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Sample records for saliva derived exosomes

  1. Tumor-derived exosomes in cancer progression and treatment failure

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    Shen, Bo; Feng, Jifeng

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes have diameter within the range of 30-100nm and spherical to cup-shaped nanoparticles with specific surface molecular characteristics, such as CD9 and CD63. These vesicles are present in nearly all human body fluids, including blood plasma/serum, saliva, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, semen, and particularly enriched in tumor microenvironment. Exosomes contain multiple proteins, DNA, mRNA, miRNA, long non-coding RNA, and even genetic materials of viruses/prions. These materials are biochemically and functionally distinct and can be transferred to a recipient cell where they regulate protein expression and signaling pathways. Recently, exosomes are demonstrated to have a close relationship with tumor development and metastasis. Exosomes influence therapeutic effect in cancer patients. In this review, we describe the biogenesis, composition, and function of exosomes. The mechanism on how tumor-derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression and clinical treatment failure is also described, with special focus on their potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26452221

  2. Saliva exosomes from pancreatic tumor-bearing mice modulate NK cell phenotype and antitumor cytotoxicity.

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    Katsiougiannis, Stergios; Chia, David; Kim, Yong; Singh, Ram P; Wong, David T W

    2017-03-01

    Tumor exosomes are emerging as antitumor immunity regulators; however, their effects on secondary exosome secretion by distal organs have not been explored. We have previously demonstrated that suppression of exosomes at the distal tumor site of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) ablated the development of salivary biomarker profile. Here, we explore the function of salivary exosomes from tumor-bearing mice in immune surveillance. We provide evidence that salivary exosomes from mice with PDAC exhibit a suppressive effect that results in reduced tumor-killing capacity by NK cells. Salivary exosomes from mice with PDAC where pancreatic tumors were engineered to suppress exosome biogenesis failed to suppress NK cell cytotoxic potential against tumor cells, as opposed to salivary exosomes from mice with PDAC with normal tumor exosome biogenesis. These results reveal an important and previously unknown mechanism of antitumor immune regulation and provide new insights into our understanding of the alterations of this biofluid during tumor development.-Katsiougiannis, S., Chia, D., Kim, Y., Singh, R. P., Wong, D. T. W. Saliva exosomes from pancreatic tumor-bearing mice modulate NK cell phenotype and antitumor cytotoxicity. © FASEB.

  3. Breast cancer exosome-like microvesicles and salivary gland cells interplay alters salivary gland cell-derived exosome-like microvesicles in vitro.

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    Chang S Lau

    Full Text Available Saliva is a useful biofluid for the early detection of disease, but how distal tumors communicate with the oral cavity and create disease-specific salivary biomarkers remains unclear. Using an in vitro breast cancer model, we demonstrated that breast cancer-derived exosome-like microvesicles are capable of interacting with salivary gland cells, altering the composition of their secreted exosome-like microvesicles. We found that the salivary gland cells secreted exosome-like microvesicles encapsulating both protein and mRNA. We also showed that the interaction with breast cancer-derived exosome-like microvesicles communicated and activated the transcriptional machinery of the salivary gland cells. Thus, the interaction altered the composition of the salivary gland cell-derived exosome-like microvesicles on both the transcriptomically and proteomically.

  4. Cell-derived vesicles exposing coagulant tissue factor in saliva.

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    Berckmans, René J; Sturk, Auguste; van Tienen, Laurens M; Schaap, Marianne C L; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2011-03-17

    On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is noncoagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism and physiologic relevance are unknown. Because saliva is known to contain TF, we hypothesized that this TF may also be associated with cell-derived vesicles to facilitate coagulation when saliva directly contacts blood. The saliva-induced shortening of the clotting time of autologous plasma and whole blood from healthy subjects (n = 10) proved TF-dependent. This TF was associated with various types of cell-derived vesicles, including microparticles and exosomes. The physiologic function was shown by adding saliva to human pericardial wound blood collected from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Addition of saliva shortened the clotting time from 300 ± 96 to 186 ± 24 seconds (P = .03). Our results show that saliva triggers coagulation, thereby reducing blood loss and the risk of pathogens entering the blood. We postulate that our reflex to lick a wound may be a mechanism to enable TF-exposing vesicles, present in saliva, to aid in the coagulation process and thus protect the organism from entering pathogens. This unique compartmentalization may be highly conserved because also animals lick their wounds.

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Prostate Cancer Derived Exosomes.

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    Geetanjali Kharmate

    Full Text Available Exosomes proteins and microRNAs have gained much attention as diagnostic tools and biomarker potential in various malignancies including prostate cancer (PCa. However, the role of exosomes and membrane-associated receptors, particularly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR as mediators of cell proliferation and invasion in PCa progression remains unexplored. EGFR is frequently overexpressed and has been associated with aggressive forms of PCa. While PCa cells and tissues express EGFR, it is unknown whether exosomes derived from PCa cells or PCa patient serum contains EGFR. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize EGFR in exosomes derived from PCa cells, LNCaP xenograft and PCa patient serum. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media of different PCa cell lines; LNCaP xenograft serum as well as patient plasma/serum by differential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. Exosomes were confirmed by electron microscopy, expression of exosomal markers and NanoSight™ analysis. EGFR expression was determined by western blot analysis and ELISA. This study demonstrates that exosomes may easily be derived from PCa cell lines, serum obtained from PCa xenograft bearing mice and clinical samples derived from PCa patients. Presence of exosomal EGFR in PCa patient exosomes may present a novel approach for measuring of the disease state. Our work will allow to build on this finding for future understanding of PCa exosomes and their potential role in PCa progression and as minimal invasive biomarkers for PCa.

  6. Identification and proteomic analysis of osteoblast-derived exosomes

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    Ge, Min; Ke, Ronghu; Cai, Tianyi; Yang, Junyi; Mu, Xiongzheng, E-mail: cranio@vip.163.com

    2015-11-06

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles with the function of intercellular communication, and they are released by various cell types. To reveal the knowledge about the exosomes from osteoblast, and explore the potential functions of osteogenesis, we isolated microvesicles from supernatants of mouse Mc3t3 by ultracentrifugation, characterized exosomes by electron microscopy and immunoblotting and presented the protein profile by proteomic analysis. The result demonstrated that microvesicles were between 30 and 100 nm in diameter, round shape with cup-like concavity and expressed exosomal marker tumor susceptibility gene (TSG) 101 and flotillin (Flot) 1. We identified a total number of 1069 proteins among which 786 proteins overlap with ExoCarta database. Gene Oncology analysis indicated that exosomes mostly derived from plasma membrane and mainly involved in protein localization and intracellular signaling. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed pathways are mostly involved in exosome biogenesis, formation, uptake and osteogenesis. Among the pathways, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 pathways played an important role in osteogenesis. Our study identified osteoblast-derived exosomes, unveiled the content of them, presented potential osteogenesis-related proteins and pathways and provided a rich proteomics data resource that will be valuable for further studies of the functions of individual proteins in bone diseases. - Highlights: • We for the first time identified exosomes from mouse osteoblast. • Osteoblasts-derived exosomes contain osteoblast peculiar proteins. • Proteins from osteoblasts-derived exosomes are intently involved in EIF2 pathway. • EIF2α from the EIF2 pathway plays an important role in osteogenesis.

  7. Tumor-derived exosomes and their role in cancer progression

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    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells actively produce, release and utilize exosomes to promote tumor growth. Mechanisms through which tumor-derived exosomes subserve the tumor are under intense investigation. These exosomes are information carriers, conveying molecular and genetic messages from tumor cells to normal or other abnormal cells residing at close or distant sites. Tumor-derived exosomes are found in all body fluids. Upon the contact with target cells, they alter phenotypic and functional attributes of recipients, reprogramming them into active contributors to angiogenesis, thrombosis, metastasis and immunosuppression. Exosomes produced by tumors carry cargos that in part mimic contents of parent cells and are of potential interest as non-invasive biomarkers of cancer. Their role in inhibiting the host antitumor responses and in mediating drug resistance is important for cancer therapy. Tumor-derived exosomes may interfere with cancer immunotherapy, but they also could serve as adjuvants and antigenic components of antitumor vaccines. Their biological roles in cancer development or progression as well as cancer therapy suggest that tumor-derived exosomes are critical components of oncogenic transformation. PMID:27117662

  8. Exosomes Derived from Breast Cancer Cells, Small Trojan Horses?

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    Villagrasa, Alejandro; Álvarez, Pablo Juan; Osuna, Antonio; Garrido, Jose Manuel; Aránega, Antonia; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles secreted to the extracellular environment by several cell types, including tumor cells. It has been demonstrated that exosomes have an important role in intercellular communication, but they have recently been implicated in various tumor processes, including the oncogenic transformation of cells in the tumor microenvironment, tumor drug resistance, and the transport of tumor factors. Tumors appear to use exosomes to dialogue with and transform neighboring cells to create an ideal environment for their growth and expansion. On the other hand, the structure and function of exosomes may make them useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, because they contain molecules that could serve as biomarkers, including oncogenes, miRNAs, and certain proteins. They have the ability to travel via body fluids, from which they could be isolated and used to transport drugs to specific targets. This review aims to provide an update on the role of exosomes derived from breast cancer cells.

  9. Biodistribution and Delivery Efficiency of Unmodified Tumor-Derived Exosomes

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    Smyth, Tyson; Kullberg, Max; Malik, Noeen; Smith-Jones, Peter; Graner, Michael W.; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of exosomes as a drug delivery vehicle has gained considerable interest. To establish if exosomes could be utilized effectively for drug delivery, a better understanding of their in vivo fate must be established. Through comparisons to liposomal formulations, which have been studied extensively for the last thirty years, we were able to make some comprehensive conclusions about the fate of unmodified tumor-derived exosomes in vivo. We observed a comparable rapid clearance and minimal tumor accumulation of intravenously-injected exosomes, PC:Chol liposomes, and liposomes formulated with the lipid extract of exosomes, suggesting the unique protein and lipid composition of exosomes does not appreciably impact exosomes’ rate of clearance and biodistribution. This rapid clearance along with minimal tumor accumulation of unmodified exosomes limits their use as an anti-cancer drug delivery vehicle; however, when delivered intratumorally, exosomes remained associated with tumor tissue to a significantly greater extent than PC:Chol liposomes. Furthermore, experiments utilizing mice with impaired adaptive or innate immune systems, revealed the significance of the innate immune system along with the complement protein C5 on exosomes’ rate of clearance. PMID:25523519

  10. Circulating osteocyte-derived exosomes contain miRNAs which are enriched in exosomes from MLO-Y4 cells.

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    Sato, Mari; Suzuki, Tomohide; Kawano, Mitsuoki; Tamura, Masato

    2017-02-01

    Signaling molecules produced by osteocytes have been proposed to serve as soluble factors that contribute to bone remodeling, as well as to homeostasis of other organs. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies investigating the role of osteocyte-secreted exosomes. In the present study, ablation of osteocytes in mice [osteocyte-less (OL)] was used to examine the microRNA (miRNA) levels of plasma-circulating exosomes. In order to investigate the function of osteocyte-secreted exosomes, exosomes derived from MLO-Y4 cells were extracted and their miRNA expression levels were examined using miRNA array analysis and deep sequencing. Comparison of miRNA expression levels between plasma exosomes from OL mouse plasma and MLO-Y4-derived exosomes revealed that decreases in the number of miRNAs from exosomes circulating in the OL mouse plasma may be caused by a decrease in secretion of exosomes from osteocytes. These results suggest that osteocytes secrete exosomes containing characterized miRNAs and then circulate in the blood, and may thus transfer their components, including miRNAs, to recipient cells where they function as signaling molecules in other organs and/or tissues to regulate biological responses.

  11. Exosomes derived from endometriotic stromal cells have enhanced angiogenic effects in vitro.

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    Harp, Djana; Driss, Adel; Mehrabi, Sharifeh; Chowdhury, Indrajit; Xu, Wei; Liu, Dong; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva; Taylor, Robert N; Gold, Bert; Jefferson, Samantha; Sidell, Neil; Thompson, Winston

    2016-07-01

    Our objective has been to establish a pro-angiogenic role for exosomes in endometriosis and to determine whether a differential expression profile of cellular and exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) exists in endometriosis. We performed an in vitro study of human primary endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We isolated and characterized exosomes from ESCs from five endometriosis patients and five phase-matched controls. Exosomes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and NanoSight technology. MiRNA was assessed by deep sequencing and reverse transcription with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Exosome uptake studies were achieved by means of confocal microscopy. The pro-angiogenic experiments were executed by treating HUVECs with ESC-derived exosomes. We observed differential profiles of exosomal miRNA expression between exosomes derived from endometriosis lesion cells and diseased eutopic stromal cells compared with exosomes derived from control ESCs. We also demonstrated autocrine cellular uptake of exosomes and paracrine functional angiogenic effects of exosomes on HUVECs. The results of this study support the hypothesis that exosomes derived from ESCs play autocrine/paracrine roles in the development of endometriosis, potentially modulating angiogenesis. The broader clinical implications are that Sampson's theory of retrograde menstruation possibly encompasses the finding that exosomes work as intercellular communication modulators in endometriosis.

  12. Inflammasome-Derived Exosomes Activate NF-κB Signaling in Macrophages.

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    Zhang, Yuehui; Liu, Fangbing; Yuan, Yanzhi; Jin, Chaozhi; Chang, Cheng; Zhu, Yunping; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-06

    Exosomes are secreted small vesicles that mediate various biological processes, such as tumorigenesis and immune response. However, whether the inflammasome signaling leads to the change of constituent of exosomes and its roles in immune response remains to be determined. We isolated the exosomes from macrophages with treatment of mock, endotoxin, or endotoxin/nigericin. A label-free quantification method by MS/MS was used to identify the components of exosomes. In total, 2331 proteins were identified and 513 proteins were exclusively detected in exosomes with endotoxin and nigericin treatment. The differentially expressed proteins were classified by Gene Ontology and KEGG pathways. The immune response-related proteins and signaling pathways were specifically enriched in inflammasome-derived exosomes. Moreover, we treated macrophages with the exosomes from different stimulation. We found that inflammasome-derived exosomes directly activate NF-κB signaling pathway, while the control or endotoxin-derived exosomes have no effect. The inflammatory signaling was amplified in neighbor cells in an exosome-dependent way. The inflammasome-derived exosomes might be used to augment the immune response in disease treatment, and preventing the transfer of these exosomes might ameliorate autoimmune diseases.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of CD34+ Blast-Derived Exosomes in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Hong, Chang Sook; Muller, Laurent; Boyiadzis, Michael; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane-bound vesicles found in all biological fluids. AML patients' plasma collected at diagnosis contains elevated exosome levels relative to normal donor (ND) plasma. The molecular profile of AML exosomes changes in the course of therapy and may serve as a measure of disease progression or response to therapy. However, plasma contains a mix of exosomes derived from various cell types. To be able to utilize blast-derived exosomes as biomarkers for AML, we have developed an immunoaffinity-based capture method utilizing magnetic microbeads coated with anti-CD34 antibody (Ab). This Ab is specific for CD34, a unique marker of AML blasts. The capture procedure was developed using CD34+ exosomes derived from Kasumi-1 AML cell culture supernatants. The capture capacity of CD34microbeads was shown to linearly correlate with the input exosomes. A 10 uL aliquot of CD34 microbeads was able to capture all of CD34+ exosomes present in 100–1,000 uL of AML plasma. The levels of immunocaptured CD34+ exosomes correlated with the percentages of CD34+ blasts in the AML patients' peripheral blood. The immunocaptured exosomes had a typical cup-shaped morphology by transmission electron microscopy, and their molecular cargo was similar to that of parental blasts. These exosomes were biologically-active. Upon co-incubation with natural killer (NK) cells, captured blast-derived exosomes down-regulated surface NKG2D expression, while non-captured exosomes reduced expression levels of NKp46. Our data provide a proof-of-principle that blast-derived exosomes can be quantitatively recovered from AML patients' plasma, their molecular profile recapitulates that of autologous blasts and they retain the ability to mediate immune suppression. These data suggest that immunocaptured blast-derived exosomes might be useful in diagnosis and/or prognosis of AML in the future. PMID:25093329

  14. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan serglycin influences protein cargo loading and functions of tumor-derived exosomes.

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    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam K; Chandrashekar, Darshan S; Jones, Richard J; Lee, Hans C; Weber, Donna M; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2017-09-26

    Tumor cells produce and utilize exosomes to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-cell-derived exosomes deliver cargos that partially mimic the contents of the parent cell to nearby or distant normal or abnormal cells, thereby reprogramming the recipient cells to support tumor progression. Mechanisms by which tumor-derived exosomes subserve the tumor are under intense investigation. Here we demonstrate a critical role of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan serglycin in regulating the protein cargo and functions of myeloma cell-derived exosomes. Previous studies have shown that serglycin, the only known intracellular proteoglycan, functions mainly in the storage of basically charged components within the intracellular granules/vesicles via serglycin's densely clustered, negatively charged glycosaminoglycan chains. Here we demonstrate that serglycin plays a critical role in the protein cargo loading of tumor-derived exosomes. Serglycin was detected in exosomes derived from cell culture supernatants of human myeloma cell lines and serum of myeloma patients. Mass spectrometry analysis of exosomal proteins identified significantly fewer protein components within exosomes derived from serglycin-knockdown myeloma cells than within exosomes from control cells. On gene ontology analysis, exosomes derived from serglycin-knockdown cells, but not from control cells, lacked many proteins that are required for mediating different cellular processes. In functional assays, exosomes from serglycin-knockdown cells failed to induce an invasive phenotype in myeloma cells and failed to promote migration of macrophages. These findings reveal that serglycin plays an important role in maintaining the protein cargo in tumor-derived exosomes and suggest that targeting serglycin may temper the influence of these exosomes on cancer progression.

  15. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation

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    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes. PMID:25944696

  16. Exosomes Derived from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Axonal Growth of Cortical Neurons.

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    Zhang, Yi; Chopp, Michael; Liu, Xian Shuang; Katakowski, Mark; Wang, Xinli; Tian, Xinchu; Wu, David; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of brain injury with exosomes derived from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhances neurite growth. However, the direct effect of exosomes on axonal growth and molecular mechanisms underlying exosome-enhanced neurite growth are not known. Using primary cortical neurons cultured in a microfluidic device, we found that MSC-exosomes promoted axonal growth, whereas attenuation of argonaut 2 protein, one of the primary microRNA (miRNA) machinery proteins, in MSC-exosomes abolished their effect on axonal growth. Both neuronal cell bodies and axons internalized MSC-exosomes, which was blocked by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) that cleave proteins of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. Moreover, tailored MSC-exosomes carrying elevated miR-17-92 cluster further enhanced axonal growth compared to native MSC-exosomes. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that the tailored MSC-exosomes increased levels of individual members of this cluster and activated the PTEN/mTOR signaling pathway in recipient neurons, respectively. Together, our data demonstrate that native MSC-exosomes promote axonal growth while the tailored MSC-exosomes can further boost this effect and that tailored exosomes can deliver their selective cargo miRNAs into and activate their target signals in recipient neurons. Neuronal internalization of MSC-exosomes is mediated by the SNARE complex. This study reveals molecular mechanisms that contribute to MSC-exosome-promoted axonal growth, which provides a potential therapeutic strategy to enhance axonal growth.

  17. Neutrophil-Derived Exosomes: A New Mechanism Contributing to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling.

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    Vargas, Amandine; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Droit, Arnaud; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils infiltrate the airways of patients with asthma of all severities, yet their role in the pathogenesis of asthma and their contribution to airway remodeling is largely unknown. We hypothesized that neutrophils modulate airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation in asthma by releasing bioactive exosomes. These newly discovered nano-sized vesicles have the capacity to modulate immune responses, cell migration, cell differentiation, and other aspects of cell-to-cell communication. The aim of the study is to determine whether bioactive exosomes are released by neutrophils, and, if so, characterize their proteomic profile and evaluate their capacity to modulate ASM cell proliferation. Exosomes were isolated from equine neutrophil supernatants by differential centrifugation and filtration methods, followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Nanovesicles were characterized using electron microscopy, particle size determination, and proteomic analyses. Exosomes were cocultured with ASM cells and analyzed for exosome internalization by confocal microscopy. ASM proliferation was measured using an impedance-based system. Neutrophils release exosomes that have characteristic size, morphology, and exosomal markers. We identified 271 proteins in exosomes from both LPS and unstimulated neutrophils, and 16 proteins that were differentially expressed, which carried proteins associated with immune response and positive regulation of cell communication. Furthermore, neutrophil-derived exosomes were rapidly internalized by ASM cells and altered their proliferative properties. Upon stimulation of LPS, neutrophil-derived exosomes can enhance the proliferation of ASM cells and could therefore play an important role in the progression of asthma and promoting airway remodeling in severe and corticosteroid-insensitive patients with asthma.

  18. [Advances in the research of effects of exosomes derived from stem cells on wound repair].

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    Li, M Y; Liu, D W; Mao, Y G

    2017-03-20

    Exosomes are nano-vesicles released by many kinds of cells. Exosomes play a significant role in cell-to-cell communication and substance transportation through direct effect of signaling molecules on the cell membrane surface, intracellular regulation of cellular content during membrane fusion, or regulation of release of various bioactive molecules. Several studies have reported that culture supernatant of stem cells has some related exosomes to take part in wound repair. The secretion of exosomes is depended on the source and the physiological and pathological condition of deriving cells. How to stimulate the stem cells to produce exosomes maximally and their clinical application are worthy to explore. In this review, we summarize the biological function and application of exosomes derived from stem cells in wound repair.

  19. Cardiac progenitor-derived exosomes protect ischemic myocardium from acute ischemia/reperfusion injury

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    Chen, Lijuan [Department of Cardiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Wang, Yingjie [Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Internal Medicine of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shuguang Hospital of Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Pan, Yaohua; Zhang, Lan [Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shen, Chengxing [Department of Cardiology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Qin, Gangjian [Feinberg Cardiovascular Research Institute, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Ashraf, Muhammad [Pathology and Lab Med, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Weintraub, Neal [Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Ma, Genshan, E-mail: magenshan@hotmail.com [Department of Cardiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Tang, Yaoliang, E-mail: tangyg@ucmail.uc.edu [Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Cardiac progenitor-derived (CPC) Exosomes protect H9C2 from apoptosis in vitro. ► CPC-exosomes protect cardiomyoyctes from MI/R induced apoptosis in vivo. ► CPC-exosomes were taken up by H9C2 with high efficiency using PKH26 labeling. ► miR-451, one of GATA4-responsive miRNA cluster, is enriched in CPC-exosomes. -- Abstract: Background: Cardiac progenitors (CPC) mediate cardioprotection via paracrine effects. To date, most of studies focused on secreted paracrine proteins. Here we investigated the CPC-derived-exosomes on protecting myocardium from acute ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Methods and results: CPC were isolated from mouse heart using two-step protocol. Exosomes were purified from conditional medium, and confirmed by electron micrograph and Western blot using CD63 as a marker. qRT-PCR shows that CPC-exosomes have high level expression of GATA4-responsive-miR-451. Exosomes were ex vivo labeled with PKH26, We observed exosomes can be uptaken by H9C2 cardiomyoblasts with high efficiency after 12 h incubation. CPC-exosomes protect H9C2 from oxidative stress by inhibiting caspase 3/7 activation invitro. In vivo delivery of CPC-exosomes in an acute mouse myocardial ischemia/reperfusion model inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis by about 53% in comparison with PBS control (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results suggest, for the first time, the CPC-exosomes can be used as a therapeutic vehicle for cardioprotection, and highlights a new perspective for using non-cell exosomes for cardiac disease.

  20. Functional significance of macrophage-derived exosomes in inflammation and pain.

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    McDonald, Marguerite K; Tian, Yuzhen; Qureshi, Rehman A; Gormley, Michael; Ertel, Adam; Gao, Ruby; Aradillas Lopez, Enrique; Alexander, Guillermo M; Sacan, Ahmet; Fortina, Paolo; Ajit, Seena K

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes, secreted microvesicles transporting microRNAs (miRNAs), mRNAs, and proteins through bodily fluids, facilitate intercellular communication and elicit immune responses. Exosomal contents vary, depending on the source and the physiological conditions of cells, and can provide insights into how cells and systems cope with physiological perturbations. Previous analysis of circulating miRNAs in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a debilitating chronic pain disorder, revealed a subset of miRNAs in whole blood that are altered in the disease. To determine functional consequences of alterations in exosomal biomolecules in inflammation and pain, we investigated exosome-mediated information transfer in vitro, in a rodent model of inflammatory pain, and in exosomes from patients with CRPS. Mouse macrophage cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharides secrete exosomes containing elevated levels of cytokines and miRNAs that mediate inflammation. Transcriptome sequencing of exosomal RNA revealed global alterations in both innate and adaptive immune pathways. Exosomes from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cells were sufficient to cause nuclear factor-κB activation in naive cells, indicating functionality in recipient cells. A single injection of exosomes attenuated thermal hyperalgesia in a murine model of inflammatory pain, suggesting an immunoprotective role for macrophage-derived exosomes. Macrophage-derived exosomes carry a protective signature that is altered when secreting cells are exposed to an inflammatory stimulus. We also show that circulating miRNAs altered in patients with complex regional pain syndrome are trafficked by exosomes. With their systemic signaling capabilities, exosomes can induce pleiotropic effects potentially mediating the multifactorial pathology underlying chronic pain, and should be explored for their therapeutic utility. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. Exosomes Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Relieve Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury

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    Yuanyuan Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at investigating whether human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell- (hucMSC- derived exosomes (hucMSC-exosomes have a protective effect on acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Exosomes were characterized under transmission electron microscopy and the particles of exosomes were further examined through nanoparticle tracking analysis. Exosomes (400 μg protein were intravenously administrated immediately following ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery in rats. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and apoptotic cells were counted using TUNEL staining. The cardiac fibrosis was assessed using Masson’s trichrome staining. The Ki67 positive cells in ischemic myocardium were determined using immunohistochemistry. The effect of hucMSC-exosomes on blood vessel formation was evaluated through tube formation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926 cells. The results indicated that ligation of the LAD coronary artery reduced cardiac function and induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Administration of hucMSC-exosomes significantly improved cardiac systolic function and reduced cardiac fibrosis. Moreover, hucMSC-exosomes protected myocardial cells from apoptosis and promoted the tube formation and migration of EA.hy926 cells. It is concluded that hucMSC-exosomes improved cardiac systolic function by protecting myocardial cells from apoptosis and promoting angiogenesis. These effects of hucMSC-exosomes might be associated with regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family.

  2. Exosomes Derived from HIV-1-infected Cells Contain Trans-activation Response Element RNA*

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    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 104–106 copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 103 copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  3. Suppression of endothelial cell migration by tumor associated macrophage-derived exosomes is reversed by epithelial ovarian cancer exosomal lncRNA.

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    Wu, Quanfeng; Wu, Xiaoli; Ying, Xiang; Zhu, Qinyi; Wang, Xinjing; Jiang, Lu; Chen, Xin; Wu, Yueqian; Wang, Xipeng

    2017-01-01

    To study the mechanism by which epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC)-derived exosomes restore the migration of endothelial cells that is suppressed by TAM-derived exosomes. Exosomes were isolated from TAMs in the ascites of patients with EOC. The effect of exosomes on the expression of endothelial cell miRNA was monitored by PCR. The miRNA mimics were transfected to explore their effects. Microarray data and literature searches were used to predict target genes and the impact of target gene pathways, and small interfering RNA was used to target these genes. We used migration assays to determine whether ovarian cancer cell-derived exosomes participate in the regulation of TAMs and endothelial cells. We used microarray data to identify the target lncRNA, and we constructed target lncRNA expression plasmids to validate targets by Western blotting. We separated TAMs from the ascites of patients with EOC and isolated exosomes from TAM supernatants. After co-culture with HUVECs, these exosomes were efficiently incorporated into HUVECs. The migration of HUVECs was suppressed significantly in the exosome group compared with blank controls (P derived exosomes targeted the miR-146b-5p/TRAF6/NF-κB/MMP2 pathway to suppress endothelial cell migration; this result was supported by PCR and Western blotting analyses. The expression of exosomal miR-146b-5p isolated from serum in the EOC group was significantly increased compared to healthy individuals. Finally, TAM-derived exosomes and EOC SKOV3-derived exosomes in combination stimulated HUVEC cells and overcame the inhibition of endothelial cell migration caused by TAM-derived exosomes. Two lncRNAs that were carried by SKOV3-derived exosomes were identified as NF-κB pathway-associated genes by Western blotting. TAM-derived exosomes can inhibit the migration of endothelial cells by targeting the miR-146b-5p/TRAF6/NF-kB/MMP2 pathway. However, EOC-derived exosomes can transfer lncRNAs to remotely reverse this effect of TAMs on

  4. Plasma-derived exosomal survivin, a plausible biomarker for early detection of prostate cancer.

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    Salma Khan

    Full Text Available Survivin is expressed in prostate cancer (PCa, and its downregulation sensitizes PCa cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes, secreted from the endosomal membrane compartment, contain RNA and protein that they readily transport via exosome internalization into recipient cells. Recent progress has shown that tumor-derived exosomes play multiple roles in tumor growth and metastasis and may produce these functions via immune escape, tumor invasion and angiogenesis. Furthermore, exosome analysis may provide novel biomarkers to diagnose or monitor PCa treatment.Exosomes were purified from the plasma and serum from 39 PCa patients, 20 BPH patients, 8 prostate cancer recurrent and 16 healthy controls using ultracentrifugation and their quantities and qualities were quantified and visualized from both the plasma and the purified exosomes using ELISA and Western blotting, respectively.Survivin was significantly increased in the tumor-derived samples, compared to those from BPH and controls with virtually no difference in the quantity of Survivin detected in exosomes collected from newly diagnosed patients exhibiting low (six or high (nine Gleason scores. Exosome Survivin levels were also higher in patients that had relapsed on chemotherapy compared to controls.These studies demonstrate that Survivin exists in plasma exosomes from both normal, BPH and PCa subjects. The relative amounts of exosomal Survivin in PCa plasma was significantly higher than in those with pre-inflammatory BPH and control plasma. This differential expression of exosomal Survivin was seen with both newly diagnosed and advanced PCa subjects with high or low-grade cancers. Analysis of plasma exosomal Survivin levels may offer a convenient tool for diagnosing or monitoring PCa and may, as it is elevated in low as well as high Gleason scored samples, be used for early detection.

  5. ATL-derived exosomes modulate mesenchymal stem cells: potential role in leukemia progression.

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    El-Saghir, Jamal; Nassar, Farah; Tawil, Nadim; El-Sabban, Marwan

    2016-10-19

    Exosomes are membrane nano-vesicles secreted by a multitude of cells that harbor biological constituents such as proteins, lipids, mRNA and microRNA. Exosomes can potentially transfer their cargo to other cells, implicating them in many patho-physiological processes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), residents of the bone marrow and metastatic niches, potentially interact with cancer cells and/or their derived exosomes. In this study, we investigated whether exosomes derived from adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells act as intercellular messengers delivering leukemia-related genes that modulate the properties of human MSCs in favor of leukemia. We hypothesized that the cargo of ATL-derived exosomes is transferred to MSCs and alter their functional behavior to support the establishment of the appropriate microenvironment for leukemia. We showed that both ATL cells (C81 and HuT-102) and patient-derived cells released Tax-containing exosomes. The cargo of HuT-102-derived exosomes consisted of miR-21, miR-155 and vascular endothelial growth factor. We demonstrated that HuT-102-derived exosomes not only deliver Tax to recipient MSCs, but also induce NF-κB activation leading to a change in cellular morphology, increase in proliferation and the induction of gene expression of migration and angiogenic markers. This study demonstrates that ATL-derived exosomes deliver Tax and other leukemia-related genes to MSCs and alter their properties to presumably create a more conducive milieu for leukemia. These findings highlight the contribution of leukemia-derived exosomes in cellular transformation and their potential value as biomarkers and targets in therapeutic strategies.

  6. Acquisition of new tumor cell properties by MSC-derived exosomes.

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    Yang, Yuanyuan; Bucan, Vesna; Baehre, Heike; von der Ohe, Juliane; Otte, Anna; Hass, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Interaction between multi-functional mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) and human tumor cells involves the exchange of biological material via extracellular vesicles including exosomes. Protein analysis of MSC-derived exosomes demonstrated the presence of MMP-2 and MSC-specific markers including CD90 and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73). Incubation of tumor cells with these membranous particles revealed a rapid uptake of MSC-released microvesicles whereby breast cancer cells incorporated ~19% and SCCOHT-1 cells representing a rare type of small cell ovarian cancer assimilated ~28% of available exosomes within 24 h. This interaction was accompanied by functional alterations of tumor cell properties during integration of exosomal content from MSC. Indeed, exosome-associated MMP-2 exhibited functional enzyme activity and MCF-7 breast cancer cells with undetectable MMP-2 protein acquired expression of this enzyme and corresponding gelatinase functionality after stimulation with MSC-derived exosomes. Similar effects were observed in SCCOHT-1 cells during culture in the presence of MSC-derived exosomes which enabled new metabolic activities in this tumor cell type. Together, these findings demonstrated that the internalization of MSC-derived exosomes was associated with the acquisition of new tumor cell properties by altering cellular functionalities and providing the capability to re-organize the tumor microenvironment.

  7. Macrophage-derived exosomes induce inflammatory factors in endothelial cells under hypertensive conditions.

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    Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Shiota, Masayuki; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Nishiyama, Masaki; Tanaka, Masako; Yamaguchi, Takehiro; Sakurai, Emi; Miura, Katsuyuki; Iwao, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important cardiovascular risk factors and results in macrophage infiltration of blood vessels. However, how macrophages coordinate inflammatory responses with endothelial cells (ECs) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether exosomes upregulate the expression of inflammatory factors in ECs under hypertensive conditions. Hypertension was induced in rats by continuous infusion of angiotensin II (Ang II). Exosomes were purified from rat serum by density gradient and ultracentrifugation and used to stimulate human coronary artery ECs (HCAECs). Moreover, the interactions between HCAECs and exosomes from human THP-1-derived macrophages were analyzed. Administration of Ang II enhanced the expression of CD68, a macrophage marker, in rat hearts, suggesting enhanced infiltration of macrophages. In addition, the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a proinflammatory factor, was increased in hypertensive rat hearts compared with control rats. CD68 protein expression and an increase in the expression of some exosome markers were detected in exosomes from hypertensive rat serum. Moreover, the exosomes upregulated the expression levels of ICAM1 and PAI-1 in HCAECs. The level of miR-17, a negative regulator of ICAM1 expression, was markedly decreased in exosomes from hypertensive rat serum compared with exosomes from control rats. Interestingly, Ang II-stimulated THP-1-derived exosomes also enhanced the expression of ICAM1 and PAI-1 and contained reduced levels of miR-17 compared with exosomes from unstimulated cells. These results suggest that inflammation of ECs under hypertensive conditions is caused, at least in part, by macrophage-derived exosomes.

  8. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

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    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Role of Lymphocyte Subsets in the Immune Response to Primary B Cell-Derived Exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunderson, Sarah C; McLellan, Alexander D

    2017-10-01

    Exosomes are lipid nanovesicles released after fusion of the endosomal limiting membrane with the plasma membrane. In this study, we investigated the requirement for CD4 T cells, B cells, and NK cells to provide help for CD8 T cell-mediated response to B cell-derived exosomes. CTL responses to Ag-loaded exosomes were dependent on host MHC class I, with a critical role for splenic langerin(+) CD8α(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in exosomal Ag cross-presentation. In addition, there was an absolute dependence on the presence of CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, and NK cells, where the loss of any one of these subsets led to a complete loss of CTL response. Interestingly, NK cell depletion experiments demonstrated a critical cutoff point for depletion efficacy, with low-level residual NK cells providing sufficient help to allow optimal CD8 T cell proliferative responses to exosomal protein. Despite the potential role for B cells in the response to B cell-derived exosomal proteins, B cell depletion did not alter the exosome-induced CTL response. Similarly, a possible role for the BCR or circulating Ab in mediating CTL responses to B cell-derived exosomes was ruled out using DHLMP2A mice, which lack secreted and membrane-bound Ab, yet harbor marginal zone and follicular B cells. In contrast, CTL responses to DC-derived exosomes were significantly inhibited within Ab-deficient DHLMP2A mice compared with wild-type mice. However, this response was not restored upon serum transfer, implicating a role for the BCR, but not circulating Ab, in DC-derived exosome responses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. MSCs-Derived Exosomes and Neuroinflammation, Neurogenesis and Therapy of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxiang; Ye, Yuqin; Su, Xinhong; He, Jun; Bai, Wei; He, Xiaosheng

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are endosomal origin membrane-enclosed small vesicles (30–100 nm) that contain various molecular constituents including proteins, lipids, mRNAs and microRNAs. Accumulating studies demonstrated that exosomes initiated and regulated neuroinflammation, modified neurogenic niches and neurogenesis, and were even of potential significance in treating some neurological diseases. These tiny extracellular vesicles (EVs) can derive from some kinds of multipotent cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that have been confirmed to be a potentially promising therapy for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in experimental models and in preclinical studies. Nevertheless, subsequent studies demonstrated that the predominant mechanisms of MSCs’s contributions to brain tissue repairment and functional recovery after TBI were not the cell replacement effects but likely the secretion-based paracrine effects produced by EVs such as MSCs-derived exosomes. These nanosized exosomes derived from MSCs cannot proliferate, are easier to preserve and transfer and have lower immunogenicity, compared with transplanted exogenous MSCs. These reports revealed that MSCs-derived exosomes might promise to be a new and valuable therapeutic strategy for TBI than MSCs themselves. However, the concrete mechanisms involved in the positive effects induced by MSCs-derived exosomes in TBI are still ambiguous. In this review, we intend to explore the potential effects of MSCs-derived exosomes on neuroinflammation and neurogenesis in TBI and, especially, on therapy. PMID:28293177

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Promote Fracture Healing in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Taisuke; Miyaki, Shigeru; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Toshihiko; Kato, Yoshio; Kamei, Naosuke; Miyado, Kenji; Higashi, Yukihito; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-12-01

    : Paracrine signaling by bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) plays a major role in tissue repair. Although the production of regulatory cytokines by MSC transplantation is a critical modulator of tissue regeneration, we focused on exosomes, which are extracellular vesicles that contain proteins and nucleic acids, as a novel additional modulator of cell-to-cell communication and tissue regeneration. To address this, we used radiologic imaging, histological examination, and immunohistochemical analysis to evaluate the role of exosomes isolated from MSC-conditioned medium (CM) in the healing process in a femur fracture model of CD9(-/-) mice, a strain that is known to produce reduced levels of exosomes. We found that the bone union rate in CD9(-/-) mice was significantly lower than wild-type mice because of the retardation of callus formation. The retardation of fracture healing in CD9(-/-) mice was rescued by the injection of exosomes, but this was not the case after the injection of exosomes-free conditioned medium (CM-Exo). The levels of the bone repair-related cytokines, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), MCP-3, and stromal cell-derived factor-1 in exosomes were low compared with levels in CM and CM-Exo, suggesting that bone repair may be in part mediated by other exosome components, such as microRNAs. These results suggest that exosomes in CM facilitate the acceleration of fracture healing, and we conclude that exosomes are a novel factor of MSC paracrine signaling with an important role in the tissue repair process. This work focuses on exosomes, which are extracellular vesicles, as a novel additional modulator of cell-to-cell communication. This study evaluated the role of exosomes isolated from mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) in the fracture-healing process of CD9(-/-) mice, a strain that is known to produce reduced levels of exosomes. Retardation of fracture healing in CD9(-/-) mice was rescued by the injection of

  12. MicroRNA profiling in kidney disease: Plasma versus plasma-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jeffrey X; Fan, Xiaoming; Drummond, Christopher A; Majumder, Reetam; Xie, Yanmei; Chen, Tian; Liu, Lijun; Haller, Steven T; Brewster, Pamela S; Dworkin, Lance D; Cooper, Christopher J; Tian, Jiang

    2017-09-05

    Liquid biopsies have advanced rapidly in recent years for use in diagnostic and prognostic applications. One important aspect of this advancement is the growth in our understanding of microRNA (miRNA) biology. The measurement of miRNAs packaged within exosomes, which are constantly released into the blood stream, may reflect pathological changes within the body. The current study performed miRNA profiling using plasma and plasma-derived exosome samples from two animal models of kidney disease, the 5/6th partial nephrectomy (PNx) and two-kidney-one-clip (2K1C) models. The RT-qPCR-based profiling results revealed that the overall miRNA expression level was much higher in plasma than in plasma-derived exosomes. With 200μl of either plasma or exosomes derived from the same volume of plasma, 629 out of 665 total miRNAs analyzed were detectable in plasma samples from sham-operated rats, while only 403 were detectable in exosomes with a cutoff value set at 35cycles. Moreover, the average miRNA expression level in plasma was about 16-fold higher than that in exosomes. We also found a select subset of miRNAs that were enriched within exosomes. The number of detectable miRNAs from plasma-derived exosomes was increased in rats subjected to PNx or 2K1C surgery compared to sham-operated animals. Importantly, we found that the changes of individual miRNAs measured in plasma had very poor concordance with that measured in plasma-derived exosomes in both animal models, suggesting that miRNAs in plasma and plasma-derived exosomes are differentially regulated in these disease conditions. Interestingly, PNx and 2K1C surgeries induced similar changes in miRNA expression, implying that common pathways were activated in these two disease models. Pathway analyses using DIANA-miRPath v3.0 showed that significantly changed exosomal miRNAs were associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor interaction and mucin type-O-glycan synthesis pathways, which are related with tissue fibrosis

  13. Shikonin Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells by Reducing Tumor-Derived Exosomes

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    Yao Wei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shikonin is a naphthoquinone isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Lithospermum. It has been used in the treatment of various tumors. However, the effects of shikonin on such diseases have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we detected the exosome release of a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 with shikonin treatment and found a positive relationship between the level of secreted exosomes and cell proliferation. We next analyzed miRNA profiles in MCF-7 cells and exosomes and found that some miRNAs are specifically sorted and abundant in exosomes. Knockdown of the most abundant miRNAs in exosomes and the MCF-7 proliferation assay showed that miR-128 in exosomes negatively regulates the level of Bax in MCF-7 recipient cells and inhibits cell proliferation. These results show that shikonin inhibits the proliferation of MCF-7 cells through reducing tumor-derived exosomal miR-128. The current study suggests that shikonin suppresses MCF-7 growth by the inhibition of exosome release.

  14. Morphological and molecular features of oral fluid-derived exosomes: oral cancer patients versus healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotogorski-Hurvitz, Ayelet; Dayan, Dan; Chaushu, Gavriel; Salo, Tuula; Vered, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer (OC) patients are at high risk to develop recurrent disease or secondary primary cancers with no available biomarkers to detect these events until a visible lesion is readily present and diagnosed by biopsy. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells are involved in tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. We aimed to determine morphological and molecular differences between oral fluid (OF)-derived exosomes of OC patients and those isolated from healthy individuals (HI). OF from OC patients (n = 36) and HI (n = 25) was initially assessed by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). Following ultracentrifugation, exosomal pellets of OC patients and HI were morphologically examined by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting (WB) were used to analyze the expression of exosomal markers--CD9, CD81 and CD63. NTA showed that OC samples of OF had a significantly higher concentration of nanoparticles/ml (p = 0.01) and modal nanoparticle size (p = 0.002) compared to HI. The difference in size was structurally highlighted by AFM three-dimensional images applied on exosomal pellets. ELISA and WB showed differential expression of exosomal markers in OC exosomes compared to HI: lower expression of CD81 and CD9 in contrast to a higher expression of CD63 (~53 kDa). OF-derived exosomes from OC patients differ both morphologically and molecularly from exosomes present in HI. This study is a baseline that provides a starting point for finding exosomal biomarkers for early detection of malignant changes in high-risk patients without overt clinical signs/lesions.

  15. Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Potential Alternative Therapeutic Agent in Orthopaedics

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    John Burke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of regenerative medicine, many have sought to use stem cells as a promising way to heal human tissue; however, in the past few years, exosomes (packaged vesicles released from cells have shown more exciting promise. Specifically, stem cell-derived exosomes have demonstrated great ability to provide therapeutical benefits. Exosomal products can include miRNA, other genetic products, proteins, and various factors. They are released from cells in a paracrine fashion in order to combat local cellular stress. Because of this, there are vast benefits that medicine can obtain from stem cell-derived exosomes. If exosomes could be extracted from stem cells in an efficient manner and packaged with particular regenerative products, then diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, bone fractures, and other maladies could be treated with cell-free regenerative medicine via exosomes. Many advances must be made to get to this point, and the following review highlights the current advances of stem cell-derived exosomes with particular attention to regenerative medicine in orthopaedics.

  16. Cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cell-derived exosomes increase cisplatin resistance of recipient cells in exosomal miR-100-5p-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaobing; Yu, Shaorong; Zhou, Leilei; Shi, Meiqi; Hu, Yong; Xu, Xiaoyue; Shen, Bo; Liu, Siwen; Yan, Dali; Feng, Jifeng

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes derived from lung cancer cells confer cisplatin (DDP) resistance to other cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. A549 resistance to DDP (A549/DDP) was established. Microarray was used to analyze microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of A549 cells, A549/DDP cells, A549 exosomes, and A549/DDP exosomes. There was a strong correlation of miRNA profiles between exosomes and their maternal cells. A total of 11 miRNAs were significantly upregulated both in A549/DDP cells compared with A549 cells and in exosomes derived from A549/DDP cells in contrast to exosomes from A549 cells. A total of 31 downregulated miRNAs were also observed. miR-100-5p was the most prominent decreased miRNA in DDP-resistant exosomes compared with the corresponding sensitive ones. Downregulated miR-100-5p was proved to be involved in DDP resistance in A549 cells, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) expression was reverse regulated by miR-100-5p. Exosomes confer recipient cells' resistance to DDP in an exosomal miR-100-5p-dependent manner with mTOR as its potential target both in vitro and in vivo. Exosomes from DDP-resistant lung cancer cells A549 can alter other lung cancer cells' sensitivity to DDP in exosomal miR-100-5p-dependent manner. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanism of DDP resistance in lung cancer.

  17. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress.

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    Samantha Sheller

    Full Text Available At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC. We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H 3, heat shock protein (HSP 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK (P-p38 MAPK co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (p<0.05. Finally, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis identified 221 different proteins involved in immunomodulatory response and cell-to-cell communication. This study determined

  18. Stem cell-derived exosomes: A promising strategy for fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zi-Chen; Lu, Jun; Wang, Shan-Zheng; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yun-Tong; Xu, Shuo-Gui

    2017-10-01

    To describe the biological characteristics of exosomes and to summarize the current status of stem cell-derived exosomes on fracture healing. Meanwhile, future challenges, limitations and perspectives are also discussed. Search and analyze the related articles in pubmed database through the multi-combination of keywords like "stem cells","exosomes","bone regeneration" and "fracture healing". Stem cell-derived exosome therapy for fracture healing has been enjoying popularity and is drawing increasing attention. This strategy helps to promote proliferation and migration of cells, as well as osteogenesis and angiogenesis, in the process of bone formation. Although the exact mechanisms remain elusive, exosomal miRNAs seem to play vital roles. Future studies are required to solve multiple problems before clinical application, including comprehensive and thorough understanding of exosomes, the exact roles of exosomes in regulating bone formation, and the optimal source, dose and frequency of treatment, as well as technical and safety issues. Moreover, studies based on fracture models of large animals are could offer guidance and are in demand. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Exosomes derived from tumor cells genetically modified to express Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen: a novel vaccine for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Aya; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Inaba, Toshio; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Sugiura, Kikuya

    2016-11-01

    To examine the potential of exosomes derived from the tumor cells, which had been genetically modified to express a Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen, as a cancer vaccine aimed at overcoming the weak immunogenicity of tumor antigens. We transfected B16 melanoma cells with a plasmid encoding the M. tuberculosis antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). The secreted exosomes bearing both tumor-associated antigens and the pathogenic antigen (or their epitopes) were collected. When the exosomes were injected into foot pads of mice, they significantly (p exosomes significantly suppressed (p exosomes derived from the non-transfected B16 cells showed no effect on tumor growth, although both exosomes should have similar tumor antigens. Exosomes bearing both tumor antigens and the M. tuberculosis antigen (or their epitopes) have a high potential as a candidate for cancer vaccine to overcome the immune escape by tumor cells.

  20. Characterization of the Proinflammatory Profile of Synovial Fluid-Derived Exosomes of Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Domenis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to characterize synovial fluid- (SF- derived exosomes of patients with gonarthrosis comparing two methods of isolation and to investigate their immune regulatory properties. Extracellular vesicles (EVs have been isolated from inflamed SF by polymer precipitation method and quantified by Exocet kit and by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Vesicles expressed all the specific exosomal markers by immunoblot and FACS. After isolation with Exoquick, a relevant contamination by immune complexes was detected, which required further magnetic bead-based purification to remove. SF-derived exosomes significantly stimulated the release of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and metalloproteinases by M1 macrophages but did not influence the expression of CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules. In conclusion, we characterized purified exosomes isolated from inflamed SF and demonstrate that purified exosomes are functionally active in their ability to stimulate the release of proinflammatory factors from M1 macrophages. Our data indicate that SF-derived exosomes from gonarthrosis patients play a role in disease progression.

