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Sample records for salix arctica assessed

  1. Effects of ambient versus reduced UV-B radiation on high arctic Salix arctica assessed by measurements and calculations of chlorophyll-a fluorescence parameters from fluorescence transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost

    2005-01-01

    A UV-B exclusion-experiment was conducted in the high arctic Zackenberg, NE Greenland, in which Salix arctica leaves during most of the growing season were fixed perpendicular to the solar zenith angle, thereby receiving maximal solar radiation. Covered with Teflon and Mylar foil, the leaves...... of evaluating the relative importance of UV-B of donor and acceptor side capacity in Photosystem II. In conclusion, the experimental set-up and non-invasive measurements proved to be a sensitive method to screen for effects of UV-B stress....... received approximately 90 and 40% of the ambient UV-B irradiance, respectively. The effects were examined through recordings of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients, determination of biomass and analysis of total carbon and nitrogen content and amount of soluble flavonoids in the leaves. The processing...

  2. Effects of ambient versus reduced UV-B radiation on high arctic ¤Salix arctica¤ assessed by measurements and calculations of chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters from fluorescence transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, K.R.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2005-01-01

    A UV-B exclusion-experiment was conducted in the high Arctic Zackenberg, NE Greenland, in which Salix arctica leaves during most of the growing season were fixed perpendicular to the solar zenith angle, thereby receiving maximal solar radiation. Covered with Teflon and Mylar foil, the leaves...... of evaluating the relative importance of UV-B of donor and acceptor side capacity in Photosystem II. In conclusion, the experimental set-up and non-invasive measurements proved to be a sensitive method to screen for effects of UV-B stress....... received approximately 90 and 40% of the ambient UV-B irradiance, respectively. The effects were examined through recordings of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients, determination of biomass and analysis of total carbon and nitrogen content and amount of soluble flavonoids in the leaves. The processing...

  3. Ambient UV-B radiation reduces PSII performance and net photosynthesis in high Arctic Salix arctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation potentially impacts the photosynthetic performance of high Arctic plants. We conducted an UV-B exclusion experiment in a dwarf shrub heath in NE Greenland (74°N), with open control, filter control, UV-B filtering and UV-AB filtering, all in combination......, nitrogen and UV-B absorbing compounds. Compared to a 60% reduced UV-B irradiance, the ambient solar UV-B reduced net photosynthesis in Salix arctica leaves fixed in the 45° position which exposed leaves to maximum natural irradiance. Also a reduced Calvin Cycle capacity was found, i.e. the maximum rate...... across position in the vegetation. These findings add to the evidence that the ambient solar UV-B currently is a significant stress factor for plants in high Arctic Greenland....

  4. Ambient UV-B radiation reduces PSII performance and net photosynthesis in high Arctic Salix arctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation potentially impacts the photosynthetic performance of high Arctic plants. We conducted an UV-B exclusion experiment in a dwarf shrub heath in NE Greenland (74°N), with open control, filter control, UV-B filtering and UV-AB filtering, all in combination...... was characterized by simultaneous gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and the PSII performance through the growing season was investigated with fluorescence measurements. Leaf harvest towards the end of the growing season was done to determine the specific leaf area and the content of carbon......, nitrogen and UV-B absorbing compounds. Compared to a 60% reduced UV-B irradiance, the ambient solar UV-B reduced net photosynthesis in Salix arctica leaves fixed in the 45° position which exposed leaves to maximum natural irradiance. Also a reduced Calvin Cycle capacity was found, i.e. the maximum rate...

  5. Local variability in growth and reproduction of Salix arctica in the High Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noémie Boulanger-Lapointe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Arctic terrestrial ecosystems are heterogeneous because of the strong influences of microtopography, soil moisture and snow accumulation on vegetation distribution. The interaction between local biotic and abiotic factors and global climate patterns will influence species responses to climate change. Salix arctica (Arctic willow is a structuring species, ubiquitous and widespread, and as such is one of the most important shrub species in the High Arctic. In this study, we measured S. arctica reproductive effort, early establishment, survival and growth in the Zackenberg valley, north-east Greenland. We sampled four plant communities that varied with respect to snow conditions, soil moisture, nutrient content and plant composition. We found large variability in reproductive effort and success with total catkin density ranging from 0.6 to 66 catkins/m2 and seedling density from <1 to 101 seedlings/m2. There were also major differences in crown area increment (4–23 cm2/year and stem radial growth (40–74 µm/year. The snowbed community, which experienced a recent reduction in snow cover, supported young populations with high reproductive effort, establishment and growth. Soil nutrient content and herbivore activity apparently did not strongly constrain plant reproduction and growth, but competition by Cassiope tetragona and low soil moisture may inhibit performance. Our results show that local environmental factors, such as snow accumulation, have a significant impact on tundra plant response to climate change and will affect the understanding of regional vegetation response to climate change.

  6. Effects of Reducing the Ambient UV-B Radiation in the High Arctic on Salix arctica and Vaccinium uliginosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2005-01-01

    , transmitting ¿ > 400 nm) were used to reduce UV-B radiation and UV-B+A respectively. A UV transparent film (Teflon, transmitting ¿ > 280 nm) and no film were used as controls. Field measurements showed that the plants under Teflon, Mylar and Lexan received app. 91%, 39% and 17% of the ambient UV-B irradiance......Effects of reducing the ambient UV-B radiation on gas exchange and chlorophyll fluores-cence of two dwarf shrub species, Salix arctica and Vaccinium uliginosum, was studied in a high arctic heath in North East Greenland during two growing seasons. Films (Mylar, transmitting ¿ > 320 nm, and Lexan......, respectively. UV radiation decreased the maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and other fast fluorescence transient derived parameters in both species, despite an increased level of leaf flavonoid content. The responses varied in signifi-cance according to species and site. The relation of these effects...

  7. Effects of reducing the ambient UV-B radiation in the high Arctic on Salix arctica and Vaccinium uliginosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, K.R.; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2005-01-01

    , transmitting λ > 400 nm) were used to reduce UV-B radiation and UV-B+A respectively. A UV transparent film (Teflon, transmitting λ > 280 nm) and no film were used as controls. Field measurements showed that the plants under Teflon, Mylar and Lexan received app. 91%, 39% and 17% of the ambient UV-B irradiance......Effects of reducing the ambient UV-B radiation on gas exchange and chlorophyll fluores-cence of two dwarf shrub species, Salix arctica and Vaccinium uliginosum, was studied in a high arctic heath in North East Greenland during two growing seasons. Films (Mylar, transmitting λ > 320 nm, and Lexan......, respectively. UV radiation decreased the maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and other fast fluorescence transient derived parameters in both species, despite an increased level of leaf flavonoid content. The responses varied in signifi-cance according to species and site. The relation of these effects...

  8. Assessment of Salix spp. pollen availability to insects based on aerobiological investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Weryszko-Chmielewska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pollen and nectar produced by flowers of species from the genus Salix are an important source of food for various insect groups in early spring. Most willows are entomophilous species; however, substantial amounts of airborne Salix pollen can be noted. The aim of the study was to evaluate the content of pollen of this taxon in the air of Lublin (central-east Poland in 2001–2016 and to identify the period of its greatest availability to insects. In 2015, we compared the course of the Salix pollen season in Lublin (51°14'37" N; 22°32'25" E and in the Roztoczański National Park (50°34'57" N; 23°04'24" E, Poland. We found that the date of the pollen season onset fluctuated greatly between March 16 and April 17. The greatest availability of Salix pollen to insects was noted from the end of the first 10-day-period of April to the first 10-day-period of May. The mean annual sum of airborne Salix pollen grains was 833. In Lublin, Salix pollen accounted for ca. 1.25% of the total airborne pollen content of different plant taxa. The investigations have demonstrated a 2-year cycle of Salix pollen abundance. The comparison of the pollen seasons in Lublin and in the Roztoczański National Park indicates that considerably greater amounts of pollen occur in the urban area than in the air of the Roztoczański National Park.

  9. Om Linguatula arctica, reinens bihulmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Egil Haugerud

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Linguatula arctica, a newly described pentastomid species, is found in the nasal sinuses of the reindeer. It seems to cover the reindeer distribution. The prevalence in Norwegian reindeer herds is fairly high for an almost unknown parasite. L. arctica infects mostly calves. This led to the hypothesis that the reindeer mounts an immune response against the invader. The author discusses possible detrimental effects and proposes management efforts to control the parasite. Briefly, veterinary treatment is reviewed.

  10. Coccolithophores in Polar Waters: Papposphaera arctica HET and HOL revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Heldal, Mikal; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2016-01-01

    It has been generally accepted based on the finding of combination coccospheres in field samples that Turrisphaera arctica and Papposphaera sarion are alternate life-cycle phases of a single species. However, while recently revisiting P. sarion it became evident that the Turrisphaera phase of thi...

  11. Salix: A viable option for phytoremediation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Salix spp which are characterized by particular physiological adaptations ... throw light on the current use of willows well beyond wetland and riparian situations such as in ... provide browse for large number of animals and willow wood is a ...

  12. A SEM study of the reindeer sinus worm (Linguatula arctica

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    Sven Nikander

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentastomids are a group of peculiar parasitic arthropods, often referred to as tongue worms due to the resemblance of some species to a tongue. Linguatula arctica is the sinus worm of the reindeer (Rangifer tarandus, being the only pentastomid to have a direct life cycle and an ungulate as a definite host. Here, the surface structures and internal anatomy of adult L. arctica are described as seen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Sinus worms were collected in the winter 1991-92 in Finnish Lapland. Paranasal cavities of about 80 reindeer were examined and 30 sinus worms were found. The sinus worms had typical Linguatula sp. morphology, being paddle-shaped, transparent, pale yellow, dorsoventrally flattened and pseudosegmented with a long tapering end. Present at the anteroventral part of the cephalothorax was an oral opening with a large, conspicuous, head-like papillar structure. Bilaterally, on both sides of this opening, was a pair of strong curved hooks. The cephalothorax and abdomen had a segmented appearance, as they showed distinct annulation. There was a small cup-shaped sensory organ present at the lateral margin on each annula. The posterior edge of each annula was roughened by tiny spines projecting backwards. Throughout the cuticular surface, small, circular depressions that represented the apical portion of chloride cells. The genital opening of the male was located medioventrally between the tips of the posterior pair of hooks, and that of the female posteroventrally and subterminally. In both sexes, the genital opening was bilaterally flanked by papillar (in males or leaf-like (in females structures. One copulating couple was present, with the male attached to the posteroventral part of the female with its anteroventral hooks and papillae. Several structures typical of arthropods and other pentastomids were identified. Because SEM allows only surfaces to be studied, the morphology and especially the sense organs of L. arctica

  13. Evaluation of Populus and Salix continuously irrigated with landfill leachate II. Soils and early tree development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Edmund O. Bauer

    2007-01-01

    Soil contaminant levels and early tree growth data are helpful for assessing phytoremediation systems. Populus (DN17, DN182, DN34, NM2, and NM6) and Salix (94003, 94012, S287, S566, and SX61) genotypes were irrigated with landfill leachate or municipal water and tested for differences in 1) element concentrations (P, K, Ca, Mg, S,...

  14. Salix : A viable option for phytoremediation | Wani | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic importance of Salix is currently increasing and emerging in a wide array of practical applications to restore damaged ecosystems. Salix spp which are characterized by particular physiological adaptations and ecological resilience are predisposed to use in conservation and environmental projects in many climatic ...

  15. A Distinct Mitochondrial Genome with DUI-Like Inheritance in the Ocean Quahog Arctica islandica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégletagne, Cyril; Abele, Doris; Held, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is strictly maternally inherited in metazoans. The major exception to this rule has been found in many bivalve species which allow the presence of different sex-linked mtDNA molecules. This mechanism, named doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI), is characterized by the presence of two mtDNAs: The female mtDNA is found in somatic tissue and female gonads, whereas the male mtDNA is usually found in male gonads and sperm. In this study we highlight the existence of two divergent mitochondrial haplotypes with a low genetic difference around 6-8% in Arctica islandica, a long-lived clam belonging to the Arcticidae, a sister group to the Veneridae in which DUI has been found. Phylogenetic analysis on cytochrome b and 16S sequences from somatic and gonadic tissues of clams belonging to different populations reveals the presence of the "divergent" type in male gonads only and the "normal" type in somatic tissues and female gonads. This peculiar segregation of divergent mtDNA types speaks for the occurrence of the DUI mechanism in A. islandica. This example also highlights the difficulties to assess the presence of such particular mitochondrial inheritance system and underlines the possible misinterpretations in phylogeographic and phylogenetic studies of bivalve species linked to the presence of two poorly differentiated mitochondrial genomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Willow (Salix) biomass production on farmland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, S. (Lantmaennen Agroenergi AB, Svaloev (Sweden)), Email: stig.larsson@lantmannen.com

    2009-07-01

    Willow (Salix) is a quite new agricultural crop that has been cultivated since the 1970's. Currently 15,000 hectares have been planted in Sweden and these plantations provide wood fuel for district heating schemes. In total willow contributes about 3 % of Sweden's requirements of wood fuel, produced from forestry and agriculture. The price of willow wood chips has this season been about 17 Euro per MWh, which is equivalent to that provided from forestry sources. The willows used in energy forestry belong to the sub-species. Salix, which are generally bushy in nature and grow to 5-7 m in height and have numerous shoots. Willows are planted as stem cuttings measuring 18-20 cm in length. A willow plantation is assumed to remain productive for at least 25-30 years and during its lifetime, the plantation may be harvested six to ten times, in cycles of 3-4 years. After each harvest new shoots sprout from the cut stumps producing a dense coppice. (orig.)

  17. Terrimonas arctica sp. nov., isolated from Arctic tundra soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Qiu, Xia; Chang, Xulu; Qu, Zhihao; Ren, Lvzhi; Kan, Wenjing; Guo, Youhao; Fang, Chengxiang; Peng, Fang

    2014-11-01

    A novel, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium, designated R9-86(T), was isolated from tundra soil collected near Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard Archipelago, Norway (78° N). Growth occurred at 4-28 °C (optimum, 22-25 °C) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0). Flexirubin-type pigments were absent. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain R9-86(T) belonged to the genus Terrimonas in the family Chitinophagaceae. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain R9-86(T) and the type strains of species of the genus Terrimonas with validly published names ranged from 93.7 to 95.0%. Strain R9-86(T) contained iso-C(15:1)-G (25.7%), iso-C(15:0) (24.5%), iso-C(17:0)-3OH (18.3%) and summed feature 3 (C(16:1)ω7c and/or C(16:1)ω6c, 8.7%) as its major cellular fatty acids; phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown polar lipid as its main polar lipids, and MK-7 as its predominant respiratory quinone. The DNA G+C content was 48.4 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain R9-86(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Terrimonas, for which the name Terrimonas arctica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R9-86(T) ( =CCTCC AB 2011004(T) =NRRL B-59114(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  18. Transcriptomic Response of Purple Willow (Salix purpurea to Arsenic Stress

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    Aymeric Yanitch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is a toxic element for plants and one of the most common anthropogenic pollutants found at contaminated sites. Despite its severe effects on plant metabolism, several species can accumulate substantial amounts of arsenic and endure the associated stress. However, the genetic mechanisms involved in arsenic tolerance remains obscure in many model plant species used for land decontamination (phytoremediation, including willows. The present study assesses the potential of Salix purpurea cv. ‘Fish Creek’ for arsenic phytoextraction and reveals the genetic responses behind arsenic tolerance, phytoextraction and metabolism. Four weeks of hydroponic exposure to 0, 5, 30 and 100 mg/L revealed that plants were able to tolerate up to 5 mg/L arsenic. Concentrations of 0 and 5 mg/L of arsenic treatment were then used to compare alterations in gene expression of roots, stems and leaves using RNA sequencing. Differential gene expression revealed transcripts encoding proteins putatively involved in entry of arsenic into the roots, storage in vacuoles and potential transport through the plant as well as primary and secondary (indirect toxicity tolerance mechanisms. A major role for tannin as a compound used to relieve cellular toxicity is implicated as well as unexpected expression of the cadmium transporter CAX2, providing a potential means for internal arsenic mobility. These insights into the underpinning genetics of a successful phytoremediating species present novel opportunities for selection of dedicated arsenic tolerant crops as well as the potential to integrate such tolerances into a wider Salix ideotype alongside traits including biomass yield, biomass quality, low agricultural inputs and phytochemical production.

  19. Transcriptomic Response of Purple Willow (Salix purpurea) to Arsenic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanitch, Aymeric; Brereton, Nicholas J. B.; Gonzalez, Emmanuel; Labrecque, Michel; Joly, Simon; Pitre, Frederic E.

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic element for plants and one of the most common anthropogenic pollutants found at contaminated sites. Despite its severe effects on plant metabolism, several species can accumulate substantial amounts of arsenic and endure the associated stress. However, the genetic mechanisms involved in arsenic tolerance remains obscure in many model plant species used for land decontamination (phytoremediation), including willows. The present study assesses the potential of Salix purpurea cv. ‘Fish Creek’ for arsenic phytoextraction and reveals the genetic responses behind arsenic tolerance, phytoextraction and metabolism. Four weeks of hydroponic exposure to 0, 5, 30 and 100 mg/L revealed that plants were able to tolerate up to 5 mg/L arsenic. Concentrations of 0 and 5 mg/L of arsenic treatment were then used to compare alterations in gene expression of roots, stems and leaves using RNA sequencing. Differential gene expression revealed transcripts encoding proteins putatively involved in entry of arsenic into the roots, storage in vacuoles and potential transport through the plant as well as primary and secondary (indirect) toxicity tolerance mechanisms. A major role for tannin as a compound used to relieve cellular toxicity is implicated as well as unexpected expression of the cadmium transporter CAX2, providing a potential means for internal arsenic mobility. These insights into the underpinning genetics of a successful phytoremediating species present novel opportunities for selection of dedicated arsenic tolerant crops as well as the potential to integrate such tolerances into a wider Salix ideotype alongside traits including biomass yield, biomass quality, low agricultural inputs and phytochemical production. PMID:28702037

  20. The influence of goose grazing on the growth of Poa arctica : overestimation of overcompensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, MJJE

    The effect of grazing by barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) on above-ground production was investigated on the Arctic tundra grass Poa arctica at Spitsbergen during the growing season of 1996. We applied three treatments: orated; whole season ungrazed and temporary ungrazed during the second half of

  1. Indução in vitro de raízes adventícias em explantes de salix (Salix humboldtiana Willdenow(Salix humboldtiana Willdenow In vitro induction of adventicious roots in salix (salix humboldtiana willdenow explants

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    Vespasiano Borges de Paiva Neto

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available With the objective to investigate the in vitro behavior of salix (Salix humboldtiana Willdenow, leaf and nodal segments were inoculated in WPM medium supplemented with NAA and IBA. In leaf explants, the presence of these growth regulators, isolated or in combination, induced the formation of adventicious roots. Root hairs were only observed when NAA was present. In nodal explants, while the combination of 2,68 µM ANA + 2,46 µM IBA induced bud growth, the other treatments (4,92 µM IBA; 2,68µM ANA + 4,92 µM IBA; 5,37 µM ANA + 4,92 µM IBA; 5,37µM ANA induced the formation of adventicious roots.

  2. Uptake of cadmium from hydroponic solutions by willows ( Salix spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salix integra 'Weishanhu') and Yizhibi (S. integra 'Yizhibi') were chosen as model plants to evaluate their potential for uptake of cadmium from hydroponic culture and relative uptake mechanism. Cadmium uptake showed a linear increase in the ...

  3. Investigation of Li/Ca variations in aragonitic shells of the ocean quahog Arctica islandica, northeast Iceland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julien Thébault; Bernd R. Schöne; Nadine Hallmann; Matthias Barth; Elizabeth V. Nunn

    2009-01-01

      Interannual and intra-annual variations in lithium-to-calcium ratio were investigated with high temporal resolution in the aragonitic outer shell layer of juvenile Arctica islandica (Mollusca; Bivalvia...

  4. Stock characterization and improvement: DNA fingerprinting and cold tolerance of Populus and Salix clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Dolly; Hubbes, M.; Zsuffa, L. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Forestry; Tsarouhas, V.; Gullberg, U. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics; Howe, G.; Hackett, W.; Gardner, G.; Furnier, G. [Minnesota Univ., St. Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources; Tuskan, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Molecular characterization of advanced-generation pedigrees and evaluation of cold tolerance are two aspects of Populus and Salix genetic improvement programmes worldwide that have traditionally received little emphasis. As such, chloroplast DNA markers were tested as a means of determining multi-generation parental contributions to hybrid progeny. Likewise, greenhouse, growth chamber and field studies were used to assess cold tolerance in Populus and Salix. Chloroplast DNA markers did not reveal size polymorphisms among four tested Populus species, but did produce sequence polymorphisms between P. maximowiczii and P. trichocarpa. Additional crosses between multiple genotypes from each species are being used to evaluate the utility of the detected polymorphism for ascertaining parentage within interspecific crosses. Short-day, cold tolerance greenhouse studies revealed that bud set date and frost damage are moderately heritable and genetically correlated in Populus. The relationship between greenhouse and field studies suggests that factors other than short days contribute to cold tolerance in Populus. In Salix, response to artificial fall conditioning varied among full-sibling families, with the fastest growing family displaying the greatest amount of cold tolerance 26 refs, 3 tabs

  5. Weak habitat specificity in ectomycorrhizal communities associated with Salix herbacea and Salix polaris in alpine tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Martin; Andreasen, Mathias; Björk, Robert G

    2011-05-01

    This study explores mid-alpine ectomycorrhizal communities on Salix herbacea and Salix polaris in plant communities differing in nutrient status and snow conditions. Plant species were identified by tracking roots back to above ground structures while fungal species were identified using molecular methods. The fungi were identified to 34 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs)/species but species accumulation curves indicated that the communities were only partially sampled. The estimated total species richness was 49 (±9 SD) MOTUs/species. No significant ectomycorrhizal community specificity was found between the two plant species and only weak specificity between different plant communities. Furthermore, no difference in proportion of colonized root tips could be demonstrated between plant communities. However, some fungal taxa showed tendencies to associate with specific environmental conditions. Sebacinaceae, Inocybe egenula, Russula cf. emetica, and a Tomentella sp. were found in meadow communities but not in the heath communities. Sistotrema cf. alboluteum and Tomentella cf. terrestris were only found in the dry and mesic heath communities. Classifications into exploration types showed that the contact type is more abundant in the dry heath community than the other communities. Cenococcum geophilum was the most common species but Cortinarius spp., Russula spp., Tomentella spp., and Lactarius spp. were also common. This study confirms that alpine communities are rich in ectomycorrhizal fungi including species from a wide variety of fungal lineages and also show that many dominant species have wide ecological amplitude.

  6. Sarcocystis arctica (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae): ultrastructural description and its new host record, the Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Cerqueira-Cézar, Camila K; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Mowery, Joseph; Carmena, David; Beckmen, Kimberlee; Dubey, Jitender P

    2016-07-01

    Sarcocystis sarcocysts are common in muscles of herbivores but are rare in muscles of carnivores. Here, we report sarcocysts in the muscles of a gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Alaska, USA, for the first time. Sarcocysts extracted from the tongue of the wolf were up to 900 μm long and slender and appeared to have a relatively thin wall by light microscope. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall most closely resembled "type 9c," and had a wavy parasitophorous vacuolar membrane folded as pleomorphic villar protrusions (vp), with anastomoses of tips. The vp and the ground substance (gs) layer were smooth without tubules or granules. The gs was up to 2.0 μm thick. The total width of the wall including vp and the gs was 3.5 μm. The vp were up to 1.5 μm long. Mature sarcocysts contained numerous bradyzoites and few metrocytes. The bradyzoites were 9.5 μm long and 1.5 μm wide, and contained all organelles found in Sarcocystis bradyzoites with at least two rhoptries. Molecular characterization showed the highest identity for 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, ITS-1, and cox1 sequences of Sarcocystis arctica of the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) from Norway. The ultrastructure of S. arctica from the fox is unknown. Here, we provide ultrastructure of S. arctica from the Alaskan wolf for the first time. The definitive host of S. arctica remains unknown.

  7. Lea protein expression during cold-induced dehydration in the Arctic collembola Megaphorura arctica

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    Popović Ž.D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic springtail Megaphorura arctica (Tullberg, 1876 employs a strategy known as cryoprotective dehydration to survive winter temperatures as low as -25°C. During cryoprotective dehydration, water is lost from the animal to ice in its surroundings as a result of the difference in vapour pressure between the animal’s supercooled body fluids and ice (Worland et al., 1998; Holmstrup and Somme, 1998. This mechanism ensures that as the habitat temperature falls, the concentration of solutes remains high enough to prevent freezing (Holmstrup et al., 2002. In M. arctica, accumulation of trehalose, a cryo/anhydro protectant, occurs in parallel with dehydration. Recent studies have identified a number of genes and cellular processes involved in cryoprotective dehydration in M. arctica (Clark et al., 2007; Clark et al., 2009; Purać et al., 2011. One of them includes late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins. This study, together with that of Bahrndorff et al. (2008, suggests that LEA proteins may be involved in protective dehydration in this species.

  8. Accumulation of Elements in Salix and Other Species Used in Vegetation Filters with Focus on Wood Fuel Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Anneli

    2007-07-01

    Woody or herbaceous perennials used as vegetation filters for treatment of different types of wastes can be suitable for production of solid biofuels when their above ground harvestable biomass yield is sufficiently high and when biomass contains appropriate concentrations of minerals with regard to fuel combustion processes. The concentrations of nitrogen (N), potassium (K) and heavy metals (especially Zn and Cd) in fuel should be low and calcium (Ca) concentrations high to avoid technical problems and environmentally harmful emissions during combustion. Since soil supplementation with essential elements improves biomass yield, a conflict might arise between yield and quality aims. There are various possibilities to influence fuel quality during the growing phase of the life cycle of perennial biomass crops. This study assessed the suitability of two deciduous woody perennials (Salix and Populus) and two summer green herbaceous perennials (Phragmites and Urtica) for phytoremediation in terms of growth and nutrient allocation patterns. Salix and Populus proved suitable as vegetation filters when nutrients were available to plants in near-optimal proportions, but when unbalanced nutrient solutions (wastewater) were applied, stem biomass fraction was strongly reduced. Phragmites was more tolerant to wastewater treatment in terms of plant biomass production and nutrient allocation patterns, so if the N:P ratio of the wastewater is suboptimal, a vegetation filter using Phragmites could be considered. In further studies, a method was developed to determine the proportions of nutrient-rich bark in coppiced Salix, while heavy metal phytoextraction capacity was assessed in two Salix vegetation filters. The relevance of proportion of bark on wood fuel quality and element removal from vegetation filters was also investigated. The concentrations of the elements studied in harvestable Salix shoot biomass were higher, meaning lower wood fuel quality, in plantations where

  9. POSSIBILITY OF USING OF SALIX BABYLONICA IN PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kompantseva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Under review is Salix babylonica L., which is widely cultivated in Russia as an ornamental plant. The purpose of the review is to summarize the literature on the chemical composition and pharmacological activity of the Babylonian willow. In Russia, only the qualitative composition of the studied species studied, pharmacologi-cal studies have not been conducted. Abroad, there is a positive experience of Salix babylonica in folk medicine, and obtained results that indicate a high content of biologically active compounds. Shown in the survey data suggest the prospect of studying the Babylonian willows growing in the southern regions of Russia for use in medicine and pharmacy.

  10. Summer C Fixation of Salix arctic is Altered by Prior Winter Snow Regimes: Photosynthetic Responses to Long-Term Snow Increases in the High Arctic of NW Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, A.; Welker, J. M.; Sullivan, P. F.; Maseyk, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    Climate models and snow measurements on Greenland show increased precipitation in addition to warming in the High Arctic. Because polar semi-deserts may be water limited, additional snow and snow melt water, may alleviate mid-summer drought and promote additional carbon fixation. We investigated the long-term (10 years of experimental snow increases) consequences of additional winter snow as it effects subsequent summer gas exchange of Salix arctica in a polar semi-desert tundra ecosystem in NW Greenland (76.6N, 68.6W). In 2011, measurements of gas exchange physiology were conducted along a transect from high to ambient snow accumulation in mid-July. In 2012, gas exchange was measured in high and ambient snow zones between late June and early August. In 2012, the seasonal patterns of δ18O of xylem water and soil water between 5 and 20 cm below the soil surface was measured to determine if snow accumulation influences the water sources and depth of water used by S. arctica. In 2011, photosynthesis in the deep snow zones was lower than in the ambient snow zone; similar results were observed for leaf N content. Carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of S. arctica leaves did not differ between deep and ambient snow zones suggesting a similar season-long relationship between photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in both locations. In 2012, there was a trend towards higher photosynthesis at the height of the growing season in the deep snow zones. Light response curves in 2012 suggest higher maximum photosynthesis in the deep snow zones compared to the ambient zones. Regardless of prior winter snow accumulation, S. arctica appears to derive nearly all its xylem water from the top 5 cm of the soil. There is little evidence that differences in photosynthetic physiology result directly from increased soil moisture associated with high snow, rather the effect appears more complex. Much of the increased snow accumulation will run-off of these systems when the soils are still

  11. Peculiarities of productivity formation of the genus Salix L. representatives

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    В. В. Баликіна

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To identify the productivity of the genus Salix L. plants and study the relationship between its structural elements. Methods. Field study, laboratory analysis, analytical approach. Results. It was found that the height of a three-year plants of species ranged from 86.0 to 775.1 cm, of hybrid forms – from 197.0 to 488.0 cm. Average diameter of three-year plants varied in the range of 19.10 to 52.94 mm (species and from 28.04 to 49.23 mm (hybrid forms. The highest stability for complex of morphological characters was observed in bog willow samples. It was determined that among species basket willow (16.94 t/ha and white willow (21.19 t/ha were the most productive for dry biomass yield per 1 hectare, among hybrid forms – purple willow × basket willow (23.36 t/ha and basket willow × bog willow (18.57 t/ha. It was established that the value of the plants productivity was characterized by moderate, significant and close correlations with the average diameter of plants, length and number of shoots of the second order. Conclusions. A comprehensive assessment of productivity traits of three-year plants from willow collection was conducted, index of dry matter yield per 1 hectare was defined. The links between quantitative traits that characterize the contribution of some of them in productivity index were investigated. Method of cluster analysis was used to group samples for the similarity of complex agronomic characters. Basket willow and white willow as well as such hybrid forms as basket willow × bog willow and purple willow × basket willow were recommended to use as a source material for selection of samples with high productivity.

  12. Surviving the cold: molecular analyses of insect cryoprotective dehydration in the Arctic springtail Megaphorura arctica (Tullberg

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    Popović Željko D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects provide tractable models for enhancing our understanding of the physiological and cellular processes that enable survival at extreme low temperatures. They possess three main strategies to survive the cold: freeze tolerance, freeze avoidance or cryoprotective dehydration, of which the latter method is exploited by our model species, the Arctic springtail Megaphorura arctica, formerly Onychiurus arcticus (Tullberg 1876. The physiological mechanisms underlying cryoprotective dehydration have been well characterised in M. arctica and to date this process has been described in only a few other species: the Antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi, an enchytraied worm, the larvae of the Antarctic midge Belgica antarctica and the cocoons of the earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra. There are no in-depth molecular studies on the underlying cold survival mechanisms in any species. Results A cDNA microarray was generated using 6,912 M. arctica clones printed in duplicate. Analysis of clones up-regulated during dehydration procedures (using both cold- and salt-induced dehydration has identified a number of significant cellular processes, namely the production and mobilisation of trehalose, protection of cellular systems via small heat shock proteins and tissue/cellular remodelling during the dehydration process. Energy production, initiation of protein translation and cell division, plus potential tissue repair processes dominate genes identified during recovery. Heat map analysis identified a duplication of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS gene in M. arctica and also 53 clones co-regulated with TPS, including a number of membrane associated and cell signalling proteins. Q-PCR on selected candidate genes has also contributed to our understanding with glutathione-S-transferase identified as the major antioxdidant enzyme protecting the cells during these stressful procedures, and a number of protein kinase signalling molecules

  13. Nanoscale Phenomena Occurring during Pyrolysis of Salix viminalis Wood

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    Aleksandra W. Cyganiuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective utilisation of unique properties of Salix viminalis wood enables preparation of materials of nanotechnologic properties. Thermal decomposition of lignin-cellulose organic matter results in the formation of a nanostructured porous carbon matrix (charcoal. Narrowed pore size distribution (PSD in the subnanometer range allows to consider the charcoals as carbon molecular sieves (CMSs, which are capable of separating even chemically inert gases like neon, krypton, and nitrogen. High tolerance of Salix viminalis to heavy metal ions enables enriching living plant tissues with metal ions like lanthanum and manganese. Such ions may later form LaMnO3 with parallel transformation of plant tissues (organic matter to carbon matrix using a heat treatment. In this way, one gets a hybrid material: a porous carbon matrix with uniformly suspended nanocrystallites of LaMoO3. The crystallites are in the catalytically active phase during the conversion of n-butanol to heptanone-4 with high yield and selectivity.

  14. Isolation of Secondary Metabolites from the Roots of Salix Babylonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpreet; Raturi, Rakesh; Badoni, P. P.

    2017-08-01

    Chemical examination of ethanolic extract of Salix babylonica, root, led to isolation of 2-(Hydroxymethyl) phenyl β-D-glucopyranoside(1) and 2-[(benzoyloxy)methyl]-4-hydroxyphenyl β-D-glucopyranoside 3-Benzoate (2)with previously known compounds β-Sitosterol, kaempferol 7-O-glucoside andapigenin 7-O-galactoside. Compounds 1and 2 had been isolated for the first time from this plant. The structures of the compounds had been elucidated with the help of spectral and chemical studies.

  15. ( rkers i willow amplif RAPD) n gene (Salix fication )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    than more marke. Conc. In this g technique sh values. n effective mu that for SSR for RAPD ers. clusion s study, we m howing relations ultiplex ratio. R (4.588) and. (0.876) tha may conclude. Singh et ships between is more for R d similarly ma an that for that molecula al. 3225. 94 Salix. RAPD (6.246 arker index i. SSR (0.751.

  16. Modeling potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts due to pesticide use in biofuel feedstock production: the cases of maize, rapeseed, salix, soybean, sugar cane, and wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordborg, Maria; Cederberg, Christel; Berndes, Göran

    2014-10-07

    The inclusion of ecotoxicity impacts of pesticides in environmental assessments of biobased products has long been hampered by methodological challenges. We expanded the pesticide database and the regional coverage of the pesticide emission model PestLCI v.2.0, combined it with the impact assessment model USEtox, and assessed potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts (PFEIs) of pesticide use in selected biofuel feedstock production cases, namely: maize (Iowa, US, two cases), rapeseed (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany), Salix (South Central Sweden), soybean (Mato Grosso, Brazil, two cases), sugar cane (São Paulo, Brazil), and wheat (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany). We found that PFEIs caused by pesticide use in feedstock production varied greatly, up to 3 orders of magnitude. Salix has the lowest PFEI per unit of energy output and per unit of cultivated area. Impacts per biofuel unit were 30, 750, and 1000 times greater, respectively, for the sugar cane, wheat and rapeseed cases than for Salix. For maize genetically engineered (GE) to resist glyphosate herbicides and to produce its own insecticidal toxin, maize GE to resist glyphosate, soybeans GE to resist glyphosate and conventional soybeans, the impacts were 110, 270, 305, and 310 times greater than for Salix, respectively. The significance of field and site-specific conditions are discussed, as well as options for reducing negative impacts in biofuel feedstock production.

  17. Transient response of Salix cuttings to changing water level regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorla, L.; Signarbieux, C.; Turberg, P.; Buttler, A.; Perona, P.

    2015-03-01

    Sustainable water management requires an understanding of the effects of flow regulation on riparian ecomorphological processes. We investigated the transient response of Salix viminalis by examining the effect of water-level regimes on its above-ground and below-ground biomass. Four sets of Salix cuttings, three juveniles (in the first growing season) and one mature (1 year old), were planted and initially grown under the same water-level regime for 1 month. We imposed three different water-level regime treatments representing natural variability, a seasonal trend with no peaks, and minimal flow (characteristic of hydropower) consisting of a constant water level and natural flood peaks. We measured sap flux, stem water potential, photosynthesis, growth parameters, and final root architecture. The mature cuttings were not affected by water table dynamics, but the juveniles displayed causal relationships between the changing water regime, plant growth, and root distribution during a 2 month transient period. For example, a 50% drop in mean sap flux corresponded with a -1.5 Mpa decrease in leaf water potential during the first day after the water regime was changed. In agreement with published field observations, the cuttings concentrated their roots close to the mean water table of the corresponding treatment, allowing survival under altered conditions and resilience to successive stress events. Juvenile development was strongly impacted by the minimum flow regime, leading to more than 60% reduction of both above-ground and below-ground biomass, with respect to the other treatments. Hence, we suggest avoiding minimum flow regimes where Salix restoration is prioritized.

  18. Synopsis of the genus Salix (Salicaceae in southern Africa

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    K. L. Immelman

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available One species of  Salix, S. mucronata Thunb. (=S .  subserrata Willd., with five subspecies, is recognized as indigenous to the southern African region. Problems of delimitation in the genus in southern Africa are discussed, and a key to the indigenous and exotic taxa is presented. The synonymy of the subspecies is presented, with leaf silhouettes and a distribution map of each. The following new combinations are made: S. mucronata subsp. hirsuta (Thunb. Immelman, S.  mucronata subsp. capensis (Thunb. Immelman, 5.  mucronata subsp. woodii (Seemen Immelman and  S. mucronata subsp. wilmsii (Seemen Immelman.

  19. A New Flavonoid Glycoside from Salix denticulata Aerial Parts

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    Amita Bamola

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A new flavonoid glycoside (1 has been isolated from the aerial parts of Salix denticulata (Salicaceae together with five known compounds, β-sitosterol, 2,6-dihydroxy- 4-methoxy acetophenone, eugenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 1-O-β-D-(3’-benzoyl salicyl alcohol and luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-6-glucopyranoside. The structure of 1 was elucidated as 2’,5-dihydroxy-3’-methoxyflavone-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside by means of chemical and spectral data including 2D NMR studies.

  20. The root anchorage ability of Salix alba var. tristis using a pull-out test

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because Salix alba var. tristis has a strong capability of keeping moisture, preventing drought and reducing wind, we selected it as a model species for soil bioengineering research and application in Beijing, China. In this study, we aimed to investigate the soil-reinforcing effects by Salix alba var. tristis. We performed a ...

  1. Using cluster analysis as a method of classification of the genus Salix L. representatives

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    М. В. Роїк

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study interactions among the representatives of the genus Salix L. through the cluster analysis, form groups of closely related species and hybrid forms basing on differences of morphological parameters of leaves. Methods. Field, cluster analysis and tree graphics. Results. Willow species were grouped according to absolute parameters of leaf, and three groups of clusters were identified. The degree of affinity between species were assessed using values of an Euclidean distance. Distinctive features of leaf parameters were defined: length of a leaf blade (Ll, distance (cm between the leaf tip and its maximum width (SDmxT and the distance between the leaf tip (cm and the line of its width that corresponds to the length of petiole (SLpT. Conclusions. Using the willow species collection as an example, diagnostically valuable quantitative parameters of leaves were revealed, the use of which allows to identify willow species and hybrid forms through PC applications.

  2. Growth of Populus and Salix Species under Compost Leachate Irrigation

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    Tooba Abedi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the known broad variation in remediation capacity, three plant species were used in the experiment: two fast growing poplar’s clones - Populus deltoides, Populus euramericana, and willows Salix alba. Populus and Salix cuttings were collected from the nursery of the Populus Research Center of Safrabasteh in the eastern part of Guilan province at north of Iran. The Populus clones were chosen because of their high biomass production capacity and willow- because it is native in Iran. The highest diameter growth rate was exhibited for all three plant species by the 1:1 treatment with an average of 0.26, 0.22 and 0.16 cm in eight months period for P. euroamericana, P. deltoides and S. alba, respectively. Over a period of eight months a higher growth rate of height was observed in (P and (1:1 treatment for S. alba (33.70 and 15.77 cm, respectively and in (C treatment for P. deltoides (16.51 cm. P. deltoides and S. alba produced significantly (p<0.05 smaller aboveground biomass in (P treatment compared to all species. P. deltoides exhibited greater mean aboveground biomass in the (1:1 treatment compared to other species. There were significant differences (p<0.05 in the growth of roots between P. deltoides, P. euramericana and S. alba in all of the treatments.

  3. Parasitic fungi of the genera Betula and Salix

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    Iwona Adamska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2001-2004, the occurrence of parasitic fungi of plants of the genera Betula and Salix growing in the Słowiński National Park was investigated. The plant species examined included B. pubescens, B. pendula, S. aurita, S. caprea, S. cinerea, S. fragilis, and S. repens. Plants of the genus Betula were affected by 9 species of parasiting fungi. In Poland, three of them (Microsphaera ornata var. europaea, Phyllactinia guttata, Melampsoridium betulinum occur commonly, five (Asteroma leptothyrioides, Discula betulina, Fusicladium betulae, Phyllosticta betulina, Septoria betulina are rare, and Septoria betulae-odoratae has not been recorded to date. Three species, Asteroma leptothyrioides, Fusicladium betulae, Phyllosticta betulina, were found on new plant hosts. Plants of the genus Salix were attacked by 8 species of parasiting fungi. Four of them (Melampsora allii-fragilis, M. caprearum, M. epitea, Uncinula adunca var. adunca are common in Poland, four (Marssonina salicicola, Phyllosticta salicicola, Septoria salicicola, Trimmatostroma betulinum rarely occur here. Uncinula adunca var. adunca, Marssonina salicicola, Phyllosticta salicicola, Septoria salicicola and Trimmatostroma betulinum were associated with the plant species not reported earlier to be their hosts.

  4. Association mapping in Salix viminalis L. (Salicaceae) - identification of candidate genes associated with growth and phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallingbäck, Henrik R; Fogelqvist, Johan; Powers, Stephen J; Turrion-Gomez, Juan; Rossiter, Rachel; Amey, Joanna; Martin, Tom; Weih, Martin; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Karp, Angela; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Hanley, Steven J; Berlin, Sofia; Rönnberg-Wästljung, Ann-Christin

    2016-05-01

    Willow species (Salix) are important as short-rotation biomass crops for bioenergy, which creates a demand for faster genetic improvement and breeding through deployment of molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS). To find markers associated with important adaptive traits, such as growth and phenology, for use in MAS, we genetically dissected the trait variation of a Salix viminalis (L.) population of 323 accessions. The accessions were sampled throughout northern Europe and were established at two field sites in Pustnäs, Sweden, and at Woburn, UK, offering the opportunity to assess the impact of genotype-by-environment interactions (G × E) on trait-marker associations. Field measurements were recorded for growth and phenology traits. The accessions were genotyped using 1536 SNP markers developed from phenology candidate genes and from genes previously observed to be differentially expressed in contrasting environments. Association mapping between 1233 of these SNPs and the measured traits was performed taking into account population structure and threshold selection bias. At a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.2, 29 SNPs were associated with bud burst, leaf senescence, number of shoots or shoot diameter. The percentage of accession variation (Radj2) explained by these associations ranged from 0.3% to 4.4%, suggesting that the studied traits are controlled by many loci of limited individual impact. Despite this, a SNP in the EARLY FLOWERING 3 gene was repeatedly associated (FDR < 0.2) with bud burst. The rare homozygous genotype exhibited 0.4-1.0 lower bud burst scores than the other genotype classes on a five-grade scale. Consequently, this marker could be promising for use in MAS and the gene deserves further study. Otherwise, associations were less consistent across sites, likely due to their small Radj2 estimates and to considerable G × E interactions indicated by multivariate association analyses and modest trait accession correlations across sites (0.32-0.61).

  5. Transcriptional and Hormonal Regulation of Weeping Trait in Salix matsudana

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    Juanjuan Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Salix matsudana is a large and rapidly-growing tree, with erect or spreading branchlets (upright willow. However, S. matsudana var. pseudomatsudana is one of the varietas, with pendulous branchlets (weeping willow. It has high ornamental value for its graceful pendulous branches. In order to study the molecular basis for this weeping trait, leaves and stems collected at different developmental stages were analyzed using RNA-seq coupled with digital gene expression. Although weeping trees are used worldwide as landscape plants, little is known about the genes that control weeping. Our growth results indicated that branches in weeping willow developed and elongated throughout all developmental stages, but branches in upright willow grew rapidly in the initial stages and then grew slowly and began shoot branching in the middle stages. A total of 613 hormone-related genes were differentially expressed in willow development. Among these, genes associated with auxin and gibberellin (GA were highly likely to be responsible for the weeping trait, and genes associated with auxin and ethylene probably play crucial roles in shoot elongation. The genes with differential expression patterns were used to construct a network that regulated stem development, and auxin-related genes were identified as hub genes in the network in the weeping willow. Our results suggest an important role of gibberellin and auxin in regulating the weeping trait in Salix matsudana. This is the first report on the molecular aspects of hormonal effects on weeping trait in willow using transcriptomics and helps in dissecting the molecular mechanisms by which the weeping trait is controlled.

  6. A Large Ornithurine Bird (Tingmiatornis arctica) from the Turonian High Arctic: Climatic and Evolutionary Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Richard K.; Clarke, Julia; Tarduno, John A.; Brinkman, Donald

    2016-12-01

    Bird fossils from Turonian (ca. 90 Ma) sediments of Axel Heiberg Island (High Canadian Arctic) are among the earliest North American records. The morphology of a large well-preserved humerus supports identification of a new volant, possibly diving, ornithurine species (Tingmiatornis arctica). The new bird fossils are part of a freshwater vertebrate fossil assemblage that documents a period of extreme climatic warmth without seasonal ice, with minimum mean annual temperatures of 14 °C. The extreme warmth allowed species expansion and establishment of an ecosystem more easily able to support large birds, especially in fresh water bodies such as those present in the Turonian High Arctic. Review of the high latitude distribution of Northern Hemisphere Mesozoic birds shows only ornithurine birds are known to have occupied these regions. We propose physiological differences in ornithurines such as growth rate may explain their latitudinal distribution especially as temperatures decline later in the Cretaceous. Distribution and physiology merit consideration as factors in their preferential survival of parts of one ornithurine lineage, Aves, through the K/Pg boundary.

  7. Leaf epidermal features of Salix species (Salicaceae) and their systematic significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghahremaninejad, Farrokh; Khalili, Zohreh; Maassoumi, Ali Asghar; Mirzaie‐Nodoushan, Hossein; Riahi, Mehrshid

    2012-01-01

    • Premise of the study: The classification of the genus Salix has historically been intrinsically difficult due to its propensity toward plasticity and high variation in diagnostic morphological characters...

  8. Bioaccessibility In Vitro of Nutraceuticals from Bark of Selected Salix Species

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    Urszula Gawlik-Dziki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate and to compare the extractability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability in vitro of antioxidative compounds from bark of selected Salix species: S. alba (SA, S. daphnoides (SD, S. purpurea (SP, and S. daphnoides x purpurea (SDP hybrid willow clones originating from their natural habitats and cultivated on the sandy soil. The highest amount of phenolic glycosides was found in the bark of SDP and SD. The best source of phenolics was bark of SDP. The highest content of flavonoids were found in SD bark samples, whereas the highest concentration of bioaccessible and bioavailable phenolic acids was determined in SDP bark. Bark of all tested Salix species showed significant antiradical activity. This properties are strongly dependent on extraction system and genetic factors. Regardless of Salix genotypes, the lowest chelating power was found for chemically-extractable compounds. Bark of all Salix species contained ethanol-extractable compounds with reducing ability. Besides this, high bioaccessibility and bioavailability in vitro of Salix bark phytochemicals were found. Obtained results indicate that extracts from bark tested Salix genotypes can provide health promoting benefits to the consumers; however, this problem requires further study.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF gene family in Salix arbutifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Guodong; Sui, Jinkai; Zeng, Yanfei; He, Caiyun; Zhang, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    AP2/ERF genes encode transcriptional regulators with a variety of functions in plant growth and development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. To date, there are no detailed classification and expression profiles for AP2/ERF genes in Salix. In this study, a comprehensive computational analysis identified 173 AP2/ERF superfamily genes in willow (Salix arbutifolia), by using in silico cloning methods with the use of the AP2/ERF conserved domain amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana as a probe. Based on the results of phylogenetic analyses and the number of AP2/ERF domains, the AP2/ERF genes were classified into four groups: AP2, RAV, ERF and Soloist. The expression profile was analyzed using transcriptome data from different tissues. A comparative analysis of AP2/ERF superfamily genes among Salix, Populus and Arabidopsis was performed. The Salix DREB, AP2 and RAV groups had a similar number to those in Arabidopsis, and the size of the ERF subfamily in Salix was about 1.4-fold that of Arabidopsis. The Salix DREB subfamily was smaller compared to Populus, while the other families were similar in size to those in Populus. These results will be useful for future functional analyses of the ERF family genes.

  10. The effects of environment on Arctica islandica shell formation and architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Stefania; Nehrke, Gernot; Wanamaker, Alan D., Jr.; Ballesta-Artero, Irene; Brey, Thomas; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2017-03-01

    Mollusks record valuable information in their hard parts that reflect ambient environmental conditions. For this reason, shells can serve as excellent archives to reconstruct past climate and environmental variability. However, animal physiology and biomineralization, which are often poorly understood, can make the decoding of environmental signals a challenging task. Many of the routinely used shell-based proxies are sensitive to multiple different environmental and physiological variables. Therefore, the identification and interpretation of individual environmental signals (e.g., water temperature) often is particularly difficult. Additional proxies not influenced by multiple environmental variables or animal physiology would be a great asset in the field of paleoclimatology. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential use of structural properties of Arctica islandica shells as an environmental proxy. A total of 11 specimens were analyzed to study if changes of the microstructural organization of this marine bivalve are related to environmental conditions. In order to limit the interference of multiple parameters, the samples were cultured under controlled conditions. Three specimens presented here were grown at two different water temperatures (10 and 15 °C) for multiple weeks and exposed only to ambient food conditions. An additional eight specimens were reared under three different dietary regimes. Shell material was analyzed with two techniques; (1) confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) was used to quantify changes of the orientation of microstructural units and pigment distribution, and (2) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to detect changes in microstructural organization. Our results indicate that A. islandica microstructure is not sensitive to changes in the food source and, likely, shell pigment are not altered by diet. However, seawater temperature had a statistically significant effect on the orientation of the biomineral. Although

  11. Connections between the growth of Arctica islandica and phytoplankton dynamics on the Faroe Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Fabian; Andersson, Carin; Trofimova, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    In this study we use molluscan sclerochronological techniques in order to obtain closer insights into environmental and ecological dynamics of Faroe Shelf waters. The Faroe Shelf represents a special ecosystem with rich benthic and neritic communities, which also have great importance for many economically relevant fish stocks. Thus, a better understanding of seasonal and year-to-year phytoplankton and stratification dynamics would be useful because they also have implications for higher trophic levels. The water masses of the Faroe Shelf are fairly homogenous and isolated from off-shelf waters but at a certain depth, which is referred to as transition zone, seasonal stratification and horizontal exchange occur. Systematic observations and phytoplankton dynamic investigations have only been performed during the last 29 years but longer records are missing. Thus, we use the growth increment variability in long-lived Arctica islandica shells from the transition zone of the eastern Faroe Shelf to evaluate its potential to estimate on-shelf phytoplankton and stratification dynamics since previous studies have shown that the growth of A. islandica is highly dependent on food availability. We have built a shell-based master-chronology reaching back to the 17th century. Comparisons between the growth indices of our chronology and fluorescence data reveal significant positive relationships. In combination with an index that accounts for stratification even stronger correlations are obtained. This indicates that the growth of A. islandica is largely influenced by a combination of how much phytoplankton is produced and how much actually reaches the bottom, i.e. how well-mixed the water column is. Further significant positive correlations can also be found between the growth indices and other primary productivity data from the Faroe Shelf. In conclusion, our results suggest that the growth indices can be related to year-to-year changes in phytoplankton production and

  12. Cryoprotective properties of exopolysaccharide (P-21653) produced by the Antarctic bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas arctica KOPRI 21653.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Yim, Joung Han

    2007-12-01

    Twenty-five bacterial strains that secrete mucous materials were isolated from sediment obtained from King George Island, Antarctica. Seven of these strains proved capable of producing cryoprotective exopolysaccharides. The strain KOPRI 21653 was selected for the further study of an anti-ice-nucleating polysaccharide (ANP), which originated from a polar region. KOPRI 21653 was identified as Pseudoalteromonas arctica as the result of 16S rRNA analysis. The exopolysaccharide, P-21653, was purified completely from the KOPRI 21653 cell culture via column chromatography and protease treatment. The principal sugar components of P-21653 were determined to be galactose and glucose, at a ratio of 1:1.5, via GC-MS analysis. The cryoprotective activity of P-21653 was characterized via an E. coli viability test. In the presence of 0.1% (w/v) P-21653, the survival ratio of E. coli cells was as high as 82.6% over three repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The survival ratio decreased drastically to 71.5 and 48.1%, respectively, in five and seven repeated cycle conditions; however, the survival ratios were greater over three (96.6-92.1%) to seven (100.5-91.6%) freeze-thaw cycles in the presence of 0.5 and 1.0% (w/v) P-21653. In addition, at much lower concentrations (0.1-1.0%), P-21653 resulted in survival ratios (83.1-98.4%) similar to those of two commercially available cryoprotectants (VEG plus X-1000, 92.9% and VM3, 95.3%), which were utilized at the recommended concentrations (90%). The biochemical characteristics of exopolysaccharide P-21653 reflect that this compound may be developed as a useful cryoprotectant for use in medical applications and in the food industry.

