA elicited potent T-cell responses. These data demonstrate that the selection of an optimal SPI2 effector protein for T3SS-mediated translocation is a critical parameter for the rational design of effective Salmonella-based recombinant vaccines. PMID:22252866

  17. Effects of P22 bacteriophage on salmonella Enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DMC4 strain biofilm formation and eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaca Basar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, several antimicrobial agents have been made available. Due to increasing antimicrobial resistance, bacteriophages were rediscovered for their potential applications against bacterial infections. In the present study, biofilm inhibition and eradication of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DMC4 strain (S. Typhimurium was evaluated with respect to different incubation periods at different P22 phage titrations. The efficacy of P22 phage on biofilm formation and eradication of S. Typhimurium DMC4 strain was screened in vitro on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces. The biofilm forming capacity of S. Typhimurium was significantly reduced at higher phage titrations (106 pfu/mL ≤. All phage titers (104-108 pfu/mL were found to be effective at the end of the 24 h-incubation period whereas higher phage titrations were found to be effective at the end of the 48 h and 72 h of incubation. P22 phage has less efficacy on already formed, especially mature biofilms (72 h-old biofilm. Notable results of P22 phage treatment on S. Typhimurium biofilm suggest that P22 phage has potential uses in food systems.

  18. Salmonella enterica ssp. arizonae infection in a 43-year-old Italian man with hypoglobulinemia: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noto Pasquale

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Salmonella enterica ssp. arizonae is an uncommon human pathogen with serious infections reported in immunocompromised hosts. In Europe, only a few cases have been described. Patients with this infection usually have a history of contact with reptiles or travel abroad. We present a case report of infection in a patient with hypoglobulinemia and a literature review. Case presentation We describe the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian Italian man with hypoglobulinemia who presented to our hospital with sepsis and diarrhea. A stool culture yielded S. enterica ssp. arizonae. Our patient was treated with oral ciprofloxacin and made a full recovery. We also present a review of the cases of S. enterica ssp. arizonae infections previously reported in Europe. Conclusions The majority of infections from S. enterica ssp. arizonae occur in patients who are immunocompromised. Data from the literature suggests that it may be difficult to eradicate the bacteria and thus, prolonged antibiotic courses are often used. It would be advisable for clinicians to investigate for pre-existing immune dysfunction if S. enterica ssp. arizonae is isolated. In Italy, although there have only been a few cases, the likely route of transmission remains unclear and requires further surveillance.

  19. Antimicrobial Probiotics Reduce Salmonella enterica in Turkey Gastrointestinal Tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkus, Brittany; Ritter, Seth; Vlysidis, Michail; Geldart, Kathryn; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2017-01-17

    Despite the arsenal of technologies employed to control foodborne nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), infections have not declined in decades. Poultry is the primary source of NTS outbreaks, as well as the fastest growing meat sector worldwide. With recent FDA rules for phasing-out antibiotics in animal production, pressure is mounting to develop new pathogen reduction strategies. We report on a technology to reduce Salmonella enteritidis in poultry. We engineered probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917, to express and secrete the antimicrobial peptide, Microcin J25. Using in vitro experiments and an animal model of 300 turkeys, we establish the efficacy of this technology. Salmonella more rapidly clear the ceca of birds administered the modified probiotic than other treatment groups. Approximately 97% lower Salmonella carriage is measured in a treated group, 14 days post-Salmonella challenge. Probiotic bacteria are generally regarded as safe to consume, are bile-resistant and can plausibly be modified to produce a panoply of antimicrobial peptides now known. The reported systems may provide a foundation for platforms to launch antimicrobials against gastrointestinal tract pathogens, including ones that are multi-drug resistant.

  20. Whole Genome DNA Sequence Analysis of Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee obtained from related peanut butter foodborne outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark R; Brown, Eric; Keys, Chris; Strain, Errol; Luo, Yan; Muruvanda, Tim; Grim, Christopher; Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Jarvis, Karen; Ewing, Laura; Gopinath, Gopal; Hanes, Darcy; Allard, Marc W; Musser, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Establishing an association between possible food sources and clinical isolates requires discriminating the suspected pathogen from an environmental background, and distinguishing it from other closely-related foodborne pathogens. We used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee (S. Tennessee) to describe genomic diversity across the serovar as well as among and within outbreak clades of strains associated with contaminated peanut butter. We analyzed 71 isolates of S. Tennessee from disparate food, environmental, and clinical sources and 2 other closely-related Salmonella serovars as outgroups (S. Kentucky and S. Cubana), which were also shot-gun sequenced. A whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed using a maximum likelihood approach to infer phylogenetic relationships. Several monophyletic lineages of S. Tennessee with limited SNP variability were identified that recapitulated several food contamination events. S. Tennessee clades were separated from outgroup salmonellae by more than sixteen thousand SNPs. Intra-serovar diversity of S. Tennessee was small compared to the chosen outgroups (1,153 SNPs), suggesting recent divergence of some S. Tennessee clades. Analysis of all 1,153 SNPs structuring an S. Tennessee peanut butter outbreak cluster revealed that isolates from several food, plant, and clinical isolates were very closely related, as they had only a few SNP differences between them. SNP-based cluster analyses linked specific food sources to several clinical S. Tennessee strains isolated in separate contamination events. Environmental and clinical isolates had very similar whole genome sequences; no markers were found that could be used to discriminate between these sources. Finally, we identified SNPs within variable S. Tennessee genes that may be useful markers for the development of rapid surveillance and typing methods, potentially aiding in traceback efforts during future

  1. Whole Genome DNA Sequence Analysis of Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee obtained from related peanut butter foodborne outbreaks.

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    Mark R Wilson

    Full Text Available Establishing an association between possible food sources and clinical isolates requires discriminating the suspected pathogen from an environmental background, and distinguishing it from other closely-related foodborne pathogens. We used whole genome sequencing (WGS to Salmonella subspecies enterica serotype Tennessee (S. Tennessee to describe genomic diversity across the serovar as well as among and within outbreak clades of strains associated with contaminated peanut butter. We analyzed 71 isolates of S. Tennessee from disparate food, environmental, and clinical sources and 2 other closely-related Salmonella serovars as outgroups (S. Kentucky and S. Cubana, which were also shot-gun sequenced. A whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis was performed using a maximum likelihood approach to infer phylogenetic relationships. Several monophyletic lineages of S. Tennessee with limited SNP variability were identified that recapitulated several food contamination events. S. Tennessee clades were separated from outgroup salmonellae by more than sixteen thousand SNPs. Intra-serovar diversity of S. Tennessee was small compared to the chosen outgroups (1,153 SNPs, suggesting recent divergence of some S. Tennessee clades. Analysis of all 1,153 SNPs structuring an S. Tennessee peanut butter outbreak cluster revealed that isolates from several food, plant, and clinical isolates were very closely related, as they had only a few SNP differences between them. SNP-based cluster analyses linked specific food sources to several clinical S. Tennessee strains isolated in separate contamination events. Environmental and clinical isolates had very similar whole genome sequences; no markers were found that could be used to discriminate between these sources. Finally, we identified SNPs within variable S. Tennessee genes that may be useful markers for the development of rapid surveillance and typing methods, potentially aiding in traceback efforts

  2. A 23-year retrospective investigation of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi isolated in a tertiary Kathmandu hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellweger, Raphaël M; Basnyat, Buddha; Shrestha, Poojan; Prajapati, Krishna G; Dongol, Sabina; Sharma, Paban K; Koirala, Samir; Darton, Thomas C; Dolecek, Christiane; Thompson, Corinne N; Thwaites, Guy E; Baker, Stephen G; Karkey, Abhilasha

    2017-11-01

    Salmonella serovars Typhi (S. Typhi) and Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi A), the causative agents of enteric fever, have been routinely isolated organisms from the blood of febrile patients in the Kathmandu Valley since the early 1990s. Susceptibility against commonly used antimicrobials for treating enteric fever has gradually changed throughout South Asia since this time, posing serious treatment challenges. Here, we aimed to longitudinally describe trends in the isolation of Salmonella enterica and assess changes in their antimicrobial susceptibility in Kathmandu over a 23-year period. We conducted a retrospective analysis of standardised microbiological data from April 1992 to December 2014 at a single healthcare facility in Kathmandu, examining time trends of Salmonella-associated bacteraemia and the corresponding antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the isolated organisms. Over 23 years there were 30,353 positive blood cultures. Salmonella enterica accounted for 65.4% (19,857/30,353) of all the bacteria positive blood cultures. S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A were the dominant serovars, constituting 68.5% (13,592/19,857) and 30.5% (6,057/19,857) of all isolated Salmonellae. We observed (i) a peak in the number of Salmonella-positive cultures in 2002, a year of heavy rainfall and flooding in the Kathmandu Valley, followed by a decline toward pre-flood baseline by 2014, (ii) an increase in the proportion of S. Paratyphi in all Salmonella-positive cultures between 1992 and 2014, (iii) a decrease in the prevalence of MDR for both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi, and (iv) a recent increase in fluoroquinolone non-susceptibility in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi isolates. Our work describes significant changes in the epidemiology of Salmonella enterica in the Kathmandu Valley during the last quarter of a century. We highlight the need to examine current treatment protocols for enteric fever and suggest a change from fluoroquinolone monotherapy to combination therapies of

  3. A 23-year retrospective investigation of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi isolated in a tertiary Kathmandu hospital.

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    Raphaël M Zellweger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella serovars Typhi (S. Typhi and Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi A, the causative agents of enteric fever, have been routinely isolated organisms from the blood of febrile patients in the Kathmandu Valley since the early 1990s. Susceptibility against commonly used antimicrobials for treating enteric fever has gradually changed throughout South Asia since this time, posing serious treatment challenges. Here, we aimed to longitudinally describe trends in the isolation of Salmonella enterica and assess changes in their antimicrobial susceptibility in Kathmandu over a 23-year period.We conducted a retrospective analysis of standardised microbiological data from April 1992 to December 2014 at a single healthcare facility in Kathmandu, examining time trends of Salmonella-associated bacteraemia and the corresponding antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the isolated organisms.Over 23 years there were 30,353 positive blood cultures. Salmonella enterica accounted for 65.4% (19,857/30,353 of all the bacteria positive blood cultures. S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A were the dominant serovars, constituting 68.5% (13,592/19,857 and 30.5% (6,057/19,857 of all isolated Salmonellae. We observed (i a peak in the number of Salmonella-positive cultures in 2002, a year of heavy rainfall and flooding in the Kathmandu Valley, followed by a decline toward pre-flood baseline by 2014, (ii an increase in the proportion of S. Paratyphi in all Salmonella-positive cultures between 1992 and 2014, (iii a decrease in the prevalence of MDR for both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi, and (iv a recent increase in fluoroquinolone non-susceptibility in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi isolates.Our work describes significant changes in the epidemiology of Salmonella enterica in the Kathmandu Valley during the last quarter of a century. We highlight the need to examine current treatment protocols for enteric fever and suggest a change from fluoroquinolone monotherapy to combination therapies

  4. Characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- as a monophasic variant of serovar Typhimurium.

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    Noriko Ido

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- (S. 4,[5]12:i:- is believed to be a monophasic variant of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium. This study was conducted to corroborate this hypothesis and to identify the molecular and phenotypic characteristics of the S. 4,[5]12:i:- isolates in Japan. A total of 51 S. 4,[5]12:i:- isolates derived from humans, cattle, swine, chickens, birds, meat (pork, and river water in 15 prefectures in Japan between 2000 and 2010 were analyzed. All the S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates were identified as S. Typhimurium by two different polymerase chain reactions (PCR for identification of S. Typhimurium. Of the 51 S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates, 39 (76.5% harbored a 94-kb virulence plasmid, which is known to be specific for S. Typhimurium. These data suggest that the S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates are monophasic variants of S. Typhimurium. The flagellar phase variation is induced by three adjacent genes (fljA, fljB, and hin in the chromosome. The results of PCR mapping of this region and comparative genomic hybridization analysis suggested that the deletion of the fljAB operon and its flanking region was the major genetic basis of the monophasic phenotype of S. 4,[5],12:i:-. The fljAB operon and hin gene were detectable in eight of the S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates with common amino acid substitutions of A46T in FljA and R140L in Hin. The introduction of these mutations into S. Typhimurium isolates led to the loss of selectability of isolates expressing the phase 2 H antigen. These data suggested that a point mutation was the genetic basis, at least in part, of the S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates. The results of phenotypic analysis suggested that the S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates in Japan consist of multiple distinct clones. This is the first detailed characterization of the S. 4,[5],12:i:- isolates derived from various sources across Japan.

  5. Disruption of type III secretion in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by external guide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Jeffrey S; Zhang, Haifeng; Kubori, Tomoko; Galán, Jorge E; Altman, Sidney

    2004-01-01

    The type III secretion system involved in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invasion of host cells has been disrupted using inducibly expressed oligonucleotide external guide sequences (EGSs) complementary to invB or invC mRNA. These EGSs direct single site cleavage in these mRNAs by endogenous RNase P, and their expression in Salmonella results in invC mRNA and InvC protein depletion, decreased type III secretion and interference with host cell invasion. Comparison of these effects with those from studies of Salmonella invB and invC mutants suggests that invB EGSs have polar effects on invC mRNA.

  6. Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium as a Vaccine Vector for HIV-1 Gag

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    Nyasha Chin'ombe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains a global health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. An effective HIV-1 vaccine is therefore badly required to mitigate this ever-expanding problem. Since HIV-1 infects its host through the mucosal surface, a vaccine for the virus needs to trigger mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. Oral, attenuated recombinant Salmonella vaccines offer this potential of delivering HIV-1 antigens to both the mucosal and systemic compartments of the immune system. So far, a number of pre-clinical studies have been performed, in which HIV-1 Gag, a highly conserved viral antigen possessing both T- and B-cell epitopes, was successfully delivered by recombinant Salmonella vaccines and, in most cases, induced HIV-specific immune responses. In this review, the potential use of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a live vaccine vector for HIV-1 Gag is explored.

  7. Emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Potsdam as a major serovar in waterfowl hatcheries and chicken eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yao-Chi; Yu, Chang-you; Lin, Jiang-Liang; Lai, Jyh-mirn; Chen, Shu-Wun; Tu, Pei-Chun; Chu, Chishih

    2011-06-01

    Salmonellosis is a common food-borne illness in humans caused by Salmonella-contaminated poultry and their products. In hatcheries, 110 Salmonella isolates were identified, mostly from first enrichment, and few from delayed enrichment. The Salmonella prevalence in goose and duck hatcheries was higher when measured by four multiplex PCR methods than by traditional culture (73.8% vs. 44.35%, P Potsdam of serogroup C1 and other isolates were Salmonella Montevideo of C1 and Salmonella Albany of C2. Plasmid and pulsed field gel electrophoresis genetic analysis revealed that isolates from duck hatcheries were more diverse than those from goose hatcheries. In Salmonella Potsdam, host species-specific genotypes were observed in geese for genotypes 3, 4, and 5 and in ducks for genotypes 7, 8, and 9, suggesting that Salmonella Potsdam may evolve into goose- and duck-specific isolates. An examination of 1121 eggs found that only Salmonella Potsdam was identified in 1.8% (7/591) of eggs from chickens fed on the ground, not housed in cages, and in egg content (6/7) as well as eggshell membrane (1/7). In conclusion, Salmonella Potsdam may be a major Salmonella infection in waterfowl and chicken eggs.