  1. Systemic T Cells Immunosuppression of Glioma Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Is Mediated by Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenis, Rossana; Cesselli, Daniela; Toffoletto, Barbara; Bourkoula, Evgenia; Caponnetto, Federica; Manini, Ivana; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Di Loreto, Carla

    2017-01-01

    A major contributing factor to glioma development and progression is its ability to evade the immune system. Nano-meter sized vesicles, exosomes, secreted by glioma-stem cells (GSC) can act as mediators of intercellular communication to promote tumor immune escape. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of GCS-derived exosomes on different peripheral immune cell populations. Healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with anti-CD3, anti-CD28 and IL-2, were treated with GSC-derived exosomes. Phenotypic characterization, cell proliferation, Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion and intracellular cytokine production were analysed by distinguishing among effector T cells, regulatory T cells and monocytes. In unfractionated PBMCs, GSC-derived exosomes inhibited T cell activation (CD25 and CD69 expression), proliferation and Th1 cytokine production, and did not affect cell viability or regulatory T-cell suppression ability. Furthermore, exosomes were able to enhance proliferation of purified CD4+ T cells. In PBMCs culture, glioma-derived exosomes directly promoted IL-10 and arginase-1 production and downregulation of HLA-DR by unstimulated CD14+ monocytic cells, that displayed an immunophenotype resembling that of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSCs). Importantly, the removal of CD14+ monocytic cell fraction from PBMCs restored T-cell proliferation. The same results were observed with exosomes purified from plasma of glioblastoma patients. Our results indicate that glioma-derived exosomes suppress T-cell immune response by acting on monocyte maturation rather than on direct interaction with T cells. Selective targeting of Mo-MDSC to treat glioma should be considered with regard to how immune cells allow the acquirement of effector functions and therefore counteracting tumor progression. PMID:28107450

  2. Systemic T Cells Immunosuppression of Glioma Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Is Mediated by Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenis, Rossana; Cesselli, Daniela; Toffoletto, Barbara; Bourkoula, Evgenia; Caponnetto, Federica; Manini, Ivana; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Di Loreto, Carla; Gri, Giorgia

    2017-01-01

    A major contributing factor to glioma development and progression is its ability to evade the immune system. Nano-meter sized vesicles, exosomes, secreted by glioma-stem cells (GSC) can act as mediators of intercellular communication to promote tumor immune escape. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of GCS-derived exosomes on different peripheral immune cell populations. Healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with anti-CD3, anti-CD28 and IL-2, were treated with GSC-derived exosomes. Phenotypic characterization, cell proliferation, Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion and intracellular cytokine production were analysed by distinguishing among effector T cells, regulatory T cells and monocytes. In unfractionated PBMCs, GSC-derived exosomes inhibited T cell activation (CD25 and CD69 expression), proliferation and Th1 cytokine production, and did not affect cell viability or regulatory T-cell suppression ability. Furthermore, exosomes were able to enhance proliferation of purified CD4+ T cells. In PBMCs culture, glioma-derived exosomes directly promoted IL-10 and arginase-1 production and downregulation of HLA-DR by unstimulated CD14+ monocytic cells, that displayed an immunophenotype resembling that of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSCs). Importantly, the removal of CD14+ monocytic cell fraction from PBMCs restored T-cell proliferation. The same results were observed with exosomes purified from plasma of glioblastoma patients. Our results indicate that glioma-derived exosomes suppress T-cell immune response by acting on monocyte maturation rather than on direct interaction with T cells. Selective targeting of Mo-MDSC to treat glioma should be considered with regard to how immune cells allow the acquirement of effector functions and therefore counteracting tumor progression.

  3. Cell-derived vesicles exposing coagulant tissue factor in saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berckmans, René J.; Sturk, Auguste; van Tienen, Laurens M.; Schaap, Marianne C. L.; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2011-01-01

    On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is non-coagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism

  4. Exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells activate NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Hui; Yuan, Xiao; Sun, Yaoxiang; Pan, Zhaoji; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized membrane vesicles secreted by both normal and cancer cells. Emerging evidence indicates that cancer cells derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression through the modulation of tumor microenvironment. However, the effects of exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells on macrophages are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological role of gastric cancer cells derived exosomes in the activation of macrophages. We demonstrated that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes activated macrophages to express increased levels of proinflammatory factors, which in turn promoted tumor cell proliferation and migration. In addition, gastric cancer cells derived exosomes remarkably upregulated the phosphorylation of NF-κB in macrophages. Inhibiting the activation of NF-κB reversed the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in macrophages and blocked their promoting effects on gastric cancer cells. Moreover, we found that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes could also activate macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes through the activation of NF-κB. In conclusion, our results suggest that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes stimulate the activation of NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression, which provides a potential therapeutic approach for gastric cancer by interfering with the interaction between exosomes and macrophages in tumor microenvironment.

  5. Tumor-derived exosomes confer antigen-specific immunosuppression in a murine delayed-type hypersensitivity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Yang

    Full Text Available Exosomes are endosome-derived small membrane vesicles that are secreted by most cell types including tumor cells. Tumor-derived exosomes usually contain tumor antigens and have been used as a source of tumor antigens to stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. However, many reports also suggest that tumor-derived exosomes can facilitate tumor immune evasion through different mechanisms, most of which are antigen-independent. In the present study we used a mouse model of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH and demonstrated that local administration of tumor-derived exosomes carrying the model antigen chicken ovalbumin (OVA resulted in the suppression of DTH response in an antigen-specific manner. Analysis of exosome trafficking demonstrated that following local injection, tumor-derived exosomes were internalized by CD11c+ cells and transported to the draining LN. Exosome-mediated DTH suppression is associated with increased mRNA levels of TGF-β1 and IL-4 in the draining LN. The tumor-derived exosomes examined were also found to inhibit DC maturation. Taken together, our results suggest a role for tumor-derived exosomes in inducing tumor antigen-specific immunosuppression, possibly by modulating the function of APCs.

  6. Raman spectroscopy and SERS analysis of ovarian tumour derived exosomes (TEXs): a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Laura T.; Gubbins, Luke; Weiner Gorzel, Karolina; Sharma, Shiva; Kell, Malcolm; McCann, Amanda; Hennelly, Bryan M.

    2014-05-01

    Here we report a preliminary study based on the application of Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to investigate the compositional differences between exosomes derived from ovarian carcinoma cells (cell line A2780) grown in normoxia (normal O2 conditions) and hypoxia (1% O2 conditions). Exosomes are integral to cell signalling, and are of interest in the study of how cells communicate within their environment. We are particularly interested in identifying whether hypoxia induced senescent cells can communi- cate via exosomes with neighbouring tumour cells, thereby causing them to become senescent and therefore radio and chemo resistant. With this goal in mind, we performed a preliminary study on the application of Raman spectroscopy and SERS to analyse the biomolecular fingerprint of both groups of exosomes and to investigate whether there exists a different biomolecular composition associated with exosomes derived from hypoxic cells in comparison to those from normoxic cells. We also applied multivariate statistical techniques for the classification of both groups of exosomes.

  7. Effects of embryo-derived exosomes on the development of bovine cloned embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Pengxiang; Qing, Suzhu; Liu, Ruiqi; Qin, Hongyu; Wang, Weiwei; Qiao, Fang; Ge, Hui; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Wei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2017-01-01

    The developmental competence of in vitro cultured (IVC) embryos is markedly lower than that of their in vivo counterparts, suggesting the need for optimization of IVC protocols. Embryo culture medium is routinely replaced three days after initial culture in bovine, however, whether this protocol is superior to continuous nonrenewal culture method under current conditions remains unclear. Using bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos as the model, our results showed that compared with routine renewal treatment, nonrenewal culture system significantly improved blastocyst formation, blastocyst quality (increased total cell number, decreased stress and apoptosis, enhanced Oct-4 expression and ratio of ICM/TE), as well as following development to term. Existence and function of SCNT embryo-derived exosomes were then investigated to reveal the cause of impaired development induced by culture medium replacement. Exosomes were successfully isolated through differential centrifugation and identified by both electron microscopy and immunostaining against exosomal membrane marker CD9. Supplementation of extracted exosomes into freshly renewed medium significantly rescued not only blastocyst formation and quality (in vitro development), but also following growth to term (in vivo development). Notably, ratio of ICM/TE and calving rate were enhanced to a similar level as that in nonrenewal group. In conclusion, our results for the first time indicate that 1: bovine SCNT embryos can secrete exosomes into chemically defined culture medium during IVC; 2: secreted exosomes are essential for SCNT blastocyst formation, blastocyst quality, and following development to term; 3: removal of exosomes induced by culture medium replacement impairs SCNT embryo development, which can be avoided by nonrenewal culture procedure or markedly recovered by exosome supplementation.

  8. Preservation of neuronal functions by exosomes derived from different human neural cell types under ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingyang; Xiao, Han; Peng, Hongling; Yuan, Huan; Xu, Yunxiao; Zhang, Guangsen; Tang, Jianguang; Hu, Zhiping

    2017-11-27

    Stem cell-based therapies have been reported in protecting cerebral infarction-induced neuronal dysfunction and death. However, most studies used rat/mouse neuron as model cell when treated with stem cell or exosomes. Whether these findings can be translated from rodent to humans has been in doubt. Here, we used human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons to detect the protective potential of exosomes against ischemia. Neurons were treated with in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 1 h. For treatment group, different exosomes were derived from neuron, embryonic stem cell, neural progenitor cell and astrocyte differentiated from H9 human embryonic stem cell and added to culture medium 30 min after OGD (100 μg/mL). Western blotting was performed 12 h after OGD, while cell counting and electrophysiological recording were performed 48 h after OGD. We found that these exosomes attenuated OGD-induced neuronal death, Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathway changes, as well as basal spontaneous synaptic transmission inhibition in varying degrees. The results implicate the protective effect of exosomes on OGD-induced neuronal death and dysfunction in human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons, potentially through their modulation on mTOR, pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathways. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Cell type-specific and common characteristics of exosomes derived from mouse cell lines: Yield, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenviriyakul, Chonlada; Takahashi, Yuki; Morishita, Masaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted from cells and are expected to be used as drug delivery systems. Important characteristics of exosomes, such as yield, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetics, may be different among different cell types. However, there is limited information about the effect of cell type on these characteristics. In the present study, we evaluated these characteristics of exosomes derived from five different types of mouse cell lines: B16BL6 murine melanoma cells, C2C12 murine myoblast cells, NIH3T3 murine fibroblasts cells, MAEC murine aortic endothelial cells, and RAW264.7 murine macrophage-like cells. Exosomes were collected using a differential ultracentrifugation method. The exosomes collected from all the cell types were negatively charged globular vesicles with a diameter of approximately 100nm. C2C12 and RAW264.7 cells produced more exosomes than the other types of cells. The exosomes were labeled with a fusion protein of Gaussia luciferase and lactadherin to evaluate their pharmacokinetics. After intravenous injection into mice, all the exosomes rapidly disappeared from the systemic circulation and mainly distributed to the liver. In conclusion, the exosome yield was significantly different among the cell types, and all the exosomes evaluated in this study showed comparable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Concise Review: MSC-Derived Exosomes for Cell-Free Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Donald G; Pittenger, Mark F

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is undergoing extensive evaluation as a cellular therapy in human clinical trials. Because MSCs are easily isolated and amenable to culture expansion in vitro there is a natural desire to test MSCs in many diverse clinical indications. This is exemplified by the rapidly expanding literature base that includes many in vivo animal models. More recently, MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), which include exosomes and microvesicles (MV), are being examined for their role in MSC-based cellular therapy. These vesicles are involved in cell-to-cell communication, cell signaling, and altering cell or tissue metabolism at short or long distances in the body. The exosomes and MVs can influence tissue responses to injury, infection, and disease. MSC-derived exosomes have a content that includes cytokines and growth factors, signaling lipids, mRNAs, and regulatory miRNAs. To the extent that MSC exosomes can be used for cell-free regenerative medicine, much will depend on the quality, reproducibility, and potency of their production, in the same manner that these parameters dictate the development of cell-based MSC therapies. However, the MSC exosome's contents are not static, but rather a product of the MSC tissue origin, its activities and the immediate intercellular neighbors of the MSCs. As such, the exosome content produced by MSCs appears to be altered when MSCs are cultured with tumor cells or in the in vivo tumor microenvironment. Therefore, careful attention to detail in producing MSC exosomes may provide a new therapeutic paradigm for cell-free MSC-based therapies with decreased risk. Stem Cells 2017;35:851-858. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Altered lysosomal proteins in neural-derived plasma exosomes in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzl, Edward J; Boxer, Adam; Schwartz, Janice B; Abner, Erin L; Petersen, Ronald C; Miller, Bruce L; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios

    2015-07-07

    Diverse autolysosomal proteins were quantified in neurally derived blood exosomes from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and controls to investigate disordered neuronal autophagy. Blood exosomes obtained once from patients with AD (n = 26) or frontotemporal dementia (n = 16), other patients with AD (n = 20) both when cognitively normal and 1 to 10 years later when diagnosed, and case controls were enriched for neural sources by anti-human L1CAM antibody immunoabsorption. Extracted exosomal proteins were quantified by ELISAs and normalized with the CD81 exosomal marker. Mean exosomal levels of cathepsin D, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), and ubiquitinylated proteins were significantly higher and of heat-shock protein 70 significantly lower for AD than controls in cross-sectional studies (p ≤ 0.0005). Levels of cathepsin D, LAMP-1, and ubiquitinylated protein also were significantly higher for patients with AD than for patients with frontotemporal dementia (p ≤ 0.006). Step-wise discriminant modeling of the protein levels correctly classified 100% of patients with AD. Exosomal levels of all proteins were similarly significantly different from those of matched controls in 20 patients 1 to 10 years before and at diagnosis of AD (p ≤ 0.0003). Levels of autolysosomal proteins in neurally derived blood exosomes distinguish patients with AD from case controls and appear to reflect the pathology of AD up to 10 years before clinical onset. These preliminary results confirm in living patients with AD the early appearance of neuronal lysosomal dysfunction and suggest that these proteins may be useful biomarkers in large prospective studies. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Exosomes derived from alcohol-treated hepatocytes horizontally transfer liver specific miRNA-122 and sensitize monocytes to LPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Bala, Shashi; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte damage and inflammation in monocytes/macrophages are central to the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate all of these processes. MiRNA-122 is abundantly expressed in hepatocytes while monocytes/macrophages have low levels. The role of exosomes in AH and possible cross talk between hepatocyte-derived exosomes and immune cells is not explored yet. Here, we show that the number of exosomes significantly increases in the sera of healthy individuals after alcohol binge drinking and in mice after binge or chronic alcohol consumption. Exosomes isolated from sera after alcohol consumption or from in vitro ethanol-treated hepatocytes contained miRNA-122. Exosomes derived from ethanol-treated Huh7.5 cells were taken up by the recipients THP1 monocytes and horizontally transferred a mature form of liver-specific miRNA-122. In vivo, liver mononuclear cells and Kupffer cells from alcohol-fed mice had increased miRNA-122 levels. In monocytes, miRNA-122 transferred via exosomes inhibited the HO-1 pathway and sensitized to LPS stimulation and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, inflammatory effects of exosomes from ethanol-treated hepatocytes were prevented by using RNA interference via exosome-mediated delivery of a miRNA-122 inhibitor. These results demonstrate that first, exosomes mediate communication between hepatocytes and monocytes/macrophages and second, hepatocyte-derived miRNA-122 can reprogram monocytes inducing sensitization to LPS. PMID:25973575

  13. Exosomes derived from mesenchymal non-small cell lung cancer cells promote chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobb, Richard J; van Amerongen, Rosa; Wiegmans, Adrian; Ham, Sunyoung; Larsen, Jill E; Möller, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common lung cancer type and the most common cause of mortality in lung cancer patients. NSCLC is often associated with resistance to chemotherapeutics and together with rapid metastatic spread, results in limited treatment options and poor patient survival. NSCLCs are heterogeneous, and consist of epithelial and mesenchymal NSCLC cells. Mesenchymal NSCLC cells are thought to be responsible for the chemoresistance phenotype, but if and how this phenotype can be transferred to other NSCLC cells is currently not known. We hypothesised that small extracellular vesicles, exosomes, secreted by mesenchymal NSCLC cells could potentially transfer the chemoresistance phenotype to surrounding epithelial NSCLC cells. To explore this possibility, we used a unique human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) model in which the parental cells were transformed from an epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype by introducing oncogenic alterations common in NSCLC. We found that exosomes derived from the oncogenically transformed, mesenchymal HBECs could transfer chemoresistance to the parental, epithelial HBECs and increase ZEB1 mRNA, a master EMT transcription factor, in the recipient cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that exosomes from mesenchymal, but not epithelial HBECs contain the ZEB1 mRNA, thereby providing a potential mechanism for the induction of a mesenchymal phenotype in recipient cells. Together, this work demonstrates for the first time that exosomes derived from mesenchymal, oncogenically transformed lung cells can transfer chemoresistance and mesenchymal phenotypes to recipient cells, likely via the transfer of ZEB1 mRNA in exosomes. © 2017 UICC.

  14. Tumor-derived exosomes enhance invasion and metastasis of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin; Wang, Fangyuan; Liu, Xiaohao; Song, Mengyang; Yin, Xuemin

    2018-02-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes (TDE) have been shown to participate in different steps of the dissemination of cancer cells. However, the role of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma-derived (SACC-derived) exosomes had not been documented in SACC. The study aims to explore the functions of SACC-derived TDE in SACC progression and investigate potential mechanisms. Salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line SACC-83 was used to generate TDE. Afterward, SACC-83 or HUVECs were cocultured with or without TDE. Tumor migration, tumor invasion, and endothelial permeability were examined by wound healing assay, tumor invasion assay, endothelial permeability assay, and tumor cell transendothelial migration assay, respectively. Moreover, the expression levels of cell junction-related proteins were examined by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma -83-derived exosomes were taken up by their host cells. Meanwhile, TDE increased migration and invasion capacity of SACC-83 cells and enhanced endothelial cell permeability. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the expression of cell junction-related proteins (Claudins and ZO-1) was downregulated, which is presumably involved in the TDE-mediated promotion of migration, invasion, and metastasis. The results suggested that SACC cell-derived exosomes were loaded with individual components that could enhance invasiveness and induce microenvironment changes, thus promoting SACC aggression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Exosomes Derived from Dendritic Cells Treated with Schistosoma japonicum Soluble Egg Antigen Attenuate DSS-Induced Colitis

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    Lifu Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are 30–150 nm small membrane vesicles that are released into the extracellular medium via cells that function as a mode of intercellular communication. Dendritic cell (DC-derived exosomes modulate immune responses and prevent the development of autoimmune diseases. Moreover, Schistosoma japonicum eggs show modulatory effects in a mouse model of colitis. Therefore, we hypothesized that exosomes derived from DCs treated with S. japonicum soluble eggs antigen (SEA; SEA-treated DC exosomes would be useful for treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Exosomes were purified from the supernatant of DCs treated or untreated with SEA and identified via transmission electron microscopy, western blotting and NanoSight. Acute colitis was induced via the administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS in drinking water (5.0%, wt/vol. Treatment with exosomes was conducted via intraperitoneal injection (i.p.; 50 μg per mouse from day 0 to day 6. Clinical scores were calculated based on weight loss, stool type, and bleeding. Colon length was measured as an indirect marker of inflammation, and colon macroscopic characteristics were determined. Body weight loss and the disease activity index of DSS-induced colitis mice decreased significantly following treatment with SEA-treated DC exosomes. Moreover, the colon lengths of SEA-treated DC exosomes treated colitis mice improved, and their mean colon macroscopic scores decreased. In addition, histologic examinations and histological scores showed that SEA-treated DC exosomes prevented colon damage in acute DSS-induced colitis mice. These results indicate that SEA-treated DC exosomes attenuate the severity of acute DSS-induced colitis mice more effectively than DC exosomes. The current work suggests that SEA-treated DC exosomes may be useful as a new approach to treat IBD.

  16. Proteome profiling of neuroblastoma-derived exosomes reveal the expression of proteins potentially involved in tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Marimpietri

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood, with grim prognosis in a half of patients. Exosomes are nanometer-sized membrane vesicles derived from the multivesicular bodies (MVBs of the endocytic pathway and released by normal and neoplastic cells. Tumor-derived exosomes have been shown in different model systems to carry molecules that promote cancer growth and dissemination. In this respect, we have here performed the first characterization and proteomic analysis of exosomes isolated from human NB cell lines by filtration and ultracentrifugation. Electron microscopy demonstrated that NB-derived exosomes exhibited the characteristic cup-shaped morphology. Dynamic light scattering studies showed a bell-shaped curve and a polydispersity factor consistent with those of exosomes. Zeta potential values suggested a good nanoparticle stability. We performed proteomic analysis of NB-derived exosomes by two dimension liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry analyses using the multidimensional protein identification technology strategy. We found that the large majority of the proteins identified in NB derived exosomes are present in Exocarta database including tetraspanins, fibronectin, heat shock proteins, MVB proteins, cytoskeleton-related proteins, prominin-1 (CD133, basigin (CD147 and B7-H3 (CD276. Expression of the CD9, CD63 and CD81 tetraspanins, fibronectin, CD133, CD147 and CD276 was validated by flow cytometry. Noteworthy, flow cytometric analysis showed that NB-derived exosomes expressed the GD2 disialoganglioside, the most specific marker of NB. In conclusion, this study shows that NB-derived exosomes express a discrete set of molecules involved in defense response, cell differentiation, cell proliferation and regulation of other important biological process. Thus, NB-derived exosomes may play an important role in the modulation of tumor microenvironment and represent potential tumor biomarkers.

  17. Exosomes Derived from Mesenchymal Stem Cells Suppress Angiogenesis by Down-Regulating VEGF Expression in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Kuen; Park, Sae-Ra; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Jeon, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Yeong-Shin; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Goo; Jang, Ji-Young; Kim, Chul-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles released by a variety of cell types. Exosomes contain genetic materials, such as mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs), implying that they may play a pivotal role in cell-to-cell communication. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which potentially differentiate into multiple cell types, can migrate to the tumor sites and have been reported to exert complex effects on tumor progression. To elucidate the role of MSCs within the tumor microenvironment, previous studies have suggested various mechanisms such as immune modulation and secreted factors of MSCs. However, the paracrine effects of MSC-derived exosomes on the tumor microenvironment remain to be explored. The hypothesis of this study was that MSC-derived exosomes might reprogram tumor behavior by transferring their molecular contents. To test this hypothesis, exosomes from MSCs were isolated and characterized. MSC-derived exosomes exhibited different protein and RNA profiles compared with their donor cells and these vesicles could be internalized by breast cancer cells. The results demonstrated that MSC-derived exosomes significantly down-regulated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells, which lead to inhibition of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, miR-16, a miRNA known to target VEGF, was enriched in MSC-derived exosomes and it was partially responsible for the anti-angiogenic effect of MSC-derived exosomes. The collective results suggest that MSC-derived exosomes may serve as a significant mediator of cell-to-cell communication within the tumor microenvironment and suppress angiogenesis by transferring anti-angiogenic molecules. PMID:24391924

  18. MIRNAS in Astrocyte-Derived Exosomes as Possible Mediators of Neuronal Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lafourcade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes use gliotransmitters to modulate neuronal function and plasticity. However, the role of small extracellular vesicles, called exosomes, in astrocyte-to-neuron signaling is mostly unknown. Exosomes originate in multivesicular bodies of parent cells and are secreted by fusion of the multivesicular body limiting membrane with the plasma membrane. Their molecular cargo, consisting of RNA species, proteins, and lipids, is in part cell type and cell state specific. Among the RNA species transported by exosomes, microRNAs (miRNAs are able to modify gene expression in recipient cells. Several miRNAs present in astrocytes are regulated under pathological conditions, and this may have far-reaching consequences if they are loaded in exosomes. We propose that astrocyte-derived miRNA-loaded exosomes, such as miR-26a, are dysregulated in several central nervous system diseases; thus potentially controlling neuronal morphology and synaptic transmission through validated and predicted targets. Unraveling the contribution of this new signaling mechanism to the maintenance and plasticity of neuronal networks will impact our understanding on the physiology and pathophysiology of the central nervous system.

  19. The potential of tumor-derived exosomes for noninvasive cancer monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes (TEXs) are emerging as a new type of cancer biomarker. TEXs are membrane-bound, virus-size vesicles of endocytic origin present in all body fluids of cancer patients. Based on the expanding albeit incomplete knowledge of their biogenesis, secretion by tumor cells and cancer cell-specific molecular and genetic contents, TEXs are viewed as promising, clinically-relevant surrogates of cancer progression and response to therapy. Preliminary proteomic, genetic and functional profiling of tumor cell-derived or cancer plasma-derived exosomes confirms their unique characteristics. Alterations in protein or nucleic acid profiles of exosomes in plasma of cancer patients responding to therapies appear to correlate with clinical endpoints. However, methods for TEX isolation and separation from the bulk of human plasma-derived exosomes are not yet established and their role as biomarkers remains to be confirmed. Further development and validation of TEXs as noninvasive, liquid equivalents of tumor biopsies are necessary to move this effort forward. PMID:26289602

  20. Human fibrocyte-derived exosomes accelerate wound healing in genetically diabetic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Adolf, E-mail: ageiger@dreirosen-pharma.com; Walker, Audrey, E-mail: awalker@dreirosen-pharma.com; Nissen, Erwin, E-mail: enissen@dreirosen-pharma.com

    2015-11-13

    Diabetic ulcers represent a substantial societal and healthcare burden worldwide and scarcely respond to current treatment strategies. This study was addressed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of exosomes secreted by human circulating fibrocytes, a population of mesenchymal progenitors involved in normal wound healing via paracrine signaling. The exosomes released from cells sequentially stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1, in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2, did not show potential immunogenicity. These exosomes exhibited in-vitro proangiogenic properties, activated diabetic dermal fibroblasts, induced the migration and proliferation of diabetic keratinocytes, and accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in vivo. Important components of the exosomal cargo were heat shock protein-90α, total and activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, proangiogenic (miR-126, miR-130a, miR-132) and anti-inflammatory (miR124a, miR-125b) microRNAs, and a microRNA regulating collagen deposition (miR-21). This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of the use of fibrocytes-derived exosomes for the treatment of diabetic ulcers. - Highlights: • Fibrocytes have shown potent wound healing properties in vitro and in vivo. • Their clinical use is precluded by low numbers and antigen-presenting function. • We isolated exosomes with no immunogenicity potential from human fibrocytes. • Their cargo included microRNAs and proteins that are known healing promoters. • They accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in a dose-dependent manner.

  1. Exosomes secreted from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells protect the intestines from experimental necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rager, Terrence M; Olson, Jacob K; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yijie; Besner, Gail E

    2016-06-01

    Treatment options for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remain inadequate. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) can protect the intestines from NEC. Exosomes are nanoparticle-sized vesicles with important cell signaling capabilities. The objective of this study was to determine whether BM-MSC-derived exosomes can prevent NEC. Rat pups were either breast fed (Group 1) or subjected to experimental NEC and randomized to receive either no treatment (Group 2) or an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of PBS (Group 3), BM-MSC (Group 4), or BM-MSC-derived exosomes (Group 5). Histologic injury grade and intestinal permeability were determined. The effect of BM-MSC-derived exosomes on IEC-6 intestinal epithelial cells in an in vitro scrape model of wound healing was also determined. Animals exposed to NEC that were either untreated or received PBS alone had an NEC incidence of 46% and 41%, respectively (p=0.61). Compared to untreated pups, the incidence of NEC was significantly lower in pups treated with either BM-MSC (9%, p=0.0003) or MB-MSC-derived exosomes (13%, p=0.0008). Similar results were found for intestinal permeability. Wound healing in IEC-6 cells was significantly increased by BM-MSC-derived exosomes. BM-MSC-derived exosomes protect the intestines from NEC and may represent a novel, cell-free, preventative therapy for NEC in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Restoring Anticancer Immune Response by Targeting Tumor-Derived Exosomes With a HSP70 Peptide Aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbo, Jessica; Marcion, Guillaume; Cordonnier, Marine; Dias, Alexandre M M; Pernet, Nicolas; Hammann, Arlette; Richaud, Sarah; Mjahed, Hajare; Isambert, Nicolas; Clausse, Victor; Rébé, Cédric; Bertaut, Aurélie; Goussot, Vincent; Lirussi, Frédéric; Ghiringhelli, François; de Thonel, Aurélie; Fumoleau, Pierre; Seigneuric, Renaud; Garrido, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes, via heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expressed in their membrane, are able to interact with the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) on myeloid-derived suppressive cells (MDSCs), thereby activating them. We analyzed exosomes from mouse (C57Bl/6) and breast, lung, and ovarian cancer patient samples and cultured cancer cells with different approaches, including nanoparticle tracking analysis, biolayer interferometry, FACS, and electron microscopy. Data were analyzed with the Student's t and Mann-Whitney tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. We showed that the A8 peptide aptamer binds to the extracellular domain of membrane HSP70 and used the aptamer to capture HSP70 exosomes from cancer patient samples. The number of HSP70 exosomes was higher in cancer patients than in healthy donors (mean, ng/mL ± SD = 3.5 ± 1.7 vs 0.17 ± 0.11, respectively, P = .004). Accordingly, all cancer cell lines examined abundantly released HSP70 exosomes, whereas "normal" cells did not. HSP70 had higher affinity for A8 than for TLR2; thus, A8 blocked HSP70/TLR2 association and the ability of tumor-derived exosomes to activate MDSCs. Treatment of tumor-bearing C57Bl/6 mice with A8 induced a decrease in the number of MDSCs in the spleen and inhibited tumor progression (n = 6 mice per group). Chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin or 5FU increase the amount of HSP70 exosomes, favoring the activation of MDSCs and hampering the development of an antitumor immune response. In contrast, this MDSC activation was not observed if cisplatin or 5FU was combined with A8. As a result, the antitumor effect of the drugs was strongly potentiated. A8 might be useful for quantifying tumor-derived exosomes and for cancer therapy through MDSC inhibition. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Investigation of Content, Stoichiometry and Transfer of miRNA from Human Neural Stem Cell Line Derived Exosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Stevanato

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small (30-100 nm membrane vesicles secreted by a variety of cell types and only recently have emerged as a new avenue for cell-to-cell communication. They are natural shuttles of RNA and protein cargo, making them attractive as potential therapeutic delivery vehicles. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs which regulate biological processes and can be found in exosomes. Here we characterized the miRNA contents of exosomes derived from human neural stem cells (hNSCs. Our investigated hNSC line is a clonal, conditionally immortalized cell line, compliant with good manufacturing practice (GMP, and in clinical trials for stroke and critical limb ischemia in the UK (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01151124, NCT02117635, and NCT01916369. By using next generation sequencing (NGS technology we identified the presence of a variety of miRNAs in both exosomal and cellular preparations. Many of these miRNAs were enriched in exosomes indicating that cells specifically sort them for extracellular release. Although exosomes have been proven to contain miRNAs, the copy number quantification per exosome of a given miRNA remains unclear. Herein we quantified by real-time PCR a highly shuttled exosomal miRNA subtype (hsa-miR-1246 in order to assess its stoichiometry per exosome. Furthermore, we utilized an in vitro system to confirm its functional transfer by measuring the reduction in luciferase expression using a 3' untranslated region dual luciferase reporter assay. In summary, NGS analysis allowed the identification of a unique set of hNSC derived exosomal miRNAs. Stoichiometry and functional transfer analysis of one of the most abundant identified miRNA, hsa-miR-1246, were measured to support biological relevance of exosomal miRNA delivery.

  4. Phenotypic modulation of auto-reactive cells by insertion of tolerogenic molecules via MSC-derived exosomes.

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    Mokarizadeh, Aram; Delirezh, Nowruz; Morshedi, Ahhmad; Mosayebi, Ghasem; Farshid, Amir-Abbas; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Auto-reactive cells-mediated immune responses are responsible for the current tissue damages during autoimmunity. Accordingly, functional modulation of auto-reactive cells has been a pivotal aim in many of recent studies. In the current study, we investigated the possibility for insertion of regulatory molecules onto auto-reactive cells through exosomal nano-shuttles as a novel approach for phenotype modification of auto-reactive cells. The exosomes were isolated from supernatant of mesenchymal stem cells culture. Resultant exosomes co-cultured with lymphocytes were harvested from established EAE mice in the presence of antigenic MOG35-55 peptide. After 24 hr, insertion of exosomal tolerogenic molecules (PD-L1, TGF-β, galectin-1) onto auto-reactive cells were explored through flow cytometry. The potency of exosomal inserted membrane molecules to modulate phenotype of auto-reactive lymphocytes was assessed upon ELISA test for their-derived cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17. Incorporation of exosomal molecules into lymohocytes' membrane was confirmed by flow cytometric analyses for surface levels of mentioned molecules. Additionally, the decreased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 were detected in exosome pre-treated lymphocytes upon stimulation with MOG peptide. Mesenchymal stem cells -derived exosomes showed to be efficient organelles for insertion of bioactive tolerogenic molecules onto auto-reactive cells and modulation of their phenotypes.

  5. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Lymphocytes Treated with Exosomes Derived from Ovarian Cancer and Ovarian Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells employ many strategies to evade immune defense and to facilitate tumor growth and angiogenesis. As a novel mode of intercellular communication, cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and mediation of lymphocytes within the tumor environment. However, the mechanisms and key molecules mediating the effect of exosomes on lymphocytes are unclear. We treated healthy peripheral blood lymphocytes with exosomes from ovarian cancer and ovarian cysts and screened for differentially expressed genes using the RT2 Profiler Cancer Inflammation and Immunity Crosstalk PCR Array. A total of 26 upregulated genes (mainly pro-inflammatory genes and immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive factor and two downregulated genes (antigen presentation HLA-A/B were identified. Western blotting using lymphocytes from malignant ascites and peritoneal washings of benign ovarian cysts suggested that the interferon and NF-κB signaling pathway were involved in the immune regulation of malignant exosomes. Out of 28 differentially expressed genes detected using the array, 11 were validated by real-time PCR using lymphocytes within ovarian cancer (n = 27 and ovarian cyst (n = 9 environments. In conclusion, our findings indicate that malignant cells secrete exosomes in the tumor microenvironment to recruit lymphocytes in order to suppress antitumor immunity (IL10, Foxp3, and HLA-A/B and enhance tumor invasion, angiogenesis, and dissemination of proinflammatory cytokines (such as IL6 and VEGFA via the interferon and NF-κB signaling pathways. These results clarify lymphocyte-cancer cell cross talk via exosomes and may facilitate the development of effective immunotherapeutic strategies for ovarian cancer.

  6. [Differential proteomics research on exosomes derived from tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells and normal mucosa cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinsheng; Zhang, Zhuoyuan; Huang, Yi; Xia, Yichao; Li, Longjiang

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to explore further the mechanisms of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) cell recurrence, metastasis, and diffusion, as well as to establish the experimental basis for the molecular biology research on TSSC. We intend to complete our objective through differential proteomics and preliminary analysis protein expression of exosomes derived from TSCC and normal mucosa cells. We acquired cultured supernatant fluid in vitro in the laboratory by culturing TSCC (tongue cancer Tca8113 cell line) and human normal mucosa cells (HOK cell line). The exosomes were separated and purified through differential centrifugation. Furthermore, the different protein expressions were identified through dielectrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The functions of the different protein expressions were identified through an online database search. TSCC and human normal mucosa cells secrete a large amount of capsule bubble structure substances in vitro, as confirmed by electron microscopy and surface markers heat shock protein-70 and major histocompatibility complex class 1. A total of 16 oral cancer cell-derived exosomes that expressed quantity more than two times, twelve that increased their expression levels, and four that cut their expressions were identified through the differential proteomics research on the two groups. Differential proteins that were verified through the online database serve an important function in exosome formation and in the progress of cancer.

  7. Inhibition of myelin membrane sheath formation by oligodendrocyte-derived exosome-like vesicles.

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    Bakhti, Mostafa; Winter, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2011-01-07

    Myelin formation is a multistep process that is controlled by a number of different extracellular factors. During the development of the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocyte progenitor cells differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes that start to enwrap axons with myelin membrane sheaths after receiving the appropriate signal(s) from the axon or its microenvironment. The signals required to initiate this process are unknown. Here, we show that oligodendrocytes secrete small membrane vesicles, exosome-like vesicles, into the extracellular space that inhibit both the morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes and myelin formation. The inhibitory effects of exosome-like vesicles were prevented by treatment with inhibitors of actomyosin contractility. Importantly, secretion of exosome-like vesicles from oligodendrocytes was dramatically reduced when cells were incubated by conditioned neuronal medium. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence for small and diffusible oligodendroglial-derived vesicular carriers within the extracellular space that have inhibitory properties on cellular growth. We propose that neurons control the secretion of autoinhibitory oligodendroglial-derived exosomes to coordinate myelin membrane biogenesis.

  8. Exosomal Secretion of Cytoplasmic Prostate Cancer Xenograft-derived Proteins *S⃞

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    Jansen, Flip H.; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; van Rijswijk, Angelique; van den Bemd, Gert-Jan; van den Berg, Mirella S.; van Weerden, Wytske M.; Willemsen, Rob; Dekker, Lennard J.; Luider, Theo M.; Jenster, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Novel markers for prostate cancer (PCa) are needed because current established markers such as prostate-specific antigen lack diagnostic specificity and prognostic value. Proteomics analysis of serum from mice grafted with human PCa xenografts resulted in the identification of 44 tumor-derived proteins. Besides secreted proteins we identified several cytoplasmic proteins, among which were most subunits of the proteasome. Native gel electrophoresis and sandwich ELISA showed that these subunits are present as proteasome complexes in the serum from xenograft-bearing mice. We hypothesized that the presence of proteasome subunits and other cytoplasmic proteins in serum of xenografted mice could be explained by the secretion of small vesicles by cancer cells, so-called exosomes. Therefore, mass spectrometry and Western blotting analyses of the protein content of exosomes isolated from PCa cell lines was performed. This resulted in the identification of mainly cytoplasmic proteins of which several had previously been identified in the serum of xenografted mice, including proteasome subunits. The isolated exosomes also contained RNA, including the gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG product. These observations suggest that although their function is not clearly defined cancer-derived exosomes offer possibilities for the identification of novel biomarkers for PCa. PMID:19204029

  9. Exosomes Derived From Natural Killer Cells Exert Therapeutic Effect in Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liya; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Gangadaran, Prakash; Oh, Ji Min; Lee, Ho Won; Baek, Se Hwan; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from normal and tumor cells and are detectable in cell culture supernatant and human biological fluids. Although previous studies have explored exosomes released from cancer cells, little is understood regarding the functions of exosomes released by normal cells. Natural killer (NK) cells display rapid immunity to metastatic or hematological malignancies, and efforts have been undertaken to clinically exploit the antitumor properties of NK cells. However, the characteristics and functions of exosomes derived from NK cells remain unknown. In this study, we explored NK cell-derived exosome-mediated antitumor effects against aggressive melanoma in vitro and in vivo. Methods: B16F10 cells were transfected with enhanced firefly luciferase (effluc) and thy1.1 genes, and thy1.1-positive cells were immunoselected using microbeads. The resulting B16F10/effluc cells were characterized using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting, and luciferase activity assays. Exosomes derived from NK-92MI cells (NK-92 Exo) were isolated by ultracentrifugation and density gradient ultracentrifugation. NK-92 Exo were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and western blotting. We also performed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure cytokines retained in NK-92 Exo cells. The in vitro cytotoxicity of NK-92 Exo against the cancer cells was determined using a bioluminescence imaging system (BLI) and CCK-8 assays. To investigate the possible side effects of NK-92 Exo on healthy cells, we also performed the BLI and CCK-8 assays using the human kidney Phoenix™-Ampho cell line. Flow cytometry and western blotting confirmed that NK-92 Exo induced apoptosis in the B16F10/effluc cells. In vivo, we used a B16F10/effluc cell xenograft model to detect the immunotherapeutic effect of NK-92 Exo. We injected NK-92 Exo into tumors, and tumor growth progression was monitored using the IVIS Lumina

  10. Mast Cell-Derived Exosomes Promote Th2 Cell Differentiation via OX40L-OX40 Ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanovesicles released by different cell types, such as dendritic cells (DCs, mast cells (MCs, and tumor cells. Exosomes of different origin play a role in antigen presentation and modulation of immune response to infectious disease. In this study, we demonstrate that mast cells and CD4+ T cells colocated in peritoneal lymph nodes from BALB/c mouse. Further, bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs constitutively release exosomes, which express CD63 and OX40L. BMMC-exosomes partially promoted the proliferation of CD4+ T cells. BMMC-exosomes significantly enhanced the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells to Th2 cells in a surface contact method, and this ability was partly inhibited by the addition of anti-OX40L Ab. In conclusion, BMMC-exosomes promoted the proliferation and differentiation of Th2 cells via ligation of OX40L and OX40 between exosomes and T cells. This method represents a novel mechanism, in addition to direct cell surface contacts, soluble mediators, and synapses, to regulate T cell actions by BMMC-exosomes.

  11. Endothelial cell-derived exosomes protect SH-SY5Y nerve cells against ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bing; Chai, Yi; Lv, Shigang; Ye, Minhua; Wu, Miaojing; Xie, Liyuan; Fan, Yanghua; Zhu, Xingen; Gao, Ziyun

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia is a leading cause of death and disability. A previous study indicated that remote ischemic postconditioning (RIP) in the treatment of cerebral ischemia reduces ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In the present study, the authors hypothesized that the protective effect of RIP on neurological damage is mediated by exosomes that are released by endothelial cells in femoral arteries. To test this, right middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion with RIP was performed in rats. In addition, an I/R injury cell model was tested that included human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and SH-SY5Y cells. Both the in vivo and in vitro models were examined for injury. Markers of exosomes (CD63, HSP70 and TSG101) were assessed by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Exosomes were extracted from both animal serum and HUVEC culture medium and identified by electron microscopy. They investigated the role of endothelial cell-derived exosomes in the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration and invasion of I/R-injured SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, apoptosis-related molecules caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2 were detected. RIP was determined to increase the number of exosomes and the expression levels of CD63, HSP70 and TSG101 in plasma, but not in brain hippocampal tissue. The size of exosomes released after I/R in HUVECs was similar to the size of exosomes released in rats subjected to RIP. Endothelial cell-derived exosomes partly suppressed the I/R-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in SH-SY5Y nerve cells. Endothelial cell-derived exosomes directly protect nerve cells against I/R injury, and are responsible for the protective role of RIP in I/R.

  12. Cardiac fibroblast–derived microRNA passenger strand-enriched exosomes mediate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Claudia; Batkai, Sandor; Dangwal, Seema; Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Foinquinos, Ariana; Holzmann, Angelika; Just, Annette; Remke, Janet; Zimmer, Karina; Zeug, Andre; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Schmiedl, Andreas; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Halder, Rashi; Fischer, Andre; Engelhardt, Stefan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Schober, Andreas; Fiedler, Jan; Thum, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In response to stress, the heart undergoes extensive cardiac remodeling that results in cardiac fibrosis and pathological growth of cardiomyocytes (hypertrophy), which contribute to heart failure. Alterations in microRNA (miRNA) levels are associated with dysfunctional gene expression profiles associated with many cardiovascular disease conditions; however, miRNAs have emerged recently as paracrine signaling mediators. Thus, we investigated a potential paracrine miRNA crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes and found that cardiac fibroblasts secrete miRNA-enriched exosomes. Surprisingly, evaluation of the miRNA content of cardiac fibroblast–derived exosomes revealed a relatively high abundance of many miRNA passenger strands (“star” miRNAs), which normally undergo intracellular degradation. Using confocal imaging and coculture assays, we identified fibroblast exosomal–derived miR-21_3p (miR-21*) as a potent paracrine-acting RNA molecule that induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Proteome profiling identified sorbin and SH3 domain-containing protein 2 (SORBS2) and PDZ and LIM domain 5 (PDLIM5) as miR-21* targets, and silencing SORBS2 or PDLIM5 in cardiomyocytes induced hypertrophy. Pharmacological inhibition of miR-21* in a mouse model of Ang II–induced cardiac hypertrophy attenuated pathology. These findings demonstrate that cardiac fibroblasts secrete star miRNA–enriched exosomes and identify fibroblast-derived miR-21* as a paracrine signaling mediator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy that has potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:24743145

  13. Tumor-derived exosomes elicit tumor suppression in murine hepatocellular carcinoma models and humans in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Quan; Zuo, Bingfeng; Lu, Zhen; Gao, Xianjun; You, Abin; Wu, Chenxuan; Du, Zhi; Yin, HaiFang

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains a global challenge due to high morbidity and mortality rates and poor response to treatment. Immunotherapy, based on introduction of dendritic cells (DCs) activated by tumor cell lysates as antigens ex vivo, shows limited response rates in HCC patients. Here, we demonstrate that tumor cell-derived exosomes (TEXs), displaying an array of HCC antigens, can elicit a stronger immune response than cell lysates in vitro and in vivo. Significant tumor growth inhibition was achieved in ectopic and orthotopic HCC mice treated with TEX-pulsed DCs. Importantly, the tumor immune microenvironment was significantly improved in orthotopic HCC mice treated by TEX-pulsed DCs, demonstrated by increased numbers of T lymphocytes, elevated levels of interferon-γ, and decreased levels of interleukin-10 and tumor growth factor-β in tumor sites. As expected, T cells played an essential role in the TEX-pulsed DC-mediated immune response. Notably, exosomes from HCC cells not only promoted HCC-specific cytolysis but also provided cross-protective effects against pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, HCC-specific cytolysis, elicited by DCs pulsed with human HepG2 cell-derived exosomes, was observed across different human HCC cells irrespective of human leukocyte antigen types. HCC TEXs can potently carry HCC antigens, trigger a strong DC-mediated immune response, and improve the HCC tumor microenvironment. (Hepatology 2016;64:456-472). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Fermentation Results in Quantitative Changes in Milk-Derived Exosomes and Different Effects on Cell Growth and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siran; Zhao, Zhehao; Sun, Liming; Li, Ping

    2017-02-15

    The discovery of microRNAs encapsulated in milk-derived exosomes has revealed stability under extreme conditions reflecting the protection of membranes. We attempted to determine the variations in nanoparticles derived from milk after fermentation, and provide evidence to determine the effects of these exosomes on cells with potential bioactivity. Using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we compared the morphology and particle size distribution of exosomes from yogurt fermented with three different combinations of strains with those from raw milk. The protein content of the exosome was significantly reduced in fermented milk. The cycle threshold showed that the expression of miR-29b and miR-21 was relatively high in raw milk, indicating a loss of microRNA after fermentation. Milk-derived exosomes could promote cell growth and activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These findings demonstrated biological functions in milk exosomes and provided new insight into the nutrient composition of dairy products.

  15. Plasmalogen enrichment in exosomes secreted by a nematode parasite versus those derived from its mouse host: implications for exosome stability and biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Simbari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs mediate communication between cells and organisms across all 3 kingdoms of life. Several reports have demonstrated that EVs can transfer molecules between phylogenetically diverse species and can be used by parasites to alter the properties of the host environment. Whilst the concept of vesicle secretion and uptake is broad reaching, the molecular composition of these complexes is expected to be diverse based on the physiology and environmental niche of different organisms. Exosomes are one class of EVs originally defined based on their endocytic origin, as these derive from multivesicular bodies that then fuse with the plasma membrane releasing them into the extracellular environment. The term exosome has also been used to describe any small EVs recovered by high-speed ultracentrifugation, irrespective of origin since this is not always well characterized. Here, we use comparative global lipidomic analysis to examine the composition of EVs, which we term exosomes, that are secreted by the gastrointestinal nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, in relation to exosomes secreted by cells of its murine host. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS analysis reveals a 9- to 62-fold enrichment of plasmalogens, as well as other classes of ether glycerophospholipids, along with a relative lack of cholesterol and sphingomyelin (SM in the nematode exosomes compared with those secreted by murine cells. Biophysical analyses of the membrane dynamics of these exosomes demonstrate increased rigidity in those from the nematode, and parallel studies with synthetic vesicles support a role of plasmalogens in stabilizing the membrane structure. These results suggest that nematodes can maintain exosome membrane structure and integrity through increased plasmalogens, compensating for diminished levels of other lipids, including cholesterol and SM. This work also illuminates the prevalence of

  16. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Luarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future.