  13. Phytotoxicity of landfill leachate on willow--Salix amygdalina L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialowiec, Andrzej; Randerson, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    Because of low investment and operational costs, interest is increasing in the use of willow plants in landfill leachate disposal. Toxic effects of leachate on the plants should be avoided in the initial period of growth and phytotoxicological testing may be helpful to select appropriate leachate dose rates. The aim of this study was to determine the phytotoxicity of landfill leachate on young willow (Salix amygdalina L.) cuttings, as a criterion for dose rate selection in the early phase of growth. Over a test period of 6 weeks plants were exposed to six concentrations of landfill leachate solutions (0%; 6.25%; 12.5%; 25%; 50% and 100%), under two different regimes. In regime A willow plants were cultivated in leachate solution from the beginning, whereas in regime B they were grown initially in clean water for 4 weeks, after which the water was exchanged for leachate solutions. The lowest effective concentration causing toxic effects (LOEC) was calculated (plandfill leachate solutions with electrical conductivity (EC) values up to 5.0 mS/cm in regime A, whereas in regime B plants were killed when EC exceeded 3.0 mS/cm. This indicates an ability of willow plants to tolerate higher strengths of landfill leachate if they are cultivated in such concentrations from the beginning. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Salix daphnoides: A Screening for Oligomeric and Polymeric Proanthocyanidins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wiesneth

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a qualitative analysis of proanthocyanidins (PAs from an aqueous-methanolic extract of Salix daphnoides VILL. bark is described. Procyanidin B1 (1, B2 (2, B3 (3, B4 (4, C1 (5, epicatechin-(4β→8-epicatechin-(4β→8-catechin (6 and epicatechin-(4β→8-epicatechin-(4β→8-epicatechin-(4β→8-catechin (7 have been isolated by a combination of different chromatographic separations on Sephadex® LH-20-, MCI®-, Diol-and RP-18-phases. Mass spectrometry, 1D- and 2D-NMR, circular dichroism and polarimetry were used for their structure elucidation and verification by comparison with the literature. Additionally, two fractions of very polar flavan-3-ols were compared: “regular” polymeric PAs received at the very end of the Sephadex® LH-20 chromatography showing no mobility on silica TLC and “unusual” PAs with the same RF-value but already eluting together with flavonoids in the Sephadex® LH-20 system. These “unusual” PAs were subsequently enriched by centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC. 13C-NMR, polarimetry, thiolysis, acid hydrolysis and phloroglucinol degradation were used to characterize both fractions. Differences in the composition of different flavan-3-ol units and the middle chain length were observed.

  15. Elevated CO₂ levels do not affect the shell structure of the bivalve Arctica islandica from the Western Baltic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Stemmer

    Full Text Available Shells of the bivalve Arctica islandica are used to reconstruct paleo-environmental conditions (e.g. temperature via biogeochemical proxies, i.e. biogenic components that are related closely to environmental parameters at the time of shell formation. Several studies have shown that proxies like element and isotope-ratios can be affected by shell growth and microstructure. Thus it is essential to evaluate the impact of changing environmental parameters such as high pCO2 and consequent changes in carbonate chemistry on shell properties to validate these biogeochemical proxies for a wider range of environmental conditions. Growth experiments with Arctica islandica from the Western Baltic Sea kept under different pCO2 levels (from 380 to 1120 µatm indicate no affect of elevated pCO2 on shell growth or crystal microstructure, indicating that A. islandica shows an adaptation to a wider range of pCO2 levels than reported for other species. Accordingly, proxy information derived from A. islandica shells of this region contains no pCO2 related bias.

  16. Elemental analysis of soils and Salix polaris in the town of Pyramiden and its surroundings (Svalbard).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcarová, Lucie; Novotný, Karel; Chattová, Barbora; Elster, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The contents of elements in the top soil (upper 5 cm) and deeper soil (5 to 10 cm) layers and in Salix polaris (leaves and stem) from the former Soviet mining town of Pyramiden and its close vicinity on the Svalbard archipelago were determined. The analyses covered major and trace elements, including heavy metals, in order to describe anthropogenic impacts related to the management of the mining town. Soil samples and plant tissues were analysed from 13 localities across and close to town vicinity. The plant ground cover of all sampling points was determined, and plant tissues (leaves and stem) were collected. Higher contents of Cd (3-11 mg kg(-1)) and Mo (11-33 mg kg(-1)) were detected in the soils. With relation to the world average concentration of metals in soils, the geo-accumulation indexes (Igeo) and the level of pollution of the analysed soils were classified into seven pollution grades. The soils of the studied localities were usually unpolluted (grade 1) when analysed for metals, with the soil pollution grades 4-6 identified only for Cd and Mo (moderately to strongly polluted). In Salix polaris, excessive amounts of Fe (60-1520 mg kg(-1)), Zn (80-1050 mg kg(-1)), Cd (0.2-5.5 mg kg(-1)) and Cr (0-3.6 mg kg(-1)) were observed. The Igeo of these elements, compared with values considered sufficient for plants, showed pollution grades from 2 to 6. The pollution load index (PLI) ranged between 0.49 and 1.01. Only one locality could be considered polluted having a PLI higher than 1. Plant/soil transfer factors (TF) for trace metals decreased in the following order: Zn > Cu > Cd > Mn > Ni > As > Mo > Pb > Co > Al > Cr > Fe. The principal contribution of this study consists in the assessment of the contamination of soils and plants by toxic heavy metals in an otherwise pristine environment of the Svalbard archipelago related to urban/industrial activities.

  17. Selection of Willows (Salix sp. for Biomass Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Kajba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Willows compared with other species are the most suitable for biomass production in short rotations because of their very abundant growth during the first years. Nowadays, in Croatia, a large number of selected and registered willow clones are available. The main objective of the research should be to find genotypes which, with minimum nutrients, will produce the maximum quantity of biomass. Material and Methods: Clonal test of the arborescent willows include the autochthonous White Willow (Salix alba, interracial hybrids of the autochthonous White Willow and the English ‘cricket’ Willow (S. alba var. calva, interspecies hybrids (S. matsudana × S. alba, as well as multispecies hybrids of willows. Average production of dry biomass (DM∙ha-1∙a-1 per hectare was estimated in regard to the clone, survival, spacing and the number of shoots per stump. Results: The highest biomass production as well as the best adaptedness and phenotypic stability on testing site was shown by clones (‘V 374’, ‘V 461’, ‘V 578’ from 15.2 - 25.0 t∙DM∙ha-1∙a-1 originated from backcross hybrid S. matsudana × (S. matsudana × S. alba and by one S. alba clone (‘V 95’, 23.1 - 25.7 t∙DM∙ha-1∙a-1. These clones are now at the stage of registration and these results indicate significant potential for further breeding aimed at biomass production in short rotations. Conclusions: Willow clones showed high biomass production on marginal sites and dry biomass could be considerably increased with the application of intensive silvicultural and agro technical measures. No nutrition or pest control measures were applied (a practice otherwise widely used in intensive cultivation system, while weed vegetation was regulated only at the earliest age.

  18. A Phylogenetic Analysis of Salix (Salicaceae Based on matK and Ribosomal DNA Sequence Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Hardig

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Salix has proven a fertile taxon for a host of evolutionary and ecological studies, yet much work remains in the development of a definitive phylogenetic context for those studies. We performed phylogenetic analyses, using both maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony techniques, of chloroplast-encoded matK and nuclear-encoded ribosomal DNA (rDNA gene sequences, gathered from specimens deemed representative of the existing subgeneric classification, with the objective of identifying and elaborating the phylogenetic relationships within Salix. Comparisons between the two phylogenetic hypotheses indicate a high degree of polyphyly in the matK-based phylogeny. This we attribute to the effects of hybridization, introgression, and lineage sorting. Comparisons with previous molecule-based phylogenetic hypotheses indicate a fair degree of congruence and all are unanimous in placing Chosenia arbutifolia within the genus Salix. The phylogenetic analysis of our ITS data set has produced results that generally support the most-recent infrageneric classification.

  19. Morphological and molecular characterization of Sarcocystis arctica-like sarcocysts from the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) from Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Cézar, Camila K.; Thompson, Peter C.; Verma, Shiv K.; Mowery, Joseph; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Antunes Murata, Fernando H.; Sinnett, David R.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Rosenthal, Benjamin M.; Dubey, Jitender P.

    2017-01-01

    The muscles of herbivores commonly harbor sarcocysts of parasites belonging to species in the genus Sarcocystis, but such muscle parasites are rare in carnivores. Here, we report Sarcocystis arctica-like sarcocysts in muscles of Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) from Alaska, USA, for the first time. The tongues of 56 foxes were examined for Sarcocystis infection using several methods. Sarcocystis bradyzoites were detected in pepsin digests of 13 (23.2%), and sarcocysts were found in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) of 9 (16.0%). By light microscopy, sarcocysts were up to 4 mm long and up to 245 μm wide. In HE-stained sections, the sarcocyst wall appeared smooth and up to 1.5 μm thick without visible protrusions. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall had a wavy parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (pvm) folded as pleomorphic villar protrusions (vp), sometimes with anastomoses of villar tips. The vp and the ground substance (gs) layer were smooth and without microtubules. The gs was up to 2.0 μm thick. The total width of the wall including vp and the gs was up to 4.0 μm. The vp were up to 3.0 μm long and most closely resembled “type 9c.” All sarcocysts were mature and contained numerous 8.1 × 2.1 μm sized bradyzoites. Molecular characterization (at 18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, ITS-1, and cox1) showed the highest affinity for S. arctica of the Arctic fox (V. lagopus) from Norway. In the present investigation, we provide evidence that sarcocysts are common in tongues of Alaskan Arctic foxes suggesting that these carnivores are serving as intermediate hosts, and we also provide ultrastructure of S. arctica from the Arctic fox for the first time.

  20. Salicilatos isolados de folhas e talos de Salix martiana Leyb. (Salicaceae Salicylates isolated from leaves and stems of Salix martiana Leyb. (Salicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carromberth Carioca Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Salix martiana Leyb. is an endemic species from the Amazon river floodplain areas (varzeas, of the State of Amazonas. Stems and leaves were extracted with dichloromethane, methanol and hydro-alcohol and these extracts were fractionated by using conventional chromatographic techniques. The major substances isolated, salicin and trichocarposide (6-0-p-coumaroyl salicin, were determined through analyses of NMR 1D (¹H and 13C and NMR 2D (gHSQC and gHMBC. These compounds were isolated for the first time in Salix martiana Leyb. (Salicaceae. The percentage of these compounds in S. martiana is very high. The extracts were analyzed for their DPPH antioxidant capacity and the methanolic from the leaves and the hydro-alcoholic from the stems were the more active.

  1. Salicylates isolated from leaves and stems of Salix martiana Leyb. (Salicaceae); Salicilatos isolados de folhas e talos de Salix martiana Leyb. (Salicaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Carromberth Carioca [Universidade Federal do Acre (UFAC), Rio Branco, AC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas e da Natureza; Cursino, Lorena Mayara de Carvalho; Novaes, Jussival de Abreu Pinheiro; Demetrio, Camilla Avelino; Pereira Junior, Orlando Liborio; Nunez, Cecilia Veronica [Instituto de Pesquisa da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Coordenacao de Pesquisas em Produtos Naturais; Amaral, Ieda Leao do [Instituto de Pesquisa da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Coordenacao de Pesquisas em Botanica

    2009-07-01

    Salix martiana Leyb. is an endemic species from the Amazon river floodplain areas (varzeas), of the State of Amazonas. Stems and leaves were extracted with dichloromethane, methanol and hydro-alcohol and these extracts were fractionated by using conventional chromatographic techniques. The major substances isolated, salicin and trichocarposide (6-0-p-coumaroyl salicin), were determined through analyses of NMR 1D ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) and NMR 2D (gHSQC and gHMBC). These compounds were isolated for the first time in Salix martiana Leyb. (Salicaceae). The percentage of these compounds in S. martiana is very high. The extracts were analyzed for their DPPH antioxidant capacity and the methanolic from the leaves and the hydro-alcoholic from the stems were the more active. (author)

  2. Pelletizing using forest fuels and Salix as raw materials. A study of the pelletizing properties; Pelletering med skogsbraensle och Salix som raavara. En undersoekning av pelleterbarheten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Lars; Oesterberg, Stefan [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    Three common forest fuels: light thinning material, cull tree and logging residues as well as energy forest fuel (Salix) has been used as fuel pellet materials. Logging residues and Salix were stacked for approximately 6 and 10 months respectively. Parameters varied for each raw material have been the moisture content and the press length of the die. These parameters have been changed to obtain best possible quality, mainly concerning mechanical durability. Pellets were also produced from bark free shavings in order to use as a reference in this study. Physical as well as chemical properties have been compared. It was comparatively easy to press logging residues and Salix into durable pellets and, even with larger press length, the production of pellets was higher than it was for the other raw materials. The density was equal for all pellets while the mechanical durability was better for all tested raw materials compared with the reference material. The fact that all raw materials besides the reference material contains bark which has an improving effect on the degree of hardness. The quality properties were mainly about the same or better for pellets made of light thinning material and cull tree respectively, compared with the reference pellets. However, the ash content was approximately twice as high compared with the reference pellets. The pellets made of logging residues and Salix respectively were of very good quality concerning duration and density but the ash content was approximately 10 times higher than in the reference pellets. Additionally, the nitrogen content was 6-9 times higher compared with the reference pellets.

  3. DC-8 being pushed out of the Arena Arctica hangar in Kiruna, Sweden for the second flight of the SAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This photo shows NASA's DC-8 being pushed out of the Arena Arctica hangar in Kiruna, Sweden for the second flight of the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). One of Dryden's high-flying ER-2 Airborne Science aircraft, a civilian variant of Lockheed's U-2, and another NASA flying laboratory, Dryden's DC-8, were based north of the Arctic Circle in Kiruna, Sweden during the winter of 2000 to study ozone depletion as part of SOLVE. A large hangar built especially for research, 'Arena Arctica' housed the instrumented aircraft and the scientists. Scientists observed unusually low levels of ozone over the Arctic during recent winters, raising concerns that ozone depletion there could become more widespread as in the Antarctic ozone hole. The NASA-sponsored international mission took place between November 1999 and March 2000 and was divided into three phases. The DC-8 was involved in all three phases returning to Dryden between each phase. The ER-2 flew science collection flights between January and March, remaining in Sweden from Jan. 9 through March 16. 'The collaborative campaign will provide an immense new body of information about the Arctic stratosphere,' said program scientist Dr. Michael Kurylo, NASA Headquarters. 'Our understanding of the Earth's ozone will be greatly enhanced by this research.' NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of scientific projects serving the world scientific community. Included in this community are NASA, federal, state, academic and foreign investigators. Data gathered by the DC-8 at flight altitude and by remote sensing have been used for scientific studies in archeology, ecology, geography, hydrology, meteorology, oceanography, volcanology, atmospheric chemistry, soil science and biology.

  4. Selecting and utilizing Populus and Salix for landfill covers: implications for leachate irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Edmund O. Bauer

    2007-01-01

    The success of using Populus and Salix for phytoremediation has prompted further use of leachate as a combination of irrigation and fertilization for the trees. A common protocol for such efforts has been to utilize a limited number of readily-available genotypes with decades of deployment in other applications, such as fiber or...

  5. Differential benefits of arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal infection of salix repens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.

    2001-01-01

    The functional significance of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and ectomycorrhiza (EcM) for Salix repens, a dual mycorrhizal plant, was investigated over three harvest periods (12, 20 and 30 weeks). Cuttings of S. repens were collected in December (low shoot P) and March (high shoot P). Glomus mosseae

  6. Response of Salix alba L. to heavy metals and diesel fuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pot experiment was set in a greenhouse in order to determine the physiological response of Salix alba grown on soil co-contaminated with individual and combination of Cd, Ni, Pb-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diesel fuel treatments. EDTA enhanced the uptake of Cd and Ni, whereas the antagonism ...

  7. Evaluation of Populus and Salix continuously irrigated with landfill leachate I. Genotype-specific elemental phytoremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Edmund O. Bauer

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for the identification and selection of specific tree genotypes that can sequester elements from contaminated soils, with elevated rates of uptake. We irrigated Populus (DN17, DN182, DN34, NM2, NM6) and Salix (94003, 94012, S287, S566, SX61) genotypes planted in large soil-filled containers with landfill leachate or...

  8. A genetic linkage map of willow (Salix viminalis) based on AFLP and microsatelite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanley, S.; Barker, J.H.A.; Ooijen, van J.W.; Aldam, C.; Harris, S.L.; Ahman, I.; Larsson, S.; Karp, A.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Salix (willow) contains a number of species of great value as biomass crops. Efforts to breed varieties with improved biomass yields and resistances to pests and diseases are limited by the lack of knowledge on the genetic basis of the traits. We have used AFLP and microsatellite markers

  9. Phylogenetic Relationships between Four Salix L. Species Based on DArT Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy A. Przyborowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of DArT markers in genotypic identification of willow species and describe genetic relationships between four willow species: Salix viminalis, S. purpurea, S. alba and S. triandra. The experimental plant material comprised 53 willow genotypes of these four species, which are popularly grown in Poland. DArT markers seem to identify Salix species with a high degree of accuracy. As a result, the examined species were divided into four distinct groups which corresponded to the four analyzed species. In our study, we observed that S. triandra was very different genetically from the other species, including S. alba which is generally classified into the same subgenus of Salix. The above corroborates the findings of other authors who relied on molecular methods to reveal that the classification of S. triandra to the subgenus Salix was erroneous. The Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA and the neighbor-joining dendrogram also confirmed the clear division of the studied willow genotypes into four clusters corresponding to individual species. This confirmed the usefulness of DArT markers in taxonomic analyses and identification of willow species.

  10. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Crude Extracts of Salix subserrata and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted between November, 2007 and April, 2008 to evaluate the anti-rabies activity of the leaf of Salix subserrata and root of Silene macroselen which are traditionally used for the treatment of rabies in Bereh-Aleltu Woreda, North Shewa, Central Ethiopia. The study involved oral administration of crude ...

  11. Cryopreservation of Populus trichocarpa and Salix using dormant buds with recovery by grafting or direct rooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populus trichocarpa and Salix can be successfully cryopreserved by using dormant scions as the source explants. These scions (either at their original moisture content of 48 to 60% or dried to 30%) were slowly cooled to –35 degree Celsius, transferred to the vapor phase of liquid nitrogen (LNV,-160...

  12. Anatomical features of the bark structure in the stem of Salix matsudana Koidz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya V. Shkuratova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The features of the bark structure in the stem ofSalix matsudana Koidz. were described in comparison with those in S. babylonicaL. It was suggested that anatomy of the bark cannot be applied for demarcation of this two species.

  13. Mechanical and chemical weed control in newly established Salix plantations. Mekanisk och kemisk ograesbekaempning i nyanlagda salixodlingar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danfors, B.

    1991-01-01

    Different methods for chemical and mechanical weed control have been studied. The studies have comprised the counting and weighing of weeds both before and after different weed control inputs. Performances studies have also been made on repeated occasions for assessment of the labour capacity required with different techniques and at different stages of development. On mineral soils that are low to moderately low in humus content it is recommended to use a soil-applied herbicide that is sprayed using a normal sprayer immediately after planting. On humus-rich mineral soils and pure humus soils the experiences are that the effect of a treatment with soil-applied herbicides will be extremely limited or, alternatively, may be totally absent. Under such conditions it is necessary to use mechanical weed control already from the start. In the mechanical control of weeds, use has usually been made of cultivators or harrow sections which have been adapted to shallow tillage. Rotary cultivators have also been used and in some cases even side delivery rakes. In the case of mechanical weed control there is a lack of both experience and technology for removing the weeds within the rows of small and delicate Salix shoots. Some experience and technology can be obtained, however, from sectors such as field production of vegetables and from vineyards where there are techniques for mechanically removing weeds. Both technique and experience must be further developed if mechanical weed control within the rows is to be accomplished successfully in larger plantations. With suitably chosen herbicides even large weeds can be eradicated and thus the competition can be reduced decisively- Here it is necessary that the Salix cuttings are effectively protected against contact with most herbicides. (12 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.).

  14. In vitro gas production of five rations of different maize silage and concentrate ratios influenced by increasing levels of chemically characterized extract of Salix babylonica

    OpenAIRE

    ELGHANDOUR, Mona Mohamed Mohamed Yasseen; KHOLIF, Ahmed Eid; BASTIDA, Adrian Zaragoza; MARTÍNEZ, Dora Luz Pinzón; SALEM, Abdelfattah Zeidan Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess the effect of the chemical substances of Salix babylonica (SB) extract on in vitro rumen fermentation of five mixed rations with different maize silage to concentrate ratios. Fifty-nine compounds were identified in SB extract using the retention time and mass spectral technique. Interactive effects were noted (P < 0.001) for the asymptotic gas production (GP) (b), the rate of production (c), the initial delay before GP begins (L), pH, dry matter dig...

  15. Wound-induced proteinase inhibitor in Salix viminalis and its association with defence against insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarikoski, P. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics

    1997-09-01

    For successful traditional breeding, the plant material has to be screened for genetic variation for the desired traits. By screening Salix clones for wound-induced proteinase inhibitor (PI) activity and ethylene evolution, it was possible to identify variation for both characters among the Salix clones tested. However, no correlation was observed with insect and pathogen resistance. Since there was no simple relationship between wound-induced ethylene production, accumulation of PI and pest resistance, a more systematic investigation of Salix PIs was begun. A gene (swin1.1) encoding a 21 kDa trypsin inhibitor with characteristics of Kunitz-type of PI was sequenced. The trypsin inhibitor encoded by the isolated swin1.1 gene was shown to be functional in vitro and exhibit specificity for trypsin. It is therefore likely that this PI is involved in the plant defence in Salix, since many insects have trypsin as their major digestive protease. In further support of this view, in bio-tests with poplar the mortality of the first instar larvae (Lymantria dispar) was significantly increased, both after application of the trypsin inhibitor encoded by swin1.1 directly on poplar leaves and after feeding the larvae with transgenic poplar over-expressing the swin1.1 gene. In Salix, the swin1.1 gene was shown to be induced by mechanical wounding, insect feeding and by treatment with the signalling substances salicylic and jasmonic acid. The locally wound-induced response (mechanical and insect) was greater than the systemic response. Other swin1 gene family members were also differentially expressed after the inductive treatment. 187 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Failure of two consecutive annual treatments with ivermectin to eradicate the reindeer parasites (Hypoderma tarandi, Cephenemyia trompe and Linguatula arctica) from an island in northern Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Nilssen, Arne C.; Willy Hemmingsen; Haugerud, Rolf E.

    2002-01-01

    The highly efficient endectocide ivermectin is used to reduce the burden of parasites in many semidomestic reindeer herds in northern Fennoscandia. In the autumn of 1995 and 1996 all reindeer on the island of Silda (42 km2) were treated with ivermectin in an attempt to eradicate the warble fly (Hypoderma (=Oedemagena) tarandi (L.)), the nose bot fly (Cephenemyia trompe (Modeer)) (Diptera: Oestridae) and the sinus worm (Linguatula arctica Riley, Haugerud and Nilssen) (Pentastomida: Linguatulid...

  17. Functional analysis of embolism induced by air injection in Acer rubrum and Salix nigra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jegsen Melcher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess the effect of induced embolism with air injection treatments on the function of xylem in Acer rubrum L. and Salix nigra Marsh. Measurements made on mature trees of A. rubrum showed that pneumatic pressurization treatments that created a pressure gradient of 5.5 MPa across pit membranes (DPpit had no effect on stomatal conductance or on branch-level sap flow. The same air injection treatments made on three year old potted A. rubrum plants also had no effect on whole plant transpiration. A separate study made on mature A. rubrum trees showed that 3.0 and 5.5 MPa of DPpit values resulted in an immediate 100% loss in hydraulic conductance (PLC in petioles. However, the observed change in PLC was short lived and significant hydraulic recovery occurred within 5-10 minutes post air pressurization treatments. Similar experiments conducted on S. nigra plants exposed to DPpit of 3 MPa resulted in a rapid decline in whole plant transpiration followed by leaf wilting and eventual plant death, showing that this species lacks the ability to recover from induced embolism. A survey that measured the effect of air-pressurization treatments on seven other species showed that some species are very sensitive to induction of embolism resulting in leaf wilting and branch death while others show minimal to no effect despite that in each case, the applied DPpit of 5.5 MPa significantly exceeded any native stress that these plants would experience naturally.

  18. Salix ×velchevii and S. ×ardana (Salicaceae) - two new willow hybrids from the Bulgarian Rhodope Mts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jerzy Zieliński; Ana Petrova; Zhivka Pancheva

    2011-01-01

    Two previously unknown willow hybrids, Salix × velchevii (S. amplexicaulis Bory × S. xanthicola K.I. Chr.) and S. × ardana (S. alba L. × S. xanthicola K.I. Chr.), are described from the Bulgarian Rhodope Mts...

  19. Hydroponical estimation of interactions among selected heavy metals accumulated by Salix viminalis in phytoremediation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mleczek, Mirosław; Magdziak, Zuzanna; Kaczmarek, Zygmunt; Golinski, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    Determination of interactions between selected heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in their phytoremediation by one-year-old cuttings of Salix viminalis 'Cannabina' was the purpose of this work. The achieved results indicate that Salix cuttings may successfully be used in phytoremediation of polluted soil and/or sewage not only with one metal at high concentrations but also in different combinations with the other metals. Under controlled conditions (the hydroponic experiment) new interactions were found as well as known data concerning interactions between-presented in the matrix-heavy metals, depending on whether their concentration and composition were confirmed. The results showed that the ratio of metal concentration can change the interaction intensity. The achieved results enable one to indirectly estimate the accumulation efficiency of dominating metals as well as accompanying ones at lower concentrations.

  20. STUDYING OF POSSIBILITY A WILLOW WHITE (SALIX ALBA L.) BRANCHES STERILIZATION BY IONIZING RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ольга Олеговна Фролова; Анна Степановна Саушкина; Майя Викторовна Мазурина; Ася Юрьевна Айрапетова; Евгения Геннадьевна Компанцева; Евгения Владимировна Компанцева

    2014-01-01

    There was determined a quantity of microorganisms in Salix alba L. branches specimens after processing by ionizing radiation (0,25–5 kGy). The powder of S. alba branches conform to recommended requirements for a standard "Microbiological purity" after processing by the minimal radiation dose, that’s why offered method of sterilization is effective. Ionizing radiation is acceptable for S. alba branches processing, because it doesn't influence significantly on the structure and the quantity of ...

  1. Development and validation of aboveground biomass estimations for four Salix clones in central New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arevalo, Carmela B.M.; Volk, Timothy A.; Bevilacqua, Eddie; Abrahamson, Lawrence [Faculty of Forest and Natural Resources Management, State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210 (United States)

    2007-01-15

    Commercial and research scale plantings of short-rotation woody crops require reliable and efficient estimations of biomass yield before time of harvest. Biomass equations currently exist but the accuracy and efficiency of estimation procedures at the level of specificity needs to be quantified for clones being used in North America. Diameter-based allometric equations for aboveground biomass for four clones of willow (Salix discolor, Salix alba, Salix dasyclados, and Salix sachalinensis), between two sites (Canastota and Tully, NY), and across four years (1998-2001), were developed using ordinary least-squares regression (OLSR) on log-transformed variables, weighted least squares regression (WLSR) on log-transformed variables, and nonlinear regression (NLR) methods and validated using independent data sets. Biomass estimations derived from clone, age, and site (Specific) using OLSR equations had highest R{sup 2} and lowest percent bias (<2.3%) allowing for accurate estimations of standing biomass. Values for specific equations using WLSR were similar, but bias was higher for NLR (0.7-12.5%). However, the amount of time and effort required to develop specific equations, is large and in many situations prohibitive. Biomass estimates derived from clone and age, regardless of site (Intermediate), resulted in small increases in prediction error and a small increase in percent bias using OLSR (<0.4%) and WLSR (<1.7%). The increase in percent bias was larger (1.1-5.7%) for NLR equations. Intermediate models correspond to the loss of only a small amount of accuracy while gaining more efficiency in estimating standing biomass. Estimates of biomass derived from clone alone (general) equations, considering neither age nor site, had the weakest prediction abilities that may lead to large errors for biomass estimations using OLSR (7.0-9.5%), WLSR (1.1-21.7%) or NLR (31.9-143.4%). (author)

  2. Cadmium phytoextraction using short-rotation coppice Salix: the evidence trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Nicholas M; Pulford, Ian D

    2005-05-01

    A substantial body of evidence has now accumulated that raises expectations that clean-up of Cd-contaminated land can be achieved through cultivation and harvest of selected clones of short-rotation coppice willow within a realistic crop lifecycle. Cd uptake rates into Salix are high compared to other trace elements and to other plant species. Effective phytoextraction would require (i) careful targeting of hotspots, (ii) repeated harvest prior to leaf fall and (iii) final removal of the root bole.

  3. Neisseria arctica sp. nov. isolated from nonviable eggs of greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Cristina M.; Himschoot, Elizabeth; Hare, Rebekah F.; Meixell, Brandt; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Hueffer, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    During the summers of 2013 and 2014, isolates of a novel Gram-negative coccus in the Neisseria genus were obtained from the contents of nonviable greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) eggs on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. We used a polyphasic approach to determine whether these isolates represent a novel species. 16S rRNA gene sequences, 23S rRNA gene sequences, and chaperonin 60 gene sequences suggested that these Alaskan isolates are members of a distinct species that is most closely related to Neisseria canis, N. animaloris, and N. shayeganii. Analysis of the rplF gene additionally showed that our isolates are unique and most closely related to N. weaveri. Average nucleotide identity of the whole genome sequence of our type strain was between 71.5% and 74.6% compared to close relatives, further supporting designation as a novel species. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis showed a predominance of C14:0, C16:0, and C16:1ω7c fatty acids. Finally, biochemical characteristics distinguished our isolates from other Neisseria species. The name Neisseria arctica (type strain KH1503T = ATCC TSD-57T = DSM 103136T) is proposed.

  4. Development and application of the mollusc Arctica islandica as a paleoceanographic tool for the North Atlantic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidman, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    Until now there has been no tool comparable to corals for reconstructing long term high-resolution geochemical time-series for the colder, higher-latitude oceans. In this thesis, the long-lived (+100 years) boreal mollusc (Bivalvia) Arctica islandica is shown to be practical for this purpose in the northern North Atlantic Ocean. The evidence, compiled here, demonstrates that the carbonate shell of this species faithfully records the ambient dissolved inorganic carbon`s (DIC) radiocarbon ({Delta}{sup 14}C) concentration and accurately reflects the ambient temperature in its stable oxygen isotope ({delta}{sup 18}O) composition. However, the stable carbon isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C) composition of the A. islandica shell likely is not a good recorder of ambient DIC {delta}{sup 13}C, and likely responds to physiological controls. Four {Delta}{sup 14}C time histories are reconstructed from the annual bands of A. islandica shells for the higher-latitudes of the northern North Atlantic Ocean (from 41{degree}N to 70{degree}N).

  5. Performance of shrub willows (Salix spp.) as an evapotranspiration cover on Solvay wastebeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirck, Jaconette

    2009-12-01

    Soda ash (Na2CO3) production in the Syracuse New York area created 607 ha of wastebeds over the course of about 100 years. Today the primary concern of the Solvay wastebeds is high chloride concentrations in the leachate and storm water that may end up in the groundwater and nearby Onondaga Lake. The potential of shrub willow evapotranspiration (ET) covers to minimize leaching and to manage storm water was assessed in two studies. A sap flow sensor field study to estimate transpiration rates of four shrub willow varieties over an entire growing season. A greenhouse study focused on recycling saline Solvay storm water onto shrub willows. Annual sap flow and crop coefficients (Kc) were similar among four shrub willows, but differences were present over the course of the growing season. Peak K c values did not coincide with peak leaf area index (LAI), as might be expected if LAI were the main driver of transpiration. Rather than solely being driven by LAI, coupling with the atmosphere was an important factor in stand level sap flow. Estimates of ET were measured during both experiments, the ET/sap flow rankings of the shrub willow varieties were similar; Salix miyabeana (SX64)water that contained 1,625 mg Cl - L-1 (close to the average storm water concentration) did not significantly decrease ET values or growth for any of the willow varieties. Mass balances of sodium and chloride were carried out to assess the potentials of recycling saline Solvay storm water back onto a shrub willow ET cover during the growing season. During a ten-week study the combination of a shallow depth soil (33 cm) and a high irrigation regime (170% of average precipitation in the Syracuse NY area) resulted in the accumulation of at least 62% of both sodium and chloride in the plant/soil system for all five Solvay storm water treatments. Both studies indicated that shrub willows have the characteristics to be part of a sustainable ET cover on the Solvay wastebeds, which will decrease leaching

  6. The Study of Interactions between Active Compounds of Coffee and Willow (Salix sp. Bark Water Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Durak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and willow are known as valuable sources of biologically active phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid, caffeine, and salicin. The aim of the study was to determine the interactions between the active compounds contained in water extracts from coffee and bark of willow (Salix purpurea and Salix myrsinifolia. Raw materials and their mixtures were characterized by multidirectional antioxidant activities; however, bioactive constituents interacted with each other. Synergism was observed for ability of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and reducing power, whereas compounds able to scavenge ABTS radical cation acted antagonistically. Additionally, phytochemicals from willow bark possessed hydrophilic character and thermostability which justifies their potential use as an ingredient in coffee beverages. Proposed mixtures may be used in the prophylaxis or treatment of some civilization diseases linked with oxidative stress. Most importantly, strong synergism observed for phytochemicals able to prevent lipids against oxidation may suggest protective effect for cell membrane phospholipids. Obtained results indicate that extracts from bark tested Salix genotypes as an ingredient in coffee beverages can provide health promoting benefits to the consumers; however, this issue requires further study.

  7. Demonstration cultivation of Salix in northern Sweden with a focus on frost resistance; Demonstrationsodling av Salix i Norrland med frosttolerans i fokus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederstroem, Yvonne

    2010-06-15

    This project is part of the Thermal Engineering Research Association's (Vaermeforsk) programme 'Crops from field to energy production' and the goal is to convince growers to begin cultivating Salix in the northern part of Sweden. The project will demonstrate whether it is possible to grow Salix and examine what type of Salix (the report refers to the different types as Tora, Karin and Gudrun) is most frost-resistant and resistant to insects, fungal infections and animals. The project is aimed primarily at landowners and energy companies. The results showed that growth at the demonstration plots was moderate and the establishment rate was considered good. Growth has been uneven across the fields. At Eriksgaard, about 75% of the plants survived the winter. Survival was determined by the number of plants missing and dead. Additional plants were planted at the sites in 2009. No major insect or leaf fungus attacks were noted at either Eriksgaard or Soergaard, but they both experienced grazing from deer and elk. The rating showed that the herbicide treatment was not sufficient on the demonstration fields. For this reason, a comparison of average lengths was performed of Gudrun in Bodum, where the weeds had not grown as much. The comparison showed that the difference in growth was not significant in the autumn 2008, but the plants in Bodum had grown more by autumn 2009. Topping was not performed in the spring 2009 so that the plants would have an opportunity to grow higher than the weeds and the plants would have an opportunity to have a growth spurt. A comparison of Tora, Karin and Gudrun in Roedoen showed moderate growth for the three types. There were variations in the rows and across the field, mostly for Tora and Karin. Gudrun had lower, but more consistent growth across the field. During the summer 2009, survival was rated for the plants in Roedoen. This rating showed that 90% of Tora, 60% of Karin and 70% of Gudrun had survived the winter. The Salix

  8. Declines in populations of Salix caprea L.during forest regeneration after strong herbivore pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz B. Faliński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Communities of broadleaved forest subject to strong pressure from large herbivores underwent degeneration. The relief of this pressure led to regeneration of the community, in which an important role was played by the sallow Salix caprea and other light-seeded pioneer species of tree (Populus tremula, Betula pendula and B. pubescens. Regeneration involving Salix caprea proceeded following the conservatorial protection of the degenerate stands in a reserve and later in Białowieża National Park. The emergence and development of the population of Salix caprea proceeded following the invasion of spruce, which coincided with the period of enhanced animal pressure on broadleaved forest. Salix caprea filled all the gaps in the tree stand arising as a result of the destruction of trees and undergrowth by herbivores (in the years 1892-1915. It also appeared en masse on old, at that time unforested, clearings and felled areas. In these places, Salix caprea created very abundant populations, with particular trees being in good condition, with a habit typical of forest trees and attaining considerable heights. The majority of trees were 50-60 years old at the time of death, although individuals reached 74 years of age. The process of extinction of the sallow population - observed over 19 years on permanent plots and fixed trees - proceeded very quickly, especially in the first decade of observation. It led to the almost complete disappearance of sallow for the forest communities of Białowieża National Park. The death of individual trees is preceded by impairment of their health and reduced annual increments in the 4-9 last years of life. The extinction of the population is associated with the loss of its primary phenological differentiation and with a change in the sex structure of the population from a prevalence of female trees to a near even distribution of the two sexes. The development of the populations of permanent constituents of the forest

  9. Resistance in Salix against willow leaf rust caused by Melampsora epitea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Leif [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Crop Production Science

    2000-07-01

    Cultivation of Salix in short rotation forests (SRF), as a source of renewable energy is a relatively recent phenomenon in Sweden. As all other crops under intensive cultivation, Salix are attacked by pests. The economically most important disease is leaf rust caused by Melampsora epitea. For successful plant breeding of new sustainable rust resistant clones, it is important to have knowledge of the inheritance of resistance and the mechanisms underlying rust resistance. Species hybridisation is one technique used in plant breeding, hence the inheritance pattern of rust resistance in hybrids of two species, S. viminalis and S. dasyclados, selected for the purpose, was studied in greenhouse as well as under field conditions. The study in greenhouse showed that hybrids acquire intermediate rust resistance compared to pure species. Plants of same hybrids in field proved to be more resistant than their parental species. Observations in field also showed that abiotic factors such as weather tend to play a significant role in expression of inheritance pattern. It was further indicated that the interaction between rust and Salix might be race-specific. Metabolic changes in Salix, induced by the pathogen in incompatible and compatible interactions were studied in terms of peroxidase and chitinase activity which were measured in S. viminalis inoculated with rust of two different pathotypes of M. epitea rust. Peroxidase activity revealed an earlier response from plants in the incompatible interactions compared to compatible interactions. Records of the chitinase accumulation showed absence of one basic isoform of chitinase in the incompatible interaction. These results demonstrated physiological differences between incompatible and compatible interactions, and gave further indication toward occurrence of race-specific interactions in this pathosystem. Further, with use of molecular biology techniques, a gene designated svpk1, was cloned and partially characterised. The gene

  10. Gene expression and physiological changes of different populations of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica under low oxygen conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva E R Philipp

    Full Text Available The bivalve Arctica islandica is extremely long lived (>400 years and can tolerate long periods of hypoxia and anoxia. European populations differ in maximum life spans (MLSP from 40 years in the Baltic to >400 years around Iceland. Characteristic behavior of A. islandica involves phases of metabolic rate depression (MRD during which the animals burry into the sediment for several days. During these phases the shell water oxygen concentrations reaches hypoxic to anoxic levels, which possibly support the long life span of some populations. We investigated gene regulation in A. islandica from a long-lived (MLSP 150 years German Bight population and the short-lived Baltic Sea population, experimentally exposed to different oxygen levels. A new A. islandica transcriptome enabled the identification of genes important during hypoxia/anoxia events and, more generally, gene mining for putative stress response and (anti- aging genes. Expression changes of a antioxidant defense: Catalase, Glutathione peroxidase, manganese and copper-zinc Superoxide dismutase; b oxygen sensing and general stress response: Hypoxia inducible factor alpha, Prolyl hydroxylase and Heat-shock protein 70; and c anaerobic capacity: Malate dehydrogenase and Octopine dehydrogenase, related transcripts were investigated. Exposed to low oxygen, German Bight individuals suppressed transcription of all investigated genes, whereas Baltic Sea bivalves enhanced gene transcription under anoxic incubation (0 kPa and, further, decreased these transcription levels again during 6 h of re-oxygenation. Hypoxic and anoxic exposure and subsequent re-oxygenation in Baltic Sea animals did not lead to increased protein oxidation or induction of apoptosis, emphasizing considerable hypoxia/re-oxygenation tolerance in this species. The data suggest that the energy saving effect of MRD may not be an attribute of Baltic Sea A. islandica chronically exposed to high environmental variability (oxygenation

  11. Electrical capacitance as a predictor of root dry weight in shrub willow (Salix; Salicaceae) parents and progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Craig H; Smart, Lawrence B

    2016-08-01

    Root biomass is an important trait often disregarded in woody perennial selection due to the challenge and expense of accurately and efficiently measuring large populations. In this study, we aim to develop a simple method that can predict root dry weight within a diverse shrub willow (Salix) breeding population representing species hybrids and their parents using root electrical capacitance (REC). The REC method was tested on plants started from cuttings and grown in pots with potting mix in the greenhouse for 11 wk to assess the relationship of REC with 24 biomass traits and its usefulness in allometric models for root and stem dry biomass. Strong linear and positive correlations were found between REC and root dry biomass (r = 0.88). The total proportion of variance of root and stem dry biomass explained by predictors in multiple regression was 85% and 69%, respectively. The relative importance of predictor variables in allometric models was dominated by the contribution of REC. This work provides an efficient and nondestructive technique to indirectly quantify root biomass of genetically diverse shrub willow progeny, which has great promise for selection of genotypes with varying root biomass and for the accurate estimation of belowground carbon sequestration.

  12. Willow wood (Salix alba as a raw material for pulp production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klašnja Bojana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of willow wood (structural-physical and mechanical properties and chemical composition were investigated to determine the parameters of the technological process of semichemical and sulphate pulp manufacture. The experimental material was willow wood Salix alba cl. 107/65/7. Semichemical and sulphate pulp were obtained in the laboratory. The yield, chemical properties and physical-mechanical properties of the obtained intermediate products intended for paper manufacture, were determined. The properties of poplar wood Populus deltoides Bartr. cl.725, were studied and its pulp production performed with the aim of comparison.

  13. Tratamiento de un efluente textil mediante electrooxidación-Salix babylonica

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Sánchez, Hilda Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    A nivel mundial, la industria textil es considerada una de las principales fuentes de descarga que afectan la calidad del agua debido al gran volumen que emplea en sus procesos y al uso de una amplia gama de colorantes sintéticos. En esta investigación se evaluó el tratamiento de un agua residual textil mediante un sistema acoplado de electrooxidación-Salix babylonica usando electrodos DDB. En el estudio, se construyó una celda electroquímica en batch, utilizando 5 electrodos paralelos vertic...

  14. DETERMINATION OF FLAVONOIDS OF WILLOW TRIANDRA (SALIX TRIANDRA L., GROWING IN THE NORTH CAUCASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Sannikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants of willow genus are rich in various flavonoids. In 60-e years of the XX century the works of V. A. Kompantsev showed that leaves of willow triandra, growing in the North Caucasus, contain up to 5% of rutin. The method, which required long sample preparation (extraction of the raw material with TLC, chromatographic layer extraction with methanol, removal of the solvent, dissolution in ethanol, optical density measurements was used. Currently available and simple methods for the determination of rutin in plant material are described. Given that leaves of Salix triandra contain significant amounts of rutin and can be a potential raw material for the creation of medicines on their basis, it is essential to determine the amount of flavonoids in the leaves of Salix triandra and its branches.The purpose of this study is determination of the amount of flavonoids in the willow triandra, growing in the North Caucasus, depending on the place and time of collection.Methods. TLC and the method of differential spectrophotometry were used to study chemical reactions. Results. The presence of flavonoids in various vegetative plant organs was established using qualitative reactions (cyanidin test; boric-citric reaction; the reaction with solution of lead acetate and solution of ammonia. Rutin and quercetin flavonoids in the presence of standard samples were identified using TLC. the method of differential spectrophotometry, based on the reaction of flavonoids with aluminum chloride was used for the quantitative determination of the amount of flavonoids. It is shown that the greatest quantity of flavonoids amount accumulated in the leaves (up to 3.76%, its value in branches is slightly smaller (up to 3.26%. The branches without leaves have almost 10 times less flavonoids. It was established experimentally that the accumulation of flavonoids in raw material of Salix triandra is dependent on the place and time of

  15. Removal of 4-chlorobenzoic acid from spiked hydroponic solution by willow trees (Salix viminalis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deavers, K.; Macek, T.; Karlson, U.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Chlorobenzoic acids (CBA) are intermediate products of the aerobic microbial degradation of PCB and several pesticides. This study explores the feasibility of using basket willows, Salix viminalis, to remove 4-CBA from polluted sites, which also might stimulate PCB degradation....... Methods The removal of 4-CBA by willow trees was investigated with intact, septic willow trees growing in hydroponic solution and with sterile cell suspensions at concentrations of 5 mg/L and 50 mg/L 4-CBA. Nutrient solutions with different levels of ammonium and nitrate were prepared to achieve different...

  16. Potentielle Weiden (Salix) Karten als Entscheidungsbasis für Ingenieurbiologische Arbeiten

    OpenAIRE

    Schiechtl, Hugo Meinhard

    2000-01-01

    Für natumahe Bauarbeiten in der Landschaft sind die Methoden der Ingenieurbiologie vorrangig. Bei zwei Gruppen dieser ingenieurbiologischen Bauweisen, nämlich den »Stabilbauweisen« und den »kombinierten Bauweisen« verwendet man vorwiegend Äste und Steckhölzer ausschlagfähiger Weiden (Salix). Daher ist die Kenntnis der etwa 30 europaeischen Weidenarten für die praktische Ingenieurbioiogie sehr wichtig. Neben der Artenkenntnis ist auch deren geographische und Höhenverbreitung zur Wahl der geeig...

  17. Response of Organ Structure and Physiology to Autotetraploidization in Early Development of Energy Willow Salix viminalis

    OpenAIRE

    Dudits, D.; Torok, K.; Cseri, A.; Paul, K; Nagy, A.V.; Nagy, B.; Sass, L.; Ferenc, G.; Vaňková, R.; Dobrev, P.; Vass, I.; Ayaydin, F.

    2016-01-01

    The biomass productivity of the energy willow Salix viminalis as a short-rotation woody crop depends on organ structure and functions that are under the control of genome size. Colchicine treatment of axillary buds resulted in a set of autotetraploid S. viminalis var. Energo genotypes (polyploid Energo [PP-E]; 2n = 4x = 76) with variation in the green pixel-based shoot surface area. In cases where increased shoot biomass was observed, it was primarily derived from larger leaf size and wider s...

  18. What causes female bias in the secondary sex ratios of the dioecious woody shrub Salix sitchensis colonizing a primary successional landscape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Che-Castaldo; C. M. Crisafulli; J. G. Bishop; W. F. Fagan

    2015-01-01

    PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Females often outnumber males in Salix populations, although the mechanisms behind female bias are not well understood and could be caused by both genetic and ecological factors. We investigated several ecological factors that could bias secondary sex ratios of Salix sitchensis colonizing Mount St. Helens after the 1980 eruption.M ETHODS...

  19. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE BIOLOGY OF TUBEROLACHNUS SALIGNUS (GMELIN (STERNORRHYNCHA: APHIDIDAE ON (SALIX ALBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nıhal ÖZDER

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development time, survivoship and reproduction of Tuberolachnus salignus (Gmelin( Lachninae: Lachnini were studied on Salix alba at fi ve constant temperatures (17.5°C, 20°C, 22.5°C, 25°C and 27.5°C . The developmental time of immature stages ranged from 17.00 days at 17.5°C to 12.21 days at 25°C on Salix alba. The total percentage of survivorship of immature stages varied from 50% and 70% 17.5°C -20°C on S. alba. The largest r m valueoccurred with 0.2540 at 20°C on S. alba. The mean generation time of the population ranged from 13.595 days at 22.5°C to 19.60 days at 17.5°C on S. alba. The optimal temperature for Tuberolachnus salignus was 20°C.

  20. A strategy for process modelling of short-rotation Salix coppice plantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isebrands, J.G. [North Central Forest Experiment Station, Rhinelander, WI (United States). Forestry Sciences Lab.; Host, G.E. [Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Natural Resources Research Inst.; Bollmark, L.; Philippot, S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research; Porter, J.R. [Royal Veterinary and Agricultural Univ., Taastrup (Denmark). Dept. of Agricultural Sciences; Stevens, E. [Aberdeen Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Forestry; Rushton, K. [Energy Technology Support Unit, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    A strategy for process modelling of short-rotation Salix coppice plantations is presented. To integrate effectively both large- and small-scale processes, this model must simulate critical processes at scales ranging from the individual leaf to the plantation. This multiscale modelling strategy extrapolates the detail of mechanistic physiological models to the patch and plantation scales. To accomplish this scaling, regional climatic and soil databases are used to generate model inputs; i.e. site and climatic information is passed from the regional scale to drive models operating at the stand or tree level. Key input variables at the individual tree level include genetically determined factors such as leaf morphology and branch architecture, as well as phenological and physiological parameters. Outputs such as carbon fixation, leaf area index, biomass by component, and yields per hectare are then passed back up to address regional questions. This strategy requires a parallel programme of modelling and experimentation. While this strategy focuses on Salix, the approach should also be applicable to species with similar life history attributes, such as Betula and Populus. (author)

  1. Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for production, resistance and tolerance traits in Salix. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennberg-Waestljung, Ann Christin; Bertholdsson, Nils-Ove; Glynn, Carolyn; Weih, Martin; Aahman, Inger [SLU, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Plant Biology and Forest Genetics

    2004-05-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for growth traits, water use efficiency and tolerance/resistance against metals and herbivores have been identified. A hybrid F2 population originating from a cross between a Salix dasyclados-clone (SW901290) and a S. viminalis-clone ('Jorunn') was used for the different studies in this project. The growth response was analyzed in a greenhouse experiment with two water treatments, normal and drought. In addition, three field experiments with contrasting soils and climates were established. QTL specific for each treatment or field environment but also QTL stable over the treatments or field environments were detected. Each QTL explained from 8 to 29 % of the phenotypic variation depending on trait, treatment or field environment. Clusters of QTL for different traits were mapped indicating a common genetic base or tightly-linked QTL. Stable QTL identified for dryweight can be useful tools for early selection in Salix. In a separate greenhouse experiment, with a subset of ten genotypes from the F2 population, we show that genotype is more important than irrigation treatment for production of phenolic substances as well as for resistance to herbivory by P vulgatissima.

  2. Evolution in situ: hybrid origin and establishment of willows (Salix L.) on alpine glacier forefields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramlich, S; Sagmeister, P; Dullinger, S; Hadacek, F; Hörandl, E

    2016-06-01

    Little attention has been paid to the evolutionary consequences of the colonizing dynamics and succession processes following glacier retreat. Here we studied hybrid populations that have recently formed and established on glacier forefields of the European Alps owing to secondary contact of a lowland colonizer with a subalpine species. We analyzed the composition of two hybrid populations between Salix purpurea and Salix helvetica with nine microsatellite markers by using Bayesian methods (structure and NewHybrids), and simulations. We also studied niche differentiation between the hybrids and the parental species based on indicator values, soil pH and water retention potential measurements. Allelic structure of hybrids confirms the assumed parentage and in situ origin of the crosses on two independent sites within the last decades. Both hybrid populations comprised F1 and later generation hybrids (F2 and backcrosses), confirming hybrid fertility. The parental species showed significant differences in niche characteristics for temperature, soil pH, nutrients and moisture. Remarkably, the hybrids exhibited a higher tolerance to cold temperatures, nutrient-poor and acidic soils than either parent. Our results show that willow hybrids originated after glacier retreat and have established persistent populations within a few decades. One factor contributing to hybrid establishment in sympatry with their parents is their ability to occupy more extreme niches than either parental species within a mosaic-like pattern of microhabitats on the forefield. Introgression and/or transgressive segregation may have resulted in novel genotypes that are able to expand the ecological spectrum of either parent.