  8. Transcriptomic Responses of Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium to Chlorine-Based Oxidative Stress▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyun; Phillippy, Adam M.; Deng, Kaiping; Rui, Xiaoqian; Li, Zengxin; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are the leading causative agents of salmonellosis in the United States. S. Enteritidis is predominantly associated with contamination of shell eggs and egg products, whereas S. Typhimurium is frequently linked to tainted poultry meats, fresh produce, and recently, peanut-based products. Chlorine is an oxidative disinfectant commonly used in the food industry to sanitize the surfaces of foods and food processing facilities (e.g., shell eggs and poultry meats). However, chlorine disinfection is not always effective, as some S. enterica strains may resist and survive the disinfection process. To date, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of how S. enterica responds to chlorine-based oxidative stress. In this study, we designed a custom bigenome microarray that consists of 385,000 60-mer oligonucleotide probes and targets 4,793 unique gene features in the genomes of S. Enteritidis strain PT4 and S. Typhimurium strain LT2. We explored the transcriptomic responses of both strains to two different chlorine treatments (130 ppm of chlorine for 30 min and 390 ppm of chlorine for 10 min) in brain heart infusion broth. We identified 209 S. enterica core genes associated with Fe-S cluster assembly, cysteine biosynthesis, stress response, ribosome formation, biofilm formation, and energy metabolism that were differentially expressed (>1.5-fold; P chlorine stress. Findings from this study suggest that the oxidative-stress response may render S. enterica resistant or susceptible to certain types of environmental stresses, which in turn promotes the development of more effective hurdle interventions to reduce the risk of S. enterica contamination in the food supply. PMID:20562293

  9. Integrative Analysis of Salmonellosis Outbreaks in Israel 1999-2012 Revealed an Invasive S. enterica Serovar 9,12:l,v:- and Endemic S. Typhimurium DT104 strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica is the leading etiologic agent of bacterial foodborne outbreaks worldwide. Methods. Laboratory-based statistical surveillance, molecular and genomics analyses were applied to characterize Salmonella outbreaks pattern in Israel. 65,087 Salmonella isolates reported to the National ...

  10. Salmonella enterica genomes from victims of a major sixteenth-century epidemic in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vågene, Åshild J; Herbig, Alexander; Campana, Michael G; Robles García, Nelly M; Warinner, Christina; Sabin, Susanna; Spyrou, Maria A; Andrades Valtueña, Aida; Huson, Daniel; Tuross, Noreen; Bos, Kirsten I; Krause, Johannes

    2018-01-15

    Indigenous populations of the Americas experienced high mortality rates during the early contact period as a result of infectious diseases, many of which were introduced by Europeans. Most of the pathogenic agents that caused these outbreaks remain unknown. Through the introduction of a new metagenomic analysis tool called MALT, applied here to search for traces of ancient pathogen DNA, we were able to identify Salmonella enterica in individuals buried in an early contact era epidemic cemetery at Teposcolula-Yucundaa, Oaxaca in southern Mexico. This cemetery is linked, based on historical and archaeological evidence, to the 1545-1550 CE epidemic that affected large parts of Mexico. Locally, this epidemic was known as 'cocoliztli', the pathogenic cause of which has been debated for more than a century. Here, we present genome-wide data from ten individuals for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi C, a bacterial cause of enteric fever. We propose that S. Paratyphi C be considered a strong candidate for the epidemic population decline during the 1545 cocoliztli outbreak at Teposcolula-Yucundaa.

  11. Survival of Salmonella enterica in Dried Turkey Manure and Persistence on Spinach Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, Ruth A; Sharma, Manan; Buchanan, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    Concerns about the microbiological safety of fresh produce have attracted attention in the past three decades due to multiple foodborne outbreaks. Animal manure contaminated with enteric pathogens has been identified as an important preharvest pathogen source. This study investigated the survival of Salmonella enterica in dust particles of dehydrated turkey manure and how association with manure dust may enhance the survival of salmonellae on leafy greens in the field. The survival of a cocktail of multiple Salmonella serotypes in the dried fecal material of various particle sizes (125 to 500 μm) was examined at varying moisture contents (5, 10, and 15%). Survival times of the pathogen were inversely related to moisture content and particle size of manure dust, with viable Salmonella still detectable for up to 291 days in the smallest particle size (125 μm) with 5% moisture. Association with manure dust particles increased the survival of Salmonella when subjected to UV light both under laboratory conditions and on the surface of spinach leaves in a greenhouse setting. The results of this study suggest that aerosolized manure particles could be a potential vehicle for Salmonella dispersal to leafy greens if the microorganism is present in the dry manure.

  12. Control of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in chicken breast meat by irradiation combined with modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudra, L L; Sebranek, J G; Dickson, J S; Mendonca, A F; Zhang, Q; Jackson-Davis, A; Prusa, K J

    2011-11-01

    Salmonella is one of the leading causes of human foodborne illnesses originating from meat and poultry products. Cross-contamination of Salmonella from raw to cooked products continues to be problematic in the food industry. Therefore, new intervention strategies are needed for meat and poultry products. Vacuum or modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) are common packaging techniques used to extend the shelf life of meat products. Irradiation has been well established as an antibacterial treatment to reduce pathogens on meat and poultry. Combining irradiation with high-CO(2)+CO MAP was investigated in this study for improving the control of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium on chicken breast meat. The radiation sensitivities (D10-values) of this pathogen in chicken breast meat were found to be similar in vacuum and in high-CO(2)+CO MAP (0.55 ± 0.03 kGy and 0.54 ± 0.03 kGy, respectively). Irradiation at 1.5 kGy reduced the Salmonella population by an average of 3 log. Some Salmonella cells survived in both vacuum and high-CO(2) + CO MAP through 6 weeks of refrigerated storage following irradiation. This pathogen also grew in both vacuum and MAP when the product was held at 25°C. This study demonstrated that irradiation is an effective means of reducing Salmonella on meat or poultry, but packaging in either vacuum or MAP had little impact during subsequent refrigerated storage.

  13. Fifteen years of successful spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Mbandaka clone ST413 in Poland and its public health consequences

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    Andrzej Hoszowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, [i]Salmonella enterica[/i] serovar (S. Mbandaka occurred in feed and poultry in Poland. In the following years, the serovar also gained epidemiological importance in other EU countries. The objectives of current study were to evaluate the genetic relationship of contemporary S. Mbandaka with isolates originating from the beginning of the epidemics, and to assess the contribution of poultry as the source of infections in humans. Seventy S. Mbandaka isolated mainly in 2009 – 2010 from humans, poultry, food, and feed were typed with API ID32 [sup]®[/sup], MIC, plasmid profiling, PFGE, and MLST. PCR and sequencing were used to identify plasmid mediated quinolone and cephalosporin resistance mechanisms. Six biochemical profiles were identified and 59 of S. Mbandaka proved to be susceptible to the applied antimicrobials. Eight strains carried plasmids and a few of them were positive for [i]bla[/i][sub]CMY-2[/sub] and [i]qnr[/i]S1 genes. Two clusters of 15 [i]XbaI[/i]-PFGE profiles with similarity of 77.5% were found. The first cluster, gathered 7 profiles involving historical isolates and several contemporary non-human S. Mbandaka. The predominant profile in the second cluster consisted of 28 human and 1 broiler isolate. MLST analysis showed sequence type ST413 occurring among all tested isolates. The identification of close genetic relationships between S. Mbandaka of human and poultry origin indicates animals as a primal human infection route. Despite [i]Salmonella [/i]control programmes, the S. Mbandaka ST413 clone has been circulating for several years in Poland. [i]Salmonella[/i] control polices in food production chain should be continuously updated to target serovars of major epidemiological importance. Resistance noted in S. Mbandaka to such antimicrobials as fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins may hinder public health.

  14. Fifteen years of successful spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Mbandaka clone ST413 in Poland and its public health consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoszowski, Andrzej; Zając, Magdalena; Lalak, Anna; Przemyk, Paweł; Wasyl, Dariusz

    2016-06-02

    In the 1990s, Salmonella enterica serovar (S.) Mbandaka occurred in feed and poultry in Poland. In the following years, the serovar also gained epidemiological importance in other EU countries. The objectives of current study were to evaluate the genetic relationship of contemporary S. Mbandaka with isolates originating from the beginning of the epidemics, and to assess the contribution of poultry as the source of infections in humans. Seventy S. Mbandaka isolated mainly in 2009 - 2010 from humans, poultry, food, and feed were typed with API ID32 (®), MIC, plasmid profiling, PFGE, and MLST. PCR and sequencing were used to identify plasmid mediated quinolone and cephalosporin resistance mechanisms. Six biochemical profiles were identified and 59 of S. Mbandaka proved to be susceptible to the applied antimicrobials. Eight strains carried plasmids and a few of them were positive for blaCMY-2 and qnrS1 genes. Two clusters of 15 XbaI-PFGE profiles with similarity of 77.5% were found. The first cluster, gathered 7 profiles involving historical isolates and several contemporary non-human S. Mbandaka. The predominant profile in the second cluster consisted of 28 human and 1 broiler isolate. MLST analysis showed sequence type ST413 occurring among all tested isolates. The identification of close genetic relationships between S. Mbandaka of human and poultry origin indicates animals as a primal human infection route. Despite Salmonella control programmes, the S. Mbandaka ST413 clone has been circulating for several years in Poland. Salmonella control polices in food production chain should be continuously updated to target serovars of major epidemiological importance. Resistance noted in S. Mbandaka to such antimicrobials as fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins may hinder public health.

  15. [Investigation of pathogenic phenotypes and virulence determinants of food-borne Salmonella enterica strains in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Deniz; Şen, Ece

    2015-10-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars with the consumption of contaminated food, is one of the leading food-borne disease that makes microbial food safety an important public health issue. This study was performed in order to determine the antibiotic resistance, serotyping, plasmid profiles and pathogenicity potentials of food-borne Salmonella isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model system in Edirne province, located at Thrace region of Turkey. In this study, 32 Salmonella isolates, of which 26 belonged to Infantis, four to Enteritidis, one to Telaviv and one to Kentucky serovars, isolated from chicken carcasses were used. Antibiotic resistance profiles were determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. A new C.elegans nematode animal model system was used to determine the pathogenicity potential of the isolates. The antibiotic resistance profiles revealed that one (3.1%) isolate was resistant to gentamicin, two (6.2%) to ciprofloxacin, three (9.4%) to ampicillin, 18 (56.3%) to kanamycin, 19 (60.8%) to neomycin, 25 (78.1%) to tetracycline, 25 (78.1%) to trimethoprim, 26 (81.25%) to nalidixic acid, 27 (84.4%) to streptomycin and 32 (100%) to sulfonamide. All of the 32 strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and ampicillin/sulbactam. High levels of resistance to streptomycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim, sulfonamide, kanamycin and neomycin was determined. According to the plasmid analysis, six isolates (18.75%) harboured 1-3 plasmids with sizes between 1.2 and 42.4 kb. In C.elegans nematode animal model system, the time (in days) required to kill 50% (TD50) of nematodes was calculated for each experimental group. TD50 values of the nematode group fed with S.Typhimurium ATCC 14028 that was used as the positive control and another group fed with E.coli OP50 as the negative control were 4.2 ± 0.5 days and 8.0 ± 0.02 days, respectively. TD50 of the groups fed with Salmonella isolates ranged

  16. Colonization of barley (Hordeum vulgare) with Salmonella enterica and Listeria spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutter, Stefan; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Colonization of barley plants by the food-borne pathogens Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium and three Listeria spp. (L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, L. innocua) was investigated in a monoxenic system. Herbaspirillum sp. N3 was used as a positive control and Escherichia coli HB101 as a negative control for endophytic root colonization. Colonization of the plants was tested 1-4 weeks after inoculation by determination of CFU, specific PCR assays and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Both S. enterica strains were found as endophytic colonizers of barley roots and reached up to 2.3 x 10(6) CFU per g root fresh weight after surface sterilization. The three Listeria strains had 10-fold fewer cell numbers after surface sterilization on the roots and therefore were similar to the results of nonendophytic colonizers, such as E. coli HB101. The FISH/CSLM approach demonstrated not only high-density colonization of the root hairs and the root surface by S. enterica but also a spreading to subjacent rhizodermis layers and the inner root cortex. By contrast, the inoculated Listeria spp. colonized the root hair zone but did not colonize other parts of the root surface. Endophytic colonization of Listeria spp. was not observed. Finally, a systemic spreading of S. enterica to the plant shoot (stems and leaves) was demonstrated using a specific PCR analysis and plate count technique.

  17. Salmonella enterica flagellin is recognized via FLS2 and activates PAMP-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ana Victoria; Charrier, Amélie; Schikora, Adam; Bigeard, Jean; Pateyron, Stephanie; de Tauzia-Moreau, Marie-Ludivine; Evrard, Alexandre; Mithöfer, Axel; Martin-Magniette, Marie Laure; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-04-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Recent evidence indicates that plants recognize S. enterica and raise defense responses. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction of S. enterica with plants are still largely unclear. Here, we show that flagellin from S. enterica represents a prominent pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, which induces PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) via the recognition of the flg22 domain by the receptor kinase FLS2. The Arabidopsis fls2 mutant shows reduced though not abolished PTI activation, indicating that plants rely also on recognition of other S. enterica PAMPs. Interestingly, the S. enterica type III secretion system (T3SS) mutant prgH- induced stronger defense gene expression than wild-type bacteria in Arabidopsis, suggesting that T3SS effectors are involved in defense suppression. Furthermore, we observe that S. enterica strains show variation in the flg22 epitope, which results in proteins with reduced PTI-inducing activity. Altogether, these results show that S. enterica activates PTI in Arabidopsis and suggest that, in order to accomplish plant colonization, S. enterica evolved strategies to avoid or suppress PTI.

  18. Demonstration of persistent contamination of a cooked egg product production facility with Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee and characterization of the persistent strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociune, D.; Bisgaard, M.; Pedersen, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate whether continuous contamination of light pasteurized egg products with Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee (S. Tennessee) at a large European producer of industrial egg products was caused by persistent contamination of the production facility...... and to characterize the persistent strains. Methods and Results: Seventy-three S. Tennessee isolates collected from products over a 3-year period with intermittent contamination, and 15 control strains were compared by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using two enzymes. Forty-five case isolates distributed...