  17. Optimized Methods to Explore the Mechanistic and Biomarker Potential of Hepatocyte-Derived Exosomes in Drug-Induced Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Sarah E; Nautiyal, Manisha; Otieno, Monicah A; Watkins, Paul B; Mosedale, Merrie

    2018-01-27

    Recent evidence supports that alterations in hepatocyte-derived exosomes (HDE) may play a role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). HDE-based biomarkers also hold promise to improve the sensitivity of existing in vitro assays for predicting DILI liability. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) provide a physiologically relevant in vitro model to explore the mechanistic and biomarker potential of HDE in DILI. However, optimal methods to study exosomes in this culture system have not been defined. Here we use HepG2 and HepaRG cells along with PHH to optimize methods for in vitro HDE research. We compared the quantity and purity of HDE enriched from HepG2 cell culture medium by three widely used methods: ultracentrifugation (UC), OptiPrep density gradient ultracentrifugation (ODG), and ExoQuick (EQ) - a commercially available exosome precipitation reagent. While EQ resulted in the highest number of particles, UC resulted in more exosomes as indicated by the relative abundance of exosomal CD63 to cellular prohibitin-1 as well as the comparative absence of contaminating extravesicular material. To determine culture conditions that best supported exosome release, we also assessed the effect of Matrigel matrix overlay at concentrations ranging from 0-0.25 mg/ml in HepaRG cells and compared exosome release from fresh and cryopreserved PHH from same donor. Sandwich culture did not impair exosome release, and freshly prepared PHH yielded a higher number of HDE overall. Taken together, our data support the use of UC-based enrichment from fresh preparations of sandwich-cultured PHH for future studies of HDE in DILI. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Altered microRNA expression profile in exosomes during osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Ji-Feng Xu

    Full Text Available The physiological role of microRNAs (miRNAs in osteoblast differentiation remains elusive. Exosomal miRNAs isolated from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs culture were profiled using miRNA arrays containing probes for 894 human matured miRNAs. Seventy-nine miRNAs (∼8.84% could be detected in exosomes isolated from BMSC culture supernatants when normalized to endogenous control genes RNU44. Among them, nine exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 4 miRNAs were under regulated significantly (Relative fold>2, p<0.05 when compared with the values at 0 day with maximum changes at 1 to 7 days. Five miRNAs (miR-199b, miR-218, miR-148a, miR-135b, and miR-221 were further validated and differentially expressed in the individual exosomal samples from hBMSCs cultured at different time points. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that RNA degradation, mRNA surveillance pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, RNA transport were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with differential exosomal miRNA patterns related to osteogenic differentiation. These data demonstrated exosomal miRNA is a regulator of osteoblast differentiation.

  19. Engineering macrophage-derived exosomes for targeted paclitaxel delivery to pulmonary metastases: in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Soo; Haney, Matthew J; Zhao, Yuling; Yuan, Dongfen; Deygen, Irina; Klyachko, Natalia L; Kabanov, Alexander V; Batrakova, Elena V

    2017-10-02

    Exosomes have recently emerged as a promising drug delivery system with low immunogenicity, high biocompatibility, and high efficacy of delivery. We demonstrated earlier that macrophage-derived exosomes (exo) loaded with a potent anticancer agent paclitaxel (PTX) represent a novel nanoformulation (exoPTX) that shows high anticancer efficacy in a mouse model of pulmonary metastases. We now report the manufacture of targeted exosome-based formulations with superior structure and therapeutic indices for systemic administration. Herein, we developed and optimized a formulation of PTX-loaded exosomes with incorporated aminoethylanisamide-polyethylene glycol (AA-PEG) vector moiety to target the sigma receptor, which is overexpressed by lung cancer cells. The AA-PEG-vectorized exosomes loaded with PTX (AA-PEG-exoPTX) possessed a high loading capacity, profound ability to accumulate in cancer cells upon systemic administration, and improved therapeutic outcomes. The combination of targeting ability with the biocompatibility of exosome-based drug formulations offers a powerful and novel delivery platform for anticancer therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Enabling a robust scalable manufacturing process for therapeutic exosomes through oncogenic immortalization of human ESC-derived MSCs

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    Choo Andre

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exosomes or secreted bi-lipid vesicles from human ESC-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hESC-MSCs have been shown to reduce myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in animal models. However, as hESC-MSCs are not infinitely expansible, large scale production of these exosomes would require replenishment of hESC-MSC through derivation from hESCs and incur recurring costs for testing and validation of each new batch. Our aim was therefore to investigate if MYC immortalization of hESC-MSC would circumvent this constraint without compromising the production of therapeutically efficacious exosomes. Methods The hESC-MSCs were transfected by lentivirus carrying a MYC gene. The transformed cells were analyzed for MYC transgene integration, transcript and protein levels, and surface markers, rate of cell cycling, telomerase activity, karyotype, genome-wide gene expression and differentiation potential. The exosomes were isolated by HPLC fractionation and tested in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, and infarct sizes were further assessed by using Evans' blue dye injection and TTC staining. Results MYC-transformed MSCs largely resembled the parental hESC-MSCs with major differences being reduced plastic adherence, faster growth, failure to senesce, increased MYC protein expression, and loss of in vitro adipogenic potential that technically rendered the transformed cells as non-MSCs. Unexpectedly, exosomes from MYC-transformed MSCs were able to reduce relative infarct size in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury indicating that the capacity for producing therapeutic exosomes was preserved. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that MYC transformation is a practical strategy in ensuring an infinite supply of cells for the production of exosomes in the milligram range as either therapeutic agents or delivery vehicles. In addition, the increased proliferative rate by MYC transformation reduces the time

  1. The Complete Exosome Workflow Solution: From Isolation to Characterization of RNA Cargo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeoffrey Schageman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small (30–150 nm vesicles containing unique RNA and protein cargo, secreted by all cell types in culture. They are also found in abundance in body fluids including blood, saliva, and urine. At the moment, the mechanism of exosome formation, the makeup of the cargo, biological pathways, and resulting functions are incompletely understood. One of their most intriguing roles is intercellular communication—exosomes function as the messengers, delivering various effector or signaling macromolecules between specific cells. There is an exponentially growing need to dissect structure and the function of exosomes and utilize them for development of minimally invasive diagnostics and therapeutics. Critical to further our understanding of exosomes is the development of reagents, tools, and protocols for their isolation, characterization, and analysis of their RNA and protein contents. Here we describe a complete exosome workflow solution, starting from fast and efficient extraction of exosomes from cell culture media and serum to isolation of RNA followed by characterization of exosomal RNA content using qRT-PCR and next-generation sequencing techniques. Effectiveness of this workflow is exemplified by analysis of the RNA content of exosomes derived from HeLa cell culture media and human serum, using Ion Torrent PGM as a sequencing platform.

  2. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes elicit tumor regression in autochthonous hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhen; Zuo, Bingfeng; Jing, Renwei; Gao, Xianjun; Rao, Quan; Liu, Zhili; Qi, Han; Guo, Hongxing; Yin, HaiFang

    2017-10-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (DEXs) form a new class of vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. However, their potency in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a life-threatening malignancy with limited treatment options in the clinic that responds poorly to immunotherapy, remains to be investigated. Exosomes derived from α-fetoprotein (AFP)-expressing DCs (DEXAFP) were investigated in three different HCC mouse models systemically. Tumor growth and microenvironment were monitored. DEXAFP elicited strong antigen-specific immune responses and resulted in significant tumor growth retardation and prolonged survival rates in mice with ectopic, orthotopic and carcinogen-induced HCC tumors that displayed antigenic and pathological heterogeneity. The tumor microenvironment was improved in DEXAFP-treated HCC mice, demonstrated by significantly more γ-interferon (IFN-γ)-expressing CD8+ T lymphocytes, elevated levels of IFN-γ and interleukin-2, and fewer CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and decreased levels of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β in tumor sites. Lack of efficacy in athymic nude mice and CD8+ T cell-depleted mice showed that T cells contribute to DEXAFP-mediated antitumor function. Dynamic examination of the antitumor efficacy and the immune microenvironment in DEXAFP-treated orthotopic HCC mice at different time-points revealed a positive correlation between tumor suppression and immune microenvironment. Our findings provide evidence that AFP-enriched DEXs can trigger potent antigen-specific antitumor immune responses and reshape the tumor microenvironment in HCC mice and thus provide a cell-free vaccine option for HCC immunotherapy. Lay summary: Dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (DEXs) form a new class of vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. However, their potency in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. Here, we investigated exosomes from HCC antigen-expressing DCs in three different HCC mouse models and proved their feasibility

  3. Exosomes Derived from Squamous Head and Neck Cancer Promote Cell Survival after Ionizing Radiation

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    Mutschelknaus, Lisa; Peters, Carsten; Winkler, Klaudia; Yentrapalli, Ramesh; Heider, Theresa; Atkinson, Michael John; Moertl, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized extracellular vesicles that are believed to function as intercellular communicators. Here, we report that exosomes are able to modify the radiation response of the head and neck cancer cell lines BHY and FaDu. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned medium of irradiated as well as non-irradiated head and neck cancer cells by serial centrifugation. Quantification using NanoSight technology indicated an increased exosome release from irradiated compared to non-irradiated cells 24 hours after treatment. To test whether the released exosomes influence the radiation response of other cells the exosomes were transferred to non-irradiated and irradiated recipient cells. We found an enhanced uptake of exosomes isolated from both irradiated and non-irradiated cells by irradiated recipient cells compared to non-irradiated recipient cells. Functional analyses by exosome transfer indicated that all exosomes (from non-irradiated and irradiated donor cells) increase the proliferation of non-irradiated recipient cells and the survival of irradiated recipient cells. The survival-promoting effects are more pronounced when exosomes isolated from irradiated compared to non-irradiated donor cells are transferred. A possible mechanism for the increased survival after irradiation could be the increase in DNA double-strand break repair monitored at 6, 8 and 10 h after the transfer of exosomes isolated from irradiated cells. This is abrogated by the destabilization of the exosomes. Our results demonstrate that radiation influences both the abundance and action of exosomes on recipient cells. Exosomes transmit prosurvival effects by promoting the proliferation and radioresistance of head and neck cancer cells. Taken together, this study indicates a functional role of exosomes in the response of tumor cells to radiation exposure within a therapeutic dose range and encourages that exosomes are useful objects of study for a better understanding of tumor

  4. BM mesenchymal stromal cell-derived exosomes facilitate multiple myeloma progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roccaro, Aldo M; Sacco, Antonio; Maiso, Patricia; Azab, Abdel Kareem; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Reagan, Michaela; Azab, Feda; Flores, Ludmila M; Campigotto, Federico; Weller, Edie; Anderson, Kenneth C; Scadden, David T; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2013-01-01

    .... Cell-cell communication is mediated by exosomes. In this study, we showed that MM BM-MSCs release exosomes that are transferred to MM cells, thereby resulting in modulation of tumor growth in vivo. Exosomal microRNA (miR...

  5. Exosomes derived from mature dendritic cells increase endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis via membrane TNF-α mediated NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Liu, Haibo; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Chaoneng; Huang, Dong; Ma, Yuanji; Zhu, Jianbing; Ma, Leilei; Guo, Junjie; Shi, Hongtao; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2016-12-01

    Whether dendritic cell (DC) derived exosomes play a role in the progression of endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis remains unclear. Using a transwell system and exosome release inhibitor GW4869, we demonstrated that mature DCs contributed to endothelial inflammation and exosomes were involved in the process. To further confirm this finding, we isolated exosomes from bone marrow dendritic cell (BMDC) culture medium (named DC-exos) and stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) with these DC-exos. We observed that mature DC-exos increased HUVEC inflammation through NF-κB pathway in a manner similar to that of lipopolysaccharide. After a protein array analysis of exosomes, we identified and confirmed tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α on exosome membrane being the trigger of NF-κB pathway in HUVECs. We then performed an in vivo study and found that the aorta endothelial of mice could uptake intravenously injected exosomes and was activated by these exosomes. After a period of 12 weeks of mature DC-exos injection into ApoE-/- mice, the atherosclerotic lesions significantly increased. Our study demonstrates that mature DCs derived exosomes increase endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis via membrane TNF-α mediated NF-κB pathway. This finding extends our knowledge on how DCs affect inflammation and provides a potential method to prevent endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells accelerate wound healing and inhibit scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yijie; Han, Shichao; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Hao; Liu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jihong; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2017-04-01

    Wound healing is a highly orchestrated physiological process consisting of a complex events, and scarless wound healing is highly desired for the development and application in clinical medicine. Recently, we have demonstrated that human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) promoted wound healing and inhibited scar formation through a paracrine mechanism. However, exosomes (Exo) are one of the most important paracrine factors. Whether exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs-Exo) have positive effects on scarless wound healing have not been reported yet. In this study, we examined the role of hAECs-Exo on wound healing in a rat model. We found that hAECs, which exhibit characteristics of both embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, have the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. hAECs-Exo ranged from 50 to 150 nm in diameter, and positive for exosomal markers CD9, CD63, CD81, Alix, TSG101 and HLA-G. Internalization of hAECs-Exo promoted the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts. Moreover, the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) were partly abolished by the treatment of high concentration of hAECs-Exo (100 μg/mL), which may be through stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). In vivo animal experiments showed that hAECs-Exo improved the skin wound healing with well-organized collagen fibers. Taken together, These findings represent that hAECs-Exo can be used as a novel hope in cell-free therapy for scarless wound healing.

  7. NK cell-released exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Fais, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that human natural killer (NK) cells release exosomes that express both NK-cell markers and cytotoxic molecules. Similar results were obtained with circulating exosomes from human healthy donors. Both NK-cell derived and circulating exosomes exerted a full functional activity and killed both tumor and activated immune cells. These findings indicate that NK-cell derived exosomes might constitute a new promising therapeutic tool.

  8. Exosomes derived from M. Bovis BCG infected macrophages activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod K Giri

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Activation of both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells is required for an effective immune response to an M. tuberculosis infection. However, infected macrophages are poor antigen presenting cells and may be spatially separated from recruited T cells, thus limiting antigen presentation within a granuloma. Our previous studies showed that infected macrophages release from cells small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes which contain mycobacterial lipid components and showed that these exosomes could stimulate a pro-inflammatory response in naïve macrophages. In the present study we demonstrate that exosomes stimulate both CD4(+ and CD8(+ splenic T cells isolated from mycobacteria-sensitized mice. Although the exosomes contain MHC I and II as well as costimulatory molecules, maximum stimulation of T cells required prior incubation of exosomes with antigen presenting cells. Exosomes isolated from M. bovis and M. tuberculosis infected macrophages also stimulated activation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Interestingly, intranasal administration of mice with exosomes isolated from M. bovis BCG infected macrophages induce the generation of memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. The isolated T cells also produced IFN-gamma upon restimulation with BCG antigens. The release of exosomes from infected macrophages may overcome some of the defects in antigen presentation associated with mycobacterial infections and we suggest that exosomes may be a promising M. tuberculosis vaccine candidate.

  9. Induction of protective immunity against Eimeria tenella, Eimeria maxima, and Eimeria acervulina infections using DC-derived exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes a novel immunization strategy against avian coccidiosis using exosomes derived from Eimeria parasite antigen (Ag)-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) in the absence of soluble Ag. Chicken intestinal DCs were isolated and pulsed in vitro with a mixture of sporozoite-extracted Ags from E...

  10. Plasma-derived exosome characterization reveals a distinct microRNA signature in long duration Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Contreras, Marta; Shah, Sanket H; Tamayo, Alejandro; Robbins, Paul D; Golberg, Ronald B; Mendez, Armando J; Ricordi, Camillo

    2017-07-20

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from an autoimmune attack against the insulin-producing ß cells which leads to chronic hyperglycemia. Exosomes are lipid vesicles derived from cellular multivesicular bodies that are enriched in specific miRNAs, potentially providing a disease-specific diagnostic signature. To assess the value of exosome miRNAs as biomarkers for T1DM, miRNA expression in plasma-derived exosomes was measured. Nanoparticle tracking analysis and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of plasma-derived exosomes (EXOs) isolated by differential centrifugation. Total RNA extracted from plasma-derived EXOs of 12 T1DM and 12 control subjects was hybridized onto Nanostring human v2 miRNA microarray array and expression data were analyzed on nSolver analysis software. We found 7 different miRNAs (1 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated), that were differentially expressed in T1DM. The selected candidate miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR analysis of cohorts of 24 T1DM and 24 control subjects. Most of the deregulated miRNAs are involved in progression of T1DM. These findings highlight the potential of EXOs miRNA profiling in the diagnosis as well as new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in T1DM.

  11. Human tumor-derived exosomes (TEX) regulate Treg functions via cell surface signaling rather than uptake mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Laurent; Simms, Patricia; Hong, Chang-Sook; Nishimura, Michael I; Jackson, Edwin K; Watkins, Simon C; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX) are ubiquitously present in the tumor microenvironment and plasma of cancer patients. TEX carry a cargo of multiple stimulatory and inhibitory molecules and deliver them to recipient cells, serving as a communication network for the tumor. The mechanisms TEX use for delivering messages to recipient cells were evaluated using PKH26-labeled TEX produced by cultured human tumor cells, exosomes produced by dendritic cells-derived exosomes (DEX), or exosomes isolated from plasma of cancer patients (EXO). Human T-cell subsets, B cells, NK cells, and monocytes were co-incubated with TEX, DEX, or EXO and binding or internalization of labeled vesicles was evaluated by confocal microscopy and/or Amnis-based flow cytometry. Vesicle-induced Ca2+ influx in recipient T cells was monitored, and TEX-induced inosine production in Treg was determined by mass spectrometry. In contrast to B cells, NK cells or monocytes, conventional T cells did not internalize labeled vesicles. Minimal exosome uptake was only evident in Treg following prolonged co-incubation with TEX. All exosomes induced Ca2+ influx in T cells, with TEX and EXO isolated from cancer patients' plasma delivering the strongest, sustained signaling to Treg. Such sustained signaling resulted in the significant upregulation of the conversion of extracellular ATP to inosine (adenosine metabolite) by Treg, suggesting that TEX signaling could have functional consequences in these recipient cells. Thus, modulation of Treg suppressor functions by TEX is mediated by mechanisms dependent on cell surface signaling and does not require TEX internalization by recipient cells.

  12. Exosomes Derived From Natural Killer Cells Exert Therapeutic Effect in Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Liya; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Gangadaran, Prakash; Oh, Ji Min; Lee, Ho Won; Baek, Se hwan; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jaetae; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from normal and tumor cells and are detectable in cell culture supernatant and human biological fluids. Although previous studies have explored exosomes released from cancer cells, little is understood regarding the functions of exosomes released by normal cells. Natural killer (NK) cells display rapid immunity to metastatic or hematological malignancies, and efforts have been undertaken to clinically exploit the antitumor properties of N...

  13. Tumor-Derived Exosomes and Their Role in Tumor-Induced Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa L. Whiteside

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX are emerging as critical components of an intercellular information network between the tumor and the host. The tumor escapes from the host immune system by using a variety of mechanisms designed to impair or eliminate anti-tumor immunity. TEX carrying a cargo of immunoinhibitory molecules and factors represent one such mechanism. TEX, which are present in all body fluids of cancer patients, deliver negative molecular or genetic signals to immune cells re-programming their functions. Although TEX can also stimulate immune activity, in the microenvironments dominated by the tumor, TEX tend to mediate immune suppression thus promoting tumor progression. The TEX content, in part resembling that of the parent cell, may serve as a source of cancer biomarkers. TEX also interfere with immune therapies. A better understanding of TEX and their contribution to cancer progression and cancer patients’ response to immune therapies represents a challenging new field of investigation.

  14. Purification and microRNA profiling of exosomes derived from blood and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Marguerite K; Capasso, Kathryn E; Ajit, Seena K

    2013-06-14

    Stable miRNAs are present in all body fluids and some circulating miRNAs are protected from degradation by sequestration in small vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes can fuse with the plasma membrane resulting in the transfer of RNA and proteins to the target cell. Their biological functions include immune response, antigen presentation, and intracellular communication. Delivery of miRNAs that can regulate gene expression in the recipient cells via blood has opened novel avenues for target intervention. In addition to offering a strategy for delivery of drugs or RNA therapeutic agents, exosomal contents can serve as biomarkers that can aid in diagnosis, determining treatment options and prognosis. Here we will describe the procedure for quantitatively analyzing miRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNA) from exosomes secreted in blood and cell culture media. Purified exosomes will be characterized using western blot analysis for exosomal markers and PCR for mRNAs of interest. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunogold labeling will be used to validate exosomal morphology and integrity. Total RNA will be purified from these exosomes to ensure that we can study both mRNA and miRNA from the same sample. After validating RNA integrity by Bioanalyzer, we will perform a medium throughput quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) to identify the exosomal miRNA using Taqman Low Density Array (TLDA) cards and gene expression studies for transcripts of interest. These protocols can be used to quantify changes in exosomal miRNAs in patients, rodent models and cell culture media before and after pharmacological intervention. Exosomal contents vary due to the source of origin and the physiological conditions of cells that secrete exosomes. These variations can provide insight on how cells and systems cope with stress or physiological perturbations. Our representative data show variations in miRNAs present in exosomes purified from mouse blood, human blood and human cell culture media

  15. Post isolation modification of exosomes for nanomedicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular nanovesicles. They innately possess ideal structural and biocompatible nanocarrier properties. Exosome components can be engineered at the cellular level. Alternatively, when exosome source cells are unavailable for customized exosome production, exosomes derived from a variety of biological origins can be modified post isolation which is the focus of this article. Modification of exosome surface structures allows for exosome imaging and tracking in vivo. Exosome membranes can be loaded with hydrophobic therapeutics to increase drug stability and efficacy. Hydrophilic therapeutics such as RNA can be encapsulated in exosomes to improve cellular delivery. Despite advances in post isolation exosome modification strategies, many challenges to effectively harnessing their therapeutic potential remain. Future topics of exploration include: matching exosome subtypes with nanomedicine applications, optimizing exosomal nanocarrier formulation and investigating how modified exosomes interface with the immune system. Research into these areas will greatly facilitate personalized exosome-based nanomedicine endeavors. PMID:27348448

  16. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M.; Hao, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27063098

  17. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M; Hao, Hongying

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prothrombin Loading of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived Exosomes Regulates Coagulation and Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustin, Alexander N; Schoppet, Michael; Schurgers, Leon J; Reynolds, Joanne L; McNair, Rosamund; Heiss, Alexander; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Hackeng, Tilman M; Schlieper, Georg; Harrison, Paul; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2017-03-01

    The drug warfarin blocks carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins and acts as an anticoagulant and an accelerant of vascular calcification. The calcification inhibitor MGP (matrix Gla [carboxyglutamic acid] protein), produced by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is a key target of warfarin action in promoting calcification; however, it remains unclear whether proteins in the coagulation cascade also play a role in calcification. Vascular calcification is initiated by exosomes, and proteomic analysis revealed that VSMC exosomes are loaded with Gla-containing coagulation factors: IX and X, PT (prothrombin), and proteins C and S. Tracing of Alexa488-labeled PT showed that exosome loading occurs by direct binding to externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) on the exosomal surface and by endocytosis and recycling via late endosomes/multivesicular bodies. Notably, the PT Gla domain and a synthetic Gla domain peptide inhibited exosome-mediated VSMC calcification by preventing nucleation site formation on the exosomal surface. PT was deposited in the calcified vasculature, and there was a negative correlation between vascular calcification and the levels of circulating PT. In addition, we found that VSMC exosomes induced thrombogenesis in a tissue factor-dependent and PS-dependent manner. Gamma-carboxylated coagulation proteins are potent inhibitors of vascular calcification suggesting warfarin action on these factors also contributes to accelerated calcification in patients receiving this drug. VSMC exosomes link calcification and coagulation acting as novel activators of the extrinsic coagulation pathway and inducers of calcification in the absence of Gla-containing inhibitors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Tumour-derived exosomes as a signature of pancreatic cancer - liquid biopsies as indicators of tumour progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzhat, Zarin; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Sharma, Shayna; Rice, Gregory E; Joshi, Virendra; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer in the world. It is known to have a poor prognosis, mostly because early stages of the disease are generally asymptomatic. Progress in pancreatic cancer research has been slow, leaving several fundamental questions pertaining to diagnosis and treatment unanswered. Recent studies highlight the putative utility of tissue-specific vesicles (i.e. extracellular vesicles) in the diagnosis of disease onset and treatment monitoring in pancreatic cancer. Extracellular vesicles are membrane-limited structures derived from the cell membrane. They contain specific molecules including proteins, mRNA, microRNAs and non-coding RNAs that are secreted in the extracellular space. Extracellular vesicles can be classified according to their size and/or origin into microvesicles (~150-1000 nm) and exosomes (~40-120 nm). Microvesicles are released by budding from the plasmatic membrane, whereas exosomes are released via the endocytic pathway by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasmatic membrane. This endosomal origin means that exosomes contain an abundance of cell-specific biomolecules which may act as a 'fingerprint' of the cell of origin. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, particularly the potential role of EVs in these facets of disease management. In particular, we suggest that as exosomes contain cellular protein and RNA molecules in a cell type-specific manner, they may provide extensive information about the signature of the tumour and pancreatic cancer progression.

  20. Effects of exosomes derived from MDA-MB-231 on proliferation of endothelial cells and the role of MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang LONG

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of exosomes derived from breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 on proliferation of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, and evaluate the role of MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway during the process. Methods  Exosomes were derived and purified from MDA-MB-231 by cryogenic ultracentrifugation and density gradient centrifugation. MTT assay was carried out for measurement of cell proliferation in HUVECs with exosome of 50, 100, 200 and 400μg/ml. The states of cell cycle of HUVECs co-cultured with 200μg/ml exosomes were detected by flow cytometry. The effects of 200μg/ml exosomes on the expression of ERK, Akt and phosphorylated ERK, Akt in HUVECs were detected with Western blotting. Results  Exosomes derived from MDA-MB-231 significantly promoted HUVECs proliferation in a classical time-and dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry revealed that, co-cultured with 200μg/ml exosomes for 24h, S-phase cells in HUVECs increased, while G1/S phase cells in HUVECs decreased. Western blotting showed that, cocultured with 200μg/ml exosomes for 24h, 48h and 72h, the expressions of phosphorylated ERK and Akt were up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. Conclusion  Exosomes derived from breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 may promote HUVECs proliferation, the changes in cell cycle and the continuous activation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathways may be the underlying mechanism.

  1. GMSC-Derived Exosomes Combined with a Chitosan/Silk Hydrogel Sponge Accelerates Wound Healing in a Diabetic Rat Skin Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Shi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Delayed wound healing in diabetic patients is one of the most challenging complications in clinical medicine, as it poses a greater risk of gangrene, amputation and even death. Therefore, a novel method to promote diabetic wound healing is of considerable interest at present. Previous studies showed that injection of MSC-derived exosomes has beneficial effects on wound healing. In current studies, we aimed to isolate exosomes derived from gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs and then loading them to the chitosan/silk hydrogel sponge to evaluate the effects of this novel non-invasive method on skin defects in diabetic rats.Methods: GMSCs were isolated from human gingival connective tissue and characterized by surface antigen analysis and in vitro multipotent differentiation. The cell supernatant was collected to isolate the exosomes. The exosomes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Western blot and size distribution analysis. The chitosan/silk-based hydrogel sponge was prepared using the freeze-drying method and then structural and physical properties were characterized. Then, the exosomes were added to the hydrogel and tested in a diabetic rat skin defect model. The effects were evaluated by wound area measurement, histological, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analysis.Results: We have successfully isolated GMSCs and exosomes with a mean diameter of 127 nm. The chitosan/silk hydrogel had the appropriate properties of swelling and moisture retention capacity. The in vivo studies showed that the incorporating of GMSC-derived exosomes to hydrogel could effectively promote healing of diabetic skin defects. The histological analysis revealed more neo-epithelium and collagen in the hydrogel-exosome group. In addition, the hydrogel-exosome group had the highest microvessel density and nerve density.Conclusions: The combination of GMSC-derived exosomes and hydrogel could effectively promote skin wound healing

  2. Adipose-Derived Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Ameliorate Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengzhi; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ding, Wei; Zeng, Qinyu; Liu, Wenbing; Huang, Can; He, Shuhua; Wei, Anyang

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in alleviating erectile dysfunction (ED) of diabetic rats has been demonstrated mainly through a paracrine effect. However, exosomes (EXOs), which are important bioactive substance vectors secreted by ADSCs, have never been associated with ED. To investigate the effect of ADSC-derived EXOs on erectile function in a type 2 diabetic ED rat model. EXOs were isolated from the supernatants of cultured ADSCs by ultracentrifugation. We constructed a type 2 diabetic rat model using a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin administered by intraperitoneal injection. In total, 24 diabetic rats were randomly assigned to three groups and were treated with an intracavernous injection of ADSC-derived EXOs, ADSCs, or phosphate buffered saline. Another eight age-matched rats underwent sham operation and composed the normal control group. Intracavernous pressure and mean arterial pressure testing and histologic and western blot analyses were performed 4 weeks after the intracavernous injection. ADSC-derived EXOs and ADSCs administered by intracavernous injection led to an increase in the ratio of intracavernous pressure to mean arterial pressure compared with that for phosphate buffered saline treatment. Histologic and western blot analyses demonstrated an increased ratio of smooth muscle to collagen, increased expression of an endothelial marker (CD31), a smooth muscle marker (α-smooth muscle actin), and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased the expression of the apoptotic protein cleaved caspase-3 and apoptosis of endothelial and smooth muscle cells in the corpus cavernosum tissue after EXO or ADSC injection compared with values for the phosphate buffered saline treatment. The present results are expected to provide a scientific foundation for clinical application in the near future. Although the results demonstrated that intracavernous injection of ADSC-derived EXOs could ameliorate ED of diabetic rats, the optimum dose

  3. Long Distance Metabolic Regulation through Adipose-Derived Circulating Exosomal miRNAs: A Trail for RNA-Based Therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Fatima

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs in regulating physiological and pathological states has been intensively elucidated during last 15 years. The discovery of circulating miRNAs (cir-miRNAs in variety of body fluids, is, however a recent focus of interest in understanding pathophysiological states of their originating cells/organs. Yet another stimulating debate that takes miRNAs to the next level is their presence in exosomes, and this is truly interesting area of research. Exosomes are cell-derived extracellular vesicles, and are naturally equipped biological vehicles that not only enable functional transfer of miRNAs between cells (horizontal transfer but also foster inter-organ communication, presumably guided by organ specific receptors—decorated on their surface. However, understandings on inter-organ communication elicited by tissue specific exosomal-miRNA fingerprints remain elusive. Recently, Thomou et al., has discovered that adipose tissue contributes a large fraction of adipose specific exosomal-miRNA fingerprints in blood circulation. Experimental evidence emphasize adipose tissue as major depot of cir-miRNAs that sail through blood flow and reach to distal organs—primarily in the liver, where they regulate gene expression of host tissue and elicit metabolic control. This appears to be a genetic form of adipokines (endocrine factors secreted from adipose tissue. We review such offshore metabolic insults, and make an effort to address few important missing links between miRNAs processing and their incorporation into exosomes. We provide potential perspectives on how this knowledge could be steered towards RNA-based therapeutics for monitoring complex metabolic diseases and beyond.

  4. Long Distance Metabolic Regulation through Adipose-Derived Circulating Exosomal miRNAs: A Trail for RNA-Based Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Farah; Nawaz, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating physiological and pathological states has been intensively elucidated during last 15 years. The discovery of circulating miRNAs (cir-miRNAs) in variety of body fluids, is, however a recent focus of interest in understanding pathophysiological states of their originating cells/organs. Yet another stimulating debate that takes miRNAs to the next level is their presence in exosomes, and this is truly interesting area of research. Exosomes are cell-derived extracellular vesicles, and are naturally equipped biological vehicles that not only enable functional transfer of miRNAs between cells (horizontal transfer) but also foster inter-organ communication, presumably guided by organ specific receptors—decorated on their surface. However, understandings on inter-organ communication elicited by tissue specific exosomal-miRNA fingerprints remain elusive. Recently, Thomou et al., has discovered that adipose tissue contributes a large fraction of adipose specific exosomal-miRNA fingerprints in blood circulation. Experimental evidence emphasize adipose tissue as major depot of cir-miRNAs that sail through blood flow and reach to distal organs—primarily in the liver, where they regulate gene expression of host tissue and elicit metabolic control. This appears to be a genetic form of adipokines (endocrine factors secreted from adipose tissue). We review such offshore metabolic insults, and make an effort to address few important missing links between miRNAs processing and their incorporation into exosomes. We provide potential perspectives on how this knowledge could be steered towards RNA-based therapeutics for monitoring complex metabolic diseases and beyond. PMID:28824444

  5. Exosomes Derived from Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Cells Are Internalized via Caveola-Dependent Endocytosis and Promote Phenotypic Modulation in Target Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Eri; Yoshida, Ryuji; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus, establishes a lifelong latent infection in B lymphocytes and epithelial cells following primary infection. Several lines of evidence suggest that exosomes derived from EBV-infected cells are internalized and transfer viral factors, including EBV-encoded latent membrane protein and microRNAs, to the recipient cells. However, the detailed mechanism by which exosomes are internalized and their physiological impact on the recipient cells are still poorly understood. In this study, we visualized the internalization of fluorescently labeled exosomes derived from EBV-uninfected and EBV-infected B cells of type I and type III latency into EBV-negative epithelial cells. In this way, we demonstrated that exosomes derived from all three cell types were internalized into the target cells in a similar fashion. Internalization of exosomes was significantly suppressed by treatment with an inhibitor of dynamin and also by the knockdown of caveolin-1. Labeled exosomes were colocalized with caveolae and subsequently trafficked through endocytic pathways. Moreover, we observed that exosomes derived from type III latency cells upregulated proliferation and expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in the recipient cells more significantly than did those derived from EBV-negative and type I latency cells. We also identified the EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) gene as responsible for induction of ICAM-1 expression. Taken together, our data indicate that exosomes released from EBV-infected B cells are internalized via caveola-dependent endocytosis, which, in turn, contributes to phenotypic changes in the recipient cells through transferring one or more viral factors. PMID:23864627

  6. Cardiac fibroblast-derived microRNA passenger strand-enriched exosomes mediate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bang, Claudia; Batkai, Sandor; Dangwal, Seema; Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Foinquinos, Ariana; Holzmann, Angelika; Just, Annette; Remke, Janet; Zimmer, Karina; Zeug, Andre; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Schmiedl, Andreas; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Halder, Rashi; Fischer, Andre; Engelhardt, Stefan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Schober, Andreas; Fiedler, Jan; Thum, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ...; however, miRNAs have emerged recently as paracrine signaling mediators. Thus, we investigated a potential paracrine miRNA crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes and found that cardiac fibroblasts secrete miRNA-enriched exosomes...

  7. Experimental, Systems, and Computational Approaches to Understanding the MicroRNA-Mediated Reparative Potential of Cardiac Progenitor Cell-Derived Exosomes From Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Udit; George, Alex; Bhutani, Srishti; Ghosh-Choudhary, Shohini; Maxwell, Joshua T; Brown, Milton E; Mehta, Yash; Platt, Manu O; Liang, Yaxuan; Sahoo, Susmita; Davis, Michael E

    2017-02-17

    Studies have demonstrated that exosomes can repair cardiac tissue post-myocardial infarction and recapitulate the benefits of cellular therapy. We evaluated the role of donor age and hypoxia of human pediatric cardiac progenitor cell (CPC)-derived exosomes in a rat model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Human CPCs from the right atrial appendages from children of different ages undergoing cardiac surgery for congenital heart defects were isolated and cultured under hypoxic or normoxic conditions. Exosomes were isolated from the culture-conditioned media and delivered to athymic rats after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Echocardiography at day 3 post-myocardial infarction suggested statistically improved function in neonatal hypoxic and neonatal normoxic groups compared with saline-treated controls. At 28 days post-myocardial infarction, exosomes derived from neonatal normoxia, neonatal hypoxia, infant hypoxia, and child hypoxia significantly improved cardiac function compared with those from saline-treated controls. Staining showed decreased fibrosis and improved angiogenesis in hypoxic groups compared with controls. Finally, using sequencing data, a computational model was generated to link microRNA levels to specific outcomes. CPC exosomes derived from neonates improved cardiac function independent of culture oxygen levels, whereas CPC exosomes from older children were not reparative unless subjected to hypoxic conditions. Cardiac functional improvements were associated with increased angiogenesis, reduced fibrosis, and improved hypertrophy, resulting in improved cardiac function; however, mechanisms for normoxic neonatal CPC exosomes improved function independent of those mechanisms. This is the first study of its kind demonstrating that donor age and oxygen content in the microenvironment significantly alter the efficacy of human CPC-derived exosomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Therapeutic Uses of Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharias E. Suntres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membrane vesicles with a diameter of 40–100 nm that are secreted by many cell types into the extracellular milieu. Exosomes are found in cell culture supernatants and in different biological fluids and are known to be secreted by most cell types under normal and pathological conditions. Considerable research is focusing on the exploitation of exosomes in biological fluids for biomarkers in the diagnosis of disease. More recently, exosomes are being exploited for their therapeutic potential. Exosomes derived from dendritic cells, tumor cells, and malignant effusions demonstrate immunomodulatory functions and are able to present antigens to T-cells and stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses. Exosomes have also been examined for their therapeutic potential in the treatment of infections such as toxoplasmosis, diphtheria, tuberculosis and atypical severe acute respiratory syndrome as well as autoimmune diseases. Attempts to find practical applications for exosomes continue to expand with the role of exosomes as a drug delivery system for the treatment of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases and cancers.

  9. Signaling Pathways in Exosomes Biogenesis, Secretion and Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Emiliani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles (30–100 nm derived from the endosomal system, which have raised considerable interest in the last decade. Several studies have shown that they mediate cell-to-cell communication in a variety of biological processes. Thus, in addition to cell-to-cell direct interaction or secretion of active molecules, they are now considered another class of signal mediators. Exosomes can be secreted by several cell types and retrieved in many body fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid. In addition to proteins and lipids, they also contain nucleic acids, namely mRNA and miRNA. These features have prompted extensive research to exploit them as a source of biomarkers for several pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. In this context, exosomes also appear attractive as gene delivery vehicles. Furthermore, exosome immunomodulatory and regenerative properties are also encouraging their application for further therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, several issues remain to be addressed: exosome biogenesis and secretion mechanisms have not been clearly understood, and physiological functions, as well as pathological roles, are far from being satisfactorily elucidated.

  10. Secretion modification region-derived peptide blocks exosome release and mediates cell cycle arrest in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Bo; Gonzalez, Ruben R; Lillard, James; Bond, Vincent C

    2017-02-14

    Discovery and development of a novel anticancer PEG-SMR-Clu peptide to prevent breast cancer metastasis. How breast cancer cells and primary mammary epithelial cells interact and communicate with each other to promote tumorigenesis and how to prevent tumor metastasis has long been a concern of researchers. Cancer cells secrete exosomes containing proteins and RNA. These factors can influence tumor development by directly targeting cancer cells and tumor stroma. In this study, we determined the effects of a peptide as an inhibitor of exosome secretion on breast tumors. We developed a peptide derived from the Secretion Modification Region (SMR) of HIV-1 Nef protein that was modified with PEG on the N-terminus and with a Clusterin (Clu)-binding peptide on the C-terminus. Attachment of PEG to the SMR peptide, termed PEGylation, offers improved water solubility and stability as well as reduced clearance through the kidneys, leading to a longer circulation time. The 12-mer Clu-binding peptide plays multiple roles in tumor development and metastasis. The Clu peptide can be detected by antibody in vivo, thus it has the potential to be used to monitor tumor status and treatment efficacy in animal studies and eventually in cancer patients. PEG-SMRwt-Clu and PEG-SMRwt peptides inhibited the growth of both of MCF-7 (estrogen responsive, ER+) and MDA-MD-231 (estrogen non-responsive, ER-) human breast cancer cells in a dose and time-dependent manner, without inducing cytotoxic effects. The SMRwt peptide, combined with paclitaxel, induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells but did not promote apoptosis. PEG-SMRwt-Clu peptide treatment blocked exosome release from both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. This effect was blocked by knockdown of the chaperone protein mortalin by either antibody or siRNA. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells were treated with PEG-SMR-Clu peptide alone and in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin. Cell proliferation and viabilty

  11. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes as maintenance immunotherapy after first line chemotherapy in NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Benjamin; Charrier, Mélinda; Lapierre, Valérie; Dansin, Eric; Lantz, Olivier; Planchard, David; Le Chevalier, Thierry; Livartoski, Alain; Barlesi, Fabrice; Laplanche, Agnès; Ploix, Stéphanie; Vimond, Nadège; Peguillet, Isabelle; Théry, Clotilde; Lacroix, Ludovic; Zoernig, Inka; Dhodapkar, Kavita; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Viaud, Sophie; Soria, Jean-Charles; Reiners, Katrin S.; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Vély, Frédéric; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Eggermont, Alexander; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cell-derived exosomes (Dex) are small extracellular vesicles secreted by viable dendritic cells. In the two phase-I trials that we conducted using the first generation of Dex (IFN-γ-free) in end-stage cancer, we reported that Dex exerted natural killer (NK) cell effector functions in patients. A second generation of Dex (IFN-γ-Dex) was manufactured with the aim of boosting NK and T cell immune responses. We carried out a phase II clinical trial testing the clinical benefit of IFN-γ-Dex loaded with MHC class I- and class II-restricted cancer antigens as maintenance immunotherapy after induction chemotherapy in patients bearing inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without tumor progression. The primary endpoint was to observe at least 50% of patients with progression-free survival (PFS) at 4 mo after chemotherapy cessation. Twenty-two patients received IFN-γ-Dex. One patient exhibited a grade three hepatotoxicity. The median time to progression was 2.2 mo and median overall survival (OS) was 15 mo. Seven patients (32%) experienced stabilization of >4 mo. The primary endpoint was not reached. An increase in NKp30-dependent NK cell functions were evidenced in a fraction of these NSCLC patients presenting with defective NKp30 expression. Importantly, MHC class II expression levels of the final IFN-γ-Dex product correlated with expression levels of the NKp30 ligand BAG6 on Dex, and with NKp30-dependent NK functions, the latter being associated with longer progression-free survival. This phase II trial confirmed the capacity of Dex to boost the NK cell arm of antitumor immunity in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:27141373

  12. Exosomes As Potential Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Colorectal Cancer: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kha Wai Hon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of colorectal cancer (CRC cases have increased gradually year by year. In fact, CRC is one of the most widely diagnosed cancer in men and women today. This disease is usually diagnosed at a later stage of the development, and by then, the chance of survival has declined significantly. Even though substantial progress has been made in understanding the basic molecular mechanism of CRC, there is still a lack of understanding in using the available information for diagnosing CRC effectively. Liquid biopsies are minimally invasive and have become the epitome of a good screening source for stage-specific diagnosis, measuring drug response and severity of the disease. There are various circulating entities that can be found in biological fluids, and among them, exosomes, have been gaining considerable attention. Exosomes can be found in almost all biological fluids including serum, urine, saliva, and breast milk. Furthermore, exosomes carry valuable molecular information such as proteins and nucleic acids that directly reflects the source of the cells. Nevertheless, the inconsistent yield and isolation process and the difficulty in obtaining pure exosomes have become major obstacles that need to be addressed. The potential usage of exosomes as biomarkers have not been fully validated and explored yet. This review attempts to uncover the potential molecules that can be derived from CRC-exosomes as promising biomarkers or molecular targets for effective diagnosing of CRC.

  13. Cancer Cell-derived Exosomes Induce Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-dependent Monocyte Survival by Transport of Functional Receptor Tyrosine Kinases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao; Ding, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Yang, Xiao; Zhao, Ruifang; Zhang, Yinlong; Zhao, Xiao; Anderson, Gregory J.; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play pivotal roles in cancer initiation and progression. Monocytes, the precursors of TAMs, normally undergo spontaneous apoptosis within 2 days, but can subsist in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment for continuous survival and generation of sufficient TAMs. The mechanisms underlying tumor-driving monocyte survival remain obscure. Here we report that cancer cell-derived exosomes were crucial mediators for monocyte survival in the inflammatory niche. Analysis of the survival-promoting molecules in monocytes revealed that cancer cell-derived exosomes activated Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, resulting in the prevention of caspase cleavage. Phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), such as phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), were abundantly expressed in cancer cell-derived exosomes. Knock-out of EGFR or/and HER-2, or alternatively, inhibitors against their phosphorylation significantly disturbed the exosome-mediated activation of the MAPK pathway, inhibition of caspase cleavage, and increase in survival rate in monocytes. Moreover, the deprived survival-stimulating activity of exosomes due to null expression of EGFR and HER-2 could be restored by activation of another RTK, insulin receptor. Overall, our study uncovered a mechanism of tumor-associated monocyte survival and demonstrated that cancer cell-derived exosomes can stimulate the MAPK pathway in monocytes through transport of functional RTKs, leading to inactivation of apoptosis-related caspases. This work provides insights into the long sought question on monocyte survival prior to formation of plentiful TAMs in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26895960

  14. MicroRNA-100 shuttled by mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes suppresses in vitro angiogenesis through modulating the mTOR/HIF-1α/VEGF signaling axis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakravan, Katayoon; Babashah, Sadegh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Mossahebi-Mohammadi, Majid; Ataei, Farangis; Dana, Nasim; Javan, Mohammad

    2017-10-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to be involved in the formation and modulation of tumor stroma and in interacting with tumor cells, partly through their secretome. Exosomes are nano-sized intraluminal multi-vesicular bodies secreted by most types of cells and have been found to mediate intercellular communication through the transfer of genetic information via coding and non-coding RNAs to recipient cells. Since exosomes are considered as protective and enriched sources of shuttle microRNAs (miRNAs), we hypothesized that exosomal transfer of miRNAs from MSCs may affect tumor cell behavior, particularly angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from MSCs were isolated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy analyses, dynamic light scattering measurements, and Western blotting. Fold changes in miR-100 expression levels were calculated in exosomes and their corresponding donor cells by qRT-PCR. The effects of exosomal transfer of miR-100 from MSCs were assessed by qRT-PCR and Western blotting of the mTOR/HIF-1α/VEGF signaling axis in breast cancer cells. The quantification of secreted VEGF protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The putative paracrine effects of MSC-derived exosomes on tumor angiogenesis were explored by in vitro angiogenesis assays including endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation assays. We found that MSC-derived exosomes induce a significant and dose-dependent decrease in the expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through modulating the mTOR/HIF-1α signaling axis in breast cancer-derived cells. We also found that miR-100 is enriched in MSC-derived exosomes and that its transfer to breast cancer-derived cells is associated with the down-regulation of VEGF in a time-dependent manner. The putative role of exosomal miR-100 transfer in regulating VEGF expression was substantiated by the ability of anti-miR-100 to rescue the inhibitory effects of MSC-derived

  15. Comparison of exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells and synovial membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yuchen; Zhao, Bizeng; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Li, Qing; Zhang, Juntao; Ding, Jian; Chen, Yunfeng; Wang, Yang

    2017-03-09

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. In the past decade, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used widely for the treatment of OA. A potential mechanism of MSC-based therapies has been attributed to the paracrine secretion of trophic factors, in which exosomes may play a major role. In this study, we aimed to compare the effectiveness of exosomes secreted by synovial membrane MSCs (SMMSC-Exos) and exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (iMSC-Exos) on the treatment of OA. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs and synovial membrane MSCs were characterized by flow cytometry. iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were isolated using an ultrafiltration method. Tunable resistive pulse-sensing analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and western blots were used to identify exosomes. iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were injected intra-articularly in a mouse model of collagenase-induced OA and the efficacy of exosome injections was assessed by macroscopic, histological, and immunohistochemistry analysis. We also evaluated the effects of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos on proliferation and migration of human chondrocytes by cell-counting and scratch assays, respectively. The majority of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were approximately 50-150 nm in diameter and expressed CD9, CD63, and TSG101. The injection of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos both attenuated OA in the mouse OA model, but iMSC-Exos had a superior therapeutic effect compared with SMMSC-Exos. Similarly, chondrocyte migration and proliferation were stimulated by both iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos, with iMSC-Exos exerting a stronger effect. The present study demonstrated that iMSC-Exos have a greater therapeutic effect on OA than SMMSC-Exos. Because autologous iMSCs are theoretically inexhaustible, iMSC-Exos may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of OA.

  16. Micro-RNA Profiling of Exosomes from Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Implications in Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ramirez, Juliana; Lavoie, Jessie R; Maganti, Harinad B; Stanford, William L; Ito, Caryn; Sabloff, Mitchell; Brand, Marjorie; Rosu-Myles, Michael; Le, Yevgeniya; Allan, David S

    2017-09-16

    Gene regulatory networks in AML may be influenced by microRNAs (miRs) contained in exosomes derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We sequenced miRs from exosomes isolated from marrow-derived MSCs from patients with AML (n = 3) and from healthy controls (n = 3; not age-matched). Known targets of mIRs that were significantly different in AML-derived MSC exosomes compared to controls were identified. Of the five candidate miRs identified by differential packaging in exosomes, only miR-26a-5p and miR-101-3p were significantly increased in AML-derived samples while miR-23b-5p, miR-339-3p and miR-425-5p were significantly decreased. Validation of the predicted change in gene expression of the potential targets was investigated by interrogating gene expression levels from public datasets of marrow-derived CD34-selected cells from patients with AML (n = 69) and healthy donors (n = 40). Two molecules with decreased gene expression in AML (EZH2 and GSK3β) were predicted by the miR profiling and have been previously implicated in AML while three molecules were increased in AML-derived cells and have not been previously associated with leukemogenesis (KRBA2, RRBP1 and HIST2H 2BE). In summary, profiling miRs in exosomes from AML-derived MSCs allowed us to identify candidate miRs with potential relevance in AML that could yield new insights regarding leukemogenesis or new treatment strategies.