  3. DETERMINATION OF RUTIN IN LEAVES OF SALIX TRIANDRA USING THE METHOD OF PLANAR CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Sannikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to develop new methods of identification and quantitative determination of rutin in the leaves of Salix triandra L. with thin-layer chromatography. The digital processing of the chromatograms was performed using «Sorbfil Videodensitometer» computer program (Krasnodar. For the chromatography analysis we used plates «Sorbfil» PTSH-P-A-UV, mobile phase: n-butanol-glacial acetic acid-water (4:1:1, detecting reagent – ammonia vapors. The rutin is detected as yellow spots with Rf 0.64±0.02. The detection limit is 0.5 μg/μl. The regression equation has the form: S=4.75×103 m. With the use of this method we found that the composition of rutin in leaves of Salix triandra was in the range 1.81±0.06% on the air-dry raw material (relative standard deviation RSD%=2.5%; the measurement error E=3.12%. The method is sensitive, linear, has a small error, and does not require expensive equipment.

  4. Magnesium and iron deficiencies alter Cd accumulation in Salix viminalis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borišev, M; Pajević, S; Nikolić, N; Orlović, S; Župunski, M; Pilipović, A; Kebert, M

    2016-01-01

    Evidence exists that Cd and certain nutrient elements, such as Fe and Mg, could share similar mechanisms of plant uptake and accumulation. Here we report that Mg and Fe deficiency in mature plants of Salix viminalis, grown in hydroponic solutions containing 5 µg ml(-1) of Cd, caused a significant increase in Cd accumulation in roots, stems and leaves. Cd (µg g(-1) dry weight) was determined following three treatments: 1) Cd treatment in complete nutrient solution; 2) Cd treatment with Fe deficiency; and 3) Cd treatment with Mg deficiency, yielding, respectively: in young leaves (65.3, 76.1, and 92.2), mature leaves (51.5 to 76.3 and 87.1), upper stems (80.6, 116.8, and 130.6) lower stems (67.2, 119, and 102.3), roots (377.1, 744.8, and 442,5). Our results suggest that Cd utilizes the same uptake and transport pathways as Mg and Fe. Evidence exists that Mg and Fe uptake and translocation could be further facilitated by plants as an adaptive response to deficiency of these elements. Such physiological reaction could additionally stimulate Cd accumulation. Although Cd uptake was mostly confined in roots, high Cd content in aerial plant parts (51.5-130.6 µg g(-1)) indicates that the analysed Salix viminalis genotype is suitable for phytoextraction.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with Populus-Salix stands in a semiarid riparian ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Stromberg, J.C.; Stutz, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    ??? This study examined the activity, species richness, and species composition of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community of Populus-Salix stands on the Verde River (Arizona, USA), quantified patterns of AMF richness and colonization along complex floodplain gradients, and identified environmental variables responsible for structuring the AMF community. ??? Samples from 61 Populus-Salix stands were analyzed for AMF and herbaceous composition, AMF colonization, gravimetric soil moisture, soil texture, per cent organic matter, pH, and concentrations of nitrate, bicarbonate phosphorus and exchangeable potassium. ??? AMF species richness declined with stand age and distance from and elevation above the channel and was positively related to perennial species cover and richness and gravimetric soil moisture. Distance from and elevation above the active channel, forest age, annual species cover, perennial species richness, and exchangeable potassium concentration all played a role in structuring the AMF community in this riparian area. ??? Most AMF species were found across a wide range of soil conditions, but a subset of species tended to occur more often in hydric areas. This group of riparian affiliate AMF species includes several not previously encountered in the surrounding Sonoran desert. ?? New Phytologist (2006).

  6. Evaluation of the phytoremediation potential of the Salix caprea in tailing ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca MIHALY-COZMUTA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The goat willow (Salix caprea belongs to the typical pioneer vegetation at former ore mining sites in East and Middle Europe as a result of its high metal-tolerance. Ectomycorrhizal (EM fungi are known to contribute essentially to the tolerance of plants against abiotic stress. We have determined the absorption/ accretion potential of the goat willow related to heavy metals, as well as the growth rhythm of this species in conditions offered by polluted sites, correlated to the presence/ absence of the microbiota in the soil attached to the root. The research unravels how the goat willow (Salix caprea, as a native species can be used in remediation actions of polluted sites based on its high adaptive potential, as well as on its capacity to absorb and accumulate heavy metals. In terms of survival strategy, mycorhrised fungi attached to the polluted soil play a significant part, since they induce plants a certain resistance by diminishing the absorption of heavy metals by the host plant. We suppose that the majority of EM associations of S. caprea, in combination with high portions of metal-chelating organic acids containing fungal partners, contributes essentially to the high tolerance of this species against high metal concentrations in the soil.

  7. Environmental controls on the boron and strontium isotopic composition of aragonite shell material of cultured Arctica islandica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-W. Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification, the decrease in ocean pH associated with increasing atmospheric CO2, is likely to impact marine organisms, particularly those that produce carbonate skeletons or shells. Therefore, it is important to investigate how environmental factors (seawater pH, temperature and salinity influence the chemical compositions in biogenic carbonates. In this study we report the first high-resolution strontium (87Sr / 86Sr and δ88 / 86Sr and boron (δ11B isotopic values in the aragonite shell of cultured Arctica islandica (A. islandica. The 87Sr / 86Sr ratios from both tank water and shell samples show ratios nearly identical to the open ocean, which suggests that the shell material reflects ambient ocean chemistry without terrestrial influence. The 84Sr–87Sr double-spike-resolved shell δ88 / 86Sr and Sr concentration data show no resolvable change throughout the culture period and reflect no theoretical kinetic mass fractionation throughout the experiment despite a temperature change of more than 15 °C. The δ11B records from the experiment show at least a 5‰ increase through the 29-week culture season (January 2010–August 2010, with low values from the beginning to week 19 and higher values thereafter. The larger range in δ11B in this experiment compared to predictions based on other carbonate organisms (2–3‰ suggests that a species-specific fractionation factor may be required. A significant correlation between the ΔpH (pHshell − pHsw and seawater pH (pHsw was observed (R2 = 0.35, where the pHshell is the calcification pH of the shell calculated from boron isotopic composition. This negative correlation suggests that A. islandica partly regulates the pH of the extrapallial fluid. However, this proposed mechanism only explains approximately 35% of the variance in the δ11B data. Instead, a rapid rise in δ11B of the shell material after week 19, during the summer, suggests that the boron uptake changes when a thermal

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the STENA ARCTICA in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-02-14 to 1989-03-17 (NODC Accession 0113893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113893 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from STENA ARCTICA in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-02-14 to...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, and other variables collected from surface underway observations using carbon dioxide gas analyzer, shower head equilibrator and other instruments from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2008-01-08 to 2009-01-07 (NCEI Accession 0162251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162251 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from SOOP M/V Nuka Arctica lines in the North Atlantic Ocean...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Kattegat and others from 2007-04-27 to 2008-01-05 (NCEI Accession 0144288)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144288 includes Surface underway data collected from NUKA ARCTICA in the Davis Strait, Kattegat, The Sound, Great Belt, Little Belt, North Atlantic...

  11. Constitutive and herbivore-induced systemic volatiles differentially attract an omnivorous biocontrol agent to contrasting Salix clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrman, Anna; Boddum, Tina; Stenberg, Johan A; Orians, Colin M; Björkman, Christer

    2013-01-01

    While carnivores are known to be attracted to herbivore-induced plant volatiles, little is known about how such volatiles may affect the behaviour of omnivorous predators that may use both plants and herbivores as food. Here, we examine how systemically produced plant volatiles, in response to local herbivore damage, differentially attract a key omnivorous predator, Anthocoris nemorum (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae), to single clones of three species of Salix: S. viminalis, S. dasyclados and S. cinerea. The profiles of the plant volatiles produced were found to vary among Salix clones and between herbivore-damaged and intact plants. Anthocoris nemorum was attracted to the volatiles released from undamaged plants of all three species, but most strongly to a native S. cinerea clone. Plants damaged by the herbivorous leaf beetle Phratora vulgatissima (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were generally more attractive than undamaged plants, with A. nemorum responding to systemic changes in the damaged plants where the experimental design specifically excluded volatiles released from the actual site of damage. When comparing damaged plants, the S. dasyclados clone was more attractive to A. nemorum than the S. viminalis clone-a somewhat surprising result since this Salix clone is considered relatively resistant to P. vulgatissima, and hence offers a limited amount of prey. Our experiments highlight that both constitutive and induced plant volatiles play a role in omnivore attraction, and this emphasizes the importance of considering odours of released volatiles when cropping and breeding Salix for increased resistance to herbivores.

  12. Wood characterization of Salix. 2: Relationships between optical and other wood properties; Caracterizacion de la madera de Salix. 2: Relaciones entre propiedades opticas y otros atributos del leno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, M. S.; Area, M. C.

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish relationships between some characteristics of the wood of Salix and their possible influence on its optical properties. In both willow clones, the presence of stains caused the decrease of brightness, L*, and b*. This effect was intensified in the more deteriorated areas. Tylose increased with the presence of such stains. The whiter wood showed the highest values of L*, being more yellow and less red, except for the dark zone in the American willow, and the brown stains and the blue stain in the hybrid willow, in which the parameters a* and b* correlated positively. The presence of defects in the wood was related to the decrease of density in both clones, except for the dark-brown stain in the American willow, which caused the increase of disks density when present. The content of insoluble and total lignin correlated negatively with brightness and L* in American willow, and with basic density in the hybrid. In the last clone, the extractives in hot water and alcohol-benzene, correlated with the alkali soluble substances content (frequently used as a measure of decay degree), and also played an important role in determining the tendency to blue color in the stains of the wood. (Author) 22 refs.

  13. ARCHITECTONICS OF BOREAL SPECIES IN THE SUBGENUS SALIX AND VETRIX DUMORT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Nedoseko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The basis for understanding the patterns of plant growth and development is the research of their structural and functional organization. One of the successfully developing areas of this research is the study of architectural models of woody plants. At the same time, widespread species of willow in the middle belt of European Russia from subgenus Salix and Vetrix are not fully studied in this respect. The goal is to develop a methodology for studying the structural and functional organization of dioecious tree species and on its basis to identify and describe the main structural and functional units (architectural modules of boreal species of willows of subgenus Salix and Vetrix. Materials and methods. Architectural modules are described for 15 boreal species in subgenus Salix and Vetrix. For this, a method based on the analysis of three features of the structural and functional organization of the species was developed: ramification type, the size of the vegetative shoots die-off zone and the longevity of the vegetative parts of the earrings. Results. 7 architectural modules have been identified in the examined species: one- and two-stage drop-down earrings on the basis of acro-, meso- and basitonium, and also with conditionally non-decreasing earrings based on acrotonia. It is established that the degree of death of the upper metamers of annual shoots correlates with the development of shoots from sleeping buds: in low shrubs such shoots develop 4–6 times more often than in trees and high shrubs. It is determined that the architectural modules of female individuals, unlike male individuals, are more branched and contain a greater number of annual assimilative shoots. It is shown that maximum number of architectural types is characteristic of the upper and middle branches, and the smaller of the lower branches in the crowns of female and male individuals of trees and tall shrubs. Conclusions. The offered technique allows us to

  14. De novo transcriptome and small RNA analysis of two Chinese willow cultivars reveals stress response genes in Salix matsudana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Rao

    Full Text Available Salix matsudana Koidz. is a deciduous, rapidly growing, and drought resistant tree and is one of the most widely distributed and commonly cultivated willow species in China. Currently little transcriptomic and small RNAomic data are available to reveal the genes involve in the stress resistant in S. matsudana. Here, we report the RNA-seq analysis results of both transcriptome and small RNAome data using Illumina deep sequencing of shoot tips from two willow variants(Salix. matsudana and Salix matsudana Koidz. cultivar 'Tortuosa'. De novo gene assembly was used to generate the consensus transcriptome and small RNAome, which contained 106,403 unique transcripts with an average length of 944 bp and a total length of 100.45 MB, and 166 known miRNAs representing 35 miRNA families. Comparison of transcriptomes and small RNAomes combined with quantitative real-time PCR from the two Salix libraries revealed a total of 292 different expressed genes(DEGs and 36 different expressed miRNAs (DEMs. Among the DEGs and DEMs, 196 genes and 24 miRNAs were up regulated, 96 genes and 12 miRNA were down regulated in S. matsudana. Functional analysis of DEGs and miRNA targets showed that many genes were involved in stress resistance in S. matsudana. Our global gene expression profiling presents a comprehensive view of the transcriptome and small RNAome which provide valuable information and sequence resources for uncovering the stress response genes in S. matsudana. Moreover the transcriptome and small RNAome data provide a basis for future study of genetic resistance in Salix.

  15. Variations in metal tolerance and accumulation in three hydroponically cultivated varieties of Salix integra treated with lead.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Wang

    Full Text Available Willow species have been suggested for use in the remediation of contaminated soils due to their high biomass production, fast growth, and high accumulation of heavy metals. The tolerance and accumulation of metals may vary among willow species and varieties, and the assessment of this variability is vital for selecting willow species/varieties for phytoremediation applications. Here, we examined the variations in lead (Pb tolerance and accumulation of three cultivated varieties of Salix integra (Weishanhu, Yizhibi and Dahongtou, a shrub willow native to northeastern China, using hydroponic culture in a greenhouse. In general, the tolerance and accumulation of Pb varied among the three willow varieties depending on the Pb concentration. All three varieties had a high tolerance index (TI and EC50 value (the effective concentration of Pb in the nutrient solution that caused a 50% inhibition on biomass production, but a low translocation factor (TF, indicating that Pb sequestration is mainly restricted in the roots of S. integra. Among the three varieties, Dahogntou was more sensitive to the increased Pb concentration than the other two varieties, with the lowest EC50 and TI for root and above-ground tissues. In this respect, Weishanhu and Yizhibi were more suitable for phytostabilization of Pb-contaminated soils. However, our findings also indicated the importance of considering the toxicity symptoms when selecting willow varieties for the use of phytoremediation, since we also found that the three varieties revealed various toxicity symptoms of leaf wilting, chlorosis and inhibition of shoot and root growth under the higher Pb concentrations. Such symptoms could be considered as a supplementary index in screening tests.

  16. Effect of sludge application on early development of two Salix species: productivity and heavy metals in plants and soil solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrecque, M.; Teodorescu, T.L.; Daigle, S. [Inst. de recherche en biologie vegetale, Jardin botanique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The aims of the present study were to assess the effects of applying various amounts of dried and pelleted sludge on the growth and productivity of S. discolor and S. viminalis and to follow the transfer of heavy metals in plants and soil solutions. Unrooted cuttings were planted on poor sandy soil in 216 large plastic pots and grown outdoors for a 20-week period. For field trials, cuttings were planted in a clayey soil using a split plot design. A single sludge application with five different doses was used for pot trials and three doses were employed for field experiments. Both experiments included untreated control plots. Trees which received the largest amount of sludge showed the best growth and productivity in pot trials. In the field experiment, there appeared to be no significant response to wastewater sludge fertilization at the end of the first season, probably because the initial fertility of the soil was high. Significantly higher stem-branch biomass was obtained for S. viminalis in pot trials compared with S. discolor, which performed better than the former in the field. In pot trials, the transfer coefficient did not vary between the species but was significantly different for Cd and Zn. The willows were able to absorb more Cd and Zn, but less Ni, Hg, Cu and Pb. About 50-80% of the total quantity of bioaccumulated metals was found in roots and stem-branch biomass. In field trials no differences were found among the various treatment plots when analysed for heavy metal concentration in the soil solution. Our results indicated that use of wastewater sludge as a fertilizer was beneficial to the growth performance of Salix species. However, differences in the estimated growth and productivity in fertilized willow trees may result when tests are carried out under field conditions compared with pot trials. 19 refs, 6 tabs

  17. Significance of stigma receptivity in intergeneric cross-pollination of Salix × Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Zenkteler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pollen–stigma interaction plays an important role in reproductive process and has been continuously studied in many interspecific and intergeneric crossing experiments. The aim of this study was to investigate stigma receptivity (SR of willow in order to determine the most suitable period for its pollination with poplar pollen and improve the effectiveness of Salix × Populus crosses. Tissue samples were examined histologically using light, epifluorescent, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. Willow SR was determined by stigma morphological traits, test of pollen germination rate, Peroxtesmo test of peroxidase and esterase activity on stigma surface as well as papilla ultrastructure at anthesis. We have ascertained that the SR duration in willow is short, lasting from 1 to 2 DA. The poplar pollen germination rate on willow stigmas on 1 DA ranged from 26.3 to 11.2%.

  18. Toxicity of 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol to willow trees (Salix viminalis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lauge Peter Westergaard; Jensen, Christian Kjær; Trapp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Chlorinated phenols have been intensively investigated from an eco-toxicological point of view, however almost nothing is known about toxicity of tetrachlorophenol (TeCP) to higher terrestrial plants. This paper applied the willow tree acute toxicity test to study the toxicity of 2,3,5,6-Te......CP to willows Salix viminalis (S. viminalis) at neutral and acidic conditions (roughly pH 7 and 4) with inhibition of transpiration as toxic endpoint. At neutral pH the EC50 was >10 mg L−1 while the EC50 at acidic conditions was 0.32 ± 0.17 mg L−1, clearly indicating that toxicity is exerted by the non......-ionic chemical fraction. Standard tests running at neutral pH are therefore not capturing the full toxicity of weak acids and bases....

  19. Production capacity of biomass of the floodpain community of Salix alba L. in southern Moravia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana López

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of the production capacity of biomass in the seven-year stand of Salix alba L. The communities originated in the process of primary succession in the area of the middle Nové Mlýny reservoir on a newly established island. Already since the first stages, the communities have been monitored. Results have shown that white willow behaves as an R-strategist with fast growth in youth. Moreover, the growth is supported by optimum environmental conditions (soils richly supplied with nutrients and water, long growing season. Accumulated phytomass amounted 102,7 t.ha−1 at the age of 7 years and the yield reached a mean annual increment of 15 t.ha−1.year−1. Communities of white willow rank among highly productive phytocoenoses capable of fixing considerable amounts of carbon and, at the same time fulfilling the function of habitat corridors.

  20. Failure of two consecutive annual treatments with ivermectin to eradicate the reindeer parasites (Hypoderma tarandi, Cephenemyia trompe and Linguatula arctica from an island in northern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne C. Nilssen

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The highly efficient endectocide ivermectin is used to reduce the burden of parasites in many semidomestic reindeer herds in northern Fennoscandia. In the autumn of 1995 and 1996 all reindeer on the island of Silda (42 km2 were treated with ivermectin in an attempt to eradicate the warble fly (Hypoderma (=Oedemagena tarandi (L., the nose bot fly (Cephenemyia trompe (Modeer (Diptera: Oestridae and the sinus worm (Linguatula arctica Riley, Haugerud and Nilssen (Pentastomida: Linguatulidae. Silda is situated 2-3 km off the mainland of Finnmark, northern Norway, and supports about 475 reindeer in summer. A year after the first treatment, the mean abundance of H. tarandi was reduced from 3.5 to 0.6, but a year after the second treatment the mean abundance unexpectedly had increased to 4.5. After one year without treatment, the mean abundance and prevalence of the three target parasites were at the same level, or higher, than pre-treatment levels. The main hypothesis for the failure to eliminate the parasites is that gravid H. tarandi and C. trompe females originating from untreated reindeer in adjacent mainland areas dispersed to the island during the warm summer of 1997 (possibly also in 1998. As these oestrids are strong flyers, it may not be too difficult for them to cross >2-3 km of oceanic waters. There are no good explanations for the failure to eradicate L. arctica, but the results indicate that there may be elements in its life cycle that are unknown. The conclusion of the study is that it may be difficult or impossible to eradicate these parasites permanently, even locally such as on islands unless adjacent areas on the mainland are also cleared.

  1. Behavioral responses of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia: Arcticidae) to simulated leakages of carbon dioxide from sub-sea geological storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamber, Shaw D., E-mail: shaw.bamber@iris.no; Westerlund, Stig, E-mail: sw@iris.no

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Valve pumping activity in A. islandica significantly increased at pH 6.2 seawater. • Changes in valve movements were not related to attempted burrowing activities. • Valve activity returned to control levels after 5 days of continuous exposure. • A. islandica tolerate pH reductions likely to follow leakage of sub-sea stored CO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Sub-sea geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) provides a viable option for the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) approach for reducing atmospheric emissions of this greenhouse gas. Although generally considered to offer a low risk of major leakage, it remains relevant to establish the possible consequences for marine organisms that live in or on sediments overlying these storage areas if such an event may occur. The present study has used a series of laboratory exposures and behavioral bioassays to establish the sensitivity of Arctica islandica to simulated leakages of CO{sub 2}. This long-lived bivalve mollusc is widely distributed throughout the North Sea, an area where geological storage is currently taking place and where there are plans to expand this operation significantly. A recently published model has predicted a maximum drop of 1.9 pH units in seawater at the point source of a substantial escape of CO{sub 2} from sub-sea geological storage in this region. Valve movements of A. islandica exposed to reduced pH seawater were recorded continuously using Hall effect proximity sensors. Valve movement regulation is important for optimising the flow of water over the gills, which supplies food and facilitates respiration. A stepwise reduction in seawater pH showed an initial increase in both the rate and extent of valve movements in the majority of individuals tested when pH fell to 6.2 units. Exposing A. islandica to pH 6.2 seawater continuously for seven days resulted in a clear increase in valve movements during the first 40 h of exposure, followed by a gradual reduction in activity

  2. A High-Density Genetic Map of Tetraploid Salix matsudana Using Specific Length Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available As a salt-tolerant arbor tree species, Salix matsudana plays an important role in afforestation and greening in the coastal areas of China. To select superior Salix varieties that adapt to wide saline areas, it is of paramount importance to understand and identify the mechanisms of salt-tolerance at the level of the whole genome. Here, we describe a high-density genetic linkage map of S. matsudana that represents a good coverage of the Salix genome. An intraspecific F1 hybrid population was established by crossing the salt-sensitive "Yanjiang" variety as the female parent with the salt-tolerant "9901" variety as the male parent. This population, along with its parents, was genotyped by specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq, leading to 277,333 high-quality SLAF markers. By marker analysis, we found that both the parents and offspring were tetraploid. The mean sequencing depth was 53.20-fold for "Yanjiang", 47.41-fold for "9901", and 11.02-fold for the offspring. Of the SLAF markers detected, 42,321 are polymorphic with sufficient quality for map construction. The final genetic map was constructed using 6,737 SLAF markers, covering 38 linkage groups (LGs. The genetic map spanned 5,497.45 cM in length, with an average distance of 0.82 cM. As a first high-density genetic map of S. matsudana constructed from salt tolerance-varying varieties, this study will provide a foundation for mapping quantitative trait loci that modulate salt tolerance and resistance in Salix and provide important references for molecular breeding of this important forest tree.

  3. Two Salix Genotypes Differ in Productivity and Nitrogen Economy When Grown in Monoculture and Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeber, Stefanie; Fransson, Petra; Prieto-Ruiz, Inés; Manzoni, Stefano; Weih, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Individual plant species or genotypes often differ in their demand for nutrients; to compete in a community they must be able to acquire more nutrients (i.e., uptake efficiency) and/or use them more efficiently for biomass production than their competitors. These two mechanisms are often complementary, as there are inherent trade-offs between them. In a mixed-stand, species with contrasting nutrient use patterns interact and may use their resources to increase productivity in different ways. Under contrasting nutrient availabilities, the competitive advantages conferred by either strategy may also shift, so that the interaction between resource use strategy and resource availability ultimately determines the performance of individual genotypes in mixtures. The aim was to investigate growth and nitrogen (N) use efficiency of two willow (Salix) genotypes grown in monoculture and mixture in a fertilizer contrast. We explored the hypotheses that (1) the biomass production of at least one of the involved genotypes should be greater when grown in mixture as compared to the corresponding monoculture when nutrients are the most growth-limiting factor; and (2) the N economy of individual genotypes differs when grown in mixture compared to the corresponding monoculture. The genotypes 'Tora' (Salix schwerinii ×S. viminalis) and 'Loden' (S. dasyclados), with contrasting phenology and functional traits, were grown from cuttings in a growth container experiment under two nutrient fertilization treatments (high and low) in mono- and mixed-culture for 17 weeks. Under low nutrient level, 'Tora' showed a higher biomass production (aboveground biomass, leaf area productivity) and N uptake efficiency in mixture than in monoculture, whereas 'Loden' showed the opposite pattern. In addition, 'Loden' showed higher leaf N productivity but lower N uptake efficiency than 'Tora.' The results demonstrated that the specific functional trait combinations of individual genotypes affect their

  4. ER-2 #809 and DC-8 in Arena Arctica hangar in Kiruna, Sweden prior to the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Va

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    NASA ER-2 # 809 and its DC-8 shown in Arena Arctica before the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). The two airborne science platforms were based north of the Arctic Circle in Kiruna, Sweden, during the winter of 2000 to study ozone depletion as part of SOLVE. A large hangar built especially for research, 'Arena Arctica' housed the instrumented aircraft and the scientists. Scientists have observed unusually low levels of ozone over the Arctic during recent winters, raising concerns that ozone depletion there could become more widespread as in the Antarctic ozone hole. The NASA-sponsored international mission took place between November 1999 and March 2000 and was divided into three phases. The DC-8 was involved in all three phases returning to Dryden between each phase. The ER-2 flew sample collection flights between January and March, remaining in Sweden from Jan. 9 through March 16. 'The collaborative campaign will provide an immense new body of information about the Arctic stratosphere,' said program scientist Dr. Michael Kurylo, NASA Headquarters. 'Our understanding of the Earth's ozone will be greatly enhanced by this research.' ER-2s bearing tail numbers 806 and 809 are used as airborne science platforms by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, an ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The

  5. Mycobionts of Salix herbacea on a glacier forefront in the Austrian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlmann, Oliver; Peintner, Ursula

    2008-04-01

    Dwarf willows (e.g. Salix herbacea) are among the earliest ectomycorrhizal (EM) plants colonising primary successional sites such as glacier forefronts in the Tyrolean Alps. EM of S. herbacea were sampled at the Rotmoos glacier forefront (Otz Valley, Austria) three times a year during the growing season and once a year during winter when plants were covered with snow in 2005 and 2006. EM were investigated using morphological methods and by sequencing the rDNA ITS region. The degree of EM mycorrhization was high throughout both years (93%). We distinguished 21 EM morphotypes and identified 19 fungal species. Cenococcum geophilum, Sebacina spp., Tomentella spp. and Cortinarius spp. dominated the mycobiont community of S. herbacea. The observed species richness in this about 150-year-old soil was at least 59% of the estimated species richness. Fungal communities differed significantly between consecutive years, and spatial heterogeneity was high. These differences made it difficult to detect seasonal impacts. Abundances of C. geophilum EM increased throughout the 2-year sampling period. Sebacina incrustans EM were very abundant in 2005, but nearly disappeared in 2006, whilst its fruitbodies were still frequent in the sampling area. This suggests that the mycorrhizae were displaced from the roots by an outcompeting species, whereas the mycelium was still present in the soil.

  6. Contrasting drought survival strategies of sympatric willows (genus: Salix): consequences for coexistence and habitat specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jessica A; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine M

    2011-06-01

    Many willow species (genus: Salix) co-occur within habitats (α-diversity) and across the landscape (β-diversity) throughout North America. This high diversity is challenging to explain because closely related species often share similar functional traits and thus experience heightened competition and shared pest and pathogen susceptibility. To investigate whether traits related to drought survival are important in maintaining diversity, we conducted an experimental dry-down on six willow species in a greenhouse. We compared species' growth rates, stem and leaf hydraulics, leaf function and dieback and examined potential associations between their drought responses and habitat affinities. Habitat affinities were characterized based on species occurrence in randomly established field plots in central Minnesota. Overall, species that occur in drier, more seasonally variable habitats tended to have higher water-use efficiency, and faster growth rates than species from wetter habitats. However, the greatest difference in drought survival strategies was found between two species with similar habitat affinities. We conclude that differences in willow species could be important in both driving habitat differentiation and permitting temporal differentiation in resource utilization within habitats. Therefore, species' water-use strategies could be important in maintaining both α- and β-diversity across the landscape.

  7. Growth and efficiency of nutrient removal by Salix jiangsuensis J172 for phytoremediation of urban wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiang; Sun, Haijing; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Yitai; Jiang, Zeping; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Shufeng

    2016-02-01

    Willows are a group of versatile tree species that may have multiple environmental applications. In the present study, Salix jiangsuensis J172 plants were grown in the fixed mats as an economic plant-based treatment system to evaluate its potential for removing nutrients in wastewater. Plants grew normally in wastewater compared with those in Hoagland solution. However, wastewater containing a high concentration of chlorine ions was toxic to S. jiangsuensis J172 plants. The plants accumulated large amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in aboveground tissues under conditions of abundant supply. The removal efficiency for raw wastewater was 82.18-87.78 % for nitrogen, 57.35-65.58 % for phosphorus, and 58.24-59.90 % for chemical oxygen demand. Nutrient removal efficiency was positively correlated with the initial nutrient supply. The results show that S. jiangsuensis J172 grown in the fixed mat economic plant-based treatment system with nutrient-rich, eutrophic water may be an effective, low-cost phytoremediation technology to treat water containing undesirable levels of wastewater.

  8. Potential of willow (Salix) as a resource of bioenergy in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viglasky, J.; Suchomel, J. (Technical Univ. of Zvolen, Zvolen (Slovakia)), e-mail: viglasky@vsld.tuzvo.sk; Polak, M. (Univ. of Economics in Bratislawa, Kapusary (Slovakia)), e-mail: vvich@vvich.sk, e-mail: polak@euke.sk

    2010-07-01

    Short Rotation Plantations (SRPs) represent a perspective source of biomass for energy purposes. These plantations can be established on soils suitable for their growing, but also on contaminated soils, which cannot be used for food production. The present state of fuel and energy basis in the world as well as in Slovakia urges on the need for radical intervention to the energy sector. Biomass from fast growing tree species cultivated on SRPs or 'energy forests' has the potential to substantially contribute to the achievement of ambitious EU and national goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural production zones in Slovakia suitable for willow cultivation are corn, beet, potato and upland production zones with soils containing high groundwater table. It does not have high demands for soil quality, but it is intolerant to soils being flooded by backwater. It is also intolerant to dry or peat soils. Therefore, the most suitable soils for energy forests cultivation are heavy loam and clay soils with high groundwater table, eventually soils occasionally being flooded. This paper deals with development of SRP implementation in Slovakia. The results of energy balance evaluation of biomass gained from short rotation coppice willow (Salix spp.) carried out in recent years. (orig.)

  9. Assembly and comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequence of an economic plant Salix suchowensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Willow is a widely used dioecious woody plant of Salicaceae family in China. Due to their high biomass yields, willows are promising sources for bioenergy crops. In this study, we assembled the complete mitochondrial (mt genome sequence of S. suchowensis with the length of 644,437 bp using Roche-454 GS FLX Titanium sequencing technologies. Base composition of the S. suchowensis mt genome is A (27.43%, T (27.59%, C (22.34%, and G (22.64%, which shows a prevalent GC content with that of other angiosperms. This long circular mt genome encodes 58 unique genes (32 protein-coding genes, 23 tRNA genes and 3 rRNA genes, and 9 of the 32 protein-coding genes contain 17 introns. Through the phylogenetic analysis of 35 species based on 23 protein-coding genes, it is supported that Salix as a sister to Populus. With the detailed phylogenetic information and the identification of phylogenetic position, some ribosomal protein genes and succinate dehydrogenase genes are found usually lost during evolution. As a native shrub willow species, this worthwhile research of S. suchowensis mt genome will provide more desirable information for better understanding the genomic breeding and missing pieces of sex determination evolution in the future.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Phenolic Compounds from the Leaves of Salix matsudana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-zhi Sun

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A bioassay-guided in vitro screen has revealed that a 70% methanol extract of the leaves of Salix matsudana shows considerable inhibitory activity against cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2. A subsequent phytochemical study led to the isolation of a new flavonoid, matsudone A (1, together with five known flavonoids – luteolin (2, isoquercitrin (3, 7-methoxyflavone (4, luteolin 7-O-glucoside (5, 4',7-dihydroxyflavone (6 – and two phenolic glycosides, leonuriside A (7 and piceoside (8. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR studies, high resolution ESI mass spectroscopic analyses and comparisons with literature data. The isolated compounds 1-8 were tested for their inhibitory activities against COX-1 and COX-2. Compounds 1, 5 and 6 were found to have potent inhibitory effect on COX-2 and compounds 3-5 exhibited moderate inhibition against COX-1.

  11. Genetic strategies for dissecting complex traits in biomass willows (Salix spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Steven J; Karp, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Willows are highly diverse catkin-bearing trees and shrubs of the genus Salix. They occur in many growth forms, from tall trees to creeping alpines, and successfully occupy a wide variety of ecological niches. Shrubby willows (sub-genus Vetrix) have many characteristics that render them suited to cultivation in much faster growth cycles than conventional forestry. They respond well to coppicing, can be propagated vegetatively as cuttings and achieve rapid growth with low fertilizer inputs. As a result, willows grown as short rotation coppice are now among the leading commercially grown biomass crops in temperate regions. However, although willows have a long history of cultivation for traditional uses, their industrial use is relatively recent and, compared with major arable crops, they are largely undomesticated. Breeding programmes initiated to improve willow as a biomass crop achieved a doubling of yields within a period of coppicing response (shoot number and shoot vigour), as well as resistance to pests, diseases and environmental stress, with little or no knowledge of the genetic basis of these traits. Genetics and genomics, combined with extensive phenotyping, have substantially improved our understanding of the basis of biomass traits in willow for more targeted breeding via marker-assisted selection. Here, we present the strategy we have adopted in which a genetic-based approach was used to dissect complex traits into more defined components for molecular breeding and gene discovery. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. High yielding biomass genotypes of willow (Salix spp.) show differences in below ground biomass allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniff, Jennifer; Purdy, Sarah J; Barraclough, Tim J P; Castle, March; Maddison, Anne L; Jones, Laurence E; Shield, Ian F; Gregory, Andrew S; Karp, Angela

    2015-09-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) grown as short rotation coppice (SRC) are viewed as a sustainable source of biomass with a positive greenhouse gas (GHG) balance due to their potential to fix and accumulate carbon (C) below ground. However, exploiting this potential has been limited by the paucity of data available on below ground biomass allocation and the extent to which it varies between genotypes. Furthermore, it is likely that allocation can be altered considerably by environment. To investigate the role of genotype and environment on allocation, four willow genotypes were grown at two replicated field sites in southeast England and west Wales, UK. Above and below ground biomass was intensively measured over two two-year rotations. Significant genotypic differences in biomass allocation were identified, with below ground allocation differing by up to 10% between genotypes. Importantly, the genotype with the highest below ground biomass also had the highest above ground yield. Furthermore, leaf area was found to be a good predictor of below ground biomass. Growth environment significantly impacted allocation; the willow genotypes grown in west Wales had up to 94% more biomass below ground by the end of the second rotation. A single investigation into fine roots showed the same pattern with double the volume of fine roots present. This greater below ground allocation may be attributed primarily to higher wind speeds, plus differences in humidity and soil characteristics. These results demonstrate that the capacity exists to breed plants with both high yields and high potential for C accumulation.

  13. Impacts of ethylenediurea (EDU) soil drench and foliar spray in Salix sachalinensis protection against O3-induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathokleous, Evgenios; Paoletti, Elena; Saitanis, Costas J; Manning, William J; Sugai, Tetsuto; Koike, Takayoshi

    2016-12-15

    It is widely accepted that elevated levels of surface ozone (O3) negatively affect plants. Ethylenediurea (EDU) is a synthetic substance which effectively protects plants against O3-caused phytotoxicity. Among other questions, the one still open is: which EDU application method is more appropriate for treating fast-growing tree species. The main aims of this study were: (i) to test if chronic exposure of Salix sachalinensis plants to 200-400mgEDUL(-1), the usually applied range for protection against O3 phytotoxicity, is beneficial to plants; (ii) to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to elevated O3 on S. sachalinensis; (iii) to assess the efficacy of two methods (i.e. soil drench and foliar spray) of EDU application to plants; (iv) to investigate the appropriate concentration of EDU to protect against elevated O3-induced damage in S. sachalinensis; and (v) to compare the two methods of EDU application in terms of effectiveness and EDU consumption. Current-year cuttings grown in infertile soil free from organic matter were exposed either to low ambient O3 (AOZ, 10-h≈28.3nmolmol(-1)) or to elevated O3 (EOZ, 10-h≈65.8nmolmol(-1)) levels during daylight hours. Over the growing season, plants were treated every nine days with 200mL soil drench of 0, 200 or 400mgEDUL(-1) or with foliar spray of 0, 200 or 400mgEDUL(-1) (in two separate experiments). We found that EDU per se had no effects on plants exposed to AOZ. EOZ practically significantly injured S. sachalinensis plants, and the impact was indifferent between the experiments. EDU did not protect plants against EOZ impact when applied as soil drench but it did protect them when applied as 200-400mgL(-1) foliar spray. We conclude that EDU may be more effective against O3 phytotoxicity to fast-growing species when applied as a spray than when applied as a drench. Keymessage: Soil-drenched EDU was ineffective in protecting willow plants against O3-induced injury, whereas foliar-sprayed EDU was effective even

  14. Tanacetum parthenium and Salix alba (Mig-RL) combination in migraine prophylaxis: a prospective, open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, R; Pechadre, J C; John, G W

    2006-01-01

    Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew) has been used traditionally to treat migraine, and although its mechanism of action is not fully understood, serotonin 5-HT receptor blocking effects have been suggested. T. parthenium and Salix alba (white willow) either alone or in combination (Mig-RL) were recently shown to inhibit binding to 5-HT(2A/2C) receptors; T. parthenium failed to recognise 5-HT(1D) receptors, whereas S. alba or the combination did. It was hypothesised that S. alba in combination with T. parthenium may provide superior migraine prophylactic activity compared with T. parthenium alone. A prospective, open-label study was performed in 12 patients diagnosed with migraine without aura. Twelve weeks' treatment with T. parthenium 300 mg plus S. alba 300 mg (Mig-RL) twice daily was administered to determine the effects of therapy on migraine attack frequency (primary efficacy criterion), intensity and duration (secondary efficacy criteria), and quality of life, together with tolerability for patients. Attack frequency was reduced by 57.2% at 6 weeks (p < 0.029) and by 61.7% at 12 weeks (p < 0.025) in nine of ten patients, with 70% patients having a reduction of at least 50%. Attack intensity was reduced by 38.7% at 6 weeks (p < 0.005) and by 62.6% at 12 weeks (p < 0.004) in ten of ten patients, with 70% of patients having a reduction of at least 50%. Attack duration decreased by 67.2% at 6 weeks (p < 0.001) and by 76.2% at 12 weeks (p < 0.001) in ten of ten patients. Two patients were excluded for reasons unrelated to treatment. Self-assessed general health, physical performance, memory and anxiety also improved by the end of the study. Mig-RL treatment was well tolerated and no adverse events occurred. The remarkable efficacy of Mig-RL in not only reducing the frequency of migraine attacks but also their pain intensity and duration in this trial warrants further investigation of this therapy in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled investigation

  15. The potential of two Salix genotypes for radionuclide/heavy metal accumulation. A case study of Rovinari ash pit (Gorj District, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernea, Cornelia; Neţoiu, Constantin; Corneanu, Gabriel; Crăciun, Constantin; Corneanu, Mihaela; Cojocaru, Luminiţa; Rovena Lăcătuşu, Anca; Popescu, Ion

    2014-05-01

    Thermo Electric Power Plants (TEPP) produce a high amount of ash, that contains heavy metals and radionuclides. Ash is usually stored in ash-pits, in mixture with water and contains U235, Th 234 and their decay products, that are released from the coal matrix, during combustion, as well as heavy metals. Warm weather dried the ash and it can be spread by the wind in surrounded area. This paper presents the results of an experiment with two Salix genotypes, cultivated on an old closed ash-pit, nearby the Rovinari TEPP, in the middle Jiu valley (Gorj District, Romania), in order to evaluate its tolerance to heavy metals and radionuclides. Ash analysis revealed the presence of natural radionuclides, beloging from ash and coal dust, as well as of Cs 137, of Chernobil provenance. Radionuclides content over the normal limits for Romania were registered for Th 234, Pb210, U235 and Ra226. The heavy metals level in ash was over the normal limits, but under the alerts limits. In order to establish the woody plants tolerance to heavy metals and radionuclides, it is important to study the seedlings behavior. In this respect Salix alba and Salix viminalis whips and cuttings culture have been establish on Rovinari ash-pit. The observations made on survival and growth rate pointed out the superiority of Salix viminalis behaviour. After a period of three years Salix viminalis registered a 96% survival rate, while in Salix alba annual decreases, reaching to 14%. These results are supported by the radionuclides content in leaves and by the electron microscopy studies. In Salix alba the leaves parenchimatic cells present a low sinthesis activity. The exogenous particles are accumulated in parenchima cells vacuola, the chloroplasts are usually agranal, with few starch grains and mitocondria presents slightly dillated crista. The ultrastructural features of the mature leaf cells, evidenced the natural adaptation of Salix viminalins for development in an environment with a big amount of

  16. Salix polaris growth responses to active layer detachment and solifluction processes in High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekacz, Liliana

    2015-04-01

    The work is dedicated to demonstrate the potential of Salix polaris grow properties in the dendrogemorphologic image, analyzing periglacially induced slope processes in the high Arctic.. Observed anatomical and morphological plants responses to solifluction and active layer detachment processes are presented qualitatively and quantitatively as a summary of presented features frequency. The results are discussed against the background of the other research results in this field. The investigations was performed in Ebba valley, in the vicinity of Petunia Bay, northernmost part of Billefjorden in central Spitsbergen (Svalbard). Environmental conditions are characterized by annual precipitation sum lower than 200 mm (Hagen et al.,1993) and average summer temperature of about 5°C, with maximum daily temperatures rarely exceeding 10°C (Rachlewicz, 2009). Collected shrub material was prepared according to the methods presented by Schweingruber and Poschlod (2005). Thin (approx. 15-20μm) sections of the whole cross-section were prepared with a sledge microtome, stained with Safranine and Astra blue and finally permanently fixed on microslides with Canada balsam and dried. Snapshots were taken partially for each cross-section with digital camera (ColorView III, Olympus) connected to a microscope (Olympus BX41) and merged into one, high resolution image. After all, ring widths were measured in 3-4 radii in every single cross-section using ImageJ software. Analyzed plants revealed extremely harsh environmental conditions of their growth. Buchwał et al. (2013) provided quantitative data concerning missing rings and partially missing rings in shrubs growing on Ebba valley floor. Mean ring width at the level of 79μm represents one of the smallest values of yearly growth ever noted. The share of missing rings and partially missing rings was 11,2% and 13,6% respectively. Plants growing on Ebba valley slope indicate almost twice smaller values of ring width (41μm), and higher

  17. Hydrologic control on the root growth of Salix cuttings at the laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau', Valentina; Calliari, Baptiste; Perona, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Riparian plant roots contribute to the ecosystem functioning and, to a certain extent, also directly affect fluvial morphodynamics, e.g. by influencing sediment transport via mechanical stabilization and trapping. There is much both scientific and engineering interest in understanding the complex interactions among riparian vegetation and river processes. For example, to investigate plant resilience to uprooting by flow, one should quantify the probability that riparian plants may be uprooted during specific flooding event. Laboratory flume experiments are of some help to this regard, but are often limited to use grass (e.g., Avena and Medicago sativa) as vegetation replicate with a number of limitations due to fundamental scaling problems. Hence, the use of small-scale real plants grown undisturbed in the actual sediment and within a reasonable time frame would be particularly helpful to obtain more realistic flume experiments. The aim of this work is to develop and tune an experimental technique to control the growth of the root vertical density distribution of small-scale Salix cuttings of different sizes and lengths. This is obtained by controlling the position of the saturated water table in the sedimentary bed according to the sediment size distribution and the cutting length. Measurements in the rhizosphere are performed by scanning and analysing the whole below-ground biomass by means of the root analysis software WinRhizo, from which root morphology statistics and the empirical vertical density distribution are obtained. The model of Tron et al. (2015) for the vertical density distribution of the below-ground biomass is used to show that experimental conditions that allow to develop the desired root density distribution can be fairly well predicted. This augments enormously the flexibility and the applicability of the proposed methodology in view of using such plants for novel flow erosion experiments. Tron, S., Perona, P., Gorla, L., Schwarz, M., Laio, F

  18. Floral Reward, Advertisement and Attractiveness to Honey Bees in Dioecious Salix caprea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dötterl, Stefan; Glück, Ulrike; Jürgens, Andreas; Woodring, Joseph; Aas, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    In dioecious, zoophilous plants potential pollinators have to be attracted to both sexes and switch between individuals of both sexes for pollination to occur. It often has been suggested that males and females require different numbers of visits for maximum reproductive success because male fertility is more likely limited by access to mates, whereas female fertility is rather limited by resource availability. According to sexual selection theory, males therefore should invest more in pollinator attraction (advertisement, reward) than females. However, our knowledge on the sex specific investment in floral rewards and advertisement, and its effects on pollinator behaviour is limited. Here, we use an approach that includes chemical, spectrophotometric, and behavioural studies i) to elucidate differences in floral nectar reward and advertisement (visual, olfactory cues) in dioecious sallow, Salix caprea, ii) to determine the relative importance of visual and olfactory floral cues in attracting honey bee pollinators, and iii) to test for differential attractiveness of female and male inflorescence cues to honey bees. Nectar amount and sugar concentration are comparable, but sugar composition varies between the sexes. Olfactory sallow cues are more attractive to honey bees than visual cues; however, a combination of both cues elicits the strongest behavioural responses in bees. Male flowers are due to the yellow pollen more colourful and emit a higher amount of scent than females. Honey bees prefer the visual but not the olfactory display of males over those of females. In all, the data of our multifaceted study are consistent with the sexual selection theory and provide novel insights on how the model organism honey bee uses visual and olfactory floral cues for locating host plants. PMID:24676333

  19. Impact of protective agents and drying methods on desiccation tolerance of Salix nigra L. seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagapita, Patricio R; Ott Schneider, Helena; Agudelo-Laverde, Lina M; Buera, M Pilar

    2014-09-01

    Willow seeds are classified as orthodox, but they show some recalcitrant characteristics, as they lose viability in a few weeks at room temperature. The aim of this work was to improve the desiccation tolerance of willow seeds (Salix nigra L.), as a model of sensitive materials to dehydration, through imbibition in solutions and later vacuum (VD) or freeze-drying (FD). Imbibition was conducted with 45% w/v trehalose or polyethylene glycol 400 -PEG- or water prior to dehydration treatments. Water- and especially trehalose-imbibed seeds subjected to VD showed better germination capability with respect to the freeze-dried ones. Water crystallization was mainly responsible for the great loss of capability germination observed in water- or trehalose-imbibed seeds subjected to FD. PEG behavior was better when seeds were FD instead of VD. DSC thermograms of seeds allowed to identify two thermal transitions corresponding to lipids melting and to proteins denaturation. This last transition reveals information about proteins state/functionality. Dehydration of control and PEG- or water-imbibed seeds affected proteins functionality leading to lower germinability. In the case of trehalose-imbibed seeds subjected to VD, proteins maintained their native state along dehydration, and the seeds showed a great germination capacity for all the water content range. Germinated seeds showed higher luminosity (L*), greenness (a*) and yellowness (b*) values than not-germinated seeds independently of the employed agent. Present work reveals that the presence of adequate protective agents as well the dehydration method were the main critical factors involved in willow seed desiccation tolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Floral reward, advertisement and attractiveness to honey bees in dioecious Salix caprea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dötterl, Stefan; Glück, Ulrike; Jürgens, Andreas; Woodring, Joseph; Aas, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    In dioecious, zoophilous plants potential pollinators have to be attracted to both sexes and switch between individuals of both sexes for pollination to occur. It often has been suggested that males and females require different numbers of visits for maximum reproductive success because male fertility is more likely limited by access to mates, whereas female fertility is rather limited by resource availability. According to sexual selection theory, males therefore should invest more in pollinator attraction (advertisement, reward) than females. However, our knowledge on the sex specific investment in floral rewards and advertisement, and its effects on pollinator behaviour is limited. Here, we use an approach that includes chemical, spectrophotometric, and behavioural studies i) to elucidate differences in floral nectar reward and advertisement (visual, olfactory cues) in dioecious sallow, Salix caprea, ii) to determine the relative importance of visual and olfactory floral cues in attracting honey bee pollinators, and iii) to test for differential attractiveness of female and male inflorescence cues to honey bees. Nectar amount and sugar concentration are comparable, but sugar composition varies between the sexes. Olfactory sallow cues are more attractive to honey bees than visual cues; however, a combination of both cues elicits the strongest behavioural responses in bees. Male flowers are due to the yellow pollen more colourful and emit a higher amount of scent than females. Honey bees prefer the visual but not the olfactory display of males over those of females. In all, the data of our multifaceted study are consistent with the sexual selection theory and provide novel insights on how the model organism honey bee uses visual and olfactory floral cues for locating host plants.

  1. Bioaccessibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in activated carbon or biochar amended vegetated (Salix viminalis) soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszczuk, Patryk; Godlewska, Paulina; Reible, Danny D; Kraska, Piotr

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of activated carbon (AC) or biochars on the bioaccessibility (Cbioacc) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils vegetated with willow (Salix viminalis). The study determined the effect of willow on the Cbioacc PAHs and the effect of the investigated amendments on changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), crop yield and the content of PAHs in plants. PAH-contaminated soil was amended with 2.5 wt% AC or biochar. Samples from individual plots with and without plants were collected at the beginning of the experiment and after 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. The Cbioacc PAHs were determined using sorptive bioaccessibility extraction (SBE) (silicon rods and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin). Both AC and biochar caused a decrease in the Cbioacc PAHs. Immediately after adding AC, straw-derived biochar or willow-derived biochar to the soil, the reduction in the sum of 16 (Σ16) Cbioacc PAHs was 70.3, 38.0, and 29.3%, respectively. The highest reduction of Cbioacc was observed for 5- and 6-ring PAHs (from 54.4 to 100%), whereas 2-ring PAHs were reduced only 8.0-25.4%. The reduction of Cbioacc PAHs increased over time. Plants reduced Cbioacc in all soils although effects varied by soil treatment and PAH. Willow grown in AC- and biochar-amended soil accumulated less phenanthrene than in the control soil. The presence of AC in the soil also affected willow yield and shoot length and DOC was reduced from 53.5 to 66.9% relative to unamended soils. In the biochars-amended soil, no changes in soil DOC content were noted nor effects on willow shoot length. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental Salix shoot and root growth statistics on the alluvial sediment of a restored river corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, N.; Perona, P.; Verones, F.; Francis, R.; Burlando, P.

    2009-12-01

    River restoration projects encompass not only the amelioration of flood protection but also the rehabilitation of the riverine ecosystem. However, the interactions and feedbacks between river hydrology, riparian vegetation and aquifer dynamics are still poorly understood. Vegetation interacts with river hydrology on multiple time scales. Hence, there is considerable interest in understanding the morphodynamics of restored river reaches in relation to the characteristics of vegetation that may colonize the bare sediment, and locally stabilize it by root anchoring. In this paper we document results from a number of ongoing experiments within the project RECORD (Restored CORridor Dynamics, sponsored by CCES - www.cces.ch - and Cantons Zurich and Thurgau, CH). In particular, we discuss both the above and below ground biomass growth dynamics of 1188 Salix cuttings (individual and group survival rate, growth of the longest shoots and number of branches and morphological root analysis) in relation to local river hydrodynamics. Cuttings were organized in square plots of different size and planted in spring 2009 on a gravel island of the restored river section of River Thur in Switzerland. By periodical monitoring the plots we obtained a detailed and quite unique set of data, including root statistics of uprooted samples derived from image analysis from a high-resolution scanner. Beyond describing the survival rate dynamics in relation to river hydrology, we show the nature and strength of correlations between island topography and cutting growth statistics. In particular, by root analysis and by comparing empirical histograms of the vertical root distribution vs satured water surface in the sediment, we show that main tropic responses on such environment are oxytropism, hydrotropism and thigmotropism. The main factor influencing the survival rate is naturally found in erosion by floods, of which we also give an interesting example that helps demonstrate the role of river

  3. Removal of 4-chlorobenzoic acid from spiked hydroponic solution by willow trees (Salix viminalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deavers, Kamila; Macek, Tomas; Karlson, Ulrich G; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    Chlorobenzoic acids (CBA) are intermediate products of the aerobic microbial degradation of PCB and several pesticides. This study explores the feasibility of using basket willows, Salix viminalis, to remove 4-CBA from polluted sites, which also might stimulate PCB degradation. The removal of 4-CBA by willow trees was investigated with intact, septic willow trees growing in hydroponic solution and with sterile cell suspensions at concentrations of 5 mg/L and 50 mg/L 4-CBA. Nutrient solutions with different levels of ammonium and nitrate were prepared to achieve different pH levels. The concentration of 4-CBA was tracked over time and quantified by HPLC. At the low level of 4-CBA (5 mg/L), willows removed 70% (pH 4.2) to 90% (pH 6.8), while 48% (pH 4.2) to 52% (pH 6.8) of the water was transpired. At the high 4-CBA level (50 mg/L), the pH varied between 4.4 and 4.6, and 10% to 30% of 4-CBA was removed, but only 5% to 9% of the water. In sterile cell suspensions, removal of 4-CBA by fresh biomass was much higher than removal by dead biomass. The results indicate that 4-CBA is toxic to willow trees at 50 mg/L. The removal of 4-CBA from solution is by both passive processes (uptake with water, sorption to plant tissue) and metabolic processes of the plants. Plants, such as willow trees, might assist in the degradation of PCB and their degradation products CBA.