  19. Association of virulence plasmid and antibiotic resistance determinants with chromosomal multilocus genotypes in Mexican Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains

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    Silva Claudia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes are mosaic structures composed of genes present in every strain of the same species (core genome, and genes present in some but not all strains of a species (accessory genome. The aim of this study was to compare the genetic diversity of core and accessory genes of a Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Typhimurium population isolated from food-animal and human sources in four regions of Mexico. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST and macrorestriction fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were used to address the core genetic variation, and genes involved in pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance were selected to evaluate the accessory genome. Results We found a low genetic diversity for both housekeeping and accessory genes. Sequence type 19 (ST19 was supported as the founder genotype of STs 213, 302 and 429. We found a temporal pattern in which the derived ST213 is replacing the founder ST19 in the four geographic regions analyzed and a geographic trend in the number of resistance determinants. The distribution of the accessory genes was not random among chromosomal genotypes. We detected strong associations among the different accessory genes and the multilocus chromosomal genotypes (STs. First, the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV was found mostly in ST19 isolates. Second, the plasmid-borne betalactamase cmy-2 was found only in ST213 isolates. Third, the most abundant integron, IP-1 (dfrA12, orfF and aadA2, was found only in ST213 isolates. Fourth, the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1 was found mainly in a subgroup of ST19 isolates carrying pSTV. The mapping of accessory genes and multilocus genotypes on the dendrogram derived from macrorestiction fingerprints allowed the establishment of genetic subgroups within the population. Conclusion Despite the low levels of genetic diversity of core and accessory genes, the non-random distribution of the accessory genes

  20. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Salmonella Isolates from Infections in Humans in Henan Province, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, S.L.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Xie, Z.Q.

    2009-01-01

    (PFGE). The most common serovars among the 2006-2007 isolates were S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (27%), S. enterica serovar Enteritidis (17%), S. enterica serovar Derby (10%), S. enterica serovar Indiana (6%), and S. enterica serovar Litchfield (6%). A high percentage of the isolates were multiple...

  1. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamding Wangdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a and C5a receptor (C5aR. Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  2. High-Resolution Microbiome Profiling for Detection and Tracking of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Grim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available 16S rRNA community profiling continues to be a useful tool to study microbiome composition and dynamics, in part due to advances in next generation sequencing technology that translate into reductions in cost. Reliable taxonomic identification to the species-level, however, remains difficult, especially for short-read sequencing platforms, due to incomplete coverage of the 16S rRNA gene. This is especially true for Salmonella enterica, which is often found as a low abundant member of the microbial community, and is often found in combination with several other closely related enteric species. Here, we report on the evaluation and application of Resphera Insight, an ultra-high resolution taxonomic assignment algorithm for 16S rRNA sequences to the species level. The analytical pipeline achieved 99.7% sensitivity to correctly identify S. enterica from WGS datasets extracted from the FDA GenomeTrakr Bioproject, while demonstrating 99.9% specificity over other Enterobacteriaceae members. From low-diversity and low-complexity samples, namely ice cream, the algorithm achieved 100% specificity and sensitivity for Salmonella detection. As demonstrated using cilantro and chili powder, for highly complex and diverse samples, especially those that contain closely related species, the detection threshold will likely have to be adjusted higher to account for misidentifications. We also demonstrate the utility of this approach to detect Salmonella in the clinical setting, in this case, bloodborne infections.

  3. Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Typhi as model organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Preeti; Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2012-01-01

    The lifestyle of intracellular pathogens has always questioned the skill of a microbiologist in the context of finding the permanent cure to the diseases caused by them. The best tool utilized by these pathogens is their ability to reside inside the host cell, which enables them to easily bypass the humoral immunity of the host, such as the complement system. They further escape from the intracellular immunity, such as lysosome and inflammasome, mostly by forming a protective vacuole-bound niche derived from the host itself. Some of the most dreadful diseases are caused by these vacuolar pathogens, for example, tuberculosis by Mycobacterium or typhoid fever by Salmonella. To deal with such successful pathogens therapeutically, the knowledge of a host-pathogen interaction system becomes primarily essential, which further depends on the use of a model system. A well characterized pathogen, namely Salmonella, suits the role of a model for this purpose, which can infect a wide array of hosts causing a variety of diseases. This review focuses on various such aspects of research on Salmonella which are useful for studying the pathogenesis of other intracellular pathogens. PMID:22722237

  4. Postharvest transfer and survival of Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis on living lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitt, J A; Kuhn, D D; Welbaum, G E; Ponder, M A

    2014-02-01

    The potential for postharvest transfer of Salmonella to 'living lettuce' is not well understood. In this study, the transfer of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (6 log CFU g(-1) ) from worker hands or contaminated roots to leaves of living lettuce was quantified. Transfer rates of Salmonella from contaminated gloves to sequentially handled lettuce heads ranged from 94% to head 1, 82% to head 2 and 69% to head 3. On average, 2.9 ± 0.1 log CFU g(-1) (64%) Salmonella was transferred from inoculated roots to leaves resulting from typical postharvest handling activities for living lettuce. Salmonella persisted on leaves stored at recommended storage temperatures (4°C) and increased 0.5 log CFU g(-1) when stored at temperature abuse conditions (12°C). Salmonella increased 1.6 log CFU g(-1) on roots after 18-day storage at 12°C, emphasizing the need to maintain temperature control to reduce the risk of human illness. Hydroponically grown lettuce packaged in plastic clamshells with intact roots, marketed as 'living lettuce', is increasing in popularity due to its extended shelf life. This study demonstrates the transfer of Salmonella from contaminated worker hands and contaminated roots to leaves where it persisted at 4°C for 18 day. Temperature abuse (12°C) increased Salmonella on roots and leaves. These findings suggest that failure to maintain temperatures below 12°C can pose a risk for consumers purchasing living lettuce at markets where recommended storage temperatures are not maintained. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Sub-inhibitory fosmidomycin exposures elicits oxidative stress in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Fox

    Full Text Available Fosmidomycin is a time-dependent nanomolar inhibitor of methylerythritol phosphate (MEP synthase, which is the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step in the MEP pathway to isoprenoids. Importantly, fosmidomycin is one of only a few MEP pathway-specific inhibitors that exhibits antimicrobial activity. Most inhibitors identified to date only exhibit activity against isolated pathway enzymes. The MEP pathway is the sole route to isoprenoids in many bacteria, yet has no human homologs. The development of inhibitors of this pathway holds promise as novel antimicrobial agents. Similarly, analyses of the bacterial response toward MEP pathway inhibitors provides valuable information toward the understanding of how emergent resistance may ultimately develop to this class of antibiotics. We have examined the transcriptional response of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium LT2 to sub-inhibitory concentrations of fosmidomycin via cDNA microarray and RT-PCR. Within the regulated genes identified by microarray were a number of genes encoding enzymes associated with the mediation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Regulation of a panel of genes implicated in the response of cells to oxidative stress (including genes for catalases, superoxide dismutases, and alkylhydrogen peroxide reductases was investigated and mild upregulation in some members was observed as a function of fosmidomycin exposure over time. The extent of regulation of these genes was similar to that observed for comparable exposures to kanamycin, but differed significantly from tetracycline. Furthermore, S. typhimurium exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of fosmidomycin displayed an increased sensitivity to exogenous H2O2 relative to either untreated controls or kanamycin-treated cells. Our results suggest that endogenous oxidative stress is one consequence of exposures to fosmidomycin, likely through the temporal depletion of intracellular isoprenoids themselves, rather than

  6. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolated from a variety of raw meat sausages in Gaborone (Botswana) retail stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaxa, Ronald Gaelekolwe; Matsheka, Maitshwarelo Ignatius; Mpoloka, Sununguko Wata; Gashe, Berhanu Abegaz

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the study was to provide baseline data on the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella in different types of raw meat sausages directly accessible to the consumers in Gaborone, Botswana. A total of 300 raw sausages comprising 79 beef, 78 pork, 72 chicken, and 71 mutton samples were concurrently analyzed for the presence of Salmonella using a conventional culture method and a validated PCR method. The PCR assay results were in full concordance with those of the conventional culture method for the detection of Salmonella. Sixty-five (21.7%) of 300 samples were positive for Salmonella by both the conventional culture method and PCR assay. Even though more chicken samples contained Salmonella than did any other sausage type, the difference in the presence of Salmonella among the four sausages types was not significant. Eleven serotypes were identified, and Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae II was most prevalent in all the sausage types. Beef sausages generally had higher mesophilic bacterial counts than did the other three sausage types. However, higher microbial counts were not reflective of the presence of salmonellae. Susceptibility of the Salmonella enterica serotypes to 20 antimicrobial agents was determined, and Salmonella Muenchen was resistant to the widest array of agents and was mostly isolated from chicken sausages. Regardless of the meat of origin, all 65 Salmonella isolates were resistant to at least four antimicrobial agents: amikacin, gentamicin, cefuroxime, and tombramycin. This resistance profile group was the most common in all four sausage types, comprising 90% of all Salmonella isolates from beef, 71% from pork, 63% from mutton, and 35% from chicken. These results suggest that raw sausages pose a risk of transmitting multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates to consumers.

  7. Competition of Lactobacillus paracasei with Salmonella enterica for Adhesion to Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Jankowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Competition of commensal and probiotic bacteria with pathogens for adhesion and colonization is one of the important protective mechanisms of gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we examined the ability of Lactobacillus paracasei to inhibit the adhesion of pathogenic Salmonella enterica to human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells were grown for 6 or 21 days to obtain nondifferentiated or well-differentiated cells, respectively. In adhesion experiments, bacteria were added to the cells for 2 or 4 hours. The number of attached bacteria was expressed as colony-forming units (CFUs, Caco-2 cells were counted in hematocytometer. Both bacterial strains used adhered better to well-differentiated than to nondifferentiated Caco-2 cells, however, the amount of Salmonella adhered to Caco-2 after 2 hours of contact was 12-fold higher in comparison to . paracasei and almost 27-fold higher after 4 hours of contact. Two types of experiments were done: coincubation (both bacteria were added to Caco-2 cells simultaneously, and preincubation (. paracasei was incubated with Caco-2 cells first, and then . enterica was added. In coincubation experiment, the presence of . paracasei decreased . enterica adhesion by 4-fold and in preincubation experiment even 7-fold. Generally, Lactobacillus spent culture supernatants (SCSs acted weaker as inhibitors of Salmonella adhesion in comparison to the whole . paracasei culture in coincubation experiment. In conclusion, the displacement of pathogens by lactic acid bacteria and its secretions showed here depends on the time of bacteria-epithelial cell contact, and also on the stage of Caco-2 differentiation.

  8. The Response to 2-Aminoacrylate Differs in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, despite Shared Metabolic Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Andrew J; Downs, Diana M

    2017-07-15

    The metabolic network of an organism includes the sum total of the biochemical reactions present. In microbes, this network has an impeccable ability to sense and respond to perturbations caused by internal or external stimuli. The metabolic potential (i.e., network structure) of an organism is often drawn from the genome sequence, based on the presence of enzymes deemed to indicate specific pathways. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family of Gram-negative bacteria that share the majority of their metabolic components and regulatory machinery as the "core genome." In S. enterica, the ability of the enamine intermediate 2-aminoacrylate (2AA) to inactivate a number of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes has been established in vivo In this study, 2AA metabolism and the consequences of its accumulation were investigated in E. coli The data showed that despite the conservation of all relevant enzymes, S. enterica and E. coli differed in both the generation and detrimental consequences of 2AA. In total, these findings suggest that the structure of the metabolic network surrounding the generation and response to endogenous 2AA stress differs between S. enterica and E. coliIMPORTANCE This work compared the metabolic networks surrounding the endogenous stressor 2-aminoacrylate in two closely related members of the Enterobacteriaceae The data showed that despite the conservation of all relevant enzymes in this metabolic node, the two closely related organisms diverged in their metabolic network structures. This work highlights how a set of conserved components can generate distinct network architectures and how this can impact the physiology of an organism. This work defines a model to expand our understanding of the 2-aminoacrylate stress response and the differences in metabolic structures and cellular milieus between S. enterica and E. coli. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Distribution of antibody titer against Salmonella enterica among healthy individuals in nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koirala Janak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteric fever is an endemic problem in Nepal and Widal agglutination test is widely used for its diagnosis but a normal baseline titer in healthy population and cutoff values have not been established. Methods We measured average baseline antibody titers against "O" and "H" antigens of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi and "H" antigens of serotypes Paratyphi A and Paratyphi B among apparently healthy blood donors in Nepal. The antibody titers were measured using Standard Widal Confirmatory Quantitative Tube test. Results Among the 100 blood samples collected from healthy volunteers, 62 individuals had significant antibody titers (≥ 1:20 against one of the four antigens against S. enterica. Among 54 samples with an anti-O titer against serotype Typhi, 15 and 36 samples had titers of ≥ 1:60 and ≥ 1:40, respectively. A significant proportion (12% of all had anti-O titer of ≥ 1:80. Similarly, among the 59 samples demonstrating anti-H titers of ≥ 1:20 to S. enterica serotype Typhi, 29 had a titer of ≥ 1:80 and 12 had 1:160. For S. enterica serotypes Paratyphi A and B, anti-H titers of ≥ 1:20 were found only in 12% and 3%, respectively, of all samples tested. Conclusion When a single Widal agglutination titer is used for the diagnosis of enteric fever, it will be more appropriate to change the currently used cutoff levels against S. enterica serotype Typhi to > 1:80 for anti-O and > 1:160 for anti-H titers for Nepal.

  10. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions.

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    Carine Makendi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies.

  11. Salmonella enterica serovar Ohio septic arthritis and bone abscess in an immunocompetent patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Hideaki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Non-typhi Salmonella species cause severe extra-intestinal focal infection after occult bacteremia. Although the number of cases of non-typhi salmonellosis is increasing worldwide among patients with immunocompromising conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, infection is uncommon in immunocompetent subjects. We report a case of septic arthritis and bone abscess due to a rare non-typhi Salmonella organism that developed after a prolonged asymptomatic period. Case presentation A 44-year-old Japanese immunocompetent man presented with acute-onset left knee pain and swelling. He had no history of food poisoning, and his most recent travel to an endemic area was 19 years ago. Salmonella enterica serovar Ohio was identified from samples of bone abscess and joint tissue. Arthrotomy and necrotic tissue debridement followed by intravenous ceftriaxone was successful. Conclusions Non-typhi Salmonella species only rarely cause extra-intestinal focal infections in immunocompetent patients. Our case suggests that non-typhi Salmonella species can cause severe focal infections many years after the occult bacteremia associated with food poisoning.