  17. [Multilateral Strategies Utilizing Exosomes for Cancer Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida-Aoki, Nao; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2017-05-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized extracellular vesicles which transfer their components such as RNA, DNA, and proteins from one cell to another cell. The components are released to the cytoplasm of the recipient cells, having an effect on the cells. Cancerderived exosomes promote cancer progression, invasion, gain of drug resistance, and metastasis. Recently, according to their characteristics, it is expected to apply exosomes to cancer therapies, such as utilizing exosomes as drug delivery systems(DDS) for anticancer drugs and as cancer vaccines to enhance immunity to cancer cells. More, as the cancer-derived exosomes have cancer-promoting effects on multiple stages, inhibiting the function of the cancer-derived exosomes would be helpful to cancer therapies by suppressing cancer progression. DDS and cancer vaccines utilizing exosomes are now undergoing clinical studies, although DDS is suffering from loading efficiency. Treatments by inhibiting the functions of cancer-derived exosomes have still only few reports at experimental levels. Recently, we showed in a mouse model that disruption of cancer-derived exosomes by antibodies could suppress lung metastasis of the human breast cancer cells. Exosomes will provide us the multiple strategies to fight with cancer, which can be applied to cancers from many organs. It is important to confirm safety and overcome technical problems to bring exosomes in practical use.

  18. Cell to Cell Signalling via Exosomes Through esRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lotvall, Jan; Valadi, Hadi

    2007-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles of endosomal origin that can be released by many different cells to the microenvironment. Exosomes have been shown to participate in the immune system, by mediating antigen presentation. We have recently shown the presence of both mRNA and microRNA in exosomes, specifically in exosomes derived from mast cells. This RNA can be transferred between one mast cell to another, most likely through fusion of the exosome to the recipient cell membrane. The delivered RNA is ...

  19. Antimicrobial Nisin Acts Against Saliva Derived Multi-Species Biofilms without Cytotoxicity to Human Oral Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Lorraine Kapila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nisin is a lantibiotic widely used for the preservation of food and beverages. Recently, investigators have reported that nisin may have clinical applications for treating bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ultra pure food grade Nisin ZP (> 95% purity on taxonomically diverse bacteria common to the human oral cavity and saliva derived multi-species oral biofilms, and to discern the toxicity of nisin against human cells relevant to the oral cavity. Methods: The MICs and MBCs of taxonomically distinct oral bacteria were determined using agar and broth dilution methods. To assess the effects of nisin on biofilms, two model systems were utilized: a static and a controlled flow microfluidic system. Biofilms were inoculated with pooled human saliva and fed filter-sterilized saliva for 20-22 h at 37°C. Nisin effects on cellular apoptosis and proliferation were evaluated using acridine orange/ethidium bromide fluorescent nuclear staining and lactate dehydrogenase activity assays. Results: Nisin inhibited planktonic growth of oral bacteria at low concentrations (2.5 – 50 μg/ml. Nisin also retarded development of multi-species biofilms at concentrations ≥ 1 μg/ml. Specifically, under biofilm model conditions, nisin interfered with biofilm development and reduced biofilm biomass and thickness in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of pre-formed biofilms with nisin resulted in dose- and time-dependent disruption of the biofilm architecture along with decreased bacterial viability. Human cells relevant to the oral cavity were unaffected by the treatment of nisin at anti-biofilm concentrations and showed no signs of apoptotic changes unless treated with much higher concentrations (> 200 μg/ml. Conclusions: This work highlights the potential therapeutic value of high purity food grade nisin to inhibit the growth of oral bacteria and the development of biofilms relevant to oral diseases.

  20. Phosphoproteome Characterization of Human Colorectal Cancer SW620 Cell-Derived Exosomes and New Phosphosite Discovery for C-HPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiahui; Cui, Yizhi; Yan, Ziqi; Luo, Yanzhang; Zhang, Wanling; Deng, Suyuan; Tang, Shengquan; Zhang, Gong; He, Qing-Yu; Wang, Tong

    2016-11-04

    Identification of all phosphorylation forms of known proteins is a major goal of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP). Recent studies have found that certain phosphoproteins can be encapsulated in exosomes and function as key regulators in tumor microenvironment, but no deep coverage phosphoproteome of human exosomes has been reported to date, which makes the exosome a potential source for the new phosphosite discovery. In this study, we performed highly optimized MS analyses on the exosomal and cellular proteins isolated from human colorectal cancer SW620 cells. With stringent data quality control, 313 phosphoproteins with 1091 phosphosites were confidently identified from the SW620 exosome, from which 202 new phosphosites were detected. Exosomal phosphoproteins were significantly enriched in the 11q12.1-13.5 region of chromosome 11 and had a remarkably high level of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins (6.4%), which were functionally relevant to ephrin signaling pathway-directed cytoskeleton remodeling. In conclusion, we here report the first high-coverage phosphoproteome of human cell-secreted exosomes, which leads to the identification of new phosphosites for C-HPP. Our findings provide insights into the exosomal phosphoprotein systems that help to understand the signaling language being delivered by exosomes in cell-cell communications. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange consortium with the data set identifier PXD004079, and iProX database (accession number: IPX00076800).

  1. [Effects of human amniotic epithelial stem cells-derived exosomes on healing of wound with full-thickness skin defect in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, B; Wu, G F; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, W; Yang, F F; Xiao, D; Zeng, K X; Shi, J H; Su, L L; Hu, D H

    2017-01-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects of human amniotic epithelial stem cells-derived exosomes on healing of wound with full-thickness skin defect in rats. Methods: (1) Human amniotic epithelial stem cells were isolated from the amnion tissue of 5 full-term pregnant women in Department of Obstetrics of our hospital by the method of trypsin digestion, and their morphology was observed. The third passage of cells were stained with rhodamine-phalloidin for cytoskeleton observation. The third passage of cells were identified with flow cytometry through the detection of expressions of cell surface markers CD29, CD31, CD34, CD90, CD105, SSEA3, SSEA4 and immunity-related marker human leukocyte antigen-D related site (HLA-DR). The third passage of cells were also assessed the ability of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. (2) The third passage of human amniotic epithelial stem cells were cultured in DMEM medium supplemented with 10% exosome-free fetal bovine serum. Exosomes were isolated from culture supernatant by the method of ultracentrifugation and represented with scanning electron microscope for morphologic observation. (3) Six adult SD rats were anesthetized, and four 1 cm×1 cm sized wounds with full-thickness skin defect were made on the back of each rat. The wounds on the back of each rat were divided into control group, 25 μg/mL exosomes group, 50 μg/mL exosomes group, and 100 μg/mL exosomes group according to the random number table (with 6 wounds in each group), and a total volume of 100 μL phosphate buffered saline, 25 μg/mL exosomes, 50 μg/mL exosomes, and 100 μg/mL exosomes were evenly injected around the wound through multiple subcutaneous sites, respectively. The wound healing rate was calculated based on measurement on post injury day (PID) 7, 14, and 21. On PID 21, the healed wound tissue of each group was collected and stained with HE to observe and count skin accessories, and the arrangement of collagen fibers was observed with Masson

  2. Tetraspanin-3 regulates protective immunity against Eimera tenella infection following immunization with dendritic cell-derived exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of immunization with dendritic cell (DC) exosomes, which had been incubated or non-incubated with an anti-tetraspanin-3 (Tspan-3) blocking antibody (Ab), were studied using an experimental model of Eimeria tenella avian coccidiosis. Purified exosomes from cecal tonsil and splenic DCs exp...

  3. Cell-specific uptake of mantle cell lymphoma-derived exosomes by malignant and non-malignant B-lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Rosenblum, Daniel; Weinstein, Shiri; Bairey, Osnat; Raanani, Pia; Peer, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive and incurable mature B cell neoplasm. The current treatments are based on chemotherapeutics and new class of drugs (e.g. Ibrutinib®), which in most cases ends with tumor resistance and relapse. Therefore, further development of novel therapeutic modalities are needed. Exosomes are natural extracellular vesicles, which play an important role in intercellular communication. The specificity of exosome uptake by different target cells remains unknown. In this study, we observed that MCL exosomes are taken up rapidly and preferentially by MCL cells. Only minor fraction of exosomes was internalized into T-cell leukemia and bone marrow stroma cell lines, when these cells were co-cultured with MCL cells. Moreover, MCL patients’ exosomes were taken up by both healthy and patients’ B-lymphocytes with no apparent internalization to T lymphocytes and NK cells. Exosome internalization was not inhibited by specific siRNA against caveolin1 and clathrin but was found to be mediated by cholesterol-dependent pathway. These findings demonstrate natural specificity of exosomes to B-lymphocytes and ultimately might be used for therapeutic intervention in B cells malignancies. PMID:25933830

  4. microRNAs derived from circulating exosomes as noninvasive biomarkers for screening and diagnosing lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoli, Riccardo; Buttitta, Fiamma; Di Nicola, Marta; Malatesta, Sara; Marchetti, Antonio; Rom, William N; Pass, Harvey I

    2013-09-01

    Lung cancer is the highest cause of mortality among tumor pathologies worldwide. There are no validated techniques for an early detection of pulmonary cancer lesions other than low-dose helical computed tomography scan. Unfortunately, this method has some negative effects. Recent studies have laid the basis for development of exosomes-based techniques to screen/diagnose lung cancers. As the isolation of circulating exosomes is a minimally invasive procedure, this technique opens new possibilities for diagnostic applications. We used a first set of 30 plasma samples from as many patients, including 10 patients affected by lung adenocarcinomas, 10 with lung granulomas, and 10 healthy smokers matched for age and sex as negative controls. Wide-range microRNAs analysis (742 microRNAs) was performed by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Data were compared on the basis of lesion characteristics, using WEKA software for statistics and modeling. Subsequently, selected microRNAs were evaluated on an independent larger group of samples (105 specimens: 50 lung adenocarcinomas, 30 lung granulomas, and 25 healthy smokers). This analysis led to the selection of four microRNAs to perform a screening test (miR-378a, miR-379, miR-139-5p, and miR-200b-5p), useful to divide population into two groups: nodule (lung adenocarcinomas + carcinomas) and non-nodule (healthy former smokers). Six microRNAs (miR-151a-5p, miR-30a-3p, miR-200b-5p, miR-629, miR-100, and miR-154-3p) were selected for a second test on the nodule population to discriminate between lung adenocarcinoma and granuloma. The screening test showed 97.5% sensitivity, 72.0% specificity, and area under the curve receiver operating characteristic of 90.8%. The diagnostic test had 96.0% sensitivity, 60.0% specificity, and area under the curve receiver operating characteristic of 76.0%. Further evaluation is needed to confirm the predictive power of these models on larger cohorts of samples.

  5. Exosomes derived from miR-140-5p-overexpressing human synovial mesenchymal stem cells enhance cartilage tissue regeneration and prevent osteoarthritis of the knee in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shi-Cong; Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Yue-Lei; Yin, Wen-Jing; Guo, Shang-Chun; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease throughout the world. Exosomes derived from miR-140-5p-overexpressing synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSC-140s) may be effective in treating OA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from SMSC-140 (SMSC-140-Exos) would enhance the proliferation and migration abilities of articular chondrocytes (ACs) without harming extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. SMSCs were transfected with or without miR-140-5p. Exosomes derived from SMSCs or SMSC-140s (SMSC-Exos or SMSC-140-Exos) were isolated and identified. Proliferation, migration and ECM secretion were measured in vitro and compared between groups. The mechanism involving alternative Wnt signalling and activation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) was investigated using lentivirus, oligonucleotides or chemical drugs. The preventative effect of exosomes in vivo was measured using Safranin-O and Fast green staining and immunohistochemical staining. Wnt5a and Wnt5b carried by exosomes activated YAP via the alternative Wnt signalling pathway and enhanced proliferation and migration of chondrocytes with the side-effect of significantly decreasing ECM secretion. Highly-expressed miR-140-5p blocked this side-effect via RalA. SMSC-140-Exos enhanced the proliferation and migration of ACs without damaging ECM secretion in vitro, while in vivo, SMSC-140-Exos successfully prevented OA in a rat model. These findings highlight the promising potential of SMSC-140-Exos in preventing OA. We first found a potential source of exosomes and studied their merits and shortcomings. Based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism, we overcame the shortcomings by modifying the exosomes. Such exosomes derived from modified cells hold potential as future therapeutic strategies.

  6. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  7. Exosomes derived from platelet-rich plasma promote the re-epithelization of chronic cutaneous wounds via activation of YAP in a diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shang-Chun; Tao, Shi-Cong; Yin, Wen-Jing; Qi, Xin; Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Chronic wounds have become an economic, social, and public health burden and need advanced treatment. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used extensively in treatment of chronic wounds because it contains an abundance of growth factors secreted by platelets. The exosomes derived from PRP (PRP-Exos) have been proven to encapsulate principal growth factors from platelets. This study is the first to show that these exosomes may exert the function of PRP. PRP-Exos can effectively induce proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and fibroblasts to improve angiogenesis and re-epithelialization in chronic wounds. We regulated YAP to verify the PRP-Exos-dependent effect on fibroblast proliferation and migration through YAP activation. In vivo, we observed the cutaneous healing process in chronic wounds treated with PRP-Exos in a diabetic rat model. We provide evidence of the probable molecular mechanisms underlying the PRP effect on healing of chronic ulcers and describe a promising resource of growth factors from exosomes without species restriction.

  8. Exosomes in tumor microenvironment: novel transporters and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Jin-Lu; Tian, Lei

    2016-10-19

    Tumor microenvironment (TME) plays an integral part in the biology of cancer, participating in tumor initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Exosome is an important part of TME. Exosomes are small vesicles formed in vesicular bodies with a diameter of 30-100 nm and a classic "cup" or "dish" morphology. They can contain microRNAs, mRNAs, DNA fragments and proteins, which are shuttled from a donor cell to recipient cells. Exosomes secreted from tumor cells are called tumor-derived (TD) exosomes. There is emerging evidence that TD exosomes can construct a fertile environment to support tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and premetastatic niche preparation. TD exosomes also may facilitate tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting immune surveillance and by increasing chemoresistance via removal of chemotherapeutic drugs. Therefore, TD-exosomes might be potential targets for therapeutic interventions via their modification or removal. For example, exosomes can serve as specific delivery vehicles to tumors of drugs, small molecules, or agents of prevention and gene therapy. Furthermore, the biomarkers detected in exosomes of biological fluids imply a potential for exosomes in the early detection and diagnosis, prediction of therapeutic efficacy, and determining prognosis of cancer. Although exosomes may serve as cancer biomarkers and aid in the treatment of cancer, we have a long way to go before we can further enhance the anti-tumor therapy of exosomes and develop exosome-based cancer diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  9. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  10. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mark, Milica Tesic; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E.; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M.; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D.; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H.; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K.; Healey, John H.; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H.; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brady, Mary S.; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J.; Bissell, Mina J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis. PMID:26524530

  11. The analysis of exosomal micro-RNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived macrophages after infection with bacillus Calmette-Guérin by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Alipoor, Shamila D; Tabarsi, Payam; Adcock, Ian M; Garssen, Johan; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global threat to human health, especially in low-income countries. The diagnosis of TB is challenging because of the limitations of specificity and sensitivity with the current diagnostics. Novel, selective biomarkers for TB would be of great practical value. Exosomes are bioactive vesicles with 30-100nm in diameter, which are secreted from almost all cell types and are found in virtually every human body fluid. Exosomes transport micro-RNAs (miRNAs), which are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, around the body and allow miRNAs to modulate biological pathways in target cells. Our aim was to investigate the potential of exosomal miRNAs as biomarkers by examining their release from human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) after infection with Mycobacterium using miRNA sequencing. Human monocytes were obtained from blood and driven to an MDM phenotype using standard protocols. MDMs were infected with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or left uninfected as control. Exosomes were collected 72 h postinfection from the cell culture medium and subjected to RNA isolation. Small RNA libraries were constructed and RNA sequencing performed. The raw reads were filtered to eliminate adaptor and primer sequences, and the sequences in FASTQ format were run against the mature human miRNA sequences available in miRBase using BLAST software using a Linux operating system. Micro-RNAs were identified using E=0.01 or 1. Infection of MDMs with BCG lead to the release of a number of exosomal miRNAs. These mainly consisted with Let-7 family members, miR-155, miR-146a, miR-145, and miR-21 all of which were predicted to target important immune-related genes and pathways. This study provides evidence for the release of specific miRNAs from BCG-infected MDMs. These results need to be confirmed and the presence of this panel of miRNAs tested in the blood of patients to determine their selectivity and specificity as a diagnostic in

  12. 3D plasmonic nanobowl platform for the study of exosomes in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changwon; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Smith, Zachary J.; Knudson, Alisha; Robertson, Christopher S.; Lam, Kit S.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-05-01

    Thin silver film coated nanobowl Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates are used to capture exosomes in solution for SERS measurements that can provide biochemical analysis of intact and ruptured exosomes. Exosomes derived via Total Exosome Isolation Reagent (TEIR) as well as ultracentrifugation (UC) from the SKOV3 cell line were analyzed. Spectra of exosomes derived via TEIR are dominated by a signal characteristic for the TEIR kit that needs to be subtracted for all measurements. Differences in SERS spectra recorded at different times during the drying of the exosome solution are statistically analyzed with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). At the beginning of the drying process, SERS spectra of exosomes exhibit peaks characteristic for both lipids and proteins. Later on during the drying process, new SERS peaks develop, suggesting that the initially intact exosome ruptures over time. This time-dependent evolution of SERS peaks enables analysis of exosomal membrane contents and the contents inside the exosomes.

  13. Placental Exosomes as Early Biomarker of Preeclampsia: Potential Role of Exosomal MicroRNAs Across Gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Carlos; Guanzon, Dominic; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Longo, Sherri; Correa, Paula; Illanes, Sebastian E; Rice, Gregory E

    2017-09-01

    There is a need to develop strategies for early prediction of patients who will develop preeclampsia (PE) to establish preventive strategies to reduce the prevalence and severity of the disease and their associated complications. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exosomes and their microRNA cargo present in maternal circulation can be used as early biomarker for PE. A retrospective stratified study design was used to quantify total exosomes and placenta-derived exosomes present in maternal plasma of normal (n = 32 per time point) and PE (n = 15 per time point) pregnancies. Exosomes present in maternal circulation were determined by nanoparticle tracking analysis. An Illumina TruSeq® Small RNA Library Prep Kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from plasma samples. In presymptomatic women, who subsequently developed PE, the concentration of total exosomes and placenta-derived exosomes in maternal plasma was significantly greater than those observed in controls, throughout pregnancy. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for total exosome and placenta-derived exosome concentrations were 0.745 ± 0.094 and 0.829 ± 0.077, respectively. In total, over 300 microRNAs were identified in exosomes across gestation, where hsa-miR-486-1-5p and hsa-miR-486-2-5p were identified as the candidate microRNAs. Although the role of exosomes during PE remains to be fully elucidated, we suggest that the concentration and content of exosomes may be of diagnostic utility for women at risk for developing PE.

  14. Exosomes: From Garbage Bins to Promising Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H Rashed, Mohammed; Bayraktar, Emine; K Helal, Gouda; Abd-Ellah, Mohamed F; Amero, Paola; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian

    2017-03-02

    Intercellular communication via cell-released vesicles is a very important process for both normal and tumor cells. Cell communication may involve exosomes, small vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by all types of cells and are found in abundance in body fluids, including blood, saliva, urine, and breast milk. Exosomes have been shown to carry lipids, proteins, mRNAs, non-coding RNAs, and even DNA out of cells. They are more than simply molecular garbage bins, however, in that the molecules they carry can be taken up by other cells. Thus, exosomes transfer biological information to neighboring cells and through this cell-to-cell communication are involved not only in physiological functions such as cell-to-cell communication, but also in the pathogenesis of some diseases, including tumors and neurodegenerative conditions. Our increasing understanding of why cells release exosomes and their role in intercellular communication has revealed the very complex and sophisticated contribution of exosomes to health and disease. The aim of this review is to reveal the emerging roles of exosomes in normal and pathological conditions and describe the controversial biological role of exosomes, as it is now understood, in carcinogenesis. We also summarize what is known about exosome biogenesis, composition, functions, and pathways and discuss the potential clinical applications of exosomes, especially as biomarkers and novel therapeutic agents.

  15. Exosomal transfer of stroma-derived miR21 confers paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells through targeting APAF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au Yeung, Chi Lam; Co, Ngai-Na; Tsuruga, Tetsushi; Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Kwan, Suet-Ying; Leung, Cecilia S; Li, Yong; Lu, Edward S; Kwan, Kenny; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Lu, Karen H; Mok, Samuel C

    2016-03-29

    Advanced ovarian cancer usually spreads to the visceral adipose tissue of the omentum. However, the omental stromal cell-derived molecular determinants that modulate ovarian cancer growth have not been characterized. Here, using next-generation sequencing technology, we identify significantly higher levels of microRNA-21 (miR21) isomiRNAs in exosomes and tissue lysates isolated from cancer-associated adipocytes (CAAs) and fibroblasts (CAFs) than in those from ovarian cancer cells. Functional studies reveal that miR21 is transferred from CAAs or CAFs to the cancer cells, where it suppresses ovarian cancer apoptosis and confers chemoresistance by binding to its direct novel target, APAF1. These data suggest that the malignant phenotype of metastatic ovarian cancer cells can be altered by miR21 delivered by exosomes derived from neighbouring stromal cells in the omental tumour microenvironment, and that inhibiting the transfer of stromal-derived miR21 is an alternative modality in the treatment of metastatic and recurrent ovarian cancer.

  16. Characterization of Membrane Integrity and Morphological Stability of Human Salivary Exosomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumeda, Nahoko; Ogawa, Yuko; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Kawakami, Hayato; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Yanoshita, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    .... Moreover, intact exosomes could be isolated from whole saliva that had been stored at 4°C. Membrane disruption with detergents such as Triton X-100 and Nonidet P-40 caused partial solubilization of DPP IV and release...

  17. Spleen-dependent immune protection elicited by CpG adjuvanted reticulocyte-derived exosomes from malaria infection is associated with T cells population changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Martin-Jaular

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Reticulocyte-derived exosomes (rex are 30-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin released during the maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. Combination of CpG-ODN with rex obtained from BALB/c mice infected with the reticulocyte-prone non-lethal P. yoelii 17X malaria strain (rexPy, had been shown to induce survival and long lasting protection. Here, we show that splenectomized mice are not protected upon rexPy+CpG inmunizations and that protection is restored upon passive transfer of splenocytes obtained from animals immunized with rexPy+CpG. Notably, rexPy immunization of mice induced PD1- memory T cell expansion with effector phenotype. Proteomics analysis of rexPy confirmed their reticulocyte origin and demonstrated the presence of parasite antigens. Our studies thus prove, for what we believe is the first time, that rex from reticulocyte-prone malarial infections are able to induce splenic long-lasting memory responses. To try extrapolating these data to human infections, in vitro experiments with spleen cells of human transplantation donors were performed. Plasma-derived exosomes from vivax malaria patients (exPv were actively uptaken by human splenocytes and stimulated spleen cells leading to expansion of T-cells.

  18. Prospects for exosomes in immunotherapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, G; Roux, S; Thery, Clotilde; Ségura, Elodie; Zitvogel, L

    2006-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer sized membrane vesicles invaginating from multivesicular bodies and secreted from epithelial and hematopoietic cells. They were first described “in vitro” but vesicles with the hallmarks of exosomes are present in vivo in germinal centers and biological fluids. Their protein and lipid composition are unique and could account for their expanding functions such as eradication of obsolete proteins, antigen presentation or “Trojan horses” for viruses or prions. Exosome secretion could be a regulated process participating in the transfer of molecules inbetween immune cells. Despite numerous questions pertaining to their biological relevance, the potential of dendritic cell derived-exosomes as cell-free cancer vaccines is currently being assessed. This review will summarize the composition and formation of exosomes, preclinical data, Phase I trials and optimization protocols for improving their immunogenicity in tumor bearing patients. PMID:16796806

  19. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-04-18

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL.

  20. Placental exosomes in normal and complicated pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Murray D; Peiris, Hassendrini N; Kobayashi, Miharu; Koh, Yong Q; Duncombe, Gregory; Illanes, Sebastian E; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    While there is considerable contemporary interest in elucidating the role of placenta-derived extracellular vesicles in normal and complicated pregnancies and their utility as biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, progress in the field is hindered by a lack of standardized extracellular vesicle taxonomy and isolation protocols. The term "extracellular vesicle" is nonspecific and refers to all membrane-bound vesicles from nanometer to micrometer diameters and of different biogenic origins. To meaningfully ascribe biological function and/or diagnostic and therapeutic utility to extracellular vesicles, and in particular exosomes, greater specificity and vesicle characterization is required. The current literature relating to exosome biology must be interpreted in this context. Exosomes are a subtype of extracellular vesicle that are specifically defined by an endosomal biogenesis and particle size (40-120 nm) and density (1.13-1.19 g/mL(-1)). Exosomes are specifically package with signaling molecules (including protein, messenger RNA, microRNA, and noncoding RNA) and are released by exocytosis into biofluid compartments. Exosomes regulate the activity of both proximal and distal target cells, including translational activity, angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis. As such, exosomal signaling represents an integral pathway mediating intercellular communication. During pregnancy, the placenta releases exosomes into the maternal circulation from as early as 6 weeks of gestation. Release is regulated by factors that include both oxygen tension and glucose concentration and correlates with placental mass and perfusion. The concentration of placenta-derived exosomes in maternal plasma increases progressively during gestation. Exosomes isolated from maternal plasma are bioactive in vitro and are incorporated into target cells by endocytosis. While the functional significance of placental exosomes in pregnancy remains to be fully elucidated, available

  1. Pseudotyping exosomes for enhanced protein delivery in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Conary; Losacco, Joseph; Stickney, Zachary; Li, Lingxuan; Marriott, Gerard; Lu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are cell-derived nanovesicles that hold promise as living vehicles for intracellular delivery of therapeutics to mammalian cells. This potential, however, is undermined by the lack of effective methods to load exosomes with therapeutic proteins and to facilitate their uptake by target cells. Here, we demonstrate how a vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) can both load protein cargo onto exosomes and increase their delivery ability via a pseudotyping mechanism. By fusing a set of fluorescent and luminescent reporters with VSVG, we show the successful targeting and incorporation of VSVG fusions into exosomes by gene transfection and fluorescence tracking. We subsequently validate our system by live cell imaging of VSVG and its participation in endosomes/exosomes that are ultimately released from transfected HEK293 cells. We show that VSVG pseudotyping of exosomes does not affect the size or distributions of the exosomes, and both the full-length VSVG and the VSVG without the ectodomain are shown to integrate into the exosomal membrane, suggesting that the ectodomain is not required for protein loading. Finally, exosomes pseudotyped with full-length VSVG are internalized by multiple-recipient cell types to a greater degree compared to exosomes loaded with VSVG without the ectodomain, confirming a role of the ectodomain in cell tropism. In summary, our work introduces a new genetically encoded pseudotyping platform to load and enhance the intracellular delivery of therapeutic proteins via exosome-based vehicles to target cells.

  2. Comparison of Non-Coding RNAs in Exosomes and Functional Efficacy of Human Embryonic Stem Cell- versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Hee; Chen, Wen-Yi; Shao, Ning-Yi; Xiao, Dan; Qin, Xulei; Baker, Natalie; Bae, Hye Ryeong; Wei, Tzu-Tang; Wang, Yongjun; Shukla, Praveen; Wu, Haodi; Kodo, Kazuki; Ong, Sang-Ging; Wu, Joseph C

    2017-10-01

    Both human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs) and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs (iPSC-CMs) can serve as unlimited cell sources for cardiac regenerative therapy. However, the functional equivalency between human ESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs for cardiac regenerative therapy has not been demonstrated. Here, we performed a head-to-head comparison of ESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs in their ability to restore cardiac function in a rat myocardial infarction (MI) model as well as their exosomal secretome. Human ESCs and iPSCs were differentiated into CMs using small molecule inhibitors. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed ∼85% and ∼83% of CMs differentiated from ESCs and iPSCs, respectively, were positive for cardiac troponin T. At a single-cell level, both cell types displayed similar calcium handling and electrophysiological properties, with gene expression comparable with the human fetal heart marked by striated sarcomeres. Sub-acute transplantation of ESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs into nude rats post-MI improved cardiac function, which was associated with increased expression of angiogenic genes in vitro following hypoxia. Profiling of exosomal microRNAs (miRs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) revealed that both groups contain an identical repertoire of miRs and lncRNAs, including some that are known to be cardioprotective. We demonstrate that both ESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs can facilitate comparable cardiac repair. This is advantageous because, unlike allogeneic ESC-CMs used in therapy, autologous iPSC-CMs could potentially avoid immune rejection when used for cardiac cell transplantation in the future. Stem Cells 2017;35:2138-2149. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Exosomes in Tumor Microenvironment Influence Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlert, Christoph; Kalluri, Raghu

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin with a size of 50 – 100 nm. They can contain microRNAs, mRNAs, DNA fragments and proteins, which are shuttled from a donar cell to recipient cells. Many different cell types including immune cells, mesenchymal cells and cancer cells release exosomes. There is emerging evidence that cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and reprogramming of constituents associated with tumor environment. Here, we discuss different mechani...

  4. Exosomes and Cardiovascular Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Sean M; Takov, Kaloyan; Yellon, Derek M

    2017-02-01

    Most, if not all, cells of the cardiovascular system secrete small, lipid bilayer vesicles called exosomes. Despite technical challenges in their purification and analysis, exosomes from various sources have been shown to be powerfully cardioprotective. Indeed, it is possible that much of the so-called "paracrine" benefit in cardiovascular function obtained by stem cell therapy can be replicated by the injection of exosomes produced by stem cells. However, exosomes purified from plasma appear to be just as capable of activating cardioprotective pathways. We discuss the potential roles of endogenous exosomes in the cardiovascular system, how this is perturbed in cardiovascular disease, and evaluate their potential as therapeutic agents to protect the heart.

  5. Exosomes: Mechanisms of Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J. McKelvey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are 30–100 nm microvesicles which contain complex cellular signals of RNA, protein and lipids. Because of this, exosomes are implicated as having limitless therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer, pregnancy complications, infections, and autoimmune diseases. To date we know a considerable amount about exosome biogenesis and secretion, but there is a paucity of data regarding the uptake of exosomes by immune and non-immune cell types (e.g., cancer cells and the internal signalling pathways by which these exosomes elicit a cellular response. Answering these questions is of paramount importance.

  6. Exosomes: Mechanisms of Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J. McKelvey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are 30–100 nm microvesicles which contain complex cellular signals of RNA, protein and lipids. Because of this, exosomes are implicated as having limitless therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer, pregnancy complications, infections, and autoimmune diseases. To date we know a considerable amount about exosome biogenesis and secretion, but there is a paucity of data regarding the uptake of exosomes by immune and non- immune cell types (e.g., cancer cells and the internal signalling pathways by which these exosomes elicit a cellular response. Answering these questions is of para‐ mount importance.

  7. Sticky Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Louise; Solomon, Michael; Schultz, William

    2016-11-01

    Oral and even systemic health begins with healthy saliva by maintaining antibacterial activity, lubricating hard and soft oral tissues, healing, tasting, chewing, and swallowing. Saliva functionality is intimately linked to its rheology. Alterations in saliva rheology may indicate or cause unhealthy biological function. One imprecise pathological designation is "sticky saliva", usually self-reported or qualitatively described by health professionals. Saliva is 99% water and therefore behaves like water in shear. Saliva also contains mucins, electrolytes, enzymes, hormones, and antibodies. These additional constituents enable saliva to form a long-lasting filament with a "beads-on-a-string" morphology in extension. Therefore, the main kinematic feature that distinguishes the coupling between the oral cavity and saliva elongational mechanics. We investigate the effect of pH and salinity on saliva filament formation with preliminary experiments and compare to 1D unsteady viscoelastic models. We discuss the results in the context of saliva functionality and in generating more satisfactory saliva substitutes for those suffering from xerostomia. We will discuss when beads-on-a-string are likely to occur.

  8. The emerging roles of exosomes in tumor-stroma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hailong; Yang, Huan; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    The tumor-stroma interaction is critical for the development and progression of cancer. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), one of the major components of the tumor stroma, can promote tumor growth and metastasis. Exosomes are secreted microvesicles that mediate cell-to-cell communication. Exosomal contents, including proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids, can be shuttled from donor cells to target cells. Recent studies suggest that exosomes play important roles in the tumor-stroma interaction. Herein, we review the multifaceted roles of exosomes in the tumor-stroma interaction and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Literature search for all relevant publications was performed on PubMed databases. The keywords of exosomes, tumor, stroma, CAFs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and other closely related terms were used for searching. Tumor cell-derived exosomes induce the differentiation of fibroblasts and MSCs into CAFs. In turn, exosomes secreted by CAFs promote tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance through distinct mechanisms. Moreover, exosomes from stromal cells can be used as therapeutic vehicles for the delivery of anticancer drugs. Tumor cells communicate with CAFs through exosomes, which establishes a bidirectional cross talk to promote tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. Targeting exosomes in tumor-stroma interaction may have important implications for anticancer therapy.

  9. Tumour exosomes from cells harbouring PTPRZ1-MET fusion contribute to a malignant phenotype and temozolomide chemoresistance in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, A-L; Yan, W; Liu, Y-W; Wang, Z; Hu, Q; Nie, E; Zhou, X; Li, R; Wang, X-F; Jiang, T; You, Y-P

    2017-09-21

    Exosomes are carriers of pro-tumorigenic factors that participate in glioblastoma (GBM) progression, and many fusion genes are strong driver mutations in neoplasia and are involved in tumorigenesis. However, the ability of fusion genes to be transduced by exosomes is unknown. We characterized exosomes from GBM cells harbouring and not harbouring PTPRZ1-MET fusion (ZM fusion). We also determined the effect of the exosomes from ZM fusion cells (ZM exosomes) on pro-oncogenic secretions and showed that ZM exosomes are internalized by the recipient cells. In addition, we studied the effect of ZM exosome-mediated intercellular communication in the GBM microenvironment. MET proto-oncogene expression was higher in ZM exosomes. Moreover, phosphorylated MET was detected only in ZM exosomes and not in exosomes released by non-ZM fusion GBM cells. ZM exosomes transferred to non-ZM fusion GBM cells and normal human astrocytes altered gene expression and induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The uptake of ZM exosomes also induced an exosome-dependent phenotype defined by GBM cell migration and invasion, neurosphere growth and angiogenesis. In addition, ZM exosomes conferred temozolomide resistance to the GBM cells, and exosome-derived ZM fusion network proteins targeted multiple pro-oncogenic effectors in recipient cells within the GBM microenvironment. Our findings show that exosomes mediate the aggressive character of GBM and demonstrate the role of ZM fusion in the exacerbation of this effect. These findings have possible implications for the foundation of gene fusion-based therapy for managing GBM.

  10. Functional Roles and Therapeutic Applications of Exosomes in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Santangelo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are important in intercellular communication. They assure the horizontal transfer of specific functional contents (i.e., proteins, lipids, RNA molecules, and circulating DNA from donor to recipient cells. Notably, tumor-derived exosomes (TDEs appear to be an important vehicle of specific signals in cancer, impacting on tumor growth and metastasis. Recent researches point to the characterization of exosomes in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC, the major adult liver malignancy. In this review, we summarize current findings on HCC exosomes, focusing on the identification of noncoding RNAs as exosome-enriched functional regulators and new potential biomarkers. The great potential of exosomes in future HCC diagnostic and therapeutic approaches is underlined.

  11. Exosomes in cancer theranostic: Diamonds in the rough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Marine; Chanteloup, Gaëtan; Isambert, Nicolas; Seigneuric, Renaud; Fumoleau, Pierre; Garrido, Carmen; Gobbo, Jessica

    2017-03-04

    During the last 10 years, exosomes, which are small vesicles of 50-200 nm diameter of endosomal origin, have aroused a great interest in the scientific and clinical community for their roles in intercellular communication in almost all physiological and pathological processes. Most cells can potentially release these nanovesicles that share with the parent cell a similar lipid bilayer with transmembrane proteins and a panel of enclosed soluble proteins such as heat shock proteins and genetic material, thus acting as potential nanoshuttles of biomarkers. Exosomes surface proteins allow their targeting and capture by recipient cells, while the exosomes' content can modify the physiological state of recipient cells. Tumor derived exosomes by interacting with other cells of the tumor microenvironment modulate tumor progression, angiogenic switch, metastasis, and immune escape. Targeting tumor-derived exosomes might be an interesting approach in cancer therapy. Furthermore, because a key issue to improve cancer patients' outcome relies on earlier cancer diagnosis (metastases, as opposed to the primary tumor, are responsible for most cancer deaths) exosomes have been put forward as promising biomarker candidates for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. This review summarizes the roles of exosomes in cancer and clinical interest, focusing on the importance of exosomal heat shock proteins (HSP). The challenges of clinical translation of HSP-exosomes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers for early cancer detection are also discussed.

  12. Exosomes in Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasini, Nora; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2017-06-01

    Exosomes are small, cell-released vesicles (40-100 nm in size) with the potential to transfer proteins, lipids, small RNAs, messenger RNAs, or DNA between cells via interstitial fluids. Due to their role in tissue homeostasis, exosomes have emerged as a new type of therapeutic and diagnostic (theranostic) tool in the noninvasive assessment of organ response to injury or treatment and in the development of reliable organ-protective intensive therapy. Our review provides current insights into the role of exosomes in the personalized management of injury and repair responses in critical illness. Data were obtained from a PubMed search of the most recent medical literature, including the PubMed "related articles" search methodology. Articles considered include original articles, review articles and conference proceedings. A detailed review of scientific, peer-reviewed data was performed. Relevant pre-clinical and clinical studies were included and summarized. Current scientific evidence is focused on the following: 1) Frontiers in the management of critical illness; 2) Biogenesis, characterization, and function of circulating exosomes; 3) The role of exosomes in acute lung injury; 4) The role of exosomes in acute cardiac injury; 5) The role of exosomes in acute kidney injury; 6) The role of exosomes in sepsis; 7) Limitations of exosome isolation protocols; and 8) Perspectives in the theranostic use of exosomes. Circulating levels of exosomes are associated with the onset and clinical course of critical illness. Exosomes released from cells with different phenotypes exert different functions in order to protect tissue and preserve organ function. Therefore, multifunctional exosomes with combined diagnostic and therapeutic functions show great promise in terms of personalized nanomedicine for patient-specific diagnosis and treatment of critical illness.

  13. Saliva as a potential diagnostic tool

    OpenAIRE

    T Deepa; N Thirrunavukkarasu

    2010-01-01

    Saliva is a complex fluid consisting of secretions from the major and minor salivary glands. Gland-specific saliva can be used to diagnose any pathology from the specific major salivary gland. Whole saliva has serum constituents that are derived from the local vasculature of the salivary glands and gingival crevicular fluid. Saliva, as a diagnostic fluid, has distinctive advantages over serum as whole saliva can be collected non-invasively by individuals with limited training using simple equ...

  14. Placental exosomes and pre-eclampsia: Maternal circulating levels in normal pregnancies and, early and late onset pre-eclamptic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Preenan; Maharaj, Niren; Moodley, Jagidesa; Mackraj, Irene

    2016-10-01

    Exosomes are a subtype of extracellular vesicle (20-130 nm) released by biological cells under normal and pathological conditions. Although there have been reports of circulating exosomes in normal pregnancy, the relevance of placental-derived exosomes in normal and abnormal pregnancies still needs to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to quantify total and placental-derived exosomes in maternal plasma from normal (N), early onset- and late onset-preeclampsia (PE). Plasma samples were obtained from pregnant women in the third trimester, for the isolation of exosomes by differential ultracentrifugation. Total exosomes were quantified using nanoparticle tracking analysis and immuno-reactive exosomal CD63 quantification. Placental-derived exosomes were quantified using placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as a specific marker. The contribution of placental-derived exosomes to total exosomes in maternal plasma was determined by the ratio of PLAP(+) exosomes to CD63(+) exosomes. The concentration of total exosomes significantly increased in early onset-PE and late onset-PE compared to N (≤33 weeks) and N (≥34 weeks). The relative concentration of placental-derived exosomes significantly increased in early onset-PE but decreased in late onset-PE compared to N. The ratio of PLAP(+) exosomes to total number of exosomes significantly decreased in early onset-PE and late onset-PE. A positive correlation between total and placental-derived exosomes were obtained in N (≤33 weeks: Pearson's r = 0.60, ≥34 weeks: Pearson's r = 0.67) and early onset-PE (Pearson's r = 0.51, p exosomes to total exosomes in maternal circulation suggests a possible pathophysiological role of placental-derived exosomes in pre-eclampsia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exosomes from eosinophils autoregulate and promote eosinophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, José Antonio; Sastre, Beatriz; Mazzeo, Carla; Fernández-Nieto, Mar; Rodrigo-Muñoz, José Manuel; González-Guerra, Andrés; Izquierdo, Manuel; Barranco, Pilar; Quirce, Santiago; Sastre, Joaquín; Del Pozo, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    Eosinophils are able to secrete exosomes that have an undefined role in asthma pathogenesis. We hypothesized that exosomes released by eosinophils autoregulate and promote eosinophil function. Eosinophils of patients with asthma (n = 58) and healthy volunteers (n = 16) were purified from peripheral blood, and exosomes were isolated and quantified from eosinophils of the asthmatic and healthy populations. Apoptosis, adhesion, adhesion molecules expression, and migration assays were performed with eosinophils in the presence or absence of exosomes from healthy and asthmatic individuals. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated by flow cytometry with an intracellular fluorescent probe and nitric oxide (NO) and a colorimetric kit. In addition, exosomal proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Eosinophil-derived exosomes induced an increase in NO and ROS production on eosinophils. Moreover, exosomes could act as a chemotactic factor on eosinophils, and they produced an increase in cell adhesion, giving rise to a specific augmentation of adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1 and integrin α2. Protein content between exosomes from healthy and asthmatic individuals seems to be similar in both groups. In conclusion, we found that exosomes from the eosinophils of patients with asthma could modify several specific eosinophil functions related to asthma pathogenesis and that they could contribute fundamentally to the development and maintenance of asthma. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  16. The roles and implications of exosomes in sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Shen, Jacson; Tu, Chongqi; Hornicek, Francis; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Better diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic options are still necessary for patients with sarcomas due to the current limitations of diagnosis and treatment. Exosomes are small extracellular membrane vesicles that are released by various cells and are found in most body fluids. Tumor-derived exosomes have been proven to mediate tumorigenesis, intercellular communication, microenvironment modulation, and metastasis in different cancers, including in sarcomas. Recently, exosomes have been considered as potential biomarkers for sarcoma diagnosis, prognosis, and possible targets for sarcoma therapy. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, exosomes can also be engineered as vehicles for drug delivery. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the roles of tumor-derived exosomes in sarcoma and their potential clinical applications. PMID:27342745

  17. Altered expression of CD63 and exosomes in scleroderma dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kayo; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Harada, Miho; Kudo, Hideo; Nakayama, Wakana; Inoue, Kuniko; Ogata, Aki; Kajihara, Ikko; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-10-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles shed from various cells. They contain proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, and are regarded as a tool of cell-cell communication. To reveal the putative role of exosomes in systemic sclerosis (SSc), and to elucidate the effect of exosomes on wound healing. The expression of common markers for exosomes (CD63, CD9, and CD81) and type I collagen were examined with real-time PCR, immunohistochemical analysis, ELISA, immunoblotting, and flow cytometry. The effect of serum-derived exosomes on wound healing was tested on full-thickness wounds in the mid-dorsal skin of BALB/c mice. The expression levels of CD63 as well as CD9 and CD81 tended to be increased in SSc dermal fibroblasts compared to normal fibroblasts. Increased exosomes in a cultured media of SSc fibroblasts stimulated the expression levels of type I collagen in normal fibroblasts. As the mechanism, collagen-related microRNA levels in SSc fibroblast-derived exosomes were dysregulated, indicating that both the amount and the content of exosomes were altered in SSc. On the other hand, SSc sera showed significantly decreased exosome levels compared to normal sera. The frequencies of vascular involvements, including skin ulcers or pitting scars, were significantly increased in patients with decreased serum exosome levels. The healing of mice wounds was accelerated by treatment with serum-derived exosomes. Vascular abnormalities in SSc may account for the decreased serum exosome levels by the disturbed transfer of exosomes from the skin tissue to the blood stream. Our study suggests the possibility that SSc patients with vascular involvements have decreased serum exosome levels, which causes the delay of wound healing due to down-regulation of collagen, resulting in higher susceptibility to pitting scars and/or ulcers. Exosome research will lead to a detailed understanding of SSc pathogenesis and new therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology

  18. A SnoRNA-derived piRNA interacts with human interleukin-4 pre-mRNA and induces its decay in nuclear exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fudi; Zhou, Nan; Wu, Kang; Guo, Yubiao; Tan, Weiping; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xue; Geng, Guannan; Pan, Ting; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Yijun; Xu, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bingfeng; Gao, Wenchao; Liu, Chao; Ren, Liangliang; Li, Jun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are highly expressed in germline cells and are involved in maintaining genome integrity by silencing transposons. These are also involved in DNA/histone methylation and gene expression regulation in somatic cells of invertebrates. The functions of piRNAs in somatic cells of vertebrates, however, remain elusive. We found that snoRNA-derived and C (C′)/D′ (D)-box conserved piRNAs are abundant in human CD4 primary T-lymphocytes. piRNA (piR30840) significantly downregulated interleukin-4 (IL-4) via sequence complementarity binding to pre-mRNA intron, which subsequently inhibited the development of Th2 T-lymphocytes. Piwil4 and Ago4 are associated with this piRNA, and this complex further interacts with Trf4-Air2-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) complex, which leads to the decay of targeted pre-mRNA through nuclear exosomes. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel piRNA mechanism in regulating gene expression in highly differentiated somatic cells and a possible novel target for allergy therapeutics. PMID:26405199

  19. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes promote natural killer cell activation and proliferation: a role for NKG2D ligands and IL-15Ralpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Viaud

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC derived-exosomes (Dex are nanomeric vesicles harboring functional MHC/peptide complexes promoting T cell-dependent tumor rejection. In the first Phase I trial using peptide-pulsed Dex, the observation of clinical regressions in the absence of T cell responses prompted the search for alternate effector mechanisms. Mouse studies unraveled the bioactivity of Dex on NK cells. Indeed, Dex promoted an IL-15Ralpha- and NKG2D-dependent NK cell proliferation and activation respectively, resulting in anti-metastatic effects mediated by NK1.1(+ cells. In humans, Dex express functional IL-15Ralpha which allow proliferation and IFNgamma secretion by NK cells. In contrast to immature DC, human Dex harbor NKG2D ligands on their surface leading to a direct engagement of NKG2D and NK cell activation ex vivo. In our phase I clinical trial, we highlight the capacity of Dex based-vaccines to restore the number and NKG2D-dependent function of NK cells in 7/14 patients. Altogether, these data provide a mechanistic explanation on how Dex may stimulate non MHC restricted-anti-tumor effectors and induce tumor regression in vivo.