  4. Floral reward, advertisement and attractiveness to honey bees in dioecious Salix caprea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dötterl

    Full Text Available In dioecious, zoophilous plants potential pollinators have to be attracted to both sexes and switch between individuals of both sexes for pollination to occur. It often has been suggested that males and females require different numbers of visits for maximum reproductive success because male fertility is more likely limited by access to mates, whereas female fertility is rather limited by resource availability. According to sexual selection theory, males therefore should invest more in pollinator attraction (advertisement, reward than females. However, our knowledge on the sex specific investment in floral rewards and advertisement, and its effects on pollinator behaviour is limited. Here, we use an approach that includes chemical, spectrophotometric, and behavioural studies i to elucidate differences in floral nectar reward and advertisement (visual, olfactory cues in dioecious sallow, Salix caprea, ii to determine the relative importance of visual and olfactory floral cues in attracting honey bee pollinators, and iii to test for differential attractiveness of female and male inflorescence cues to honey bees. Nectar amount and sugar concentration are comparable, but sugar composition varies between the sexes. Olfactory sallow cues are more attractive to honey bees than visual cues; however, a combination of both cues elicits the strongest behavioural responses in bees. Male flowers are due to the yellow pollen more colourful and emit a higher amount of scent than females. Honey bees prefer the visual but not the olfactory display of males over those of females. In all, the data of our multifaceted study are consistent with the sexual selection theory and provide novel insights on how the model organism honey bee uses visual and olfactory floral cues for locating host plants.

  5. Biomass productivity and wood energy of Salix species after 2 years growth in SRIC fertilized with wastewater sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrecque, M.; Teodorescu, T.I.; Daigle, S. [Instituit de Recherche en Biologie Vegetale, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The energy equivalent of willows in short-rotation intensive culture (SRIC) varies in terms of yield and wood biomass characteristics. Three willow species (Salix discolor Muhl., Salix petiolaris Smith and Salix viminalis L.) were planted on two sites, well-drained and poorly drained, in two different densities (20 000 and 30 000 plants per ha). Four doses of dried and granulated sludge were applied: the equivalents of 0, 100, 200 and 300 kg ``available`` N per ha. At the end of the second season, above-ground biomass was similar for S. discolor and S. viminalis, and greater than that of S. petiolaris on both sites and for all sludge treatments. On the well-drained site, each increment in the sludge dose significantly increased the performance of the species, regardless of plant density. Fertilized with a sludge dose equivalent to 300 kg N per ha, S. viminalis and S. discolor yielded 30.17 and 24.97 t/ha of dry matter respectively. On the poorly drained site, differences in performance were also observed between fertilized and unfertilized plots, but not among the various treatments. The calorific value of the wood of the three species being similar (19.21-19.59 kJ/g), the energy equivalent of a hectare of willows is proportional to the yield of each species. Thus the energy equivalent of S. viminalis and S. discolor is two to three times that of S. petiolaris. S. viminalis had the highest woody biomass quality, with an FVI (fuelwood value index) of 1.030.58 (100%), followed by S. petiolaris with 954.25 (92.6%) and S. discolor with 849.08 (82.4%). (Author)

  6. Effects of cutting characteristics on sprouting and early growth of willow; Effekter av sticklingsparametrar paa grobarhet och tillvaext hos salix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verwijst, Theo; Nordh, Nils-Erik; Lundkvist, Anneli

    2010-06-15

    In plantations of willow, the size- and weight variability of established plants is increasing over time. This size-hierarchy development is enforced by competition for resources between plants, and is preserved by root reserves and maintained over harvest. This long-term development causes mortality of entire willow plants, and thereby to gaps in the stand, and production losses under later cutting cycles. Variations in productivity across a field may be caused by soil fertility- and moisture gradients and by differences in weed pressure. Even difference between adjacent plants during the establishment phase may be caused by small scale differences in the biotic (weeds) and abiotic (moisture, nutrients) direct environment of the plants. But the central question here is whether differences between single cuttings may contribute to the development of a size- and weight hierarchy between willow plants during the early establishment phase? And if so, (i) to what degree do differences between cuttings contribute to the development of a hierarchy and (ii) are we able, in commercial practice, to modify cutting handling and selection to minimise the development of early size variations between plants? This research project aimed to quantify how cutting length and -origin and cutting handling during planting affects survival and growth of plants in a willow stand under establishment. The goal was to identify and quantify cutting characteristics which are of relevance for a high viability and for a fast and equal establishment of a willow stand, and thereby to be able to recommend advice which leads to a faster and more reliable establishment of willows. The study was performed by means of two box experiments under controlled conditions and by means of a field experiment during May 2008 - September 2009, on the Ultuna campus (SLU) nearby Uppsala. In all trials, the clones Tora (Salix schwerinii x S. viminalis), Jorr (Salix viminalis), Olof (Salix viminalis x (Salix

  7. Correspondence of ectomycorrhizal diversity and colonisation of willows (Salix spp.) grown in short rotation coppice on arable sites and adjacent natural stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Toljander, Ylva K; Baum, Christel; Fransson, Petra M A; Taylor, Andy F S; Weih, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are mycorrhizal tree species sometimes cultivated as short rotation coppice (SRC) on arable sites for energy purposes; they are also among the earliest plants colonising primary successional sites in natural stands. The objective of this study was to analyse the degree of colonisation and diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities on willows grown as SRC in arable soils and their adjacent natural or naturalized stands. Arable sites usually lack ectomycorrhizal host plants before the establishment of SRC, and adjacent natural or naturalized willow stands were hypothesized to be a leading source of ectomycorrhizal inoculum for the SRC. Three test sites including SRC stands (Salix viminalis, Salix dasyclados, and Salix schwerinii) and adjacent natural or naturalized (Salix caprea, Salix fragilis, and Salix × mollissima) stands in central Sweden were investigated on EM colonisation and morphotypes, and the fungal partners of 36 of the total 49 EM fungi morphotypes were identified using molecular tools. The frequency of mycorrhizas in the natural/naturalized stands was higher (two sites) or lower (one site) than in the corresponding cultivated stands. Correspondence analysis revealed that some EM taxa (e.g. Agaricales) were mostly associated with cultivated willows, while others (e.g. Thelephorales) were mostly found in natural/naturalized stands. In conclusion, we found strong effects of sites and willow genotype on EM fungi formation, but poor correspondence between the EM fungi abundance and diversity in SRC and their adjacent natural/naturalized stands. The underlying mechanism might be selective promotion of some EM fungi species by more effective spore dispersal.

  8. Technique for compressed bundles for harvest of whole straw willow. Pilot study; Teknik foer komprimerande helskottsskoerd av salix i buntform. Foerstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Hans (Vaesteraeng Lantbruk AB (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    The pilot study was initiated by the need of a new technology that has been raised from the problem, and by the specifications of requirements, that has been described from the project 'Salix Maelardalen'. The need has been crystallized by the energy company Maelarenergi AB, Vaesteraas, in their handling of bio fuel, among many other fuels. The company Maelarenergi AB can see a potential in the use of Salix of a considerable volume. There is a special need by the means of the big volume handling of Salix, since the Salix raw material must be able to be delivered under a longer period or for intermediate storage. 8-9 months could be an adequate storage period. The possibility for intermediate storage could do the flow of fuel raw material to the combined power and heating plant is harmonized to the special requirements of fuel. The storage capability in chipped raw Salix chips is very short and that's why chipped Salix are not going to be a sustainable system combined with the handle of big volume together with portioned inflow to the plant. The production of Salix chips in a system of direct chipping is a very delicate system. The ground conditions with frozen and dry grounds are important for a system with heavy machines. The last years have not given such climate conditions. A big problem with practicability has been coming up. The number of days for contract work during the harvest period without interruption, because of hard conditions, has been decreased to the level that the capacity very considerably falls below what is economical defensible. The needs of larger areas for harvesting during fewer days under good conditions counteract each other. In the 'hot flow' during the harvest when the harvest machine will work with escort vehicles/container transports in the field can be impossible to realize because of for example the breakdown of the soil structure. The organization around 'hot flow system' is a very heavy programme

  9. Seasonality of bottom water temperature in the northern North Sea reconstructed from the oxygen isotope composition of the bivalve Arctica islandica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimova, Tamara; Andersson, Carin; Bonitz, Fabian

    2017-04-01

    The seasonality of temperature changes is an important characteristic of climate. However, observational data for the ocean are only available for the last 150 year from a limited number of locations. Prior to 18th century information is only available from proxy reconstructions. The vast majority of such reconstructions depend on land-based archives, primarily from dendrochronology. Established marine proxy records for the ocean, especially at high latitudes, are both sparsely distributed and poorly resolved in time. Therefore, the identification and development of proxies for studying key ocean processes at sub-annual resolution that can extend the marine instrumental record is a clear priority in marine climate science. In this study, we have developed a record of early Holocene seasonal variability of bottom water temperature from the Viking Bank in the northern most North Sea. This area is of a particular interest since the hydrography is controlled by the inflow of Atlantic water. The reconstruction is based on the oxygen isotope composition of the growth increments in two sub-fossil shells of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia), dated to 9600-9335 cal. yr BP. By combining radiocarbon dating and sclerochronological techniques a floating chronology spanning over 200 years was constructed. Using the chronology as an age model, oxygen isotope measurements from 2 shells were combined into a 22-years long record. The results from this oxygen isotope record are compared with stable oxygen isotope profiles from modern shells to estimate changes in the mean state and seasonality between present and early Holocene. Shell-derived oxygen isotope values together with ice-volume corrected oxygen isotope values for the seawater were used to calculate bottom-water temperatures on a sub-annual time-scale. Preliminary results of the reconstructed early Holocene bottom water temperature indicate higher seasonality and lower minimum temperature compared to the present.

  10. Genome-wide identification and characterization of WRKY gene family in Salix suchowensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Changwei; Xu, Yiqing; Ye, Qiaolin; Yin, Tongming; Ye, Ning

    2016-01-01

    WRKY proteins are the zinc finger transcription factors that were first identified in plants. They can specifically interact with the W-box, which can be found in the promoter region of a large number of plant target genes, to regulate the expressions of downstream target genes. They also participate in diverse physiological and growing processes in plants. Prior to this study, a plenty of WRKY genes have been identified and characterized in herbaceous species, but there is no large-scale study of WRKY genes in willow. With the whole genome sequencing of Salix suchowensis, we have the opportunity to conduct the genome-wide research for willow WRKY gene family. In this study, we identified 85 WRKY genes in the willow genome and renamed them from SsWRKY1 to SsWRKY85 on the basis of their specific distributions on chromosomes. Due to their diverse structural features, the 85 willow WRKY genes could be further classified into three main groups (group I-III), with five subgroups (IIa-IIe) in group II. With the multiple sequence alignment and the manual search, we found three variations of the WRKYGQK heptapeptide: WRKYGRK, WKKYGQK and WRKYGKK, and four variations of the normal zinc finger motif, which might execute some new biological functions. In addition, the SsWRKY genes from the same subgroup share the similar exon-intron structures and conserved motif domains. Further studies of SsWRKY genes revealed that segmental duplication events (SDs) played a more prominent role in the expansion of SsWRKY genes. Distinct expression profiles of SsWRKY genes with RNA sequencing data revealed that diverse expression patterns among five tissues, including tender roots, young leaves, vegetative buds, non-lignified stems and barks. With the analyses of WRKY gene family in willow, it is not only beneficial to complete the functional and annotation information of WRKY genes family in woody plants, but also provide important references to investigate the expansion and evolution of

  11. Genome-wide identification and characterization of WRKY gene family in Salix suchowensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiaolin; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    WRKY proteins are the zinc finger transcription factors that were first identified in plants. They can specifically interact with the W-box, which can be found in the promoter region of a large number of plant target genes, to regulate the expressions of downstream target genes. They also participate in diverse physiological and growing processes in plants. Prior to this study, a plenty of WRKY genes have been identified and characterized in herbaceous species, but there is no large-scale study of WRKY genes in willow. With the whole genome sequencing of Salix suchowensis, we have the opportunity to conduct the genome-wide research for willow WRKY gene family. In this study, we identified 85 WRKY genes in the willow genome and renamed them from SsWRKY1 to SsWRKY85 on the basis of their specific distributions on chromosomes. Due to their diverse structural features, the 85 willow WRKY genes could be further classified into three main groups (group I–III), with five subgroups (IIa–IIe) in group II. With the multiple sequence alignment and the manual search, we found three variations of the WRKYGQK heptapeptide: WRKYGRK, WKKYGQK and WRKYGKK, and four variations of the normal zinc finger motif, which might execute some new biological functions. In addition, the SsWRKY genes from the same subgroup share the similar exon–intron structures and conserved motif domains. Further studies of SsWRKY genes revealed that segmental duplication events (SDs) played a more prominent role in the expansion of SsWRKY genes. Distinct expression profiles of SsWRKY genes with RNA sequencing data revealed that diverse expression patterns among five tissues, including tender roots, young leaves, vegetative buds, non-lignified stems and barks. With the analyses of WRKY gene family in willow, it is not only beneficial to complete the functional and annotation information of WRKY genes family in woody plants, but also provide important references to investigate the expansion and evolution

  12. Site-specific early performance and nutrition of two Salix species in SRIC in southern Quebec (Canada)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrecque, M.; Teodorescu, T.I.; Daigle, S. [Institut de Recherche en Biologie Vegetale, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Salix discolor WU and Salix viminalis L. were planted under short-rotation intensive culture (SRIC) in three unirrigated and unfertilized abandoned farmland sites (S1, S2, S3) showing different soil textures: sandy loam, clay silt and clay loam. The aims of the experiment were to: (i) investigate first year response to site nutrient condition and (ii) diagnose factors limiting performance. Over the first season, stem biomass productivity was superior on the sandy site (S1) for S. discolor and did not vary between species on clay sites (S2, S3). The inferior performance of plants on clay sites was related to difficulty implanting unrooted cuttings in compacted soil during an exceptionally dry period (May and June). The change in nutrient status was unapparent solely from comparison of critical levels or optimum ratios because leaf nutrient concentration was less affected by site. Diagnostic techniques based on vector analysis of leaf nutrient concentration, content, and dry mass allowed simultaneous comparison of the nutrient status of two species planted on three sites. The relative deficiency of all nutrients, based on vector magnitude and direction, on the two other clay sites (S2, S3) supports the hypothesis that specific edaphic conditions and dryness induced nutrient disorders in willows. Successful establishment of willows in SRIC depends strongly on the characteristics of the plantation site and on precipitation during the establishment phase in the first year of growth.

  13. Does warming affect growth rate and biomass production of shrubs in the High Arctic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campioli, Matteo; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Albert, Kristian Rost

    2013-01-01

    (for RGR and branching) and gas exchange and chemical analysis (for GEP and C concentration). Warming nearly doubled the apical RGR of Cassiope, whereas it did not affect the apical RGR of Salix. Similarly, secondary growth increased for Cassiope but not for Salix. In particular, warming enhanced......Few studies have assessed directly the impact of warming on plant growth and biomass production in the High Arctic. Here, we aimed to investigate the impact of 7 years of warming (open greenhouses) on the aboveground relative growth rate (RGR) of Cassiope tetragona and Salix arctica in North......-Eastern Greenland. RGR was assessed for apical (leaves, stem, reproductive organs) and lateral meristems (secondary growth of stem and branches) and accompanied by measures of gross ecosystem production (GEP), branching and tissue carbon (C) concentration. Measurements were based on harvest and biometric methods...

  14. The Effect of Clove Bud, Nigella, Salix Alba and Olive Oil on Wart Treatment in Comparison with Conventional Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    roghaye Jebraili

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Jebraili R1, Rezaei K2, Matourianpour H3, Moradi L4, Meshkaat MH5, Tarrahi MJ6 1. Assistant professor, Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Islamic Azad University of Tehran 2. Instructor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 3. Assistant Professor, Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 4. BSc. Nurse, Haaj Seddiq Health and Treatment Center, Khorramabad 5. Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Lorestan University 6. Instructor, Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Wart is a common and contagious viral disease of the skin caused by papilloma viruses which leads to aesthetic and psychological problems, and if occurred in touching and pressured parts of the body causes pain and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Clove bud, Nigella, Salix alba and Olive oil which have wound disinfectant, anesthetic, analgesic and wound healing properties on wart treatment in comparison with the conventional treatment. Materials and methods: This randomized double blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 291 female students selected form guidance and high schools in Khorramabad, Lorestan, Iran, during the year 2007. The diagnosis of wart was confirmed by a dermatologist according to the diagnosis criteria. The cases fulfilling the inclusion criteria were assigned in 3 study groups randomly. The first group was treated with the conventional treatment (Salicylic acid 16.7%, lactic acid 16.7% in Collodione body, the second group with herbal medicine without acid in olive oil, and the third group with herbal medicine alongside salicylic acid 1% and lactic acid 1% in olive oil. Each group was administered the drugs for 6 weeks. The effects of drugs on lesions were assessed after 4 and 6 weeks and compared among 3

  15. The effect of pH on the uptake and toxicity of the bivalent weak base chloroquine tested on Salix viminalis and Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendal, Cecilie; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    , and therefore a higher toxicity can be expected. The current study examines the pHdependent toxicity and bioaccumulation of the bivalent weak base chloroquine (pKa: 10.47 and 6.33, log KOW 4.67) tested on Salix viminalis (basket willow) and Daphnia magna (water flea). The transpiration rates of hydroponically...

  16. Mycorrhizal associations as Salix repens L. communities in succession of dune ecosystems II Mycorrhizal dynamics and interactions of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.; Vosatka, M.

    2000-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EcM) and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations of Salix repens were studied at 16 sites in different successional stages of dune ecosystems (calcareous-acidic, dry-wet) in the Netherlands. High EcM colonization, low AM colonization, and lack of differences between habitats

  17. Fungal community structure under goat willows (Salix caprea L.) growing at metal polluted site: the potential of screening in a model phytostabilisation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjana Regvar; Matevz Likar; Andrej Piltaver; Nives Kugonic; Jane E. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Goat willow (Salix caprea L.) was selected in a previous vegetation screening study as a potential candidate for the later-stage phytostabilisation efforts at a heavily metal polluted site in Slovenia. The aims of this study were to identify the fungi colonising roots of S. caprea along the gradient of vegetation succession and...

  18. Is pollen morphology of Salix polaris affected by enhanced UV-B irradiation? Results from a field experiment in high arctic tundra.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeloff, D.; Blokker, P.; Boelen, P.; Rozema, J.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the thickness of the pollen wall will increase in response to enhanced UV-B irradiation, by examining the effect of enhanced UV-B irradiance on the pollen morphology of Salix polaris Wahlem. grown in a field experiment on the Arctic tundra of Svalbard.

  19. Is pollen morphology of Salix polaris affected by enhanced UV-B irradiation? Results from a field experiment in High Arctic tundra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeloff, D.; Blokker, P.; Boelen, P.; Rozema, J.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the thickness of the pollen wall will increase in response to enhanced UV-B irradiation, by examining the effect of enhanced UV-B irradiance on the pollen morphology of Salix polaris Wahlem. grown in a field experiment on the Arctic tundra of Svalbard.

  20. Indução de calos friáveis em explantes foliares de Salix (Salyx humboldtiana Willd Induction of friable callus in leaf explants of Salix (Salyx humboldtiana Willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Régis Santos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O salix é uma árvore ornamental adaptada a terrenos úmidos, sendo considerada uma espécie importante para a recomposição de áreas ciliares degradadas. A madeira pode ser empregada na indústria em geral. Apesar de produzir grande quantidade de sementes, estas não possuem alta percentagem de germinação. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo realizar o estabelecimento in vitro de salix através da indução e formação de calos friáveis em explantes foliares, visando a uma posterior regeneração de plantas para a propagação massal desta espécie. Explantes foliares foram inoculados em meio de cultura MS (MURASHIGE & SKOOG, 1962, acrescido de diferentes concentrações de ácido 2,4-diclorofenoxiacético (0; 1,0; 2,0; 4,0; 6,0; 8,0; 10,0 e 12,0mg L-1 e combinações entre ácido naftalenoacético e benzilaminopurina, ambos em concentrações de 0,0; 1,0; 2,0; 4,0; 6,0 e 8,0mg L-1. Os resultados demonstram que explantes inoculados na ausência de reguladores de crescimento não apresentam a formação de calos friáveis. Significativa produção de calos friáveis (90% é obtida utilizando-se 6,0mg L-1 de ácido 2,4-diclorofenoxiacético. A utilização de concentração individual de ácido naftalenoacético ou benzilaminopurina, além de induzir a calogênese também foi capaz de promover rizogênese.Salix is an ornamental tree adapted to humid soils being considered an important species used in depleted areas. Its wood may be used in all kinds of industries. Although the production of seeds is large, the germination is reduced. The objective of this work was to establish salix in vitro through the induction and formation of friable callus of leaf explants to provide future regeneration of plants for mass propagation of the species. Leaf explants were inoculated in MS medium (MURASHIGE & SKOOG, 1962 supplemented with different concentrations of 2-4-diclorofenoxiacetic acid (0; 1.0; 2.0; 4.0; 6.0; 8.0 and 12.0mg L-1 and combinations

  1. High biomass yield achieved by Salix clones in SRIC following two 3-year coppice rotations on abandoned farmland in southern Quebec, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrecque, M.; Teodorescu, T.I. [Institut de recherche en biologie vegetale, Montreal Botanical Garden, Quebec (Canada)

    2003-08-01

    Two species of willow, Salix discolor and S. viminalis, were planted in 1995 under short-rotation intensive culture on two abandoned farmland sites: sandy site (S1) and clay site (S2). After three seasons of growth the two species were coppiced. In the spring of the first season following coppicing, one dose of composted sludge equivalent to 100 kg of 'available' Nha{sup -1} was applied to some plots (T1) while others were left unfertilized (T0). The aims of the experiment were to compare the growth performance and nutrients exported by willow species planted on marginal sites with different soil characteristics and to assess the impact of fertilization with wastewater sludge on yields during a second rotation cycle. Over three seasons, willow height, diameter and aboveground biomass were greater for S. viminalis than for S. discolor on all fertilized plots. The best growth performance of two willows were obtained on the clay site. S. viminalis, planted on the fertilized plots of the clay site, had the highest biomass yield (70.36 tDMha{sup -1}). The application of a dose of wastewater sludge (100 kg of 'available' Nha{sup -1}) was not enough to satisfy all nutritional requirements of willows for the period of growth. Over the second rotation the nutrients removed from the soil by willows (in kg per ton of dry mass harvested) were: from 5.3 to 7.5 for N; from 0.6 to 0.9 for P; from 1.8 to 3 for K; from 4.2 to 7.2 for Ca and from 0.4 to 0.7 for Mg. (author)

  2. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of complete mitochondrial DNA genomes of two grasshopper species Gomphocerus rufus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Primnoa arctica (Zhang and Jin, 1985) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huimin; Zheng, Zhemin; Huang, Yuan

    2010-06-01

    In Xia's taxonomic revision, Gomphocerus rufus (Linnaeus, 1758), Chorthippus chinensis and Phlaeoba albonema belong to the families Gomphoceridae, Arcypteridae and Acrididae, respectively; whereas in Otte's taxonomic analysis of Orthoptera, all three species belong to the subfamily Gomphocerinae, family Acrididae. We determined the mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of G. rufus, compared these with 10 other caeliferan mitogenomes, and performed phylogenetic analyses in order to clarify the relationships of the three families in Xia's taxonomic revision and which study is more accurate in defining the relationships of the three families. Furthermore, the mitogenome of Primnoa arctica (Zhang and Jin, 1985) was determined. This is the first mitogenome of the subfamily Catantopinae, superfamily Acridoidea. Through the comparison of mitogenomes from six subfamilies of the superfamily Acridoidea and one species of Pyrgomorphoidea, we hope to summarize a general law on the composition of the caeliferan mitogenome. The two molecules contain the same set of mitochondrial genes for 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, 13 proteins, and a non-coding, AT-rich region. The base composition, gene order, and codon usage of the two genomes conform to those reported for other caeliferan species. Both genomes possess the rearrangement of tRNA(Lys) and tRNA(Asp). Compared with their ancestral mitogenome, this is a significant difference between the mitogenome of the suborders Caelifera and Ensifera or other Metazoa. A stem-loop structure that is similar to a previously presumed one (that probably involved in replication initiation) was found at the A+T-rich region of each mitogenome. In the phylogenetic analyses, the species from suborders Caelifera and Ensifera cluster, respectively, as monophyletic groups, and the two suborders cluster as sister groups. Within Caelifera, the subfamily Gomphocerinae appears to be a paraphyletic group in the analyses of the protein-coding gene (PCG) dataset and a

  3. Copper and cadmium tolerance, uptake and effect on chloroplast ultrastructure. Studies on Salix purpurea and Phragmites australis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakmaoui, A.; Ater, A. [Abdelmalek Essaadi Univ., Tetouan (Morocco). Dept. of Biology; Boka, K. [Eoetvoes Lorand Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Plant Anatomy; Baron, M. [Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Biochemistry and Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants

    2007-05-15

    We have compared the effect of toxic Cu and Cd concentrations on growth, metal accumulation, and chloroplast ultrastructure of willow (Salix purpurea L.) and reed [Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud.]. After a 10-day treatment, both species have tolerated to some extent the lowest concentration of both metals; however, plant growth was strongly reduced at the highest Cu and Cd concentrations. These plants could be described as Cu-tolerant at the lowest concentration tested, showing a higher tolerance index in reed than in willow; in contrast, willow exhibited higher tolerance against Cd. Both plants appeared to be moderate root accumulators of Cu and Cd. Ultrastructural studies revealed special features that can provide some protection against heavy metals stress, such as ferritin aggregates in the stroma. In addition, Cu and Cd induced distortion of thylakoids, reduction of grana stacks, as well as an increased number and size of plastoglobuli and peripheral vesicles. (orig.)

  4. Building energetic material from novel salix leaf-like CuO and nano-Al through electrophoretic deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yan Jun; Li, Xueming [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-11-15

    In this study, an energetic material was prepared by depositing nano-Al on CuO arrays via electrophoretic deposition (EPD), which offers a feasible route for nano-Al integration. The morphology and structure of the CuO arrays and Al/CuO composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The CuO arrays were homogenously salix leaf-like structure with a width of ⁓150 to 200 nm. The energy density of Al/CuO composites was approximate to 1454.5 J/g by integrating the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) plot and the combustion performance was recorded by a high-speed camera. Moreover, the combustion flames were violent and the whole reaction process only lasted 72.2 ms, indicating that the energy of the Al/CuO nanothermite can be released effectively.

  5. First Record Of Clytra Laeviuscula Ratzeburg As Potential Insect Pest Of Energy Willow (Salix Viminalis L. In Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanovska Tatyana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of short rotation coppice energy willow (SRC EW, Salix viminalis L., has a great potential in Ukraine as a source of biomass for biofuel production. Commercial production of this species was recently initiated in the country. The growing of SRC EW in Western and Northern Europe for a long time showed that leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae are key pests causing significant biomass reduction. However, data about the pest complex for energy willow growing in Ukraine is not available. Our three-year experiment in Poltava region, Ukraine showed that foliar damage caused by Clytra laeviuscula Ratzeburg (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae occurred at energy willow plantations in the second year of production, which could have an effect on commercial production. Accordingly, information about seasonal activity, population dynamics, host range and the role of natural enemies in pest regulation are requested for developing pest control program.

  6. Growth patterns and biomass productivity of two Salix species grown under short-rotation intensive culture in southern Quebec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrecque, M.; Teodorescu, T.I.; Cogliastro, A.; Daigle, S. (Institut de Recherche en Biologie Vegetale, Montreal, PQ (Canada))

    1993-01-01

    Samples of two species of Salix, Salix discolor and S. viminalis were studied to compare their productivity and their growth patterns under the short-rotation, intensive-culture system (SRIC). Growth parameters were measured at regular intervals during summer of the two first years following planting. At the end of each growing season, after leaf drop, a part of each plot was cut down and the stems and branches were harvested and weighed to evaluate their annual growth rates and their biomass yields. For the first growing season, height growth in both species was greater than 2 m. Although S. viminalis grew more rapidly early in summer, S. discolor grew about three weeks longer and its total height at the end of the growing season was greater than the former. Meanwhile the stem-branch dry weight of S. discolor was similar to the one produced by S. viminalis. Two growing seasons after establishment, the total tree height was about 3.5 m for both species, while the biomass of stems and branches of S. viminalis was weakly superior in comparison to S. discolor and reached very high values - about 27 Mg ha[sup -1] for S. viminalis. The growth patterns and yields of the one-year-old coppice were similar to those recorded at the end of the first year for trees developed directly from cuttings. Both species produced a comparable quantity of sprout biomass. The yield of the trees harvested two years after planting was about twice the total biomass harvested two times, at the end of each growing season, that a two-year cycle is more productive than a one-year cycle. (author)

  7. Wood characterization of Salix. 1. Influence of the site, clone, age and sampling height; Caracterizacion de la madera de Salix. 1: Influencia del sitio, clon, edad y altura de muestreo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, M. S.; Area, M. C.; Marlats, R. M.

    2009-07-01

    The wood of two Salix clones cultivated in the Delta of Parana River in Argentina was characterized according to their optical properties, chemical composition, basic density, tylose content and health condition, analysing variations in terms of site, clone, age and sampling height. American willow showed more cellulose content, higher density and less lignin, extractives and tylose than the 131/27 hybrid. The wood of the last one had the smallest damaged area in the disks and the highest brightness values. The most appropriate site for both clones was the one less affected by flood. Brightness, L* and basic density increased, whereas deteriorated area decreased from bottom to tip within each tree. The tally's percentage also decreased, both in vertical and horizontal directions. Six different types of wood were defined. Between them, grey-coloured rings, result of flood, and dark zone, may be considered similar to healthy wood. Three types of stains were responsible for the main changes in the wood analysed. The brown stains showed low brightness and high tylose, but the darkest one showed high lignin and low cellulose contents. The light-brown stain had the highest alkali-soluble substances content. The blue stain showed low brightness and high extractives content. (Author) 32 refs.

  8. Melampsora rust on Salix in short rotation cultivation. Plant protection against fungi and bacteria in deciduous plantations. Final report for the period 1997-1999; Melampsora-rost paa Salix i energiskogsodling. Vaextskydd i intensivodlad loevskog mot svampar och bakterier. Slutrapport foer perioden 1997-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramstedt, Mauritz [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Plant Pathology and Biological Control Unit

    2000-04-01

    The project has focussed on the diseases of Salix in short rotation forestry, with emphasis on the rust fungus, Melampsora ssp., which could be responsible for significant loss in production and dieback of plants. We have studied the virulence patterns of the rust population (rust pathotypes) to be able to give qualified support for analysis of field trials for resistance and advice for choice of breeding strategies. The rust population includes a large number of pathotypes and the variousness indicate a high capacity to adapt to new clones or plantation strategies. The sexual cycle is of crucial importance and gives the rust the property of recombination and exchange of virulence factors every season. The idea with clonal mixtures instead of monoclonal plantations is evaluated on Northern Ireland. The records of pathotypes and genotypes in the rust population in these trials, would after a repeated assessment and analysis give valuable indications concerning the development and selection of rust in relation to plantation design. The question is if a clonal mixture affects the infection pressure or if surrounding plantations and long distance spore migration will eliminate this effect. An analysis of the rust population on european willows in Chile is also performed to study the role of local adaptation and selection as compared to long distance migration of spores. The rust is pathotyped and analysed by AFLP to reveal the relatedness with european rust and analyze the level of long distance exchange. Possible exchange of virulence factors between the continents is of utmost importance for the outcome of the resistance breeding and longevity of the new more resistant clones.

  9. Response of leaf and fine roots proteomes of Salix viminalis L. to growth on Cr-rich tannery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemleduch-Barylska, Agata; Lorenc-Plucińska, Gabriela

    2016-09-01

    The tannery industry is a major source of anthropogenic chromium (Cr) contamination due to the large amounts of solid waste produced and its problematic management. The unique composition of tannery waste, usually high concentrations of Cr and other metals as well as organic matter and nutrients, makes it a great risk for soil and water environment but also a possible effective fertilizer for non-food plants that can tolerate metals. The goal of this study was to understand the adaptation mechanism of Salix viminalis to growth on Cr-rich tannery waste from an active landfill. We used a proteomic approach to identify leaf and fine roots proteins altered by tannery waste as compared to control soil conditions. We found no obvious symptoms of oxidative stress in leaves or fine roots. Proteomic results indicated some changes in metabolism, with increases in energy production processes and their greater efficiency for leaves rather than root development. Comparison between S. viminalis and P. × canescens response to tannery waste suggested that S. viminalis is not suitable for remediation of Cr-contaminated areas of a tannery waste landfill site.

  10. Calculated characters of leaves are independent on environmental conditions in Salix herbacea (Salicaceae and Betula nana (Betulaceae

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    Katarzyna Marcysiak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to check if the shape-describing characters, calculated as ratios of the morphological measured traits are more stable, compared to the latter, and can be treated as independent on environmental conditions. The test was based on the example of leaves of Salix herbacea and Betula nana. The individuals of the two populations of S. herbacea from Tatra Mts. were divided into two groups: with bigger and smaller leaves. The two populations of B. nana came from different substrata: the first one, collected from the mire on the lower altitude, had bigger leaves, and the second, collected from the granite plateau and higher altitude, had smaller leaves. For both species, the measured traits were generally more variable than the ratios calculated on their basis, as expressed by the variation coefficients. The results of Students' t-test analyses showed statistically significant differences between the two groups of S. herbacea and the two populations of B. nana with respect to almost all the measured characters, and no such differences for the calculated traits, reflecting the leaf shape. As the differentiation of the leaf size was probably bound to the environmental factors, the lack of the dependence of the leaf shape on the leaf size could lead to a conclusion of independence of the leaf shape on the environment conditions.

  11. Early Effects of Afforestation with Willow (Salix purpurea, “Hotel” on Soil Carbon and Nutrient Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Farrell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Willow (Salix spp. is currently being researched as a source of biomass energy in Canada. However, it is not certain whether afforestation with willow plantations will enhance or diminish soil C storage and nutrient availability. Trees are known to have pronounced effects on biologically mediated nutrient cycling processes which can increase nutrient availability, but willows are known to be nutrient demanding. In this paper, the net effect of plantation establishment is examined at nine sites across the prairie and southern Ontario regions of Canada. Carbon, N, P, K, Ca and Mg levels in soils and harvestable biomass were compared between willow plantations and paired reference sites at the end of the first three-year rotation. Soils were depleted in total C (−2.22 mg·g−1, p < 0.05, inorganic N (−3.12 μg·N·g−1, p < 0.10, exchangeable K (−0.11 cmolc·kg−1, p < 0.10 and leachable P (−0.03 mg·g−1, p < 0.10. Exchangeable Ca was found to be consistently depleted only at the 20–40 depth. Depletion of soil K was more heavily influenced by disturbance, whereas soil N was directly affected by willow N uptake. Sites with greater growth and biocycling stabilized soil P concentrations.

  12. Performance of Salix viminalis and Populus nigra x Populus maximowiczii in short rotation intensive culture under high irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillion, Maud; Brisson, Jacques [Departement de Sciences biologiques, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Institut de recherche en biologie vegetale, 4101 Sherbrooke East, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Teodorescu, Traian I.; Labrecque, Michel [Institut de recherche en biologie vegetale, 4101 Sherbrooke East, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sauve, Sebastien [Departement de chimie, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2009-09-15

    On a plantation established in 2004 from stem cuttings at a density of 20,000 trees per hectare, we investigated growth and nutritional plant response to a high hydraulic regime for two species (Salix viminalis and Populus nigra x Populus maximowiczii), using a comparative approach with measurements from irrigated and control plots. The plantation was irrigated from June to September 2005 with about 140 mm per day. The equivalent of 120 Kg NO{sub 3}-N, 40 Kg P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-P and 85 Kg K{sub 2}O-K per hectare per year was applied by means of irrigation with wastewater. No mortality occurred and stem biomass production of both poplar and willow species were not statistically different on irrigated and control areas. However, S. viminalis revealed to be more tolerant to flooded conditions since these corresponded more closely to its nutritional requirements (foliar concentration of 20 mgN g{sup -1}). The capacity of S. viminalis to withstand waterlogged conditions could play an important role in the sustainability of a plantation for the filtration of effluent at low pollutant concentration. (author)

  13. Replacement of berseem hay by Salix tetrasperma on physiological performance of New Zealand White rabbits under subtropical conditions of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuHafsa, Salma H; Hassan, Ayman A; Camacho, Luis M; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M

    2014-10-01

    Forty-eight growing New Zealand White male rabbits aged 6 weeks (874 ± 1.3 g initial body weight (BW)) were used to study effects of partial replacement of berseem hay (BH) with Salix tetrasperma hay (ST) on growth and physiological responses. Rabbits were allotted to one of four diets of 12 rabbits each for 75 days in a completely randomized design. The treatments were as follows: control (30 % BH), ST25 (7.5 % ST + 22.5 % BH), ST50 (15 % ST + 15 % BH), ST75 (22.5 % ST + 7.5 % BH). Nutrient digestibility coefficients, nutritive value and N utilization of rabbits fed with the ST50 rations were higher (P rabbits fed ST25 and ST50 were higher (P  ST25 and ST50 > control. Glucose level was higher (P Rabbits fed with the mixed diets of ST had lower (P rabbits fed with the ST75 than the other groups. However, other haematological parameters were similar among diets. Since all the performance and blood parameters were within normal ranges for healthy rabbits, and there were no signs of toxicity, we conclude that partial replacement of BH by ST improves rabbit growth performance, and did not impact rabbit health.

  14. Gender differences in Salix myrsinifolia at the pre-reproductive stage are little affected by simulated climatic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nybakken, Line; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2013-04-01

    Females of dioecious species are known often to prioritize defense, while males grow faster. As climatic change is known to influence both growth and defense in plants, it would be important to know whether it affects the sexes of dioecious species differently. This could have impacts on future sex ratios in nature. We grew four clones of each sex of Salix myrsinifolia in greenhouse chambers under ambient conditions, enhanced temperature, enhanced CO2 or enhanced temperature  +  enhanced CO2 . The females had the greatest growth and also the highest levels of phenolic compounds in twigs, while in leaves some compounds were higher in males, some in females. Enhanced CO2 increased growth equally in both sexes, while growth was not affected by elevated temperature. Phenolic compounds in twigs were, however, lowered under elevated temperature. The gender differences were not strongly affected by the simulated climatic changes, but the effects seen on some highly concentrated compounds may be important. We interpret the intensive growth at pre-reproductive phase as a strategy in females to get an initial advantage before later periods with fewer resources available for growth. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  15. Minimum Irrigation Requirements for Cottonwood (Populus fremontii and P. deltoides) and Willow (Salix gooddingii) Grown in a Desert Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, E. P.; Hartwell, S.; Morino, K.; Nagler, P. L.

    2009-12-01

    Native tree plots have been established in riverine irrigation districts in the western U.S. to provide habitat for threatened and endangered birds. Information is needed on the minimum effective irrigation requirements of the target species. We summarize preliminary (or unpublished) findings of a study or cottonwood (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix gooddingii) trees that were grown for seven years in an outdoor plot in a desert environment in Tucson, Arizona to determine plant water use. Plants were allowed to achieve a nearly complete canopy cover over the first four years, then were subjected to three summer irrigation schedules: 6.2 mm d-1; 8.26 mm d-1 and 15.7 mm d-1. The lowest irrigation rate was sufficient to maintain growth and high leaf area index for cottonwoods over three years, but willows suffered partial die-back on this rate, and required 8.26 mm d-1 to maintain growth. These irrigation rates were required April 15 - September 15, but only 0.88 mm d-1 was required during the dormant periods of the year. Expressed as a fraction of reference crop evapotranspiration (ET/ETo), annual water requirements were 0.83 ETo for cottonwood and 1.01 ETo for willow, which includes irrigation plus precipitation. Current practices tend to over-irrigate restoration plots, and this study can provide guidelines for more efficient water use.

  16. Effect of Rock Phosphate on Zn and Fe Bioavailability and Accumulation by Salix smithiana in Heavily Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vondrackova S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available High biomass production Salix smithiana was proved as the plant able to accumulate substantial amount of Cd and Zn in aboveground biomass. Nevertheless, in heavily contaminated soils (mainly by Zn willows can suffer from chlorosis because of Fe deficiency induced by excess of Zn amount. Method such as chemophytostabilization seems like very good measure for planting willows in such heavily contaminated soil. In our experiments we evaluated effect of rock phosphate on changes in Zn and Fe bioavailability and accumulation of these elements by willows together with the willows growth on heavily contaminated soil. Addition of rock phosphate reduced plant-available Zn concentrations in soils resulting in significant decrease of Zn content in leaves. In the case of Fe, however, its contents in the leaves significantly decreased as well, although the mobile portion of Fe in soil remained unchanged. Yield of aboveground biomass in rock phosphate treatment was not significantly different in comparison to the control. After the first vegetation period, we can conclude that reduction of Zn contents in willows after rock phosphate application did not lead to suppress of Fe deficiency and improvement of willow growth in heavily contaminated soil.

  17. Effects of reindeer on the re-establishment of Betula pubescens subsp. czerepanovii and Salix phylicifolia in a subarctic meadow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael den Herder

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of reindeer browsing on the regeneration of Betula pubescens subsp. czerepanovii and Salix phylicifolia was studied in a subarctic meadow in Finnish Lapland. The aim of the study was to see whether tree recovery from seeds is possible under heavy reindeer-browsing pressure. After removal of the ground and field layer vegetation in 1986, two exclosures were established so that the effect of reindeer on the secondary succession, starting from seeds, could be studied. The size and the number of B. pubescens and S. phylicifolia were recorded in 1994, 1996, 1997 and 1999. Reindeer significantly reduced the height and the number of saplings (plants > 10 cm high of B. pubescens and S. phylicifolia but the number of seedlings (plants < 10 cm high did not differ between browsed and unbrowsed plots. Furthermore the heightclass distribution of saplings was different inside the exlosures compared to control areas. Over time browsed plots continued to have high densities of small saplings while in protected plots an increasing number of larger saplings appeared. In our study site, regeneration from seeds seemed possible although the height of B. pubescens and S. phylicifolia was limited by reindeer. 

  18. Gender differences in Salix myrsinifolia at the pre-reproductive stage are little affected by simulated climatic change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nybakken, L.; Julkunen-Tiitto, R. [Univ. of Eastern Finland. Dept. of Biology, Joensuu (Finland)

    2013-04-15

    Females of dioecious species are known often to prioritize defense, while males grow faster. As climatic change is known to influence both growth and defense in plants, it would be important to know whether it affects the sexes of dioecious species differently. This could have impacts on future sex ratios in nature. We grew four clones of each sex of Salix myrsinifolia in greenhouse chambers under ambient conditions, enhanced temperature, enhanced CO{sub 2} or enhanced temperature? + enhanced CO{sub 2}. The females had the greatest growth and also the highest levels of phenolic compounds in twigs, while in leaves some compounds were higher in males, some in females. Enhanced CO{sub 2} increased growth equally in both sexes, while growth was not affected by elevated temperature. Phenolic compounds in twigs were, however, lowered under elevated temperature. The gender differences were not strongly affected by the simulated climatic changes, but the effects seen on some highly concentrated compounds may be important. We interpret the intensive growth at pre-reproductive phase as a strategy in females to get an initial advantage before later periods with fewer resources available for growth. (Author)

  19. Pertumbuhan dan kelangsungan hidup benih ikan nila (Oreochromis niloticus pada beberapa konsentrasi tepung daun jaloh (Salix tetrasperma dalam pakan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraidha Yanti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of jaloh (Salix tetrasperma leaf powders as alternative raw material for tilapia fish feed. Four concentrations of jaloh leafe powders (0%, 5%, 10% and 15% were examined in this study. The experimental fish were fed three times a day on 08.00 AM, 12.00 AM and 17.00 PM. with feeding ration of 5% of body weight for 42 days. The one-way Anova test showed that the different concentrations of jaloh leaf powders gave a significantly effect on growth performance of tilapia larvae (p0.05. The Duncans test showed that the higher growth performace and survival rate were found at 5-10% of jaloh leaf powders, it was indicated that diet with 5-10% jaloh leaf powders were better than control (without jaloh leaf powders. Therefore, it is concluded that the jaloh leaf powders is suitable as alternative raws material for tilapia formulated diet at concentration of 5-10%.

  20. Yield Mapping in Salix; Skoerdekartering av salix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christoffer; Gilbertsson, Mikael; Rogstrand, Gustav; Thylen, Lars

    2004-09-01

    The most common species for energy forest production is willow. Willow is able to produce a large amount of biomass in a short period of time. Growing willow has a potential to render a good financial result for the farmer if cultivated on fields with the right conditions and plenty of water. Under the right conditions growing willow can give the farmer a net income of 3,000 SEK (about 430 USD) per hectare and year, which is something that common cereal crops cannot compete with. However, this is not the common case since willow is often grown as a substitute crop on fields where cereal crop yield is low. The aim of this study was to reveal if it is possible to measure yield variability in willow, and if it is possible to describe the reasons for yield variation both within the field but also between different fields. Yield mapping has been used in conventional farming for about a decade. The principles for yield mapping are to continuously measure the yield while registering location by the use of GPS when harvesting the field. The collected data is then used to search for spatial variations within the field, and to try to understand the reasons for this variation. Since there is currently no commercial equipment for yield mapping in willow, a yield mapping system had to be developed within this project. The new system was installed on a Claas Jaguar harvester. The principle for yield mapping on the Claas Jaguar harvester is to measure the distance between the feeding rollers. This distance is correlated to the flow through the harvester. The speed and position of the machine was registered using GPS. Knowing the working width of the harvester this information was used to calculate the yield. All collected data was stored on a PDA computer. Soil samples were also collected from the yield mapped fields. This was to be able to test yield against both physical and chemical soil parameters. The result shows that it is possible to measure spatial variations of yield in willow. It is also possible to measure variations between fields. From the physical and chemical parameters in the soil it is difficult to get a decisive picture of which parameters actually have an effect on the yield, especially if you look at one parameter at time. It is often the interplay between many parameters that results in yield variability. One thing that is evident is that if one parameter is critically low or high, for example extremely dry soil, it effects the yield negatively. Because of problems with the equipment, data could only be collected from five fields in order to make this analysis.

  1. Leaf degradation of Salix humboldtiana Willd: (Salicaceae and invertebrate colonization in a subtropical lake (Brazil Degradação foliar de Salix humboldtiana Willd: (Salicaceae e colonização por invertebrados em um lago subtropical (Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franko Telöken

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate leaf degradation and invertebrate colonization of Salix humboldtiana Willd. in a subtropical shallow lake on the coastal plain of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; METHODS: Litter bags containing 6.85 g of leaves were incubated in the superficial layer of sediment in the littoral region for 1, 4, 7, 14, 32, 47 and 71 days; RESULTS: After 71 days, a loss of 51% of the initial leaf weight was observed (k = 0.0100 d-1. We estimated that it would take 300 days to lose 95% of the initial weight. A total of 16040 organisms and 35 taxa were identified. Caenidae (25.9%, Oligochaeta (19%, Ostracoda (13.8%, Hydracarina (9.8%, Tanypodinae (9.7% and Coenagrionidae (7.7% were the most highly represented taxa. We observed increases in density, richness and diversity of taxa over time, with a stabilizing trend noted in the taxa diversity. Regarding the functional trophic groups (FTGs, gathering-collectors accounted for 57.6% of the community, while predators (25%, scrapers (15.8%, filtering-collectors (0.88% and shredders (0.73% were also represented. The diversity and evenness of the FTGs had stabilized by day 14; CONCLUSIONS: S. humboldtiana detritus provides a favorable habitat for a sufficient duration to support a high density and diversity of aquatic invertebrates. The small percentage of shredders indicates the minor influence of the invertebrate community on the rate of detrital degradation. The main contribution of invertebrates to detrital processing comes from the consumption of fine particulate organic matter by gathering-collectors.OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a degradação foliar de Salix humboldtiana Willd. e a colonização pela comunidade de invertebrados aquáticos em um lago raso subtropical, planície costeira do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil; MÉTODOS: Bolsas de decomposição contendo 6,85 g de folhas foram incubadas na região litorânea, na superfície do sedimento, e retiradas após 1, 4, 7, 14, 32, 47 e 71 dias de decomposi

  2. Particle size distribution of ashes and the behaviour of metals when firing Salix in a circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB); Askans partikelfraktionsfoerdelning och metallernas beteende vid eldning av Salix i en CFB-panna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfiris, G.; Johansson, A. [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Valmari, T.; Kauppinen, E.; Pyykoenen, J.; Lyyraenen, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    This project is part of the Ash Recovery Programme aimed at establishing the environmental, technical and financial preconditions for returning wood ash to the forest. The programme is funded jointly by NUTEK, Sydkraft and Vattenfall. This report summarises the results of the experimental and modelling work to study the behaviour of the metals (especially Cd and K), after burning Salix in a 3-12 MW Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler. The purpose of the study was to determine, using the experimental data, where cadmium and potassium condense, on what size particles they condense, and the decisive parameters governing these processes. Measurements of the fly ash particle size distribution carried out with a Berner Low Pressure Impactor (BLPI), coupled to a pre-cyclone. Samples were collected from three points: in the convection path at 650 deg C, after the convection path but before the secondary cyclone (160 deg C), and after the bag house (150 deg C). Wet chemical sampling was made for Cd, K, Zn and Pb, with three types of sampling equipment: collection of both particles and gas, collection of particles only, and analysis of the gas phase only. Analysis was made of samples from two places in the convection path (650 deg C and 250 deg C). Samples of bed material, bottom ash and fly ash have been subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and in addition a few fly ash particles, sampled after the convection path, were subjected to energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Based on experimental results, modelling work was carried out with an equilibrium model and with a general aerosol computer model ABC (Aerosol Behaviour in Combustion)

  3. Salix purpurea Stimulates the Expression of Specific Bacterial Xenobiotic Degradation Genes in a Soil Contaminated with Hydrocarbons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine P Pagé

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to uncover Salix purpurea-microbe xenobiotic degradation systems that could be harnessed in rhizoremediation, and to identify microorganisms that are likely involved in these partnerships. To do so, we tested S. purpurea's ability to stimulate the expression of 10 marker microbial oxygenase genes in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. In what appeared to be a detoxification rhizosphere effect, transcripts encoding for alkane 1-monooxygenases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, laccase/polyphenol oxidases, and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase small subunits were significantly more abundant in the vicinity of the plant's roots than in bulk soil. This gene expression induction is consistent with willows' known rhizoremediation capabilities, and suggests the existence of S. purpurea-microbe systems that target many organic contaminants of interest (i.e. C4-C16 alkanes, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo(apyrene, biphenyl, polychlorinated biphenyls. An enhanced expression of the 4 genes was also observed within the bacterial orders Actinomycetales, Rhodospirillales, Burkholderiales, Alteromonadales, Solirubrobacterales, Caulobacterales, and Rhizobiales, which suggest that members of these taxa are active participants in the exposed partnerships. Although the expression of the other 6 marker genes did not appear to be stimulated by the plant at the community level, signs of additional systems that rest on their expression by members of the orders Solirubrobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Actinomycetales, and Sphingobacteriales were observed. Our study presents the first transcriptomics-based identification of microbes whose xenobiotic degradation activity in soil appears stimulated by a plant. It paints a portrait that contrasts with the current views on these consortia's composition, and opens the door for the development of laboratory test models geared towards the identification of root exudate characteristics that limit the

  4. Combined enhancements of temperature and UVB influence growth and phenolics in clones of the sexually dimorphic Salix myrsinifolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nybakken, L.; Hoerkkae, R.; Julkunen-Tiitto, R. (Univ. of Eastern Finland. Dept. of Biology, Joensuu (Finland))

    2012-08-15

    Although several climatic factors are expected to change simultaneously in the future, the effect of such combined changes on plants have seldom been tested under field conditions. We report on a field experiment with dark-leaved willow, Salix myrsinifolia, subjected to enhancements in ultraviolet-A (UVA), UVB radiation and temperature, setup in Joensuu, Eastern Finland. S. myrsinifolia is a dioecious species, known as an important food plant for many herbivores. Cuttings of eight clones, four of each sex, of dark-leaved willow were planted in the field in spring 2009. In both 2009 and 2010, the total biomass increased significantly with temperature, and in 2010 there was an additive effect of UVB radiation. Both height and diameter increased with temperature in 2009, while the effect on height growth ceased in 2010. Males had greater diameter growth than females in 2010. Most phenolic compounds in the leaves decreased under enhanced temperature in both growing seasons. In 2010, four of six salicylates increased in response to enhanced temperature. Some quercetin derivatives increased under enhanced UVB radiation. Females had higher concentrations of chlorogenic acids than males, and while enhanced temperature reduced chlorogenic acid in females only, luteolins were reduced only in males. In summary, the combined enhancements gave no effects in addition to those that appeared under the single-factor treatments, except for the additive effect of UVB on temperature-increased biomass. The few gender-related differences found in response to climate change do not allow any marked expectations of future climate-induced changes in sex ratios. (Author)

  5. Effect of available nitrogen on phytoavailability and bioaccumulation of hexavalent and trivalent chromium in hankow willows (Salix matsudana Koidz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2008-06-01

    The effect of available nitrogen in nutrient solution on removal of two chemical forms of chromium (Cr) by plants was investigated. Pre-rooted hankow willows (Salix matsudana Koidz) were grown in a hydroponic solution system with or without nitrogen, and amended with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] or trivalent chromium [Cr (III)] at 25.0+/-0.5 degrees C for 192 h. The results revealed that higher removal of Cr by plants was achieved from the hydroponic solutions without any nitrogen than those containing nitrogen. Although faster removal of Cr (VI) than Cr (III) was observed, translocation of Cr (III) within plant materials was more efficient than Cr (VI). Substantial difference existed in the distribution of Cr in different parts of plant tissues due to the nitrogen in nutrient solutions (pnutrient solutions and more Cr was accumulated in the roots of plants in N-containing ones. No significant difference was found in the removal rate of Cr (VI) between willows grown in the N-free and N-containing solutions (p>0.05). Removal rates of Cr (III) decreased linearly with the strength of nutrient solutions with or without N addition (pnutrient solutions and decreased with the strength of N-free nutrient solutions. Results suggest that uptake and translocation mechanisms of Cr (VI) and Cr (III) are apparently different in hankow willows. The presence of easily available nitrogen and other nutrient elements in the nutrient solutions had a more pronounced influence on the uptake of Cr (III) than Cr (VI). Nitrogen availability and quantities in the ambient environment will affect the translocation of both Cr species and their distribution in willows in phytoremediation.