  12. Iron acquisition pathways and colonization of the inflamed intestine by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Luciana F.; Mol, Juliana P. S.; Silva, Ana Patricia C.; Macêdo,Auricélio A.; Silva, Teane M. A.; Alves, Geraldo E.S.; Winter, Sebastian; Winter, Maria G.; Velazquez, Eric M; Byndloss, Mariana X.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Renato L Santos

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is able to expand in the lumen of the inflamed intestine through mechanisms that have not been fully resolved. Here we utilized streptomycin-pretreated mice and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated mice to investigate how pathways for S. Typhimurium iron acquisition contribute to pathogen expansion in the inflamed intestine. Competitive infection with an iron uptake-proficient S. Typhimurium strain and mutant strains lacking tonB feoB, feoB, tonB or ir...

  13. BIOCHEMICAL AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SALMONELLA-ENTERICA SEROVAR BERTA, AND COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR TYPING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. E.; Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    1992-01-01

    Strains of Salmonella enterica serovar berta (S. berta) from Denmark and seven other countries have been characterized with the aim of developing a rational typing strategy in connection with outbreak investigations, Biotyping divided the strains into H2S-positive (90 %) and H2S-negative (10...... with restriction enzyme analysis of plasmids seemed to be the most rational typing strategy for S. berta. The results indicated that S. berta strains regardless of geographical source or host are possibly clonal in nature....

  14. Purulent Pericarditis with Salmonella enterica Subspecies arizona in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ai; Tanaka, Takamitsu; Ohba, Kenji; Ito, Naomi; Sakai, Yuki; Kaneko, Akane; Machii, Masashi; Nonaka, Daishi; Goto, Yoshie; Takase, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-15

    Purulent pericarditis is a life-threatening disorder, even in the modern antibiotic era. Although diabetes mellitus is known to be associated with an increased risk of multiple types of infections, purulent pericarditis is extremely rare. We herein report an unusual case of pericarditis caused by Salmonella enterica subspecies arizona that was not associated with any evident underlying immunosuppressive disorder apart from uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Because a pet snake was suspected as being the source of infection in the present case, patient education and a detailed review of exposure history could play an important role in treating patients with diabetes mellitus.

  15. Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky Flagella Are Required for Broiler Skin Adhesion and Caco-2 Cell Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Sanaz; Howe, Kevin; Lawrence, Mark L; Brooks, John P; Bailey, R Hartford; Karsi, Attila

    2017-01-15

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella strains are the main source of pathogenic bacterial contamination in the poultry industry. Recently, Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky has been recognized as the most prominent serovar on carcasses in poultry-processing plants. Previous studies showed that flagella are one of the main factors that contribute to bacterial attachment to broiler skin. However, the precise role of flagella and the mechanism of attachment are unknown. There are two different flagellar subunits (fliC and fljB) expressed alternatively in Salmonella enterica serovars using phase variation. Here, by making deletions in genes encoding flagellar structural subunits (flgK, fliC, and fljB), and flagellar motor (motA), we were able to differentiate the role of flagella and their rotary motion in the colonization of broiler skin and cellular attachment. Utilizing a broiler skin assay, we demonstrated that the presence of FliC is necessary for attachment to broiler skin. Expression of the alternative flagellar subunit FljB enables Salmonella motility, but this subunit is unable to mediate tight attachment. Deletion of the flgK gene prevents proper flagellar assembly, making Salmonella significantly less adherent to broiler skin than the wild type. S Kentucky with deletions in all three structural genes, fliC, fljB, and flgK, as well as a flagellar motor mutant (motA), exhibited less adhesion and invasion of Caco-2 cells, while an fljB mutant was as adherent and invasive as the wild-type strain. In this work, we answered clearly the role of flagella in S Kentucky attachment to the chicken skin and Caco-2 cells. We demonstrated that the presence of FliC is necessary for attachment to broiler skin. Expression of the alternative flagellar subunit FljB enables Salmonella motility, but this subunit is unable to mediate strong attachment. Deletion of the flgK gene prevents proper flagellar assembly, making Salmonella significantly less adherent to broiler skin than the wild

  16. Recovery of Salmonella enterica from seropositive finishing pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dahl, J.; van der Wolf, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    the proportion of culture positive- and seropositive samples in a herd at cut-off OD% > 10 and of 0.58 at cut-off OD% > 40. Serology is a measure of historical exposure, which may or may not correlate closely to the microbiological burden at the time of sampling. Due to the low sensitivity of culture methods...... (87.5%) had a within-herd seroprevalence larger than 50% at sample cut-off OD% > 10. In our study, there was an increasing probability of recovering Salmonella with increasing within-herd seroprevalence. However, this was only a moderate correlation. A correlation coefficient of 0.62 was found between...

  17. Infection of chickens with antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium-like variants: an emerging risk to the poultry industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, B N; Crayford, G; Humphrey, T J; Wigley, P

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica poses a particular risk to public health, and in particular isolates belonging to clonal lineages such as Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 cause epidemics across species including poultry. In recent years, antimicrobial-resistant S. Typhimurium DT193 and specifically the monophasic S. Typhimurium-like variants of this phage type, serotypes 4,12:i:- and 4,5,12:i:-, have become an increasing risk to public health in Europe and the USA and now account for nearly one-half of human S. Typhimurium infections in the UK. Unlike S. Typhimurium that possesses two forms of flagella which can vary between phase 1 and phase 2 during infection, monophasic variants possess only phase 1 flagella. These monophasic antimicrobial-resistant variants have become a major problem in pig production but human cases have also been associated with poultry consumption and have been found in UK flocks through surveillance schemes since 2010. In this study we determined the ability of antimicrobial-resistant DT193 serotype 4,12:i:- and 4,5,12:i:- isolates from pigs to infect chickens. All isolates were found to colonize the caeca and liver. All but one isolate of serotype 4,5,12:i:- also infected the spleen. Levels of infection and pathology were comparable with those found with the virulent S. Typhimurium isolate 4/74. These findings indicate that both S. Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic variants of this phage type usually associated with pigs are capable of colonizing the chicken. This shows that both S. Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic variants represent a significant and potential emerging threat to poultry production from "spill-over" of these isolates from the pig industry or other sources.

  18. Evaluation of Eight Different Cephalosporins for Detection of Cephalosporin Resistance in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarestrup, F.M.; Hasman, H.; Veldman, K.T.; Mevius, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of eight different cephalosporins for detection of cephalosporin resistance mediated by extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and plasmidic AmpC beta-lactamases in Salmonella and Escherichia coli. A total of 138 E. coli and 86 Salmonella isolates with known

  19. PREVALENCE OF SALMONELLA IN CAPTIVE REPTILES FROM CROATIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Maja; Pedersen, Karl; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella

    2015-06-01

    Salmonellosis transmitted by pet reptiles is an increasing public health issue worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella strains from captive reptiles in Croatia. From November 2009 to November 2011 a total of 292 skin, pharyngeal, cloacal, and fecal samples from 200 apparently healthy reptiles were tested for Salmonella excretions by bacteriologic culture and serotyping. These 200 individual reptiles included 31 lizards, 79 chelonians, and 90 snakes belonging to private owners or housed at the Zagreb Zoo, Croatia. Salmonella was detected in a total of 13% of the animals, among them 48.4% lizards, 8.9% snakes, and 3.8% turtles. Representatives of five of the six Salmonella enterica subspecies were identified with the following proportions in the total number of isolates: Salmonella enterica enterica 34.6%, Salmonella enterica houtenae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica arizonae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica diarizonae 15.4%, and Salmonella enterica salamae 3.8%. The 14 different serovars isolated included several rarely occurring serovars such as Salmonella Apapa, Salmonella Halle, Salmonella Kisarawe, and Salmonella Potengi. These findings confirm that the prevalence of Salmonella is considerable in captive reptiles in Croatia, indicating that these animals may harbor serovars not commonly seen in veterinary or human microbiologic practice. This should be addressed in the prevention and diagnostics of human reptile-transmitted infections.

  20. Loss of Multicellular Behavior in Epidemic African Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium ST313 Strain D23580.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singletary, Larissa A; Karlinsey, Joyce E; Libby, Stephen J; Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Tsolis, Renée M; Byndloss, Mariana X; Hirao, Lauren A; Gaulke, Christopher A; Crawford, Robert W; Dandekar, Satya; Kingsley, Robert A; Msefula, Chisomo L; Heyderman, Robert S; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-03-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a frequent cause of bloodstream infections in children and HIV-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. Most isolates from African patients with bacteremia belong to a single sequence type, ST313, which is genetically distinct from gastroenteritis-associated ST19 strains, such as 14028s and SL1344. Some studies suggest that the rapid spread of ST313 across sub-Saharan Africa has been facilitated by anthroponotic (person-to-person) transmission, eliminating the need for Salmonella survival outside the host. While these studies have not ruled out zoonotic or other means of transmission, the anthroponotic hypothesis is supported by evidence of extensive genomic decay, a hallmark of host adaptation, in the sequenced ST313 strain D23580. We have identified and demonstrated 2 loss-of-function mutations in D23580, not present in the ST19 strain 14028s, that impair multicellular stress resistance associated with survival outside the host. These mutations result in inactivation of the KatE stationary-phase catalase that protects high-density bacterial communities from oxidative stress and the BcsG cellulose biosynthetic enzyme required for the RDAR (red, dry, and rough) colonial phenotype. However, we found that like 14028s, D23580 is able to elicit an acute inflammatory response and cause enteritis in mice and rhesus macaque monkeys. Collectively, these observations suggest that African S. Typhimurium ST313 strain D23580 is becoming adapted to an anthroponotic mode of transmission while retaining the ability to infect and cause enteritis in multiple host species. The last 3 decades have witnessed an epidemic of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Genomic analysis and clinical observations suggest that the Salmonella strains responsible for these infections are evolving to become more typhoid-like with regard to patterns of transmission and virulence. This study shows that a prototypical

  1. Pattern of multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... point of sample collection was Akaraugo Hospital, Ikenegbu, Owerri,. Imo state. All the samples were packed well on ice pack and taken to the Nigeria Institute of Medical Research (NIMR), Yaba, Lagos state for isolation, antimicrobial susceptibility test and plasmid DNA isolation. Isolation. A loop full of each ...

  2. Laboratory Investigation of Salmonella enterica serovar Poona Outbreak in California: Comparison of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreva, Varvara K; Crandall, John; Sabol, Ashley; Poe, Alyssa; Zhang, Peng; Concepción-Acevedo, Jeniffer; Schroeder, Morgan N; Wagner, Darlene; Higa, Jeffrey; Trees, Eija; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2016-11-22

    Recently, Salmonella enterica serovar Poona caused a multistate outbreak, with 245 out of 907 cases occurring in California. We report a comparison of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) results with whole genome sequencing (WGS) for genotyping of Salmonella Poona isolates. CA Salmonella Poona isolates, collected from July to August 2015, were genotyped by PFGE using XbaI restriction enzyme. WGS was done using Nextera XT library kit with 2x300 bp or 2x250 bp sequencing chemistry on the Illumina MiSeq Sequencer.  Reads were mapped to the de novo assembled serovar Poona draft genome (48 contigs, N50= 223,917) from the outbreak using CLCbio GW 8.0.2. The phylogenetic tree was generated based on hqSNPs calling. Genomes were annotated with CGE and PHAST online tools. In silico MLST was performed using the CGE online tool. Human (14) and cucumber (2) Salmonella Poona isolates exhibited 3 possibly related PFGE patterns (JL6X01.0018 [predominant], JL6X01.0375, JL6X01.0778).  All isolates that were related by PFGE also clustered together according to the WGS. One isolate with a divergent PFGE pattern (JL6X01.0776) served as an outlier in the phylogenetic analysis and substantially differed from the outbreak clade by WGS. All outbreak isolates were assigned to MLST sequence type 447. The majority of the outbreak-related isolates possessed the same set of Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands with few variations. One outbreak isolate was sequenced and analyzed independently by CDC and CDPH laboratories; there was 0 SNP difference in results. Additional two isolates were sequenced by CDC and the raw data was processed through CDPH and CDC analysis pipelines. Both data analysis pipelines also generated concordant results.  Discussion: PFGE and WGS results for the recent CA Salmonella enterica serovar Poona outbreak provided concordant assignment of the isolates to the outbreak cluster. WGS allowed more robust determination of genetic relatedness, provided information

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  4. Identification of in vivo-induced genes during infection of chickens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Zhicheng; Lin, Zhijie; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-06-01

    Chickens are an important source of food worldwide and are often infected with food-poisoning serovars of Salmonella enterica, frequently Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), without exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Ivi (in vivo induced) genes identified using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) are expressed only during bacterial infection and have the potential value of identifying epidemic strains and antigens which can form the basis for sub-unit vaccine development. We applied IVIAT to SE strain 50041 and identified 42 ivi genes. Eight representative ivi genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR as being expressed only in vivo within 48 h of infection compared with that of in vitro-cultured. Although our results indicated that the identified ivi genes are expressed only in vivo, further research is needed to elucidate the exact roles of these genes during infection and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon

    2016-01-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally...... initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed...... by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes...

  6. [Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection presenting as a retrocecal mass in an 8-year-old child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle Mbou, V; Vu Thien, H; Thuilleux, G; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Grand d'Esnon, A; Coulomb, A

    2010-11-01

    Minor salmonellosis is due to Gram-negative bacilli, which usually cause enterocolitis with potentially severe complications. We report on a case of a clinically uncommon presentation of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection in an 8-year-old child who presented with acute abdominal pain. We discuss clinically uncommon presentations of salmonella disease in children, as well as its pathology and radiology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of Lawsonia intracellularis, Serpulina hyodysenteriae, weakly beta-haemolytic intestinal spirochaetes, Salmonella enterica, and haemolytic Escherichia coli from swine herds with and without diarrhoea among growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kristian; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Jorsal, Sven Erik Lind

    1998-01-01

    was used together with conventional culture techniques to detect Serpulina hyodysenteriae, weakly beta-haemolytic intestinal spirochaetes (WBHIS), Salmonella enterica, and haemolytic Escherichia coli, in a case control study to examine selected risk factors for the development of diarrhoea in growing pigs......A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was optimized to detect Lawsonia intracellularis in faeces from naturally infected pigs. By combining a boiling procedure to extract DNA and a nested PCR procedure, a detection limit at 2x10(2) bacterial cells per gram of faeces was achieved. The optimized PCR....... Herds with diarrhoea were selected as cases and randomly chosen herds without diarrhoea were chosen as controls. Infection with L. intracellularis significantly enhanced the chance of diarrhoea. S. hyodysenteriae, WBHIS group IV (Serpulina pilosicoli), and S. enterica were isolated only from case herds...