  20. Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes Promote Natural Killer Cell Activation and Proliferation: A Role for NKG2D Ligands and IL-15Rα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaud, Sophie; Terme, Magali; Flament, Caroline; Taieb, Julien; André, Fabrice; Novault, Sophie; Escudier, Bernard; Robert, Caroline; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Tursz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) derived-exosomes (Dex) are nanomeric vesicles harboring functional MHC/peptide complexes promoting T cell-dependent tumor rejection. In the first Phase I trial using peptide-pulsed Dex, the observation of clinical regressions in the absence of T cell responses prompted the search for alternate effector mechanisms. Mouse studies unraveled the bioactivity of Dex on NK cells. Indeed, Dex promoted an IL-15Rα- and NKG2D-dependent NK cell proliferation and activation respectively, resulting in anti-metastatic effects mediated by NK1.1+ cells. In humans, Dex express functional IL-15Rα which allow proliferation and IFNγ secretion by NK cells. In contrast to immature DC, human Dex harbor NKG2D ligands on their surface leading to a direct engagement of NKG2D and NK cell activation ex vivo. In our phase I clinical trial, we highlight the capacity of Dex based-vaccines to restore the number and NKG2D-dependent function of NK cells in 7/14 patients. Altogether, these data provide a mechanistic explanation on how Dex may stimulate non MHC restricted-anti-tumor effectors and induce tumor regression in vivo. PMID:19319200

  1. Label-free Proteomic Analysis of Exosomes Derived from Inducible Hepatitis B Virus-Replicating HepAD38 Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaofang; Chen, Jieliang; Megger, Dominik A; Zhang, Xiaonan; Kozlowski, Maya; Zhang, Lijun; Fang, Zhong; Li, Jin; Chu, Qiaofang; Wu, Min; Li, Yaming; Sitek, Barbara; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that some viruses can manipulate the infection process by packing specific viral and cellular components into exosomes, small nanometer-sized (30-150 nm) vesicles secreted from various cells. However, the impact of HBV replication on the content of exosomes produced by hepatocytes has not been fully delineated. In this work, an HBV-inducible cell line HepAD38 was used to directly compare changes in the protein content of exosomes secreted from HepAD38 cells with or without HBV replication. Exosomes were isolated from supernantants of HepAD38 cells cultured with or without doxycycline (dox) and their purity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western immunoblotting assays. Ion-intensity based label-free LC-MS/MS quantitation technologies were applied to analyze protein content of exosomes from HBV replicating cells [referred as HepAD38 (dox(-))-exo] and from HBV nonreplicating cells [referred as HepAD38 (dox(+))-exo]. A total of 1412 exosomal protein groups were identified, among which the abundance of 35 proteins was significantly changed following HBV replication. Strikingly, 5 subunit proteins from the 26S proteasome complex, including PSMC1, PSMC2, PSMD1, PSMD7 and PSMD14 were consistently enhanced in HepAD38 (dox(-))-exo. Bioinformatic analysis of differential exosomal proteins confirmed the significant enrichment of components involved in the proteasomal catabolic process. Proteasome activity assays further suggested that HepAD38 (dox(-))-exo had enhanced proteolytic activity compared with HepAD38 (dox(+))-exo. Furthermore, human peripheral monocytes incubated with HepAD38 (dox(-))-exo induced a significantly lower level of IL-6 secretion compared with IL-6 levels from HepAD38 (dox(+))-exo. Irreversible inhibition of proteasomal activity within exosomes restored higher production of IL-6 by monocytes, suggesting that transmission of

  2. PDAC-derived exosomes enrich the microenvironment in MDSCs in a SMAD4-dependent manner through a new calcium related axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Daniela; Gnatta, Elisa; Padoan, Andrea; Fogar, Paola; Furlanello, Sara; Aita, Ada; Bozzato, Dania; Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Frasson, Chiara; Franchin, Cinzia; Moz, Stefania; Brefort, Thomas; Laufer, Thomas; Navaglia, Filippo; Pedrazzoli, Sergio; Basso, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario

    2017-10-17

    Tumor genetics and escape from immune surveillance concur in the poor prognosis of PDAC. In this study an experimental model was set up to verify whether SMAD4, deleted in about 55% PDAC and associated with poor prognosis, is involved in determining immunosuppression through Exosomes (Exo). Potential mechanisms and mediators underlying SMAD4-dependent immunosuppression were evaluated by studying intracellular calcium (Fluo-4), Exo-miRNAs (microarray) and Exo-proteins (SILAC). Two PDAC cell lines expressing (BxPC3-SMAD4+) or not-expressing (BxPC3) SMAD4 were used to prepare Exo-enriched conditioned media, employed in experiments with blood donors PBMCs. Exo expanded myeloid derived suppressor cells (gMDSC and mMDSC, flow cytometry) and altered intracellular calcium fluxes in an SMAD4 dependent manner. BxPC3-SMAD4+, but mainly BxPC3 Exo, increased calcium fluxes of PBMCs (p = 0.007) and this increased intracellular calcium trafficking characterized mMDSCs. The analysis of de-regulated Exo-miRNAs and transfection experiments revealed hsa-miR-494-3p and has-miR-1260a as potential mediators of SMAD4-associated de-regulated calcium fluxes. Eleven main biological processes were identified by the analysis of SMAD4-associated de-regulated Exo-proteins, including translation, cell adhesion, cell signaling and glycolysis. A reverse Warburg effect was observed by treating PBMCs with PDAC-derived Exo: BxPC3 Exo induced a higher glucose consumption and lactate production than BxPC3-SMAD4+ Exo. PDAC-derived Exo from cells with, but mainly from those without SMAD4 expression, create an immunosuppressive myeloid cell background by increasing calcium fluxes and glycolysis through the transfer of SMAD4-related differentially expressed miRNAs and proteins.

  3. Activated platelets release two types of membrane vesicles: microvesicles by surface shedding and exosomes derived from exocytosis of multivesicular bodies and alpha-granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, H F; Schiel, A E; Fijnheer, R; Geuze, H J; Sixma, J J

    1999-12-01

    Platelet activation leads to secretion of granule contents and to the formation of microvesicles by shedding of membranes from the cell surface. Recently, we have described small internal vesicles in multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and alpha-granules, and suggested that these vesicles are secreted during platelet activation, analogous to the secretion of vesicles termed exosomes by other cell types. In the present study we report that two different types of membrane vesicles are released after stimulation of platelets with thrombin receptor agonist peptide SFLLRN (TRAP) or alpha-thrombin: microvesicles of 100 nm to 1 microm, and exosomes measuring 40 to 100 nm in diameter, similar in size as the internal vesicles in MVBs and alpha-granules. Microvesicles could be detected by flow cytometry but not the exosomes, probably because of the small size of the latter. Western blot analysis showed that isolated exosomes were selectively enriched in the tetraspan protein CD63. Whole-mount immuno-electron microscopy (IEM) confirmed this observation. Membrane proteins such as the integrin chains alpha(IIb)-beta(3) and beta(1), GPIbalpha, and P-selectin were predominantly present on the microvesicles. IEM of platelet aggregates showed CD63(+) internal vesicles in fusion profiles of MVBs, and in the extracellular space between platelet extensions. Annexin-V binding was mainly restricted to the microvesicles and to a low extent to exosomes. Binding of factor X and prothrombin was observed to the microvesicles but not to exosomes. These observations and the selective presence of CD63 suggest that released platelet exosomes may have an extracellular function other than the procoagulant activity, attributed to platelet microvesicles.

  4. Reduction of saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans MT8148 and dental biofilm development by tragacanth gum and yeast-derived phosphomannan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotoyodome, A; Kobayashi, H; Nakamura, J; Tokimitsu, I; Hase, T; Inoue, T; Matsukubo, T; Takaesu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate materials which reduce saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans onto enamel surfaces, and their potential in preventing dental biofilm development. The effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) surface pretreatment with hydrophilic polysaccharides on saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion in vitro and de novo dental biofilm deposition in vivo were examined. Saliva-promoted adhesion of S. mutans MT8148 was significantly reduced by pretreatment of the HA surface with tragacanth gum (TG) and yeast-derived phosphoglycans. Extracellular phosphomannan (PM) from Pichia capsulata NRRL Y-1842 and TG reduced biofilm development on lower incisors in plaque-susceptible rats when administered via drinking water at concentrations of 0.5% and 0.01%, respectively. The inhibitory effect of TG on de novo dental biofilm formation was also demonstrated when administered via mouthwash in humans. It is concluded that TG and yeast-derived PM have the potential for use as anti-adherent agents and are effective in reducing de novo dental biofilm formation.

  5. The Possible Role of Extravillous Trophoblast-Derived Exosomes on the Uterine Spiral Arterial Remodeling under Both Normal and Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A tenet of contemporary obstetrics is that events that compromise placentation increase the risk of complications of pregnancy and contribute to poor pregnancy outcome. In particular, conditions that affect the invasion of placental cells and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries compromise placental function and the subsequent development of the fetus. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs proliferate and migrate from the cytotrophoblast in the anchoring villi of the placenta and invade the maternal decidua and myometrium. These cells are localised with uterine uterine spiral arteries and are thought to induce vascular remodeling. A newly identified pathway by which EVTs may regulate vascular remodeling within the uterus is via the release of exosomes. Trophoblast cells release exosomes that mediate aspects of cell-to-cell communication. The aim of this brief commentary is to review the putative role of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells in uterine spiral artery remodeling and, in particular, their role in the aetiology of preeclampsia. Placental exosomes may engage in local cell-to-cell communication between the cell constituents of the placenta and contiguous maternal tissues and/or distal interactions, involving the release of placental exosomes into biological fluids and their transport to a remote site of action.

  6. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients. PMID:25944692

  7. Tumour exosomes display different differential mechanical and complement activation properties dependent on malignant state: implications in endothelial leakiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehead, Bradley Joseph; Wu, Linping; Hvam, Michael Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Background : Exosomes have been implicated in tumour progression and metastatic spread. Little is known of the effect of mechanical and innate immune interactions of malignant cell-derived exosomes on endothelial integrity, which may relate to increased extravasation of circulating tumour cells a......-malignant cell line exosomes, which may explain the observed increased endothelial monolayer disruption and transendothelial transport of these vesicles....

  8. Exosomes from Osteosarcoma and normal osteoblast differ in proteomic cargo and immunomodulatory effects on T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Ryan M; Ruby, Carl E; Goodall, Cheri P; Yang, Liping; Maier, Claudia S; Albarqi, Hassan A; Brady, Jacqueline V; Bathke, Kallan; Taratula, Oleh; Mourich, Dan; Bracha, Shay

    2017-09-15

    Canine osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common cancer of the appendicular skeleton and is associated with high metastatic rate to the lungs and poor prognosis. Recent studies have shown the impact of malignant-derived exosomes on immune cells and the facilitation of immune evasion. In the current study, we have characterized the proteomic profile of exosomes derived from healthy osteoblasts and osteosarcoma cell lines. We investigated the direct impact of these exosomes on healthy T cells. Proteomic cargo of the malignant exosomes was markedly different from osteoblastic exosomes and contained immunosuppressive proteins including TGF-β, α fetoprotein and heat shock proteins. OSA exosomes directly attenuated the rate of T cell proliferation, increased a regulatory (FoxP3+) CD4+ phenotype and diminished the expression of the activation marker CD25+ on CD8+ cells. Exosomes of osteoblasts also demonstrated a direct impact on T cells, but to a lesser degree. Osteosarcoma-derived exosomes compared to normal osteoblasts contain an immunomodulatory cargo, which reduced the rate of T cell proliferation and promoted T regulatory phenotype. Osteoblast-derived exosomes can also reduce T cell activity, but to lesser degree compared to OSA exosomes and without promoting a T regulatory phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cancer Exosomes Perform Cell-Independent MicroRNA Biogenesis and Promote Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Sonia A.; Sugimoto, Hikaru; O’Connell, Joyce T.; Kato, Noritoshi; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Perelman, Lev T.; Melo, Carlos A.; Lucci, Anthony; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A.; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Exosomes are secreted by all cell types and contain proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we report that breast cancer associated exosomes contain microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with the RISC Loading Complex (RLC) and display cell-independent capacity to process precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) into mature miRNAs. Pre-miRNAs, along with Dicer, AGO2, and TRBP, are present in exosomes of cancer cells. CD43 mediates the accumulation of Dicer specifically in cancer exosomes. Cancer exosomes mediate an efficient and rapid silencing of mRNAs to reprogram the target cell transcriptome. Exosomes derived from cells and sera of patients with breast cancer instigate non-tumorigenic epithelial cells to form tumors in a Dicer-dependent manner. These findings offer opportunities for the development of exosomes based biomarkers and therapies. PMID:25446899

  10. Radiolabeled Exosomes for the Early Detection of Metastases and to Predict Breast Cancer Premetastatic Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    breast cancer (BC). This project takes advantage of the breakthrough knowledge in tumor - derived exosome tropism and exploits recent advances in the...exosomes from different cancer models recapitulate the metastatic organotropism of their cell of origin, therefore tumor exosomes could be...radiolabeling protocol in order to achieve a radioactive probe of high specific activity, stability and specificity. Figure 1. Cancer cell-derived

  11. High-resolution proteomic and lipidomic analysis of exosomes and microvesicles from different cell sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reka A. Haraszti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including exosomes and microvesicles (MVs, are explored for use in diagnostics, therapeutics and drug delivery. However, little is known about the relationship of protein and lipid composition of EVs and their source cells. Here, we report high-resolution lipidomic and proteomic analyses of exosomes and MVs derived by differential ultracentrifugation from 3 different cell types: U87 glioblastoma cells, Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. We identified 3,532 proteins and 1,961 lipid species in the screen. Exosomes differed from MVs in several different areas: (a The protein patterns of exosomes were more likely different from their cells of origin than were the protein patterns of MVs; (b The proteomes of U87 and Huh7 exosomes were similar to each other but different from the proteomes of MSC exosomes, whereas the lipidomes of Huh7 and MSC exosomes were similar to each other but different from the lipidomes of U87 exosomes; (c exosomes exhibited proteins of extracellular matrix, heparin-binding, receptors, immune response and cell adhesion functions, whereas MVs were enriched in endoplasmic reticulum, proteasome and mitochondrial proteins. Exosomes and MVs also differed in their types of lipid contents. Enrichment in glycolipids and free fatty acids characterized exosomes, whereas enrichment in ceramides and sphingomyelins characterized MVs. Furthermore, Huh7 and MSC exosomes were specifically enriched in cardiolipins; U87 exosomes were enriched in sphingomyelins. This study comprehensively analyses the protein and lipid composition of exosomes, MVs and source cells in 3 different cell types.

  12. Exosomes as immunotheranostic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha G; Gundogan, Buket; Tan, Aaron; Farhatnia, Yasmin; Wu, Woffles; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-06-01

    Exosomes are small biological membrane vesicles that measure 30 to 100 nm in diameter. They are involved in a wide array of biological activities, such as cell-cell communication, signal transduction, transport of genetic materials, and modulation of immune response. Evidence indicates that they can be used as not only therapeutic agents targeted against disease but also diagnostic biomarkers for pathologic conditions. In this review, we endeavor to present exosomes as immunologic agents that can be used as pioneering cancer vaccines to prime the immune system and explicate their therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities. An extensive literature search for studies that involved the use of exosomes as immunotheranostic nanoparticles was conducted using PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar. Clinical trials that involved exosomes were also compiled by searching the clinicaltrials.gov database. In its therapeutic facet of application, exosomes can be used as vehicles for drug or gene delivery. These biological vesicles have been found to have excellent host biodistribution and biocompatibility, issues often presented with gene delivery vehicles. Diagnostically, exosomes may prove to be useful biomarkers that are able to surpass current setbacks of modern diagnostic testing, which include invasive methods. Finally, current evidence has implied that the use of exosomes could form the basis for the development of future cell-free cancer vaccines. Exosomes have numerous functions, and their double-edged features make the scope of their clinical applications, as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool, immense. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by EM Inc USA. All rights reserved.

  13. Research Progress of Exosomes in Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo ZOU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the leading cause of morbidity and cancer related-death worldwide, lung cancer has a serious threat to human health. Exosomes are nanoscale lipid membrane vesicles derived from multivesicles, which containing active biomolecules including proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and etc. Exosomes play important roles in lung cancer initiation and progression by promoting the formation of tumor microenvironment, enhancing tumor invasive and metastasis capability, leading to immunosuppression and resistance to chemoradiotherapy, and also have the application value in early diagnosis and treatment. This review summarizes the research progress of exosomes in tumor initiation and progression, and its roles in diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

  14. A gestational profile of placental exosomes in maternal plasma and their effects on endothelial cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    Full Text Available Studies completed to date provide persuasive evidence that placental cell-derived exosomes play a significant role in intercellular communication pathways that potentially contribute to placentation and development of materno-fetal vascular circulation. The aim of this study was to establish the gestational-age release profile and bioactivity of placental cell-derived exosome in maternal plasma. Plasma samples (n = 20 per pregnant group were obtained from non-pregnant and pregnant women in the first (FT, 6-12 weeks, second (ST, 22-24 weeks and third (TT, 32-38 weeks trimester. The number of exosomes and placental exosome contribution were determined by quantifying immunoreactive exosomal CD63 and placenta-specific marker (PLAP, respectively. The effect of exosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT on endothelial cell migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte. Exosome plasma concentration was more than 50-fold greater in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women (p<0.001. During normal healthy pregnancy, the number of exosomes present in maternal plasma increased significantly with gestational age by more that two-fold (p<0.001. Exosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT increased endothelial cell migration by 1.9±0.1, 1.6±0.2 and 1.3±0.1-fold, respectively compared to the control. Pregnancy is associated with a dramatic increase in the number of exosomes present in plasma and maternal plasma exosomes are bioactive. While the role of placental cell-derived exosome in regulating maternal and/or fetal vascular responses remains to be elucidated, changes in exosome profile may be of clinical utility in the diagnosis of placental dysfunction.

  15. Intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes target M2-type macrophages in the injured spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Lankford, Karen L.; Arroyo, Edgardo J.; Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Askenase, Philip W.; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    2018-01-01

    In a previous report we showed that intravenous infusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) improved functional recovery after contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in the non-immunosuppressed rat, although the MSCs themselves were not detected at the spinal cord injury (SCI) site [1]. Rather, the MSCs lodged transiently in the lungs for about two days post-infusion. Preliminary studies and a recent report [2] suggest that the effects of intravenous (IV) infusion of MSCs could ...

  16. Exosomes as a liquid biopsy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shaohua; Cheng, Zhuoan; Qin, Wenxin; Jiang, Liyan

    2018-02-01

    In lung cancer and other malignancies, the so-called "liquid biopsy" is quickly moving into clinical practice. Its full potential has not yet been fully identified, but the "liquid biopsy" is no longer a promise but has become a reality that allows for better treatment selection and monitoring of lung cancer. This emerging field has significant potential to make up for the limitations of the traditional tissue-derived biomaterials. Exosomes are spherical nano-sized vesicles with a diameter of 40-100 nm and a density of 1.13-1.19 g/ml. In both physiological and pathological conditions, exosomes can be released by different cell types, including immune cells, stem cells and tumor cells. These small molecules may serve as promising biomarkers in lung cancer "liquid biopsy" as they can be easily obtained from most body fluids. In addition, the lipid bilayer of exosomes allows for stable cargoes which are relatively hard to degrade. Furthermore, the composition of exosomes reflects that of their parental cells, suggesting that exosomes are potential surrogates of the original cells and, therefore, are useful for understanding cell biology. Previous studies have demonstrated that exosomes play important roles in cell-to-cell communication. Moreover, tumor-derived exosomes are evolved in tumor-specific biological process, including tumor proliferation and progression. Recently, a growing number of studies has focused on exosomal cargo and their use in lung cancer genesis and progression. In addition, their utility as lung cancer diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers have also been studied. The current review primarily summaries lung cancer-related exosomal biomarkers that have recently been identified and discusses their potential in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, E; Perut, F; Roncuzzi, L; Zini, N; Baglìo, S R; Baldini, N

    2014-09-22

    Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF) released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one of the effectors of PL activity. Exosomes were isolated from human PL by differential ultracentrifugation, and analysed by electron microscopy and Western blotting. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) treated with three different exosome concentrations (0.6 μg, 5 μg and 50 μg) showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control. In addition, osteogenic differentiation assays demonstrated that exosome concentration differently affected the ability of MSC to deposit mineralised matrix. Finally, the analysis of exosome protein content revealed a higher amount of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) as compared to PL. In regards to RNA content, an enrichment of small RNAs in exosomes as compared to donor platelets has been found. These results suggest that exosomes consistently contribute to PL activity and could represent an advantageous nanodelivery system for cell-free regeneration therapies.

  18. Exosomes carrying immunoinhibitory proteins and their role in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, T L

    2017-09-01

    Recent emergence of exosomes as information carriers between cells has introduced us to a new previously unknown biological communication system. Multi-directional cross-talk mediated by exosomes carrying proteins, lipids and nucleic acids between normal cells, cells harbouring a pathogen or cancer and immune cells has been instrumental in determining outcomes of physiological as well as pathological conditions. Exosomes play a key role in the broad spectrum of human diseases. In cancer, tumour-derived exosomes carry multiple immunoinhibitory signals, disable anti-tumour immune effector cells and promote tumour escape from immune control. Exosomes delivering negative signals to immune cells in cancer, viral infections, autoimmune or other diseases may interfere with therapy and influence outcome. Exosomes can activate tissue cells to produce inhibitory factors and thus can suppress the host immune responses indirectly. Exosomes also promise to be non-invasive disease biomarkers with a dual capability to provide insights into immune dysfunction as well as disease progression and outcome. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  19. Exosomes from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hiPSC-MSCs Protect Liver against Hepatic Ischemia/ Reperfusion Injury via Activating Sphingosine Kinase and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingdong Du

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of exosomes produced by human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hiPSC-MSCs-Exo on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Exosomes derived from hiPSC-MSCs were isolated and characterized both biochemically and biophysically. hiPSC-MSCs-Exo were injected systemically into a murine ischemia/reperfusion injury model via the inferior vena cava, and then the therapeutic effects were evaluated. The serum levels of transaminases (aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT, as well as histological changes were examined. Primary hepatocytes and human hepatocyte cell line HL7702 were used to test whether exosomes could induce hepatocytes proliferation in vitro. In addition, the expression levels of proliferation markers (proliferation cell nuclear antigen, PCNA; Phosphohistone-H3, PHH3 were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Moreover, SK inhibitor (SKI-II and S1P1 receptor antagonist (VPC23019 were used to investigate the role of sphingosine kinase and sphingosine-1-phosphate-dependent pathway in the effects of hiPSC-MSCs-Exo on hepatocytes. Results: hiPSCs were efficiently induced into hiPSC-MSCs that had typical MSC characteristics. hiPSC-MSCs-Exo had diameters ranging from 100 to 200 nm and expressed exosome markers (Alix, CD63 and CD81. After hiPSC-MSCs-Exo administration, hepatocyte necrosis and sinusoidal congestion were markedly suppressed in the ischemia/reperfusion injury model, with lower histopathological scores. The levels of hepatocyte injury markers AST and ALT were significantly lower in the treatment group compared to control, and the expression levels of proliferation markers (PCNA and PHH3 were greatly induced after hiPSC-MSCs-Exo administration. Moreover, hiPSC-MSCs-Exo also induced primary hepatocytes and HL7702 cells proliferation in vitro in a dose

  20. Characterization of CLL exosomes reveals a distinct microRNA signature and enhanced secretion by activation of BCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Lehman, Amy M; Maddocks, Kami; Yu, Lianbo; Johnson, Amy J; Byrd, John C

    2015-05-21

    Multiple studies show that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are heavily dependent on their microenvironment for survival. Communication between CLL cells and the microenvironment is mediated through direct cell contact, soluble factors, and extracellular vesicles. Exosomes are small particles enclosed with lipids, proteins, and small RNAs that can convey biological materials to surrounding cells. Our data herein demonstrate that CLL cells release significant amounts of exosomes in plasma that exhibit abundant CD37, CD9, and CD63 expression. Our work also pinpoints the regulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in the release of CLL exosomes: BCR activation by α-immunoglobulin (Ig)M induces exosome secretion, whereas BCR inactivation via ibrutinib impedes α-IgM-stimulated exosome release. Moreover, analysis of serial plasma samples collected from CLL patients on an ibrutinib clinical trial revealed that exosome plasma concentration was significantly decreased following ibrutinib therapy. Furthermore, microRNA (miR) profiling of plasma-derived exosomes identified a distinct exosome microRNA signature, including miR-29 family, miR-150, miR-155, and miR-223 that have been associated with CLL disease. Interestingly, expression of exosome miR-150 and miR-155 increases with BCR activation. In all, this study successfully characterized CLL exosomes, demonstrated the control of BCR signaling in the release of CLL exosomes, and uncovered a disease-relevant exosome microRNA profile. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Exosomes as potent cell-free peptide-based vaccine. II. Exosomes in CpG adjuvants efficiently prime naive Tc1 lymphocytes leading to tumor rejection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaput, N.; Schartz, N.E.; Andre, F.; Taieb, J.; Novault, S.; Bonnaventure, P.; Aubert, N.; Bernard, J.; Lemonnier, F.; Merad, M.; Adema, G.J.; Adams, M.; Ferrantini, M.; Carpentier, A.F.; Escudier, B.; Tursz, T.; Angevin, E.; Zitvogel, L.

    2004-01-01

    Ideal vaccines should be stable, safe, molecularly defined, and out-of-shelf reagents efficient at triggering effector and memory Ag-specific T cell-based immune responses. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes could be considered as novel peptide-based vaccines because exosomes harbor a discrete set of

  2. In Vivo Neuroimaging of Exosomes Using Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzer, Oshra; Perets, Nisim; Angel, Ariel; Motiei, Menachem; Sadan, Tamar; Yadid, Gal; Offen, Daniel; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2017-11-28

    Exosomes are emerging as effective therapeutic tools for various pathologies. These extracellular vesicles can bypass biological barriers, including the blood-brain barrier, and can serve as powerful drug and gene therapy transporters. However, the progress of therapy development is impeded by several challenges, including insufficient data on exosome trafficking and biodistribution and the difficulty to image deep brain structures in vivo. Herein, we established a method for noninvasive in vivo neuroimaging and tracking of exosomes, based on glucose-coated gold nanoparticle (GNP) labeling and computed tomography imaging. Labeling of exosomes with the GNPs was achieved directly, as opposed to the typical and less efficient indirect labeling mode through parent cells. On the mechanistic level, we found that the glucose-coated GNPs were uptaken into MSC-derived exosomes via an active, energy-dependent mechanism that is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1 and involves endocytic proteins. Next, we determined optimal parameters of size and administration route; we demonstrated that 5 nm GNPs enabled improved exosome labeling and that intranasal, compared to intravenous, administration led to superior brain accumulation and thus enhanced in vivo neuroimaging. Furthermore, using a mouse model of focal brain ischemia, we noninvasively tracked intranasally administered GNP-labeled exosomes, which showed increased accumulation at the lesion site over 24 h, as compared to nonspecific migration and clearance from control brains over the same period. Thus, this exosome labeling technique can serve as a powerful diagnostic tool for various brain disorders and could potentially enhance exosome-based treatments for neuronal recovery.

  3. Exosome production and its regulation of EGFR during wound healing in renal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangjun; Zhang, Wei; Yao, Qisheng; Zhang, Hao; Dong, Guie; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Yutao; Chen, Jian-Kang; Dong, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Kidney repair following injury involves the reconstitution of a structurally and functionally intact tubular epithelium. Growth factors and their receptors, such as EGFR, are important in the repair of renal tubules. Exosomes are cell-produced small (~100 nm in diameter) vesicles that contain and transfer proteins, lipids, RNAs, and DNAs between cells. In this study, we examined the relationship between exosome production and EGFR activation and the potential role of exosome in wound healing. EGFR activation occurred shortly after scratch wounding in renal tubular cells. Wound repair after scratching was significantly promoted by EGF and suppressed by EGFR inhibitor gefitinib. Interestingly, scratch wounding induced a significant increase of exosome production. The exosome production was decreased by EGF and increased by gefitinib, suggesting a suppressive role of EGFR signaling in exosome production. Conversely, inhibition of exosome release by GW4869 and manumycin A markedly increased EGFR activation and promoted wound healing. Moreover, exosomes derived from scratch-wounding cells could inhibit wound healing. Collectively, the results indicate that wound healing in renal tubular cells is associated with EGFR activation and exosome production. Although EGFR activation promotes wound healing, released exosomes may antagonize EGFR activation and wound healing. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Saliva as a potential diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, T; Thirrunavukkarasu, N

    2010-07-01

    Saliva is a complex fluid consisting of secretions from the major and minor salivary glands. Gland-specific saliva can be used to diagnose any pathology from the specific major salivary gland. Whole saliva has serum constituents that are derived from the local vasculature of the salivary glands and gingival crevicular fluid. Saliva, as a diagnostic fluid, has distinctive advantages over serum as whole saliva can be collected non-invasively by individuals with limited training using simple equipments. This review aimed to explore the diagnostic applications of saliva in systemic and oral diseases. Analysis of saliva can offer a cost-effective approach to screen for a larger population. Salivary analysis may be useful for diagnosing systemic oral disorders, as well as for monitoring hormone and therapeutic levels of drug.

  5. Tumour exosomes display differential mechanical and complement activation properties dependent on malignant state: implications in endothelial leakiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Whitehead

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exosomes have been implicated in tumour progression and metastatic spread. Little is known of the effect of mechanical and innate immune interactions of malignant cell-derived exosomes on endothelial integrity, which may relate to increased extravasation of circulating tumour cells and, therefore, increased metastatic spread. Methods: Exosomes isolated from non-malignant immortalized HCV-29 and isogenic malignant non-metastatic T24 and malignant metastatic FL3 bladder cells were characterized by nanoparticle tracking analysis and quantitative nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy (QNM AFM to determine size and nanomechanical properties. Effect of HCV-29, T24 and FL3 exosomes on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayer integrity was determined by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER measurements and transport was determined by flow cytometry. Complement activation studies in human serum of malignant and non-malignant cell-derived exosomes were performed. Results: FL3, T24 and HCV-29 cells produced exosomes at similar concentration per cell (6.64, 6.61 and 6.46×104 exosomes per cell for FL3, T24 and HCV-29 cells, respectively and of similar size (120.2 nm for FL3, 127.6 nm for T24 and 117.9 nm for HCV-29, respectively. T24 and FL3 cell-derived exosomes exhibited a markedly reduced stiffness, 95 MPa and 280 MPa, respectively, compared with 1,527 MPa with non-malignant HCV-29 cell-derived exosomes determined by QNM AFM. FL3 and T24 exosomes induced endothelial disruption as measured by a decrease in TEER in HUVEC monolayers, whereas no effect was observed for HCV-29 derived exosomes. FL3 and T24 exosomes traffic more readily (11.6 and 21.4% of applied exosomes, respectively across HUVEC monolayers than HCV-29 derived exosomes (7.2% of applied exosomes. Malignant cell-derived exosomes activated complement through calcium-sensitive pathways in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions: Malignant

  6. Investigation of the roles of exosomes in colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Ding, Xiaoling; Nan, Lijuan; Wang, Yiting; Wang, Jing; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Jihong; Zhu, Wei; Ni, Bing; Dong, Suzhen; Yu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    The leading cause of death among cancer patients is tumor metastasis. Tumor-derived exosomes are emerging as mediators of metastasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that exosomes play a pivotal role in the metastatic progression of colorectal cancer. First, a nude mouse model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis was established and characterized. Then, we demonstrated that exosomes from a highly liver metastatic colorectal cancer cell line (HT-29) could significantly increase the metastatic tumor burden and distribution in the mouse liver of Caco-2 colorectal cancer cells, which ordinarily exhibit poor liver metastatic potential. We further investigated the mechanisms by which HT-29-derived-exosomes influence the liver metastasis of colorectal cancer and found that mice treated with HT-29-derived exosomes had a relatively higher level of CXCR4 in the metastatic microenvironment, indicating that exosomes may promote colorectal cancer metastasis by recruiting CXCR4-expressing stromal cells to develop a permissive metastatic microenvironment. Finally, the migration of Caco-2 cells was significantly increased following treatment with HT-29-derived exosomes in vitro, further supporting a role for exosomes in modulating colorectal tumor-derived liver metastasis. The data from the present study may facilitate further translational medicine research into the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

  7. Exosomes from hypoxic endothelial cells have increased collagen crosslinking activity through up-regulation of lysyl oxidase-like 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Olivier G; van Balkom, Bas W M; Gremmels, Hendrik; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes are important mediators of intercellular communication. Additionally, they contain a variety of components capable of interacting with the extracellular matrix (ECM), including integrins, matrix metalloproteinases and members of the immunoglobin superfamily. Despite these observations, research on exosome-ECM interactions is limited. Here, we investigate whether the exosome-associated lysyl oxidase family member lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is involved in ECM remodelling. We found that LOXL2 is present on the exterior of endothelial cell (EC)-derived exosomes, placing it in direct vicinity of the ECM. It is up-regulated twofold in EC-derived exosomes cultured under hypoxic conditions. Intact exosomes from hypoxic EC and LOXL2 overexpressing EC show increased activity in a fluorometric lysyl oxidase enzymatic activity assay as well as in a collagen gel contraction assay. Concordantly, knockdown of LOXL2 in exosome-producing EC in both normal and hypoxic conditions reduces activity of exosomes in both assays. Our findings show for the first time that ECM crosslinking by EC-derived exosomes is mediated by LOXL2 under the regulation of hypoxia, and implicate a role for exosomes in hypoxia-regulated focal ECM remodelling, a key process in both fibrosis and wound healing. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  8. Exosome delivered anticancer drugs across the blood-brain barrier for brain cancer therapy in Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Martin, Paige; Fogarty, Brittany; Brown, Alison; Schurman, Kayla; Phipps, Roger; Yin, Viravuth P; Lockman, Paul; Bai, Shuhua

    2015-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) essentially restricts therapeutic drugs from entering into the brain. This study tests the hypothesis that brain endothelial cell derived exosomes can deliver anticancer drug across the BBB for the treatment of brain cancer in a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. Four types of exosomes were isolated from brain cell culture media and characterized by particle size, morphology, total protein, and transmembrane protein markers. Transport mechanism, cell uptake, and cytotoxicity of optimized exosome delivery system were tested. Brain distribution of exosome delivered anticancer drugs was evaluated using transgenic zebrafish TG (fli1: GFP) embryos and efficacies of optimized formations were examined in a xenotransplanted zebrafish model of brain cancer model. Four exosomes in 30-100 diameters showed different morphologies and exosomes derived from brain endothelial cells expressed more CD63 tetraspanins transmembrane proteins. Optimized exosomes increased the uptake of fluorescent marker via receptor mediated endocytosis and cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs in cancer cells. Images of the zebrafish showed exosome delivered anticancer drugs crossed the BBB and entered into the brain. In the brain cancer model, exosome delivered anticancer drugs significantly decreased fluorescent intensity of xenotransplanted cancer cells and tumor growth marker. Brain endothelial cell derived exosomes could be potentially used as a carrier for brain delivery of anticancer drug for the treatment of brain cancer.

  9. Exosomal and Non-Exosomal Transport of Extra-Cellular microRNAs in Follicular Fluid: Implications for Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mahmodul Hasan Sohel

    Full Text Available Cell-cell communication within the follicle involves many signaling molecules, and this process may be mediated by secretion and uptake of exosomes that contain several bioactive molecules including extra-cellular miRNAs. Follicular fluid and cells from individual follicles of cattle were grouped based on Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB staining of the corresponding oocytes. Both Exoquick precipitation and differential ultracentrifugation were used to separate the exosome and non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid. Following miRNA isolation from both fractions, the human miRCURY LNA™ Universal RT miRNA PCR array system was used to profile miRNA expression. This analysis found that miRNAs were present in both exosomal and non-exosomal fraction of bovine follicular fluid. We found 25 miRNAs differentially expressed (16 up and 9 down in exosomes and 30 miRNAs differentially expressed (21 up and 9 down in non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid in comparison of BCB- versus BCB+ oocyte groups. Expression of selected miRNAs was detected in theca, granulosa and cumulus oocyte complex. To further explore the potential roles of these follicular fluid derived extra-cellular miRNAs, the potential target genes were predicted, and functional annotation and pathway analysis revealed most of these pathways are known regulators of follicular development and oocyte growth. In order to validate exosome mediated cell-cell communication within follicular microenvironment, we demonstrated uptake of exosomes and resulting increase of endogenous miRNA level and subsequent alteration of mRNA levels in follicular cells in vitro. This study demonstrates for the first time, the presence of exosome or non-exosome mediated transfer of miRNA in the bovine follicular fluid, and oocyte growth dependent variation in extra-cellular miRNA signatures in the follicular environment.

  10. The diagnostic role of saliva: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Sanjeev; Bansal, Vikram; Garg, Shushant K.; Atreja, Gaurav; Bansal, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    As a diagnostic fluid, saliva offers distinctive advantages over serum because it can be collected non-invasively by individuals, even by patient. Does not require special equipment for collection and storage as unlike blood saliva does not clot. Advantageous for person in whom blood drawing is difficult as in obese and haemophilic patient. Whole saliva used for diagnosis of systemic diseases, because it contains serum constituents. These constituents are derived from the ...

  11. Characterization of human thymic exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Skogberg; Judith Gudmundsdottir; Sjoerd van der Post; Kerstin Sandström; Sören Bruhn; Mikael Benson; Lucia Mincheva-Nilsson; Vladimir Baranov; Esbjörn Telemo; Olov Ekwall

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized membrane-bound vesicles that are released by various cell types and are capable of carrying proteins, lipids and RNAs which can be delivered to recipient cells. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication and have been described to mediate immunologic information. In this article we report the first isolation and characterization of exosomes from human thymic tissue. Using electron microscopy, particle size determination, density gradient measurement, flow cytom...

  12. Targeting the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meola, Nicola; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2017-01-01

    Centrally positioned in nuclear RNA metabolism, the exosome deals with virtually all transcript types. This 3'-5' exo- and endo-nucleolytic degradation machine is guided to its RNA targets by adaptor proteins that enable substrate recognition. Recently, the discovery of the 'Poly(A) tail exosome...... targeting (PAXT)' connection as an exosome adaptor to human nuclear polyadenylated transcripts has relighted the interest of poly(A) binding proteins (PABPs) in both RNA productive and destructive processes....

  13. Accelerated growth of B16BL6 tumor in mice through efficient uptake of their own exosomes by B16BL6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akihiro; Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Sano, Kohei; Morishita, Masaki; Charoenviriyakul, Chonlada; Saji, Hideo; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2017-09-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released by various cell types and play roles in cell-cell communication. Several studies indicate that cancer cell-derived exosomes play important pathophysiological roles in tumor progression. Biodistribution of cancer cell-derived exosomes in tumor tissue is an important factor for determining their role in tumor proliferation; however, limited studies have assessed the biodistribution of exosomes in tumor tissues. In the present study, we examined the effect of cancer-cell derived exosomes on tumor growth by analyzing their biodistribution. Murine melanoma B16BL6-derived exosomes increased the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of B16BL6 cells, which was associated with an increase and decrease in the levels of proliferation- and apoptosis-related proteins, respectively. GW4869-induced inhibition of exosome secretion decreased the proliferation of B16BL6 cells, and treatment of GW4869-treated cells with B16BL6-derived exosomes restored their proliferation. Next, we treated B16BL6 tumors in mice with B16BL6-derived exosomes and examined the biodistribution and cellular uptake of these exosomes. After the intratumoral injection of radiolabeled B16BL6-derived exosomes, most radioactivity was detected within the tumor tissues of mice. Fractionation of cells present in the tumor tissue showed that fluorescently labeled exosomes were mainly taken up by B16BL6 cells. Moreover, intratumoral injection of B16BL6-derived exosomes promoted tumor growth, whereas intratumoral injection of GW4869 suppressed tumor growth. These results indicate that B16BL6 cells secrete and take up their own exosomes to induce their proliferation and inhibit their apoptosis, which promotes tumor progression. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayanithy, Venugopal [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Babatunde, Victor [Moore Laboratory, Department of Cell Biology, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Dickson, Elizabeth L. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Wong, Phillip [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy [Molecular Cytology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Moreira, André L. [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Downey, Robert J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Steer, Clifford J. [Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Subramanian, Subbaya [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Manova-Todorova, Katia [Molecular Cytology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Moore, Malcolm A.S. [Moore Laboratory, Department of Cell Biology, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Lou, Emil, E-mail: emil-lou@umn.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24–48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3–1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: • Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. • Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. • Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. • Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. • Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and

  15. The release and trans-synaptic transmission of Tau via exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yipeng; Balaji, Varun; Kaniyappan, Senthilvelrajan; Krüger, Lars; Irsen, Stephan; Tepper, Katharina; Chandupatla, RamReddy; Maetzler, Walter; Schneider, Anja; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2017-01-13

    Tau pathology in AD spreads in a hierarchical pattern, whereby it first appears in the entorhinal cortex, then spreads to the hippocampus and later to the surrounding areas. Based on this sequential appearance, AD can be classified into six stages ("Braak stages"). The mechanisms and agents underlying the progression of Tau pathology are a matter of debate. Emerging evidence indicates that the propagation of Tau pathology may be due to the transmission of Tau protein, but the underlying pathways and Tau species are not well understood. In this study we investigated the question of Tau spreading via small extracellular vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from different sources were analyzed by biochemical methods and electron microscopy (EM) and cryo-EM. Microfluidic devices that allow the culture of cell populations in different compartments were used to investigate the spreading of Tau. We show that Tau protein is released by cultured primary neurons or by N2a cells overexpressing different Tau constructs via exosomes. Neuron-derived exosomal Tau is hypo-phosphorylated, compared with cytosolic Tau. Depolarization of neurons promotes release of Tau-containing exosomes, highlighting the importance of neuronal activity. Using microfluidic devices we show that exosomes mediate trans-neuronal transfer of Tau depending on synaptic connectivity. Tau spreading is achieved by direct transmission of exosomes between neurons. In organotypic hippocampal slices, Tau-containing exosomes in conditioned medium are taken up by neurons and microglia, not astrocytes. In N2a cells, Tau assemblies are released via exosomes. They can induce inclusions of other Tau molecules in N2a cells expressing mutant human Tau. We also studied exosomes from cerebrospinal fluid in AD and control subjects containing monomeric and oligomeric Tau. Split-luciferase complementation reveals that exosomes from CSF can promote Tau aggregation in cultured cells. Our study demonstrates that exosomes contribute

  16. Trichomonas vaginalis Exosomes Deliver Cargo to Host Cells and Mediate Host∶Parasite Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Olivia; Lustig, Gila; Stevens, Grant C.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogential tract where it remains extracellular and adheres to epithelial cells. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Here, we use a combination of methodologies including cell fractionation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, RNA, proteomic and cytokine analyses and cell adherence assays to examine pathogenic properties of T. vaginalis. We have found that T.vaginalis produces and secretes microvesicles with physical and biochemical properties similar to mammalian exosomes. The parasite-derived exosomes are characterized by the presence of RNA and core, conserved exosomal proteins as well as parasite-specific proteins. We demonstrate that T. vaginalis exosomes fuse with and deliver their contents to host cells and modulate host cell immune responses. Moreover, exosomes from highly adherent parasite strains increase the adherence of poorly adherent parasites to vaginal and prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, exosomes from poorly adherent strains had no measurable effect on parasite adherence. Exosomes from parasite strains that preferentially bind prostate cells increased binding of parasites to these cells relative to vaginal cells. In addition to establishing that parasite exosomes act to modulate host∶parasite interactions, these studies are the first to reveal a potential role for exosomes in promoting parasite∶parasite communication and host cell colonization. PMID:23853596

  17. Trichomonas vaginalis exosomes deliver cargo to host cells and mediate host∶parasite interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Twu

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogential tract where it remains extracellular and adheres to epithelial cells. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Here, we use a combination of methodologies including cell fractionation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, RNA, proteomic and cytokine analyses and cell adherence assays to examine pathogenic properties of T. vaginalis. We have found that T.vaginalis produces and secretes microvesicles with physical and biochemical properties similar to mammalian exosomes. The parasite-derived exosomes are characterized by the presence of RNA and core, conserved exosomal proteins as well as parasite-specific proteins. We demonstrate that T. vaginalis exosomes fuse with and deliver their contents to host cells and modulate host cell immune responses. Moreover, exosomes from highly adherent parasite strains increase the adherence of poorly adherent parasites to vaginal and prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, exosomes from poorly adherent strains had no measurable effect on parasite adherence. Exosomes from parasite strains that preferentially bind prostate cells increased binding of parasites to these cells relative to vaginal cells. In addition to establishing that parasite exosomes act to modulate host∶parasite interactions, these studies are the first to reveal a potential role for exosomes in promoting parasite∶parasite communication and host cell colonization.

  18. Exosomes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I Pathogenesis: Threat or Opportunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin-Yeang Teow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanometre-sized vesicles, also known as exosomes, are derived from endosomes of diverse cell types and present in multiple biological fluids. Depending on their cellular origins, the membrane-bound exosomes packed a variety of functional proteins and RNA species. These microvesicles are secreted into the extracellular space to facilitate intercellular communication. Collective findings demonstrated that exosomes from HIV-infected subjects share many commonalities with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1 particles in terms of proteomics and lipid profiles. These observations postulated that HIV-resembled exosomes may contribute to HIV pathogenesis. Interestingly, recent reports illustrated that exosomes from body fluids could inhibit HIV infection, which then bring up a new paradigm for HIV/AIDS therapy. Accumulative findings suggested that the cellular origin of exosomes may define their effects towards HIV-1. This review summarizes the two distinctive roles of exosomes in regulating HIV pathogenesis. We also highlighted several additional factors that govern the exosomal functions. Deeper understanding on how exosomes promote or abate HIV infection can significantly contribute to the development of new and potent antiviral therapeutic strategy and vaccine designs.

  19. Exosomes in Prostate Cancer: Putting Together the Pieces of a Puzzle

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    Soekmadji, Carolina, E-mail: carolina.soekmadji@qut.edu.au; Russell, Pamela J.; Nelson, Colleen C. [Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre-Queensland, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Translational Research Institute, Level 3 West, 37 Kent Street, Brisbane, Queensland 4102 (Australia)

    2013-11-11

    Exosomes have been shown to act as mediators for cell to cell communication and as a potential source of biomarkers for many diseases, including prostate cancer. Exosomes are nanosized vesicles secreted by cells and consist of proteins normally found in multivesicular bodies, RNA, DNA and lipids. As a potential source of biomarkers, exosomes have attracted considerable attention, as their protein content resembles that of their cells of origin, even though it is noted that the proteins, miRNAs and lipids found in the exosomes are not a reflective stoichiometric sampling of the contents from the parent cells. While the biogenesis of exosomes in dendritic cells and platelets has been extensively characterized, much less is known about the biogenesis of exosomes in cancer cells. An understanding of the processes involved in prostate cancer will help to further elucidate the role of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles in prostate cancer progression and metastasis. There are few methodologies available for general isolation of exosomes, however validation of those methodologies is necessary to study the role of exosomal-derived biomarkers in various diseases. In this review, we discuss “exosomes” as a member of the family of extracellular vesicles and their potential to provide candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer.

  20. Exosomes as nucleic acid nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boorn, Jasper G; Dassler, Juliane; Coch, Christoph; Schlee, Martin; Hartmann, Gunther

    2013-03-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced naturally by many cell types. They are specifically loaded with nucleic acid cargo, dependent on the exosome-producing cell and its homeostatic state. As natural intercellular shuttles of miRNA, exosomes influence an array of developmental, physiological and pathological processes in the recipient cell or tissue to which they can be selectively targeted by their tetraspanin surface-domains. By a review of current research, we illustrate here why exosomes are ideal nanocarriers for use in the targeted in vivo delivery of nucleic acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Retracted: Exosomes secreted by human urine-derived stem cells accelerate skin wound healing by promoting angiogenesis in rat by Yuan H, Guan J, Zhang J, Zhang R, Li M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The above article, published online on 21 April 2016 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cbin.10615/full), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor, Sergio Schenkman, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed because the authors discovered inconsistent results in repeated tests. The authors and publisher apologise for any inconvenience. Reference Yuan H, Guan J, Zhang J, Zhang R, LiM(2016) Exosomes secreted by human urine-derived stem cells accelerate skin wound healing by promoting angiogenesis in rat. Cell Biol Int, Accepted Author Manuscript. https://doi.org/10.1002/cbin.10615. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  2. Leishmania exosomes modulate innate and adaptive immune responses through effects on monocytes and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Judith Maxwell; Clos, Joachim; Horakova, Eva; Wang, Adele Y; Wiesgigl, Martina; Kelly, Isabelle; Lynn, Miriam A; McMaster, W Robert; Foster, Leonard J; Levings, Megan K; Reiner, Neil E

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the properties of leishmania exosomes with respect to influencing innate and adaptive immune responses. Exosomes from Leishmania donovani modulated human monocyte cytokine responses to IFN-γ in a bimodal fashion by promoting IL-10 production and inhibiting that of TNF-α. Moreover, these vesicles were inhibitory with respect to cytokine responses (IL-12p70, TNF-α, and IL-10) by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Exosomes from wild-type (WT) L. donovani failed to prime monocyte-derived dendritic cells to drive the differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. In contrast, vesicles from heat shock protein (HSP)100(-/-) L. donovani showed a gain-of-function and proinflammatory phenotype and promoted the differentiation of naive CD4 lymphocytes into Th1 cells. Proteomic analysis showed that exosomes from WT and HSP100(-/-) leishmania had distinct protein cargo, suggesting that packaging of proteins into exosomes is dependent in part on HSP100. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with WT L. donovani exosomes prior to challenge with WT organisms exacerbated infection and promoted IL-10 production in the spleen. In contrast, HSP100(-/-) exosomes promoted spleen cell production of IFN-γ and did not adversely affect hepatic parasite burdens. Furthermore, the proparasitic properties of WT exosomes were not species specific because BALB/c mice exposed to Leishmania major exosomes showed increased Th2 polarization and exacerbation of disease in response to infection with L. major. These findings demonstrate that leishmania exosomes are predominantly immunosuppressive. Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first evidence to suggest that changes in the protein cargo of exosomes may influence the impact of these vesicles on myeloid cell function.

  3. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. The RNA Exosome and RNA Exosome-linked Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Derrick J; Kuiper, Emily G; Jones, Stephanie K; Leung, Sara W; Corbett, Anita H; Fasken, Milo B

    2017-11-01

    The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved, ribonuclease complex that is critical for both processing and degradation of a variety of RNAs. Cofactors that associate with the RNA exosome likely dictate substrate specificity for this complex. Recently, mutations in genes encoding both structural subunits of the RNA exosome and its cofactors have been linked to human disease. Mutations in the RNA exosome genes EXOSC3 and EXOSC8 cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1b (PCH1b) and type 1c (PCH1c), respectively, which are similar autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in the RNA exosome gene EXOSC2 cause a distinct syndrome with various tissue-specific phenotypes including retinitis pigmentosa and mild intellectual disability. Mutations in genes that encode RNA exosome cofactors also cause tissue-specific diseases with complex phenotypes. How mutations in these genes give rise to distinct, tissue-specific diseases is not clear. In this review, we discuss the role of the RNA exosome complex and its cofactors in human disease, consider the amino acid changes that have been implicated in disease, and speculate on the mechanisms by which exosome gene mutations could underlie dysfunction and disease. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Role of TIM-4 in exosome-dependent entry of HIV-1 into human immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Brian; Farrow, Anitra L; Williams, Sparkle D; Bansal, Anju; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Gu, Linlin; Matthews, Qiana L

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes, 30-200 nm nanostructures secreted from donor cells and internalized by recipient cells, can play an important role in the cellular entry of some viruses. These microvesicles are actively secreted into various body fluids, including blood, urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and breast milk. We successfully isolated exosomes from human breast milk and plasma. The size and concentration of purified exosomes were measured by nanoparticle tracking, while Western blotting confirmed the presence of the exosomal-associated proteins CD9 and CD63, clathrin, and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin proteins (TIMs). Through viral infection assays, we determined that HIV-1 utilizes an exosome-dependent mechanism for entry into human immune cells. The virus contains high amounts of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and may bind PtdSer receptors, such as TIMs. This mechanism is supported by our findings that exosomes from multiple sources increased HIV-1 entry into T cells and macrophages, and viral entry was potently blocked with anti-TIM-4 antibodies.