  6. Selection of Reliable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Analysis under Abiotic Stresses in the Desert Biomass Willow, Salix psammophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianbo; Jia, Huixia; Han, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Jin; Sun, Pei; Lu, Mengzhu; Hu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Salix psammophila is a desert shrub willow that has extraordinary adaptation to abiotic stresses and plays an important role in maintaining local ecosystems. Moreover, S. psammophila is regarded as a promising biomass feedstock because of its high biomass yields and short rotation coppice cycle. However, few suitable reference genes (RGs) for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) constrain the study on normalization of gene expression in S. psammophila until now. Here, we investigated the expression stabilities of 14 candidate RGs across tissue types and under four abiotic stress treatments, including heat, cold, salt, and drought treatments. After calculation of PCR efficiencies, three different software, NormFinder, geNorm, and BestKeeper were employed to analyze systematically the qRT-PCR data, and the outputs were merged by RankAggreg software. The optimal RGs selected for gene expression analysis were EF1α (Elongation factor-1 alpha) and OTU (OTU-like cysteine protease family protein) for different tissue types, UBC (Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2) and LTA4H (Leukotriene A-4 hydrolase homolog) for heat treatment, HIS (Histone superfamily protein H3) and ARF2 (ADP-ribosylation factor 2) for cold treatment, OTU and ACT7 (Actin 7) for salt treatment, UBC and LTA4H for drought treatment. The expression of UBC, ARF2, and VHAC (V-type proton ATPase subunit C) varied the least across tissue types and under abiotic stresses. Furthermore, the relative genes expression profiles of one tissue-specific gene WOX1a (WUSCHEL-related homeobox 1a), and four stress-inducible genes, including Hsf-A2 (Heat shock transcription factors A2), CBF3 (C-repeat binding factor 3), HKT1 (High-Affinity K+ Transporter 1), and GST (Glutathione S-transferase), were conducted to confirm the validity of the RGs in this study. These results provided an important RGs application guideline for gene expression characterization in S. psammophila.

  7. Growth and photosynthesis of plants in response to environmental stress. [Raphanus sativus; Glycine max; Salix nigra; Alnus serrulata; Populus tremuloides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitner, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental stresses generally decrease photosynthetic rates and growth of plants, and alter biomass partitioning. Nutrient deficiency and drought cause root:shoot ratios to increase, whereas the air pollutant ozone (O[sub 3]) causes an opposite shift in carbon allocation. Plants in nature usually grow under suboptimal conditions; therefore plants were raised with O[sub 3] combined with other stresses to analyze the mechanisms whereby multiple stresses influence gas exchange and growth. Physiological and growth responses to stress were determined for radish (raphanus sativus), soybean (Glycine max) willow (Salix nigra), alder (Alnus serrulata) and aspen (Populus tremuloides) in laboratory and field trials. In willow, high-nutrient status plants had more visible injury, but a smaller decline in leaf area with O[sub 3] than did low-nutrient plants. Ultrastructure of host plant cells in alder root nodules was disrupted by O[sub 3], suggesting that this air pollutant can affect the ability of plants to acquire nutrients via symbiosis. Biomass and root:shoot ratios decreased with O[sub 3] in radish and soy-bean. Shifts in stable carbon isotope ratios were caused by O[sub 3], and this technique was used to integrate the effects of O[sub 3] on gas exchange over time. In aspen, O[sub 3] enhanced photosynthesis and foliar areas in young leaves of well-watered aspen, partially compensating for declines in older leaves. This effect was more pronounced in plants raised at a high nitrogen level than in N-deficient plants. Carboxylation efficiency decreased in older, but increased in younger leaves with O[sub 3]. Prior exposure to drought reduced effects of O[sub 3] on photosynthesis and leaf area.

  8. Response of Organ Structure and Physiology to Autotetraploidization in Early Development of Energy Willow Salix viminalis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudits, Dénes; Török, Katalin; Cseri, András; Paul, Kenny; Nagy, Bettina; Sass, László; Ferenc, Györgyi; Vankova, Radomira; Dobrev, Petre; Vass, Imre; Ayaydin, Ferhan

    2016-01-01

    The biomass productivity of the energy willow Salix viminalis as a short-rotation woody crop depends on organ structure and functions that are under the control of genome size. Colchicine treatment of axillary buds resulted in a set of autotetraploid S. viminalis var. Energo genotypes (polyploid Energo [PP-E]; 2n = 4x = 76) with variation in the green pixel-based shoot surface area. In cases where increased shoot biomass was observed, it was primarily derived from larger leaf size and wider stem diameter. Autotetraploidy slowed primary growth and increased shoot diameter (a parameter of secondary growth). The duplicated genome size enlarged bark and wood layers in twigs sampled in the field. The PP-E plants developed wider leaves with thicker midrib and enlarged palisade parenchyma cells. Autotetraploid leaves contained significantly increased amounts of active gibberellins, cytokinins, salicylic acid, and jasmonate compared with diploid individuals. Greater net photosynthetic CO2 uptake was detected in leaves of PP-E plants with increased chlorophyll and carotenoid contents. Improved photosynthetic functions in tetraploids were also shown by more efficient electron transport rates of photosystems I and II. Autotetraploidization increased the biomass of the root system of PP-E plants relative to diploids. Sections of tetraploid roots showed thickening with enlarged cortex cells. Elevated amounts of indole acetic acid, active cytokinins, active gibberellin, and salicylic acid were detected in the root tips of these plants. The presented variation in traits of tetraploid willow genotypes provides a basis to use autopolyploidization as a chromosome engineering technique to alter the organ development of energy plants in order to improve biomass productivity. PMID:26729798

  9. Valuation of ecosystem services of commercial shrub willow (Salix spp.) woody biomass crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, Alison; Vidon, Philippe; Hirsch, Paul; Volk, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    The development of shrub willow as a bioenergy feedstock contributes to renewable energy portfolios in many countries with temperate climates and marginal croplands due to excessive moisture. However, to fully understand the potential of shrub willow as an alternative crop on marginal cropland, more research is needed to understand the potential of shrub willow for providing a variety of ecosystem services. At the same time, there is much need for research developing strategies to value ecosystem services beyond conventional valuation systems (e.g., monetary, intrinsic). In this context, this project investigates the ecosystem services of shrub willow woody biomass from an environmental science perspective, and proposes a new avenue to assess ecosystem services for management purposes based on the relative value of key ecosystem services under various land management strategies (i.e., willow vs. corn vs. hay). On marginal cropland in the US Northeast, shrub willow may be used to replace crops like corn or hay. Transitioning from conventional corn or hay to willow tends to reduce nutrient loss and erosion, improve biodiversity and adaptability to climate change, and increase access to recreational activities. However, it is unlikely to change soil carbon pools or greenhouse gas emissions at the soil-atmosphere interface. By encouraging decision makers to weigh the pros and cons of each management decision (i.e., willow vs. corn vs. hay) based on the situation, the ecosystems services valuation method used here provides a clear framework for decision making in a watershed management context.

  10. Selection of reliable reference genes for gene expression analysis under abiotic stresses in the desert biomass willow, Salix psammophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Salix psammophila is a desert shrub willow that has extraordinary adaptation to abiotic stresses and plays an important role in maintaining local ecosystems. Moreover, S. psammophila is regarded as a promising biomass feedstock because of its high biomass yields and short rotation coppice cycle. However, few suitable reference genes (RGs for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR constrain the study on normalization of gene expression in S. psammophila until now. Here, we investigated the expression stabilities of 14 candidate RGs across tissue types and under four abiotic stress treatments, including heat, cold, salt and drought treatments. After calculation of PCR efficiencies, three different software, NormFinder, geNorm, and BestKeeper were employed to analyze systematically the qRT-PCR data, and the outputs were merged by RankAggreg software. The optimal reference genes selected for gene expression analysis were EF1□□ (Elongation factor-1 alpha and OTU (OTU-like cysteine protease family protein for different tissue types, UBC (Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 and LTA4H (Leukotriene A-4 hydrolase homologue for heat treatment, HIS (Histone superfamily protein H3 and ARF2 (ADP-ribosylation factor 2 for cold treatment, OTU and ACT7 (Actin 7 for salt treatment, UBC and LTA4H for drought treatment. The expression of UBC, ARF2 and VHAC (V-type proton ATPase subunit C varied the least across tissue types and under abiotic stresses. Furthermore, the relative genes expression profiles of one tissue-specific gene WOX1a (WUSCHEL-related homeobox 1a, and four stress-inducible genes, including Hsf-A2 (Heat shock transcription factors A2, CBF3 (C-repeat binding factor 3, HKT1 (High-Affinity K+ Transporter 1 and GST (Glutathione S-transferase, were conducted to confirm the validity of the reference genes in this study. These results provided an important RGs application guideline for gene expression characterization in S. psammophila.

  11. n-Alkane biosynthetic hydrogen isotope fractionation is not constant throughout the growing season in the riparian tree Salix viminalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Sarah L.; Kahmen, Ansgar; Dennis, Paul; Grant, Alastair

    2015-09-01

    Compound-specific δ2H values of leaf wax n-alkanes have emerged as a potentially powerful paleohydrological proxy. Research suggests terrestrial plant n-alkane δ2H values are strongly correlated with meteoric water δ2H values, and may provide information on temperature, relative humidity, evaporation, and precipitation. This is based upon several assumptions, including that biosynthetic fractionation of n-alkanes during synthesis is constant within a single species. Here we present a multi-isotope study of the n-alkanes of riparian Salix viminalis growing in Norwich, UK. We measured n-alkane δ2H, leaf water δ2H, xylem water δ2H, and bulk foliar δ13C and evaluated the variability of n-alkane δ2H values and net biosynthetic fractionation (εlw-wax) over a whole growing season. S. viminalis n-alkane δ2H values decreased by 40‰ between the start of the growing season in April and the time when they stabilized in July. Variation in leaf and xylem water δ2H did not explain this variability. εlw-wax varied from -116‰ during leaf expansion in April to -156‰ during the stable phase. This suggests that differential biosynthetic fractionation was responsible for the strong seasonal trends in S. viminalis n-alkane δ2H values. We suggest that variability in εlw-wax is driven by seasonal differences in the carbohydrate source and thus the NADPH used in n-alkane biosynthesis, with stored carbohydrates utilized during spring and recent occurring growing season assimilates used later in the season. This is further supported by bulk foliar δ13C values, which are 13C-enriched during the period of leaf flush, relative to the end of the growing season. Our results challenge the assumption that biosynthetic fractionation is constant for a given species, and suggest that 2H-enriched stored assimilates are an important source for n-alkane biosynthesis early in the growing season. These findings have implications for the interpretation of sedimentary n-alkanes and call

  12. Influence of Ca/Mg ratio on phytoextraction properties of Salix viminalis. II. Secretion of low molecular weight organic acids to the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdziak, Z; Kozlowska, M; Kaczmarek, Z; Mleczek, M; Chadzinikolau, T; Drzewiecka, K; Golinski, P

    2011-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment in a phytotron was performed to investigate the effect of two different Ca/Mg ratios (4:1 and 1:10) and trace element ions (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in solution on the efficiency of low molecular weight organic acid (LMWOA) formation in Salix viminalis rhizosphere. Depending on the Ca/Mg ratio and presence of selected trace elements at 0.5mM concentration, the amount and kind of LMWOAs in the rhizosphere were significantly affected. In physiological 4:1 Ca/Mg ratio the following complex of acids was observed: malonic (Pb, Zn), citric, lactic, maleic and succinic (Zn) acids. Under 1:10 Ca/Mg ratio, citric (Cd, Zn), maleic and succinic (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) acids were seen. Additionally, high accumulation of zinc and copper in all systems was observed, with the exception of those where one of the metals was at higher concentration. Summing up, the results indicate a significant role of LMWOAs in Salix phytoremediation abilities. Both effects can be modulated depending on the mutual Ca/Mg ratio. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Contrasting responses in the growth and energy utilization properties of sympatric Populus and Salix to different altitudes: implications for sexual dimorphism in Salicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yanbao; Chen, Ke; Jiang, Hao; Yu, Lei; Duan, Baoli

    2017-01-01

    An interesting ecological and evolutionary puzzle arises from the observations of male-biased sex ratios in genus Populus, whereas in the taxonomically related Salix, females are generally more dominant. In the present study, we combined results from a field investigation into the sex ratios of the Salicaceous species along an altitudinal gradient on Gongga Mountain, and a pot experiment by monitoring growth and energy utilization properties to elucidate the mechanisms governing sexual dimorphism. At middle altitudes 2000 and 2300 m, the sex ratios were consistent with a 1:1 equilibrium in sympatric Populus purdomii and Salix magnifica. However, at the lower and higher ends of the altitudinal gradient, skewed sex ratios were observed. For example, the male:female ratios were 1.33 and 2.36 in P. purdomii at 1700 and 2600 m respectively; for S. magnifica the ratio was 0.62 at 2600 m. At 2300 m, the pot-grown seedlings of both species exhibited the highest biomass accumulation and total leaf area, simultaneously with the balanced sex ratios in the field. At 3300 m, the specific leaf area in male P. purdomii was 23.9% higher than that of females, which may be the morphological cause for the observed 19.3% higher nitrogen allocation to Rubisco, and 20.6% lower allocation to cell walls. As such, male P. purdomii showed a 32.9% higher foliar photosynthetic capacity, concomitant with a 12.0% lower construction cost. These properties resulted in higher photosynthetic nitrogen- and energy-use efficiencies, and shorter payback time (24.4 vs 40.1 days), the time span that a leaf must photosynthesize to amortize the carbon investment. Our results thus suggested that male P. purdomii evolved a quicker energy-return strategy. Consequently, these superior energy gain-cost related traits and the higher total leaf area contributed to the higher growth rate and tolerance in stress-prone environments, which might, in part, shed new light on the male-biased sex ratios in

  14. A heart that beats for 500 years: age-related changes in cardiac proteasome activity, oxidative protein damage and expression of heat shock proteins, inflammatory factors, and mitochondrial complexes in Arctica islandica, the longest-living noncolonial animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowska, Danuta; Richardson, Chris; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Ridgway, Iain

    2014-12-01

    Study of negligibly senescent animals may provide clues that lead to better understanding of the cardiac aging process. To elucidate mechanisms of successful cardiac aging, we investigated age-related changes in proteasome activity, oxidative protein damage and expression of heat shock proteins, inflammatory factors, and mitochondrial complexes in the heart of the ocean quahog Arctica islandica, the longest-lived noncolonial animal (maximum life span potential: 508 years). We found that in the heart of A. islandica the level of oxidatively damaged proteins did not change significantly up to 120 years of age. No significant aging-induced changes were observed in caspase-like and trypsin-like proteasome activity. Chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity showed a significant early-life decline, then it remained stable for up to 182 years. No significant relationship was observed between the extent of protein ubiquitination and age. In the heart of A. islandica, an early-life decline in expression of HSP90 and five mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes was observed. We found significant age-related increases in the expression of three cytokine-like mediators (interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the heart of A. islandica. Collectively, in extremely long-lived molluscs, maintenance of protein homeostasis likely contributes to the preservation of cardiac function. Our data also support the concept that low-grade chronic inflammation in the cardiovascular system is a universal feature of the aging process, which is also manifest in invertebrates. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Correlation between air pollution and crystal pattern of calcium oxalate in plant leaves of street trees in Itami City. [Ginkgo biloba; Salix babylonica; Aphananthe aspera; Robinia pseudoacacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umemoto, K.; Tatsumi, S.

    1975-01-01

    A characteristic difference in calcium oxalate crystal patterns in leaves of roadside trees planted in relatively unpolluted northern parts of Itami City and in parts of the city polluted by automobile exhaust was discovered. The species of trees examined were Ginkgo biloba, Salix babylonica, Aphananthe aspera, Robinia pseudoacacia, and Poplar. The leaves of trees grown in relatively less air polluted areas displayed crystal aggregates of calcium oxalate (50-80 micron) that were arranged in rows on both sides of the central vein; some scattered crystal aggregates between veins were observed. Trees grown in air polluted areas showed irregular crystal patterns and more scattering of the crystals between veins. The cause of the observed differences in the pattern of crystal aggregates was attributed to the difference in metabolism of trees under different environmental conditions. Air pollutants disturb the normal metabolism of the tree and cause hyperproduction of calcium oxalate.

  16. The Response of the Alpine Dwarf Shrub Salix herbacea to Altered Snowmelt Timing: Lessons from a Multi-Site Transplant Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, Janosch; Wheeler, Julia A; Cortés, Andrés J; Bossdorf, Oliver; Hoch, Guenter; Lexer, Christian; Wipf, Sonja; Karrenberg, Sophie; van Kleunen, Mark; Rixen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is altering spring snowmelt patterns in alpine and arctic ecosystems, and these changes may alter plant phenology, growth and reproduction. To predict how alpine plants respond to shifts in snowmelt timing, we need to understand trait plasticity, its effects on growth and reproduction, and the degree to which plants experience a home-site advantage. We tested how the common, long-lived dwarf shrub Salix herbacea responded to changing spring snowmelt time by reciprocally transplanting turfs of S. herbacea between early-exposure ridge and late-exposure snowbed microhabitats. After the transplant, we monitored phenological, morphological and fitness traits, as well as leaf damage, during two growing seasons. Salix herbacea leafed out earlier, but had a longer development time and produced smaller leaves on ridges relative to snowbeds. Longer phenological development times and smaller leaves were associated with reduced sexual reproduction on ridges. On snowbeds, larger leaves and intermediate development times were associated with increased clonal reproduction. Clonal and sexual reproduction showed no response to altered snowmelt time. We found no home-site advantage in terms of sexual and clonal reproduction. Leaf damage probability depended on snowmelt and thus exposure period, but had no short-term effect on fitness traits. We conclude that the studied populations of S. herbacea can respond to shifts in snowmelt by plastic changes in phenology and leaf size, while maintaining levels of clonal and sexual reproduction. The lack of a home-site advantage suggests that S. herbacea may not be adapted to different microhabitats. The studied populations are thus unlikely to react to climate change by rapid adaptation, but their responses will also not be constrained by small-scale local adaptation. In the short term, snowbed plants may persist due to high stem densities. However, in the long term, reduction in leaf size and flowering, a longer phenological

  17. Resprout and Survival of Willow ( Salix) Cuttings on Bioengineering Structures in Actively Eroding Gullies in Marls in a Mountainous Mediterranean Climate: A Large-Scale Experiment in the Francon Catchment (Southern Alps, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, F.; Labonne, S.

    2015-10-01

    Improving the understanding of the role of vegetation and bioengineering structures on erosion and sedimentation control, especially in torrent-prone catchments in a mountainous Mediterranean climate, has become a key issue today for the scientific community working in ecological engineering and restoration ecology. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of willow ( Salix) cuttings in resprouting and survival on bioengineering structures in actively eroding gullies in marls and to identify the factors influencing this performance. Measurements were taken from 2008 to 2011 on 336 bioengineering structures, namely brush layers on wooden sills (BL) and brush layers with brush mats on wooden sills (BLM), using 8890 cuttings of Salix purpurea and Salix incana. These structures were built in 18 gullies of the Francon Catchment in marls (73 ha) in the Southern French Alps. After four growing seasons, the results revealed a total cutting survival rate of 45 %. They also demonstrated that in BLM, brush mats provided better survival (56 %) than brush layers (37 %). In BL, brush layers alone showed 51 % cutting survival. Cutting resprout and survival were observed for all structure aspects. They were positively related to increasing gully size and vegetation cover on gully sides. The results of this large-scale experiment clarified previous data obtained on a limited sample of bioengineering structures, providing further detail and showing that it is possible to use such structures made of willow cuttings to revegetate actively eroding gullies in marls within a mountainous Mediterranean climate.

  18. Phylogenetic analyses of the genus Glaciecola: emended description of the genus Glaciecola, transfer of Glaciecola mesophila, G. agarilytica, G. aquimarina, G. arctica, G. chathamensis, G. polaris and G. psychrophila to the genus Paraglaciecola gen. nov. as Paraglaciecola mesophila comb. nov., P. agarilytica comb. nov., P. aquimarina comb. nov., P. arctica comb. nov., P. chathamensis comb. nov., P. polaris comb. nov. and P. psychrophila comb. nov., and description of Paraglaciecola oceanifecundans sp. nov., isolated from the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaji, Sisinthy; Reddy, Gundlapally Sathyanarayana

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of the genus Glaciecola were performed using the sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and the GyrB protein to establish its taxonomic status. The results indicated a consistent clustering of the genus Glaciecola into two clades, with significant bootstrap values, with all the phylogenetic methods employed. Clade 1 was represented by seven species, Glaciecola agarilytica, G. aquimarina, G. arctica, G. chathamensis, G. mesophila, G. polaris and G. psychrophila, while clade 2 consisted of only three species, Glaciecola nitratireducens, G. pallidula and G. punicea. Evolutionary distances between species of clades 1 and 2, based on 16S rRNA gene and GyrB protein sequences, ranged from 93.0 to 95.0 % and 69.0 to 73.0 %, respectively. In addition, clades 1 and 2 possessed 18 unique signature nucleotides, at positions 132, 184 : 193, 185 : 192, 230, 616 : 624, 631, 632, 633, 738, 829, 1257, 1265, 1281, 1356 and 1366, in the 16S rRNA gene sequence and can be differentiated by the occurrence of a 15 nt signature motif 5'-CAAATCAGAATGTTG at positions 1354-1368 in members of clade 2. Robust clustering of the genus Glaciecola into two clades based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene and GyrB protein sequences, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of ≤95.0 % and the occurrence of signature nucleotides and signature motifs in the 16S rRNA gene suggested that the genus should be split into two genera. The genus Paraglaciecola gen. nov. is therefore created to accommodate the seven species of clade 1, while the name Glaciecola sensu stricto is retained to represent species of clade 2. The species of clade 1 are transferred to the genus Paraglaciecola as Paraglaciecola mesophila comb. nov. (type strain DSM 15026(T) = KMM 241(T)), P. agarilytica comb. nov. (type strain NO2(T) = KCTC 12755(T) = LMG 23762(T)), P. aquimarina comb. nov. (type strain GGW-M5(T) = KCTC 32108(T) = CCUG 62918(T)), P. arctica comb. nov. (type strain BSs20135(T

  19. The effect of air pollution and other environmental stressors on leaf fluctuating asymmetry and specific leaf area of Salix alba L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuytack, Tatiana, E-mail: tatiana.wuytack@ua.ac.be [Department of Bioscience Engineering, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Wuyts, Karen, E-mail: karen.wuyts@ugent.be [Department of Bioscience Engineering, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Laboratory of Forestry, Department of Forest and Water Management, Ghent University, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, B-9090 Gontrode (Melle) (Belgium); Van Dongen, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.vandongen@ua.ac.be [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Baeten, Lander, E-mail: lander.baeten@ugent.be [Laboratory of Forestry, Department of Forest and Water Management, Ghent University, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, B-9090 Gontrode (Melle) (Belgium); Kardel, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemeh.kardel@ua.ac.be [Department of Bioscience Engineering, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Verheyen, Kris, E-mail: kris.verheyen@ugent.be [Laboratory of Forestry, Department of Forest and Water Management, Ghent University, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, B-9090 Gontrode, Melle (Belgium); Samson, Roeland, E-mail: roeland.samson@ua.ac.be [Department of Bioscience Engineering, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2011-10-15

    We aimed at evaluating the effect of low-level air pollution on leaf area fluctuating asymmetry (FAA) and specific leaf area (SLA) of Salix alba L., taking into account other environmental factors. Cuttings were grown in standardized conditions in the near vicinity of air quality measuring stations in Belgium. Variability of SLA and FAA between measuring stations explained 83% and 7.26%, respectively, of the total variability. FAA was not influenced by air pollution or environmental factors such as shading, herbivory, air temperature and humidity. SLA was increased by an increase in shadow, while NO{sub x} and O{sub 3} concentrations had only a marginal influence. The influence of SO{sub 2} concentration was negligible. Although our data analysis suggests a relationship between SLA and NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} concentration, the absence of a straightforward relationship between FAA and SLA and air pollution still questions the usefulness of these bio-indicators for monitoring air pollution. - Highlights: > Leaf characteristics of white willow as possible bio-indicators for air quality. > Fluctuating asymmetry is not a good bio-indicator for monitoring the air quality. > Shadow increases specific leaf area. > NO{sub x} and O{sub 3} change specific leaf area of white willow. - Specific leaf area of S. alba increased with increasing shade and, in less extent, with increasing NO{sub x} and decreasing O{sub 3} concentration, while leaf asymmetry did not respond to air pollution

  20. On the irrigation requirements of cottonwood (Populus fremontii and Populus deltoides var. wislizenii) and willow (Salix gooddingii) grown in a desert environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, S.; Morino, K.; Nagler, P.L.; Glenn, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    Native tree plots have been established in river irrigation districts in the western U.S. to provide habitat for threatened and endangered birds. Information is needed on the effective irrigation requirements of the target species. Cottonwood (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix gooddingii) trees were grown for seven years in an outdoor plot in a desert environment in Tucson, Arizona. Plants were allowed to achieve a nearly complete canopy cover over the first four years, then were subjected to three daily summer irrigation schedules of 6.20??mm??d-1; 8.26??mm??d-1 and 15.7??mm??d-1. The lowest irrigation rate was sufficient to maintain growth and high leaf area index for cottonwoods over three years, while willows suffered considerable die-back on this rate in years six and seven. These irrigation rates were applied April 15-September 15, but only 0.88??mm??d-1 was applied during the dormant period of the year. Expressed as a fraction of reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo), recommended annual water applications plus precipitation (and including some deep drainage) were 0.83 ETo for cottonwood and 1.01 ETo for willow. Current practices tend to over-irrigate restoration plots, and this study can provide guidelines for more efficient water use. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The effect of air pollution and other environmental stressors on leaf fluctuating asymmetry and specific leaf area of Salix alba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuytack, Tatiana; Wuyts, Karen; Van Dongen, Stefan; Baeten, Lander; Kardel, Fatemeh; Verheyen, Kris; Samson, Roeland

    2011-10-01

    We aimed at evaluating the effect of low-level air pollution on leaf area fluctuating asymmetry (FAA) and specific leaf area (SLA) of Salix alba L., taking into account other environmental factors. Cuttings were grown in standardized conditions in the near vicinity of air quality measuring stations in Belgium. Variability of SLA and FAA between measuring stations explained 83% and 7.26%, respectively, of the total variability. FAA was not influenced by air pollution or environmental factors such as shading, herbivory, air temperature and humidity. SLA was increased by an increase in shadow, while NO(x) and O(3) concentrations had only a marginal influence. The influence of SO(2) concentration was negligible. Although our data analysis suggests a relationship between SLA and NO(x)/O(3) concentration, the absence of a straightforward relationship between FAA and SLA and air pollution still questions the usefulness of these bio-indicators for monitoring air pollution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. To be or not to be a subspecies: description of Saperda populnea lapponica ssp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) developing in downy willow (Salix lapponum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Henrik; Kvamme, Torstein; Bergsten, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A new subspecies of the European cerambycid Saperda populnea (Linnaeus, 1758) is described: Saperda populnea lapponica ssp. n. based on specimens from Scandinavia. The male genitalia characters were examined and found to provide support for this separation, as well as differences in morphology, geographical distribution and bionomy. The preferred host tree for the nominate subspecies S. populnea populnea is Populus tremula L., whereas S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. is considered to be monophagous on Salix lapponum L. DNA sequence data of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) was generated from Scandinavian specimens of S. populnea populnea and specimens representing S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. The two subspecies were not reciprocally monophyletic and genetic distances in COI were small. All synonyms of S. populnea populnea have been considered, and species similar to S. populnea populnea have been examined, and not found to be related to S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. A male lectotype has been designated for each of the two following synonyms: Cerambyx decempunctatus De Geer, 1775, and Saperda salicis Zetterstedt, 1818. The synonymised species from Asia, S. balsamifera (Motshulsky, 1860), is elevated to subspecies: S. populnea balsamifera stat. n. We end with a discussion on the definition of subspecies under the unified species concept. PMID:29187784

  3. Metabolic Responses of Willow (Salix purpurea L. Leaves to Mycorrhization as Revealed by Mass Spectrometry and 1H NMR Spectroscopy Metabolite Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos A Aliferis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The root system of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic interfaces with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, which are important for nutrient cycling and ecosystem sustainability. The elucidation of the undergoing changes in plants’ metabolism during symbiosis is essential for understanding nutrient acquisition and for alleviation of soil stresses caused by environmental cues. Within this context, we have undertaken the task of recording the fluctuation of willow (Salix purpurea L. leaf metabolome in response to AMF inoculation. The development of an advanced metabolomics/bioinformatics protocol employing mass spectrometry (MS and 1H NMR analyzers combined with the in-house-built metabolite library for willow (http://willowmetabolib.research.mcgill.ca/index.html are key components of the research. Analyses revealed that AMF inoculation of willow causes up-regulation of various biosynthetic pathways, among others, those of flavonoid, isoflavonoid, phenylpropanoid, and the chlorophyll and porphyrin pathways, which have well-established roles in plant physiology and are related to resistance against environmental stresses. The recorded fluctuation in the willow leaf metabolism is very likely to provide AMF-inoculated willows with a significant advantage compared to non-inoculated ones when they are exposed to stresses such as, high levels of soil pollutants. The discovered biomarkers of willow response to AMF inoculation and corresponding pathways could be exploited in biomarker-assisted selection of willow cultivars with superior phytoremediation capacity or genetic engineering programs.

  4. A physiological and biophysical model of coppice willow (Salix spp.) production yields for the contiguous USA in current and future climate scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Jaiswal, Deepak; LeBauer, David S; Wertin, Timothy M; Bollero, Germán A; Leakey, Andrew D B; Long, Stephen P

    2015-09-01

    High-performance computing has facilitated development of biomass production models that capture the key mechanisms underlying production at high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct responses to increasing [CO2 ] and temperature are important to long-lived emerging woody bioenergy crops. Fast-growing willow (Salix spp.) within short rotation coppice (SRC) has considerable potential as a renewable biomass source, but performance over wider environmental conditions and under climate change is uncertain. We extended the bioenergy crop modeling platform, BioCro, to SRC willow by adding coppicing and C3 photosynthesis subroutines, and modifying subroutines for perennation, allocation, morphology, phenology and development. Parameterization with measurements of leaf photosynthesis, allocation and phenology gave agreement of modeled with measured yield across 23 sites in Europe and North America. Predictions for the continental USA suggest yields of ≥17 Mg ha(-1)  year(-1) in a 4 year rotation. Rising temperature decreased predicted yields, an effect partially ameliorated by rising [CO2 ]. This model, based on over 100 equations describing the physiological and biophysical mechanisms underlying production, provides a new framework for utilizing mechanism of plant responses to the environment, including future climates. As an open-source tool, it is made available here as a community resource for further application, improvement and adaptation. © 2015 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Single and competitive adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution by activated carbon prepared with Salix matsudana Kiodz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yan; Li, Kelin; Song, Jinfeng; Li, Bing; Tang, Chunfang

    2016-12-01

    In this study, Salix matsudana activated carbon (SAC) was prepared by phosphoric acid activation, and the adsorption characteristics of Cd(II) and Pb(II) on SAC in single- and double-component solutions were investigated. In both systems, the adsorption capacities of both ions on SAC increased with the increasing initial pH value and temperature in the solutions, and the adsorption equilibrium was approached at 10 min. The adsorption process was spontaneous, endothermic, and depicted well by the pseudo-second-order adsorption model, and the equilibrium adsorption fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity (Qm) of Cd(II) and Pb(II) was 58.48 and 59.01 mg/g, respectively, in the single-element systems. However, it reduced to 25.32 and 31.09 mg/g, respectively, in the double-element system. The physicochemical property analysis showed that the specific surface area, total pore volume, and average pore diameter of SAC was 435.65 m2/g, 35.68 mL/g, and 3.86 nm, respectively. The SAC contained groups of -OH, C = O, and P = O. Results suggest that SAC had a good performance for the adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from solution, and the adsorption selectivity sequence was Pb(II) > Cd(II).

  6. Harvest and logistics for better profitability from small cultivations of Short Rotation Willow Coppice; Skoerdeteknik och logistik foer baettre loensamhet fraan smaa odlingar av Salix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baky, Andras; Forsberg, Maya; Rosenqvist, Haakan; Jonsson, Nils; Sundberg, Martin

    2010-06-15

    In Sweden, the political desire to increase the amount of short rotation willow coppice (Salix) plantations has been expressed. However, for various reasons interest from farmers has been low. The hypothesis of this study is that the total area of Salix cultivation can be increased by also cultivating fields smaller than those generally considered economic today. In order to lower production costs, machine systems adapted for harvest of smaller fields are required. The possibility of using farmers' existing tractors and more convenient machines, as well as achieving lower machine costs for smaller fields, may increase farmers' interest. The long-term objective is to achieve large-scale deliveries of willow with small-scale solutions at farm level, as an option and complement to today's more large-scale systems for harvesting willow. Costs, energy use and climatic impact (CO{sub 2} emissions) for two harvest and logistical chains suitable for small fields have been calculated from field to energy plant, and methods for minimizing these costs have been analyzed. Comparison is made with the direct chipping system, the most commonly used in Sweden today. The systems studied comprised: 1. Direct bundling harvest system with a tractor-towed harvester, collection of bundles in the field with a trailer-mounted crane, and storage in a pile before delivery. Chipping is performed at the energy plant. 2. Direct billeting with a tractor-towed harvester accompanied simultaneously by a tractor and trailer for collection, and storage in a pile before delivery. 3. Direct chipping with a self-propelled modified forage harvester accompanied simultaneously by a tractor and container for collection, and direct delivery to plant. Both the billet and bundle systems show higher costs than the direct chipping system, irrespective of field size. The analysis of different scenarios and conditions shows possibilities of lowering the costs through certain measures. Furthermore

  7. Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 mediates growth promotion of crack willow (Salix fragilis) saplings in both clean and metal-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P; De-Leij, F A A M; Lynch, J M

    2007-08-01

    We investigated if the plant growth promoting fungus Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 (also known as "T22") could be used to enhance the establishment and growth of crack willow (Salix fragilis) in a soil containing no organic or metal pollutants and in a metal-contaminated soil by comparing this fungus with noninoculated controls and an ectomycorrhizal formulation commercially used to enhance the establishment of tree saplings. Crack willow saplings were grown in a temperature-controlled growth room over a period of 5 weeks' in a garden center topsoil and over 12 weeks in a soil which had been used for disposal of building materials and sewage sludge containing elevated levels of heavy metals including cadmium (30 mg kg(-1)), lead (350 mg kg(-1)), manganese (210 mg kg(-1)), nickel (210 mg kg(-1)), and zinc (1,100 mg kg(-1)). After 5 weeks' growth in clean soil, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 produced shoots and roots that were 40% longer than those of the controls and shoots that were 20% longer than those of saplings grown with ectomycorrhiza (ECM). T. harzianum T22 saplings produced more than double the dry biomass of controls and more than 50% extra biomass than the ECM-treated saplings. After 12 weeks' growth, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 in the metal-contaminated soil produced 39% more dry weight biomass and were 16% taller than the noninoculated controls. This is the first report of tree growth stimulation by application of Trichoderma to roots, and is especially important as willow is a major source of wood fuel in the quest for renewable energy. These results also suggest willow trees inoculated with T. harzianum T22 could be used to increase the rate of revegetation and phytostabilization of metal-contaminated sites, a property of the fungus never previously demonstrated.

  8. Administration of extract Salix tetrasperma combined with extract of turmeric and neem to improve eggs quality of chicken reared under heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality of eggs might decrease when hens under heat stress. A further study found that a specific plant extracts could reduce the impacts of heat stress. The aim of this study was to determine effects of Salix tetrasperma plant extract in combination with extract of turmeric and neem to improve egg quality and productivity of laying hens under heat stress. Sixty laying hens strain Isa Brown of 6 months old were used and reared in individual cages. The feed and drinking water were supplied ad libitum. This study was conducted in a completely randomized design with five treatments (two controls and three treatments and each treatment consisted of 12 replication. Treatment consisted of with (KP and without (KP commercial anti-stress supplement. Formulations of extract were S. tetrasperma 1.000 mg / l water (EJ, S. tetrasperma 1.000 mg / l + Turmeric 250 mg / l + neem 250 mg / l (EJ+K1, and S. tetrasperma 1.000 mg / l + Turmeric 500 mg / l + neem 500 mg / l drinking water (EJ+K2. The hens were exposed to heat stress for 5 hours per day at a temperature range of 34.0±1.0°C. Supplements were dissolved in drinking water and were given for 30 days in the morning and noon. Results showed that a single extract of S. tetrasperma or the combination of an extract of turmeric and neem were significantly increased thickness of eggshell (P<0.05, but did not affect color of egg yolk, height albumin, egg weight, and HU value. Extract of S. tetrasperma combined with turmeric and neem extract dissolved in drinking water for 30 days in laying hens reared under heat stress could not improved quality of the eggs, but may increase thickness of the egg shell and cause decreased water consumption.

  9. Potential for Salix schwerinii Е. Wolf to uptake heavy metals in the contaminated territories of mining industry in the north-west Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Terebova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out on the industrial territory of Joint Stock Co. «Karelsky Okatysh» (Russia, Republic of Karelia, Kostomuksha. The species Salix schwerinii E. Wolf (Finland was used as a phytoremediant and was cultivated on the contaminated territory of the mining enterprise – the tailing dump (the main pollutants being Ni and Fe. After one year, the willow plant samples were divided into two groups: healthy plants with higher biomass production (HBP and suppressed plants with lower biomass production (LBP. The root system of HBP and LBP plants had no differences, but aboveground biomass was higher in HBP willow plants. The content of photosynthetic pigments was low in both groups of willows at (1.62 ± 0.10 mg/g wet weight. SLA index (specific leaf area was 1.53 mm2 mg–1 and 1.21 mm2 mg–1 in HBP and LBP groups, correspondingly. About 50–90 % of Ni, Fe, Mn, Co, Cu, Cr were absorbed by the roots and leaves of willow. All of these elements accumulated in maximal amounts in the roots (70 % of plants from the HBP group, while in the LBP group they accumulated mostly in leaves (70 %. Pb was deposited in the roots, leaves and bark (20–30 % for each structure, Cd, Zn – in the bark (50–60 %. According to the coefficient of biological absorption, heavy metals in the willow plants formed the following sequence: Zn (8 > Mn (6–8 > Cd (4–6 > Cu (4–5 > Pb (3 > Co (1 > Ni (0.6 = Cr (0.5–0.7 > Fe (0.2.

  10. Functional screening of willow alleles in Arabidopsis combined with QTL mapping in willow (Salix) identifies SxMAX4 as a coppicing response gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Jemma; Ward, Sally P; Hanley, Steven J; Leyser, Ottoline; Karp, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are important biomass crops due to their ability to grow rapidly with low fertilizer inputs and ease of cultivation in short-rotation coppice cycles. They are relatively undomesticated and highly diverse, but functional testing to identify useful allelic variation is time-consuming in trees and transformation is not yet possible in willow. Arabidopsis is heralded as a model plant from which knowledge can be transferred to advance the improvement of less tractable species. Here, knowledge and methodologies from Arabidopsis were successfully used to identify a gene influencing stem number in coppiced willows, a complex trait of key biological and industrial relevance. The strigolactone-related More AXillary growth (MAX) genes were considered candidates due to their role in shoot branching. We previously demonstrated that willow and Arabidopsis show similar response to strigolactone and that transformation rescue of Arabidopsis max mutants with willow genes could be used to detect allelic differences. Here, this approach was used to screen 45 SxMAX1, SxMAX2, SxMAX3 and SxMAX4 alleles cloned from 15 parents of 11 mapping populations varying in shoot-branching traits. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies were locus dependent, ranging from 29.2 to 74.3 polymorphic sites per kb. SxMAX alleles were 98%-99% conserved at the amino acid level, but different protein products varying in their ability to rescue Arabidopsis max mutants were identified. One poor rescuing allele, SxMAX4D, segregated in a willow mapping population where its presence was associated with increased shoot resprouting after coppicing and colocated with a QTL for this trait. © 2014 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Plant co-existence patterns and High-Arctic vegetation composition in three common plant communities in north-east Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Grau

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic regions are expected to experience substantial changes in climate in the coming decades. In order to predict potential changes of Arctic vegetation, it is important to understand the distinct role of life forms of plants and of individual species in relation to plant co-existence patterns. Our aim is to investigate if three common Arctic plant patch types dominated by contrasting life forms (by the dwarf shrubs Salix arctica or Dryas octopetala×intermedia or by mosses are related (a to the co-existence of vascular plants and species richness at patch scale and (b to the floristic composition in three distinct plant communities (Salix snowbed, Dryas heath and fell-field associated with contrasting abiotic regimes. The study was conducted at Zackenberg, in north-east Greenland. Dryas patches showed a clear negative effect on small-scale plant richness and co-existence in the fell-field. Salix and moss patches showed a similar pattern in all the plant communities, although the number of individuals growing in Salix patches was lower than in moss patches. Salix and mosses in the fell-fields hosted a high number of species in spite of the much less vegetated aspect of this harsh, upper zone. The floristic composition varied between plant communities, but it did not change substantially between patch types within each community. This study provides novel background knowledge of plant co-existence patterns at patch scale and of the structure of contrasting Arctic plant communities, which will help to better assess the potential effects of varying abiotic stress regimes on Arctic vegetation.

  12. Phytoremediation Efficacy of Salix discolor and S. eriocephela on Adjacent Acidic Clay and Shale Overburden on a Former Mine Site: Growth, Soil, and Foliage Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Mosseler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants regularly experience suboptimal environments, but this can be particularly acute on highly-disturbed mine sites. Two North American willows—Salix discolor Muhl. (DIS and S. eriocephala Michx. (ERI—were established in common-garden field tests on two adjacent coal mine spoil sites: one with high clay content, the other with shale overburden. The high clay content site had 44% less productivity, a pH of 3.6, 42% clay content, high water holding capacity at saturation (64%, and high soil electrical conductivity (EC of 3.9 mS cm−1. The adjacent shale overburden site had a pH of 6.8, and after removing 56.5% stone content, a high sand content (67.2%, low water holding capacity at saturation (23%, and an EC of 0.9 mS cm−1. The acidic clay soil had significantly greater Na (20×, Ca (2×, Mg (4.4×, S (10×, C (12× and N (2× than the shale overburden. Foliar concentrations from the acidic clay site had significantly greater Mg (1.5×, Mn (3.3×, Fe (5.6×, Al (4.6×, and S (2× than the shale overburden, indicating that these elements are more soluble under acidic conditions. There was no overall species difference in growth; however, survival was greater for ERI than DIS on both sites, thus overall biomass yield was greater for ERI than DIS. Foliar concentrations of ERI were significantly greater than those of DIS for N (1.3×, Ca (1.5×, Mg (1.2×, Fe (2×, Al (1.5×, and S (1.5×. There were no significant negative relationships between metal concentrations and growth or biomass yield. Both willows showed large variation among genotypes within each species in foliar concentrations, and some clones of DIS and ERI had up to 16× the Fe and Al uptake on the acidic site versus the adjacent overburden. Genetic selection among species and genotypes may be useful for reclamation activities aimed at reducing specific metal concentrations on abandoned mine sites. Results show that, despite having a greater water holding capacity, the greater

  13. Catechin content and consumption ratio of the collared lemming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Thomas B.

    2003-01-01

    catechin content. Dicrostonyx species are known to have specialised on shrubs, especially Dryas spp. and Salix spp., rather than graminoids like other related microtines. Bioassays were conducted using food material from Dryas spp., Salix arctica, Vaccinium uliginosum, Kobresia myosuroides and Poa glauca....... Enclosures with the first three species mentioned were further treated by clipping to simulate herbivory in order to induce the production of the plant defence compound catechin. Treatment increased the catechin content in Dryas spp., S. arctica (females only) and V. uliginosum significantly compared...... with the catechin concentration in untreated plants. These elevated catechin concentrations had a significantly negative effect on the consumption rate of Dryas spp. and female S. arctica by collared lemmings....

  14. Salix alba and Populus nigra seedlings resistance to physical hydro-sedimentary stresses: nursery experimental approach compared to in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintenberger, Coraline; Rodrigues, Stephane; Breheret, Jean-Gabriel; Jugé, Philippe; Villar, Marc

    2014-05-01

    In Europe, riparian Salicaceae is declining following the loss of potential germination areas associated with river management. Nevertheless, as an exception for lowland rivers, the Loire River (France) shows in its middle reaches an efficient sexual regeneration of Populus nigra and Salix alba species on bare sediments deposited during flood events. The study focuses on the influence of flow, sediment dynamics and fluvial maintenance operations on the establishment and survival of black poplar and white willow seedlings during the first year of development in a lowland sandy-gravel river, the Middle Loire. Main questions are: what is the influence of morphological and sedimentary features on seedlings recruitment and how do they withstand the hydro-sedimentary stresses occurring during high flow periods? How fluvial management works, and induced morphology and sedimentary features, modify the sediment dynamics and subsequent establishment and maintenance of seedlings? To answer these questions, we developed an ex-situ approach which allowed, under controlled conditions, to determine the influence of the sedimentological characteristics of the substrate on the development and maintenance of seedlings with a specific focus on the root system. Three experiments were carried out for three sedimentary mixtures from the river (sand, sand-gravel and 0.2 m of sand superimposed on sand-gravel mixture) that correspond to grain size and stratigraphy conditions often observed on bars and secondary channels in the Loire. The experimental design includes 108 plots of 1 m3, with 400 seeds per plot (corresponding to the Loire density measurements) and combining seeds from two species, three sedimentary mixtures, four replicates and three experiments. Experiment 1 (control) is based on the architecture of root systems using the WinRHIZO image analysis software. Experiment 2 is relative to the evaluation of constraints leading to "uprooting" of seedlings. Experiment 3 provides data

  15. Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gehan Elassal; Mona Elsheikh; Abdel Gawad Abu Zeid

    2014-01-01

    .... Subjects and methods: 80 COPD patients were assessed using SCID for establishing psychiatric diagnosis, Beck depression inventory for assessment of the severity of depressive symptoms, Hamilton anxiety scale...

  16. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina, Willow Bark (Salix alba, and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shakibaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina, willow bark (Salix alba, and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG, β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles.

  17. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina), Willow Bark (Salix alba), and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica) Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Allaway, David; Nebrich, Simone; Mobasheri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina), willow bark (Salix alba), and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG), β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles.

  18. Potencial biotécnico do sarandi-branco (Phyllanthus sellowianus Müll. Arg. e vime (Salix viminalis L. para revegetação de margens de cursos de água

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Sutili Jaques

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with planning and careful use of natural resources, and specially in the case of water courses, some areas are negatively modified, due to losing of margin or hillside stability, leading to erosions and slides. On this way, revegetation and stabilization techniques are imposing tasks to these areas. Some non expensive and easy biological techniques are already known, resting to investigate the applicability of adequate materials to each area, as well as biotechnical value of local native species. This works deals with investigating, on field situation, the rooting stick capability of two different species, that are common on water courses edges of the studied region: ‘sarandi-branco’ (Phyllanthus sellowianus Müll. Arg. and ‘vime’ (Salix viminalis L.. The experiment was developed on eroded margin of ‘Guarda-mor’ stream, in central area of ‘Rio Grande do Sul’ State, Brazil. The sticks used were from different parts of branches (base, half and tip. Sixty day after planting, the rooting was evaluated, being found a good revegetation capability of both species. On ‘sarandibranco’ sticks, the rooting reached 78%, being significantly higher than on ‘vime’ sticks (69%. To both species, the rooting rose up with the proximity of water level and with increasing diameter of sticks (base > half > tip.

  19. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina), Willow Bark (Salix alba), and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica) Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Allaway, David; Nebrich, Simone; Mobasheri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina), willow bark (Salix alba), and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG), β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles. PMID:22474508

  20. Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion, salinity and sodicity hazards are serious problems in the northern west coast of Egypt and lead to reducing the soil quality and increasing the degradation of soil resources. Sidi Barrani and Al-Sallum regions are selected as study areas which are located from a longitude of 25°10′00″ to 26°55′00″East and from a latitude of 31°00′0″ to 31°37′30″ North. Erosion hazard was estimated using the ‘Universal Soil Loss Equation’ (USLE, which is a simple empirical model that is widely used for assessing long-term annual soil loss .The salinity and sodicity hazards were estimated based on FAO method as standard reference. The resultant map of annual soil erosion shows a maximum soil loss of 60 t h−1 y−1 with a close relation to foot slopes and wide units on the steep side-slopes (with high LS value and the erodibility value reached to 0.1 t h−1 y−1. Meanwhile sand beaches and sabkha units are characterized by high environmental hazards of both water erosion, salinity and sodicity, while in the overflow basin units are identified as low environmental hazards. The spatial environmental hazards assessment is conducted by using integrated GIS and RS which can serve as effective inputs in deriving strategies for sustainable land use planning and management.

  1. Salicortin-Derivatives from Salix pseudo-lasiogyne Twigs Inhibit Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Cells via Modulation of C/EBPα and SREBP1c Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Pyo Kim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is reported to be associated with excessive growth of adipocyte mass tissue as a result of increases in the number and size of adipocytes differentiated from preadipocytes. To search for anti-adipogenic phytochemicals, we screened for inhibitory activities of various plant sources on adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Among the sources, a methanolic extract of Salix pseudo-lasiogyne twigs (Salicaceae reduced lipid accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. During our search for anti-adipogenic constituents from S. pseudo-lasiogyne, five salicortin derivatives isolated from an EtOAc fraction of this plant and bearing 1-hydroxy-6-oxo-2-cyclohexene-carboxylate moieties, namely 2′,6′-O-acetylsalicortin (1, 2′-O-acetylsalicortin (2, 3′-O-acetylsalicortin (3, 6′-O-acetylsalicortin (4, and salicortin (5, were found to significantly inhibit adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. In particular, 2′,6′-O-acetylsalicortin (1 had the most potent inhibitory activity on adipocyte differentiation, with an IC50 value of 11.6 μM, and it significantly down-regulated the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1c. Furthermore, 2′,6′-O-acetylsalicortin (1 suppressed mRNA expression levels of C/EBPβ during the early stage of adipocyte differentiation and stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD-1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, and fatty acid synthase (FAS expression, target genes of SREBP1c. In the present study, we demonstrate that the anti-adipogenesis mechanism of 2′,6′-O-acetylsalicortin (1 may be mediated via down-regulation of C/EBPα and SREBP1c dependent pathways. Through their anti-adipogenic activity, salicortin derivatives may be potential novel therapeutic agents against obesity.