  8. Pediatric Epidemic of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in the Area of L'Aquila, Italy, Four Years after a Catastrophic Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Giovanni; Bottone, Gabriella; Maiorani, Daniela; Trombatore, Fabiana; Falasca, Silvana; Bruno, Gianfranco

    2016-05-06

    A Salmonella enterica epidemic occurred in children of the area of L'Aquila (Central Italy, Abruzzo region) between June 2013 and October 2014, four years after the catastrophic earthquake of 6 April 2009. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory children. Routine investigations for Salmonella infection were carried out on numerous alimentary matrices of animal origin and sampling sources for drinking water of the L'Aquila district, including pickup points of the two main aqueducts. Salmonella infection occurred in 155 children (83 females: 53%), aged 1 to 15 years (mean 2.10). Of these, 44 children (28.4%) were hospitalized because of severe dehydration, electrolyte abnormalities, and fever resistant to oral antipyretic and antibiotic drugs. Three children (1.9%) were reinfected within four months after primary infection by the same Salmonella strain. Four children (2.6%), aged one to two years, were coinfected by rotavirus. A seven-year old child had a concomitant right hip joint arthritis. The isolated strains, as confirmed in about the half of cases or probable/possible in the remaining ones, were identified as S. enterica serovar Typhimurium [4,5:i:-], monophasic variant. Aterno river, bordering the L'Aquila district, was recognized as the main responsible source for the contamination of local crops and vegetables derived from polluted crops. The high rate of hospitalized children underlines the emergence of a highly pathogenic S. enterica strain probably subsequent to the contamination of the spring water sources after geological changes occurred during the catastrophic earthquake.

  9. Pediatric Epidemic of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in the Area of L’Aquila, Italy, Four Years after a Catastrophic Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Nigro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A Salmonella enterica epidemic occurred in children of the area of L’Aquila (Central Italy, Abruzzo region between June 2013 and October 2014, four years after the catastrophic earthquake of 6 April 2009. Methods: Clinical and laboratory data were collected from hospitalized and ambulatory children. Routine investigations for Salmonella infection were carried out on numerous alimentary matrices of animal origin and sampling sources for drinking water of the L’Aquila district, including pickup points of the two main aqueducts. Results: Salmonella infection occurred in 155 children (83 females: 53%, aged 1 to 15 years (mean 2.10. Of these, 44 children (28.4% were hospitalized because of severe dehydration, electrolyte abnormalities, and fever resistant to oral antipyretic and antibiotic drugs. Three children (1.9% were reinfected within four months after primary infection by the same Salmonella strain. Four children (2.6%, aged one to two years, were coinfected by rotavirus. A seven-year old child had a concomitant right hip joint arthritis. The isolated strains, as confirmed in about the half of cases or probable/possible in the remaining ones, were identified as S. enterica serovar Typhimurium [4,5:i:-], monophasic variant. Aterno river, bordering the L’Aquila district, was recognized as the main responsible source for the contamination of local crops and vegetables derived from polluted crops. Conclusions: The high rate of hospitalized children underlines the emergence of a highly pathogenic S. enterica strain probably subsequent to the contamination of the spring water sources after geological changes occurred during the catastrophic earthquake.

  10. Phage type conversion in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis caused by the introduction of a resistance plasmid of incompatibility group X (IncX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Platt, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The plasmid pOG670, a 54 kb, conjugative plasmid that specifies resistance to ampicillin and kanamycin and belonging to the incompatibility group X (IncX), was transferred into 10 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis belonging to 10 different phage types (PT1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10......, 6 and 13a respectively. The results indicate a different route for phage type conversion Enteritidis from others reported in the literature and, although IncX plasmids are not normally present in PT8 or PT13a, may suggest a possible mechanism/link connecting these phage types....

  11. Simultaneous Detection of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytegenes and Bacillus cereus by Oligonucleotide Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Sarshar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional laboratory methods to detect pathogenic bacteria are time consuming and laborious. Therefore, it is essential to use powerful and reliable molecular methods for quick and simultaneous detection of microbial pathogens. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the capability and efficiency of 23S rDNA sequence for rapid and simultaneous detection of four important food-borne pathogens by an oligonucleotide microarray technique. Materials and Methods: The 23S rDNA sequences of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus were obtained from GenBank databases and used to design the oligonucleotide probes and primers by Vector NTI software. Oligonucleotide probes were placed on a nylon membrane and hybridization was performed between probes and 23S rDNA digoxigenin-labeled polymerase chain reaction (PCR products. Hybridization signals were visualized by NBT/BCIP color development. Results: Positive hybridization color was produced for Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus. The oligonucleotide microarray detected all bacterial strains in a single reaction in less than five hours. The sensitivity of the performed microarray assay was 103 cfu/mL for each species of pathogen. No cross reaction was found between the tested bacterial species. Conclusions: The obtained results indicated that amplification of 23S rDNA gene followed by oligonucleotide microarray hybridization is a rapid and reliable method to identify and discriminate foodborne pathogens tested under the study.

  12. Physiological and Immunological Regulations in Caenorhabditis elegans Infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Studies pertaining to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by utilizing model systems failed to mimic the essential aspects of immunity induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, as the determinants of innate immunity are distinct. The present study investigated the physiological and innate immune responses of S. Typhi infected Caenorhabditis elegans and also explored the Ty21a mediated immune enhancement in C. elegans. Ty21a is a known live vaccine for typhoidal infection in human beings. Physiological responses of C. elegans infected with S. Typhi assessed by survival and behavioral assays revealed that S. Typhi caused host mortality by persistent infection. However, Ty21a exposure to C. elegans was not harmful. Ty21a pre-exposed C. elegans, exhibited significant resistance against S. Typhi infection. Elevated accumulation of S. Typhi inside the infected host was observed when compared to Ty21a exposures. Transcript analysis of candidate innate immune gene (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7, ilys-3, scl-2, cpr-2, F08G5.6, atf-7, age-1, bec-1 and daf-16) regulations in the host during S. Typhi infection have been assessed through qPCR analysis to understand the activation of immune signaling pathways during S. Typhi infections. Gene silencing approaches confirmed that clec-60 and clec-87 has a major role in the defense system of C. elegans during S. Typhi infection. In conclusion, the study revealed that preconditioning of host with Ty21a protects against subsequent S. Typhi infection.

  13. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T David Matthews

    Full Text Available The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.

  14. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Skills To Succeed in the Host: Virulence and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbrega, Anna

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary enteric pathogen infecting both humans and animals. Infection begins with the ingestion of contaminated food or water so that salmonellae reach the intestinal epithelium and trigger gastrointestinal disease. In some patients the infection spreads upon invasion of the intestinal epithelium, internalization within phagocytes, and subsequent dissemination. In that case, antimicrobial therapy, based on fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins as the current drugs of choice, is indicated. To accomplish the pathogenic process, the Salmonella chromosome comprises several virulence mechanisms. The most important virulence genes are those located within the so-called Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs). Thus far, five SPIs have been reported to have a major contribution to pathogenesis. Nonetheless, further virulence traits, such as the pSLT virulence plasmid, adhesins, flagella, and biofilm-related proteins, also contribute to success within the host. Several regulatory mechanisms which synchronize all these elements in order to guarantee bacterial survival have been described. These mechanisms govern the transitions from the different pathogenic stages and drive the pathogen to achieve maximal efficiency inside the host. This review focuses primarily on the virulence armamentarium of this pathogen and the extremely complicated regulatory network controlling its success. PMID:23554419

  15. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  16. Heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli promotes intestinal colonization of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Van Parys, Alexander; Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Arnouts, Sven; Lundberg, Urban; Ducatelle, Richard; Van den Broeck, Wim; Yekta, Maryam Atef; Cox, Eric; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of infantile and travellers' diarrhoea, which poses a serious health burden, especially in developing countries. In addition, ETEC bacteria are a major cause of illness and death in neonatal and recently weaned pigs. The production of a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) promotes the colonization and pathogenicity of ETEC and may exacerbate co-infections with other enteric pathogens such as Salmonella enterica. We showed that the intraintestinal presence of LT dramatically increased the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in experimentally inoculated pigs. This could not be explained by direct alteration of the invasion or survival capacity of Salmonella in enterocytes, in vitro. However, we demonstrated that LT affects the enteric mucus layer composition in a mucus-secreting goblet cell line by significantly decreasing the expression of mucin 4. The current results show that LT alters the intestinal mucus composition and aggravates a Salmonella Typhimurium infection, which may result in the exacerbation of the diarrhoeal illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Harada, Tomoyuki; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kanehira, Katsushi; Hikono, Hirokazu; Matsui, Hidenori; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb)-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  18. Exposure of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to high level biocide challenge can select multidrug resistant mutants in a single step.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah N Whitehead

    Full Text Available Biocides are crucial to the prevention of infection by bacteria, particularly with the global emergence of multiply antibiotic resistant strains of many species. Concern has been raised regarding the potential for biocide exposure to select for antibiotic resistance due to common mechanisms of resistance, notably efflux.Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was challenged with 4 biocides of differing modes of action at both low and recommended-use concentration. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the physiological state of the cells after biocide challenge. After 5 hours exposure to biocide, live cells were sorted by FACS and recovered. Cells recovered after an exposure to low concentrations of biocide had antibiotic resistance profiles similar to wild-type cells. Live cells were recovered after exposure to two of the biocides at in-use concentration for 5 hours. These cells were multi-drug resistant and accumulation assays demonstrated an efflux phenotype of these mutants. Gene expression analysis showed that the AcrEF multidrug efflux pump was de-repressed in mutants isolated from high-levels of biocide.These data show that a single exposure to the working concentration of certain biocides can select for mutant Salmonella with efflux mediated multidrug resistance and that flow cytometry is a sensitive tool for identifying biocide tolerant mutants. The propensity for biocides to select for MDR mutants varies and this should be a consideration when designing new biocidal formulations.

  19. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-Infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosab Ahmadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic and route (oral gavage or vent lip of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration.

  20. Sequence analysis and characterization of rolling-circle replicating plasmid pVCM01 from Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penido, A. F. B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Characterization of cryptic plasmid pVCM01 (accession number JX133088 isolated from Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. Methodology and results: The complete sequence of pVCM01 was obtained. This plasmid possesses 1981 bp, with G+C content of 57% in agreement of the range of Salmonella genomic DNA. pVCM01 has a high degree of similarity to pB and pJ plasmids. It possesses six main open reading frames, only one have a very high degree of amino acid identity with protein involved in the rolling-circle-like replication (RCR. Based on the sequence similarities, pVCM01 plasmid belonged to the pC194/pUB110 rolling-circle replicating plasmid family. The Rep pVCM01 possesses the motifs: FLTLTVRN, HPHFHTL, SGDGYVKHERW, which were present in all Rep proteins. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The small size of pVCM01 plasmid and its stability in E. coli cells, make it an attractive candidate to develop new vectors, such as cloning and/or expression vector.

  1. Survival of Salmonella enterica on soybean sprouts following treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide and biocontrol Pseudomonas bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of Salmonella enterica on sprouts and minimally processed, ready-to-eat fruits and vegetables is important for food and consumer safety. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide(ClO2)and biocontrol microorganisms (Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. fluoresc...

  2. Identification of potential drug targets in Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium using metabolic modelling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartman, Hassan B.; Fell, David A.; Rossell, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium is an established model organism for Gram-negative, intracellular pathogens. Owing to the rapid spread of resistance to antibiotics among this group of pathogens, new approaches to identify suitable target proteins are required. Based on the genome sequence of ...

  3. Dose-dependent effects on survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in house flies (Musca domestica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult house flies ingest variable numbers of bacteria when they encounter microbe-rich substrates. Bacterial abundance may affect survival within the fly gut, which subsequently impacts vector potential. This study investigated the dose-dependent survival of GFP-expressing Salmonella enterica serova...

  4. Quantification of contamination of lettuce by GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, E.; Visser, A.A.; Diepeningen, van A.D.; Klerks, M.M.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the possibility of internalization of GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains MAE 110 (multi-cellular morphology) and 119 (wild type morphology) into lettuce seedlings (Lactuca

  5. Quantification of contamination of lettuce by GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, Eelco; Visser, Anna A; Van Diepeningen, Anne D; Klerks, Michel M; Termorshuizen, Aad J; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the possibility of internalization of GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains MAE 110 (multi-cellular morphology) and 119 (wild type morphology) into lettuce seedlings (Lactuca

  6. Competitive exclusion of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis by Lactobacillus crispatus and Clostridium lactatifermentans in a sequencing fed-batch culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wielen, PWJJ; Lipman, LJA; van Knapen, F; Biesterveld, S

    Competitive exclusion of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis by a mixed culture of Lactobacillus crispatus and Clostridium lactatifermentans was studied in a sequencing fed-batch reactor mimicking the cecal ecophysiology of broiler chickens. Growth of serovar Enteritidis was inhibited by a mixed

  7. Combining essential oils and olive extract for control of multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the combined antimicrobial effects of plant essential oils and olive extract against antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Newport on organic leafy greens. Organic baby spinach, mature spinach, romaine lettuce, and iceberg lettuce were inoculated with S. Newport and dip-t...

  8. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and quality maintenance of cherry tomatoes treated with gaseous essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils (EOs) from cinnamon bark, oregano, mustard and of their major components cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, and allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) were evaluated as a gaseous treatment to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in vitro and on tomatoes. In dif...

  9. Beta-glucan plus ascorbic acid in neonatal calves modulates immune functions with and without Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calves often succumb to Salmonella enterica, Dublin after maternal antibody protection has abated. Enhancement of innate immunity or earlier maturation of adaptive immunity to support vaccinations with dietary immune modulators may be the best option for protection during this vulnerable period. I...

  10. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe puree by high hydrostatic pressure with/without added ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to evaluate and develop a method for inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe puree (CP) by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Cantaloupe being the most netted varieties of melons presents a greater risk of pathogen transmission. ...

  11. Molecular profiling: Catecholamine modulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium have demonstrated that these bacterial pathogens can respond to the presence of catecholamines including norepinephrine and/or epinephrine in their environment by modulating gene expression and exhibiting various ...

  12. The global establishment of a highly-fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198 strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Hello, Simon; Bekhit, Amany; Granier, Sophie A.

    2013-01-01

    While the spread of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky resistant to ciprofloxacin across Africa and the Middle-East has been described recently, the presence of this strain in humans, food, various animal species (livestock, pets, and wildlife) and in environment is suspected in other countrie...