  6. Resolving sorting mechanisms into exosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Willem

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of mechanisms driving protein sorting into exosomes is only beginning to emerge. In a paper recently published in Cell Research, Roucourt et al. report that trimming of heparan sulfate side chains of syndecans by endosomal heparanase facilitates sorting into exosomes by the formation

  7. Characterization of human thymic exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; van der Post, Sjoerd; Sandström, Kerstin; Bruhn, Sören; Benson, Mikael; Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia; Baranov, Vladimir; Telemo, Esbjörn; Ekwall, Olov

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized membrane-bound vesicles that are released by various cell types and are capable of carrying proteins, lipids and RNAs which can be delivered to recipient cells. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication and have been described to mediate immunologic information. In this article we report the first isolation and characterization of exosomes from human thymic tissue. Using electron microscopy, particle size determination, density gradient measurement, flow cytometry, proteomic analysis and microRNA profiling we describe the morphology, size, density, protein composition and microRNA content of human thymic exosomes. The thymic exosomes share characteristics with previously described exosomes such as antigen presentation molecules, but they also exhibit thymus specific features regarding surface markers, protein content and microRNA profile. Interestingly, thymic exosomes carry proteins that have a tissue restricted expression in the periphery which may suggest a role in T cell selection and the induction of central tolerance. We speculate that thymic exosomes may provide the means for intercellular information exchange necessary for negative selection and regulatory T cell formation of the developing thymocytes within the human thymic medulla.

  8. Characterization of human thymic exosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Skogberg

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanosized membrane-bound vesicles that are released by various cell types and are capable of carrying proteins, lipids and RNAs which can be delivered to recipient cells. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication and have been described to mediate immunologic information. In this article we report the first isolation and characterization of exosomes from human thymic tissue. Using electron microscopy, particle size determination, density gradient measurement, flow cytometry, proteomic analysis and microRNA profiling we describe the morphology, size, density, protein composition and microRNA content of human thymic exosomes. The thymic exosomes share characteristics with previously described exosomes such as antigen presentation molecules, but they also exhibit thymus specific features regarding surface markers, protein content and microRNA profile. Interestingly, thymic exosomes carry proteins that have a tissue restricted expression in the periphery which may suggest a role in T cell selection and the induction of central tolerance. We speculate that thymic exosomes may provide the means for intercellular information exchange necessary for negative selection and regulatory T cell formation of the developing thymocytes within the human thymic medulla.

  9. [Exosome: Trojan horse in immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Dan-Lei; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Bai, Xue-Fan

    2005-04-01

    Exosomes are small membrane-bound vesicles that are secreted by a multitude of eukaryocytes as a consequence of fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. Exosomes can play critical roles in different physiological processes depending on their origins. Exosomes secreted from professional antigen-presenting cells are enriched in MHC class I and II complexes, costimulatory molecules, hsp 70 and hsp 90 chaperones, therefore exosomes, like Trojan horse, are of importance of immunoregulation in vivo and in vitro. The review will present current trends of research on the fundamental properties, production and purification of exosomes, and will focus on their implementation in cancer and virus immunotherapy as a novel cell-free peptide-based vaccine.

  10. Exosomes as mediators of platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Jennifer; Atay, Safinur; Banskota, Samagya; Artale, Brittany; Schmitt, Sarah; Godwin, Andrew K

    2017-02-14

    Exosomes have been implicated in the cell-cell transfer of oncogenic proteins and genetic material. We speculated this may be one mechanism by which an intrinsically platinum-resistant population of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells imparts its influence on surrounding tumor cells. To explore this possibility we utilized a platinum-sensitive cell line, A2780 and exosomes derived from its resistant subclones, and an unselected, platinum-resistant EOC line, OVCAR10. A2780 cells demonstrate a ~2-fold increase in viability upon treatment with carboplatin when pre-exposed to exosomes from platinum-resistant cells as compared to controls. This coincided with increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). DNA sequencing of EOC cell lines revealed previously unreported somatic mutations in the Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog 4 (SMAD4) within platinum-resistant cells. A2780 cells engineered to exogenously express these SMAD4 mutations demonstrate up-regulation of EMT markers following carboplatin treatment, are more resistant to carboplatin, and release exosomes which impart a ~1.7-fold increase in resistance in naive A2780 recipient cells as compared to controls. These studies provide the first evidence that acquired SMAD4 mutations enhance the chemo-resistance profile of EOC and present a novel mechanism in which exchange of tumor-derived exosomes perpetuates an EMT phenotype, leading to the development of subpopulations of platinum-refractory cells.

  11. Plasma exosomes are enriched in Hsp70 and modulated by stress and cortisol in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Erin; Henrickson, Lynsi; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2017-02-01

    Exosomes are endosomally derived vesicles that are secreted from cells and contain a suite of molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. Recent studies suggest the possibility that exosomes in circulation may be affecting recipient target cell function, but the modes of action are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes are in circulation in fish plasma and that these vesicles are enriched with heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Exosomes were isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) plasma using differential centrifugation, and their presence was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and the exosomal marker acetylcholinesterase. Plasma exosomes were enriched with Hsp70, and this stress protein was transiently elevated in trout plasma in response to a heat shock in vivo Using trout hepatocytes in primary culture, we tested whether stress levels of cortisol, the principle corticosteroid in teleosts, regulates exosomal Hsp70 content. As expected, a 1-h heat shock (+15°C above ambient) increased Hsp70 expression in hepatocytes, and this led to higher Hsp70 enrichment in exosomes over a 24-h period. However, cortisol treatment significantly reduced the expression of Hsp70 in exosomes released from either unstressed or heat-shocked hepatocytes. This cortisol-mediated suppression was not specific to Hsp70 as beta-actin expression was also reduced in exosomes released from hepatocytes treated with the steroid. Our results suggest that circulating Hsp70 is released from target tissues via exosomes, and their release is modulated by stress and cortisol. Overall, we propose a novel role for extracellular vesicular transport of Hsp70 in the organismal stress response. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Identifying mRNA, MicroRNA and Protein Profiles of Melanoma Exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinlu; Taylor, Douglas D.; Rai, Shesh N.; Waigel, Sabine; Zacharias, Wolfgang; Hao, Hongying; McMasters, Kelly M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Exosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted into body fluids by multiple cell types, including tumor cells, and in various disease conditions. Tumor exosomes contain intact and functional mRNAs, small RNAs (including miRNAs), and proteins that can alter the cellular environment to favor tumor growth. Molecular profiling may increase our understanding of the role of exosomes in melanoma progression and may lead to discovery of useful biomarkers. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we used mRNA array profiling to identify thousands of exosomal mRNAs associated with melanoma progression and metastasis. Similarly, miRNA array profiling identified specific miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-31, -185, and -34b, involved in melanoma invasion. We also used proteomic analysis and discovered differentially expressed melanoma exosomal proteins, including HAPLN1, GRP78, syntenin-1, annexin A1, and annexin A2. Importantly, normal melanocytes acquired invasion ability through molecules transported in melanoma cell-derived exosomes. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that melanoma-derived exosomes have unique gene expression signatures, miRNA and proteomics profiles compared to exosomes from normal melanocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first in-depth screening of the whole transcriptome/miRNome/proteome expression in melanoma exosomes. These results provide a starting point for future more in-depth studies of tumor-derived melanoma exosomes, which will aid our understanding of melanoma biogenesis and new drug-targets that may be translated into clinical applications, or as non-invasive biomarkers for melanoma. PMID:23056502

  13. In silico target network analysis of de novo-discovered, tick saliva-specific microRNAs reveals important combinatorial effects in their interference with vertebrate host physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Michael; Langenberger, David; Schwarz, Alexandra; Erhart, Jan; Kotsyfakis, Michail

    2017-08-01

    The hard tick Ixodes ricinus is an important disease vector whose salivary secretions mediate blood-feeding success on vertebrate hosts, including humans. Here we describe the expression profiles and downstream analysis of de novo-discovered microRNAs (miRNAs) expressed in I. ricinus salivary glands and saliva. Eleven tick-derived libraries were sequenced to produce 67,375,557 Illumina reads. De novo prediction yielded 67 bona fide miRNAs out of which 35 are currently not present in miRBase. We report for the first time the presence of microRNAs in tick saliva, obtaining furthermore molecular indicators that those might be of exosomal origin. Ten out of these microRNAs are at least 100 times more represented in saliva. For the four most expressed microRNAs from this subset, we analyzed their combinatorial effects upon their host transcriptome using a novel in silico target network approach. We show that only the inclusion of combinatorial effects reveals the functions in important pathways related to inflammation and pain sensing. A control set of highly abundant microRNAs in both saliva and salivary glands indicates no significant pathways and a far lower number of shared target genes. Therefore, the analysis of miRNAs from pure tick saliva strongly supports the hypothesis that tick saliva miRNAs can modulate vertebrate host homeostasis and represents the first direct evidence of tick miRNA-mediated regulation of vertebrate host gene expression at the tick-host interface. As such, the herein described miRNAs may support future drug discovery and development projects that will also experimentally question their predicted molecular targets in the vertebrate host. © 2017 Hackenberg et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. Exosomes released by chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells induce the transition of stromal cells into cancer-associated fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggetti, Jerome; Haderk, Franziska; Seiffert, Martina; Janji, Bassam; Distler, Ute; Ammerlaan, Wim; Kim, Yeoun Jin; Adam, Julien; Lichter, Peter; Solary, Eric; Berchem, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes derived from solid tumor cells are involved in immune suppression, angiogenesis, and metastasis, but the role of leukemia-derived exosomes has been less investigated. The pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is stringently associated with a tumor-supportive microenvironment and a dysfunctional immune system. Here, we explore the role of CLL-derived exosomes in the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which malignant cells create this favorable surrounding. We show that CLL-derived exosomes are actively incorporated by endothelial and mesenchymal stem cells ex vivo and in vivo and that the transfer of exosomal protein and microRNA induces an inflammatory phenotype in the target cells, which resembles the phenotype of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). As a result, stromal cells show enhanced proliferation, migration, and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, contributing to a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Exosome uptake by endothelial cells increased angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo, and coinjection of CLL-derived exosomes and CLL cells promoted tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Finally, we detected α-smooth actin–positive stromal cells in lymph nodes of CLL patients. These findings demonstrate that CLL-derived exosomes actively promote disease progression by modulating several functions of surrounding stromal cells that acquire features of cancer-associated fibroblasts. PMID:26100252

  15. Multiple myeloma exosomes establish a favourable bone marrow microenvironment with enhanced angiogenesis and immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinheng; De Veirman, Kim; Faict, Sylvia; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Ribatti, Domenico; Vacca, Angelo; Menu, Eline

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis and progression largely rely on the cells and extracellular factors in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Compelling studies have identified tumour exosomes as key regulators in the maintenance and education of the BM microenvironment by targeting stromal cells, immune cells, and vascular cells. However, the role of MM exosomes in the modification of the BM microenvironment and MM progression remains unclear. Here, we explored the functions of MM exosomes in angiogenesis and immunosuppression in vitro and in vivo. Murine MM exosomes carrying multiple angiogenesis-related proteins enhanced angiogenesis and directly promoted endothelial cell growth. Several pathways such as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p53 were modulated by the exosomes in endothelial and BM stromal cells. These exosomes promoted the growth of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in naive mice through activation of the STAT3 pathway and changed their subsets to similar phenotypes to those seen in MM-bearing mice. Moreover, MM exosomes up-regulated inducible nitric oxide synthase and enhanced the immunosuppressive capacity of BM MDSCs in vivo. Our data show that MM exosomes modulate the BM microenvironment through enhancement of angiogenesis and immunosuppression, which will further facilitate MM progression. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Exosome-SIRPα, a CD47 blockade increases cancer cell phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eunee; Lee, Eun Jung; Nam, Gi-Hoon; Hong, Yeonsun; Cho, Eunji; Yang, Yoosoo; Kim, In-San

    2017-03-01

    CD47, a "don't eat me" signal, is over-expressed on the surface of most tumors that interacts with signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) on phagocytic cells. By engaging SIRPα, CD47 limits the ability of macrophages to engulf tumor cells, which acts as a major phagocytic barrier. In this study, we developed an exosome-based immune checkpoint blockade that antagonizes the interaction between CD47 and SIRPα. These exosomes harboring SIRPα variants (SIRPα-exosomes) were sufficient to induce remarkably augmented tumor phagocytosis, lead to prime effective anti-tumor T cell response. Given that clustering of native CD47 provides a high binding avidity to ligate dimerized SIRPα on macrophage, nature-derived exosomes could be appreciable platform to antagonize CD47. Disruption of CD47-SIRPα interaction by SIRPα-exosomes leads to an increase in cells being engulfed by macrophages and a concomitant inhibition of tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice. Moreover, SIRPα-exosomes therapy promotes an intensive T cell infiltration in syngeneic mouse models of cancer, raising the possibility of CD47-targeted therapies to unleash both an innate and adaptive anti-tumor response. Note that very small amount of exosomal SIRPα proteins could effectively lead to phagocytic elimination of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that superlative exosome-based platform has broad potential to maximize the therapeutic efficacy of membrane-associated protein therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Morphologic and proteomic characterization of exosomes released by cultured extravillous trophoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Safinur [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Gercel-Taylor, Cicek [Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Kesimer, Mehmet [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Taylor, Douglas D., E-mail: ddtaylor@louisville.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Exosomes represent an important intercellular communication vehicle, mediating events essential for the decidual microenvironment. While we have demonstrated exosome induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, to date, no extensive characterization of trophoblast-derived exosomes has been provided. Our objective was to provide a morphologic and proteomic characterization of these exosomes. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned media of Swan71 human trophoblast cells by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. These were analyzed for density (sucrose density gradient centrifugation), morphology (electron microscopy), size (dynamic light scattering) and protein composition (Ion Trap mass spectrometry and western immunoblotting). Based on density gradient centrifugation, microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit a density between 1.134 and 1.173 g/ml. Electron microscopy demonstrated that microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit the characteristic cup-shaped morphology of exosomes. Dynamic light scattering showed a bell-shaped curve, indicating a homogeneous population with a mean size of 165 nm {+-} 0.5 nm. Ion Trap mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of exosome marker proteins (including CD81, Alix, cytoskeleton related proteins, and Rab family). The MS results were confirmed by western immunoblotting. Based on morphology, density, size and protein composition, we defined the release of exosomes from extravillous trophoblast cells and provide their first extensive characterization. This characterization is essential in furthering our understanding of 'normal' early pregnancy.

  18. Exosomes as biomimetic tools for stem cell differentiation: Applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Chieh; Narayanan, Raghuvaran; Alapati, Satish; Ravindran, Sriram

    2016-12-01

    Achieving and maintaining safe and reliable lineage specific differentiation of stem cells is important for clinical translation of tissue engineering strategies. In an effort to circumvent the multitude of problems arising from the usage of growth factors and growth factor delivery systems, we have explored the use of exosomes as biomimetic tools to induce stem cell differentiation. Working on the hypothesis that cell-type specific exosomes can trigger lineage-specific differentiation of stem cells, we have evaluated the potential of exosomes derived from dental pulp cells cultured on under growth and odontogenic differentiation conditions to induce odontogenic differentiation of naïve human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and human bone marrow derived stromal cells (HMSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Results indicate that the exosomes can bind to matrix proteins such as type I collagen and fibronectin enabling them to be tethered to biomaterials. The exosomes are endocytosed by both DPSCs and HMSCs in a dose-dependent and saturable manner via the caveolar endocytic mechanism and trigger the P38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In addition, the exosomes also trigger the increased expression of genes required for odontogenic differentiation. When tested in vivo in a tooth root slice model with DPSCs, the exosomes triggered regeneration of dental pulp-like tissue. However, our results indicate that exosomes isolated under odontogenic conditions are better inducers of stem cell differentiation and tissue regeneration. Overall, our results highlight the potential exosomes as biomimetic tools to induce lineage specific differentiation of stem cells. Our results also show the importance of considering the source and state of exosome donor cells before a choice is made for therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Circulating exosomes as new biomarkers for brain disease and injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graner, Michael W.; Epple, Laura M.; Dusto, Nathaniel L.; Lencioni, Alex M.; Nega, Meheret; Herring, Matthew; Winston, Ben; Madsen, Helen; Bemis, Lynne T.; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    Brain diseases such as cancers, neurodegenerative disorders, or trauma are frequently diagnosed with imaging modalities and sometimes with intracranial biopsies. Treatment response is similarly monitored, along with clinical indications. While these technologies provide important windows into the disease state, they fail to provide us a detailed molecular portrait of the disease and of the changes taking place during therapy. Exosomes are virus-sized nanovesicles derived from the endosomal system and are released extracellularly from essentially all cell types. Exosomes contain intracellular entities (proteins, nucleic acids, metabolites), membrane proteins and lipids, and even extracellular proteins bound to them. Exosomes may be considered as mini-surrogates of their cells of origin, with some content common to all cells/exosomes, but some of the content would be cell-specific. These vesicles are found in all biofluids in humans, and are thus accessible to "liquid biopsy" with harvest of vesicles from such fluids. Current challenges are to identify disease-related markers or panels of markers to distinguish the disease state. Here we will show examples of brain tumor markers found in/on exosomes from cell culture and patient sera, and we will suggest that aspects of the biology of disease may have a relevant place in the search for biomarkers.

  20. Exosomes: A Novel Strategy for Treatment and Prevention of Diseases

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    Jiaqi Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An “exosome” is a nanoscale membrane vesicle derived from cell endocytosis that functions as an important intercellular communication mediator regulating the exchange of proteins and genetic materials between donor and surrounding cells. Exosomes secreted by normal and cancer cells participate in tumor initiation, progression, invasion, and metastasis. Furthermore, immune cells and cancer cells exert a two-way bidirectional regulatory effect on tumor immunity by exchanging exosomes. Current studies on exosomes have further expanded their known functions in physiological and pathological processes. The purpose of this review is to describe their discovery and biological functions in the context of their enormous potential in the clinical diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer as well as bacterial and viral infectious diseases.

  1. Exosomes derived from human mesenchymal stem cells promote gastric cancer cell growth and migration via the activation of the Akt pathway.

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    Gu, Hongbing; Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Chen, Yongchang; Jiang, Pengcheng; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a component of the tumor microenvironment and can promote the development of gastric cancer through paracrine mechanism. However, the effects of MSC‑exosomes (MSC‑ex) on gastric cancer are less clear. The present study reported that MSC‑ex promoted the proliferative and metastatic potential of gastric cancer cells ex vivo. It was found that MSC‑ex enhanced the migration and invasion of HGC‑27 cells via the induction of the epithelial‑mesenchymal transition. MSC‑ex increased the expression of mesenchymal markers and reduced the expression of epithelial markers in gastric cancer cells. MSC‑ex also enhanced the tumorigenicity of gastric cancer cells ex vivo. MSC‑ex induced the stemness of gastric cancer cells. The expression of octamer‑binding transcription factor 4, ex determining region Y‑box 2 and Lin28B significantly increased in gastric cancer cells treated with MSC‑ex. The present study further demonstrated that MSC‑ex elicited these biological effects predominantly via the activation of the protein kinase B signaling pathway. Taken together, the present findings provided novel evidence for the role of MSC‑ex in gastric cancer and a new opportunity for improving the efficiency of gastric cancer treatment by targeting MSC‑ex.

  2. Post-translational modifications of exosomal proteins.

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    Moreno-Gonzalo, Olga; Villarroya-Beltri, Carolina; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes mediate intercellular communication and participate in many cell processes such as cancer progression, immune activation or evasion, and the spread of infection. Exosomes are small vesicles secreted to the extracellular environment through the release of intraluminal vesicles contained in multivesicular bodies (MVBs) upon the fusion of these MVBs with the plasma membrane. The composition of exosomes is not random, suggesting that the incorporation of cargo into them is a regulated process. However, the mechanisms that control the sorting of protein cargo into exosomes are currently elusive. Here, we review the post-translational modifications detected in exosomal proteins, and discuss their possible role in their specific sorting into exosomes.

  3. Effect on Intermittent Hypoxia on Plasma Exosomal Micro RNA Signature and Endothelial Function in Healthy Adults.

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    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Zhang, Chunling; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Foster, Glen E; Beaudin, Andrew E; Andrade, Jorge; Hanly, Patrick J; Poulin, Marc J; Gozal, David

    2016-12-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types and released in biological fluids, including plasma, and play a role in modifying the functional phenotype of target cells. Using an experimental human model of IH, we investigated potential exosome-derived biomarkers of IH-induced vascular dysfunction. Ten male volunteers were exposed to room air (D0), IH (6 h/day) for 4 days (D4) and allowed to recover for 4 days (D8). Circulating plasma exosomes were isolated and incubated with human endothelial monolayer cultures for impedance measurements and RNA extracted and processed with messenger RNA (mRNA) arrays to identify gene targets. In addition, immunofluorescent assessments of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA expression, ICAM-1 cellular distribution were conducted. Plasma exosomal micro RNAs (miRNAs) were profiled. D4 exosomes, primarily from endothelial sources, disrupted impedance levels compared to D0 and D8. ICAM-1 expression was markedly upregulated in endothelial cells exposed to D4 exosomes along with significant reductions in eNOS expression. Microarray approaches identified a restricted and further validated signature of exosomal miRNAs in D4 exosomes, and mRNA arrays revealed putative endothelial gene target pathways. In humans, intermittent hypoxia alters exosome cargo in the circulation which promotes increased permeability and dysfunction of endothelial cells in vitro. A select number of circulating exosomal miRNAs may play important roles in the cardiovascular dysfunction associated with OSA by targeting specific effector pathways.

  4. Exosomes in Pathogen Infections: A Bridge to Deliver Molecules and Link Functions

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    Wenchao Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are extracellular vesicles derived from cell endocytosis which act as transmitters between cells. They are composed of proteins, lipids, and RNAs through which they participate in cellular crosstalk. Consequently, they play an important role in health and disease. Our view is that exosomes exert a bidirectional regulatory effect on pathogen infections by delivering their content. First, exosomes containing proteins and RNAs derived from pathogens can promote infections in three ways: (1 mediating further infection by transmitting pathogen-related molecules; (2 participating in the immune escape of pathogens; and (3 inhibiting immune responses by favoring immune cell apoptosis. Second, exosomes play anti-infection roles through: (1 inhibiting pathogen proliferation and infection directly; (2 inducing immune responses such as those related to the function of monocyte-macrophages, NK cells, T cells, and B cells. We believe that exosomes act as “bridges” during pathogen infections through the mechanisms mentioned above. The purpose of this review is to describe present findings regarding exosomes and pathogen infections, and highlight their enormous potential in clinical diagnosis and treatment. We discuss two opposite aspects: infection and anti-infection, and we hypothesize a balance between them. At the same time, we elaborate on the role of exosomes in immune regulation.

  5. Isolation of Exosomes from Blood Plasma: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparison of Ultracentrifugation and Size Exclusion Chromatography Methods.

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    Tamás Baranyai

    Full Text Available Exosomes are emerging targets for biomedical research. However, suitable methods for the isolation of blood plasma-derived exosomes without impurities have not yet been described.Therefore, we investigated the efficiency and purity of exosomes isolated with potentially suitable methods; differential ultracentrifugation (UC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC.Exosomes were isolated from rat and human blood plasma by various UC and SEC conditions. Efficiency was investigated at serial UC of the supernatant, while in case of SEC by comparing the content of exosomal markers of various fractions. Purity was assessed based on the presence of albumin. We found that the diameter of the majority of isolated particles fell into the size range of exosomes, however, albumin was also present in the preparations, when 1h UC at 4°C was applied. Furthermore, with this method only a minor fraction of total exosomes could be isolated from blood as deduced from the constant amount of exosomal markers CD63 and TSG101 detected after serial UC of rat blood plasma samples. By using UC for longer time or with shorter sedimentation distance at 4°C, or UC performed at 37°C, exosomal yield increased, but albumin impurity was still observed in the isolates, as assessed by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and immunoblotting against CD63, TSG101 and albumin. Efficiency and purity were not different in case of using further diluted samples. By using SEC with different columns, we have found that although a minor fraction of exosomes can be isolated without significant albumin content on Sepharose CL-4B or Sephacryl S-400 columns, but not on Sepharose 2B columns, the majority of exosomes co-eluted with albumin.Here we show that it is feasible to isolate exosomes from blood plasma by SEC without significant albumin contamination albeit with low vesicle yield.

  6. Role of Exosomes in Placental Homeostasis and Pregnancy Disorders.

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    Salomon, C; Rice, G E

    2017-01-01

    The human placenta is a unique organ that performs the function of the majority of fetal organs across gestation. How the placenta communicates with maternal tissues to prepare them for pregnancy is not fully understood. Recently, it has been established that placental cells can communicate with maternal tissues to regulate their biological function via extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs are subclassified into exosomes or microvesicles (MVs) according to their size, cell or tissue of origin, functions, and physical features. Exosomes are a specific type of EVs from an endocytic origin, while MVs are released via budding from the plasma membrane. With regards to pregnancy, the role of EVs has been described in several functions such as immune responses and maternal metabolic adaptation to gestation. Interestingly, EVs of placental origin can be detected in a variety of body fluids including urine and blood, and have been identified in the maternal circulation at as early as 6 weeks of gestation. Moreover, the number of exosomes across gestation is higher in complications of pregnancies such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus compared to normal pregnancies. Circulating exosomes contains proteins and RNAs that are representative of the cell of origin, including surface and cytoplasmic protein, messenger RNA, and micro-RNAs. Finally, exosomes are capable of transferring their contents to other cells and regulating the biological function of the target cell. In this review, we will discuss the effect of the maternal microenvironment on secretion and content of placenta-derived EVs, and how this may lead to complications of pregnancies with a special emphasis on exosomes. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerging roles of exosomes in normal and pathological conditions. New insights for diagnosis and therapeutic applications

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    Julieta eDe Toro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available From the time when they were first described in the 1970s by the group of Johnstone and Stahl, exosomes are a target of constant research. Exosomes belong to the family of nano-vesicles which are of great interest for their many functions and potential for diagnosis and therapy in multiples diseases. Exosomes originate from the intraluminal vesicles of late endosomal compartments named multivesicular bodies and the fusion of these late endosomes with the cell membrane result in the release of the vesicles into the extracellular compartment. Moreover, their generation can be induced by many factors including extracellular stimuli, such as microbial attack and other stress conditions. The primary role attributed to exosomes was the removal of unnecessary proteins from the cells. Now, several studies have demonstrated that exosomes are involved in cell-cell communication, even though their biological function is not completely clear.The participation of exosomes in cancer is the field of microvesicle research that has expanded more over the last years. Evidence proving that exosomes derived from tumor-pulsed dendritic cells, neoplastic cells and malignant effusions, are able to present antigens to T‐cells, has led to numerous studies using them as cell free cancer vaccines.Since exosomes derive from all cell types, they contain proteins, lipids and miRNA capable of regulating a variety of target genes. Much research is being conducted, which focuses on the employment of these vesicles as biomarkers in the diagnosis of cancer in addition to innovative biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and management of cardiovascular diseases. Interesting findings indicating the role of exosomes in the pathogenesis of several diseases have encouraged researchers to consider their therapeutic potential not only in oncology but also in the treatment of autoimmune syndromes and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer´s and Parkinson´s disease; in addition

  8. A combination of exosomes carrying TSA derived from HLA-A2-positive human white buffy coat and polyI:C for use as a subcellular antitumor vaccination.

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    Ren, Wei-na; Chang, Chun-kang; Fan, Hua-hua; Guo, Fang; Ren, Ya-na; Yang, Jie; Guo, Juan; Li, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    To improve its antitumor effect, we used human leukocyte antigen -A2 (HLA-A2)-positive human dendritic cell (DC)-derived DEXs (DC-derived exosomes) to support NY-ESO-1 antigen and polyI:C, with the aim of increasing the proliferation of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in transgenic mice. Mature dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood of healthy adults with positive HLA-2A. Using centrifuge and membrane ultrafiltration, EXO (exosomes) were extracted from the supernatant of DCs secretions. Transgenic C57 mice were immunized with human-derived tumor testis antigen NY-ESO-1/EXO, with or without polyI:C. Mice were sacrificed four weeks after immunization, and spleen cells were isolated and tested for function. The experiments included antigen-specific CTL proliferation, as tested by dimerization and antitumor effects for K562 cells as well as melanoma, tested at different ratios of effected cells:target cells (0:1, 10:1, 50:1, and 100:1). Dimerization experiments indicated that the effect of DEX/TSA (tumor specific antigens) + PolyI:C was 2.36 ± 1.10% and the control was 0.38 ± 0.31%, while the effect of DEX/TSA was 1.97 ± 0.63% and the control was 0.36 ± 0.07%. Antitumor effects by DEX/TSA: PolyI:C for the cell ratios of 0:1, 10:1, 50:1, and 100:1 were 11.14 ± 1.36%, 14.17 ± 0.62%, 15.71 ± 2.48%, and 24.31 ± 2.91%, respectively, for K562 cells. The antitumor effects for DEX/TSA for the cell ratios of 0:1, 10:1, 50:1, and 100:1 were 12.23 ± 2.25%, 13.10 ± 1.57%, 15.27 ± 2.93%, and 19.87 ± 2.72%, respectively, for K562 cells. With ratios of 10:1 and 100:1, the antitumor effects of DEX/TSA + PolyI:C were better than for the DEX/TSA group (P TSA derived from healthy human blood positive for HLA-A2 is a promising strategy for developing new subcellular antitumor vaccination.

  9. Tumor Exosomes Induce Tunneling Nanotubes in Lipid Raft-Enriched Regions of Human Mesothelioma Cells

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    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Philip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, André L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Phil, D.; Lou, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24-48 hours; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3-1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. PMID:24468420

  10. The biological significance and clinical applications of exosomes in ovarian cancer.

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    Dorayappan, Kalpana Deepa Priya; Wallbillich, John J; Cohn, David E; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized (20-100nm) vesicles released by a variety of cells and are generated within the endosomal system or at the plasma membrane. There is emerging evidence that exosomes play a key role in intercellular communication in ovarian and other cancers. The protein and microRNA content of exosomes has been implicated in various intracellular processes that mediate oncogenesis, tumor spread, and drug resistance. Exosomes may prime distant tissue sites for reception of future metastases and their release can be mediated by the tumor microenvironment (e.g., hypoxia). Ovarian cancer-derived exosomes have unique features that could be leveraged for use as biomarkers to facilitate improved detection and treatment of the disease. Further, exosomes have the potential to serve as targets and/or drug delivery vehicles in the treatment of ovarian cancer. In this review we discuss the biological and clinical significance of exosomes relevant to the progression, detection, and treatment of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exosome in Tumour Microenvironment: Overview of the Crosstalk between Normal and Cancer Cells

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    Catarina Roma-Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer development is a multistep process in which exosomes play important roles. Exosomes are small vesicles formed in vesicular bodies in the endosomal network. The major role of exosomes seems to be the transport of bioactive molecules between cells. Depending on the cell of origin, exosomes are implicated in the regulation of several cellular events, with phenotypic consequences in recipient cells. Cancer derived exosomes (CCEs are important players in the formation of the tumour microenvironment by (i enabling the escape of tumour cells to immunological system and help initiating the inflammatory response; (ii acting in the differentiation of fibroblasts and mesenchymal cells into myofibroblasts; (iii triggering the angiogenic process; and (iv enhancing the metastatic evolution of the tumour by promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transformation of tumour cells and by preparing the tumour niche in the new anatomical location. Since the finding that exosomes content resembles that of the cell of origin, they may be regarded as suitable biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, allowing for diagnosis and prognosis via a minimal invasive procedure. Exosome involvement in cancer may open new avenues regarding therapeutics, such as vectors for targeted drug delivery.

  12. Exosomal transfer of proteins and RNAs at synapses in the nervous system

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    Smalheiser Neil R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cell types have been reported to secrete small vesicles called exosomes, that are derived from multivesicular bodies and that can also form from endocytic-like lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane. Secretory exosomes contain a characteristic composition of proteins, and a recent report indicates that mast cell exosomes harbor a variety of mRNAs and microRNAs as well. Exosomes express cell recognition molecules on their surface that facilitate their selective targeting and uptake into recipient cells. Results In this review, I suggest that exosomal secretion of proteins and RNAs may be a fundamental mode of communication within the nervous system, supplementing the known mechanisms of anterograde and retrograde signaling across synapses. In one specific scenario, exosomes are proposed to bud from the lipid raft region of the postsynaptic membrane adjacent to the postsynaptic density, in a manner that is stimulated by stimuli that elicit long-term potentiation. The exosomes would then transfer newly synthesized synaptic proteins (such as CAM kinase II alpha and synaptic RNAs to the presynaptic terminal, where they would contribute to synaptic plasticity. Conclusion The model is consistent with the known cellular and molecular features of synaptic neurobiology and makes a number of predictions that can be tested in vitro and in vivo. Open peer review Reviewed by Etienne Joly, Gaspar Jekely, Juergen Brosius and Eugene Koonin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  13. Role of Exosomes Released by Dendritic Cells and/or by Tumor Targets: Regulation of NK Cell Plasticity.

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    Reiners, Katrin S; Dassler, Juliane; Coch, Christoph; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are endosomal-derived nanovesicles released by normal and tumor cells, which transfer functionally active proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids between cells. They are important mediators of intercellular communication and act on the adjacent stroma as well as in the periphery. Recently, exosomes have been recognized to play a pathophysiological role in various diseases such as cancer or infectious diseases. Tumor cell-derived exosomes (Tex) have been shown to act as tumor promotors by educating non-malignant cells to provide a tumor supporting microenvironment, which helps to circumvent immune detection by the host and supports metastasis. However, Tex with anti-tumor, immune-activating properties were also described reflecting the complexity of exosomes. Here, we assess the role of extracellular microvesicles/exosomes as messengers affecting NK cell function in health and disease and discuss the molecular basis for the differential impact of exosomes on NK cell activity. The molecular composition/load of exosomes and the mechanisms regulating their release remain unclear and need to be further analyzed to facilitate the development of new treatment options targeting the exosomal machinery.

  14. TWEAK-stimulated macrophages inhibit metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer via exosomal shuttling of microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Li, Dong; Wu, Anyue; Qiu, Xingdi; Di, Wen; Huang, Lei; Qiu, Lihua

    2017-05-01

    Exosomal-miRNAs are emerging as mediators of crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. In this study, we observed that exosomes derived from TWEAK-stimulated macrophages (TMs) could be internalized by epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells and inhibit cell metastasis. Through a miRNA microarray analysis, we identified 19 miRNAs that are differentially expressed in exosomes derived from macrophages treated with or without TWEAK. The study validated that TWEAK not only increased the levels of microRNA-7 (miR-7) in macrophages and its secreted exosomes but also resulted in an elevated level of miR-7 in recipient EOC cells, which eventually reduced the activity of the EGFR/AKT/ERK1/2 pathway. Pre-transfection of antagomiR-7 in TMs substantially decreased the levels of miR-7 in macrophages, its secreted exosomes and the recipient EOC cells with a concomitant enhancement of EOC metastasis, suggesting an involvement of exosomal miR-7 from TMs in modulating the metastasis of EOC cells. Finally, the exosomes from TMs significantly blocked EOC metastasis in a xenograft mouse model. These findings provide a novel model in which TMs inhibit the metastasis of EOC cells via shuttling of exosomal miR-7 to EOC cells, thereby inhibiting the EGFR/AKT/ERK1/2 pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification and Reconstruction of Prostate Tumor-Suppressing Exosomes for Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Fevrier B, Raposo G. Exosomes: endosomal-derived vesicles shipping extracellular messages. Current opinion in cell biology 2004;16(4):415-21. 2. Record...overarching challenges of PCRP is to develop effective treatments for advanced prostate cancer. As nano-meter sized vesicles released by many cell types...meter sized vesicles released by many cell types (1). Comprised of lipids, proteins, coding and non-coding RNAs, exosomes serve as cargo carriers

  16. Exosomes and Exosomal miRNA in Respiratory Diseases

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    Shamila D. Alipoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanosized vesicles released from every cell in the body including those in the respiratory tract and lungs. They are found in most body fluids and contain a number of different biomolecules including proteins, lipids, and both mRNA and noncoding RNAs. Since they can release their contents, particularly miRNAs, to both neighboring and distal cells, they are considered important in cell-cell communication. Recent evidence has shown their possible importance in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. The differential expression of exosomes and of exosomal miRNAs in disease has driven their promise as biomarkers of disease enabling noninvasive clinical diagnosis in addition to their use as therapeutic tools. In this review, we summarize recent advances in this area as applicable to pulmonary diseases.

  17. Molecular lipid species in urinary exosomes as potential prostate cancer biomarkers.

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    Skotland, Tore; Ekroos, Kim; Kauhanen, Dimple; Simolin, Helena; Seierstad, Therese; Berge, Viktor; Sandvig, Kirsten; Llorente, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes have recently appeared as a novel source of noninvasive cancer biomarkers, since these nanovesicles contain molecules from cancer cells and can be detected in biofluids. We have here investigated the potential use of lipids in urinary exosomes as prostate cancer biomarkers. A high-throughput mass spectrometry quantitative lipidomic analysis was performed to reveal the lipid composition of urinary exosomes in prostate cancer patients and healthy controls. Control samples were first analysed to characterise the lipidome of urinary exosomes and test the reproducibility of the method. In total, 107 lipid species were quantified in urinary exosomes. Several differences, for example, in cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine, were found between urinary exosomes and exosomes derived from cell lines, thus showing the importance of in vivo studies for biomarker analysis. The 36 most abundant lipid species in urinary exosomes were then quantified in 15 prostate cancer patients and 13 healthy controls. Interestingly, the levels of nine lipids species were found to be significantly different when the two groups were compared. The highest significance was shown for phosphatidylserine (PS) 18:1/18:1 and lactosylceramide (d18:1/16:0), the latter also showed the highest patient-to-control ratio. Furthermore, combinations of these lipid species and PS 18:0-18:2 distinguished the two groups with 93% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Finally, in agreement with the reported dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism in cancer cells, alteration in specific sphingolipid lipid classes were observed. This study shows for the first time the potential use of exosomal lipid species in urine as prostate cancer biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exosomes in the nose induce immune cell trafficking and harbour an altered protein cargo in chronic airway inflammation.

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    Lässer, Cecilia; O'Neil, Serena E; Shelke, Ganesh V; Sihlbom, Carina; Hansson, Sara F; Gho, Yong Song; Lundbäck, Bo; Lötvall, Jan

    2016-06-20

    Exosomes are nano-sized extracellular vesicles participating in cell-to-cell communication both in health and disease. However, the knowledge about the functions and molecular composition of exosomes in the upper airways is limited. The aim of the current study was therefore to determine whether nasal exosomes can influence inflammatory cells and to establish the proteome of nasal lavage fluid-derived exosomes in healthy subjects, as well as its alterations in individuals with chronic airway inflammatory diseases [asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)]. Nasal lavage fluid was collected from 14 healthy subjects, 15 subjects with asthma and 13 subjects with asthma/CRS. Exosomes were isolated with differential centrifugation and the proteome was analysed by LC-MS/MS with the application of two exclusion lists as well as using quantitative proteomics. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and GO Term finder was used to predict the functions associated with the exosomal proteome and a migration assay was used to analyse the effect on immune cells by nasal exosomes. Firstly, we demonstrate that nasal exosomes can induce migration of several immune cells, such as monocytes, neutrophils and NK cells in vitro. Secondly, a mass spectrometry approach, with the application of exclusion lists, was utilised to generate a comprehensive protein inventory of the exosomes from healthy subjects. The use of exclusion lists resulted in the identification of ~15 % additional proteins, and increased the confidence in ~20 % of identified proteins. In total, 604 proteins were identified in nasal exosomes and the nasal exosomal proteome showed strong associations with immune-related functions, such as immune cell trafficking. Thirdly, a quantitative proteomics approach was used to determine alterations in the exosome proteome as a result of airway inflammatory disease. Serum-associated proteins and mucins were more abundant in the exosomes from subjects with respiratory diseases compared to

  19. Exosomic microRNAs in the tumor microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eNeviani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissecting the cross talk between tumor cells and tumor microenvironment is quickly becoming the new frontier in cancer research. It is now widely accepted that cancer cells can exert a profound influence over their surroundings, by changing the microenvironment from a normal to a tumor-supportive state that allows for sustained tumor-growth, invasion and drug-resistance. Extracellular vesicles, especially exosomes, are recognized as a new category of intercellular communicator and they are emerging as of primary importance in controlling the interplay between the tumor and its environment. Exosomes derived from cancer cells or from cells of the tumor microenvironment allow for the horizontal transfer of information by virtue of their cargo, made of functional proteins and nucleic acids that are specifically sorted and loaded in exosomes during their biogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge regarding the role invested by microRNAs, a family of short non-coding RNAs frequently deregulated in malignancies and present in exosomes, in shaping the microenvironment in a cancer-dependent manner.

  20. Exosomal microRNA communication between tissues during organogenesis

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    Hayashi, Toru; Hoffman, Matthew P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are required to coordinate cell proliferation, patterning, and functional differentiation of multiple cell types in a developing organ. This exquisite coordination is dependent on various secreted molecules that provide developmental signals to mediate these tissue interactions. Recently, it was reported that mature mesenchymal-derived microRNAs (miRNAs) in the fetal mouse salivary gland are loaded into exosomes, and transported to the epithelium where they influence progenitor cell proliferation. The exosomal miRNAs regulated epithelial expression of genes involved in DNA methylation in progenitor cells to influence morphogenesis. Thus, exosomal miRNAs are mobile genetic signals that cross tissue boundaries within an organ. These findings raise many questions about how miRNA signals are initiated to coordinate organogenesis and whether they are master regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. The development of therapeutic applications using exosomal miRNAs for the regeneration of damaged adult organs is a promising area of research. PMID:28816640

  1. Exosomal long noncoding RNA CRNDE-h as a novel serum-based biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Xin; Gao, Shanyu; Jing, Fangmiao; Yang, Yongmei; Du, Lutao; Zheng, Guixi; Li, Peilong; Li, Chen; Wang, Chuanxin

    2016-12-20

    Cancer-secreted long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging mediators of cancer-host cross talk. The aim of our study was to illustrate the clinical significance of the lncRNA CRNDE-h in exosomes purified from the serum of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The study was divided into four parts: (1) The exosome isolated methods and lncRNA detected methods which accurately and reproducibly measure CRC-related exosomal CRNDE-h in serum were optimized in preliminary pilot stage; (2) The stability of exosomal CRNDE-h was evaluated systematically; (3) The origin of exosomal CRNDE-h was explorated in vitro and in vivo; (4) The diagnostic and prognostic value of exosomal CRNDE-h for CRC were validated in 468 patients. In pilot study, our results indicated that exosomal CRNDE-h was detectable and stable in serum of CRC patients, and derived from tumor cells. Then, the increased expression of exosomal CRNDE-h was successfully validated in 148 CRC patients when compared with colorectal benign disease patients and healthy donors. Exosomal CRNDE-h level significantly correlated with CRC regional lymph node metastasis (P = 0.019) and distant metastasis (P = 0.003). Moreover, at the cut-off value of 0.020 exosomal CRNDE-h level of serum, the area under ROC curve distinguishing CRC from colorectal benign disease patients and healthy donors was 0.892, with 70.3% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, which was superior to carcinoembryogenic antigen. In addition, high exosomal CRNDE-h level has a lower overall survival rates than that for low groups (34.6% vs. 68.2%, P h in exosome shed a light on utilizing exosomal CRNDE-h as a noninvasive serum-based tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of CRC.

  2. Specific packaging and circulation of cytochromes P450, especially 2E1 isozyme, in human plasma exosomes and their implications in cellular communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Sinha, Namita; Gerth, Kelli A; Rahman, Mohammad A; Yallapu, Murali M; Midde, Narasimha M

    2017-09-23

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes metabolize the majority of xenobiotics and are mainly found in hepatic and some extra-hepatic cells. However, their presence and functional role in exosomes, small extracellular vesicles that are secreted from various cells into extracellular fluids including plasma, is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the expression and biological activity of CYP enzymes in human plasma exosomes. First, we optimized isolation of plasma exosomes and characterized them for their physical properties and quality. The results showed that the purity of exosomes (exosomal CYP mRNAs, proteins, and enzyme activity. The results showed that the relative level of CYP enzymes in exosomes is higher than in plasma, suggesting their specific packaging in exosomes. Of the seven CYP enzymes tested, the mRNA of CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2E1, and CYP3A4 were detectable in exosomes. Interestingly, the relative level of CYP2E1 mRNA was >500-fold higher than the other CYPs. The results from the Western blot showed detectable levels of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2E1, and CYP3A4. Our results also demonstrated that exosomal CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 show appreciable activity relative to their respective positive controls (CYP-induced baculosomes). Our results also showed that CYP2E1 is expressed relatively higher in plasma exosomes than hepatic and monocytic cells and exosomes derived from these cells. In conclusion, this is the first evidence of the specific packaging and circulation of CYP enzymes, especially CYP2E1, in human plasma exosomes. The findings have biological and clinical significance in terms of their implications in cellular communications and potential use of plasma exosomal CYPs as biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival

  4. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In

  5. SMALL VESICLES, BIG VEHICLES: EXOSOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiz-Lopez P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous vesicles released by different cell types. Since their discovery, they have evolved from being considered simple vehicles for the liberation of cellular wastes, to become one of the most promising fields in the area of biomedical research, and more specifically in oncology, since the different malignant tumors release exosomes to all biological fluids, being involved in various functions of the neoplastic process. At present, it is possible to study these vesicles by minimally invasive techniques in patients, which approach us to obtain a more detailed diagnosis and prognosis, as well as to the discovery of new antitumoral therapies

  6. The Role of Isolation Methods on a Nanoscale Surface Structure and its Effect on the Size of Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JungReem Woo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are ∼100 nanometre diameter vesicles secreted by mammalian cells. These emerging disease biomarkers carry nucleic acids, proteins and lipids specific to the parental cells that secrete them. Exosomes are typically isolated in bulk by ultracentrifugation, filtration or immunoaffinity precipitation for downstream proteomic, genomic, or lipidomic analysis. However, the structural properties and heterogeneity of isolated exosomes at the single vesicle level are not well characterized due to their small size. In this paper, by using high-resolution atomic force microscope imaging, we show the nanoscale morphology and structural heterogeneity in exosomes derived from U87 cells. Quantitative assessment of single exosomes reveals nanoscale variations in morphology, surface roughness and counts isolated by ultracentrifugation (UC and immunoaffinity (IA purification. Both methods produce intact globular, 30–120 nm sized vesicles when imaged under fluid and in air. However, IA exosomes had higher surface roughness and bimodal size population compared to UC exosomes. The study highlights the differences in size and surface topography of exosomes purified from a single cell type using different isolation methods.

  7. The Role of Isolation Methods on a Nanoscale Surface Structure and Its Effect on the Size of Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JungReem Woo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are ~100 nanometre diameter vesicles secreted by mammalian cells. These emerging disease biomarkers carry nucleic acids, proteins and lipids specific to the parental cells that secrete them. Exosomes are typically isolated in bulk by ultracentrifugation, filtration or immu‐ noaffinity precipitation for downstream proteomic, genomic, or lipidomic analysis. However, the structural properties and heterogeneity of isolated exosomes at the single vesicle level are not well characterized due to their small size. In this paper, by using high-resolution atomic force microscope imaging, we show the nanoscale mor‐ phology and structural heterogeneity in exosomes derived from U87 cells. Quantitative assessment of single exosomes reveals nanoscale variations in morphology, surface roughness and counts isolated by ultracentrifugation (UC and immunoaffinity (IA purification. Both methods produce intact globular, 30-120 nm sized vesicles when imaged under fluid and in air. However, IA exosomes had higher surface roughness and bimodal size population compared to UC exosomes. The study highlights the differences in size and surface topography of exosomes purified from a single cell type using different isolation methods.