  2. Estudo de toxicologia clínica de um fitoterápico contendo Passiflora incarnata L., Crataegus oxyacantha L., Salix alba L. em voluntários saudáveis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demétrius F. Nascimento

    Full Text Available O Pasalix® é um produto fitoterápico contendo uma associação de três plantas medicinais: Passiflora incarnata, Salix alba e Crataegus oxyacantha. Sua principal indicação é para o tratamento da ansiedade e insônia. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar a toxicologia clínica dessa formulação em voluntários saudáveis. Para isso realizou-se um ensaio clínico não aleatório, aberto, com 24 voluntários sadios do sexo masculino, que receberam ambulatorialmente dois (2 comprimidos revestidos do fitoterápico duas vezes ao dia, durante 28 dias ininterruptos. Os voluntários foram incluídos no estudo somente quando considerados saudáveis após avaliação clínica, exame físico e exames laboratoriais que antecederam o estudo. A avaliação laboratorial incluiu análise hematológica, bioquímica e sorológica. A avaliação clínica e laboratorial foi repetida após a 1ª, 2ª, 3ª e 4ª semanas de tratamento e 7 dias após a última administração. O Pasalix® foi bem tolerado pelos 24 voluntários não apresentando eventos adversos graves. Os exames clínicos, eletrocardiográficos e laboratoriais efetuados antes, durante e após o ensaio não evidenciaram sinais de toxicidade nos diversos órgãos e sistemas avaliados, confirmando a segurança da preparação para utilização em ensaios de eficácia terapêutica.

  3. Biofuel or excavation? - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of soil remediation options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suer, Pascal; Andersson-Skoeld, Yvonne [Swedish Geotechnical Institute, 58193 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2011-02-15

    The environmental consequences of soil remediation through biofuel or through dig-and-dump were compared using life cycle assessment (LCA). Willow (Salix viminalis) was actually grown in-situ on a discontinued oil depot, as a phytoremediation treatment. These data were used for the biofuel remediation, while excavation-and-refill data were estimated from experience. The biofuel remediation had great environmental advantages compared to the ex situ excavation remediation. With the ReCiPe impact assessment method, which included biodiversity, the net environmental effect was even positive, in spite of the fact that the wood harvest was not utilised for biofuel production, but left on the contaminated site. Impact from the Salix viminalis cultivation was mainly through land use for the short rotation coppice, and through journeys of control personnel. The latter may be reduced when familiarity with biofuel as a soil treatment method increases. The excavation-and-refill remediation was dominated by the landfill and the transport of contaminated soil and backfill. (author)

  4. Effects of harvest season prolongation on survival and growth of willow; Effekter paa oeverlevnad och tillvaext vid foerlaengd skoerdesaesong av salix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordh, Nils-Erik

    2010-06-15

    Willow normally is harvested in Sweden during the winter period, when the plants are in dormancy, the soil is frozen and able to carry heavy machinery, and when the chips can be transported directly to the district heating plants. Mild and wet winters often cause harvest delays and may hamper supply of fuel to the heating plants. During the harvest season 2006/2007 only a minor part of the planned harvest could be performed, which resulted in a one-year delay of harvest of about 3000 hectares of willow. Similar problems occurred during the following harvest season. The above experiences stressed the need for a prolonged harvest season, partly to perform harvests before stem dimensions become too large for conventional harvesters, and partly to guaranty security of supply to the heating stations. Many actors on the market have shown a strong interest in prolonging the harvest season. To test the effects of harvest season, two field trials containing the clone 'Tora' were established on the farms Flosta, Altuna, 25 km north of Enkoeping, and on Teda Risberga, about 10 km south of Enkoeping. The plantation at Flosta was about to be harvested for the first time, while the stand at Teda was going to be harvested for the second time. Both plantations are located on clay soils, representative for the Maelardalen district. At both sites, seven harvests were performed, from mid-September until mid-June. Biomass at harvest and regrowth after one season were determined. A phenology study was performed to assess growth cessation and growth start, and at each of the harvests, leaf biomass also was estimated. Plant survival after harvest was nearly 100% in all cases. There was a high correlation between plant weight at harvest and regrowth during the following season. Regrowth after the different harvest occasions varied and was highest for the harvests under January, March and April at both sites. In Flosta, the September harvest and the late spring harvests were

  5. Environmental impact assessment of biofuel production on contaminated land - Swedish case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson-Skoeld, Yvonne; Suer, Pascal (Swedish Geotechnical Institute, Linkoeping (Sweden)); Blom, Sonja (FB Engineering AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Bardos, Paul (r3 Environmental Technology Ltd, Reading (United Kingdom)); Track, Thomas; Polland, Marcel (DECHEMA e. V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany))

    2009-07-01

    This report studies the (possible) cultivation of short rotation wood (Salix Vinimalis) on two contaminated sites from an environmental perspective, through a life cycle analysis (LCA) and carbon footprint, with an outlook towards an overarching method for a qualitative or semi-quantitative analysis based on a life cycle framework. Two areas were selected as case studies: a small site where short rotation crop (Salix Vinimalis) cultivation is in progress and a large site where biofuel production is hypothetical. For the selection of suitable sites, the following aspects were considered: Site location and size, so that biofuel cultivation might be economically viable without a remediation bonus, Topography and soil conditions, so that machinery could be used for cultivation, Time, so that the site was not in urgent need of remediation due to environmental or human health risks, or acute exploitation requirements, Contamination degree, which should not be plant-toxic, Contamination depth, Assessment of optimum crop and its use. For doubtful areas, it is especially important to analyse what the most viable option for the contaminated site is, and what bio-product could be used. For a more comprehensive analysis, which also incorporates local economic and social aspects, the decision support matrix, inter alia, described in the main report of the project Rejuvenate, is recommended. The calculation of emissions for the LCA and the carbon footprint used a German software tool for LCA of soil remediation. The software includes equipment emission data published in 1995. The module 'landfarming' has been used in this study to calculate emissions from herbicide application, fertilisation, ploughing and deep-ploughing, Salix harvest, harrowing etc. Since production of herbicide and Salix Vinimalis shoots were not included in the software, they were not included in the study. The conclusions for the two sites were very similar, in spite of the large differences

  6. Climate change alters leaf anatomy, but has no effects on volatile emissions from Arctic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schollert, Michelle; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Valolahti, Hanna M; Rinnan, Riikka

    2015-10-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions are expected to change substantially because of the rapid advancement of climate change in the Arctic. BVOC emission changes can feed back both positively and negatively on climate warming. We investigated the effects of elevated temperature and shading on BVOC emissions from arctic plant species Empetrum hermaphroditum, Cassiope tetragona, Betula nana and Salix arctica. Measurements were performed in situ in long-term field experiments in subarctic and high Arctic using a dynamic enclosure system and collection of BVOCs into adsorbent cartridges analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In order to assess whether the treatments had resulted in anatomical adaptations, we additionally examined leaf anatomy using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Against expectations based on the known temperature and light-dependency of BVOC emissions, the emissions were barely affected by the treatments. In contrast, leaf anatomy of the studied plants was significantly altered in response to the treatments, and these responses appear to differ from species found at lower latitudes. We suggest that leaf anatomical acclimation may partially explain the lacking treatment effects on BVOC emissions at plant shoot-level. However, more studies are needed to unravel why BVOC emission responses in arctic plants differ from temperate species. © 2015 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The assessment of physiology parameters of willow plants as a criterion for selection of prospective clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodzkin Aleh I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioenergy production based on short rotation coppice willow plantations (SRC is an effective direction both for economic and environment profit. The yield of willow wood can amount to 10-15 tons per hectare of dry biomass per year and the cost of thus obtained energy is lower in comparison with other energy crops. In order to achieve high yield and profitability, the use of special willow clones is necessary. Species most often used in selection for biomass production are shrub type willows: Salix viminalis, Salix dasyclados and Salix schwerini, while the clones tested in this paper were also of tree species Salix alba. The productivity and some physiology characteristics of Serbian selection clones of Salix alba (Bačka, Volmianka and Drina and Swedish selection clone Jorr (Salix viminalis were investigated in greenhouses and in field conditions. As the result of testing three clones of Salix alba - Bačka, Volmianka and Drina, having special preferences and adaptability to different environmental conditions, these were included in State register of Republic of Belarus in 2013. In our experiment it was also satisfactory that specific properties of willows (intensity of transpiration and photosynthesis, water use efficiency and others, were conserved both in greenhouses and in field conditions. This factor gives opportunity to select prospective clones of willows at an early stage of ontogenesis for further testing.

  8. Final Environmental Assessment: Construction of New Arnold Village Sewage Treatment Plant Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    caroliniana) / Onoclea sensibilis Forest Salix nigra - Acer (rubrum, saccharinum) / Alnus serrulata - Cephalanthus occidentalis Forest WOODLAND Quercus...Rhynchospora corniculata - (Mecardonia acuminata - Proserpinaca spp.) Herbaceous Vegetation Panicum hemitomon - Dulichium arundinaceum Herbaceous Vegetation

  9. Environmental Compliance Assessment Protocol - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (ECAP-CDC), West Virginia Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Appendix 5-1 (continued) Scientific Name Common Name Salix lucida Shining willow Saxifraga camoliniana Carolina saxifrage Saxafraga michauxii Michaux...saxifrage Saxifraga pensylvanica Swamp saxifrage Scheuchzeria palustris ssp american Pod grass Schizachne purpurascens False melic Scirpus acutus A bullrush

  10. Energy forest irrigated with wastewater: a comparative microbial risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlander, A; Schönning, C; Stenström, T A

    2009-09-01

    In this study, risks for human infection associated with irrigation of municipal wastewater on short rotation willow coppice (Salix) were evaluated in three countries. The aim was also to determine the reduction of indicator organisms and pathogens in the treatment plants. Two of the field sites were chosen for further evaluation by QMRA (quantitative microbial risk assessment) applied to three scenarios: accidental ingestions of wastewater, exposure to aerosols and ingestion of groundwater. The risks of infection for bacteria (Salmonella), virus (rotavirus) and protozoa (Giardia, Cryptosporidium) were characterised as probability of infections per exposure and number of infections per year.The highest risk for infection was associated with exposure to rotavirus in Culmore (Northern Ireland), by either accidental ingestion of wastewater or ingestion of groundwater (P(inf) 8 x 10(-1)). For Kvidinge (Sweden) the risk for virus infection by ingestion of wastewater were in the same range (P(inf) 7 x 10(-1)). The risk for Giardia infection differed between the two sites due to differences in concentration of this pathogen in the wastewater. The groundwater was found to have suffered faecal contamination due to the wastewater irrigation. Use of partially treated wastewater for irrigation of energy crops could be a sustainable option if site-specific recommendations are developed.

  11. Final Environmental Assessment: Construction of SWMU 74 Groundwater Extraction and Convenience System Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    occidentalis - (Liquidambar styraciflua, Acer rubrum) / (Carpinus caroliniana) / Onoclea sensibilis Forest Salix nigra - Acer (rubrum, saccharinum) / Alnus ...Vegetation Eleocharis microcarpa - Juncus repens - Rhynchospora corniculata - (Mecardonia acuminata - Proserpinaca spp) Herbaceous Vegetation Panicum

  12. Phytopharmacology and medicinal properties of Salix aegyptiaca L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High amounts of phenols and flavonoids such as gallic acid, caffeic acid, myricetin, catechin, quercetin as well as salicin, are reported from the leaves of this plant. 1,4-dimethoxybenzene, phenylethyl alcohol, carvone, citronellol, methyleugenol, eugenol, n-tetradecane and 4-methoxyacetophenone were identified as the ...

  13. Salix : A viable option for phytoremediation | Wani | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 8 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF ...

  14. Sex and the single Salix: considerations for riparian restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; David R. Dreesen; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2003-01-01

    Most restoration projects strive to create a sustain able plant community but exclusive use of vegetatively propagated material may be preventing this goal. The dioecious willows and cottonwoods of the Salicaceae are widely used in riparian restoration projects. Hardwood cuttings have traditionally been used to propagate these species in nurseries, and live stakes,...

  15. Vermistella arctica n. sp. Nominates the Genus Vermistella as a Candidate for Taxon with Bipolar Distribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tyml, Tomáš; Kostka, Martin; Ditrich, O.; Dyková, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2016), s. 210-219 ISSN 1066-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : actin * biogeography * bipolar distribution * free-living amoebae * phylogeny * polar regions * SSU Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.692, year: 2016

  16. The winter diet of the Atlantic Puffin Fratercula arctica around the Faroe Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, M.P.; Leopold, M.F.; Jensen, J.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Wanless, S.

    2015-01-01

    Most mortality of Atlantic Puffins occurs outside the breeding season but little is known about the species’ diet at that time. The stomach contents of 176 Puffins shot legally for food around the Faroe Islands between October and January in three winters were examined. The remains of 20 species of

  17. Sarcocystis arctica (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae): ultrastructural description and its new host record, the Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcocystis sarcocysts are common in muscles of herbivores but are rare in muscles of carnivores. Here, we report sarcocysts in muscle of an Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus) from Alaska, USA for the first time. Sarcocysts extracted from tongue of the wolf were up to 900 µm long, slender, and appeared to h...

  18. Assessing Classroom Assessment Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson-Beck, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are teaching strategies that provide formative assessments of student learning. It has been argued that the use of CATs enhances and improves student learning. Although the various types of CATs have been extensively documented and qualitatively studied, there appears to be little quantitative research…

  19. Assessing soil quality and potential productivity - a basic approach to define and assess the marginality of land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repmann, Frank; Gerwin, Werner; Freese, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    An ever growing demand for energy and the widely proposed switch from fossil fuels to more sustainable energy sources puts the cultivation and use of bioenergy plants into focus. However, bioenergy production on regular and fertile agricultural soils might conflict with the worldwide growing demand for food. To mitigate or omit this potential conflict, the use of low quality or marginal land for cultivation of bioenergy plants becomes favorable. Against this background the definition and assessment of land marginality and, respectively, the evaluation whether and to which extent specific areas are marginal and thus convenient for sustainable bioenergy production, becomes highly relevant. Within the framework of the EU funded Horizon 2020 project SEEMLA, we attempted to asses land marginality of designated test sites in the Ukraine, Greece and Germany by direct field survey. For that purpose, soil and site properties were investigated and evaluated by applying the Muencheberg Soil Quality Rating (SQR) method, developed at the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF). The method deploys a comprehensive set of biogeophysical and chemical indicators to describe and finally evaluate the quality of the soil and site by a score ranging from 1 to 100 points. Field survey data were supported by additional laboratory tests on a representative set of soil samples. Practical field work and analysis of field and lab data from the investigated sites proved the applicability of the SQR method within the SEEMLA context. The SQR indices calculated from the field and lab data ranged from 2 to Germany, which differed considerably in respect to their characteristics. Correlating the site quality index to yield data reflecting yield estimations for common bioenergy plants such as willow (Salix sp.), black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) and poplar (Populus sp.) cultivated at the respective test sites, revealed that SQR might additionally reflect the potential yield of

  20. Gestational assessment assessed

    OpenAIRE

    Wariyar, U; TIN, W.; Hey, E

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To review the accuracy with which obstetric information on gestation is recorded in the neonatal records; and the reliability of the methods used for assessing gestational age after birth.
METHODS—Service information on all babies born in 1989, and research information on all babies of  32 weeks gestation, and senior staff looked at 105 babies of 

  1. Gestational assessment assessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wariyar, U; Tin, W; Hey, E

    1997-11-01

    To review the accuracy with which obstetric information on gestation is recorded in the neonatal records; and the reliability of the methods used for assessing gestational age after birth. Service information on all babies born in 1989, and research information on all babies of 347 babies of > 32 weeks gestation, and senior staff looked at 105 babies of creep into the routine computation and recording of gestation at birth.

  2. Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    How the EPA conducts risk assessment to protect human health and the environment. Several assessments are included with the guidelines, models, databases, state-based RSL Tables, local contacts and framework documents used to perform these assessments.

  3. [Effect of excretion-secretion products of some fouling species on the biochemical parameters of blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the White Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidchenko, V S; Vysotskaia, R U; Krupnova, M Iu; Khalaman, V V

    2011-01-01

    The effect of excretion-secretion products (ESP) of five abundant fouling invertebrate species (bivalve mollusks Hiatella arctica and Mytilus edulis, solitary ascidia Styela rustica, sponge Halichondria panicea, and sea starAsterias rubens, inhabiting the White Sea) on the biochemical status of blue mussel M. edulis was assessed by the dynamics of lysosomal enzymes activity (nucleases, glycoside hydrolases, and cathepsins). ESP of conspecific species had no effect on the metabolism of the mollusks of this species. ESP of A. rubens, S. rustica, and H. panicea activated the same enzymes. First, acid RNase and glycoside hydrolases activity increased, but in different ways. The metabolites of H. arctica affected the activity of proteometabolism enzymes.

  4. Conservation assessment for the autumn willow in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Hope Hornbeck; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Deanna J. Reyher

    2003-01-01

    Autumn willow, Salix serissima (Bailey) Fern., is an obligate wetland shrub that occurs in fens and bogs in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada. Disjunct populations of autumn willow occur in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Only two populations occur on Black Hills National Forest lands: a large population at McIntosh Fen and a small...

  5. Volumetric assessment of airborne pollen and spore levels in Rochester, Minnesota, 1992 through 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decco, M L; Wendland, B I; O'Connell, E J

    1998-03-01

    To reassess airborne pollen counts and to study spore counts by volumetric collection in Rochester, Minnesota. Samples of pollen and spores were collected from the top of a six-story building in downtown Rochester by use of a rotational rod sampler, which was activated for 30 seconds every 10 minutes for 24 hours a day, 5 days a week, from mid-April to mid-October 1992 through 1995. Particles were stained with Calberla's fluid and viewed microscopically by transmitted light. Identifications were substantiated by comparison with field-collected "known" materials and standard reference guides. Data were expressed as "particles retained/cubic meter of air sampled." Because the methods of collection varied, only qualitative comparisons could be made with a study done in Rochester more than 3 1/2 decades earlier. For tree pollens, a similar progression of appearance and seasonal duration were noted for most species. Alder (Alnus), willow (Salix), and hickory-pecan (Carya), however, were found to have distinctly longer seasons, and walnut (Julgans) was detected 2 weeks earlier in the season. The most frequently detected tree pollen had changed from oak (Quercus) to apple and crab apple (Malus), which was not reported at all previously. Ragweed (Ambrosia) was still found to peak at the end of August and had a similar duration. Study of grass and nettle pollen as well as the Amaranthaceae-Chenopodiaceae complex yielded findings similar to those in the prior investigation. Fungal spores were detected from April through October and represented a substantial percentage of the airborne allergens; Cladosporium, ascospores, and basidiospores were the most common. Volumetric assessment of airborne pollen and spore levels in Rochester, Minnesota, yielded useful information for clinicians in southern Minnesota that could help direct skin test selection.

  6. Dynamic Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoel, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Adventure therapists are often asked to assess clients in a manner that differs from their therapeutic approach, resulting in assessment being perceived as burdensome. Project Adventure's Decision Tree combines assessment with activity selection to create a dynamic tool that is responsive to group, individual, and leader needs. Example focuses on…

  7. Environmental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, M C; Tennant, J

    1997-11-01

    The significance, standard elements, components, and documentation of an environmental assessment in home care are discussed. This assessment is delineated within Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and from a functional perspective. An Environmental Assessment Form that can be used as a documentation tool is included.

  8. Site assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report describes the site assessment of given position in a given site, for a wind turbine with a well-defined hub height and rotor diameter. The analysis is carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 [1], and both an obstacle assessment and a terrain assessment are performed....

  9. Site assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Vesth, Allan

    This report describes the site assessment of given position in a given site, for a wind turbine with a well-defined hub height and rotor diameter. The analysis is carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 [1], and both an obstacle assessment and a terrain assessment are performed...

  10. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions along a high arctic soil moisture gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Sarah Hagel; Lindwall, Frida; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    emissions from a high arctic soil moisture gradient extending from dry tundra to a wet fen. Ecosystem BVOC emissions were sampled five times in the July-August period using a push-pull enclosure technique, and BVOCs trapped in absorbent cartridges were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry....... Plant species compositions were estimated using the point intercept method. In order to take into account important underlying ecosystem processes, gross ecosystem production, ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem production were measured in connection with chamber-based BVOC measurements. Highest...... emissions of BVOCs were found from vegetation communities dominated by Salix arctica and Cassiope tetragona, which had emission profiles dominated by isoprene and monoterpenes, respectively. These results show that emissions of BVOCs are highly dependent on the plant cover supported by the varying soil...

  11. Holocene stratigraphy and vegetation history in the Scoresby Sund area, East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby

    1978-01-01

    The Holocene stratigraphy in Scoresby Sund is based on climatic change as reflected by fluctuations in fjord and valley glaciers, immigration and extinction of marine molluscs, and the vegetation history recorded in pollen diagrams from five lakes. The histories are dated by C-14, and indirectly...... into the area, and in the period until 5000 yr BP dense dwarf shrub heath grew in areaS where it is now absent. In the fjords the subarctic Mytilus edulis and Pecten islandica lived, suggesting a climate warmer than the present. From c. 5000 yr BP the dense dwarf shrub heath began to disappear in the coastal...... areas, and a 'poor' heath dominated by the high arctic Salix Arctica and Cassiope tetragona expanded. These two species, which are now extremely common, apparently did not grow in the area until c. 6000 yrBP. In lakes in the coastal area minerogenic sedimentation at c. 2800 yr BP, reflecting the general...

  12. Improved UV-B screening capacity does not prevent negative effects of ambient UV irradiance on PSII performance in High Arctic plants. Results from a six year UV exclusion study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term responses of ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation were investigated on Salix arctica and Vaccinium uliginosum in a High Arctic heath ecosystem in Zackenberg, northeast Greenland. Over a period of six years, UV exclusion was conducted in the growing season by means of filters: 60% UV......-B reduction, 90% UV-B + UV-A reduction, UV transparent filter control, and an open control without filter. Plant responses were evaluated using specific leaf area, leaf content of UV-B absorbing compounds and PSII performance parameters derived from chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction curves. Based...... increased TRo/ABS = FV/FM and REo/ETo. These results demonstrate the current level of ambient UV-B to decrease PSII performance significantly in these High Arctic plants. It appears that the two plant species both have improved their UV-screening capacity, but through different strategies, although this did...

  13. Symposium: Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4)…

  14. Portfolio Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagavarian, Debra A.

    The portfolio assessment process at Thomas A. Edison State College is described in this report. Through portfolio assessment, the school helps students identify and gain credit for college-level skills and knowledge acquired through work, volunteer activities, independent reading, military or corporate training, and life experiences that may be…

  15. Technology assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rip, Arie; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Technology assessment (TA) refers to the early identification and assessment of eventual impacts of technological change and applications, as a service to policy making and decision making more generally. TA can be done by (or for) business firms, or as a medical, social, or environmental impact

  16. Existential Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Richard H.; Leech, Shirley

    1974-01-01

    Present psychological assessment stems from a philosophy of science that values objectivity but fails to comprehend the existence of the person being evaluated. A humanistic-existential model shifts the focus from omnipotence to encounter and encourages client responsibility. Some pertinent assessment issues are formulated and specific instruments…

  17. Digitial assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard; Petersen, Lise

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with The Danish eGOVERNMENT strategy 2011-2015 digital assessment and exam should be implemented at all Danish universities by the end of 2013. University of Southern Denmark (SDU) decided to start the implementation in May 2010.By the exam term of January 2013, the implementation proved successful, and close to completion. The majority of assessments at all of the 5 faculties and 5 campuses were digital, and students had handed in a total of 17.021 digital assessments.On the ba...

  18. Hydrographical variability and major ecosystem changes as recorded in the growth of Arctica islandica from the northern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimova, Tamara; Andersson, Carin; Bonitz, Fabian

    2017-04-01

    Reconstruction of marine climate variability on regional to global scales requires a network of climatically sensitive annually resolved archives from key oceanographic locations. The small number of records existing to date impedes the application of a network approach. In this study, we aim at improving the spatial coverage of annually resolved paleo proxy records by investigating the impact of climate variability on sclerochronological records of A. islandica from the Viking Bank in the northern North Sea. The northern North Sea has an excellent oceanographic setting because its hydrography is primarily controlled by the major Atlantic water inflow to the North Sea. Using annual growth increment measurements of 30 shells we constructed a 265-year shell-growth chronology spanning the time interval AD 1748-2013. Chronology statistics (Rbar (>0.5) and EPS (>0.85)) indicate a robust signal of a common environmental forcing controlling shell growth for the major part of the record. Comparison with other sclerochronologies from the oceanographically related locations reveals a coherency on longer time scales, which is likely a response to a common environmental driver or a combination of such drivers. No significant correlation on the year-on-year level has been found between the chronology and time series of temperature and salinity from the area close to the study site. However, the timing of major hydrographical anomalies described for the region (Great Salinity Anomalies) coincide with a decrease in shell growth; likely in response to an impact on lower trophic levels, i.e. plankton composition and abundance. Spectral analysis of the chronology reveals a 21-26 year periodicity recorded in the shell growth. The variability on a similar time scale has been observed in multiple records from the North Atlantic and in model outputs. It has been suggested to represent one of the dominant scales of multi-decadal variability especially pronounced prior to the 20th century. In our chronology this variability is clearly observed prior to the 1920's and fades out towards present day. This change coincides with the most significant regime shift in the North Atlantic observed in the 20th-century, connected with dramatic warming and increasing Atlantic inflow. Hence, our data show that growth chronology from the Viking Bank region has a high potential to be used in climate variability studies and can significantly contribute to the development of a spatial sclerochronological network.

  19. Dietary Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    EGRP's goals in Dietary Assessment are to increase the precision of dietary intake estimates by improving self-report of dietary intake and the analytic procedures for processing reported information.

  20. Transforming assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens; Evans, Robert Harry

    This book reports the results of a research project that investigated assessment methods aimed at supporting and improving inquiry-based approaches in European science, technology and mathematics (STM) education. The findings were used to influence policy makers with guidelines for ensuring...... that assessment enhances learning. The book provides insights about: - The concept of competence within the STM domains and its relevance for education - The conceptualisation and teaching of four key competences: scientific inquiry, mathematical problem-solving, design processes, and innovation. - Fundamental...... aspects of the two main purposes of assessment, formative and summative, the relations between the two purposes and ways of linking them. - The main challenges related to the uptake of formative assessment in daily teaching-learning practices in STM and specifically, the usability of formative on...

  1. Commercial bumblebee hives to assess an anthropogenic environment for pollinator support: a case study in the region of Ghent (Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Laurian; Meeus, Ivan; Cheroutre, Lore; Mommaerts, Veerle; Louwye, Stephen; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic changes of the environment influence the distribution and abundance of pollinators such as bumblebees and have been proposed as one of the main causes in their worldwide decline. In order to evaluate the impact of expanding anthropogenic landscapes on supporting pollinator potential, reliable tools are needed. Bombus terrestris is one of the most abundant bumblebee species in Europe, and these bumblebees are known as generalist pollinators of not only wild flowers in nature but also of crops in agriculture. For more than two decades, these bumblebees have been commercially mass reared for biological pollination in greenhouses. In this project, we placed commercial hives of the bumblebee B. terrestris containing one queen and 40 workers, in three different locations in the region of Ghent (Belgium), and the performance of these hives was followed during a 4-week period in spring 2012. In parallel, we determined the floral richness and diversity index in the chosen study sites. The sites consisted of a rich urban environment with patchy green areas opposed to an urban environment with poor landscape metrics; a third rural study site showed average positive landscape metrics. The results demonstrated that the hive biomass and numbers of workers increased significantly in the rich compared to the poor environment, providing a mechanism to discriminate between study sites. In addition, the bumblebee-collected pollen showed that the flowering plants Salix spp. and Rosaceae/Prunus spp. are dominant food sources in all anthropogenic environments during early spring. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to the optimization of the experimental setup and to the use of commercial bumblebee hives in assessing local pollinator support within any given environment.

  2. Effect of very short cycles of wood production on some paper and chemical characteristics of osier rods (salix viminalis and salix fragilis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milea, I.

    1980-01-01

    The indexes of web-formation, flexibility, rigidity, Runkel, and Muehlsteph showed that the clones of S. Viminalis were more useful than those of S. Fragilis in the preparation of special cultures for short-cycle production of willow wood for manufacture of pulp usable for papermaking. The fibers of S. Viminalis were thinner than those of S. Fragilis. The differences in the fiber thinness and web-formability indexes for the two species were explained by the lower ploidy of the clones of S. Viminalis.

  3. Preoperative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Miguel, F J; Serrano-Aguilar, P G; López-Bastida, J

    2003-11-22

    Although anaesthetic and surgical procedures should be individualised for every patient, in practice many preoperative protocols and routines are used generally. In this article, we aim to emphasise: why preoperative assessment is important; how it should be done, and by whom; what can be expected; and the importance of test selection based on patients' needs and on scientific evidence of effectiveness. We outline the roles of preoperative medical assessment in otherwise healthy patients. Clinical history, preoperative questionnaires, physical examination, routine tests, individual risk-assessment, and fasting policies are investigated by review of published work. Cost of routine preoperative assessment, the anaesthetist's legal responsibility, and patients'views in the preoperative process are also considered. A thorough clinical preoperative assessment of the patient is more important than routine preoperative tests, which should be requested only when justified by clinical indications. Moreover, this practice eliminates unnecessary cost without compromising the safety and quality of care. Education and training of medical doctors should be more scientifically guided, emphasising the relevance of effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness in clinical decision-making and complemented by audit.

  4. Pain assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefeli, Mathias; Elfering, Achim

    2006-01-01

    Pain usually is the major complaint of patients with problems of the back, thus making pain evaluation a fundamental requisite in the outcome assessment in spinal surgery. Pain intensity, pain-related disability, pain duration and pain affect are the aspects that define pain and its effects. For each of these aspects, different assessment instruments exist and are discussed in terms of advantages and disadvantages. Risk factors for the development of chronic pain have been a major topic in pain research in the past two decades. Now, it has been realised that psychological and psychosocial factors may substantially influence pain perception in patients with chronic pain and thus may influence the surgical outcome. With this background, pain acceptance, pain tolerance and pain-related anxiety as factors influencing coping strategies are discussed. Finally, a recommendation for a minimum as well as for a more comprehensive pain assessment is given.

  5. Sectoral assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaway, J.M.; Fenhann, J.; Gorham, R.; Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J.

    1999-09-01

    This publication contains five papers that were written as a part of the GEF project, The Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations. The main goal of the project was to assess the greenhouse gas reductions and incremental costs of mitigation option sin Ecuador, Argentina, Senegal, Mauritius, Vietnam, Indonesia, Estonia and Hungary. In addition, regional studies were conducted for the Andean Pact nations and Southern Africa to assess various aspects of regional co-operation in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The GEF study also involved the development of a methodological framework for climate change assessment, with a special emphasis on developing countries. These guidelines have been published in a separate document, Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations: Methodological Guidelines. The papers in this publication focus on various methodological and policy aspects of greenhouse gas mitigation at the sectoral level, and are outgrowth of work performed on other parts of the GEF project. (au)

  6. Nutritional Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirmann, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Nutritional assessment focuses on evaluation of animal-specific, diet-specific, feeding management, and environmental factors. Assessment includes evaluation of a patient's medical history, comprehensive diet history, and physical examination including body weight, body condition, and muscle condition. Diagnostic testing may identify comorbidities associated with obesity or concurrent health conditions that need to be considered when developing a nutrition plan. When obesity is diagnosed during the nutritional assessment this finding along with health implications must be clearly communicated to the pet owner. Careful consideration of animal-specific, diet-specific, owner-specific, and environmental factors allows the clinician to develop a specific nutrition plan tailored to the needs of pet and owner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing Believability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togelius, Julian; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Karakovskiy, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    (or at least complementary) assessment might be made by an external observer that does not participate in the game, through comparing and ranking the performance of human and non-human agents playing a game. This assessment philosophy was embodied in the Turing Test Track of the recent Mario AI...... Championship, where non-expert bystanders evaluated the human-likeness of several agents and humans playing a version of Super Mario Bros. We analyze the results of this competition. Finally, we discuss the possibilities for forming models of believability and of maximizing believability through adjusting game...

  8. Innovation Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    I label innovation assessment, to steer polities through periods of disruptive technological change, during which innovations have taken concrete forms and are beginning to diffuse, but still exhibit much scope for rapid, unexpected change and alternative trajectories of development. By juxtaposing...

  9. The investigation of morphological characteristics of willow species in different environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodzkin Aleh I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative or renewable energy is a modern strategy with a good per­spective in the nearest future. There are several directions of renewable energy development that depend on climatic, economic and technological opportunities of a region. The perspective choice for areas with moderate climate is bioenergy. One of the bioenergy directions is agro forestry based on short rotation coppice plantations (SRC of trees, like willow, poplar and others. The goal of experiments was the assessment of the potential of different willow species for the obtaining of energy in two climatic zones and on two types of soils of Belarus. For this purpose several morphological characteristics were metered: height of plants, biomass, diameter and number of sprouts. The field experiments were conducted on two types of soils: post-mining peaty soils in Grodno region and on degraded peaty soils in Brest region of Belarus. The same soils are very problematic for growing of traditional agricultural crops, thus willow production is a good alternative for biomass production of energy as well as for the reclamation of these soils. In our experiments the following species of willow were tested (Salix alba, Salix viminalis, Salix dasyclados, Salix aurita that may grow on peaty soils at the natural conditions. The most popular species for modern selection of SRC of willow is Salix viminalis. Nevertheless, the most suitable morphological characteristics on post-mining peaty soils were established for plants of Salix dasyclados and on degraded peaty soils for the plants of Salix alba. The unfavorable parameters at the both type of soils were identified for the plants of Salix aurita. However, it is necessary to take into account that the used species are more popular for natural wetlands and in our experiments plants have best results of survival of cutting and rates of growth at the beginning of vegetation. In accordance with these facts Salix aurita may not be used for energy

  10. Environmental Assessment: Clear Zone and Accident Potential Zone Selective Tree Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    species in these stands include mature white oak (Quercus alba), water oak, tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), beech, laurel oak (Quercus...virginiana), sweet gum, laurel oak, black willow (Salix nigra), tulip poplar, and red maple are also common in this vegetation type. Joor’s sedge...in a different type of vegetation community. Swamp tupelo, red maple, sweet bay, red bay (Persea palustris), tulip poplar, sweet gum, and laurel oak

  11. Risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Liselotte; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Elsass, Peter

    2010-01-01

    International research suggests that using formalized risk assessment methods may improve the predictive validity of professionals' predictions of risk of future violence. This study presents data on forensic psychiatric patients discharged from a forensic unit in Denmark in year 2001-2002 (n=107...... and the individual dynamic items strengthen the use of this scheme in clinical practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)...

  12. Accounting assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafka S.М.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The proper evaluation of accounting objects influences essentially upon the reliability of assessing the financial situation of a company. Thus, the problem in accounting estimate is quite relevant. The works of home and foreign scholars on the issues of assessment of accounting objects, regulatory and legal acts of Ukraine controlling the accounting and compiling financial reporting are a methodological basis for the research. The author uses the theoretical methods of cognition (abstraction and generalization, analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction and other methods producing conceptual knowledge for the synthesis of theoretical and methodological principles in the evaluation of assets accounting, liabilities and equity. The tabular presentation and information comparison methods are used for analytical researches. The article considers the modern approaches to the issue of evaluation of accounting objects and financial statements items. The expedience to keep records under historical value is proved and the articles of financial statements are to be presented according to the evaluation on the reporting date. In connection with the evaluation the depreciation of fixed assets is considered as a process of systematic return into circulation of the before advanced funds on the purchase (production, improvement of fixed assets and intangible assets by means of including the amount of wear in production costs. Therefore it is proposed to amortize only the actual costs incurred, i.e. not to depreciate the fixed assets received free of charge and surplus valuation of different kinds.

  13. Flibe assessments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, D. K.; McCarthy, K.; Sawan, M.; Tillack, M.; Ying, A.; Zinkle, S.

    2000-11-15

    An assessment of the issues on using flibe for fusion applications has been made. It is concluded that sufficient tritium breeding can be achieved for a flibe blanket, especially if a few cm of Be is include in the blanket design. A key issue is the control of the transmutation products such as TF and F{sub 2}. A REDOX (Reducing-Oxidation) reaction has to be demonstrated which is compatible to the blanket design. Also, MHD may have strong impact on heat transfer if the flow is perpendicular to the magnetic field. The issues associated with the REDOX reaction and the MHD issues have to be resolved by both experimental program and numerical solutions.

  14. Alternative Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Porto Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O ensino/aprendizagem tem mudado nas últimas três décadas e também a avaliação que não deve ser vista apenas como uma forma de testar os alunos e promovê-los, mas ajudá-los a se envolver no processo de aprendizagem, e que forneça ao professor informações para o planejamento de instrução e práticas pedagógicas. É um diagnóstico dos pontos fortes e fracos do aluno que direciona a sala de aula para a avaliação através de atividades reunidas em portfólio, incluindo todas as ações do processo ensino/ aprendizagem, visando atender às necessidades dos domínios cognitivos, afetivos e psicomotores do aluno, definir objetivos, planejamento e instrução, o envolvimento do aprendiz em sua aprendizagem e a avaliação, desconstruindo, construindo e reconstruindo o seu conhecimento.The teaching/learning has changed over the past three decades and assessment musn´t be seen as just a means of testing learners´ achievement and promotion. This type of evaluation helps students get more involved in their learning and provides teachers with useful information as the basis for instructional plans and pedagogical practices. It is a way of diagnosing the students´ strengths and weaknesses so that class procedures are directed to include activities in which students measurable outcomes are collected in a portfolio that include all types of learning/assessment procedures aiming to match the students´ cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains, to define objectives, planning, instruction and active participation in the process, deconstructing, constructing and reconstructing knowledge.

  15. Programmatic assessment: From assessment of learning to assessment for learning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuwirth, L.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    In assessment a considerable shift in thinking has occurred from assessment of learning to assessment for learning. This has important implications for the conceptual framework from which to approach the issue of assessment, but also with respect to the research agenda. The main conceptual changes

  16. Phytoremediation capacity of poplar (Populus spp. and willow (Salix spp. clonesin relation to photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajević Slobodanka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Good photosynthetic features and a favorable water regimes of woody plants improve their survival and remediation potential under unfavorable ecological conditions. Accordingly, we here present results of testing plant tolerance of Pb, Cd, Ni, and diesel fuel based on gas exchange parameters and WUE of four poplar and two willow clones grown in a greenhouse on soil culture. Photosynthesis and transpiration of plants grown on soils with individually applied heavy metals decreased significantly, but this was less obvious in the case of Cd treatment. A heavy metal mixture in the soil induced significant reduction in photosynthesis (by more than 50%. Diesel fuel as the only pollutant in soil caused very strong and significant inhibition of photosynthesis and transpiration of willow clones. The results indicate genotypic specificity of all investigated physiological parameters and mark poplar clones as very useful in phytoextraction technology for the bio-cleaning of chemically polluted soils.

  17. Seasonal sap flow of four Salix varieties growing on the Solvay wastebeds in Syracuse, NY, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirck, Jaconette; Volk, Timothy A

    2010-01-01

    Sap flow of four shrub willow varieties was measured to study their potential use as an evapotranspiration (ET) cover on the Solvay wastebeds to reduce deep percolation and leaching of chloride. Stem and stand-level sap flow and crop coefficients (K(c)) were different among four willow varieties measured between early June and mid November 2006. Diameter and cross sectional area had a significant impact on stand level sap flow. Peak stand-level sap flow of 7 mm d(-1) occurred in June, due to coupling of the willow with the atmosphere, and not in July or August when peak LAI was measured. The coupling also resulted in high K(c) values of 3 in June and above 2 in October with an average of 1.1-1.3 for the entire season. Our measurements confirmed the potentials of shrub willow in ET cover applications in the northeastern USA. Total transpiration for the growing season ranged between 494 mm and 533 mm, which was about 45% of the precipitation in 2006. Our calculations showed a significant difference between peak season sap flow in June, July and August and sap flow over the course of the whole growing season, which showed the need for long-term measurements.

  18. The root anchorage ability of Salix alba var. tristis using a pull-out test

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... The vegetation materials may reduce soil erosion and runoff, create space for breeding and habitat and they are commonly used in river ecological engineering. Therefore, it is important to select the soil- bioengineering plant by taking its growth characteristics and the soil solidity of its root system as the.

  19. Manipulating sheep browsing levels on coyote willow (Salix exigua) with supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macronutrients and additives have been used to suppress or promote intake of upland tannin-containing browse species by livestock, but to our knowledge this technique has not been applied to sheep that feed on tannin-containing species in riparian areas. The objective of this study was to determine ...

  20. Response of Organ Structure and Physiology to Autotetraploidization in Early Development of Energy Willow Salix viminalis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dudits, D.; Torok, K.; Cseri, A.; Paul, K.; Nagy, A.V.; Nagy, B.; Sass, L.; Ferenc, G.; Vaňková, Radomíra; Dobrev, Petre; Vass, I.; Ayaydin, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 3 (2016), s. 1504-1523 ISSN 0032-0889 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : IMAGE-ANALYSIS * WATER - STRESS * PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSES Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  1. Stabilization of sunflower oil with pussy willow (Salix aegyptiaca) extract and essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyari, Zahra; Farahmandfar, Reza

    2017-03-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate antioxidant efficacy of pussy willow extract (PWE) and essential oil (PWEO) in stabilization of sunflower oil (SFO) during ambient storage (60 days at 25°C). Initially, total phenolic (TP) and total flavonoid (TF) contents were evaluated. Then, PWE, PWEO, and TBHQ were added to SFO. Peroxide value (PV), carbonyl value (CV), total polar compound (TPC), acid value (AV), and Oxidative stability index (OSI) were measured every 15 days. The results showed that PWE had higher TP and TF than PWEO (TP: 966.72 mg GAE/g and 355.8472 mg GAE/g, respectively; TF: 619.45 mg/100 g and 195.45 mg/100 g, respectively). Furthermore, according to all stabilization parameters, PWE had higher antioxidant efficacy followed by TBHQ, PWEO, and control, respectively. Therefore, PWE has antioxidant activity and it may be recommended as natural strong antioxidants to suppress lipid oxidation.

  2. Differential expression of genes encoding phosphate transporters contributes to arsenic accumulation in shrub willow (Salix spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily E. Puckett; Michelle J. Serpiglia; Alyssa M. DeLeon; Stephanie Long; Rakesh Minocha; Lawrence B. Smart

    2012-01-01

    Studies of arsenate and phosphate uptake by plants in hydroponic and soil systems indicate a common transport mechanism via the phosphate transporters (PHTs) due to structural similarity of the anions. Typically, the presence of phosphate decreases plant uptake and translocation of arsenate in hydroponic solution. This study quantified arsenic (As) uptake related to...

  3. Distribution of assimilated carbon in plants and rhizosphere soil of basket willow (Salix viminalis L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neergaard, de A.; Porter, J.R.; Gorissen, A.

    2002-01-01

    Willow is often used in bio-energy plantations for its potential to function as a renewable energy source, but knowledge about its effect on soil carbon dynamics is limited. Therefore, we investigated the temporal variation in carbon dynamics in willow, focusing on below-ground allocation and

  4. SALIX-2 Simulatie Agenten voor Landschapsarchitectonisch Design in virtual reality (X)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammeren, van R.J.A.; Clerc, V.; Kramer, H.

    2003-01-01

    De ontwikkeling van een driedimensionale computerapplicatie ten behoeve van de landschapsarchitectuur wordt beschreven. De applicatie, een voorbeeld van virtual reality, wordt zowel functioneel als naar implementatie besproken. Ingegaan wordt op de digitale weergave van beplantingen, het

  5. Chemical weed control by planting of poplar (Populus and willow (Salix short rotation coppice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehring, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Five field trials were carried out from 2010 – 2012 on three different locations. The trials conformed high requirement of effective weed control by planting poplar and willow short rotation coppice (SRC on arable area. The selectivity of different pre-emergent and post-emergent herbicide treatments was tested. Further trials focused on sufficient and long-standing herbicide efficacy of tank mixture and sequence treatments. As results of these trials it is advisable to use proper soil active herbicides like Artist, Cadou SC, Sencor WG, Spectrum, Spectrum Plus or Stomp Aqua as pre-emergent tank mixture treatment after planting of poplar and willow SRC. Aramo and Lontrel 100 can be used as post-emergent treatment for control of specific weeds. We intend to register the successful tested herbicides for minor use in poplar and willow SRC under licensing referred to Art. 51 regulation (EC no 1107/2009.

  6. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Crude Extracts of Salix subserrata and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute, P.O.B. 1242, Addis. Ababa, Ethiopia. 2Agri-service Ethiopia, P.O. .... evaluate the anti-rabies activities of the claimed medicinal plants and encour- age further research on the claimed plants if they are ..... Traditional Medicinal Program. WHO manual for traditional medicine.

  7. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Deployment of Up to Four F-16C Aircraft to the 133rd Airlift Wing for Air Sovereignty Alert Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    nomadic groups to larger, more politically complex villages. This change is particularly striking in the Minnesota River region, since it contains...vivipara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ball cactus Fimbristylis puberula var. interior . . . . . . . hairy fimbristylis Glaux maritima ...leaved coneflower Ruppia maritima . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ditch-grass Salix maccalliana

  8. Soil carbon and belowground carbon balance of a short-rotation coppice: assessments from three different approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhongaray, Gonzalo; Verlinden, Melanie S; Broeckx, Laura S; Janssens, Ivan A; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2017-02-01

    Uncertainty in soil carbon (C) fluxes across different land-use transitions is an issue that needs to be addressed for the further deployment of perennial bioenergy crops. A large-scale short-rotation coppice (SRC) site with poplar (Populus) and willow (Salix) was established to examine the land-use transitions of arable and pasture to bioenergy. Soil C pools, output fluxes of soil CO 2, CH 4, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and volatile organic compounds, as well as input fluxes from litter fall and from roots, were measured over a 4-year period, along with environmental parameters. Three approaches were used to estimate changes in the soil C. The largest C pool in the soil was the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool and increased after four years of SRC from 10.9 to 13.9 kg C m-2. The belowground woody biomass (coarse roots) represented the second largest C pool, followed by the fine roots (Fr). The annual leaf fall represented the largest C input to the soil, followed by weeds and Fr. After the first harvest, we observed a very large C input into the soil from high Fr mortality. The weed inputs decreased as trees grew older and bigger. Soil respiration averaged 568.9 g C m-2 yr-1. Leaching of DOC increased over the three years from 7.9 to 14.5 g C m-2. The pool-based approach indicated an increase of 3360 g C m-2 in the SOC pool over the 4-year period, which was high when compared with the -27 g C m-2 estimated by the flux-based approach and the -956 g C m-2 of the combined eddy-covariance + biometric approach. High uncertainties were associated to the pool-based approach. Our results suggest using the C flux approach for the assessment of the short-/medium-term SOC balance at our site, while SOC pool changes can only be used for long-term C balance assessments.

  9. Salt intrusion in tidal wetlands: European willow species tolerate oligohaline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Michalczyk, Heike; Hanelt, Dieter; Ludewig, Kristin; Müller, David; Schröter, Brigitte; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Tidal wetlands experience salt intrusion due to the effects of climate change. This study clarifies that the European flood plain willows species Salix alba and Salix viminalis tolerate oligohaline conditions. Salix alba L. and Salix viminalis L. are distributed on flood plains up to transitional waters of the oligohaline to the mesohaline estuarine stretch in temperate climates. They experience spatial and temporal variations in flooding and salinity. In the past, willows dominated the vegetation above the mean high water line, attenuated waves and contributed to sedimentation. In recent centuries, human utilization reduced willow stands. Today, the Elbe estuary - a model system for an estuary in temperate zones - exhibits increasing flooding and salinity due to man-induced effects and climatic changes. Willows were described as having no salinity tolerance. In contrast, our soil water salinity measurements at willows in tidal wetlands prove that mature Salix individuals tolerate oligohaline conditions. To assess immature plant salinity tolerance, we conducted a hydroponic greenhouse experiment. Vegetative propagules originating from a freshwater and an oligohaline site were treated in four salinities. Related to growth rates and biomass production, we found interspecific similarities and a salinity tolerance up to salinity 2. Vitality and chlorophyll fluorescence indicated an acclimation of Salix viminalis to oligohaline conditions. We conclude, that the survival of S. alba and S. viminalis and the restoration of willow stands in estuarine flood plains - with regard to wave attenuation and sedimentation - might be possible, despite increasing salinity in times of climate change.

  10. SIS - Fish Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Fish Assessment data set within the Species Information System (SIS) constraints information related to fishery stock assessments, including assessment meta-data...

  11. The geriatric assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elsawy, Bassem; Higgins, Kim E

    2011-01-01

    The geriatric assessment is a multidimensional, multidisciplinary assessment designed to evaluate an older person's functional ability, physical health, cognition and mental health, and socioenvironmental circumstances...

  12. Patient Assessment File (PAF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Patient Assessment File (PAF) database compiles the results of the Patient Assessment Instrument (PAI) questionnaire filled out for intermediate care Veterans...

  13. Programmatic Environmental Assessment, 2007 General Plan for the Main Cantonment and the South Base Cantonment at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-05

    a dense, low, closed-canopy, broad- leafed , winter-deciduous riparian forest dominated by arroyo willow (Salix lasiolepis), which can grow as a tree...Wild blackberry (Rubus ursinus), mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana), and stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) are common understory components of...effusus), and toad rush (Juncus bufonius). Sword-leaved rush (Juncus ensifolius), and sickle- leaf rush (Juncus falcatus) may dominate where moisture

  14. Dimensions of Oral Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joughin, Gordon

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of literature on oral assessment in college instruction identified six dimensions: primary content type; interaction between examiner and learner; authenticity of assessment task; structure of assessment task; examiner; and orality (extent to which knowledge is tested orally). These help in understanding the nature of oral assessment and…

  15. Sustainable Assessment Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boud, David; Soler, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable assessment has been proposed as an idea that focused on the contribution of assessment to learning beyond the timescale of a given course. It was identified as an assessment that meets the needs of the present in terms of the demands of formative and summative assessment, but which also prepares students to meet their own future…

  16. Reading Assessment: Looking Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afflerbach, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on three areas of reading assessment that I believe to be crucial for students' reading development: developing comprehensive formative assessments, assessing the wide array of factors that contribute to students' reading development, and fostering student independence by helping students learn to use reading assessment on…

  17. Energy and environmental assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Sukkumnoed, Decharut

    2004-01-01

    The paper introduce and discuss strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and economic assessment for energy innovation and suggests approach to influence support for sustainable energy development in Thailand.......The paper introduce and discuss strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and economic assessment for energy innovation and suggests approach to influence support for sustainable energy development in Thailand....

  18. Teachers' Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Bruce B.; Schmitt, Vicki L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined classroom assessment practices of 3rd- through 12th-grade teachers in a Midwestern state. In addition to determining the frequency with which specific assessment item formats were utilized, the level of use of selected "best practice" approaches to assessment was considered ("performance-based assessment,…

  19. Collaborative Assessment: Fostering Ownership in Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the results of a study conducted to explore the effects of collaborative assessment. Forty college students studying at the English Language Teaching Department participated in the study. During the study the participants were briefed about the principles and practices of collaborative and self-assessment and were given the…

  20. SPECAL ISSUE Assessing the Assessment Procedures and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    purpose only if they are of good quality. It follows that the ... comply with the CBE philosophy, the objectives of each CBE and the assessment criteria. It is with this ... The study generally attempted to examine the quality of assessment and grading guidelines of CBE courses at Jimma University. Specific Objectives. The study ...

  1. Life Cycle Assessment and Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stig Irving

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a tool for environmental assessment of product and systems – over the whole life cycle from acquisition of raw materials to the end-of-life of the product – and encompassing all environmental impacts of emissions and resource usage, e.g. global warming, acidification...... and toxicity. Whereas Risk Assessment (RA) aims to identify absolute risks, LCA assess potential or relative impacts. LCA is readily applicable to nanotechnologies and several studies have been carried out, but LCA faces large problems when addressing toxic impacts of nanomaterials emitted during the life...... cycle. The models for assessing toxic impacts in LCA are to a large extent based on those developed for RA, e.g. EUSES, and require basic information about the inherent properties of the emissions like solubility, LogKow,ED50 etc. Additionally, it is a prerequisite to know how to characterize...