  13. Laser Optical Sensor, a Label-Free On-Plate Salmonella enterica Colony Detection Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Atul K.; Bettasso, Amanda M.; Bae, Euiwon; Rajwa, Bartek; Dundar, Murat M.; Forster, Mark D.; Liu, Lixia; Barrett, Brent; Lovchik, Judith; Robinson, J. Paul; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated the application capabilities of a laser optical sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scatter technology) to generate differentiating scatter patterns for the 20 most frequently reported serovars of Salmonella enterica. Initially, the study tested the classification ability of BARDOT by using six Salmonella serovars grown on brain heart infusion, brilliant green, xylose lysine deoxycholate, and xylose lysine tergitol 4 (XLT4) agar plates. Highly accurate discrimination (95.9%) was obtained by using scatter signatures collected from colonies grown on XLT4. Further verification used a total of 36 serovars (the top 20 plus 16) comprising 123 strains with classification precision levels of 88 to 100%. The similarities between the optical phenotypes of strains analyzed by BARDOT were in general agreement with the genotypes analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). BARDOT was evaluated for the real-time detection and identification of Salmonella colonies grown from inoculated (1.2 × 102 CFU/30 g) peanut butter, chicken breast, and spinach or from naturally contaminated meat. After a sequential enrichment in buffered peptone water and modified Rappaport Vassiliadis broth for 4 h each, followed by growth on XLT4 (~16 h), BARDOT detected S. Typhimurium with 84% accuracy in 24 h, returning results comparable to those of the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service method, which requires ~72 h. BARDOT also detected Salmonella (90 to 100% accuracy) in the presence of background microbiota from naturally contaminated meat, verified by 16S rRNA sequencing and PFGE. Prolonged residence (28 days) of Salmonella in peanut butter did not affect the bacterial ability to form colonies with consistent optical phenotypes. This study shows BARDOT’s potential for nondestructive and high-throughput detection of Salmonella in food samples. PMID:24496794

  14. Efecto in vitro de la acetamida furánica bromada sobre aislados de Salmonella enterica de aves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmaida Estrada Cutiño

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentro del género Salmonella, la especie Salmonella enterica, subsp enterica es una de las de mayor interés por su efecto patógeno sobre los animales. El trabajo se realizó con el objetivo de evaluar el efecto in vitro de la acetamida furánica bromada (AFB sobre Salmonella enterica aviar. La AFB se obtuvo en el Centro de Bioactivos Químicos de la Universidad Central de las Villas, Cuba. La actividad antimicrobiana del producto sobre los aislados de Salmonella entérica se determinó por el método de macrodilución en caldo, según el “National Comité for Clinical Laboratory Standards”, NCCLS, documento M7-A2. La concentración letal mínima se determinó según NCCLS, documento M26-A, 1999. Las pruebas bioquímicas y serológicas confirmaron la presencia de Salmonella gallinarum en el 100 % de las muestras. Los valores de la mínima concentración inhibitoria (MCI y mínima concentración bactericida (MCB de la AFB fueron ambas de 12.5 mg/ml, para las cepas de Salmonella gallinarum y “American Type Culture Collection” de E. coli. Se concluye que la MCI y MCB de la Salmonella enterica frente a la acetamida furánica bromada in vitro fue de 12.5 mg/ml, demostrando la acción bactericida del producto.

  15. Virulence Characterization of Salmonella enterica by a New Microarray: Detection and Evaluation of the Cytolethal Distending Toxin Gene Activity in the Unusual Host S. Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Figueiredo

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic foodborne pathogen that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans. We assessed the virulence potential of one-hundred and six Salmonella strains isolated from food animals and products. A high through-put virulence genes microarray demonstrated Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPI and adherence genes were highly conserved, while prophages and virulence plasmid genes were variably present. Isolates were grouped by serotype, and virulence plasmids separated S. Typhimurium in two clusters. Atypical microarray results lead to whole genome sequencing (WGS of S. Infantis Sal147, which identified deletion of thirty-eight SPI-1 genes. Sal147 was unable to invade HeLa cells and showed reduced mortality in Galleria mellonella infection model, in comparison to a SPI-1 harbouring S. Infantis. Microarray and WGS of S. Typhimurium Sal199, established for the first time in S. Typhimurium presence of cdtB and other Typhi-related genes. Characterization of Sal199 showed cdtB genes were upstream of transposase IS911, and co-expressed with other Typhi-related genes. Cell cycle arrest, cytoplasmic distension, and nuclear enlargement were detected in HeLa cells infected by Sal199, but not with S. Typhimurium LT2. Increased mortality of Galleria was detected on infection with Sal199 compared to LT2. Thus, Salmonella isolates were rapidly characterized using a high through-put microarray; helping to identify unusual virulence features which were corroborated by further characterisation. This work demonstrates that the use of suitable screening methods for Salmonella virulence can help assess the potential risk associated with certain Salmonella to humans. Incorporation of such methodology into surveillance could help reduce the risk of emergence of epidemic Salmonella strains.

  16. Virulence Characterization of Salmonella enterica by a New Microarray: Detection and Evaluation of the Cytolethal Distending Toxin Gene Activity in the Unusual Host S. Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Rui; Card, Roderick; Nunes, Carla; AbuOun, Manal; Bagnall, Mary C; Nunez, Javier; Mendonça, Nuno; Anjum, Muna F; da Silva, Gabriela Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic foodborne pathogen that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans. We assessed the virulence potential of one-hundred and six Salmonella strains isolated from food animals and products. A high through-put virulence genes microarray demonstrated Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPI) and adherence genes were highly conserved, while prophages and virulence plasmid genes were variably present. Isolates were grouped by serotype, and virulence plasmids separated S. Typhimurium in two clusters. Atypical microarray results lead to whole genome sequencing (WGS) of S. Infantis Sal147, which identified deletion of thirty-eight SPI-1 genes. Sal147 was unable to invade HeLa cells and showed reduced mortality in Galleria mellonella infection model, in comparison to a SPI-1 harbouring S. Infantis. Microarray and WGS of S. Typhimurium Sal199, established for the first time in S. Typhimurium presence of cdtB and other Typhi-related genes. Characterization of Sal199 showed cdtB genes were upstream of transposase IS911, and co-expressed with other Typhi-related genes. Cell cycle arrest, cytoplasmic distension, and nuclear enlargement were detected in HeLa cells infected by Sal199, but not with S. Typhimurium LT2. Increased mortality of Galleria was detected on infection with Sal199 compared to LT2. Thus, Salmonella isolates were rapidly characterized using a high through-put microarray; helping to identify unusual virulence features which were corroborated by further characterisation. This work demonstrates that the use of suitable screening methods for Salmonella virulence can help assess the potential risk associated with certain Salmonella to humans. Incorporation of such methodology into surveillance could help reduce the risk of emergence of epidemic Salmonella strains.

  17. Initial identification and sensitivity to antimicrobial agents of Salmonella sp.isolated from poultry products in the state of Ceara, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WF Oliveira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to isolate and to verify the sensitivity to antimicrobial agents of strains of Salmonella sp. isolated from poultry products in the state of Ceara, Brazil. A total number of 114 samples was collected from 63 broiler carcasses derived from two processing plants and two supermarkets, and 51 excreta samples were collected in broiler farms located in the state of Ceara, which used three live production stages. Each excreta sample consisted of a fresh excreta pool from 100 birds. Samples were submitted to microbiological analyses, and the isolated Salmonella strains were tested for antimicrobial sensitivity. No Salmonella was isolated from excreta samples, while broiler carcass samples showed a high contamination rate of11.8%. Three serotypes were identified: Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, 50%; Salmonella enterica serovar Panama 33%, and Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, 17%. As to the susceptibility tests to antimicrobial agents, 100% of the isolated Salmonella strains showed resistance to Ampicillin and Tetracycline, and sensitivity to Gentamycin, Netilmycin, Carbenicillin, Chloramphenicol.

  18. Factores Gre de Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, su papel en el control de la filosofía y patogenicidad

    OpenAIRE

    Gaviria Cantín, Tania Cristina

    2016-01-01

    [spa] El género Salmonella, está compuesto de bacterias Gram-negativas, no esporuladas, en forma de bacilo. Salmonella tiene importante relevancia a nivel de salud pública ya que es uno de los principales patógenos entéricos tanto en países desarrollados como en vías de desarrollo. En los casos de gastroenteritis notificados en España, Salmonella se posiciona en segundo lugar, después de Campylobacter. En este trabajo se utilizó como organismo modelo de estudio S. enterica serovar Typhimurium...

  19. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  20. Antibiotic Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in Kolkata, India, and In Vitro Experiments on Effect of Combined Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamapada Mandal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication states the changing patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi isolates causing enteric fever in and around Kolkata, India. Among the isolates resistance to ampicillin (A, chloramphenicol (C, cotrimoxazole (Co and tetracycline (T were plasmid mediated; the plasmid was unstable in S. Typhi, and the other enteric bacteria like Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris were found to be the potential source of dissemination of such plasmids into S. Typhi. The infection with such S. Typhi strains were successfully treated with ciprofloxacin (Cp: MICs 0.0075–0.075 μg mL−1 and/or ofloxacin (Ofx: MICs 0.0125–0.075 μg mL−1, but in the later course, the S. Typhi strains, showing resistance to nalidixic acid, developed low level of resistance to Cp and Ofx, causing the treatment failure. Thus, the treatment regimen was shifted to the third generation cephalosporins like ceftriaxone (Ct and cefotaxime (Cf. Keeping in mind the anticipation of development of resistance to Ct/Cf, we prepared the treatment regimen for MDR enteric fever, based on the double-drug synergy tests in vitro; Cp-gentamycin (FICI 0.121–0.216 and Cp-trimethoprim (FICI 0.14–0.483 combinations were found effective against S. Typhi isolates having decreased sensitivity to cp (MICs: 0.5–1.25 μg mL−1.

  1. Unstable tandem gene amplification generates heteroresistance (variation in resistance within a population) to colistin in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Karin; Nicoloff, Hervé; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-10-01

    Heteroresistance, a phenomenon where subpopulations of a bacterial isolate exhibit different susceptibilities to an antibiotic, is a growing clinical problem where the underlying genetic mechanisms in most cases remain unknown. We isolated colistin resistant mutants in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium at different concentrations of colistin. Genetic analysis showed that genetically stable pmrAB point mutations were responsible for colistin resistance during selection at high drug concentrations for both species and at low concentrations for E. coli. In contrast, for S. Typhimurium mutants selected at low colistin concentrations, amplification of different large chromosomal regions conferred a heteroresistant phenotype. All amplifications included the pmrD gene, which encodes a positive regulator that up-regulates proteins that modify lipid A, and as a result increase colistin resistance. Inactivation and over-expression of the pmrD gene prevented and conferred resistance, respectively, demonstrating that the PmrD protein is required and sufficient to confer resistance. The heteroresistance phenotype is explained by the variable gene dosage of pmrD in a population, where sub-populations with different copy number of the pmrD gene show different levels of colistin resistance. We propose that variability in gene copy number of resistance genes can explain the heteroresistance observed in clinically isolated pathogenic bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. In vitro and in vivo investigation on genomic stability of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT41 obtained from broiler breeders in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barua, Himel; Lindblom, Ina Lucilia; Bisgaard, Magne

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT41 has previously been identified from salmonella-positive broiler breeder flocks in Denmark and isolates obtained from different flocks have demonstrated major diversity by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis (MLVA) typing...... and human origin, respectively. The in vitro experiment demonstrated that DT41 survived more than 6 months in feed-pellets at 20 °C whereas the survival in dust was less than 4 weeks. Infection pattern and excretion varied for the poultry and human strain and birds of different age groups as revealed...... by the in vivo experiment. Genetic stability of cultures obtained from the in vitro and in vivo survival/passage was investigated by plasmid profiling, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and MLVA. The results of plasmid profiling and PFGE demonstrated genomic stability of all but one strain kept in dust...

  3. Survival and growth of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis in membrane-processed liquid egg white with pH, temperature, and storage conditions as controlling factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Ukuku, Dike; Phillips, John G; Juneja, Vijay K

    2012-01-01

    .... A study was undertaken to determine the effects of variations in solution pH and process temperature on the removal and growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in liquid egg white (LEW...

  4. Differential interaction of Salmonella enterica serovars with lettuce cultivars and plant-microbe factors influencing the colonization efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, Michel M; Franz, Eelco; van Gent-Pelzer, Marga; Zijlstra, Carolien; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2007-11-01

    The availability of knowledge of the route of infection and critical plant and microbe factors influencing the colonization efficiency of plants by human pathogenic bacteria is essential for the design of preventive strategies to maintain safe food. This research describes the differential interaction of human pathogenic Salmonella enterica with commercially available lettuce cultivars. The prevalence and degree of endophytic colonization of axenically grown lettuce by the S. enterica serovars revealed a significant serovar-cultivar interaction for the degree of colonization (S. enterica CFUs per g leaf), but not for the prevalence. The evaluated S. enterica serovars were each able to colonize soil-grown lettuce epiphytically, but only S. enterica serovar Dublin was able to colonize the plants also endophytically. The number of S. enterica CFU per g of lettuce was negatively correlated to the species richness of the surface sterilized lettuce cultivars. A negative trend was observed for cultivars Cancan and Nelly, but not for cultivar Tamburo. Chemotaxis experiments revealed that S. enterica serovars actively move toward root exudates of lettuce cultivar Tamburo. Subsequent micro-array analysis identified genes of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium that were activated by the root exudates of cultivar Tamburo. A sugar-like carbon source was correlated with chemotaxis, while also pathogenicity-related genes were induced in presence of the root exudates. The latter revealed that S. enterica is conditioned for host cell attachment during chemotaxis by these root exudates. Finally, a tentative route of infection is described that includes plant-microbe factors, herewith enabling further design of preventive strategies.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium from humans and production animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; FrimodtMoller, N.

    1997-01-01

    infections contracted outside Denmark, most often in southern Europe or south-east Asia. Resistance in human strains was most common against tetracycline (13%), ampicillin (12%), sulphonamide (12%), streptomycin (10%) and chloramphenicol (8%). The resistance pattern differed somewhat in animal isolates...

  6. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium systemic infection of wild type and immune-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Oshota

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica are a threat to public health. Current vaccines are not fully effective. The ability to grow in infected tissues within phagocytes is required for S. enterica virulence in systemic disease. As the infection progresses the bacteria are exposed to a complex host immune response. Consequently, in order to continue growing in the tissues, S. enterica requires the coordinated regulation of fitness genes. Bacterial gene regulation has so far been investigated largely using exposure to artificial environmental conditions or to in vitro cultured cells, and little information is available on how S. enterica adapts in vivo to sustain cell division and survival. We have studied the transcriptome, proteome and metabolic flux of Salmonella, and the transcriptome of the host during infection of wild type C57BL/6 and immune-deficient gp91-/-phox mice. Our analyses advance the understanding of how S. enterica and the host behaves during infection to a more sophisticated level than has previously been reported.

  7. Xanthosine utilization in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is recovered by a single aspartate-to-glycine substitution in xanthosine phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Dandanell, Gert

    2006-01-01

    xapABR from Salmonella enterica was analyzed and compared with the corresponding Escherichia coli genes. xapB and xapR, but not xapA, encode functional proteins. An S. enterica XapA(Asp72Gly) mutant that restores the phosphorolytic activity was selected. The purified mutant enzyme has different k...