  8. Direct detection of two different tumor-derived extracellular vesicles by SAM-AuNIs LSPR biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Abhimanyu; Qiu, Guangyu; Ng, Siu-Pang; Guan, Jintao; Yue, Jianbo; Lee, Youngjin; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2017-08-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are abundant in various biological fluids including blood, saliva, urine, as well as extracellular milieu. Accumulating evidence has indicated that EVs, which contain functional proteins and small RNAs, facilitate intercellular communication between neighbouring cells, and are critical to maintain various physiological processes. In contrast, EV-derived toxic signals can spread out over the tissues adjacent to the injured area in certain diseases, including brain tumors and neurodegenerative disorders. This demands better characterization of EVs which can be employed for liquid biopsy clinically as well as for the study of intercellular signalling. Exosomes and microvesicles share a number of similar characteristics, but it is important to distinguish between these two types of EVs. Here, we report for the first time that our in-house developed Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensor with self-assembly gold nanoislands (SAM-AuNIs) can be used to detect and distinguish exosomes from MVs isolated from A-549 cells, SH-SY5Y cells, blood serum, and urine from a lung cancer mouse model. Exosomes, compared with MVs, produced a distinguishable response to the bare LSPR biosensor without functionalization, suggesting a different biophysical interaction between exosomes and MVs with SAM AuNIs. This sensor attains the limit of detection to 0.194µg/ml, and the linear dynamic range covers 0.194-100µg/ml. This discovery not only reveals great insight into the distinctive membrane property of tumor-derived exosomes and MVs, but also facilitate the development of novel LSPR biosensors for direct detection and isolation of heterogeneous EVs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exosomes and Exosomal miRNA in Respiratory Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alipoor, Shamila D.; Mortaz, Esmaeil|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29141320X; Garssen, Johan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086369962; Movassaghi, Masoud; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Adcock, Ian M.

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles released from every cell in the body including those in the respiratory tract and lungs. They are found in most body fluids and contain a number of different biomolecules including proteins, lipids, and both mRNA and noncoding RNAs. Since they can release their

  10. Exosomal non-coding RNAs: a promising cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Fu, Hailong; Xu, Wenrong; Zhang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Novel and non-invasive biomarkers are urgently needed for early detection of cancer. Exosomes are nano-sized particles released by cells and contain various bioactive molecules including proteins, DNA, mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs. Increasing evidence suggests that exosomes play critical roles in tumorigenesis, tumor growth, metastasis, and therapy resistance. Exosomes could be readily accessible in nearly all the body fluids. The altered production of exosomes and aberrant expression of exosomal contents could reflect the pathological state of the body, indicating that exosomes and exosomal contents can be utilized as novel cancer biomarkers. Herein, we review the basic properties of exosomes, the functional roles of exosomes in cancer, and the methods of detecting exosomes and exosomal contents. In particular, we highlight the clinical values of exosomal non-coding RNAs in cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

  11. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-infected cells secrete exosomes that contain Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V; Sampey, Gavin C; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-08-08

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V.; Sampey, Gavin C.; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. PMID:24939845

  13. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA to Inhibit Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Zebrafish Using Natural Brain Endothelia Cell-Secreted Exosome Nanovesicles for the Treatment of Brain Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Fogarty, Brittany; LaForge, Bret; Aziz, Salma; Pham, Thuy; Lai, Leanne; Bai, Shuhua

    2017-03-01

    Although small interfering RNA (siRNA) holds great therapeutic promise, its delivery to the disease site remains a paramount obstacle. In this study, we tested whether brain endothelial cell-derived exosomes could deliver siRNA across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in zebrafish. Natural exosomes were isolated from brain endothelial bEND.3 cell culture media and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) siRNA was loaded in exosomes with the assistance of a transfection reagent. While fluorescence-activated cell flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry staining studies indicated that wild-type exosomes significantly increased the uptake of fluorescence-labeled siRNA in the autologous brain endothelial cells, decreased fluorescence intensity was observed in the cells treated with the tetraspanin CD63 antibody-blocked exosome-delivered formulation (p brain endothelial bEND.3 cell and astrocyte. Inhibition at the expression of VEGF RNA and protein levels was observed in glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG cells treated with exosome-delivered siRNAs. Imaging results showed that exosome delivered more siRNAs across the BBB in Tg(fli1:GFP) zebrafish. In a xenotransplanted brain tumor model, exosome-delivered VEGF siRNAs decreased the fluorescence intensity of labeled cancer cells in the brain of zebrafish. Brain endothelial cell-derived exosomes could be potentially used as a natural carrier for the brain delivery of exogenous siRNA.

  14. Diagnostic profiling of salivary exosomal microRNAs in oral lichen planus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, J-S; Hong, S-H; Choi, J-K; Jung, J-K; Lee, H-J

    2015-11-01

    Oral lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory oral mucosal disease whose exact cause is unclear and which requires efficient diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Identification of disease-specific biomarkers in saliva is an easy, quick, and non-invasive approach for molecular diagnosis. This study was designed to examine salivary exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) that could be candidates for diagnosing and elucidating the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus. We compared miRNA profiles of salivary exosomes of patients with oral lichen planus with those of healthy controls. Saliva samples from 16 patients with oral lichen planus and eight healthy controls were divided into two sets and examined using miRNA microarray analysis and TaqMan quantitative PCR. The three miRNAs identified (miR-4484, miR-1246, and miR-1290) were further validated. Of these, miR-4484 was significantly upregulated in the salivary exosomes of patients with oral lichen planus. This study thus identifies a potential miRNA biomarker for oral lichen planus and provides insight into the functions of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of oral inflammatory diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  16. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  17. MicroRNAs in Salivary Exosome as Potential Biomarkers of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Machida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether salivary exosomal miRNAs could be identified as aging biomarkers. Fifteen young healthy volunteers (median age, 21.0 years and 13 old individuals (median age, 66.0 years were recruited. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected, salivary exosomes were isolated, and total RNA was extracted. In a microarray, 242 miRNAs were commonly detected in these two mixed samples. Based on the cut-off values of 2- or 0.5-fold changes (FC and regulatory power for aging process, six candidate miRNAs (miR-24-3p, miR-371a-5p, miR-3175, miR-3162-5p, miR-671-5p, and miR-4667-5p were selected. After comparing each total RNA obtained by the 15 young and 13 old individuals to validate the FC values using quantitative real-time PCR, miR-24-3p was identified as a novel candidate aging biomarker. This pilot study suggested that salivary exosomal miRNAs could be identified as candidate aging biomarkers. To confirm whether miR-24-3p in salivary exosomes are suitable biomarkers of aging, further validation research is required.

  18. Exosomes from Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Suppress Carrageenan-Induced Acute Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivoraitė, Ugnė; Jarmalavičiūtė, Akvilė; Tunaitis, Virginijus; Ramanauskaitė, Giedrė; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Kašėta, Vytautas; Biziulevičienė, Genė; Venalis, Algirdas; Pivoriūnas, Augustas

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to examine the effects of human dental pulp stem cell-derived exosomes on the carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in mice. Exosomes were purified by differential ultracentrifugation from the supernatants of stem cells derived from the dental pulp of human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) cultivated in serum-free medium. At 1 h post-carrageenan injection, exosomes derived from supernatants of 2 × 10(6) SHEDs were administered by intraplantar injection to BALB/c mice; 30 mg/kg of prednisolone and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Edema was measured at 6, 24, and 48 h after carrageenan injection. For the in vivo imaging experiments, AngioSPARK750, Cat B 750 FAST, and MMPSense 750 FAST were administered into the mouse tail vein 2 h post-carrageenan injection. Fluorescence images were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h after edema induction by IVIS Spectrum in vivo imaging system. Exosomes significantly reduced the carrageenan-induced edema at all the time points studied (by 39.5, 41.6, and 25.6% at 6, 24, and 48 h after injection, respectively), to similar levels seen with the positive control (prednisolone). In vivo imaging experiments revealed that, both exosomes and prednisolone suppress activities of cathepsin B and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) at the site of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation, showing more prominent effects of prednisolone at the early stages, while exosomes exerted their suppressive effects gradually and at later time points. Our study demonstrates for the first time that exosomes derived from human dental pulp stem cells suppress carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in mice.

  19. Clustering and Candidate Motif Detection in Exosomal miRNAs by Application of Machine Learning Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Pallavi; Chaturvedi, Anoop

    2017-07-22

    The clustering pattern and motifs give immense information about any biological data. An application of machine learning algorithms for clustering and candidate motif detection in miRNAs derived from exosomes is depicted in this paper. Recent progress in the field of exosome research and more particularly regarding exosomal miRNAs has led much bioinformatic-based research to come into existence. The information on clustering pattern and candidate motifs in miRNAs of exosomal origin would help in analyzing existing, as well as newly discovered miRNAs within exosomes. Along with obtaining clustering pattern and candidate motifs in exosomal miRNAs, this work also elaborates the usefulness of the machine learning algorithms that can be efficiently used and executed on various programming languages/platforms. Data were clustered and sequence candidate motifs were detected successfully. The results were compared and validated with some available web tools such as 'BLASTN' and 'MEME suite'. The machine learning algorithms for aforementioned objectives were applied successfully. This work elaborated utility of machine learning algorithms and language platforms to achieve the tasks of clustering and candidate motif detection in exosomal miRNAs. With the information on mentioned objectives, deeper insight would be gained for analyses of newly discovered miRNAs in exosomes which are considered to be circulating biomarkers. In addition, the execution of machine learning algorithms on various language platforms gives more flexibility to users to try multiple iterations according to their requirements. This approach can be applied to other biological data-mining tasks as well.

  20. Ultrasensitive microfluidic analysis of circulating exosomes using a nanostructured graphene oxide/polydopamine coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; He, Mei; Zeng, Yong

    2016-08-02

    Exosomes are cell-derived nano-sized vesicles that have been recently recognized as new mediators for many cellular processes and potential biomarkers for non-invasive disease diagnosis and the monitoring of treatment response. To better elucidate the biology and clinical value of exosomes, there is a pressing need for new analytical technologies capable of the efficient isolation and sensitive analysis of such small and molecularly diverse vesicles. Herein, we developed a microfluidic exosome analysis platform based on a new graphene oxide/polydopamine (GO/PDA) nano-interface. To the best of our best knowledge, we report for the first time, the GO-induced formation of a 3D nanoporous PDA surface coating enabled by the microfluidic layer-by-layer deposition of GO and PDA. It was demonstrated that this nanostructured GO/PDA interface greatly improves the efficiency of exosome immuno-capture, while at the same time effectively suppressing non-specific exosome adsorption. Based on this nano-interface, an ultrasensitive exosome ELISA assay was developed to afford a very low detection limit of 50 μL(-1) with a 4 log dynamic range, which is substantially better than the existing methods. As a proof of concept for clinical applications, we adapted this platform to discriminate ovarian cancer patients from healthy controls by the quantitative detection of exosomes directly from 2 μL plasma without sample processing. Thus, this platform could provide a useful tool to facilitate basic and clinical investigations of exosomes for non-invasive disease diagnosis and to aid precision treatment.

  1. RNA substrate length as an indicator of exosome interactions in vivo [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Delan-Forino

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The exosome complex plays key roles in RNA processing and degradation in Eukaryotes and Archaea. Outstanding structural studies identified multiple pathways for RNA substrates into the exosome in vitro, but identifying the pathway followed by individual RNA species in vivo remains challenging. Methods: We attempted to address this question using RNase protection. In vivo RNA-protein crosslinking (CRAC was applied to the exosome component Rrp44/Dis3, which has both endonuclease and exonuclease activity. During CRAC, the exosome was purified under native conditions and subjected to RNase digestion, prior to protein denaturation and cDNA cloning. The resulting high-throughput sequence reads were stratified by length of the cDNA sequence. This should reflect RNA fragment lengths, and therefore the RNA region that was protected by exosome binding. We anticipated major read lengths of ~30nt and ~10nt, reflecting the “central channel” and “direct access” routes to the Rrp44 exonuclease active site observed in vitro. Results: Unexpectedly, no clear peak was observed at 30nt, whereas a broad peak was seen around 20nt. The expected ~10nt peak was seen, and showed strong elevation in strains lacking exonuclease activity. Unexpectedly, this peak was suppressed by point mutations in the Rrp44 endonuclease active site. This indicates that the short fragments are degraded by the exonuclease activity of Rrp44, but also suggests that at least some may be generated by endonuclease activity. Conclusions: The absence of 30nt protected fragments may reflect obligatory binding of cofactors at the entrance to the exosome central channel in vivo. The presence of ~20nt fragments apparently indicates an access route not yet reported from in vitro studies. Confident mapping of 10nt reads is challenging, but they are clearly derived from a subset of exosome targets. In particular, pre-rRNA species, which are major exosome targets, are strongly

  2. Differential expression of exosomal microRNAs in prefrontal cortices of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

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    Meredith G Banigan

    Full Text Available Exosomes are cellular secretory vesicles containing microRNAs (miRNAs. Once secreted, exosomes are able to attach to recipient cells and release miRNAs potentially modulating the function of the recipient cell. We hypothesized that exosomal miRNA expression in brains of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD might differ from controls, reflecting either disease-specific or common aberrations in SZ and BD patients. The sources of the analyzed samples included McLean 66 Cohort Collection (Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center, BrainNet Europe II (BNE, a consortium of 18 brain banks across Europe and Boston Medical Center (BMC. Exosomal miRNAs from frozen postmortem prefrontal cortices with well-preserved RNA were isolated and submitted to profiling by Luminex FLEXMAP 3D microfluidic device. Multiple statistical analyses of microarray data suggested that certain exosomal miRNAs were differentially expressed in SZ and BD subjects in comparison to controls. RT-PCR validation confirmed that two miRNAs, miR-497 in SZ samples and miR-29c in BD samples, have significantly increased expression when compared to control samples. These results warrant future studies to evaluate the potential of exosome-derived miRNAs to serve as biomarkers of SZ and BD.

  3. Quantifying exosome secretion from single cells reveals a modulatory role for GPCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Frederik Johannes; Bebelman, Maarten P; Jimenez, Connie R; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; Knol, Jaco C; de Goeij-de Haas, Richard; Piersma, Sander R; Baglio, S Rubina; Verhage, Matthijs; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Zomer, Anoek; van Rheenen, Jacco; Coppolino, Marc G; Hurbain, Ilse; Raposo, Graça; Smit, Martine J; Toonen, Ruud F G; van Niel, Guillaume; Pegtel, D Michiel

    2018-01-16

    Exosomes are small endosome-derived extracellular vesicles implicated in cell-cell communication and are secreted by living cells when multivesicular bodies (MVBs) fuse with the plasma membrane (PM). Current techniques to study exosome physiology are based on isolation procedures after secretion, precluding direct and dynamic insight into the mechanics of exosome biogenesis and the regulation of their release. In this study, we propose real-time visualization of MVB-PM fusion to overcome these limitations. We designed tetraspanin-based pH-sensitive optical reporters that detect MVB-PM fusion using live total internal reflection fluorescence and dynamic correlative light-electron microscopy. Quantitative analysis demonstrates that MVB-PM fusion frequency is reduced by depleting the target membrane SNAREs SNAP23 and syntaxin-4 but also can be induced in single cells by stimulation of the histamine H1 receptor (H1HR). Interestingly, activation of H1R1 in HeLa cells increases Ser110 phosphorylation of SNAP23, promoting MVB-PM fusion and the release of CD63-enriched exosomes. Using this single-cell resolution approach, we highlight the modulatory dynamics of MVB exocytosis that will help to increase our understanding of exosome physiology and identify druggable targets in exosome-associated pathologies. © 2018 Verweij et al.

  4. Gender-specific differential expression of exosomal miRNA in synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhe, Ravindra; Hunter, Monte; Liu, Siyang; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Pundkar, Chetan; Mondal, Ashis K; Mendhe, Bharati; Drewry, Michelle; Rojiani, Mumtaz V; Liu, Yutao; Isales, Carlos M; Guldberg, Robert E; Hamrick, Mark W; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2017-05-17

    The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) is poorly understood, and therapeutic approaches are limited to preventing progression of the disease. Recent studies have shown that exosomes play a vital role in cell-to-cell communication, and pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. Molecular profiling of synovial fluid derived exosomal miRNAs may increase our understanding of OA progression and may lead to the discovery of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this article we report the first characterization of exosomes miRNAs from human synovial fluid. The synovial fluid exosomes share similar characteristics (size, surface marker, miRNA content) with previously described exosomes in other body fluids. MiRNA microarray analysis showed OA specific exosomal miRNA of male and female OA. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified gender-specific target genes/signaling pathways. These pathway analyses showed that female OA specific miRNAs are estrogen responsive and target TLR (toll-like receptor) signaling pathways. Furthermore, articular chondrocytes treated with OA derived extracellular vesicles had decreased expression of anabolic genes and elevated expression of catabolic and inflammatory genes. In conclusion, synovial fluid exosomal miRNA content is altered in patients with OA and these changes are gender specific.

  5. A Refined Bead-Free Method to Identify Astrocytic Exosomes in Primary Glial Cultures and Blood Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory M. Willis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are the most abundant glial cell type in the central nervous system (CNS and are known to fulfill critical homeostatic functions. Dysfunction of activated astrocytes is also known to participate in the development of several neurological diseases. Astrocytes can be uniquely identified by expression of the intermediate filament protein glial acidic fibrillary protein (GFAP. Herein, we report on the development of a rigorous and sensitive methodology to identify GFAP+ exosomes in primary culture using flow cytometry. We then demonstrate that activated astrocytes release increased amounts of exosomes in response to treatment with interleukin-1β. Using this methodology, we report the identification of GFAP+ exosomes in blood and then use a mouse model of inflammatory demyelination, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, to examine whether the abundance of GFAP+ exosomes in blood circulation changes during clinical illness. We find a detectable increase in the presence of GFAP+ exosomes in EAE mice when compared with non-EAE, control mice. Our data provide a novel perspective on the presence of GFAP in blood as it identifies exosomes as potential astrocyte-derived signals within blood. These data are complementary to previous clinical studies that reported elevated GFAP protein in blood samples from multiple sclerosis (MS patients during a clinical relapse. These data also reveal the existence of a potential systemic role for astrocyte-derived exosomes in CNS conditions involving inflammation such as multiple sclerosis.

  6. Cardiomyocytes mediate anti-angiogenesis in type 2 diabetic rats through the exosomal transfer of miR-320 into endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Huang, Wei; Liu, Guansheng; Cai, Wenfeng; Millard, Ronald W.; Wang, Yigang; Chang, Jiang; Peng, Tianqing; Fan, Guo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, nano-vesicles naturally released from living cells, have been well recognized to play critical roles in mediating cell-to-cell communication. Given that diabetic hearts exhibit insufficient angiogenesis, it is significant to test whether diabetic cardiomyocyte-derived exosomes possess any capacity in regulating angiogenesis. In this study, we first observed that both proliferation and migration of mouse cardiac endothelial cells (MCECs) were inhibited when co-cultured with cardiomyocytes isolated from adult Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a commonly used animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, GK-myocyte-mediated anti-angiogenic effects were negated upon addition of GW4869, an inhibitor of exosome formation/release, into the co-cultures. Next, exosomes were purified from the myocyte culture supernatants by differential centrifugation. While exosomes derived from GK myocytes (GK-exosomes) displayed similar size and molecular markers (CD63 and CD81) to those originated from the control Wistar rat myocytes (WT-exosomes), their regulatory role in angiogenesis is opposite. We observed that the MCEC proliferation, migration and tube-like formation were inhibited by GK-exosomes, but were promoted by WT-exosomes. Mechanistically, we found that GK-exosomes encapsulated higher levels of miR-320 and lower levels of miR-126 compared to WT-exosomes. Furthermore, GK-exosomes were effectively taken up by MCECs and delivered miR-320. In addition, transportation of miR-320 from myocytes to MCECs could be blocked by GW4869. Importantly, the exosomal miR-320 functionally down-regulated its target genes (IGF-1, Hsp20 and Ets2) in recipient MCECs, and overexpression of miR-320 inhibited MCEC migration and tube formation. GK exosome-mediated inhibitory effects on angiogenesis were removed by knockdown of miR-320. Together, these data indicate that cardiomyocytes exert an anti-angiogenic function in type 2 diabetic rats through exosomal transfer of miR-320 into endothelial cells

  7. Prospects for exosomes in immunotherapy of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mignot, G; Roux, S; Thery, Clotilde; S?gura, Elodie; Zitvogel, L

    2007-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer sized membrane vesicles invaginating from multivesicular bodies and secreted from epithelial and hematopoietic cells. They were first described ?in vitro? but vesicles with the hallmarks of exosomes are present in vivo in germinal centers and biological fluids. Their protein and lipid composition are unique and could account for their expanding functions such as eradication of obsolete proteins, antigen presentation or ?Trojan horses? for viruses or prions. Exosome secr...

  8. Commercial saliva collections tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Slowey, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Saliva has been used as a specimen for diagnostics purposes for many years, but it has only been in the last 10 years that a number of new tools have been developed that promise to greatly increase...

  9. Glycan profiling analysis using evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted lectin array: Importance of sugar recognition for cellular uptake of exosomes from mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Asako; Tahara, Yoshiro; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2017-09-23

    Studies involving the functional analysis of exosomal contents including proteins, DNA, and RNA have been reported. Most membrane proteins and lipids are glycosylated, which controls their physical properties and functions, but little is known about glycans on exosomes owing to the difficulty of analysing them. To shed light on these issues, we collected exosomes from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human adipose tissue for glycan profiling using evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted lectin array as well as analysis of their uptake in vivo. Initial analyses showed that the mean diameter of the collected exosomes was 178 nm and they presented with typical exosomal and MSC markers. Regarding the glycan profiling, exosomes interacted more strongly than the membrane of the original MSCs did with a range of lectins, especially sialic acid-binding lectins. The findings also showed that cellular exosome uptake involved recognition by HeLa cell-surface-bound sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectins (siglecs). Confirming this siglec-related uptake, in vivo experiments involving subcutaneous injection of the fluorescently labelled exosomes into mice showed their transport into lymph nodes and internalization by antigen-presenting cells, particularly those expressing CD11b. Closer analysis revealed the colocalization of the exosomes with siglecs, indicating their involvement in the uptake. These findings provide us with an improved understanding of the importance of exosomal transport and targeting in relation to glycans on exosomal surfaces, potentially enabling us to standardize exosomes when using them for therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Commercial saliva collections tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowey, Paul D

    2013-02-01

    Saliva has been used as a specimen for diagnostics purposes for many years, but it has only been in the last 10 years that a number of new tools have been developed that promise to greatly increase the use of oral specimens for broad-based diagnosis and potentially screening applications. This article focuses on tools that are commercially viable or can play a role in whole saliva collection and future testing for critical diseases.

  11. Gender-specific differential expression of exosomal miRNA in synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra Kolhe; Monte Hunter; Siyang Liu; Ravirajsinh N. Jadeja; Chetan Pundkar; Mondal, Ashis K.; Bharati Mendhe; Michelle Drewry; Rojiani, Mumtaz V.; Yutao Liu; Isales, Carlos M.; Guldberg, Robert E; Hamrick, Mark W.; Sadanand Fulzele

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) is poorly understood, and therapeutic approaches are limited to preventing progression of the disease. Recent studies have shown that exosomes play a vital role in cell-to-cell communication, and pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. Molecular profiling of synovial fluid derived exosomal miRNAs may increase our understanding of OA progression and may lead to the discovery of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this article we report the fi...

  12. Biochemistry and Function of the RNA Exosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Chlebowski, Aleksander; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of the evolutionary conserved RNA exosome was a milestone in RNA biology. First identified as an activity essential for the processing of ribosomal RNA, the exosome has since proved to be central for RNA processing and degradation in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cell...

  13. Lung tumor exosomes induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in mesenchymal stem cells via NFκB-TLR signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In tumor microenvironment, a continuous cross-talk between cancer cells and other cellular components is required to sustain tumor progression. Accumulating evidence suggests that exosomes, a novel way of cell communication, play an important role in such cross-talk. Exosomes could facilitate the direct intercellular transfer of proteins, lipids, and miRNA/mRNA/DNAs between cells. Since mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be attracted to tumor sites and become an important component of the tumor microenvironment, there is an urgent need to reveal the effect of tumor exosomes on MSCs and to further explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Exosomes were harvested from lung cancer cell line A549 and added to MSCs. Secretion of inflammation-associated cytokines in exosome-treated MSCs were analyzed by RT-PCR and ELISA. The growth-promoting effect of exosome-treated MSCs on lung tumor cells was evaluated by in vivo mouse xenograft model. Signaling pathway involved in exosomes-treated MSCs was detected by PCR array of human toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RT-PCR, and Western blot. Results Data showed that lung tumor cell A549-derived exosomes could induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in MSCs named P-MSCs, which have significantly elevated secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1. P-MSCs possess a greatly enhanced ability in promoting lung tumor growth in mouse xenograft model. Analysis of the signaling pathways in P-MSCs revealed a fast triggering of NF-κB. Genetic ablation of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 by siRNA and TLR2-neutralizing antibody could block NF-κB activation by exosomes. We further found that Hsp70 present on the surface of lung tumor exosomes contributed to the induction of P-MSCs by A549 exosomes. Conclusions Our studies suggest a novel mechanism by which lung tumor cell-derived exosomes induce pro-inflammatory activity of MSCs which in turn get tumor supportive characteristics.

  14. Exosomes mediate interepithelial transfer of functional P-glycoprotein in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Angela L; Miyake, Marcel M; Seifert, Philip; Han, Xue; Bleier, Benjamin S

    2017-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) drives type-2 helper T-cell inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) through unknown posttranslational mechanisms of overexpression. A recent randomized clinical trial demonstrated that inhibition of P-gp was as effective as oral steroids and biologics in treating CRSwNP. Exosomes are 30- to 150-nm vesicles capable of intercellular membrane protein transfer. The aims of this study were 1) to determine whether CRSwNP mucus exosomes are enriched with P-gp, and 2) whether exosomal P-gp can be functionally transferred to autologous epithelial cells as a putative mechanism for the proinflammatory overexpression of P-gp in CRSwNP. Institutional review board-approved study in CRSwNP and control patients (n = 10 per group). P-gp content of purified mucus exosomes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Epithelial transfer of exosomal P-gp was determined by time-lapse fluorescent microscopy and calcein acetoxymethylester functional P-gp assay. CD63+/P-gp+ exosomes were detected in both groups. P-gp was significantly enriched in CRSwNP exosomes relative to control (median 198.5; interquartile range 123.6-270.5 vs. 74.4; 41.3-95.0 pcg P-gp/10(9) exosomes, P = 0.002). Exosomes were absorbed by epithelial cells within 10 minutes, resulting in a significant increase in P-gp activity in CRSwNP patients relative to control (P = 0.006). Here we demonstrate the presence and P-gp enrichment of mucus-derived exosomes, or rhinosomes, in CRSwNP. These rhinosomes are capable of rapid intercellular transfer of P-gp, leading to increased P-gp function within recipient cells. This represents a novel mechanism for maintaining P-gp overexpression in CRSwNP, and more generally for interepithelial transfer of other proteins between mucosal epithelial cells. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E295-E300, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) constitutes a nucleoprotein component of extracellular inflammatory exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Zhong; Dahmane, Nadia; Tsai, Kevin; Wang, Pu; Williams, Dewight R; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Showe, Louise C; Zhang, Rugang; Huang, Qihong; Conejo-Garcia, José R; Lieberman, Paul M

    2015-11-17

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) has been identified as a telomere-associated regulator of chromosome end protection. Here, we report that TERRA can also be found in extracellular fractions that stimulate innate immune signaling. We identified extracellular forms of TERRA in mouse tumor and embryonic brain tissue, as well as in human tissue culture cell lines using RNA in situ hybridization. RNA-seq analyses revealed TERRA to be among the most highly represented transcripts in extracellular fractions derived from both normal and cancer patient blood plasma. Cell-free TERRA (cfTERRA) could be isolated from the exosome fractions derived from human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) culture media. cfTERRA is a shorter form (∼200 nt) of cellular TERRA and copurifies with CD63- and CD83-positive exosome vesicles that could be visualized by cyro-electron microscopy. These fractions were also enriched for histone proteins that physically associate with TERRA in extracellular ChIP assays. Incubation of cfTERRA-containing exosomes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated transcription of several inflammatory cytokine genes, including TNFα, IL6, and C-X-C chemokine 10 (CXCL10) Exosomes engineered with elevated TERRA or liposomes with synthetic TERRA further stimulated inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that exosome-associated TERRA augments innate immune signaling. These findings imply a previously unidentified extrinsic function for TERRA and a mechanism of communication between telomeres and innate immune signals in tissue and tumor microenvironments.

  16. The biology and function of exosomes in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kalluri, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    Humans circulate quadrillions of exosomes at all times. Exosomes are a class of extracellular vesicles released by all cells, with a size range of 40?150 nm and a lipid bilayer membrane. Exosomes contain DNA, RNA, and proteins. Exosomes likely remove excess and/or unnecessary constituents from the cells, functioning like garbage bags, although their precise physiological role remains unknown. Additionally, exosomes may mediate specific cell-to-cell communication and activate signaling pathway...

  17. Exosomes expressing carbonic anhydrase 9 promote angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Kengo; Kawakami, Kyojiro; Fujita, Yasunori; Sugaya, Maki; Kameyama, Koji; Mizutani, Kosuke; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2017-10-21

    Exosomes or microvesicles that are secreted from cells are considered to play important roles in tumor microenvironment. Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), which is induced by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) in response to hypoxia, is overexpressed in many types of cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We examined the expression level of CA9 in several RCC cell lines and found that the basal level of CA9 was much higher in OSRC-2 cells than in Caki-1, KMRC-1 and 786-O cells. Consistent with the intracellular expression levels, CA9 was abundantly detected in exosomes isolated by ultracentrifugation from OSRC-2 cells. Density gradient centrifugation of OSRC-2 and 786-O exosomes confirmed the co-presence of CA9 with exosomal markers. Upon hypoxia and treatment with CoCl2, a hypoxia mimic agent, the CA9 level in exosomes was increased for all cell lines. In order to examine the effects of CA9 exosomes on angiogenesis, we generated stably transfected HEK293 cells expressing CA9. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated the uptake of CA9 exosomes by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In vitro angiogenesis assays using HUVEC revealed that CA9 exosomes promoted migration and tube formation. Lastly, MMP2 expression was increased by treatment with CA9 exosomes in HUVEC. Taken together, our results suggest the possibility that CA9 exosomes released from hypoxic RCC may enhance angiogenesis in microenvironment, thereby contributing to cancer progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exosomal signaling during hypoxia mediates microvascular endothelial cell migration and vasculogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    Full Text Available Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are critical processes in fetal circulation and placental vasculature development. Placental mesenchymal stem cells (pMSC are known to release paracrine factors (some of which are contained within exosomes that promote angiogenesis and cell migration. The aims of this study were: to determine the effects of oxygen tension on the release of exosomes from pMSC; and to establish the effects of pMSC-derived exosomes on the migration and angiogenic tube formation of placental microvascular endothelial cells (hPMEC. pMSC were isolated from placental villi (8-12 weeks of gestation, n = 6 and cultured under an atmosphere of 1%, 3% or 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-pMSC isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The dose effect (5-20 µg exosomal protein/ml of pMSC-derived exosomes on hPMEC migration and tube formation were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. The exosome pellet was resuspended in PBS and protein content was established by mass spectrometry (MS. Protein function and canonical pathways were identified using the PANTHER program and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, respectively. Exo-pMSC were identified, by electron microscopy, as spherical vesicles, with a typical cup-shape and diameters around of 100 nm and positive for exosome markers: CD63, CD9 and CD81. Under hypoxic conditions (1% and 3% O2 exo-pMSC released increased by 3.3 and 6.7 folds, respectively, when compared to the controls (8% O2; p<0.01. Exo-pMSC increased hPMEC migration by 1.6 fold compared to the control (p<0.05 and increased hPMEC tube formation by 7.2 fold (p<0.05. MS analysis identified 390 different proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization, development, immunomodulatory, and cell-to-cell communication. The data obtained support the hypothesis that pMSC-derived exosomes may contribute to placental vascular adaptation to low oxygen tension under both

  19. Roles of Macrophage Exosomes in Immune Response to Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilubon Singhto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In kidney stone disease, macrophages secrete various mediators via classical secretory pathway and cause renal interstitial inflammation. However, whether their extracellular vesicles, particularly exosomes, are involved in kidney stone pathogenesis remained unknown. This study investigated alterations in exosomal proteome of U937-derived macrophages (by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate activation after exposure to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM crystals for 16-h using 2-DE-based proteomics approach. Six significantly altered proteins in COM-treated exosomes were successfully identified by nanoscale liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry as proteins involved mainly in immune processes, including T-cell activation and homeostasis, Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis, interferon-γ (IFN-γ regulation, and cell migration/movement. The decreased heat shock protein 90-beta (HSP90β and increased vimentin were confirmed by Western blotting. ELISA showed that the COM-treated macrophages produced greater level of interleukin-1β (IL-1β, one of the markers for inflammasome activation. Functional studies demonstrated that COM-treated exosomes enhanced monocyte and T-cell migration, monocyte activation and macrophage phagocytic activity, but on the other hand, reduced T-cell activation. In addition, COM-treated exosomes enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 by monocytes that could be restored to its basal level by small-interfering RNA targeting on vimentin (si-Vimentin. Moreover, si-Vimentin could also abolish effects of COM-treated exosomes on monocyte and T-cell migration as well as macrophage phagocytic activity. These findings provided some implications to the immune response during kidney stone pathogenesis via exosomal pathway of macrophages after exposure to COM crystals.

  20. Exosomes account for vesicle-mediated transcellular transport of activatable phospholipases and prostaglandins[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subra, Caroline; Grand, David; Laulagnier, Karine; Stella, Alexandre; Lambeau, Gérard; Paillasse, Michael; De Medina, Philippe; Monsarrat, Bernard; Perret, Bertrand; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc; Record, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are bioactive vesicles released from multivesicular bodies (MVB) by intact cells and participate in intercellular signaling. We investigated the presence of lipid-related proteins and bioactive lipids in RBL-2H3 exosomes. Besides a phospholipid scramblase and a fatty acid binding protein, the exosomes contained the whole set of phospholipases (A2, C, and D) together with interacting proteins such as aldolase A and Hsp 70. They also contained the phospholipase D (PLD) / phosphatidate phosphatase 1 (PAP1) pathway leading to the formation of diglycerides. RBL-2H3 exosomes also carried members of the three phospholipase A2 classes: the calcium-dependent cPLA2-IVA, the calcium-independent iPLA2-VIA, and the secreted sPLA2-IIA and V. Remarkably, almost all members of the Ras GTPase superfamily were present, and incubation of exosomes with GTPγS triggered activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2)and PLD2. A large panel of free fatty acids, including arachidonic acid (AA) and derivatives such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandinJ2 (15-d PGJ2), were detected. We observed that the exosomes were internalized by resting and activated RBL cells and that they accumulated in an endosomal compartment. Endosomal concentrations were in the micromolar range for prostaglandins; i.e., concentrations able to trigger prostaglandin-dependent biological responses. Therefore exosomes are carriers of GTP-activatable phospholipases and lipid mediators from cell to cell. PMID:20424270

  1. Exosome engineering for efficient intracellular delivery of soluble proteins using optically reversible protein-protein interaction module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Nambin; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Kyungsun; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Lee, Seunghee; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jeongjin; Shaker, Mohammed R; Sun, Woong; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Daesoo; Heo, Won Do; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-07-22

    Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of functional macromolecules is a promising method for treating a variety of human diseases. Among nanoparticles, cell-derived exosomes have recently been highlighted as a new therapeutic strategy for the in vivo delivery of nucleotides and chemical drugs. Here we describe a new tool for intracellular delivery of target proteins, named 'exosomes for protein loading via optically reversible protein-protein interactions' (EXPLORs). By integrating a reversible protein-protein interaction module controlled by blue light with the endogenous process of exosome biogenesis, we are able to successfully load cargo proteins into newly generated exosomes. Treatment with protein-loaded EXPLORs is shown to significantly increase intracellular levels of cargo proteins and their function in recipient cells in vitro and in vivo. These results clearly indicate the potential of EXPLORs as a mechanism for the efficient intracellular transfer of protein-based therapeutics into recipient cells and tissues.

  2. Exosomes/tricalcium phosphate combination scaffolds can enhance bone regeneration by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jieyuan; Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Haiyan; Chen, Chunyuan; Hu, Bin; Niu, Xin; Li, Qing; Zhao, Bizeng; Xie, Zongping; Wang, Yang

    2016-09-20

    Recently, accumulating evidence has shown that exosomes, the naturally secreted nanocarriers of cells, can exert therapeutic effects in various disease models in the absence of parent cells. However, application of exosomes in bone defect repair and regeneration has been rarely reported, and little is known regarding their underlying mechanisms. Exosomes derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPS-MSC-Exos) were combined with tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) to repair critical-sized calvarial bone defects, and the efficacy was assessed by histological examination. We evaluated the in vitro effects of hiPSC-MSC-Exos on the proliferation, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) by cell-counting, scratch assays, and qRT-PCR, respectively. Gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analyses were also used to identify the underlying mechanisms in the repair. We found that the exosome/β-TCP combination scaffolds could enhance osteogenesis as compared to pure β-TCP scaffolds. In vitro assays showed that the exosomes could release from β-TCP and could be internalized by hBMSCs. In addition, the internalization of exosomes into hBMSCs could profoundly enhance the proliferation, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Furthermore, gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analyses demonstrated that exosome/β-TCP combination scaffolds significantly altered the expression of a network of genes involved in the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Functional studies further confirmed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway was the critical mediator during the exosome-induced osteogenic responses of hBMSCs. We propose that the exosomes can enhance the osteoinductivity of β-TCP through activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway of hBMSCs, which means that the exosome/β-TCP combination scaffolds possess better osteogenesis activity than pure β-TCP scaffolds. These

  3. Exosomes from Hepatitis C Infected Patients Transmit HCV Infection and Contain Replication Competent Viral RNA in Complex with Ago2-miR122-HSP90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodys, Karen; Bala, Shashi; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies targeting receptor-mediated entry of HCV into hepatocytes confer limited therapeutic benefits. Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic materials between cells; however, their role in HCV infection remains obscure. Here, we show that exosomes isolated from sera of chronic HCV infected patients or supernatants of J6/JFH1-HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells contained HCV RNA. These exosomes could mediate viral receptor-independent transmission of HCV to hepatocytes. Negative sense HCV RNA, indicative of replication competent viral RNA, was present in exosomes of all HCV infected treatment non-responders and some treatment-naïve individuals. Remarkably, HCV RNA was associated with Ago2, HSP90 and miR-122 in exosomes isolated from HCV-infected individuals or HCV-infected Huh7.5 cell supernatants. Exosome-loading with a miR-122 inhibitor, or inhibition of HSP90, vacuolar H+-ATPases, and proton pumps, significantly suppressed exosome-mediated HCV transmission to naïve cells. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence for HCV transmission by blood-derived exosomes and highlight potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:25275643

  4. Serum long non coding RNA MALAT-1 protected by exosomes is up-regulated and promotes cell proliferation and migration in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Xia, Yuhong; Wang, Zhixin; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Yafei; Li, Xiaoli; Wang, Yu; Ming, Huaikun

    2017-08-19

    Circulating lncRNAs have been defined as a novel biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), MALAT-1 was first identified lncRNA that was related to lung cancer metastasis. However, the relationship between exosomal lncRNAs and the diagnosis and prognosis of NSCLC was poorly understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of serum exosomal MALAT-1 as a biomarker in the metastasis of NSCLC. In this study, we firstly isolated the exosomes from healthy subjects and NSCLC patients. Then we measured the expression levels of MALAT-1 contained in exosomes, and found that exosomal MALAT-1 was highly expressed in NSCLC patients, more importantly, the levels of exosomal MALAT-1 were positively associated with tumor stage and lymphatic metastasis. In addition, we decreased MALAT-1 expression by short hairpin RNA and conducted a series of assays including MTT, cell cycle, colony formation, wound-healing scratch and Annexin/V PI by flow cytometry in human lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro studies demonstrated that serum exosome-derived long noncoding RNA MALAT-1 promoted the tumor growth and migration, and prevented tumor cells from apoptosis in lung cancer cell lines. Taken together, this study shed a light on utilizing MALAT-1 in exosomes as a non-invasive serum-based tumor biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exosomes from hepatitis C infected patients transmit HCV infection and contain replication competent viral RNA in complex with Ago2-miR122-HSP90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukong, Terence N; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Kodys, Karen; Bala, Shashi; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies targeting receptor-mediated entry of HCV into hepatocytes confer limited therapeutic benefits. Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic materials between cells; however, their role in HCV infection remains obscure. Here, we show that exosomes isolated from sera of chronic HCV infected patients or supernatants of J6/JFH1-HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells contained HCV RNA. These exosomes could mediate viral receptor-independent transmission of HCV to hepatocytes. Negative sense HCV RNA, indicative of replication competent viral RNA, was present in exosomes of all HCV infected treatment non-responders and some treatment-naïve individuals. Remarkably, HCV RNA was associated with Ago2, HSP90 and miR-122 in exosomes isolated from HCV-infected individuals or HCV-infected Huh7.5 cell supernatants. Exosome-loading with a miR-122 inhibitor, or inhibition of HSP90, vacuolar H+-ATPases, and proton pumps, significantly suppressed exosome-mediated HCV transmission to naïve cells. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence for HCV transmission by blood-derived exosomes and highlight potential therapeutic strategies.

  6. Exosomes: the ideal nanovectors for biodelivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, Stefano; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Lugini, Luana; Federici, Cristina; Azzarito, Tommaso; Zarovni, Natasa; Chiesi, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Nanomedicine aims to exploit the improved and often novel physical, chemical, and biological properties of materials at the nanometric scale, possibly with the highest level of biomimetism, an approach that simulates what occurs in nature. Although extracellularly released vesicles include both microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes, only exosomes have the size that may be considered suitable for potential use in nanomedicine. In fact, recent reports have shown that exosomes are able to interact with target cells within an organ or at a distance using different mechanisms. Much is yet to be understood about exosomes, and currently, we are looking at the visible top of an iceberg, with most of what we have to understand on these nanovesicles still under the sea. In fact, we know that exosomes released by normal cells always trigger positive effects, whereas those released by cells in pathological condition, such as tumor or infected cells, may induce undesired, dangerous, and mostly unknown effects, but we cannot exclude the possibility that exosomes may also be detrimental for the body in normal conditions. However, whether we consider extracellular vesicles as a whole, thus including MVs, it appears that even in normal conditions, extracellular vesicles may lead to unwanted effects, depending on gender and age. This review aims to critically emphasize existing data in the literature that support the possible roles of exosomes in both diagnostic and therapeutic scopes.

  7. Human Endometrial Exosomes Contain Hormone-Specific Cargo Modulating Trophoblast Adhesive Capacity: Insights into Endometrial-Embryo Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, David W; Nguyen, Hong P T; Elgass, Kirstin; Simpson, Richard J; Salamonsen, Lois A

    2016-02-01

    Embryo implantation into receptive endometrium requires synergistic endometrial-blastocyst interactions within the uterine cavity and is essential for establishing pregnancy. We demonstrate that exosomes (40-150 nm nanovesicles) released from endometrial epithelial cells are an important component of these interactions. We defined the proteome of purified endometrial epithelial-derived exosomes (Exos) influenced by menstrual cycle hormones estrogen (E; proliferative phase) and estrogen plus progesterone (EP; receptive phase) and examined their potential to modify trophoblast function. E-/EP-Exos were uniquely enriched with 254 and 126 proteins, respectively, with 35% newly identified proteins not previously reported in exosome databases. Importantly, EP-Exos protein cargo was related to fundamental changes in implantation: adhesion, migration, invasion, and extracellular matrix remodeling. These findings from hormonally treated ECC1 endometrial cancer cells were validated in human primary uterine epithelial cell-derived exosomes. Functionally, exosomes were internalized by human trophoblast cells and enhanced their adhesive capacity, a response mediated partially through active focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Thus, exosomes contribute to the endometrial-embryo interactions within the human uterine microenvironment essential for successful implantation. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  8. Detection of mutant KRAS and TP53 DNA in circulating exosomes from healthy individuals and patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sujuan; Che, Sara P Y; Kurywchak, Paul; Tavormina, Jena L; Gansmo, Liv B; Correa de Sampaio, Pedro; Tachezy, Michael; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Gebauer, Florian; Haltom, Amanda R; Melo, Sonia A; LeBleu, Valerie S; Kalluri, Raghu

    2017-03-04

    Pancreatic cancer presents with a dismal mortality rate and is in urgent need of methods for early detection with potential for timely intervention. All living cells, including cancer cells, generate exosomes. We previously discovered double stranded genomic DNA in exosomes derived from the circulation of pancreatic cancer patients, which enabled the detection of prevalent mutations associated with the disease. Here, we report a proof-of-concept study that demonstrates the potential clinical utility of circulating exosomal DNA for identification of KRASG12D and TP53R273H mutations in patients with pancreas-associated pathologies, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), chronic pancreatitis (CP) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), and in healthy human subjects. In 48 clinically annotated serum samples from PDAC patients, digital PCR analyses of exosomal DNA identified KRASG12D mutation in 39.6% of cases, and TP53R273H mutation in 4.2% of cases. KRASG12D and TP53R273H mutations were also detected in exosomal DNA from IPMN patients (2 out of 7 with KRASG12D, one of which also co-presented with TP53R273H mutation). Circulating exosomal DNA in 5 out of 9 CP patients enabled the detection of KRASG12D mutation. In 114 healthy subject-derived circulating exosomal DNA, 2.6% presented with KRASG12D mutation and none with TP53R273H mutation. This study highlights the value of circulating exosomal DNA for a rapid, low-cost identification of cancer driving mutations. The identification of mutations in IPMN patients and healthy subjects suggests that liquid biopsies may allow potential assessment of cancer risk but with a cautionary note that detection of clinical cancer cannot be assumed.

  9. Exosomes Mediate Mobilization of Autocrine Wnt10b to Promote Axonal Regeneration in the Injured CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardos G. Tassew

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing strategies that promote axonal regeneration within the injured CNS is a major therapeutic challenge, as axonal outgrowth is potently inhibited by myelin and the glial scar. Although regeneration can be achieved using the genetic deletion of PTEN, a negative regulator of the mTOR pathway, this requires inactivation prior to nerve injury, thus precluding therapeutic application. Here, we show that, remarkably, fibroblast-derived exosomes (FD exosomes enable neurite growth on CNS inhibitory proteins. Moreover, we demonstrate that, upon treatment with FD exosomes, Wnt10b is recruited toward lipid rafts and activates mTOR via GSK3β and TSC2. Application of FD exosomes shortly after optic nerve injury promoted robust axonal regeneration, which was strongly reduced in Wnt10b-deleted animals. This work uncovers an intercellular signaling pathway whereby FD exosomes mobilize an autocrine Wnt10b-mTOR pathway, thereby awakening the intrinsic capacity of neurons for regeneration, an important step toward healing the injured CNS.

  10. The functional role of exosome microRNAs in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer causes the highest incidence and mortality rates of cancer disease worldwide. Despite obvious advances in lung cancer research, a better understanding of the disease is urgently needed to improve early detection and correct diagnoses. Exosomes are released from cancer cells and modulate cell-cell communication. Exosomes transfer a wide variety of molecules including microRNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are single-stranded, small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNA expression patterns represent the status of physiology and disease. The focus of this review is to provide an update on the progress of miRNAs of cancer-derived exosome as potential biomarkers for lung cancer.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine (Lamictal) in plasma and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnavska, Z; Krejcova, H; Tkaczykovam; Salcmanova, Z; Elis, J

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of lamotrigine (LTG) disposition in plasma and saliva was evaluated in patients undergoing long-term antiepileptic drug therapy. Blood and saliva samples were collected simultaneously at intervals during the study and the concentration of LTG was measured by HPLC. Concentrations of LTG in saliva were proportional to plasma LTG concentrations, with a significant (p) correlation of r = 0.95 + 0.18. The saliva concentration-time curves of LTG were parallel to those derived for plasma LTG. The kinetics of LTG absorption, elimination and mean residence time were identical in both saliva and plasma estimations. The saliva/plasma ratio, determined from the terminal phase of individual patient LTG concentration vs time curves, was used to predict plasma LTG concentrations from saliva determinations. The binding of LTG to plasma proteins remained constant in patients treated with sodium valproate and/or enzyme-inducing drugs. Thus, LTG determination in saliva represents a noninvasive alternative for therapeutic drug monitoring and may also be employed for studying LTG pharmacokinetics.