  2. Distributed road assessment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  3. Assessing the assessment in emergency care training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E W Dankbaar

    Full Text Available Each year over 1.5 million health care professionals attend emergency care courses. Despite high stakes for patients and extensive resources involved, little evidence exists on the quality of assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of commonly used formats in assessing emergency care skills.Residents were assessed at the end of a 2-week emergency course; a subgroup was videotaped. Psychometric analyses were conducted to assess the validity and inter-rater reliability of the assessment instrument, which included a checklist, a 9-item competency scale and a global performance scale.A group of 144 residents and 12 raters participated in the study; 22 residents were videotaped and re-assessed by 8 raters. The checklists showed limited validity and poor inter-rater reliability for the dimensions "correct" and "timely" (ICC = .30 and.39 resp.. The competency scale had good construct validity, consisting of a clinical and a communication subscale. The internal consistency of the (subscales was high (α = .93/.91/.86. The inter-rater reliability was moderate for the clinical competency subscale (.49 and the global performance scale (.50, but poor for the communication subscale (.27. A generalizability study showed that for a reliable assessment 5-13 raters are needed when using checklists, and four when using the clinical competency scale or the global performance scale.This study shows poor validity and reliability for assessing emergency skills with checklists but good validity and moderate reliability with clinical competency or global performance scales. Involving more raters can improve the reliability substantially. Recommendations are made to improve this high stakes skill assessment.

  4. Life cycle assessment (LCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Mikkel; Schmidt, Jannick Andresen

    2004-01-01

    The chapter introduces Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and its application according to the ISO 1404043 standards.......The chapter introduces Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and its application according to the ISO 1404043 standards....

  5. Solar Resource Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

    2008-02-01

    This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

  6. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hepatitis Risk Assessment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Viral Hepatitis. ... at risk? Take this 5 minute Hepatitis Risk Assessment developed by the CDC and get a personalized ...

  7. National Assessment Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Assessment Database stores and tracks state water quality assessment decisions, Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) and other watershed plans designed to...

  8. [Assessing a patient's pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Pain assessment has taken a predominant role in nursing practice. In day-to-day care, the way a patient in pain is approached and the assessment of their pain are sometimes subject to extensive questioning. The subjective part of pain is still often emphasised when the quantified assessment and the nurse's clinical observation are contradictory. The exhaustive gathering of information is key to an effective assessment of a patient's pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. GM Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Penny A. C.

    GM risk assessments play an important role in the decision-making process surrounding the regulation, notification and permission to handle Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Ultimately the role of a GM risk assessment will be to ensure the safe handling and containment of the GMO; and to assess any potential impacts on the environment and human health. A risk assessment should answer all ‘what if’ scenarios, based on scientific evidence.

  10. Assessment: What Drives Innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchikov, Nancy; Thomson, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The developing discourse which moves assessment away from a measurement model towards one of learner empowerment and the development of assessment for lifelong learning sets the context for this paper. Within this framework, we explore how the demands made on practitioners may influence current reported assessment practices. The reasons given by…

  11. Georgia's Teacher Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Anne Marie; Wetherington, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Like most states, Georgia until recently depended on an assessment of content knowledge to award teaching licenses, along with a licensure recommendation from candidates' educator preparation programs. While the content assessment reflected candidates' grasp of subject matter, licensure decisions did not hinge on direct, statewide assessment of…

  12. Assessing Basic Fact Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Gina; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors share a variety of ways to formatively assess basic fact fluency. The define fluency, raise some issues related to timed testing, and then share a collection of classroom-tested ideas for authentic fact fluency assessment. This article encourages teachers to try a variety of alternative assessments from this sampling,…

  13. Defining Authentic Classroom Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Bruce B.; Schmitt, Vicki L.; Allen, Justin P.

    2012-01-01

    A commonly advocated best practice for classroom assessment is to make the assessments authentic. Authentic is often used as meaning the mirroring of real-world tasks or expectations. There is no consensus, however, in the actual definition of the term or the characteristics of an authentic classroom assessment. Sometimes, the realistic component…

  14. Assessing the potential of short rotation coppice (SRC) for cleanup of radionuclide-contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, M V; Humphreys, P N

    2005-01-01

    A small-scale greenhouse investigation was undertaken using Goat willow (Salix caprea) and aspen (Populus tremula) to evaluate the potential of short rotation coppice for remediation of 137Cs- and 90Sr-contaminated sites. Results showed that both species were able to accumulate these radionuclides from a representative disposal soil (aged) and a spiked soil S. caprea accumulating greater levels of 137Cs than P. tremula, with no difference between species for 90Sr accumulation. For each radionuclide, the distribution in both species was similar, with 137Cs accumulation greatest in the roots, whereas 90Sr accumulation was greatest in the leaves. It was also evident that the soil-to-plant transfer factor (Tf) values for 90Sr were greater than for 137Cs, agreeing with differences in the reported bioavailailablity of these radionuclides in soil Based on the Tf values for S. caprea (conservative), estimated remediation times were 92 and 56 yr, for 137Cs and 90Sr, respectively. It is suggested that the selection of Salix species grown in a system of SRC provides a significant opportunity for removal of both 137Cs and 90Sr, primarily due to its higher biomass production. However, for 137Cs phytoremediation investigations into the appropriate use of soil amendments for increasing bioavailability are required.

  15. Forested floristic quality index: An assessment tool for forested wetland habitats using the quality and quantity of woody vegetation at Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) vegetation monitoring stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William B.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Krauss, Ken W.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Sharp, Leigh Anne; Cretini, Kari F.

    2017-02-08

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority of Louisiana and the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act, developed the Forested Floristic Quality Index (FFQI) for the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS). The FFQI will help evaluate forested wetland sites on a continuum from severely degraded to healthy and will assist in defining areas where forested wetland restoration can be successful by projecting the trajectories of change. At each CRMS forested wetland site there are stations for quantifying the overstory, understory, and herbaceous vegetation layers. Rapidly responding overstory canopy cover and herbaceous layer composition are measured annually, while gradually changing overstory basal area and species composition are collected on a 3-year cycle.A CRMS analytical team has tailored these data into an index much like the Floristic Quality Index (FQI) currently used for herbaceous marsh and for the herbaceous layer of the swamp vegetation. The core of the FFQI uses basal area by species to assess the quality and quantity of the overstory at each of three stations within each CRMS forested wetland site. Trees that are considered by experts to be higher quality swamp species like Taxodium distichum (bald cypress) and Nyssa aquatica (water tupelo) are scored higher than tree species like Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow) and Salix nigra (black willow) that are indicators of recent disturbance. This base FFQI is further enhanced by the percent canopy cover in the overstory and the presence of indicator species at the forest floor. This systemic approach attempts to differentiate between locations with similar basal areas that are on different ecosystem trajectories. Because of these varying states of habitat degradation, paired use of the FQI and the FFQI is useful to interpret the vegetative data in transitional locations. There is often an inverse relation between the health of the

  16. Practical Privacy Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peen, Søren; Jansen, Thejs Willem; Jensen, Christian D.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter proposes a privacy assessment model called the Operational Privacy Assessment Model that includes organizational, operational and technical factors for the protection of personal data stored in an IT system. The factors can be evaluated in a simple scale so that not only the resulting...... graphical depiction can be easily created for an IT system, but graphical comparisons across multiple IT systems are also possible. Examples of factors presented in a Kiviat graph are also presented. This assessment tool may be used to standardize privacy assessment criteria, making it less painful...... for the management to assess privacy risks on their systems....

  17. Sustainable assessment revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Boud, David; Soler, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable assessment has been proposed as an idea that focused on the contribution of assessment to learning beyond the timescale of a given course. It was identified as an assessment that meets the needs of the present in terms of the demands of formative and summative assessment, but which also prepares students to meet their own future learning needs. This paper reviews the value of such a notion for assessment; how it has been taken up over the past 15 years in higher education and why ...

  18. Diel Variation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions--A field Study in the Sub, Low and High Arctic on the Effect of Temperature and Light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Lindwall

    Full Text Available Many hours of sunlight in the midnight sun period suggest that significant amounts of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs may be released from arctic ecosystems during night-time. However, the emissions from these ecosystems are rarely studied and limited to point measurements during daytime. We measured BVOC emissions during 24-hour periods in the field using a push-pull chamber technique and collection of volatiles in adsorbent cartridges followed by analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Five different arctic vegetation communities were examined: high arctic heaths dominated by Salix arctica and Cassiope tetragona, low arctic heaths dominated by Salix glauca and Betula nana and a subarctic peatland dominated by the moss Warnstorfia exannulata and the sedge Eriophorum russeolum. We also addressed how climate warming affects the 24-hour emission and how the daytime emissions respond to sudden darkness. The emissions from the high arctic sites were lowest and had a strong diel variation with almost no emissions during night-time. The low arctic sites as well as the subarctic site had a more stable release of BVOCs during the 24-hour period with night-time emissions in the same range as those during the day. These results warn against overlooking the night period when considering arctic emissions. During the day, the quantity of BVOCs and the number of different compounds emitted was higher under ambient light than in darkness. The monoterpenes α-fenchene, α-phellandrene, 3-carene and α-terpinene as well as isoprene were absent in dark measurements during the day. Warming by open top chambers increased the emission rates both in the high and low arctic sites, forewarning higher emissions in a future warmer climate in the Arctic.

  19. Sustainability assessment and complementarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. Alrøe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability assessments bring together different perspectives that pertain to sustainability to produce overall assessments, and a wealth of approaches and tools have been developed in the past decades. However, two major problems remain. The problem of integration concerns the surplus of possibilities for integration; different tools produce different assessments. The problem of implementation concerns the barrier between assessment and transformation; assessments do not lead to the expected changes in practice. We aim to analyze issues of complementarity in sustainability assessment and transformation as a key to better handling the problems of integration and implementation. Based on a generalization of Niels Bohr's complementarity from quantum mechanics, we have identified two forms of complementarity in sustainability assessment, observer stance complementarity and value complementarity. Unlike many other problems of sustainability assessment, complementarity is of a fundamental character connected to the very conditions for observation. Therefore, complementarity cannot be overcome methodologically, only handled better or worse. Science is essential to the societal goal of sustainability, but these issues of complementarity impede the constructive role of science in the transition to more sustainable structures and practices in food systems. The agencies of sustainability assessment and transformation need to be acutely aware of the importance of different perspectives and values and the complementarities that may be connected to these differences. An improved understanding of complementarity can help to better recognize and handle issues of complementarity. These deliberations have relevance not only for sustainability assessment, but more generally for transdisciplinary research on wicked problems.

  20. Performance Assessment for Mastoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethia, Rishabh; Kerwin, Thomas F; Wiet, Gregory J

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this report is to provide a review of the current literature for assessment of performance for mastoidectomy, to identify the current assessment tools available in the literature, and to summarize the evidence for their validity. Data Sources The MEDLINE database was accessed via PubMed. Review Methods Inclusion criteria consisted of English-language published articles that reported use of a mastoidectomy performance assessment tool. Studies ranged from 2007 to November 2015 and were divided into 2 groups: intraoperative assessments and those performed with simulation (cadaveric laboratory or virtual reality). Studies that contained specific reliability analyses were also highlighted. For each publication, validity evidence data were analyzed and interpreted according to conceptual definitions provided in a recent systematic review on the modern framework of validity evidence. Conclusions Twenty-three studies were identified that met our inclusion criteria for review, including 4 intraoperative objective assessment studies, 5 cadaveric studies, 10 virtual reality simulation studies, and 4 that used both cadaveric assessment and virtual reality. Implications for Practice A review of the literature revealed a wide variety of mastoidectomy assessment tools and varying levels of reliability and validity evidence. The assessment tool developed at Johns Hopkins possesses the most validity evidence of those reviewed. However, a number of agreed-on specific metrics could be integrated into a standardized assessment instrument to be used nationally. A universally agreed-on assessment tool will provide a means for developing standardized benchmarks for performing mastoid surgery.

  1. Stress and practical assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Neil D.; Gardiner, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the role of stress in practical assessments, which have long been used in an academic Sports Science and Sports Therapy setting. Practical exams have the potential to assess many aspects of both theory and practice. They are especially important for assessing a student’s competence in performance of a particular skill. In addition, practical exams are designed to recreate the stresses of a clinical environment (Rushforth, 2006). The practical exams for Sports Therapy also ...

  2. Assessment in Cognitive Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Gary P.; Clark, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This volume brings together leading experts to explore the state of the art of cognitive clinical assessment and identify cutting-edge approaches of interest to clinicians and researchers. The book highlights fundamental problems concerning the validity of assessments that are widely used in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Key directions for further research and development are identified. Updated cognitive assessment methods are described in detail, with particular attention to transdiag...

  3. Wound Assessment: Made Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Ousey, Karen; Cook, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    A structured approach to wound assessment is required to maintain a good standard of care. This involves a thorough patient assessment, which should be carried out by skilled and competent practitioners, adhering to local and national guidelines (Harding et al, 2008). Inappropriate or inaccurate assessment can lead to delayed wound healing, pain, increased risk of infection, inappropriate use of wound dressings and a reduction in the quality of life for patients.

  4. Ecological risk assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suter, Glenn W; Barnthouse, L. W. (Lawrence W)

    2007-01-01

    Ecological risk assessment is commonly applied to the regulation of chemicals, the remediation of contaminated sites, the monitoring of importation of exotic organisms, the management of watersheds...

  5. Formative assessment as mediation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Vos, Mark; Belluigi, Dina Zoe

    2011-01-01

    Whilst principles of validity, reliability and fairness should be central concerns for the assessment of student learning in higher education, simplistic notions of 'transparency' and 'explicitness...

  6. Assessment of ketamine uropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen S. Yang

    2015-09-01

    Using the standardized tools to assess patients with ketamine abuse, patients characteristics can be clarified and different therapeutic strategies for ketamine uropathy can be compared in the future.

  7. Assessment of Students Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; Stachowicz, Marian S.

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation and assessment of engineering programmes is a big issue, and there exist many concepts and methods. This paper deals with the assessment methods which can be used when assessing the knowledge, skills and competences developed in projects using PBL (problem based and project organized...... learning) pedagogical approaches. The experience of assessing first year projects from the Medialogy education at Aalborg University and third year projects from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at University of Minnesota, Duluth are presented, and the different methods discussed...

  8. Systems dependability assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Aubry, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Presents recent developments of probabilistic assessment of systems dependability based on stochastic models, including graph theory, finite state automaton and language theory, for both dynamic and hybrid contexts.

  9. Nutritional assessment of athletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Driskell, Judy A; Wolinsky, Ira

    2011-01-01

    "Evaluating dietary intake, determining energy metabolism, and conducting other nutritional assessments are essential in understanding the relationships between diet, exercise, health, and physical...

  10. Using Arabidopsis to study shoot branching in biomass willow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sally P; Salmon, Jemma; Hanley, Steven J; Karp, Angela; Leyser, Ottoline

    2013-06-01

    The success of the short-rotation coppice system in biomass willow (Salix spp.) relies on the activity of the shoot-producing meristems found on the coppice stool. However, the regulation of the activity of these meristems is poorly understood. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms behind axillary meristem regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has grown rapidly in the past few years through the exploitation of integrated physiological, genetic, and molecular assays. Here, we demonstrate that these assays can be directly transferred to study the control of bud activation in biomass willow and to assess similarities with the known hormone regulatory system in Arabidopsis. Bud hormone response was found to be qualitatively remarkably similar in Salix spp. and Arabidopsis. These similarities led us to test whether Arabidopsis hormone mutants could be used to assess allelic variation in the cognate Salix spp. hormone genes. Allelic differences in Salix spp. strigolactone genes were observed using this approach. These results demonstrate that both knowledge and assays from Arabidopsis axillary meristem biology can be successfully applied to Salix spp. and can increase our understanding of a fundamental aspect of short-rotation coppice biomass production, allowing more targeted breeding.

  11. Using Arabidopsis to Study Shoot Branching in Biomass Willow1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sally P.; Salmon, Jemma; Hanley, Steven J.; Karp, Angela; Leyser, Ottoline

    2013-01-01

    The success of the short-rotation coppice system in biomass willow (Salix spp.) relies on the activity of the shoot-producing meristems found on the coppice stool. However, the regulation of the activity of these meristems is poorly understood. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms behind axillary meristem regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has grown rapidly in the past few years through the exploitation of integrated physiological, genetic, and molecular assays. Here, we demonstrate that these assays can be directly transferred to study the control of bud activation in biomass willow and to assess similarities with the known hormone regulatory system in Arabidopsis. Bud hormone response was found to be qualitatively remarkably similar in Salix spp. and Arabidopsis. These similarities led us to test whether Arabidopsis hormone mutants could be used to assess allelic variation in the cognate Salix spp. hormone genes. Allelic differences in Salix spp. strigolactone genes were observed using this approach. These results demonstrate that both knowledge and assays from Arabidopsis axillary meristem biology can be successfully applied to Salix spp. and can increase our understanding of a fundamental aspect of short-rotation coppice biomass production, allowing more targeted breeding. PMID:23610219

  12. Matriculation Assessment Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; Halliday, Karen

    Assessment testing in California's community colleges (CCC) helps to identify entering students' goals and skills level and to ensure that the students are properly advised of appropriate courses and programs. The California Education Code requires that all assessment instruments be approved by the Office of the Chancellor of the California…

  13. Diagnosing Diagnostic Language Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic language assessment (DLA) is gaining a lot of attention from language teachers, testers, and applied linguists. With a recent surge of interest in DLA, there seems to be an urgent need to assess where the field of DLA stands at the moment and develop a general sense of where it should be moving in the future. The current article, as the…

  14. Transforming Assessment Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis; Dolin, Jens; Tidemand, Sofie

    2018-01-01

    This chapter will identify and outline current gaps in research into assessment practice and tie the results of the ASSIST-ME project onto this outline. In this way, the chapter will present concrete research vistas that are still needed in international assessment research. The chapter concludes...

  15. Assessment of human exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebret, E. [RIVM-National Inst. of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    This article describes some of the features of the assessment of human exposure to environmental pollutants in epidemiological studies. Since exposure assessment in air pollution epidemiology studies typically involve professionals from various backgrounds, interpretation of a concepts like `exposure` may vary. A brief descriptions is therefore given by way of introduction

  16. Angola : Student Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2009-01-01

    In 2009, Angola joined the Russia Education Aid for Development (READ) trust fund program, the goal of which is to help countries improve their capacity to design, carry out, analyze, and use assessments for improved student learning. Systems Approach for Better Education Results (SABER)-student assessment is a component of the SABER program that focuses specifically on benchmarking studen...

  17. Change Agents & Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørnøv, Lone; Larsen, Sanne Vammen; Hansen, Anne Merrild

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges facing impact assessment is finding ways to work in research and practice that allow appropriate action and critical interrogation og action to enable and support sustainable change.......One of the challenges facing impact assessment is finding ways to work in research and practice that allow appropriate action and critical interrogation og action to enable and support sustainable change....

  18. Assessing Team Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Susan; Rottier, Jerry

    Interdisciplinary middle school level teams capitalize on the idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Administrators and team members can maximize the advantages of teamwork using team assessments to increase the benefits for students, teachers, and the school environment. Assessing team performance can lead to high performing…

  19. Formative Assessment Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  20. Assessment Problems in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGinitie, Walter H., Ed.

    The papers in this volume deal with a range of assessment problems in reading. The first paper, by Karlin, introduces the general problem of using assessment procedures to guide teaching. The next six papers deal with various aspects of this general problem. Otto discusses the distinction between norm-referenced, standardized achievement tests and…

  1. Leadership Evaluation and Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James F., II

    2001-01-01

    Discusses leadership assessment in academic libraries; explores the topic of leadership assessment through a review of the literature, the arguments on performance reviews, and through an exploration of the societal and institutional context within which these reviews take place in academia; and reviews the leadership roles of library directors.…

  2. AEROSOL DISSEMINATION ASSESSMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic performance requirements are given for a chamber assessment aerosol system to be designed, developed and fabricated for evaluating the...automated assessment system. These include light scattering particle counters and mathematical treatment of decay curves for analysis of size properties

  3. Comprehensive neurotoxicity assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulig, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in terms of both the conceptualization of neurotoxicity assessment strategies as well as in the development of behavioral techniques for evaluating neurotoxic exposures. A tiered approach, for example, has been advocated as an assessment strategy in

  4. Calculus Courses' Assessment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauna, Matti

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe computer-aided assessment methods used in online Calculus courses and the data they produce. The online learning environment collects a lot of time-stamped data about every action a student makes. Assessment data can be harnessed into use as a feedback, predictor, and recommendation facility for students and instructors.…

  5. TIMSS 2015 Assessment Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullis, Ina V. S., Ed.; Martin, Michael O., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Now entering into its 20th year of data collection, Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study, (TIMSS) is an international assessment of mathematics and science at the fourth and eighth grades. TIMSS 2015 is the most recent in the TIMSS series, which began with the first assessments in 1995 and has continued every four years--1999,…

  6. Role of assessment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    students' learning. In the section, assessment as a means of curriculum operation and experience in everyday classroom context is also discussed. Moreover, the section focuses on roles of course instructor in integrating assessment with everyday classroom instruction, and in facilitating appropriate learning environments.

  7. Assessing Homeschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Steven F.

    2011-01-01

    During a period spanning more than 2 decades, the author assessed approximately 2,000 school-age students, about 50 of whom were educated entirely at home. In many respects, the data gathering activities were similar regardless of the settings involved, but the uniqueness of homeschooling sometimes made assessment adaptations necessary in order…

  8. Classroom Assessment in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shermis, Mark D.; DiVesta, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    "Classroom Assessment in Action" clarifies the multi-faceted roles of measurement and assessment and their applications in a classroom setting. Comprehensive in scope, Shermis and Di Vesta explain basic measurement concepts and show students how to interpret the results of standardized tests. From these basic concepts, the authors then…

  9. Comprehensive geriatric assessment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-14

    Sep 14, 2007 ... i.e. difficulty performing simple physical and mental tasks necessary for daily ... elderly person's medical, psychological and functional capability in ... care. Components of comprehensive geriatric assessment. Comprehensive geriatric assessment. The increasing morbidity related to old age requires careful.

  10. SPAT 15 - Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, J.C. (Coordinator)

    1998-08-01

    In the Spring of 1997, the Department of Energy's Department Standards Committee (DSC) convened a Standards Process Action Team (SPAT-15) to evaluate assessment processes within the DOE complex. If time and resources permitted, the team was also to evaluate assessment processes used by private industry conducting similar work and activities. The specific task statement was as follows: "Define the attributes of assessment programs that effectively support organizational feedback and improvement of safety systems at all the different levels of contractor and Department organizations." The team gathered information on existing assessment programs through surveys and presentations by representatives from national laboratories, processing facilities, and remediation sites. Examples of assessment programs described in this report encompass site-wide, individual facility, and task level applications within the DOE compIex

  11. The Assessment Cycle: A Model for Learning through Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper advances a model describing how peer assessment supports self-assessment. Although prior research demonstrates that peer assessment promotes self-assessment, the connection between these two activities is underspecified. This model, the assessment cycle, draws from theories of self-assessment to elaborate how learning takes place…

  12. Research on dynamics of tundra ecosystems and their potential response to energy resource development. Progress report, May 1, 1978-April 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    The ecological effects (costs and benefits) of impacts that can be expected from the development and utilization of energy resources in the arctic. The impacts selected for study are: altered nutrient availability (nitrogen and phosphorus); altered patterns of soil water drainage; and vehicle tracks. The general ecosystem characteristics chosen to provide integrative measures of the possible ecological effects include annual primary production and the relative aboveground growth of the different species or growth forms comprising the vegetation. Plant growth forms are defined by height, leaf longevity, position of the perennating bud, and rooting pattern. The growth forms and species selected are: erect deciduous shrubs (Betula nana, Vaccinium uliginosum, Salix pulchra); erect evergreen shrubs (Ledum palustre); prostrate evergreen shrub (Vaccinium vitis-idaea); tussock graminoid (Eriophorum vaginatum); rhizomatous graminoid (Carex bigelowii, Carex aquatilis, Eriophorum angustifolium); forb (Artemisia arctica); grass (Calamagrostis or Arctagrostis); cushion moss (Dicranum sp.); Sphagnum sp.; and Polytrichum commune. Progress is reported in field and laboratory studies. The main conclusion of the research is that species respond individually in terms of nutrient and total nonstructural carbohydrates accumulation to fertilization, and that the growth forms studied are not distinctive from each other on the basis of plant nutrition or growth. The explicit mechanism for integrating and guiding this research and for extrapolating the existing data base to make quantitative predictions of the effects of perturbations is a simulation model of arctic tundra vegetation and soil processes called ARTUS (Arctic Tundra Simulator). (JGB)

  13. Full-glacial upland tundra vegetation preserved under tephra in the Beringia National Park, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetcheus, Victoria G.; Birks, Hilary H.

    2001-01-01

    The nature of the full-glacial vegetation of Beringia has been the subject of a great deal of investigation and debate. Here we present a reconstruction of an intact example of the full-glacial upland vegetation of part of the northern Seward Peninsula at one point in time. The area was blanketed by more than 1 m of tephra ca. 18,000 14C BP (ca. 21,500 cal. BP), and the former land-surface was preserved in the permafrost. The discovery of the land-surface provides a unique opportunity to study a fossil ecosystem preserved in situ. Macrofossils were used to reconstruct the vegetation growing at several sites on the buried land-surface. The macrofossil assemblages indicate a vegetation characterized by graminoids and forbs, with the occasional occurrence of Salix arctica. The vegetation was dominated by Kobresia myosuroides, other sedges ( Carex), and grasses, with a fine-scale mosaic related to snow accumulation and moisture availability. Overall, the vegetation was a closed, dry, herb-rich tundra-grassland with a continuous moss layer, growing on calcareous soil that was continuously supplied with loess. Nutrient renewal by loess deposition was probably responsible for the relatively fertile vegetation, and the occurrence of a continuous mat of acrocarpous mosses. Good physiognomic analogues can be suggested, but no exact modern vegetational analogues have been found, probably because the full-glacial environment and climate with loess deposition do not occur today.

  14. Competencies, skills and assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an analysis of the challenge of assessing student learning and how that is affected by using descriptions of competencies as a core element when describing the aims of the learning process. Assessment is modelled as a three step process; characterising, identifying and judging, to a...... the characterisation part of an assessment process. From a teaching and teachers' perspective, the latter is far more important than the former.......This paper is an analysis of the challenge of assessing student learning and how that is affected by using descriptions of competencies as a core element when describing the aims of the learning process. Assessment is modelled as a three step process; characterising, identifying and judging......, to allow for the following argument: Working with competency descriptions is rightly said to make judging more difficult. This potentially lowers the reliability of the assessment. But competency descriptions also carry a great potential of raising the validity of the assessment by focusing...

  15. Integrated assessment briefs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Integrated assessment can be used to evaluate and clarify resource management policy options and outcomes for decision makers. The defining characteristics of integrated assessment are (1) focus on providing information and analysis that can be understood and used by decision makers rather than for merely advancing understanding and (2) its multidisciplinary approach, using methods, styles of study, and considerations from a broader variety of technical areas than would typically characterize studies produced from a single disciplinary standpoint. Integrated assessment may combine scientific, social, economic, health, and environmental data and models. Integrated assessment requires bridging the gap between science and policy considerations. Because not everything can be valued using a single metric, such as a dollar value, the integrated assessment process also involves evaluating trade-offs among dissimilar attributes. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recognized the importance and value of multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems early on and have pioneered the development of tools and methods for integrated assessment over the past three decades. Major examples of ORNL`s experience in the development of its capabilities for integrated assessment are given.

  16. Assessing Resource Assessment for MRE (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, H. P.; Bozec, A.; Duerr, A. S.; Rauchenstein, L. T.

    2010-12-01

    The Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center at Florida Atlantic University is concerned with marine renewable energy (MRE) recovery from the Florida Current using marine hydrokinetic technology and, in the future, from the thermocline in the Florida Straits via ocean thermal energy conversion. Although neither concept is new, technology improvements and the evolution of policy now warrant optimism for the future of these potentially rich resources. In moving toward commercial-scale deployments of energy-generating systems, an important first step is accurate and unembellished assessment of the resource itself. In short, we must ask: how much energy might be available? The answer to this deceptively simple question depends, of course, on the technology itself - system efficiencies, for example - but it also depends on a variety of other limiting factors such as deployment strategies, environmental considerations, and the overall economics of MRE in the context of competing energy resources. While it is universally agreed that MRE development must occur within a framework of environmental stewardship, it is nonetheless inevitable that there will be trade-offs between absolute environmental protection and realizing the benefits of MRE implementation. As with solar-energy and wind-power technologies, MRE technologies interact with the environment in which they are deployed. Ecological, societal, and even physical resource concerns all require investigation and, in some cases, mitigation. Moreover, the converse - how will the environment affect the equipment? - presents technical challenges that have confounded the seagoing community forever. Biofouling, for example, will affect system efficiency and create significant maintenance and operations issues. Because this will also affect the economics of MRE, nonlinear interactions among the limiting factors complicate the overall issue of resource assessment significantly. While MRE technology development is

  17. [Assessment in Medical Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Martha Delgado; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of medical education is fundamental for proper feedback and evaulation of students. The overall purpose of the evaluation is numerically and formatively revised. The suggested evaluation processes is described taking into account the Miller competence pyramid as a tool for designing evaluations and concepts of validity and reproducibility in assessments. The utility of student and the teacher is also raised. The issue of assessment should leave the knowledge parameters that are usually used. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement System Reliability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kłos Ryszard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decision-making in problem situations is based on up-to-date and reliable information. A great deal of information is subject to rapid changes, hence it may be outdated or manipulated and enforce erroneous decisions. It is crucial to have the possibility to assess the obtained information. In order to ensure its reliability it is best to obtain it with an own measurement process. In such a case, conducting assessment of measurement system reliability seems to be crucial. The article describes general approach to assessing reliability of measurement systems.

  19. Assessment of inclusive education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the way teachers, in teams can work with assessing the inclusive practice in their own classes. In 2012 a joint effort between CEPRA, teachers and school administrators from the municipality of Hjørring developed a dialog based model for continually assessing...... the quality of the learning environment in regard to inclusion – this model draws heavily on the logic and mindset of ECERS (Early child environment program). This article will relate the rationale of the assessment model called “Dialoger om Kvalitet” (dialogues on quality) to LSP’s definition of inclusion...

  20. Assessing Big Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leimbach, Timo; Bachlechner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, big data has been one of the most controversially discussed technologies in terms of its possible positive and negative impact. Therefore, the need for technology assessments is obvious. This paper first provides, based on the results of a technology assessment study, an overview...... of the potential and challenges associated with big data and then describes the problems experienced during the study as well as methods found helpful to address them. The paper concludes with reflections on how the insights from the technology assessment study may have an impact on the future governance of big...... data....

  1. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Yukon Flats Assessment Area (002) Assessment Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Assessment Unit is the fundamental unit used in the National Assessment Project for the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources. The Assessment Unit is...

  2. The neutral species of the weak base trimethoprim is more toxic to willow trees (Salix viminalis) than the cation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikes, O.; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The acute toxicity of the veterinary antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP) to willow trees was tested at three different pH levels in hydroponic solutions with TMP concentrations of 1, 10, 100 or 1000 mg/L. The pH variation was achieved by using ammonium (pH 4.3, low) or nitrate (pH 6.4, medium) as nitro......The acute toxicity of the veterinary antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP) to willow trees was tested at three different pH levels in hydroponic solutions with TMP concentrations of 1, 10, 100 or 1000 mg/L. The pH variation was achieved by using ammonium (pH 4.3, low) or nitrate (pH 6.4, medium...

  3. Response of leaf and fine roots proteomes of Salix viminalis L. to growth on Cr-rich tannery waste

    OpenAIRE

    Zemleduch-Barylska, Agata; Lorenc-Pluci?ska, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The tannery industry is a major source of anthropogenic chromium (Cr) contamination due to the large amounts of solid waste produced and its problematic management. The unique composition of tannery waste, usually high concentrations of Cr and other metals as well as organic matter and nutrients, makes it a great risk for soil and water environment but also a possible effective fertilizer for non-food plants that can tolerate metals. The goal of this study was to understand the adaptation mec...

  4. Can energy willow (Salix sp.) remediate cadmium- and nickel-contaminated fish farm sludge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne Bruus

    it meets the criteria. Phytoremediation by willow may combine accumulation of cadmium and nickel from the sludge with the production of an energy crop. The ability of eight selected willow clones to take up and tolerate cadmium and nickel was studied in pots under outdoor conditions. Fish farm sludge...

  5. Test of aerobic TCE degradation by willows (Salix viminalis) and willows inoculated with TCE-cometabolizing strains of Burkholderia cepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lauge Peter Westergaard; Broholm, Mette Martina; Gosewinkel, Ulrich Bay

    2017-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread soil and groundwater pollutant and clean-up is often problematic and expensive. Phytoremediation may be a cost-effective solution at some sites. This study investigates TCE degradation by willows (S. viminalis) and willows inoculated with three strains of B...

  6. Greater stemflow yield and efficiency of Caragana korshinskii than Salix psammophila: leaf's effect and implication for drought tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C.

    2016-12-01

    Stemflow infuses the enriched precipitation down to plant's rhizosphere soil, and is of great importance for the survival of xerophytic shrubs at the water-stressed ecosystems. However, its ecological significance has usually been underestimated for the relative limited amount, and its biotic influential mechanism has not been studied completely at the leaf scale. In this study, branch stemflow volume (SFb), shrub stemflow equivalent water depth (SFd) and stemflow percentage of incident precipitation (SF%), stemflow productivity (SFP), funneling ratio (FR), rainfall characteristics and plant traits were measured for C. korshinskii and S. psammophila during the rainy seasons of 2014 and 2015 at the northern Loess Plateau of China. This study aimed to determine the inter- and intra-specific difference of stemflow production and production efficiency, and the bio-/abiotic influential mechanism affecting them. The results indicated that precipitation amount was the most influential rainfall characteristics affecting stemflow for the two endemic shrub species, and the stem biomass and leaf biomass were the most influential plant traits for C. korshinskii and S. psammophila, respectively. C. korshinskii had greater stemflow production and production efficiency at all the precipitation classes, and the largest inter-specific difference was during the most frequent ≤2-mm rains. The smaller threshold precipitation (0.9 mm of C. korshinskii vs. 2.1 mm of S. psammophila) entitled C. korshinskii with more available rains to reap water via stemflow. Leaf influenced stemflow production, and the beneficial leaf traits helped secure the superiority of C. korshinskii in stemflow production. In summary, C. korshinskii might possess a greater drought tolerance and competition edge at dryland ecosystems via bigger amount and more efficient stemflow production, and more beneficial leaf traits.

  7. USAID Construction Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID construction assessment is a survey of the character, scope, value and management of construction activities supported by USAID during the period from June...

  8. Biosafety Risk Assessment Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, Susan Adele [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). International Biological Threat Reduction Program; Gaudioso, Jennifer M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). International Biological Threat Reduction Program; Salerno, Reynolds Mathewson [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). International Biological Threat Reduction Program; Wagner, Stefan M. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Canadian Science Centre for Human and Animal Health (CSCHAH); Shigematsu, Mika [National Inst. of Infectious Diseases (NIID), Tokyo (Japan); Risi, George [Infectious Disease Specialists, P.C, Missoula, MT (United States); Kozlovac, Joe [US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)., Beltsville, MD (United States); Halkjaer-Knudsen, Vibeke [Statens Serum Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark); Prat, Esmeralda [Bayer CropScience, Monheim am Rhein (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    Laboratories that work with biological agents need to manage their safety risks to persons working the laboratories and the human and animal community in the surrounding areas. Biosafety guidance defines a wide variety of biosafety risk mitigation measures, which include measures which fall under the following categories: engineering controls, procedural and administrative controls, and the use of personal protective equipment; the determination of which mitigation measures should be used to address the specific laboratory risks are dependent upon a risk assessment. Ideally, a risk assessment should be conducted in a manner which is standardized and systematic which allows it to be repeatable and comparable. A risk assessment should clearly define the risk being assessed and avoid over complication.

  9. an Initial Assessment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2001-09-17

    . A first insight in the cetacean biodiversity based on stranding, capture and sighting records, as well as a preliminary assessment of status, is provided. Seven species were authenticated: humpback whale Megaptera ...

  10. Assessment of Innovation Competency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2015-01-01

    competency, and communication competency) as well as assessment criteria for a number of skills relevant to these subcompetencies. These assessment criteria, it is argued, largely resonate with existing literature and they provide a detailed glimpse into how assessment of innovation competency could......The author employed a 3-step qualitative research design with multiple instances of source validation to capture expert teachers’ (n = 28) reflections on which manifest signs they would look for when they asses students’ innovation competency. The author reports on the thematic analysis...... of the recorded talk in interaction that occurred in teacher group discussion sessions at 5 upper secondary schools. Based on the analysis, it was possible to extrapolate assessment criteria for 5 subcompetencies relevant to innovation (creative competency, collaboration competency, navigation competency, action...

  11. Offshore risk assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Vinnem, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

      Offshore Risk Assessment was the first book to deal with quantified risk assessment (QRA) as applied specifically to offshore installations and operations. Risk assessment techniques have been used for more than three decades in the offshore oil and gas industry, and their use is set to expand increasingly as the industry moves into new areas and faces new challenges in older regions.   This updated and expanded third edition has been informed by a major R&D program on offshore risk assessment in Norway and summarizes research from 2006 to the present day. Rooted with a thorough discussion of risk metrics and risk analysis methodology,  subsequent chapters are devoted to analytical approaches to escalation, escape, evacuation and rescue analysis of safety and emergency systems.   Separate chapters analyze the main hazards of offshore structures: fire, explosion, collision, and falling objects as well as structural and marine hazards. Risk mitigation and control are discussed, as well as an illustrat...

  12. National Lakes Assessment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Lakes Assessment (NLA) is a first-ever statistically-valid survey of the biological condition of lakes and reservoirs throughout the U.S. The U.S....

  13. Assessment of strategy formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acur, Nuran; Englyst, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – Today, industrial firms need to cope with competitive challenges related to innovation, dynamic responses, knowledge sharing, etc. by means of effective and dynamic strategy formulation. In light of these challenges, the purpose of the paper is to present and evaluate an assessment tool...... for strategy formulation processes that ensures high quality in process and outcome. Design/methodology/approach – A literature review was conducted to identify success criteria for strategy formulation processes. Then, a simple questionnaire and assessment tool was developed and used to test the validity...... of the success criteria through face-to-face interviews with 46 managers, workshops involving 40 managers, and two in-depth case studies. The success criteria have been slightly modified due to the empirical results, to yield the assessment tool. Findings – The resulting assessment tool integrates three generic...

  14. Lesion activity assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, K R; Zero, D T; Martignon, S

    2009-01-01

    of predictors increases the accuracy of lesion activity prediction for both primary coronal and root lesions. Three surrogate methods have been used for evaluating lesion activity (construct validity); all have disadvantages. If construct validity is accepted as a 'gold standard', it is possible to assess......This chapter focusses on the probability of a caries lesion detected during a clinical examination being active (progressing) or arrested. Visual and tactile methods to assess primary coronal lesions and primary root lesions are considered. The evidence level is rated as low (R...... in response to cariogenic plaque as well as lesion arrest. Based on this understanding, different clinical scoring systems have been developed to assess the severity/depth and activity of lesions. A recent system has been devised by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System Committee...

  15. The library assessment cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, Aaron W

    2017-01-01

    The Library Assessment Cookbook features 80 practical, easy-to-implement recipes divided into nine sections. This Cookbook will help librarians of all levels of experience measure and demonstrate their institutional value.

  16. Pollinator Risk Assessment Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Guidance is part of a long-term strategy to advance the science of assessing the risks posed by pesticides to honey bees, giving risk managers the means to further improve pollinator protection in our regulatory decisions.

  17. Crowdsourced emphysema assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørting, Silas Nyboe; Cheplygina, Veronika; Petersen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Classification of emphysema patterns is believed to be useful for improved diagnosis and prognosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Emphysema patterns can be assessed visually on lung CT scans. Visual assessment is a complex and time-consuming task performed by experts, making...... it unsuitable for obtaining large amounts of labeled data. We investigate if visual assessment of emphysema can be framed as an image similarity task that does not require expert. Substituting untrained annotators for experts makes it possible to label data sets much faster and at a lower cost. We use crowd...... annotators to gather similarity triplets and use t-distributed stochastic triplet embedding to learn an embedding. The quality of the embedding is evaluated by predicting expert assessed emphysema patterns. We find that although performance varies due to low quality triplets and randomness in the embedding...

  18. RCTA capstone assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Craig; Bodt, Barry; Childers, Marshal; Dean, Robert; Oh, Jean; DiBerardino, Chip; Keegan, Terence

    2015-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory's Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) is a program intended to change robots from tools that soldiers use into teammates with which soldiers can work. This requires the integration of fundamental and applied research in perception, artificial intelligence, and human-robot interaction. In October of 2014, the RCTA assessed progress towards integrating this research. This assessment was designed to evaluate the robot's performance when it used new capabilities to perform selected aspects of a mission. The assessed capabilities included the ability of the robot to: navigate semantically outdoors with respect to structures and landmarks, identify doors in the facades of buildings, and identify and track persons emerging from those doors. We present details of the mission-based vignettes that constituted the assessment, and evaluations of the robot's performance in these vignettes.

  19. Onboard System Health Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Tom; Cunningham, Harry

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion of onboard system health assessment are presented. Success of the space station program will be measured by how well it addresses the basic requirements for (1) maintaining the orbiting Space Station Freedom fully operational for its projected life of thirty years, and (2) the cost-effective execution of the overall space station program. Onboard system health assessment must provide complete and thorough testing capabilities along with effective associated redundancy/fault management.

  20. Risk Assessment Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassinos, Peter G.; Lyver, John W., IV; Bui, Chinh T.

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment is used in many industries to identify and manage risks. Initially developed for use on aeronautical and nuclear systems, risk assessment has been applied to transportation, chemical, computer, financial, and security systems among others. It is used to gain an understanding of the weaknesses or vulnerabilities in a system so modification can be made to increase operability, efficiency, and safety and to reduce failure and down-time. Risk assessment results are primary inputs to risk-informed decision making; where risk information including uncertainty is used along with other pertinent information to assist management in the decision-making process. Therefore, to be useful, a risk assessment must be directed at specific objectives. As the world embraces the globalization of trade and manufacturing, understanding the associated risk become important to decision making. Applying risk assessment techniques to a global system of development, manufacturing, and transportation can provide insight into how the system can fail, the likelihood of system failure and the consequences of system failure. The risk assessment can identify those elements that contribute most to risk and identify measures to prevent and mitigate failures, disruptions, and damaging outcomes. In addition, risk associated with public and environment impact can be identified. The risk insights gained can be applied to making decisions concerning suitable development and manufacturing locations, supply chains, and transportation strategies. While risk assessment has been mostly applied to mechanical and electrical systems, the concepts and techniques can be applied across other systems and activities. This paper provides a basic overview of the development of a risk assessment.

  1. Net technical assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wegmann, David G.

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The present and near term military balance of power between the U.S. and the Soviet Union can be expressed in a variety of net assessments. One can examine the strategic nuclear balance, the conventional balance in Europe, the maritime balance, and many others. Such assessments are essential not only for policy making but for arms control purposes and future force structure planning. However, to project the future military balance, on...

  2. Agile software assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Nierstrasz Oscar; Lungu Mircea

    2012-01-01

    Informed decision making is a critical activity in software development but it is poorly supported by common development environments which focus mainly on low level programming tasks. We posit the need for agile software assessment which aims to support decision making by enabling rapid and effective construction of software models and custom analyses. Agile software assessment entails gathering and exploiting the broader context of software information related to the system at hand as well ...

  3. Emotions: Methods of Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Mortillaro, Marcello; Mehu, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Emotions are brief episodes during which several functional components are synchronized in response to an eliciting event. Emotions can be assessed by measuring responses in each of these components: subjective feeling, physiology, expression, and motivation. In this article we review the most advanced methods that can be used to assess emotions in each of the four components: self-report measures and questionnaires, measures of physiological activation, instruments for the analysis of nonver...

  4. Assessments of adolescent language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiig, E H

    1995-02-01

    I have stressed that language and learning disabilities that are exhibited in the preschool or elementary school years often persist into adolescence but that the characteristics and implications of these disabilities change with the preadolescent and adolescent transitions to metalinguistic maturity. As the student with language disabilities matures and as educational demands increase in complexity and in level of abstractness, the interactions between language and cognition become more apparent. Language disabilities of adolescents are often described in relation to observed deficits in the acquisition of content (semantics), form (morphology and syntax), and use (pragmatics). I have broadened this perspective to consider identification of metalinguistic strengths and/or deficits, deficits in the integration and organization of communication, reasoning and problem solving, and in conceptualization and creativity. Several assessment options were discussed, among them, norm-and criterion- referenced testing, language sample analysis, portfolio assessments of integrated communication, observational checklists and interviews, classroom language probes, and self-assessments. The perspectives taken for assessment have been that no single assessment option can satisfy all assessment objectives and/or constraints. I have also stressed that all tests are subject to measurement error and how to account for this error. Last, but not least, I have shared some of the voices of adolescents which express their perspectives and priorities.

  5. Operational risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Vicky L

    2017-06-01

    In the world of risk management, which encompasses the business continuity disciplines, many types of risk require evaluation. Financial risk is most often the primary focus, followed by product and market risks. Another critical area, which typically lacks a thorough review or may be overlooked, is operational risk. This category encompasses many risk exposure types including those around building structures and systems, environmental issues, nature, neighbours, clients, regulatory compliance, network, data security and so on. At times, insurance carriers will assess internal hazards, but seldom do these assessments include more than a cursory look at other types of operational risk. In heavily regulated environments, risk assessments are required but may not always include thorough assessments of operational exposures. Vulnerabilities may linger or go unnoticed, only to become the catalyst for a business disruption at a later time, some of which are so severe that business recovery becomes nearly impossible. Businesses may suffer loss of clients as the result of a prolonged disruption of services. Comprehensive operational risk assessments can assist in identifying such vulnerabilities, exposures and threats so that the risk can be minimised or removed. This paper lays out how an assessment of this type can be successfully conducted.

  6. Assessment in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustaman, N. Y.

    2017-09-01

    An analyses study focusing on scientific reasoning literacy was conducted to strengthen the stressing on assessment in science by combining the important of the nature of science and assessment as references, higher order thinking and scientific skills in assessing science learning as well. Having background in developing science process skills test items, inquiry in its many form, scientific and STEM literacy, it is believed that inquiry based learning should first be implemented among science educators and science learners before STEM education can successfully be developed among science teachers, prospective teachers, and students at all levels. After studying thoroughly a number of science researchers through their works, a model of scientific reasoning was proposed, and also simple rubrics and some examples of the test items were introduced in this article. As it is only the beginning, further studies will still be needed in the future with the involvement of prospective science teachers who have interests in assessment, either on authentic assessment or in test items development. In balance usage of alternative assessment rubrics, as well as valid and reliable test items (standard) will be needed in accelerating STEM education in Indonesia.

  7. Evaluación del paisaje visual en humedales del río Cruces, sitio Ramsar de Chile Assessment of wetland visual landscape in the Cruces River, Ramsar site of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRÉS MUÑOZ-PEDREROS

    2012-03-01

    valoración de los paisajes se relacionan más fuertemente con las características de la línea y de la textura como grano y densidad y su valoración es dependiente de su componente primario, los de VP alto se relacionan con cortina densa de Salix spp. con vegetación palustre y paisajes con vegetación boscosa.Landscape is an environmental heritage, which includes cultural and natural values, a resource that represents the appearance of an area and reflects its nature and history. Thus, this heritage resource should be assessed and managed rationally, especially since there is an increasing demand for areas of high landscape value for ecotourism activities. Regarding the study of visual landscape, it was not considered as a measurable element until the mid-twentieth century and considerable progress has been made in assessing the quality, the fragility and capacity for use as a direct assessment of the landscape. Still pending is the indirect analysis which includes its basic visual features such as line, color, texture, spatial configuration and relief, and their components, both primary and secondary. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the visual landscape (direct analysis of the Cruces River and surrounding area, its fragility and capacity for use, analyzing the relationship between the value of these landscapes with their visual characteristics and primary components (indirect analysis. The visual landscape quality was assessed using a mixed method with direct assessment of representative subjectivity and subsequent indirect analysis of its components, using a standardized panel of assessors. We also determined the fragility of the landscape, which was integrated with the visual quality and spatialized in a GIS. Thus categories of landscape use in the study area were created. The landscape quality average value (± SD was VP = 16.86 ± 1.99. Recommended uses are in category 3 (high landscape quality and low fragility that is tourism and recreation

  8. A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudi, Hossein; Renn, Ortwin; Vanclay, Frank; Hoffmann, Volker; Karami, Ezatollah

    2013-01-01

    An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify

  9. Building Sustainability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Koukkari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Although social, economic, and cultural indicators are of substantial importance to the concept of sustainable building, this concept is usually related to environmental characteristics. Any building level assessment method is complex and involves contradictory aspects. Moreover, emphasizing qualitative criteria only increases confusion. R&D and standardization are thus concentrated to transparency and usability of the environmental methods. Other directions of research aim at performance-based design and methods to take regional and cultural aspects into account. In this paper, the perspectives of the sustainability assessment of a whole building are presented, based on a state of the art, feasibility study on performance analysis and the development of an extended life-cycle assessment for buildings. Using various tools, and based on the case studies of building sustainability assessment, environmental indicators were often shown to be of lesser importance than the other, soft ones. The first steps in the development of a building sustainability assessment method for Portuguese residential buildings will be presented and discussed in the end.

  10. Impact assessment revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Jan; Kollmann, Johannes Christian; Markussen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical underpinnings of the assessment of invasive alien species impacts need to be improved. At present most approaches are unreliable to quantify impact at regional scales and do not allow for comparison of different invasive species. There are four basic problems that need to be addre......The theoretical underpinnings of the assessment of invasive alien species impacts need to be improved. At present most approaches are unreliable to quantify impact at regional scales and do not allow for comparison of different invasive species. There are four basic problems that need...... that ignoring these issues leads to impact estimates almost an order of magnitude from the real values. Thus, we propose a habitatsensitive formula for regional impact assessment that is unaffected by non-linearity. Furthermore, we make some statistical suggestions on how to assess invader effects properly...... and we discuss the quantification of the invaded range. These improvements are crucial for impact assessment with the overall aim of prioritizing management of invasive species....

  11. Information technology resources assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, D.F. [ed.

    1992-01-01

    This year`s Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is something of a departure from traditional practice. Past assessments have concentrated on developments in fundamental technology, particularly with respect to hardware. They form an impressive chronicle of decreasing cycle times, increasing densities, decreasing costs (or, equivalently, increasing capacity and capability per dollar spent), and new system architectures, with a leavening of operating systems and languages. Past assessments have aimed -- and succeeded -- at putting information technology squarely in the spotlight; by contrast, in the first part of this assessment, we would like to move it to the background, and encourage the reader to reflect less on the continuing technological miracles of miniaturization in space and time and more on the second- and third-order implications of some possible workplace applications of these miracles. This Information Technology Resources Assessment is intended to provide a sense of technological direction for planners in projecting the hardware, software, and human resources necessary to support the diverse IT requirements of the various components of the DOE community. It is also intended to provide a sense of our new understanding of the place of IT in our organizations.

  12. Information technology resources assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, D.F. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    This year's Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is something of a departure from traditional practice. Past assessments have concentrated on developments in fundamental technology, particularly with respect to hardware. They form an impressive chronicle of decreasing cycle times, increasing densities, decreasing costs (or, equivalently, increasing capacity and capability per dollar spent), and new system architectures, with a leavening of operating systems and languages. Past assessments have aimed -- and succeeded -- at putting information technology squarely in the spotlight; by contrast, in the first part of this assessment, we would like to move it to the background, and encourage the reader to reflect less on the continuing technological miracles of miniaturization in space and time and more on the second- and third-order implications of some possible workplace applications of these miracles. This Information Technology Resources Assessment is intended to provide a sense of technological direction for planners in projecting the hardware, software, and human resources necessary to support the diverse IT requirements of the various components of the DOE community. It is also intended to provide a sense of our new understanding of the place of IT in our organizations.