  8. SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROTYPE CHOLERAESUIS, A RARE PATHOGEN – REPORT OF TWO CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpa R; Sunanda A; Usha S; Sara S; Shashikant H.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Nontyphoidal salmonellosis is well known clinical en tity. Outbreaks of gastroenteritis, septicemia and meningitis caused by different nontyphoidal salmonellae have been reported in the past. S. choleraesuis is the hig hly swine adapted serotype of salmonella causing swine paratyphoid. It is extremely invasive and may be isolated from other animals, including man. We report two cases of S. cholerasuis infections, o ne in electric burn wound and the ...

  9. Curcumin increases the pathogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya A Marathe

    Full Text Available Curcumin has gained immense importance for its vast therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Contrary to this, our study reveals that it regulates the defense pathways of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium to enhance its pathogenicity. In a murine model of typhoid fever, we observed higher bacterial load in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver, when infected with curcumin-treated Salmonella. Curcumin increased the resistance of S. Typhimurium against antimicrobial agents like antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This increased tolerance might be attributed to the up-regulation of genes involved in resistance against antimicrobial peptides--pmrD and pmrHFIJKLM and genes with antioxidant function--mntH, sodA and sitA. We implicate that iron chelation property of curcumin have a role in regulating mntH and sitA. Interestingly, we see that the curcumin-mediated modulation of pmr genes is through the PhoPQ regulatory system. Curcumin downregulates SPI1 genes, required for entry into epithelial cells and upregulates SPI2 genes required to intracellular survival. Since it is known that the SPI1 and SPI2 system can be regulated by the PhoPQ system, this common regulator could explain curcumin's mode of action. This data urges us to rethink the indiscriminate use of curcumin especially during Salmonella outbreaks.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of different copper alloy surfaces against copper resistant and sensitive Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Libin; Elguindi, Jutta; Rensing, Christopher; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2012-05-01

    Copper has shown antibacterial effects against foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of copper surfaces on copper resistant and sensitive strains of Salmonella enterica. Six different copper alloy coupons (60-99.9% copper) were tested along with stainless steel as the control. The coupons were surface inoculated with either S. Enteritidis or one of the 3 copper resistant strains, S. Typhimurium S9, S19 and S20; stored under various incubation conditions at room temperature; and sampled at various times up to 2 h. The results showed that under dry incubation conditions, Salmonella only survived 10-15 min on high copper content alloys. Salmonella on low copper content alloys showed 3-4 log reductions. Under moist incubation conditions, no survivors were detected after 30 min-2 h on high copper content alloys, while the cell counts decreased 2-4 logs on low copper content coupons. Although the copper resistant strains survived better than S. Enteritidis, they were either completely inactivated or survival was decreased. Copper coupons showed better antimicrobial efficacy in the absence of organic compounds. These results clearly show the antibacterial effects of copper and its potential as an alternative to stainless steel for selected food contact surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. mgtA Expression is induced by rob overexpression and mediates a Salmonella enterica resistance phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiesi, Julieta; Castelli, María E; Soncini, Fernando C; Véscovi, Eleonora García

    2008-07-01

    Rob is a member of the Sox/Mar subfamily of AraC/XylS-type transcriptional regulators implicated in bacterial multidrug, heavy metal, superoxide, and organic solvent resistance phenotypes. We demonstrate that, in Salmonella enterica, Rob overexpression upregulates the transcription of mgtA, which codes for the MgtA Mg2+ transporter. mgtA was previously characterized as a member of the Mg2+-modulated PhoPQ regulon. Here we demonstrate that Rob (but not its paralog protein SoxS or MarA) is able to induce mgtA transcription in a PhoP-independent fashion by binding to a conserved Mar/Sox/Rob motif localized downstream of the PhoP-box and overlapping the PhoP-dependent transcriptional start site. We found that Rob-induced mgtA expression confers low-level cyclohexane resistance on Salmonella. Because mgtA intactness is required for Rob-induced cyclohexane resistance, provided the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump can be expressed, we postulate that MgtA is involved in the AcrAB-mediated cyclohexane detoxification mechanism promoted by Rob in Salmonella.

  12. Protective action of camel milk in mice inoculated with Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Roberto R De Almeida; Ponte, Marina; Leite, Vanuza

    2013-01-01

    In some countries people believe that camel milk can protect against various aggressors, whether due to infections, diabetes, or even autism. Little has been scientifically demonstrated regarding the veracity of these beliefs. To study the anti-infectious action of camel milk. Fifty mice were divided into 5 groups of 10 animals each: 3 control groups and 2 test groups. Except for one of the control groups, all groups were intraperitoneally inoculated with a strain of Salmonella enterica. The rations in the test groups were supplemented with camel milk or cow milk. A statistically significant survival was observed in the mice supplemented with camel milk. The death rate after Salmonella inoculation was only 40% in the study group, as compared to 100% in the control groups where the mice were not protected, and 80% in the group supplemented with cow milk and injected with Salmonella. Camel milk is an excellent nutrient and because of its specific properties, particularly its anti-infectious action, should be used to replace other milks.

  13. Type VI secretion system-associated gene clusters contribute to pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, David T; Cooper, Colin A; Coombes, Brian K

    2012-06-01

    The enteropathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium employs a suite of tightly regulated virulence factors within the intracellular compartment of phagocytic host cells resulting in systemic dissemination in mice. A type VI secretion system (T6SS) within Salmonella pathogenicity island 6 (SPI-6) has been implicated in this process; however, the regulatory inputs and the roles of noncore genes in this system are not well understood. Here we describe four clusters of noncore T6SS genes in SPI-6 based on a comparative relationship with the T6SS-3 of Burkholderia mallei and report that the disruption of these genes results in defects in intracellular replication and systemic dissemination in mice. In addition, we show that the expression of the SPI-6-encoded Hcp and VgrG orthologs is enhanced during late stages of macrophage infection. We identify six regions that are transcriptionally active during cell infections and that have regulatory contributions from the regulators of virulence SsrB, PhoP, and SlyA. We show that levels of protein expression are very weak under in vitro conditions and that expression is not enhanced upon the deletion of ssrB, phoP, slyA, qseC, ompR, or hfq, suggesting an unknown activating factor. These data suggest that the SPI-6 T6SS has been integrated into the Salmonella Typhimurium virulence network and customized for host-pathogen interactions through the action of noncore genes.

  14. Cattle-derived Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin Infections in Red Foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) in Tyrol, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glawischnig, Walter; Lazar, Judit; Wallner, Alice; Kornschober, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin is endemic in the cattle population in some areas of the Austrian province Tyrol, and each year single dairy farms have experienced clinical infections. To ascertain if Tyrolean red foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) act as a reservoir for Salmonella spp., we tested hepatic tissue and intestinal content from foxes hunted in the years 2015-16 by using microbiological methods. In addition, we included several fox fecal samples collected on a mountain pasture near chamois carcasses in the investigation. Of 434 foxes tested, nine animals (2.1%) were positive for Salmonella spp. Serotyping revealed five foxes positive with S. Dublin, demonstrating that this serovar exists in the Tyrolean fox population. The fecal samples collected in the area surrounding skeletonized chamois ( Rupicapra rupicapra ) also tested positive for S. Dublin. These chamois were probably victims of a waterborne outbreak caused by S. Dublin-shedding cattle. Our results indicate that the S. Dublin infections in red foxes were primarily acquired through ingestion of infected cattle material such as abortion tissues, but also by feeding on dead chamois. The findings underline the importance of interspecies transmission in this domestic/wildlife interface.

  15. Resistance to essential oils affects survival of Salmonella enterica serovars in growing and harvested basil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisluk, Guy; Kalily, Emmanuel; Yaron, Sima

    2013-10-01

    The number of outbreaks of food-borne illness associated with consumption of fresh products has increased. A recent and noteworthy outbreak occurred in 2007. Basil contaminated with Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg was the source of this outbreak. Since basil produces high levels of antibacterial compounds the aim of this study was to investigate if the emerging outbreak reflects ecological changes that occurred as a result of development of resistance to ingredients of the basil oil. We irrigated basil plants with contaminated water containing two Salmonella serovars, Typhimurium and Senftenberg, and showed that Salmonella can survive on the basil plants for at least 100 days. S. Senftenberg counts in the phyllosphere were significantly higher than S. Typhimurium, moreover, S. Senftenberg was able to grow on stored harvested basil leaves. Susceptibility experiments demonstrated that S. Senftenberg is more resistant to basil oil and to its antimicrobial constituents: linalool, estragole and eugenol. This may indicate that S. Senftenberg had adapted to the basil environment by developing resistance to the basil oil. The emergence of resistant pathogens has a significant potential to change the ecology, and opens the way for pathogens to survive in new niches in the environment such as basil and other plants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Role of Environmental Factors in Shaping Spatial Distribution of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi, Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Watson, Conall; Nikolay, Birgit; Lowry, John H; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Van, Tan Trinh; Ngoc, Dung Tran Thi; Rawalai, Kitione; Taufa, Mere; Coriakula, Jerimaia; Lau, Colleen L; Nilles, Eric J; Edmunds, W John; Kama, Mike; Baker, Stephen; Cano, Jorge

    2018-02-01

    Fiji recently experienced a sharp increase in reported typhoid fever cases. To investigate geographic distribution and environmental risk factors associated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi infection, we conducted a cross-sectional cluster survey with associated serologic testing for Vi capsular antigen-specific antibodies (a marker for exposure to Salmonella Typhi in Fiji in 2013. Hotspots with high seroprevalence of Vi-specific antibodies were identified in northeastern mainland Fiji. Risk for Vi seropositivity increased with increased annual rainfall (odds ratio [OR] 1.26/quintile increase, 95% CI 1.12-1.42), and decreased with increased distance from major rivers and creeks (OR 0.89/km increase, 95% CI 0.80-0.99) and distance to modeled flood-risk areas (OR 0.80/quintile increase, 95% CI 0.69-0.92) after being adjusted for age, typhoid fever vaccination, and home toilet type. Risk for exposure to Salmonella Typhi and its spatial distribution in Fiji are driven by environmental factors. Our findings can directly affect typhoid fever control efforts in Fiji.

  17. Rapid Detection and Classification of Salmonella enterica Shedding in Feedlot Cattle Utilizing the Roka Bioscience Atlas Salmonella Detection Assay for the Analysis of Rectoanal Mucosal Swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, W Evan; Agga, Getahun E; Nguyen, Scott V; Arthur, Terrance M; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Dreyling, Erin; Rishi, Anantharama; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna

    2017-10-01

    With an increasing focus on preharvest food safety, rapid methods are required for the detection and quantification of foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella enterica in beef cattle. We validated the Atlas Salmonella Detection Assay (SEN), a nucleic acid amplification technology that targets Salmonella rRNA, for the qualitative detection of S. enterica with sample enrichment using immunomagnetic separation as a reference test, and we further evaluated its accuracy to predict pathogen load using SEN signal-to-cutoff (SCO) values from unenriched samples to classify animals as high or nonhigh shedders. Rectoanal mucosal swabs (RAMS) were collected from 238 beef cattle from five cohorts located in the Midwest or southern High Plains of the United States between July 2015 and April 2016. Unenriched RAMS samples were used for the enumeration and SEN SCO analyses. Enriched samples were tested using SEN and immunomagnetic separation methods for the detection of Salmonella. The SEN method was 100% sensitive and specific for the detection of Salmonella from the enriched RAMS samples. A SEN SCO value of 8, with a sensitivity of 93.5% and specificity of 94.3%, was found to be an optimum cutoff value for classifying animals as high or nonhigh shedders from the unenriched RAMS samples. The SEN assay is a rapid and reliable method for the qualitative detection and categorization of the shedding load of Salmonella from RAMS in feedlot cattle.

  18. Fate of Salmonella enterica and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli cells, Artificially Internalized into Vegetable Seeds during Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Cui, Yue; Walcott, Ronald; Chen, Jinru

    2017-10-27

    Vegetable seeds contaminated with bacterial pathogens have been linked to fresh produce-associated outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections. This study was undertaken to observe the physiological behavior of Salmonella enterica and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cells, artificially internalized into vegetable seeds during the germination process. Surface-decontaminated seeds of alfalfa, fenugreek, lettuce, and tomato were vacuum-infiltrated with four individual strains of Salmonella or EHEC. Contaminated seeds were germinated at 25°C for 9 days and different sprout/seedling tissues were microbiologically analyzed every other day. Internalization of Salmonella and EHEC cells into vegetable seeds was confirmed by the absence of pathogens in seed-rinsing water and presence of pathogens in seed homogenates after post-internalization seed surface decontamination. Results show that 317 (62%) and 343 (67%) out of the 512 collected sprout/seedling tissue samples were positive for Salmonella and EHEC, respectively. Average Salmonella populations were significantly higher (pcell populations on sprout/seedling tissues than other strains used in the study. Salmonella and EHEC populations from fenugreek and alfalfa tissues were significantly higher than those from tomato and lettuce tissues. The study observed the fate of internalized human pathogens on germinating vegetable seeds and sprout/seedling tissues and emphasized the importance of using pathogen-free seeds for sprout production.IMPORTANCE Internalization of microorganisms into vegetable seeds could occur naturally and represents a possible pathway of vegetable seed contamination by human pathogens. The present study investigated the ability of two important bacterial pathogens, Salmonella and EHEC, when artificially internalized into vegetable seeds, to grow and disseminate along vegetable sprouts/seedlings during germination. Data of the study revealed that the pathogen cells artificially internalized

  19. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in Mauritius linked to consumption of marlin mousse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issack, Mohammad I; Hendriksen, Rene S; Lun, Phimy Lan Keng; Lutchun, Ram K S; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2009-01-01

    We report the first outbreak of salmonellosis caused by consumption of contaminated marlin mousse. Between 29 October and 5 November 2008, at least 53 persons developed diarrheal illness, all with a history of eating marlin mousse. Salmonella spp. that did not produce gas from glucose was isolated from stools of 26 affected patients and blood culture from one patient. Salmonella sp. isolates with the same phenotype were isolated in three samples of marlin mousse manufactured on 27 October 2008. The constituents of the mousse were smoked marlin, raw eggs, bovine gelatin, oil, and cream. A laboratory investigation of one sample of marlin mousse manufactured 3 days later, and the individual ingredients sampled a week after production of the contaminated batch were all negative for Salmonella. Serotyping and minimum inhibitory concentration determination were performed on 12 patient isolates related to the outbreak and two mousse isolates. All isolates belonged to Salmonella serovar Typhimurium and were pansusceptible to all antimicrobials tested. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that all the isolates were indistinguishable, thus implicating the mousse as the vehicle of the outbreak.