  13. Societal assessment overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The decision to proceed with SPS depends on a political determination that commitment of the economic, institutional, and social energies required for its implementation is a worthwhile investment. This determination is national (and international) in scope and is based on knowledge of the environmental and societal impacts of the SPS, its projected economics and technological risks, expressed through the influence of contending segments of society. To assist the decision makers, an assessment of societal issues associated with the SPS was undertaken as part of the Concept Development and Evaluation Program. Results of the assessment are reported. The primary societal assessment objectives are to determine if the societal ramifications of an SPS might significantly impede its development, and to establish an information base regarding these issues. Estimates regarding SPS impacts commensurate with its stage of development and the needs of the decision makers are provided.

  14. Assessment of cardiovascular risk.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-10-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of death worldwide. Usually atherosclerosis is caused by the combined effects of multiple risk factors. For this reason, most guidelines on the prevention of CVD stress the assessment of total CVD risk. The most intensive risk factor modification can then be directed towards the individuals who will derive the greatest benefit. To assist the clinician in calculating the effects of these multiple interacting risk factors, a number of risk estimation systems have been developed. This review address several issues regarding total CVD risk assessment: Why should total CVD risk be assessed? What risk estimation systems are available? How well do these systems estimate risk? What are the advantages and disadvantages of the current systems? What are the current limitations of risk estimation systems and how can they be resolved? What new developments have occurred in CVD risk estimation?

  15. Patient caries risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Fontana, Margherita

    2009-01-01

    Risk assessment is an essential component in the decision-making process for the correct prevention and management of dental caries. Multiple risk factors and indicators have been proposed as targets in the assessment of risk of future disease, varying sometimes based on the age group at which...... they are targeted. Multiple reviews and systematic reviews are available in the literature on this topic. This chapter focusses primarily on results of reviews based on longitudinal studies required to establish the accuracy of caries risk assessment. These findings demonstrate that there is a strong body...... of evidence to support that caries experience is still, unfortunately, the single best predictor for future caries development. In young children, prediction models which include a variety of risk factors seem to increase the accuracy of the prediction, while the usefulness of additional risk factors...

  16. The Energy Efficiency Of Willow Biomass Production In Poland - A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczukowski, Stefan; Tworkowski, Józef; Stolarski, Mariusz J.; Krzyżaniak, Michał

    2015-01-01

    Field experiments with willow (Salix L.) coppice cultivation and Eko-Salix systems have been conducted at the University of Warmia and Mazury since 1992. In that wider context, the aim of the work described here was to compare energy inputs involved in setting up a plantation and producing biomass, and to assess the efficiency of willow-chips production under the coppice and Eko-Salix systems. The energy gain determined in the experiments was several to more than twenty times as great as the inputs needed to operate the plantation and to harvest willow biomass, this leaving both systems of willow cultivation under study attractive where setting up short-rotation coppices is concerned.

  17. Assessment of pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forrest, M; Hermann, G; Andersen, B

    1989-01-01

    .1 cm). The correlation was 0.64 while the differences in dispersion were insignificant. Our findings indicate that it is far from unimportant who makes the pain assessment--the patient who experiences it or the doctor who evaluates it--but they also suggest that the differences could be a matter......In a trial based on 52 patients admitted because of acute abdominal pain, we compared the assessment of pain intensity by doctors and patients according to a visual analogue scale. We found significant differences with regard to the median score of the doctors (3.4 cm) compared to the patients (6...

  18. Acute pain assessment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clear, Elaine

    2016-05-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage” (IASP, 1997). This definition of pain emphasises that it is neither a sensory nor an emotional experience, but a combination of both. It is a subjective experience influenced by physical, psychological and environmental factors that is assessed from a biopsychosocial perspective. The gold standard in assessing pain however is always what the patient says it is.

  19. Assessment: The Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This position statement presents a summative argument against current structures and practices of assessment in England's primary schools, and some key principles for its replacement. The text was agreed by More Than A Score, a broad coalition of professional, curriculum, research and campaigning organisations opposed to the current assessment…

  20. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  1. Research in Language Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Since its inception in 1990, the Language Testing Research Centre (LTRC) at the University of Melbourne has earned an international reputation for its work in the areas of language assessment and testing as well as program evaluation. The mission of the centre is: (1) to carry out and promote research and development in language testing; (2) to…

  2. Financial Sector Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; International Monetary Fund

    2017-01-01

    A joint International Monetary Fund (IMF)-World Bank mission visited Rabat and Casablanca in 2015, to assess the soundness and resilience of the banking system, the state of play in financial inclusion and infrastructure, the oversight frameworks for banking, capital markets and financial market infrastructures, crisis preparedness, and update the findings of the Financial Sector Assessme...

  3. Financial Sector Assessment : Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    This Financial Sector Assessment (FSA) provides a summary of the policy priorities, and main findings intended to assist the Moroccan authorities in evaluating the country's financial system. It reviews the uneasy trade-off between concerns for stability, and development, suggesting Morocco's macroeconomic policies and practices as a whole tend to err more on the side of the concerns of pr...

  4. Assessing Sensitiveness to Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieb, Christoph; Suter, Stefan; Sánchez, Alfredo

    Summary The EU-project ASSET (ASessing SEnsitiveness to Transport) aims at developing and implementing a concise concept to assess transport sensitive areas (TSA) in a European context, i.e. areas in which transport leads to more serious impacts than in other areas. The aim of work package 2 (WP2...

  5. Geothermal industry assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

  6. Kazakhstan : Student Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    Kazakhstan has focused on increasing student learning outcomes by improving the quality of education in the country. An effective student assessment system is an important component to improving education quality and learning outcomes as it provides the necessary information to meet stakeholders' decision-making needs. In order to gain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses...

  7. Serbia : Student Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    Serbia has focused on increasing student learning outcomes by improving the quality of education in the country. An effective student assessment system is an important component to improving education quality and learning outcomes as it provides the necessary information to meet stakeholders' decision-making needs. In order to gain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of ...

  8. THE LATEST ASSESSMENT TOOLS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anonymous

    2011-01-01

    ...-S. CONSOLIDATED DATA WAREHOUSE The OnCourse (www.oncoursesystems.com) Student Stats Data Analysis Tool is a consolidated data warehouse for all district assessment data, like state test scores, local formative and summative test results, and teacher-administered test scores.

  9. LIFE-CYCLE ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life Cycle Assessment, or LCA, is an environmental accounting and mangement approach that consider all the aspects of resource use and environmental releases associated with an industrial system from cradle-to-grave. Specifically, it is a holistic view of environmental interacti...

  10. The Assessment of Proctoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, R.

    1992-01-01

    To give students practical experience in professional engineering, final year students at Nottingham Polytechnic (United Kingdom) proctor (assist) groups of first and second year engineering students and local school students in completing projects. Outlines the aims and objectives of the proctoring program and its assessment procedure: a report…

  11. Math Skills Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, R. W.; Adem, M.

    2004-01-01

    A math review exam, written and administered in conjunction with the Quantitative Assessment Program at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, is used at the beginning of the 1st food engineering course to evaluate math skills needed for successful completion of the course. Students who do not score well on the math exam are targeted for individual…

  12. Rwanda Poverty Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    The last poverty assessment for Rwanda was conducted in 1997. Three years after the genocide, the country was characterized by deep and widespread poverty, rock-bottom health indicators, and pervasive hunger and food insecurity. In real terms, gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was lower than it had been in 1960. In real terms, the economy quadrupled between 1995 and 2013. Enrolment in ...

  13. Assessing cataract surgical competency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Johnson, A. Tim; Boldt, H. Culver; Abramoff, Michael; Olson, Richard; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has mandated that all residency training programs teach and assess 6 general competencies.1 A.G. Lee and K.D. Carter, Managing the new mandate in resident education: A blueprint for translating a national mandate into local compliance,

  14. Assessment as Evidential Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Joanna S.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Principles of evidential reasoning have often been discussed in the context of educational and psychological measurement with respect to construct validity and validity arguments. More recently, Mislevy proposed the metaphor of assessment as an evidentiary argument about students' learning and abilities given their…

  15. Assessment of inclusive education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    the quality of the learning environment in regard to inclusion – this model draws heavily on the logic and mindset of ECERS (Early child environment program). This article will relate the rationale of the assessment model called “Dialoger om Kvalitet” (dialogues on quality) to LSP’s definition of inclusion...

  16. Simply Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Cheryl A.; McLaughlin, Felecia C.; Pringle, Rose M.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the experiences of Miss Felecia McLaughlin, a fourth-grade teacher from the island of Jamaica who used the model proposed by Bass et al. (2009) to assess conceptual understanding of four of the six types of simple machines while encouraging collaboration through the creation of learning teams. Students had an opportunity to…

  17. Sovereign default risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, H.A.; Altman, E.I.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new approach toward assessing sovereign risk by examining rigorously the health and aggregate default risk of a nation's private corporate sector. Models can be utilised to measure the probability of default of the non-financial sector cumulatively for five years, both as an absolute

  18. Comparative Judgement for Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitt, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    Historically speaking, students were judged long before they were marked. The tradition of marking, or scoring, pieces of work students offer for assessment is little more than two centuries old, and was introduced mainly to cope with specific problems arising from the growth in the numbers graduating from universities as the industrial revolution…

  19. Assessing Process and Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Caspersen, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    The final assessment of a course must reflect its goals, and contents. An important goal of our introductory programming course is that the students learn a systematic approach for the development of computer programs. Having the programming process as learning objective naturally raises the ques...

  20. Assessing for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Brynja; Alibegovic, Emina

    2015-01-01

    Continual assessment of student understanding is a crucial aspect of teaching. The adoption of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) represents raised expectations for the level and depth of mathematical understanding that is expected of our students. But new standards also mean new tests. What those tests will be like is of…

  1. Assessing oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Laurentzen, Ramona; Mulder, Martin; Mononen, Asko; Kyttä, Janika; Kortelainen, Mika J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to design a rubric instrument for assessing oral presentation performance in higher education and to test its validity with an expert group. Design/methodology/approach: This study, using mixed methods, focusses on: designing a rubric by identifying

  2. Pre-Test Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Pre-tests are a non-graded assessment tool used to determine pre-existing subject knowledge. Typically pre-tests are administered prior to a course to determine knowledge baseline, but here they are used to test students prior to topical material coverage throughout the course. While counterintuitive, the pre-tests cover material the student is…

  3. Power and environmental assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashmore, Matthew Asa; Richardson, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The significance of politics and power dynamics has long been recognised in environmental assessment (EA) research, but there has not been sustained attention to power, either theoretically or empirically. The aim of this special issue is to encourage the EA community to engage more consistently...

  4. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  5. Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Boulay, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    This chapter is dedicated to the third phase of an LCA study, the Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) where the life cycle inventory’s information on elementary flows is translated into environmental impact scores. In contrast to the three other LCA phases, LCIA is in practice largely automated...

  6. Mobile Sensors Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-26

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...multicellular angiosperms (flowering plants) and gymnosperms (non-flowering seed plants). Animals include single-cell protozoa up through multicellular...Assessment 3-30 The Cowardin classification system has five wetland systems, eight subsystems, and 11 classes of wetlands. The term “system

  7. Health needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A Bani

    2008-01-01

    The findings of the assessment of the health needs of Jazan presented in this review could be utilized as a baseline and reference information for policy formulation, subsequent planning and cost effective intervention programs. It could also be utilized for the curriculum development or review for a community oriented medical schools.

  8. Venetie, Alaska energy assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson; Baca, Michael J.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Brainard, James Robert

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the Energy Assessment performed for Venetie, Alaska using the principals of an Energy Surety Microgrid (ESM) The report covers a brief overview of the principals of ESM, a site characterization of Venetie, a review of the consequence modeling, some preliminary recommendations, and a basic cost analysis.

  9. An assessment of Clethra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffman, M.H.A.

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on the assessment of the Clethra species and cultivars based on the research by Applied Plant Research of Wageningen in Netherlands. The specie is known for its beautiful, attractive and strongly scented flowers. It provides a comparison on the plant structure, flowers, and

  10. Assessing Knowledge in Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.; Strømgren, Ole; Sato, Toyoko

    2013-01-01

    The Synopsis–Based Oral Examination (S–BOE) is described as deployed in international management education programs in a Danish business school. It assesses students in light of specified learning objectives through time–constrained presentation and dialogue. The format is premised on prior submi...

  11. Risk assessment [Chapter 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis S. Ojima; Louis R. Iverson; Brent L. Sohngen; James M. Vose; Christopher W. Woodall; Grant M. Domke; David L. Peterson; Jeremy S. Littell; Stephen N. Matthews; Anantha M. Prasad; Matthew P. Peters; Gary W. Yohe; Megan M. Friggens

    2014-01-01

    What is "risk" in the context of climate change? How can a "risk-based framework" help assess the effects of climate change and develop adaptation priorities? Risk can be described by the likelihood of an impact occurring and the magnitude of the consequences of the impact (Yohe 2010) (Fig. 9.1). High-magnitude impacts are always...

  12. Climate change assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda A. Joyce

    2008-01-01

    The science associated with climate and its effects on ecosystems, economies, and social systems is developing rapidly. Climate change assessments can serve as an important synthesis of this science and provide the information and context for management and policy decisions on adaptation and mitigation. This topic paper describes the variety of climate change...

  13. Music therapy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Når klienter henvises til musikterapi, gennemgår de en assessment-procedure (en klinisk vurdering), som kræver terapeutens ekspertise inden for forskellige områder - med henblik på at stille en en diagnose og identificere klientens behov og potentialer, samt at opstille realistiske forventninger ...

  14. Integrated long-term responses of an arctic-alpine willow and associated ectomycorrhizal fungi to an altered environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Karina Engelbrecht; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) colonization and morphotype community composition together with growth response and biomass distribution in the arctic-alpine, prostrate willow Salix herbacea L. x Salix polaris Wahlenb. after 11 seasons of shading, warming, and fertilization at a fellfield...... in subarctic Sweden. The aim was to assess responses of the integrated plant-fungal system to long-term field experiments simulating expected environmental changes. Warming more than doubled aboveground S. herbacea x S. polaris biomass and shoot growth, whereas shading and nutrient addition had less influence...

  15. Small Wind Site Assessment Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Tim [Advanced Energy Systems LLC, Eugene, OR (United States); Preus, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Site assessment for small wind energy systems is one of the key factors in the successful installation, operation, and performance of a small wind turbine. A proper site assessment is a difficult process that includes wind resource assessment and the evaluation of site characteristics. These guidelines address many of the relevant parts of a site assessment with an emphasis on wind resource assessment, using methods other than on-site data collection and creating a small wind site assessment report.

  16. How EPA Assesses Chemical Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  17. Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) database is part of the VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP). This database contains assessments of selected surgical...

  18. Assessing together. Peer assessment from an interpersonal perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennip, Anna Eva (Nanine) van

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focused on how the social context in which peer assessment takes place is related to the learning effects of peer assessment. We wanted to identify interpersonal beliefs in peer assessment settings that influence the peer assessment process on the one hand, but could also been seen

  19. Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2008). Modeling Units of Assessment for Sharing Assessment Process Information: towards an Assessment Process Specification. Presentation at the ICWL 2008 conference. August, 20, 2008, Jinhua, China.

  20. Management self assessment plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debban, B.L.

    1998-01-30

    Duke Engineering and Services Hanford Inc., Spent Nuclear Fuel Project is responsible for the operation of fuel storage facilities. The SNF project mission includes the safe removal, processing and transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel from 100 K Area fuel storage basins to a new Storage facility in the Hanford 200 East Area. Its mission is the modification of the 100 K area fuel storage facilities and the construction of two new facilities: the 100 K Area Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and the 200 East Area Canister Storage Building. The management self assessment plan described in this document is scheduled to begin in April of 1999 and be complete in May of 1999. The management self assessment plan describes line management preparations for declaring that line management is ready to commence operations.

  1. Microbial Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Mena, K. D.; Nickerson, C.A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, microbiological spaceflight requirements have been established in a subjective manner based upon expert opinion of both environmental and clinical monitoring results and the incidence of disease. The limited amount of data, especially from long-duration missions, has created very conservative requirements based primarily on the concentration of microorganisms. Periodic reevaluations of new data from later missions have allowed some relaxation of these stringent requirements. However, the requirements remain very conservative and subjective in nature, and the risk of crew illness due to infectious microorganisms is not well defined. The use of modeling techniques for microbial risk has been applied in the food and potable water industries and has exceptional potential for spaceflight applications. From a productivity standpoint, this type of modeling can (1) decrease unnecessary costs and resource usage and (2) prevent inadequate or inappropriate data for health assessment. In addition, a quantitative model has several advantages for risk management and communication. By identifying the variable components of the model and the knowledge associated with each component, this type of modeling can: (1) Systematically identify and close knowledge gaps, (2) Systematically identify acceptable and unacceptable risks, (3) Improve communication with stakeholders as to the reasons for resource use, and (4) Facilitate external scientific approval of the NASA requirements. The modeling of microbial risk involves the evaluation of several key factors including hazard identification, crew exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, and risk characterization. Many of these factors are similar to conditions found on Earth; however, the spaceflight environment is very specialized as the inhabitants live in a small, semi-closed environment that is often dependent on regenerative life support systems. To further complicate modeling efforts, microbial dose

  2. Assessing Cardiac Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Young, Martin E.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Abel, E. Dale; Brunengraber, Henri; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Des Rosiers, Christine; Gerszten, Robert; Glatz, Jan F.; Griffin, Julian L.; Gropler, Robert J.; Holzhuetter, Hermann-Georg; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lewandowski, E. Douglas; Malloy, Craig R.; Neubauer, Stefan; Peterson, Linda R.; Portman, Michael A.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a complex system of interrelated reactions, the heart converts chemical energy to mechanical energy. Energy transfer is achieved through coordinated activation of enzymes, ion channels, and contractile elements, as well as structural and membrane proteins. The heart’s needs for energy are difficult to overestimate. At a time when the cardiovascular research community is discovering a plethora of new molecular methods to assess cardiac metabolism, the methods remain scattered in the literature. The present statement on “Assessing Cardiac Metabolism” seeks to provide a collective and curated resource on methods and models used to investigate established and emerging aspects of cardiac metabolism. Some of those methods are refinements of classic biochemical tools, whereas most others are recent additions from the powerful tools of molecular biology. The aim of this statement is to be useful to many and to do justice to a dynamic field of great complexity. PMID:27012580

  3. Medical assessment in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Ricard; Lizarraga, Antonia; Domínguez, David

    2017-10-30

    Practicing sports at a professional level requires the body to be in good health. The fact of carrying out a continuous and high intensity physical activity in the presence of pathological conditions and/or a maladaptation of the body can be detrimental to the athletes' health and, therefore, to their performance. Many of the problems that arise in the sports field could be prevented with a periodic and well-structured medical assessment. In this review, we describe the protocol of the medical service of a high-level sports club for the assessment of its professional athletes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Cortical and spinal assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, I W; Gram, Mikkel; Hansen, T M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standardized objective methods to assess the analgesic effects of opioids, enable identification of underlying mechanisms of drug actions in the central nervous system. Opioids may exert their effect on both cortical and spinal levels. In this study actions of morphine at both levels...... were investigated, followed by analysis of a possible correlation between the cortical processing and spinal transmission. METHODS: The study was conducted after a double-blinded, two-way crossover design in thirty-nine healthy participants. Each participant received 30mg morphine or placebo as oral...... morphine administration (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Cold pressor EEG and the nociceptive reflex were more sensitive to morphine analgesia than resting EEG and can be used as standardized objective methods to assess opioid effects. However, no correlation between the analgesic effect of morphine on the spinal...

  5. Patent Assessment Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Paul F.; Reitzig, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The increasing number of patent applications worldwide and the extension of patenting to the areas of software and business methods have triggered a debate on "patent quality". While patent quality may have various dimensions, this paper argues that consistency in the decision making on the side...... of the patent office is one important dimension, particularly in new patenting areas (emerging technologies). In order to understand whether patent offices appear capable of providing consistent assessments of a patent's technological quality in such novel industries from the beginning, we study the concordance...... of the European Patent Office's (EPO's) granting and opoposition decisions for individual patents. We use the historical example of biotech patens filed between 1978 until 1986, the early stage of the industry. Our results indicate that the EPO shows systematically different assessments of technological quality...

  6. Assessing Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2013-12-01

    This is an encore presentation of what was presented at the 2012 AGU International Conference. It was entitled: 'ASSESSING CORE COMPETENCIES.' The poster presentation, however, has been redesigned and reorganized with new, revised perspectives. The importance of ASSESSMENT principles has been emphasized. Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marchese in 1987. Assessment is the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology itself. He further argues that students must demonstrate that they have the have the ability to think critically before they make an attempt to use technology in a chosen application-specific environment. The author further

  7. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  8. Crowdsourced emphysema assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørting, Silas Nyboe; Petersen, Jens; Thomsen, Laura H.

    2017-01-01

    it unsuitable for obtaining large amounts of labeled data. We investigate if visual assessment of emphysema can be framed as an image similarity task that does not require expert. Substituting untrained annotators for experts makes it possible to label data sets much faster and at a lower cost. We use crowd......, we still achieve a median F1 score of 0.58 for prediction of four patterns....

  9. Reusable Assessment Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Karsten Henke; Heinz-Dietrich Wuttke

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a Web-based Test, Examination and Assessment system that can be used via the Internet. It is therefore suitable for both local and remote examination preparation as well as examination within a lab course (entry test). This solution is also intended for the use in lectures dealing with the design of complex digital control systems within the newly created European Master Degree Program “Remote Engineering”. Actual Learning Management Systems (LMS) include mainly tools for...

  10. Indoor Climate Quality Assessment -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansaldi, Roberta; Asadi, Ehsan; Costa, José Joaquim

    This Guidebook gives building professionals useful support in the practical measurements and monitoring of the indoor climate in buildings. It is evident that energy consumption in a building is directly influenced by required and maintained indoor comfort level. Wireless technologies for measure...... for measurement and monitoring have allowed a significantly increased number of possible applications, especially in existing buildings. The Guidebook illustrates several cases with the instrumentation of the monitoring and assessment of indoor climate....

  11. Sustainability Assessment Circle

    OpenAIRE

    Schlör, H.; Hake, J.-Fr.

    2015-01-01

    Since the nineteen seventies, science and society have been discussing the worldwide ecological, economic, and social problems caused by industrialization and globalization. Sustainable development is perceived as a strategy for coping with these problems. The Rio +20 conference in 2012 confirmed the sustainability concept and introduced the green economy and the life cycle sustainable assessment as its implementation and operationalization strategy and tool.In the following, we will demonstr...

  12. Rapid Building Assessment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    22  Figure 12. Average kWh savings per gross square footage ( GSF ). ....................................... 22  iii LIST OF TABLES...Certification Program FTP File Transfer Protocol GIS Geographical Information Systems GSF gross square footage JCI Johnson Controls Energy...Average kWh savings per gross square footage ( GSF ). 23 6.0 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FirstFuel chose each Performance Objective with the major project

  13. FRAPCON-3: Integral assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Berna, G.A.; Berna, G.A.

    1997-12-01

    An integral assessment has been performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to quantify the predictive capabilities of FRAPCON-3, a steady-state fuel behavior code designed to analyze fuel behavior from beginning-of-life to burnup levels of 65 GWd/MTU. FRAPCON-3 code calculations are shown to compare satisfactorily to a pre-selected set of experimental data with steady-state operating conditions. 30 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. Health equity impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povall, Susan L; Haigh, Fiona A; Abrahams, Debbie; Scott-Samuel, Alex

    2014-12-01

    The World Health Organization's Commission on Social Determinants of Health has called for 'health equity impact assessments' of all economic agreements, market regulation and public policies. We carried out an international study to clarify if existing health impact assessment (HIA) methods are adequate for the task of global health equity assessments. We triangulated data from a scoping review of the international literature, in-depth interviews with health equity and HIA experts and an international stakeholder workshop. We found that equity is not addressed adequately in HIAs for a variety of reasons, including inadequate guidance, absence of definitions, poor data and evidence, perceived lack of methods and tools and practitioner unwillingness or inability to address values like fairness and social justice. Current methods can address immediate, 'downstream' factors, but not the root causes of inequity. Extending HIAs to cover macro policy and global equity issues will require new tools to address macroeconomic policies, historical roots of inequities and upstream causes like power imbalances. More sensitive, participatory methods are also required. There is, however, no need for the development of a completely new methodology. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Methods for assessing geodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwoliński, Zbigniew; Najwer, Alicja; Giardino, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The accepted systematics of geodiversity assessment methods will be presented in three categories: qualitative, quantitative and qualitative-quantitative. Qualitative methods are usually descriptive methods that are suited to nominal and ordinal data. Quantitative methods use a different set of parameters and indicators to determine the characteristics of geodiversity in the area being researched. Qualitative-quantitative methods are a good combination of the collection of quantitative data (i.e. digital) and cause-effect data (i.e. relational and explanatory). It seems that at the current stage of the development of geodiversity research methods, qualitative-quantitative methods are the most advanced and best assess the geodiversity of the study area. Their particular advantage is the integration of data from different sources and with different substantive content. Among the distinguishing features of the quantitative and qualitative-quantitative methods for assessing geodiversity are their wide use within geographic information systems, both at the stage of data collection and data integration, as well as numerical processing and their presentation. The unresolved problem for these methods, however, is the possibility of their validation. It seems that currently the best method of validation is direct filed confrontation. Looking to the next few years, the development of qualitative-quantitative methods connected with cognitive issues should be expected, oriented towards ontology and the Semantic Web.

  16. AUTOMATED GEOSPATIAL WATERSHED ASSESSMENT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment tool (AGWA) is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Arizona, and the University of Wyoming to automate the parameterization and execution of the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and KINEmatic Runoff and EROSion (KINEROS2) hydrologic models. The application of these two models allows AGWA to conduct hydrologic modeling and watershed assessments at multiple temporal and spatial scales. AGWA’s current outputs are runoff (volumes and peaks) and sediment yield, plus nitrogen and phosphorus with the SWAT model. AGWA uses commonly available GIS data layers to fully parameterize, execute, and visualize results from both models. Through an intuitive interface the user selects an outlet from which AGWA delineates and discretizes the watershed using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) based on the individual model requirements. The watershed model elements are then intersected with soils and land cover data layers to derive the requisite model input parameters. The chosen model is then executed, and the results are imported back into AGWA for visualization. This allows managers to identify potential problem areas where additional monitoring can be undertaken or mitigation activities can be focused. AGWA also has tools to apply an array of best management practices. There are currently two versions of AGWA available; AGWA 1.5 for

  17. Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcot, Divya K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to particular hazardous materials in a work environment is dangerous to the employees who work directly with or around the materials as well as those who come in contact with them indirectly. In order to maintain a national standard for safe working environments and protect worker health, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set forth numerous precautionary regulations. NASA has been proactive in adhering to these regulations by implementing standards which are often stricter than regulation limits and administering frequent health risk assessments. The primary objective of this project is to create the infrastructure for an Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database specific to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) which will compile all of the exposure assessment data into a well-organized, navigable format. The data includes Sample Types, Samples Durations, Crafts of those from whom samples were collected, Job Performance Requirements (JPR) numbers, Phased Contrast Microscopy (PCM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results and qualifiers, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and names of industrial hygienists who performed the monitoring. This database will allow NASA to provide OSHA with specific information demonstrating that JSC s work procedures are protective enough to minimize the risk of future disease from the exposures. The data has been collected by the NASA contractors Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) and Wyle Laboratories. The personal exposure samples were collected from devices worn by laborers working at JSC and by building occupants located in asbestos-containing buildings.

  18. Public Risk Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendeck, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    The Public Entry Risk Assessment (PERA) program addresses risk to the public from shuttle or other spacecraft re-entry trajectories. Managing public risk to acceptable levels is a major component of safe spacecraft operation. PERA is given scenario inputs of vehicle trajectory, probability of failure along that trajectory, the resulting debris characteristics, and field size and distribution, and returns risk metrics that quantify the individual and collective risk posed by that scenario. Due to the large volume of data required to perform such a risk analysis, PERA was designed to streamline the analysis process by using innovative mathematical analysis of the risk assessment equations. Real-time analysis in the event of a shuttle contingency operation, such as damage to the Orbiter, is possible because PERA allows for a change to the probability of failure models, therefore providing a much quicker estimation of public risk. PERA also provides the ability to generate movie files showing how the entry risk changes as the entry develops. PERA was designed to streamline the computation of the enormous amounts of data needed for this type of risk assessment by using an average distribution of debris on the ground, rather than pinpointing the impact point of every piece of debris. This has reduced the amount of computational time significantly without reducing the accuracy of the results. PERA was written in MATLAB; a compiled version can run from a DOS or UNIX prompt.

  19. Comparative environmental health assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk R

    2008-10-01

    Conceptual and methodological issues in calculating and comparing the health impacts from environmental risk factors in ways that are not only compatible across environmental hazards but also can be fairly compared to burdens from nonenvironmental risk factors, such as poor nutrition, unsafe sex, and smoking, are discussed. It is emphasized that a focus on environmental health burden does not always produce priorities that correspond to those related to environmental quality alone. The methods when applied to China's environmental and other risks using the Chinese burden of disease in terms of lost healthy life years as the metric are illustrated. Household environmental risks are still quite important in China, because of rural poverty, but have been exceeded by community environmental risks nationally. Global risks from climate are small at present, but have the potential to rise. Although not a major greenhouse gas emitter on a per capita basis compared to rich countries, China has already passed the threshold of imposing more global risk than it receives. The study ends with the suggestion that environmental risk assessment should use as a baseline estimates that are based on methods developed in international collaborative assessments, such as those in the WHO Comparative Risk Assessment, in order to foster comparability and policy and public confidence in the methods.

  20. Assessment in Elementary Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebright, Krissa; Mahoney, Meg Robson

    2012-01-01

    In this article, two public school elementary dance educators share their experiences developing and implementing dance performance assessments. The assessments were developed for the State of Washington Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to assess student learning in dance education and bring dance assessment to an equal platform…

  1. Second and Foreign Language Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpura, James E.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes some of the main issues, concerns, and debates that have ensued over the years in the field of L2 assessment and shows how past concerns have shaped contemporary L2 assessment research and practice. The article first describes what L2 assessment is and what it entails, arguing that notions of L2 assessment have been…

  2. Assessment in Intercultural Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, Angela

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides background to considering how to assess intercultural language learning. It describes why traditional views of assessment are not sufficient. Essentially, assessing intercultural language learning requires assessment of both students' performance of communication in the target language and how they understand and explain the…

  3. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  4. Life Cycle Assessment and Risk Assessment: A Methodological Comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stig Irving; Christensen, Frans Møller; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2001-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment and Risk Assessment are two different tools in environmental management. The paper identifies harmonies, discrepancies and relations between the two tools exemplified by the risk assessment principles of the European Commission (EC) and the LCA method ‘EDIP’ (En......-vironmental Design of Industrial Products) developed in Denmark, respectively. A very important feature of LCA is the relative assessment due to the use of a functional unit. Risk assessment on the other hand is an absolute assessment, which may require very specific and detailed information on e.g. the exposure...

  5. Classification and clinical assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cantini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There are at least nine classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis (PsA that have been proposed and used in clinical studies. With the exception of the ESSG and Bennett rules, all of the other criteria sets have a good performance in identifying PsA patients. As the CASPAR criteria are based on a robust study methodology, they are considered the current reference standard. However, if there seems to be no doubt that they are very good to classify PsA patients (very high specificity, they might be not sensitive enough to diagnose patients with unknown early PsA. The vast clinical heterogeneity of PsA makes its assessment very challenging. Peripheral joint involvement is measured by 78/76 joint counts, spine involvement by the instruments used for ankylosing spondylitis (AS, dactylitis by involved digit count or by the Leeds dactylitis index, enthesitis by the number of affected entheses (several indices available and psoriasis by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI. Peripheral joint damage can be assessed by a modified van der Heijde-Sharp scoring system and axial damage by the methods used for AS or by the Psoriatic Arthritis Spondylitis Radiology Index (PASRI. As in other arthritides, global evaluation of disease activity and severity by patient and physician and assessment of disability and quality of life are widely used. Finally, composite indices that capture several clinical manifestations of PsA have been proposed and a new instrument, the Psoriatic ARthritis Disease Activity Score (PASDAS, is currently being developed.

  6. Tank farms hazards assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-30

    Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

  7. Petroleum resources assessment 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Geobit, a seismic data processing software, is the token of the achievement for the development of technology in the oil exploration over the Korean continental shelf. This report consists of six articles: (1) Experimental processing of a model data set using Geobit seismic software, (2) Management of seismic data on network, (3) Seismic data processing for domestic seismic survey over the continental shelf of Korea using the Geobit, (4) A study on the intrusion model by physical modeling, (5) Research on application and development of Geobit seismic software, (6) Assessment of Geobit system and suggestions for further development. (author)

  8. Audit and Assessment Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Craig [Tlingit-Haida Regional Housing Authority, Juneau, AK (United States)

    2016-03-22

    Project to assess 46 low-income multifamily residences owned and managed by THRHA in up to 14 southeast Alaska communities. The Objective of project was to identify efficiency measures to reduce energy costs by 30% for low-income multifamily housing by; 1. Decreasing energy demand by increasing multifamily housing energy efficiency; 2. Reducing household energy consumption through energy conservation education and installation of energy upgrades; and 3. Projecting energy savings based on fossil fuel reduction to environmentally and economically benefit Tribal southeast communities

  9. Assessing computer anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B A; Waugh, G W

    1989-12-01

    A study was conducted to develop a scale for assessing computer anxiety. The scale was administered to 152 psychology students. The responses were then subjected to both item and principal components analysis. Computer anxiety was significantly and negatively correlated -.48 with the total amount of experience individuals had had with computers. Graduate and undergraduate students did not differ significantly in anxiety. When controlling for amount of experience with computers, clinical psychology students reported more anxiety than industrial-organizational psychology students, but men and women did not differ significantly in anxiety.

  10. Technology assessment. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasselt, K.H.

    1981-06-01

    During its international winter meeting in Duesseldorf on 9th and 10th February, 1981, the Deutsches Atom-Forum tried to present a programme which did not only reflect the negative but also the positive aspects of the technology assessment. Acutally the Atom-Forum had intended to practice 'nuclear abstinence'. But since nuclear energy is a synonym for the risks of technology in public discussion this intention could not be fulfilled. Much too often the general topic of the meeting was shifted towards the discussion of nuclear energy.

  11. Introducing Health Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannheimer, L N; Gulis, G; Lehto, J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intersectoral Action for Health (IAH) and its Health Impact Assessment (HIA) tool are built on collaboration between actors and sectors, requiring multidimensional and horizontal way of working. The study aims to analyse the enablers and barriers when such a new way of working and tool...... used by which the actual problems, the governmental actions (or non-actions) (politics) and the understanding, implementation and evaluation of the initiative (policy) could be analysed. All actors involved, civil servants, politicians, representatives of the local public health institute...

  12. Integrated Assessment Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

    2012-10-31

    This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

  13. Strategic environmental assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørnøv, Lone

    1997-01-01

    The integration of environmental considerations into strategic decision making is recognized as a key to achieving sustainability. In the European Union a draft directive on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is currently being reviewed by the member states. The nature of the proposed SEA...... that the SEA directive will influence the decision-making process positively and will help to promote improved environmental decisions. However, the guidelines for public participation are not sufficient and the democratic element is strongly limited. On the basis of these findings, recommendations relating...

  14. Assessment of fracture risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanis, John A. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.j.pontefract@sheffield.ac.uk; Johansson, Helena; Oden, Anders [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); McCloskey, Eugene V. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); Osteoporosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Fractures are a common complication of osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis is defined by bone mineral density at the femoral neck, other sites and validated techniques can be used for fracture prediction. Several clinical risk factors contribute to fracture risk independently of BMD. These include age, prior fragility fracture, smoking, excess alcohol, family history of hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and the use of oral glucocorticoids. These risk factors in conjunction with BMD can be integrated to provide estimates of fracture probability using the FRAX tool. Fracture probability rather than BMD alone can be used to fashion strategies for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis.

  15. Assessment and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, B.

    1999-12-20

    The author's assignment at this conference is to assess where the authors are in high-energy physics and speculate on where the authors might be going. This frees him from any obligation to summarize all that went on here and allows him to talk just about those topics that interest him the most at this time. He will lets his prejudices show and talks a bit about physics in general, CP violation, neutrinos, accelerators, non-accelerator experiments, and even theory.

  16. Total System Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung; Lee, Youn Myoung; Han, Ji Woong; Choi, Jong Won; Hahn, Pil Soo; Park, Jeong Hwa; Jeong, Mi Seon

    2007-06-15

    Based on the KAERI FEP list developed through the previous studies, the KAERI FEP Encyclopedia has been developed. Current version is 1.0 which includes all relevant FEPs to compose of two references and all alternative scenarios. Many interaction FEPs between scenario defining FEP(SDF) are created throughout the study. FEPs are classified into many Integrated FEP(IFEP) which eventually become the elements of the RES matrix. The FEAS program one of the component of the KAERI's CYPRUS information system is added to develop the FEP, RES, AC, AMF and finally scenarios. It assists to create transparent way to deal with assessment from the stage of the planning of the R and D to the final stage of the external audit and regulatory body review. Even though MASCOT-K and compartment analysis codes such as AMBER, GoldSim and Ecolego are excellent for TSPA they by in heritage possess a certain limitation especially to identify a proper migration cross sectional area when a relatively big component intersects with a tiny one such as a fracture. It is truly 3D phenomena in nature. MDPSA code is developed which is expected to overcome limitations in compartment models while successfully deals with natural disruptive events. The R and D target for the TSPA is to develop the sufficient scenarios and their variation cases to understand the safety of KRS in every possible aspect. For this, reference scenarios, alternative scenarios covering engineered barrier failure and natural events are developed and assessed respectively for around 100 cases. The stylized template to assess the Korean reference biosphere is developed using the AMBER. Three critical groups, agricultural, freshwater and marine water fishing groups are identified to assess the DCF following the guidelines of ICRP. Based on the QA principles of T2R3, the web based QA system is developed using the procedures in the USNRC 10CFR50 Appendix B. The QA system is combined with the PAID and FEAS to create the

  17. 2007 TOXICOLOGY AND RISK ASSESSMENT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has announced The 2007 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference Cincinnati Marriott North, West Chester (Cincinnati), OHApril 23- 26, 2007 - Click to register!The Annual Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference is a unique meeting where several Government Agencies come together to discuss toxicology and risk assessment issues that are not only of concern to the government, but also to a broader audience including academia and industry. The theme of this year's conference is Emerging Issues and Challenges in Risk Assessment and the preliminary agenda includes: Plenary Sessions and prominent speakers (tentative) include: Issues of Emerging Chemical ContaminantsUncertainty and Variability in Risk Assessment Use of Mechanistic data in IARC evaluationsParallel Sessions:Uncertainty and Variability in Dose-Response Assessment Recent Advances in Toxicity and Risk Assessment of RDX The Use of Epidemiologic Data for Risk Assessment Applications Cumulative Health Risk Assessment:

  18. Software Process Assessment (SPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Linda H.; Sheppard, Sylvia B.; Butler, Scott A.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's environment mirrors the changes taking place in the nation at large, i.e. workers are being asked to do more work with fewer resources. For software developers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the effects of this change are that we must continue to produce quality code that is maintainable and reusable, but we must learn to produce it more efficiently and less expensively. To accomplish this goal, the Data Systems Technology Division (DSTD) at GSFC is trying a variety of both proven and state-of-the-art techniques for software development (e.g., object-oriented design, prototyping, designing for reuse, etc.). In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques, the Software Process Assessment (SPA) program was initiated. SPA was begun under the assumption that the effects of different software development processes, techniques, and tools, on the resulting product must be evaluated in an objective manner in order to assess any benefits that may have accrued. SPA involves the collection and analysis of software product and process data. These data include metrics such as effort, code changes, size, complexity, and code readability. This paper describes the SPA data collection and analysis methodology and presents examples of benefits realized thus far by DSTD's software developers and managers.

  19. Comprehensive baseline hazard assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S.B.; Amundson, T.M.

    1994-10-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and implemented a cost effective/value-added program/process that assists in fulfilling key elements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration`s (OSHA) voluntary Protection Program (VPP) requirements. WHC is the prime contractor for the US Department of Energy (US DOE) at the Hanford site, located in Richland, Washington. The site consists of over 560 square miles, contains over 1100 facilities and has an employment of approximately 18,000. WHC is currently in the application review phase for the US DOE equivalent of OSHA-VPP ``merit`` program status. The program involves setting up a team consisting of industrial safety and health (industrial hygienists) professionals, members of the maintenance and operations work force, and facility management. This team performs a workplace hazard characterization/analysis and then applies a risk assessment approach to prioritize observed and potential hazards in need of abatement. The process involves using checklists that serve as a guide for evaluation/inspection criteria. Forms are used to document meetings, field observations, instrument calibration and performance testing. Survey maps are generated to document quality records of measurement results. A risk assessment code matrix with a keyword index was developed to facilitate consistency. The end product is useful in communicating hazards to facility management, health and safety professionals, audit/appraisal groups, and most importantly, facility workers.

  20. Health care technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  1. Intelligent Fish Freshness Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gholam Hosseini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish species identification and automated fish freshness assessment play important roles in fishery industry applications. This paper describes a method based on support vector machines (SVMs to improve the performance of fish identification systems. The result is used for the assessment of fish freshness using artificial neural network (ANN. Identification of the fish species involves processing of the images of fish. The most efficient features were extracted and combined with the down-sampled version of the images to create a 1D input vector. Max-Win algorithm applied to the SVM-based classifiers has enhanced the reliability of sorting to 96.46%. The realisation of Cyranose 320 Electronic nose (E-nose, in order to evaluate the fish freshness in real-time, is experimented. Intelligent processing of the sensor patterns involves the use of a dedicated ANN for each species under study. The best estimation of freshness was provided by the most sensitive sensors. Data was collected from four selected species of fishes over a period of ten days. It was concluded that the performance can be increased using individual trained ANN for each specie. The proposed system has been successful in identifying the number of days after catching the fish with an accuracy of up to 91%.

  2. The potential of willow for remediation of heavy metal polluted calcareous urban soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Holm, P E; Nejrup, J

    2009-01-01

    Growth performance and heavy metal uptake by willow (Salix viminalis) from strongly and moderately polluted calcareous soils were investigated in field and growth chamber trials to assess the suitability of willow for phytoremediation. Field uptakes were 2-10 times higher than growth chamber...

  3. Phytoremediation prospects of willow stands on contaminated sediment : A field trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervaeke, P; Luyssaert, S.; Mertens, J.; Meers, E.; Tack, F. M.G.; Lust, N

    2003-01-01

    Establishing fast growing willow stands on land disposed contaminated dredged sediment can result in the revaluation of this material and opens possibilities for phytoremediation. A field trial was designed to assess the impact of planting a willow stand (Salix viminalis L. 'Orm') on the dissipation

  4. Southern Great Plains rapid ecoregional assessment : Pre-assessment report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Pre-Assessment Report for the Southern Great Plains Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) is to document the selection process for and final list of...

  5. Systemic Assessment as a New Tool for Assessing Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic Assessment as a New Tool for Assessing Students Learning in Chemistry using SATL Methods: Systemic Matching, Systemic Synthesis, Systemic Analysis, Systemic Synthetic – Analytic, as Systemic Question Types.

  6. World Assessment Unit Geological Characterizations, 2000 World Petroleum Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapfile includes arcs and polygons that describe U.S. Geological Survey defined petroleum resource Assessment Units of the World. Each assessment unit is...

  7. Assessment Might Dictate the Curriculum, but What Dictates Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Phillip; Bearman, Margaret; Boud, David J.; Hall, Matt; Molloy, Elizabeth K.; Bennett, Sue; Joughin, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Almost all tertiary educators make assessment choices, for example, when they create an assessment task, design a rubric, or write multiple-choice items. Educators potentially have access to a variety of evidence and materials regarding good assessment practice but may not choose to consult them or be successful in translating these into practice.…

  8. Short Cycle Assessment: Improving Student Achievement through Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Susan; Stanley, Todd; Moore, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    This book shows you how to improve student achievement by providing them with frequent feedback on their work. It provides a step-by-step process to help you: (1) write good questions that assess student learning; (2) design your own formative assessments; (3) administer short-cycle assessments; (4) analyze and use data to shape instruction; and…

  9. Assessed by a Teacher Like Me: Race and Teacher Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouazad, Amine

    2014-01-01

    Do teachers assess same-race students more favorably? This paper uses nationally representative data on teacher assessments of student ability that can be compared with test scores to determine whether teachers give better assessments to same-race students. The data set follows students from kindergarten to grade 5, a period during which racial…

  10. Rethinking Traditional Assessment Concepts in Classroom-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeywickrama, Priyanvada

    2012-01-01

    As teachers and students have taken more active roles in assessment practices, our field has begun to pay more attention to classroom-based assessment (CBA). As a result, we have gained a better understanding of CBA principles but we have also become aware of challenges, particularly in applying traditional assessment concepts such as reliability…

  11. Dermal exposure assessment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, R A

    1993-12-01

    Exposure of the skin to chemical substances can contribute significantly to total dose in many workplace situations, and its relative importance will increase when airborne occupational exposure limits are reduced, unless steps to reduce skin exposure are undertaken simultaneously. Its assessment employs personal sampling techniques to measure skin loading rates, and combines these measurements with models of percutaneous absorption to estimate absorbed dose. Knowledge of dermal exposure pathways is in many cases fundamental to hazard evaluation and control. When the skin is the primary contributor to absorbed dose, dermal exposure measurements and biological monitoring play complementary roles in defining occupational exposures. Exposure normally occurs by one of three pathways: (i) immersion (direct contact with a liquid or solid chemical substance); (ii) deposition of aerosol or uptake of vapour through the skin; or (iii) surface contact (residue transfer from contaminated surfaces). Sampling methods fall into three categories: surrogate skin; chemical removal; and fluorescent tracers. Surface sampling represents a supplementary approach, providing an estimate of dermal exposure potential. Surrogate skin techniques involve placing a chemical collection medium on the skin. Whole-body garment samplers do not require assumptions relating to distribution, an inherent limitation of patch sampling. The validity of these techniques rests on the ability of the sampling medium to capture and retain chemicals in a manner similar to skin. Removal techniques include skin washing and wiping, but these measure only what can be removed from the skin, not exposure: laboratory removal efficiency studies are required for proper interpretation of data. Fluorescent tracer techniques exploit the visual properties of fluorescent compounds, and combined with video imaging make quantification of dermal exposure patterns possible, but the need to introduce a chemical substance (tracer

  12. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  13. NATURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.F. Fenster

    2000-12-11

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the scientific work that was performed to evaluate and assess the occurrence and economic potential of natural resources within the geologic setting of the Yucca Mountain area. The extent of the regional areas of investigation for each commodity differs and those areas are described in more detail in the major subsections of this report. Natural resource assessments have focused on an area defined as the ''conceptual controlled area'' because of the requirements contained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation, 10 CFR Part 60, to define long-term boundaries for potential radionuclide releases. New requirements (proposed 10 CFR Part 63 [Dyer 1999]) have obviated the need for defining such an area. However, for the purposes of this report, the area being discussed, in most cases, is the previously defined ''conceptual controlled area'', now renamed the ''natural resources site study area'' for this report (shown on Figure 1). Resource potential can be difficult to assess because it is dependent upon many factors, including economics (demand, supply, cost), the potential discovery of new uses for resources, or the potential discovery of synthetics to replace natural resource use. The evaluations summarized are based on present-day use and economic potential of the resources. The objective of this report is to summarize the existing reports and information for the Yucca Mountain area on: (1) Metallic mineral and mined energy resources (such as gold, silver, etc., including uranium); (2) Industrial rocks and minerals (such as sand, gravel, building stone, etc.); (3) Hydrocarbons (including oil, natural gas, tar sands, oil shales, and coal); and (4) Geothermal resources. Groundwater is present at the Yucca Mountain site at depths ranging from 500 to 750 m (about 1,600 to 2,500 ft) below the ground surface. Groundwater resources are not discussed in this

  14. Assessing Operational Situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xinxin

    In spite of the high level of automation commonly applied to today’s engineering system, humans’ skill and knowledge still plays a central role in the systems’ daily operation, critical decision making, and accident management. The complexity of the engineered system poses great challenge for human...... operators to perceive and understand the operational situation. The research domain of situation awareness approaches the operational challenges from the human cognition perspective while the presented thesis aims at supporting situation assessment from the system perspective. The thesis has reviewed...... different perspectives on situation awareness in the human factor studies and uses the knowledge reflectively for system representation and analysis. The human cognitive activities during complex plant operation and how they perceive a situation and what kind of knowledge has to be established in the human...

  15. Petroleum resources assessment 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This report consists of two articles. (1) Petroleum resources assessment of the Okinawa Trough: The hydrocarbon potential has been evaluated for the Tertiary strata in the northwestern margin of the Okinawa Trough on the basis of the pale-ontological, petrological, geochemical data from two wells (Nikkan 8-9 and JDZ 7-3), and geophysical data. (2) Petroliferous basin analysis in Jinju area (2): Petroleum geological studies such as stratigraphy, sedimentology, petrology and organic geochemistry were carried out in the Gyeongsang Supergroup, Junju area. Based on lithofacies and rock color, the sequence can be divided into seven formations which can be organized into two groups (Sindong Group: Nagdong, Hasandong and Jinju formations in ascending order; Hayang Group: Chilgog, Silla Conglomerate, Haman and Jindong formations). (author). 57 refs.

  16. Supporting analyses and assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohi, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Supporting analysis and assessments can provide a sound analytic foundation and focus for program planning, evaluation, and coordination, particularly if issues of hydrogen production, distribution, storage, safety, and infrastructure can be analyzed in a comprehensive and systematic manner. The overall purpose of this activity is to coordinate all key analytic tasks-such as technology and market status, opportunities, and trends; environmental costs and benefits; and regulatory constraints and opportunities-within a long-term and systematic analytic foundation for program planning and evaluation. Within this context, the purpose of the project is to help develop and evaluate programmatic pathway options that incorporate near and mid-term strategies to achieve the long-term goals of the Hydrogen Program. In FY 95, NREL will develop a comprehensive effort with industry, state and local agencies, and other federal agencies to identify and evaluate programmatic pathway options to achieve the long-term goals of the Program. Activity to date is reported.

  17. Animal welfare impact assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Gamborg, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Control of wild animals may give rise to controversy, as is seen in the case of badger control to manage TB in cattle in the UK. However, it is striking that concerns about the potential suffering of the affected animals themselves are often given little attention or completely ignored in policies...... aimed at dealing with wild animals. McCulloch and Reiss argue that this could be remedied by means of a “mandatory application of formal and systematic Animal Welfare Impact Assessment (AWIA)”. Optimistically, they consider that an AWIA could help to resolve controversies involving wild animals. The aim...... of this paper is to evaluate the potential of AWIA. We begin by showing how ideas akin to AWIA already play a significant role in other animal ethics controversies, particularly those concerning laboratory animal use and livestock production; and we bring in lessons learnt from these controversies. Then we...

  18. [The geriatric assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Christoph; Schultheis, Beate S; Pientka, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    Due to demographic changes there is an increasing number of elderly and old patients with cancer. This group of patients shows a significant heterogeneity and differs from the average young patient. Identification of relevant functional deficits and comorbidities remains crucial for an efficient treatment strategy of this patient group. For this reason, the geriatric assessment has been developed and integrated in daily oncological practice. Within this diagnostic approach oncologists can for example identify elderly fit patients suitable for aggressive treatments or identify at-risk patients for complications. Recent studies have shown that this approach is feasible in daily practice and capable of improving outcome. There is still the need for more specific instruments for different cancers. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Information Technology Resources Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    The Information Technology Resources Assessment (ITRA) is being published as a companion document to the Department of Energy (DOE) FY 1994--FY 1998 Information Resources Management Long-Range Plan. This document represents a collaborative effort between the Office of Information Resources Management and the Office of Energy Research that was undertaken to achieve, in part, the Technology Strategic Objective of IRM Vision 21. An integral part of this objective, technology forecasting provides an understanding of the information technology horizon and presents a perspective and focus on technologies of particular interest to DOE program activities. Specifically, this document provides site planners with an overview of the status and use of new information technology for their planning consideration.

  20. Caries risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejàre, I; Axelsson, S; Dahlén, G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the ability of multivariate models and single factors to correctly identify future caries development in pre-school children and schoolchildren/adolescents. STUDY DESIGN: A systematic literature search for relevant papers was conducted with pre-determined inclusion criteria...... predictors, baseline caries experience had moderate/good accuracy in pre-school children and limited accuracy in schoolchildren/adolescents. The period of highest risk for caries incidence in permanent teeth was the first few years after tooth eruption. In general, the quality of evidence was limited....... CONCLUSIONS: Multivariate models and baseline caries prevalence performed better in pre-school children than in schoolchildren/adolescents. Baseline caries prevalence was the most accurate single predictor in all age groups. The heterogeneity of populations, models, outcome criteria, measures and reporting...