  20. Selected lactic acid-producing bacterial isolates with the capacity to reduce Salmonella translocation and virulence gene expression in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojian; Brisbin, Jennifer; Yu, Hai; Wang, Qi; Yin, Fugui; Zhang, Yonggang; Sabour, Parviz; Sharif, Shayan; Gong, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization/infection in chickens. Yet the mechanisms of probiotic effects are not fully understood. This study has characterized our previously-selected lactic acid-producing bacterial (LAB) isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens, particularly the mechanism underlying the control. In vitro studies were conducted to characterize 14 LAB isolates for their tolerance to low pH (2.0) and high bile salt (0.3-1.5%) and susceptibility to antibiotics. Three chicken infection trials were subsequently carried out to evaluate four of the isolates for reducing the burden of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the broiler cecum. Chicks were gavaged with LAB cultures (10(6-7) CFU/chick) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 1 day of age followed by Salmonella challenge (10(4) CFU/chick) next day. Samples of cecal digesta, spleen, and liver were examined for Salmonella counts on days 1, 3, or 4 post-challenge. Salmonella in the cecum from Trial 3 was also assessed for the expression of ten virulence genes located in its pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1). These genes play a role in Salmonella intestinal invasion. Tested LAB isolates (individuals or mixed cultures) were unable to lower Salmonella burden in the chicken cecum, but able to attenuate Salmonella infection in the spleen and liver. The LAB treatments also reduced almost all SPI-1 virulence gene expression (9 out of 10) in the chicken cecum, particularly at the low dose. In vitro treatment with the extracellular culture fluid from a LAB culture also down-regulated most SPI-1 virulence gene expression. The possible correlation between attenuation of Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver and reduction of Salmonella SPI-1 virulence gene expression in the chicken cecum by LAB isolates is a new observation. Suppression of Salmonella virulence gene expression in vivo can be one of the strategies for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens.

  1. Optimization of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction for molecular typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Otimização da reação de amplificação aleatória do DNA polimórfico - reação em cadeia da polimerase para tipagem molecular de Salmonella enterica sorovar Typhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Ramalho Quintaes

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of the RAPD reaction for characterizing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains was studied in order to ensure the reproducibility and the discriminatory power of this technique. Eight Salmonella serovar Typhi strains isolated from various regions in Brazil were examined for the fragment patterns produced using different concentrations of DNA template, primer, MgCl2 and Taq DNA polymerase. Using two different low stringency thermal cycle profiles, the RAPD fingerprints obtained were compared. A set of sixteen primers was evaluated for their ability to produce a high number of distinct fragments. We found that variations associated to all of the tested parameters modified the fingerprinting patterns. For the strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi used in this experiment, we have defined a set of conditions for RAPD-PCR reaction, which result in a simple, fast and reproducible typing method.A otimização da reação de RAPD para a caracterização de cepas de Salmonella enterica sorovar Typhi foi estudada com o objetivo de assegurar a reprodutibilidade e o poder discriminatório desta técnica. Oito cepas de Salmonella sorovar Typhi isoladas de algumas regiões do Brasil foram usadas para examinar os padrões de fragmentação produzidos quando foram empregadas concentrações diferentes do DNA molde, do iniciador, do MgCl2 e da enzima Taq DNA polimerase. Com a utilização de dois diferentes perfis de ciclos termais de baixa estringência, foram comparados os padrões de bandeamento obtidos. Um conjunto de dezesseis iniciadores foi avaliado quanto à capacidade de produzir elevado número de fragmentos distintos. Observou-se que variações associadas a todos os parâmetros testados modificaram os padrões de bandeamento. Para as amostras de Salmonella enterica sorovar Typhi utilizadas neste experimento, definiu-se um conjunto de condições para a reação de RAPD-PCR que resultou num método de tipagem simples, rápido e

  2. Iron acquisition pathways and colonization of the inflamed intestine by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luciana F; Mol, Juliana P S; Silva, Ana Patricia C; Macêdo, Auricélio A; Silva, Teane M A; Alves, Geraldo E S; Winter, Sebastian; Winter, Maria G; Velazquez, Eric M; Byndloss, Mariana X; Bäumler, Andreas J; Tsolis, Renée M; Paixão, Tatiane A; Santos, Renato L

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is able to expand in the lumen of the inflamed intestine through mechanisms that have not been fully resolved. Here we utilized streptomycin-pretreated mice and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated mice to investigate how pathways for S. Typhimurium iron acquisition contribute to pathogen expansion in the inflamed intestine. Competitive infection with an iron uptake-proficient S. Typhimurium strain and mutant strains lacking tonB feoB, feoB, tonB or iroN in streptomycin pretreated mice demonstrated that ferric iron uptake requiring IroN and TonB conferred a fitness advantage during growth in the inflamed intestine. However, the fitness advantage conferred by ferrous iron uptake mechanisms was independent of inflammation and was only apparent in models where the normal microbiota composition had been disrupted by antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of whole genome sequencing for outbreak detection of Salmonella enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Nielsen, Eva M.; Kaas, Rolf Sommer

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a common cause of minor and large food borne outbreaks. To achieve successful and nearly ‘real-time’ monitoring and identification of outbreaks, reliable sub-typing is essential. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) shows great promises for using as a routine epidemiological typing...... analyses were also compared to PFGE reveling that WGS typing achieved the greater performance than the traditional method. In conclusion, for S. Typhimurium, SNP analysis and nucleotide difference approach of WGS data seem to be the superior methods for epidemiological typing compared to other phylogenetic...... analytic approaches that may be used on WGS. These approaches were also superior to the more classical typing method, PFGE. Our study also indicates that WGS alone is insufficient to determine whether strains are related or un-related to outbreaks. This still requires the combination of epidemiological...

  4. Outbreaks of monophasic Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- in Luxembourg, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossong, J; Marques, P; Ragimbeau, C; Huberty-Krau, P; Losch, S; Meyer, G; Moris, G; Strottner, C; Rabsch, W; Schneider, F

    2007-06-01

    A monophasic Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- phage type DT193 emerged as the dominant serovar in Luxembourg in 2006, when it caused two major outbreaks involving 133 laboratory-confirmed human cases, 24 hospitalisations, and one death. The outbreak strain had an uncommon pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern STYMXB.0031 and antibiotic resistance profile ASSuT. A high proportion of cases were clustered in institutions for the elderly and in day-care centers. Strains identical to the outbreak strain were recovered from two control meals, a nappy changing table, retail sausages and caecal porcine samples at an abattoir. Locally produced pork meat is strongly suspected to have been the vehicle for the outbreaks, although the precise mechanisms remain unclear.

  5. Nosocomial Outbreak of a Novel Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Salmonella enterica Serotype Isangi Among Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleyman, Geehan; Tibbetts, Robert; Perri, Mary Beth; Vager, Dora; Xin, Yuan; Reyes, Katherine; Samuel, Linoj; Chami, Eman; Starr, Patricia; Pietsch, Jennifer; Zervos, Marcus J; Alangaden, George

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Nosocomial outbreaks caused by Salmonella are rare. We describe the investigation and control of a cluster of novel extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) Salmonella enterica serotype Isangi in a hospital in southeastern Michigan. METHODS An epidemiologic investigation, including case-control study, assessment of infection control practices and environmental cultures, was performed to identify modes of transmission. Healthcare workers (HCWs) exposed to case patients were screened. Strain relatedness was determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE); ESBL confirmation was conducted using real-time PCR. Control measures were implemented to prevent further transmission. RESULTS Between September 2 and October 22, 2015, 19 surgical patients, including 10 organ transplant recipients and 1 HCW, had positive S. Isangi cultures. Of these case patients and HCW, 13 had gastroenteritis, 2 had bacteremia, 1 had surgical-site infection, and 4 were asymptomatic. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed 89.5% similarity among the isolates in these cases. Isolates with resistant-phenotypes possessed plasmid-mediated CTX-M15 ESBL. A total of 19 case patients were compared with 57 control participants. Case patients had significantly higher odds of exposure to an intraoperative transesophageal (TEE) probe (adjusted odds ratio 9.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-72.60; P=.02). Possible cross-transmission occurred in the HCW and 2 patients. Cultures of TEE probes and the environment were negative. The outbreak ended after removal of TEE probes, modification of reprocessing procedures, implementation of strict infection control practices, and enhanced environmental cleaning. CONCLUSIONS We report the first nosocomial ESBL S. Isangi outbreak in the United States. Multiple control measures were necessary to interrupt transmission of this gastrointestinal pathogen. Exposure to possibly contaminated TEE probes was associated with transmission. Periodic monitoring

  6. CRISPR is an optimal target for the design of specific PCR assays for salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A.

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    Laetitia Fabre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serotype-specific PCR assays targeting Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A, the causal agents of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers, are required to accelerate formal diagnosis and to overcome the lack of typing sera and, in some situations, the need for culture. However, the sensitivity and specificity of such assays must be demonstrated on large collections of strains representative of the targeted serotypes and all other bacterial populations producing similar clinical symptoms. METHODOLOGY: Using a new family of repeated DNA sequences, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, as a serotype-specific target, we developed a conventional multiplex PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of serotypes Typhi and Paratyphi A from cultured isolates. We also developed EvaGreen-based real-time singleplex PCR assays with the same two sets of primers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We achieved 100% sensitivity and specificity for each protocol after validation of the assays on 188 serotype Typhi and 74 serotype Paratyphi A strains from diverse genetic groups, geographic origins and time periods and on 70 strains of bacteria frequently encountered in bloodstream infections, including 29 other Salmonella serotypes and 42 strains from 38 other bacterial species. CONCLUSIONS: The performance and convenience of our serotype-specific PCR assays should facilitate the rapid and accurate identification of these two major serotypes in a large range of clinical and public health laboratories with access to PCR technology. These assays were developed for use with DNA from cultured isolates, but with modifications to the assay, the CRISPR targets could be used in the development of assays for use with clinical and other samples.

  7. Biofilm formation of Salmonella species isolated from fresh cabbage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to isolate Salmonella from fresh cabbage and spinach vegetables, determine antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation of the isolates. Spinach and cabbage farm vegetables were found to harbour Salmonella. A total of eighty-two Salmonella isolates were recovered from both vegetables and ...

  8. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium BipA Exhibits Two Distinct Ribosome Binding Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLivron, M.; Robinson, V

    2008-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions to influence numerous cellular processes in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, BipA has been implicated in controlling bacterial motility, modulating attachment and effacement processes, and upregulating the expression of virulence genes and is also responsible for avoidance of host defense mechanisms. In addition, BipA is thought to be involved in bacterial stress responses, such as those associated with virulence, temperature, and symbiosis. Thus, BipA is necessary for securing bacterial survival and successful invasion of the host. Steady-state kinetic analysis and pelleting assays were used to assess the GTPase and ribosome-binding properties of S. enterica BipA. Under normal bacterial growth, BipA associates with the ribosome in the GTP-bound state. However, using sucrose density gradients, we demonstrate that the association of BipA and the ribosome is altered under stress conditions in bacteria similar to those experienced during virulence. The data show that this differential binding is brought about by the presence of ppGpp, an alarmone that signals the onset of stress-related events in bacteria.

  9. Suppressor analyses identify threonine as a modulator of ridA mutant phenotypes in Salmonella enterica.

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    Melissa R Christopherson

    Full Text Available The RidA (YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins is broadly conserved in the three domains of life yet the functional understanding of these proteins is at an early stage. Physiological studies of ridA mutant strains of Salmonella enterica provided a framework to inform in vitro studies and led to the description of a conserved biochemical activity for this family. ridA mutant strains of S. enterica have characteristic phenotypes including new synthesis of thiamine biosynthetic intermediate phosphoribosylamine (PRA, inability to grow on pyruvate as a sole carbon and energy source or when serine is present in the minimal growth medium, and a decreased specific activity of transaminase B (IlvE. Secondary mutations restoring growth to a ridA mutant in the presence of serine were in dapA (encoding dihydrodipicolinate synthase and thrA (encoding homoserine dehydrogenase. These mutations suppressed multiple ridA mutant phenotypes by increasing the synthesis of threonine. The ability of threonine to suppress the metabolic defects of a ridA mutant is discussed in the context of recent biochemical data and in vivo results presented here.

  10. Pathogenicity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from Egg Shells and the Layer Farm Environment in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Andrea R.; Davos, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, the egg industry is periodically implicated during outbreaks of Salmonella food poisoning. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and other nontyphoidal Salmonella spp., in particular, are a major concern for Australian public health. Several definitive types of Salmonella Typhimurium strains, but primarily Salmonella Typhimurium definitive type 9 (DT9), have been frequently reported during egg-related food poisoning outbreaks in Australia. The aim of the present study was to generate a pathogenicity profile of nontyphoidal Salmonella isolates obtained from Australian egg farms. To achieve this, we assessed the capacity of Salmonella isolates to cause gastrointestinal disease using both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Data from in vitro experiments demonstrated that the invasion capacity of Salmonella serovars cultured to stationary phase (liquid phase) in LB medium was between 90- and 300-fold higher than bacterial suspensions in normal saline (cultured in solid phase). During the in vivo infection trial, clinical signs of infection and mortality were observed only for mice infected with either 103 or 105 CFU of S. Typhimurium DT9. No mortality was observed for mice infected with Salmonella serovars with medium or low invasive capacity in Caco-2 cells. Pathogenicity gene profiles were also generated for all serovars included in this study. The majority of serovars tested were positive for selected virulence genes. No relationship between the presence or absence of virulence genes by PCR and either in vitro invasive capacity or in vivo pathogenicity was detected. Our data expand the knowledge of strain-to-strain variation in the pathogenicity of Australian egg industry-related Salmonella spp. PMID:25362057

  11. Pathogenicity of Salmonella strains isolated from egg shells and the layer farm environment in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Andrea R; Davos, Dianne; Chousalkar, K K

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, the egg industry is periodically implicated during outbreaks of Salmonella food poisoning. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and other nontyphoidal Salmonella spp., in particular, are a major concern for Australian public health. Several definitive types of Salmonella Typhimurium strains, but primarily Salmonella Typhimurium definitive type 9 (DT9), have been frequently reported during egg-related food poisoning outbreaks in Australia. The aim of the present study was to generate a pathogenicity profile of nontyphoidal Salmonella isolates obtained from Australian egg farms. To achieve this, we assessed the capacity of Salmonella isolates to cause gastrointestinal disease using both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Data from in vitro experiments demonstrated that the invasion capacity of Salmonella serovars cultured to stationary phase (liquid phase) in LB medium was between 90- and 300-fold higher than bacterial suspensions in normal saline (cultured in solid phase). During the in vivo infection trial, clinical signs of infection and mortality were observed only for mice infected with either 10(3) or 10(5) CFU of S. Typhimurium DT9. No mortality was observed for mice infected with Salmonella serovars with medium or low invasive capacity in Caco-2 cells. Pathogenicity gene profiles were also generated for all serovars included in this study. The majority of serovars tested were positive for selected virulence genes. No relationship between the presence or absence of virulence genes by PCR and either in vitro invasive capacity or in vivo pathogenicity was detected. Our data expand the knowledge of strain-to-strain variation in the pathogenicity of Australian egg industry-related Salmonella spp. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Genetic analysis and CRISPR typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from different sources revealed potential transmission from poultry and pig to human.

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