  12. Serum exosomal protein profiling for the non-invasive detection of cardiac allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Peter J; Saha, Amit; Maldonado, Dawn A; Givens, Raymond; Brunjes, Danielle L; Castillero, Estibaliz; Zhang, Xiaokan; Ji, Ruiping; Yahi, Alexandre; George, Isaac; Mancini, Donna M; Koller, Antonius; Fine, Barry; Zorn, Emmanuel; Colombo, Paolo C; Tatonetti, Nicholas; Chen, Emily I; Schulze, P Christian

    2017-07-19

    Exosomes are cell-derived circulating vesicles that play an important role in cell-cell communication. Exosomes are actively assembled and carry messenger RNAs, microRNAs and proteins. The "gold standard" for cardiac allograft surveillance is endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), an invasive technique with a distinct complication profile. The development of novel, non-invasive methods for the early diagnosis of allograft rejection is warranted. We hypothesized that the exosomal proteome is altered in acute rejection, allowing for a distinction between non-rejection and rejection episodes. Serum samples were collected from heart transplant (HTx) recipients with no rejection, acute cellular rejection (ACR) and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of serum exosome was performed using a mass spectrometer (Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid). Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a clustering of 3 groups: (1) control and heart failure (HF); (2) HTx without rejection; and (3) ACR and AMR. A total of 45 proteins were identified that could distinguish between groups (q < 0.05). Comparison of serum exosomal proteins from control, HF and non-rejection HTx revealed 17 differentially expressed proteins in at least 1 group (q < 0.05). Finally, comparisons of non-rejection HTx, ACR and AMR serum exosomes revealed 15 differentially expressed proteins in at least 1 group (q < 0.05). Of these 15 proteins, 8 proteins are known to play a role in the immune response. Of note, the majority of proteins identified were associated with complement activation, adaptive immunity such as immunoglobulin components and coagulation. Characterizing of circulating exosomal proteome in different cardiac disease states reveals unique protein expression patterns indicative of the respective pathologies. Our data suggest that HTx and allograft rejection alter the circulating exosomal protein content. Exosomal protein analysis could be a novel approach

  13. Erosion protection conferred by whole human saliva, dialysed saliva, and artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Kozik, J.; Lussi, A.; Carvalho, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    During dental erosion, tooth minerals are dissolved, leading to a softening of the surface and consequently to irreversible surface loss. Components from human saliva form a pellicle on the tooth surface, providing some protection against erosion. To assess the effect of different components and compositions of saliva on the protective potential of the pellicle against enamel erosion, we prepared four different kinds of saliva: human whole stimulated saliva (HS), artificial saliva containing only ions (AS), human saliva dialysed against artificial saliva, containing salivary proteins and ions (HS/AS), and human saliva dialysed against deionised water, containing only salivary proteins but no ions (HS/DW). Enamel specimens underwent four cycles of immersion in either HS, AS, HS/AS, HS/DW, or a humid chamber (Ctrl), followed by erosion with citric acid. During the cycling process, the surface hardness and the calcium released from the surface of the specimens were measured. The different kinds of saliva provided different levels of protection, HS/DW exhibiting significantly better protection than all the other groups (p saliva, therefore, have different effects on the protective properties of the pellicle and the right proportions of these components in saliva are critical for the ability to form a protective pellicle.

  14. Anti-obesogenic and hypolipidemic effects of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist derived from the saliva of the Gila monster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Patricia Lucio; Abdalla, Fernando Mauricio Francis; Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2017-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (R) agonists are a class of incretin mimetic drugs that have been used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and also considered strong candidates for the treatment of obesity. The original prototypical drug in this class is the exenatide, a synthetic peptide with the same structure as the native molecule, exendin-4, found in the saliva of the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum suspectum lizard). To identify and compare the anti-obesogenic, antidyslipidemic and antidiabetogenic effects of agonism in GLP-1R by exenatide on two distinct models of obesity: induced by hypothalamic injury (MSG) or high-calorie diet (DIO). To obtain MSG, neonatal rats were daily subcutaneously injected with 4 g monosodium glutamate/kg, for 10 consecutive days. To obtain DIO, 72-75 days old rats received hyperlipid food and 30% sucrose for drinking up to 142-145 days old. Untreated healthy rats with the same age were used as control. General biometric and metabolic parameters were measured. MSG was characterized by decreased naso-anal length, food and fluid intake, plasma protein and glucose decay rate per minute after insulin administration (K ITT ), as well as increased Lee index (body mass 0.33 /naso-anal length), mass of retroperitoneal and periepididymal fat pads, glycemia, triglycerides (TG), LDL and VLDL. Exenatide ameliorated K ITT and food and fluid intake, and it also restored glycemia in MSG. DIO was characterized by glucose intolerance, increased body mass, Lee index, fluid intake, mass of retroperitoneal and periepididymal fat pads, glycemia, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), TG, VLDL and total cholesterol, as well as decreased food intake and K ITT . Exenatide restored glycemia, HbA1c, TG, VLDL, total cholesterol and body mass, and it also ameliorated food and fluid intake, K ITT and mass of retroperitoneal fat pad in DIO. The hypothalamic injury and the high-calorie diet induce dyslipidemia and glycemic dysregulation in addition

  15. Burning mouth and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenos-Kustner, Eduardo; Marques-Soares, Maria Sueli

    2002-01-01

    Stomatodynia is the complaint of burning, tickling or itching of the oral cavity, and can be associated with other oral and non-oral signs and symptoms. However, the oral mucosa often appears normal, with no apparent underlying organic cause to account for the symptomatology. The etiology is unknown, though evidence points to the participation of numerous local, systemic and psychological factors. Among the local factors, saliva may play an important role in the symptoms of burning mouth. Saliva possesses specific rheological properties as a result of its chemical, physical and biological characteristics - these properties being essential for maintaining balanced conditions within the oral cavity. Patients with burning mouth present evidence of changes in salivary composition and flow, as well as a probable alteration in the oral mucosal sensory perception related particularly to dry mouth and taste alterations. On the other hand, alterations in salivary composition appear to reflect on its viscosity and symptomatology of burning mouth. Saliva is a field open to much research related to burning mouth, and knowledge of its properties (e.g., viscosity) merits special attention in view of its apparent relationship to the symptoms of burning mouth. The present study describes our clinical experience with burning mouth, and discusses some of the aspects pointing to salivary alterations as one of the most important factors underlying stomatodynia.

  16. Induction of α-synuclein aggregate formation by CSF exosomes from patients with Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuendl, Anne; Kunadt, Marcel; Kruse, Niels; Bartels, Claudia; Moebius, Wiebke; Danzer, Karin M.; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular α-synuclein has been proposed as a crucial mechanism for induction of pathological aggregate formation in previously healthy cells. In vitro, extracellular α-synuclein is partially associated with exosomal vesicles. Recently, we have provided evidence that exosomal α-synuclein is present in the central nervous system in vivo. We hypothesized that exosomal α-synuclein species from patients with α-synuclein related neurodegeneration serve as carriers for interneuronal disease transmission. We isolated exosomes from cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, progressive supranuclear palsy as a non-α-synuclein related disorder that clinically overlaps with Parkinson’s disease, and neurological controls. Cerebrospinal fluid exosome numbers, α-synuclein protein content of cerebrospinal fluid exosomes and their potential to induce oligomerization of α-synuclein were analysed. The quantification of cerebrospinal fluid exosomal α-synuclein showed distinct differences between patients with Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. In addition, exosomal α-synuclein levels correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment in cross-sectional samples from patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Importantly, cerebrospinal fluid exosomes derived from Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies induce oligomerization of α-synuclein in a reporter cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Our data suggest that cerebrospinal fluid exosomes from patients with Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies contain a pathogenic species of α-synuclein, which could initiate oligomerization of soluble α-synuclein in target cells and confer disease pathology. PMID:26647156

  17. Exosomes: secreted vesicles and intercellular communications

    OpenAIRE

    Théry, Clotilde

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin secreted by most cell types, and are thought to play important roles in intercellular communications. Although exosomes were originally described in 1983, interest in these vesicles has really increased dramatically in the last 3 years, after the finding that they contain mRNA and microRNA. This discovery sparked renewed interest for the general field of membrane vesicles involved in intercellular communications, and research on these s...

  18. Protein content and functional characteristics of serum-purified exosomes from patients with colorectal cancer revealed by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanyu; Xie, Yong; Xu, Lai; Zhan, Shaohua; Xiao, Yi; Gao, Yanpan; Wu, Bin; Ge, Wei

    2017-02-15

    Tumor cells of colorectal cancer (CRC) release exosomes into the circulation. These exosomes can mediate communication between cells and affect various tumor-related processes in their target cells. We present a quantitative proteomics analysis of the exosomes purified from serum of patients with CRC and normal volunteers; data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003875. We identified 918 proteins with an overlap of 725 Gene IDs in the Exocarta proteins list. Compared with the serum-purified exosomes (SPEs) of normal volunteers, we found 36 proteins upregulated and 22 proteins downregulated in the SPEs of CRC patients. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that upregulated proteins are involved in processes that modulate the pretumorigenic microenvironment for metastasis. In contrast, differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) that play critical roles in tumor growth and cell survival were principally downregulated. Our study demonstrates that SPEs of CRC patients play a pivotal role in promoting the tumor invasiveness, but have minimal influence on putative alterations in tumor survival or proliferation. According to bioinformatics analysis, we speculate that the protein contents of exosomes might be associated with whether they are involved in premetastatic niche establishment or growth and survival of metastatic tumor cells. This information will be helpful in elucidating the pathophysiological functions of tumor-derived exosomes, and aid in the development of CRC diagnostics and therapeutics. © 2016 UICC.

  19. Proteomic analysis of saliva in HIV-positive heroin addicts reveals proteins correlated with cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen S Dominy

    Full Text Available The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND remains high despite effective antiretroviral therapies. Multiple etiologies have been proposed over the last several years to account for this phenomenon, including the neurotoxic effects of antiretrovirals and co-morbid substance abuse; however, no underlying molecular mechanism has been identified. Emerging evidence in several fields has linked the gut to brain diseases, but the effect of the gut on the brain during HIV infection has not been explored. Saliva is the most accessible gut biofluid, and is therefore of great scientific interest for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. This study presents a longitudinal, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics study investigating saliva samples taken from 8 HIV-positive (HIV+, 11 -negative (HIV- heroin addicts. In addition, saliva samples were investigated from 11 HIV-, non-heroin addicted healthy controls. In the HIV+ group, 58 proteins were identified that show significant correlations with cognitive scores, implicating disruption of protein quality control pathways by HIV. Notably, only one protein from the HIV- heroin addict cohort showed a significant correlation with cognitive scores, and no proteins correlated with cognitive scores in the healthy control group. In addition, the majority of correlated proteins have been shown to be associated with exosomes, allowing us to propose that the salivary glands and/or oral epithelium may modulate brain function during HIV infection through the release of discrete packets of proteins in the form of exosomes.

  20. Exosomes in the Pathology of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Jason; Hill, Andrew F

    2016-12-23

    More than 30 years ago, two unexpected findings were discovered that challenged conventional thinking in biology. The first was the identification of a misfolded protein with transmissible properties associated with a group of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The second was the discovery of a new pathway used for the extracellular release of biomolecules, including extracellular vesicles called exosomes. Two decades later, the convergence of these pathways was shown when exosomes were found to play a significant role in both the transmission and propagation of protein aggregates in disease. Recent research has now revealed that the majority of proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases are transported in exosomes, and that external stresses due to age-related impairment of protein quality control mechanisms can promote the transcellular flux of these proteins in exosomes. Significantly, exosomes provide an environment that can induce the conformational conversion of native proteins into aggregates that can be transmitted to otherwise aggregate-free cells in the brain. Here we review the current roles of exosomes in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Exploring the RNA landscape of endothelial exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Boza, Jennifer; Lion, Michelle; Struman, Ingrid

    2017-12-27

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles of around 100nm of diameter produced by most cell types. These vesicles carry nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and other biomolecules and function as carriers of biological information in processes of extracellular communication. The content of exosomes is regulated by the external and internal microenvironment of the parent cell, but the intrinsic mechanisms of loading of molecules into exosomes is still not completely elucidated. In this study, by the use of next generation sequencing we have characterized in depth the RNA composition of healthy endothelial cells and exosomes and provided an accurate profile of the different coding and non-coding RNA species found per compartment. We have also discovered a set of unique genes preferentially included (or excluded) into vesicles. Moreover, after studying the enrichment of RNA motifs in the genes unequally distributed between cells and exosomes, we have detected a set of enriched sequences for several classes of RNA. In conclusion, our results provide the basis to study the involvement of RNA-binding proteins capable to recognize RNA sequences and their role in the export of RNAs into exosomes. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Antitumor HPV E7-specific CTL activity elicited by in vivo engineered exosomes produced through DNA inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonito, Paola; Chiozzini, Chiara; Arenaccio, Claudia; Anticoli, Simona; Manfredi, Francesco; Olivetta, Eleonora; Ferrantelli, Flavia; Falcone, Emiliana; Ruggieri, Anna; Federico, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    established a novel method to generate immunogenic exosomes in vivo by the intramuscular inoculation of DNA vectors expressing the exosome-anchoring protein Nef(mut) and its derivatives.

  3. Exosomes: promising sacks for treating ischemic heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui-Hao; Xu, Jun; Yang, Yue-Jin

    2017-09-01

    Ischemic heart disease(IHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the development of continuously improving therapeutic strategies, morbidity and mortality of patients with IHD remain relatively high. Exosomes are a subpopulation of vesicles that are universally recognized as major mediators in intercellular communication. Numerous preclinical studies have shown that these tiny vesicles were protective in IHD, through such actions as alleviating myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, promoting angiogenesis, inhibiting fibrosis, and facilitating cardiac regeneration. Our review focused on these beneficial exosome-mediated processes. In addition, we discuss in detail how to fully exploit the therapeutic potentials of exosomes in the field of IHD. Topics include identifying robust sources of exosomes, loading protective agents into exosomes, developing heart-specific exosomes, optimizing isolation methods, and translating the cardioprotective effects of exosomes into clinical practice. Finally, both the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing exosomes in clinical settings are addressed. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Saliva Preservative for Diagnostic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is an important body fluid for diagnostic purposes. Glycoproteins, glucose, steroids, DNA, and other molecules of diagnostic value are found in saliva. It is easier to collect as compared to blood or urine. Unfortunately, saliva also contains large numbers of bacteria that can release enzymes, which can degrade proteins and nucleic acids. These degradative enzymes destroy or reduce saliva s diagnostic value. This innovation describes the formulation of a chemical preservative that prevents microbial growth and inactivates the degradative enzymes. This extends the time that saliva can be stored or transported without losing its diagnostic value. Multiple samples of saliva can be collected if needed without causing discomfort to the subject and it does not require any special facilities to handle after it is collected.

  5. Insights into the saliva of the brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Michelle; Felton, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    We examined the salivary gland structure of the brown marmorated stink bug (Pentatomidae: Halyomorpha halys) and developed methods for independent collection of watery saliva and sheath saliva. This stink bug has become a serious invasive pest of agriculture in the United States and its saliva is largely responsible for the damage it causes. We determined by protein gel analysis and shotgun proteomics that the suite of proteins comprising the sheath and watery saliva are very distinct. Our results indicate that a substantial amount of sheath proteins are derived from tomato when stink bugs feed on tomato fruit. Consequently, the sheath saliva is comprised of both insect and plant-derived proteins. Both sheath and watery saliva possessed amylase activities, but polyphenol oxidase and glucose oxidase activities were not detected in either saliva. Peroxidase activity was only detected in salivary sheaths, but only when stink bugs fed on tomato. Proteomic analysis indicated that the peroxidase was likely of plant origin. We also determined that sheath saliva, but not watery saliva elicited the jasmonate inducible defense gene proteinase inhibitor 2 (Pin2), but this induction was only observed when sheaths had been collected from tomato. This indicates that the eliciting factor of the saliva is likely of plant origin. Lastly, neither watery or sheath saliva affected the expression of the salicylate inducible gene pathogenesis related gene (Pr1a-P4).

  6. Insights into the saliva of the brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Peiffer

    Full Text Available We examined the salivary gland structure of the brown marmorated stink bug (Pentatomidae: Halyomorpha halys and developed methods for independent collection of watery saliva and sheath saliva. This stink bug has become a serious invasive pest of agriculture in the United States and its saliva is largely responsible for the damage it causes. We determined by protein gel analysis and shotgun proteomics that the suite of proteins comprising the sheath and watery saliva are very distinct. Our results indicate that a substantial amount of sheath proteins are derived from tomato when stink bugs feed on tomato fruit. Consequently, the sheath saliva is comprised of both insect and plant-derived proteins. Both sheath and watery saliva possessed amylase activities, but polyphenol oxidase and glucose oxidase activities were not detected in either saliva. Peroxidase activity was only detected in salivary sheaths, but only when stink bugs fed on tomato. Proteomic analysis indicated that the peroxidase was likely of plant origin. We also determined that sheath saliva, but not watery saliva elicited the jasmonate inducible defense gene proteinase inhibitor 2 (Pin2, but this induction was only observed when sheaths had been collected from tomato. This indicates that the eliciting factor of the saliva is likely of plant origin. Lastly, neither watery or sheath saliva affected the expression of the salicylate inducible gene pathogenesis related gene (Pr1a-P4.

  7. Insights into the Saliva of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Michelle; Felton, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the salivary gland structure of the brown marmorated stink bug (Pentatomidae: Halyomorpha halys) and developed methods for independent collection of watery saliva and sheath saliva. This stink bug has become a serious invasive pest of agriculture in the United States and its saliva is largely responsible for the damage it causes. We determined by protein gel analysis and shotgun proteomics that the suite of proteins comprising the sheath and watery saliva are very distinct. Our results indicate that a substantial amount of sheath proteins are derived from tomato when stink bugs feed on tomato fruit. Consequently, the sheath saliva is comprised of both insect and plant-derived proteins. Both sheath and watery saliva possessed amylase activities, but polyphenol oxidase and glucose oxidase activities were not detected in either saliva. Peroxidase activity was only detected in salivary sheaths, but only when stink bugs fed on tomato. Proteomic analysis indicated that the peroxidase was likely of plant origin. We also determined that sheath saliva, but not watery saliva elicited the jasmonate inducible defense gene proteinase inhibitor 2 (Pin2), but this induction was only observed when sheaths had been collected from tomato. This indicates that the eliciting factor of the saliva is likely of plant origin. Lastly, neither watery or sheath saliva affected the expression of the salicylate inducible gene pathogenesis related gene (Pr1a-P4). PMID:24586332

  8. Bioinformatics advances in saliva diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Ji-Ye; Smith, Barry; Wong, David T W

    2012-06-01

    There is a need recognized by the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research and the National Cancer Institute to advance basic, translational and clinical saliva research. The goal of the Salivaomics Knowledge Base (SKB) is to create a data management system and web resource constructed to support human salivaomics research. To maximize the utility of the SKB for retrieval,integration and analysis of data, we have developed the Saliva Ontology and SDxMart. This article reviews the informatics advances in saliva diagnostics made possible by the Saliva Ontology and SDxMart.

  9. Boca ardiente y saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Chimenos Küstner, Eduardo; Marques Soares, Maria Sueli

    2002-01-01

    La sensación de ardor, escozor o picor generalizados en la cavidad bucal se denomina estomatodinia. Es un síntoma que puede guardar relación con otros síntomas o signos orales y no orales. Sin embargo, es frecuente que la mucosa bucal esté normal, no observándose una causa orgánica que justifique la sintomatología. Su etiología es desconocida, a pesar de que hay indicios de la participación de numerosos factores locales, sistémicos y psicológicos. Entre los factores locales, la saliva puede d...

  10. Micro RNA in Exosomes from HIV-Infected Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, William W; Huang, Ming Bo; Addae Konadu, Kateena; Powell, Michael D; Bond, Vincent C

    2015-12-22

    Exosomes are small membrane-bound vesicles secreted by cells that function to shuttle RNA and proteins between cells. To examine the role of exosomal micro RNA (miRNA) during the early stage of HIV-1 infection we characterized miRNA in exosomes from HIV-infected macrophages, compared with exosomes from non-infected macrophages. Primary human monocytes from uninfected donors were differentiated to macrophages (MDM) which were either mock-infected or infected with the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 BaL strain. Exosomes were recovered from culture media and separated from virus particles by centrifugation on iodixanol density gradients. The low molecular weight RNA fraction was prepared from purified exosomes. After pre-amplification, RNA was hybridized to microarrays containing probes for 1200 miRNA species of known and unknown function. We observed 48 miRNA species in both infected and uninfected MDM exosomes. Additionally, 38 miRNAs were present in infected-cell exosomes but not uninfected-cell exosomes. Of these, 13 miRNAs were upregulated in exosomes from HIV-infected cells, including 4 miRNA species that were increased by more than 10-fold. Though numerous miRNA species have been identified in HIV-infected cells, relatively little is known about miRNA content in exosomes from these cells. In the future, we plan to investigate whether the upregulated miRNA species we identified are increased in exosomes from HIV-1-positive patients.

  11. Exosomes: Some approaches to cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtam, T.; Samsonov, R.; Kamyshinsky, R.; Pantina, R.; Verlov, N.; Vasiliev, A.; Konevega, A. L.; Malek, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Exosomes are membrane-bound, intercellular communication shuttle vesicles that are defined by their endocytic origin and size range of 30-120 nm. Secreted by nearly all mammalian cell types and present in bodily fluids, exosomes confer messages between cells, by transporting functionally relevant proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The capability of tumor exosomes to house tumorigenic information and induce cellular responses that promote disease pathogenesis make tumor exosomes an attractive tool in identifying cancer biomarkers and exploiting exosomes for therapy. In this paper, we sum up our previous findings to utilize exosomes as biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis and therapy selection of prostate and thyroid cancer and present our results on exosomes in colon cancer. Some of plasma exosomal miRNAs showed their potential as diagnostic markers for colon cancer. All together, the data suggested the potentials of circulating exosomal miRNAs as liquid biopsy markers for cancer. Here we also present the possibilities of delivering therapeutic molecules by exosomes. Previously, we had demonstrated the potential of exosome-mediated siRNA delivery. Here, we present the possibility of carrying the exogenous p53 protein by exosomes in vitro.

  12. Elimination of Cigarette Smoke-derived Acetaldehyde in Saliva by Slow-release L-Cysteine Lozenge Is a Potential New Method to Assist Smoking Cessation. A Randomised, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjänen, Kari; Salminen, Johanna; Aresvuo, Ulla; Hendolin, Panu; Paloheimo, Lea; Eklund, Carita; Salaspuro, Mikko; Suovaniemi, Osmo

    2016-05-01

    Harmans are condensation products of acetaldehyde and biogenic amines in saliva. Like other monoamine oxidase inhibitors, harmans help maintain behavioral sensitization to nicotine and mediate the addictive potential of cigarette smoke-derived acetaldehyde. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that effective elimination of acetaldehyde in saliva by slow-release L-cysteine (Acetium™ lozenge; Biohit Oyj, Helsinki, Finland) blocks the formation of harmans and eliminates acetaldehyde-enhanced nicotine addiction in smokers. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial comparing Acetium lozenges and placebo in smoking intervention was undertaken. A cohort of 423 cigarette smokers were randomly allocated to intervention (n=212) and placebo arms (n=211). Smoking-related data were recorded by questionnaires, together with nicotine dependence testing by Fagerström scale. The participants used a smoking diary to record the daily number of cigarettes, test lozenges and sensations of smoking. The data were analyzed separately for point prevalence of abstinence and prolonged abstinence endpoints. Altogether, 110 study participants completed the trial per protocol, 234 had minor violations, and the rest (n=79) were lost to follow-up. During the 6-month trial, 65 participants quit smoking; 38 (17.9%) in the intervention arm and 27 (12.8%) in the placebo arm [odds ratio (OR)=1.48; 95% confidence intervals (CI)=0.87-2.54; p=0.143]. Success in the per protocol group was better (42.9% vs. 31.1%, respectively; OR=1.65, 95% CI=0.75-3.62; p=0.205) than in the modified intention-to-treat group: 13.5% vs. 7.4% (p=0.128). If the efficacy of Acetium lozenge can be confirmed in an adequately powered study, this new approach would represent a major breakthrough in smoking quit intervention because slow-release L-cysteine is non-toxic with no side-effects or limitations of use. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All

  13. Exosome nanotechnology: an emerging paradigm shift in drug delivery: exploitation of exosome nanovesicles for systemic in vivo delivery of RNAi heralds new horizons for drug delivery across biological barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Samira; Wood, Matthew J A

    2011-10-01

    The demonstration that dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes can be exploited for targeted RNAi delivery to the brain after systemic injection provides the first proof-of-concept for the potential of these naturally occurring vesicles as vehicles of drug delivery. As well as being amenable to existing in vivo targeting strategies already in use for viruses and liposomes, this novel approach offers the added advantages of in vivo safety and low immunogenicity. Fulfilment of the potential of exosome delivery methods warrants a better understanding of their biology, as well as the development of novel production, characterisation, targeting and cargo-loading nanotechnologies. Ultimately, exosome-mediated drug delivery promises to overcome important challenges in the field of therapeutics, such as delivery of drugs across otherwise impermeable biological barriers, such as the blood brain barrier, and using patient-derived tissue as a source of individualised and biocompatible therapeutic drug delivery vehicles. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Exosome-associated hepatitis C virus in cell cultures and patient plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ziqing [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Zhang, Xiugen [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Yu, Qigui [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); He, Johnny J., E-mail: johnny.he@unthsc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • HCV occurs in both exosome-free and exosome-associated forms. • Exosome-associated HCV is infectious and resistant to neutralizing antibodies. • More exosome-associated HCV than exosome-free HCV is present in patient plasma. - Abstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects its target cells in the form of cell-free viruses and through cell–cell contact. Here we report that HCV is associated with exosomes. Using highly purified exosomes and transmission electron microscopic imaging, we demonstrated that HCV occurred in both exosome-free and exosome-associated forms. Exosome-associated HCV was infectious and resistant to neutralization by an anti-HCV neutralizing antibody. There were more exosome-associated HCV than exosome-free HCV detected in the plasma of HCV-infected patients. These results suggest exosome-associated HCV as an alternative form for HCV infection and transmission.

  15. Radioimmunoassay of thyroxine in saliva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Z.; Vanuga, A.; Veleminsky, J. (Institute of Clinical Endocrinology, Lubochna (Czechoslovakia))

    1985-04-01

    A simple radioimmunoassay (RIA) for thyroxine (T/sub 4/) in saliva has been described. Fifty euthyroid control subjects, 14 euthyroid pregnant women, 23 thyreotoxic and 10 hypothyroid patients were examined. Serum T/sub 3/, T/sub 4/, thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) and TSH were measured simultaneously. The mean level of T/sub 4/ in saliva in controls was 1.10 +- 0.07 nmol/l. There was a good correlation between the saliva and serum T/sub 4/ concentrations (r = 0.74) and between saliva T/sub 4/ values and the T/sub 4//TBG ratio (r = 0.83). The saliva T/sub 4/ levels, like serum free T/sub 4/, were not dependent on fluctuations of serum TBG concentrations. In euthyroid pregnant women, saliva T/sub 4/ levels were within the normal range while the serum T/sub 4/ and TBG were increased. There was a good agreement of saliva T/sub 4/ values with the functional state of the thyroid. Thus, the RIA of saliva T/sub 4/ could replace the laborious determination of serum free T/sub 4/. It can especially be useful in instances with abnormal values of TBG, as it is in pregnancy, in congenital deficiency of serum TBG or in subjects with hereditary elevated TBG levels.

  16. Cortisol in urine and saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurwitz Eller, N; Netterstrøm, B; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (IMT) of the artery carotis communis.......The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (IMT) of the artery carotis communis....

  17. Proteomic Profiling of Exosomes Leads to the Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijvesz, Diederick; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hoogland, Marije; Vredenbregt-van den Berg, Mirella S.; Willemsen, Rob; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Jenster, Guido

    2013-12-31

    Introduction: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, biomarker discovery from body fluids is often hampered by the high abundance of many proteins unrelated to disease. An attractive alternative biomarker discovery approach is the isolation of small vesicles (exosomes, ~100 nm). They contain proteins that are specific to the tissue from which they are derived and therefore can be considered as treasure chests for disease-specific marker discovery. Profiling prostate cancer-derived exosomes could reveal new markers for this malignancy. Materials and Methods: Exosomes were isolated from 2 immortalized primary prostate epithelial cells (PNT2C2 and RWPE-1) and 2 PCa cell lines (PC346C and VCaP) by ultracentrifugation. Proteomic analyses utilized a nanoLC coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap operated in tandem MS (MS/MS) mode, followed by the Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag approach. Exosomal proteins were validated by Western blotting. A Tissue Micro Array, containing 481 different PCa samples (radical prostatectomy), was used to correlate candidate markers with several clinical-pathological parameters such as PSA, Gleason score, biochemical recurrence, and (PCa-related) death. Results: Proteomic characterization resulted in the identification of 263 proteins by at least 2 peptides. Specifically analysis of exosomes from PNT2C2, RWPE-1, PC346C, and VCaP identified 248, 233, 169, and 216 proteins, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed 52 proteins differently expressed between PCa and control cells, 9 of which were more abundant in PCa. Validation by Western blotting confirmed a higher abundance of FASN, XPO1 and PDCD6IP (ALIX) in PCa exosomes. The Tissue Micro 4 Array showed strong correlation of higher Gleason scores and local recurrence with increased cytoplasmic XPO1 (P<0.001). Conclusions: Differentially abundant proteins of cell line-derived exosomes make a clear subdivision between

  18. Saliva as a diagnostic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Lakshman

    2007-10-01

    The use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid for various human ailments is gaining popularity as it offers distinct advantages over serum. These include the non-invasive nature of saliva collection compared with phlebotomy, simplicity of collection even for individuals with a modest training and the cost-effective applicability for screening large populations. Whole saliva is most frequently used for diagnosis of systemic diseases since it is readily collected and contains serum constituents while gland-specific saliva is useful for investigating pathology of major salivary glands. Broadly, saliva analysis is currently used for the diagnosis of infectious and malignant diseases, hereditary disorders, autoimmune diseases, and endocrine disorders, as well as for the assessment of therapeutic drug levels, particularly in monitoring drug abuse. This review addresses the current status of salivary diagnostics and their future potential.

  19. Interactions between Exosomes from Breast Cancer Cells and Primary Mammary Epithelial Cells Leads to Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Which Induce DNA Damage Response, Stabilization of p53 and Autophagy in Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sujoy; Warshall, Case; Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Dutta, Dipanjan; Chandran, Bala

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles originating from multivesicular bodies and are released by all cell types. They contain proteins, lipids, microRNAs, mRNAs and DNA fragments, which act as mediators of intercellular communications by inducing phenotypic changes in recipient cells. Tumor-derived exosomes have been shown to play critical roles in different stages of tumor development and metastasis of almost all types of cancer. One of the ways by which exosomes affect tumorigenesis is to manipulate the tumor microenvironments to create tumor permissive “niches”. Whether breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate epithelial cells of the mammary duct to facilitate tumor development is not known. To address whether and how breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate ductal epithelial cells we studied the interactions between exosomes isolated from conditioned media of 3 different breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, T47DA18 and MCF7), representing three different types of breast carcinomas, and normal human primary mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). Our studies show that exosomes released by breast cancer cell lines are taken up by HMECs, resulting in the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and autophagy. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) led to abrogation of autophagy. HMEC-exosome interactions also induced the phosphorylation of ATM, H2AX and Chk1 indicating the induction of DNA damage repair (DDR) responses. Under these conditions, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 15 was also observed. Both DDR responses and phosphorylation of p53 induced by HMEC-exosome interactions were also inhibited by NAC. Furthermore, exosome induced autophagic HMECs were found to release breast cancer cell growth promoting factors. Taken together, our results suggest novel mechanisms by which breast cancer cell secreted exosomes manipulate HMECs to create a tumor permissive microenvironment. PMID:24831807

  20. Heparanase activates the syndecan-syntenin-ALIX exosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucourt, Bart; Meeussen, Sofie; Bao, Jie; Zimmermann, Pascale; David, Guido

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes are secreted vesicles of endosomal origin involved in signaling processes. We recently showed that the syndecan heparan sulfate proteoglycans control the biogenesis of exosomes through their interaction with syntenin-1 and the endosomal-sorting complex required for transport accessory component ALIX. Here we investigated the role of heparanase, the only mammalian enzyme able to cleave heparan sulfate internally, in the syndecan-syntenin-ALIX exosome biogenesis pathway. We show that heparanase stimulates the exosomal secretion of syntenin-1, syndecan and certain other exosomal cargo, such as CD63, in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, exosomal CD9, CD81 and flotillin-1 are not affected. Conversely, reduction of endogenous heparanase reduces the secretion of syntenin-1-containing exosomes. The ability of heparanase to stimulate exosome production depends on syntenin-1 and ALIX. Syndecans, but not glypicans, support exosome biogenesis in heparanase-exposed cells. Finally, heparanase stimulates intraluminal budding of syndecan and syntenin-1 in endosomes, depending on the syntenin-ALIX interaction. Taken together, our findings identify heparanase as a modulator of the syndecan-syntenin-ALIX pathway, fostering endosomal membrane budding and the biogenesis of exosomes by trimming the heparan sulfate chains on syndecans. In addition, our data suggest that this mechanism controls the selection of specific cargo to exosomes.

  1. The biology and function of exosomes in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    Humans circulate quadrillions of exosomes at all times. Exosomes are a class of extracellular vesicles released by all cells, with a size range of 40–150 nm and a lipid bilayer membrane. Exosomes contain DNA, RNA, and proteins. Exosomes likely remove excess and/or unnecessary constituents from the cells, functioning like garbage bags, although their precise physiological role remains unknown. Additionally, exosomes may mediate specific cell-to-cell communication and activate signaling pathways in cells they fuse or interact with. Exosomes are detected in the tumor microenvironment, and emerging evidence suggests that they play a role in facilitating tumorigenesis by regulating angiogenesis, immunity, and metastasis. Circulating exosomes can be used as liquid biopsies and noninvasive biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27035812

  2. Using exosomes, naturally-equipped nanocarriers, for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Kim, Myung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes offer distinct advantages that uniquely position them as highly effective drug carriers. Comprised of cellular membranes with multiple adhesive proteins on their surface, exosomes are known to specialize in cell–cell communications and provide an exclusive approach for the delivery of various therapeutic agents to target cells. In addition, exosomes can be amended through their parental cells to express a targeting moiety on their surface, or supplemented with desired biological activity. Development and validation of exosome-based drug delivery systems are the focus of this review. Different techniques of exosome isolation, characterization, drug loading, and applications in experimental disease models and clinic are discussed. Exosome-based drug formulations may be applied to a wide variety of disorders such as cancer, various infectious, cardiovascular, and neuro-degenerative disorders. Overall, exosomes combine benefits of both synthetic nanocarriers and cell-mediated drug delivery systems while avoiding their limitations. PMID:26241750

  3. Diverse subpopulations of vesicles secreted by different intracellular mechanisms are present in exosome preparations obtained by differential ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrie, Angélique; Colombo, Marina; Krumeich, Sophie; Raposo, Graça; Théry, Clotilde

    2012-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles of 50 to 100 nm in diameter, released by many cell types. Exosomes are formed inside the cell in intracellular endosomal compartments and are secreted upon fusion of these compartments with the plasma membrane. Cells also secrete other types of membrane vesicles, for instance, by outward budding from the plasma membrane, and although some of them clearly differ from exosomes by their structural features (larger size), others are possibly more difficult to separate. Here, using Rab27a inhibition to modulate exosome secretion, we show the existence of at least 2 distinct populations of vesicles after purification by classical ultracentrifugation from mouse tumor cell conditioned medium. Rab27a inhibition lead to decreased vesicular secretion of some conventional markers of exosomes (CD63, Tsg101, Alix and Hsc70) but did not affect secretion of others (CD9 and Mfge8). By electron microscopy, CD9 was observed on vesicles of various sizes, ranging from 30 nm to more than 150 nm in diameter. Flotation onto sucrose gradients showed different proportions of CD63, CD9 and Mfge8 not only in fractions of densities classically described for exosomes (around 1.15 g/ml) but also in fractions of densities over 1.20 g/ml, indicating the presence of heterogenous vesicle populations. CD9 and Mfge8 were also found in large vesicles pelleted at low speed and can thus not be considered as specific components of endosome-derived vesicles. We propose that the most commonly used protocols for exosome preparations co-purify vesicles from endosomal and other origins, possibly the plasma membrane. Future work will be required to improve techniques for accurate purification and characterization of the different populations of extracellular vesicles. PMID:24009879

  4. Single molecule localization imaging of exosomes using blinking silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shenfei; Zong, Junzhu; Chen, Chen; Jiang, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Yizhi; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2018-02-01

    Discovering new fluorophores, which are suitable for single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) is important for promoting the applications of SMLM in biological or material sciences. Here, we found that silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) possess a fluorescence blinking behavior, making them an excellent candidate for SMLM. The Si QDs are fabricated using a facile microwave-assisted method. Blinking of Si QDs is confirmed by single particle fluorescence measurement and the spatial resolution achieved is about 30 nm. To explore the potential application of Si QDs as the nanoprobes for SMLM imaging, cell derived exosomes are chosen as the object owing to their small size (50–100 nm in diameter). Since CD63 is commonly presented on the membrane of exosomes, CD63 aptamers are attached to the surface of Si QDs to form nanoprobes which can specifically recognize exosomes. SMLM imaging shows that Si QDs based nanoprobes can indeed realize super resolved optical imaging of exosomes. More importantly, blinking of Si QDs is observed in water or PBS buffer with no need for special imaging buffers. Besides, considering that silicon is highly biocompatible, Si QDs should have minimal cytotoxicity. These features make Si QDs quite suitable for SMLM applications especially for live cell imaging.

  5. Comparative proteomics evaluation of plasma exosome isolation techniques and assessment of the stability of exosomes in normal human blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Hina; Adda, Christopher G; Liem, Michael; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mechler, Adam; Simpson, Richard J; Hulett, Mark D; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2013-11-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles released by a variety of cells and are detected in body fluids including blood. Recent studies have highlighted the critical application of exosomes as personalized targeted drug delivery vehicles and as reservoirs of disease biomarkers. While these research applications have created significant interest and can be translated into practice, the stability of exosomes needs to be assessed and exosome isolation protocols from blood plasma need to be optimized. To optimize methods to isolate exosomes from blood plasma, we performed a comparative evaluation of three exosome isolation techniques (differential centrifugation coupled with ultracentrifugation, epithelial cell adhesion molecule immunoaffinity pull-down, and OptiPrep(TM) density gradient separation) using normal human plasma. Based on MS, Western blotting and microscopy results, we found that the OptiPrep(TM) density gradient method was superior in isolating pure exosomal populations, devoid of highly abundant plasma proteins. In addition, we assessed the stability of exosomes in plasma over 90 days under various storage conditions. Western blotting analysis using the exosomal marker, TSG101, revealed that exosomes are stable for 90 days. Interestingly, in the context of cellular uptake, the isolated exosomes were able to fuse with target cells revealing that they were indeed biologically active. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Exosomes from Glioma-Associated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Increase the Tumorigenicity of Glioma Stem-like Cells via Transfer of miR-1587.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Javier; Phillips, Lynette M; Shahar, Tal; Hossain, Anwar; Gumin, Joy; Kim, Hoon; Bean, Andrew J; Calin, George A; Fueyo, Juan; Walters, Edgar T; Kalluri, Raghu; Verhaak, Roel G; Lang, Frederick F

    2017-11-01

    Tumor-stromal communications impact tumorigenesis in ways that are incompletely understood. Here, we show that glioma-associated human mesenchymal stem cells (GA-hMSC), a newly identified stromal component of glioblastoma, release exosomes that increase the proliferation and clonogenicity of tumor-initiating glioma stem-like cells (GSC). This event leads to a significantly greater tumor burden and decreased host survival compared with untreated GSCs in orthotopic xenografts. Analysis of the exosomal content identified miR-1587 as a mediator of the exosomal effects on GSCs, in part via downregulation of the tumor-suppressive nuclear receptor corepressor NCOR1. Our results illuminate the tumor-supporting role for GA-hMSCs by identifying GA-hMSC-derived exosomes in the intercellular transfer of specific miRNA that enhance the aggressiveness of glioblastoma. Cancer Res; 77(21); 5808-19. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles in host–pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorey, Jeffrey S; Cheng, Yong; Singh, Prachi P; Smith, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    An effective immune response requires the engagement of host receptors by pathogen-derived molecules and the stimulation of an appropriate cellular response. Therefore, a crucial factor in our ability to control an infection is the accessibility of our immune cells to the foreign material. Exosomes—which are extracellular vesicles that function in intercellular communication—may play a key role in the dissemination of pathogen- as well as host-derived molecules during infection. In this review, we highlight the composition and function of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles produced during viral, parasitic, fungal and bacterial infections and describe how these vesicles could function to either promote or inhibit host immunity. PMID:25488940

  8. The functions of human saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dawes, C; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Villa, A

    2015-01-01

    as a buffer to protect oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal mucosae from orally ingested acid or acid regurgitated from the stomach. Saliva protects the teeth against acid by contributing to the acquired enamel pellicle, which forms a renewable lubricant between opposing tooth surfaces, by being supersaturated...... with respect to tooth mineral, by containing bicarbonate as a buffer and urea and by facilitating clearance of acidic materials from the mouth. Saliva contains many antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal agents which modulate the oral microbial flora in different ways. Saliva also facilitates the healing...

  9. [The diagnostic possibilities of saliva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochurova, E V; Kozlov, S V

    2014-01-01

    Saliva is a clinically informative biological fluid which contains multitude of bio-markers. This characteristic makes it possible to carry out numerous analyzes for developing mode to test patient in situ, express-tests included. The diagnostic by saliva is a new area of more simple application both markers and analyzers that can be useful in diagnostic of diseases of oral cavity, oncological diseases included. The using of saliva expands perspectives for making clinical diagnosis and establishment of dynamics and monitoring of disease.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva in HIV-positive Heroin Addicts Reveals Proteins Correlated with Cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominy, Stephen; Brown, Joseph N.; Ryder, Mark I.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high despite effective antiretroviral therapies. Multiple etiologies have been proposed over the last few years to account for this phenomenon, including the neurotoxic effects of antiretrovirals and co-morbid substance abuse. However, no underlying molecular mechanism has been identified. Emerging evidence in several fields has linked the gut to brain diseases, but the effect of the gut on the brain during HIV infection has not been explored. Saliva is the most accessible gut biofluid, and is therefore of great scientific interest for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. This study presents a longitudinal, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics study investigating saliva samples taken from 8 HIV-positive (HIV+) and 11 -negative (HIV-) heroin addicts. In the HIV+ group, 58 proteins were identified that show significant correlations with cognitive scores and that implicate disruption of protein quality control pathways by HIV. Notably, no proteins from the HIV- heroin addict cohort showed significant correlations with cognitive scores. In addition, the majority of correlated proteins have been shown to be associated with exosomes, allowing us to propose that the salivary glands and/or oral epithelium may modulate brain function during HIV infection through the release of discrete packets of proteins in the form of exosomes.

  11. SALIVA AS A DIAGNOSTIC FLUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezelj-Ribarić Sonja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is a readily available oral fluid with many functions, from digestion, maintenance of oral tissues' integrity, to caries prevention. Changes regarding its secretion may be divided into qualitative and quantitative: both of them are a consequence of certain conditions/diseases (e.g. internal factors or nutrients/drugs ingested (e.g. external factors. During the last 15 years, technological advances gave a significant momentum to utilization of saliva as a diagnostic tool. Analysis of saliva, just like the blood analysis, has two main objectives: to identify the subjects suffering from a certain disorder, and to follow the development and progress of therapy. This paper provides an overview of possibilities for the use of saliva for diagnostic purposes and gives specific examples of some clinical investigations, with the final aim to stimulate the use of this noninvasive means for the health care promotion.

  12. Exosome-Based Cell-Cell Communication in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Maia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are not isolated entities, but complex systemic networks involving cell-cell communication between transformed and non-transformed cells. The milieu created by tumor-associated cells may either support or halt tumor progression. In addition to cell-cell contact, cells communicate through secreted factors via a highly complex system involving characteristics such as ligand concentration, receptor expression and integration of diverse signaling pathways. Of these, extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are emerging as novel cell-cell communication mediators in physiological and pathological scenarios. Exosomes, membrane vesicles of endocytic origin released by all cells (both healthy and diseased, ranging in size from 30 to 150 nm, transport all the main biomolecules, including lipids, proteins, DNAs, messenger RNAs and microRNA, and perform intercellular transfer of components, locally and systemically. By acting not only in tumor cells, but also in tumor-associated cells such as fibroblasts, endothelium, leukocytes and progenitor cells, tumor- and non-tumor cells-derived exosomes have emerged as new players in tumor growth and invasion, tumor-associated angiogenesis, tissue inflammation and immunologic remodeling. In addition, due to their property of carrying molecules from their cell of origin to the peripheral circulation, exosomes have been increasingly studied as sources of tumor biomarkers in liquid biopsies. Here we review the current literature on the participation of exosomes in the communication between tumor and tumor-associated cells, highlighting the role of this process in the setup of tumor microenvironments that modulate tumor initiation and metastasis.

  13. Proteomic profiling of exosomes: Current perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, Richard J; Jensen, Søren S; Lim, Justin W E

    2008-01-01

    distinct subsets of proteins that may be linked to cell-type associated functions. The secretion of exosomes by tumor cells and their implication in the transport and propagation of infectious cargo such as prions and retroviruses such as HIV suggest their participation in pathological situations...

  14. Isolation of nanoscale exosomes using viscoelastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoqing; Liu, Chao

    2017-11-01

    Exosomes, molecular cargos secreted by almost all mammalian cells, are considered as promising biomarkers to identify many diseases including cancers. However, the small size of exosomes (30-200 nm) poses serious challenges on their isolation from the complex media containing a variety of extracellular vesicles (EVs) of different sizes, especially in small sample volumes. Here we develop a viscoelasticity-based microfluidic system to directly separate exosomes from cell culture media or serum in a continuous, size-dependent, and label-free manner. Using a small amount of biocompatible polymer as the additive into the media to control the viscoelastic forces exerted on EVs, we are able to achieve a high separation purity (>90%) and recovery (>80%) of exosomes. The size cutoff in viscoelasticity-based microfluidics can be easily controlled using different PEO concentrations. Based on this size-dependent viscoelastic separation strategy, we envision the handling of diverse nanoscale objects, such as gold nanoparticles, DNA origami structures, and quantum dots. This work was supported financially by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11572334, 91543125).

  15. Identification of Individual Exosome-Like Vesicles by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremersch, Stephan; Marro, Monica; Pinchasik, Bat-El; Baatsen, Pieter; Hendrix, An; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Skirtach, Andre G; Raemdonck, Koen; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) are a novel class of biomarkers that are receiving a lot of attention for the detection of cancer at an early stage. In this study the feasibility of using a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based method to distinguish between ELVs derived from different cellular origins is evaluated. A gold nanoparticle based shell is deposited on the surface of ELVs derived from cancerous and healthy cells, which enhances the Raman signal while maintaining a colloidal suspension of individual vesicles. This nanocoating allows the recording of SERS spectra from single vesicles. By using partial least squares discriminant analysis on the obtained spectra, vesicles from different origin can be distinguished, even when present in the same mixture. This proof-of-concept study paves the way for noninvasive (cancer) diagnostic tools based on exosomal SERS fingerprinting in combination with multivariate statistical analysis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Saliva as a diagnostic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Richard; Simek, Jiri; Vondrakova, Jana; Faber, Edgar; Michl, Petr; Pazdera, Jindrich; Indrak, Karel

    2009-06-01

    This is a review of current knowledge on the use of saliva, gingival cervical fluid and mucosal transudate in the detection of some oral and systemic diseases as well as drugs. Oral fluid is a diagnostic medium that can be easily collected and with minimal invasion but it has been neglected in the past. Today, saliva is being used more often to diagnose: HIV virus, oro-facial and systemic tumors, cardiovascular disease and in detecting addictive substances. Neutropil levels in saliva may also indicate successful bone marrow transplant. Oral fluid is now systematically being researched and oral fluid analysis is being compared with the analysis of other diagnostic media such as blood and urine. A number of recent studies have focused on oncogenic marker detection and its monitoring in saliva. The latest clinical and laboratory findings on diagnostic markers of oropharyngeal carcinoma in oral fluid could be the beginning of their wider use as a diagnostic medium. Oral fluid can also be also used to diagnose other malignancies such as breast cancer which was one of the first malignant tumors to be detected using genetic protein biomarkers. Raised levels of CA15-3 and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor have been found in patients with breast cancer and elevated levels of CA 125 and the glycoprotein complex in the saliva of ovarian cancer patients. Doubtless, the diagnostic value of saliva, aided by current technological development will increase rapidly in the near future.

  17. HIV and mature dendritic cells: Trojan exosomes riding the Trojan horse?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Erkizia, Itziar; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Borràs, Francesc E; Blanco, Julià; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2010-01-01

    ...). The Trojan exosome hypothesis proposes that retroviruses can take advantage of the cell-encoded intercellular vesicle traffic and exosome exchange pathway, moving between cells in the absence...

  18. Do Neural Cells Communicate with Endothelial Cells via Secretory Exosomes and Microvesicles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R. Smalheiser

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons, glial, cells, and brain tumor cells tissues release small vesicles (secretory exosomes and microvesicles, which may represent a novel mechanism by which neuronal activity could influence angiogenesis within the embryonic and mature brain. If CNS-derived vesicles can enter the bloodstream as well, they may communicate with endothelial cells in the peripheral circulation and with cells concerned with immune surveillance.

  19. Exosomes as agents of change in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poe, A J; Knowlton, A A

    2017-10-01

    Exosomes have an evolving role in paracrine and autocrine signaling, which is enhanced because these lipid vesicles are quite stable and can deliver miRNA, DNA, protein and other molecules to cells throughout the body. Most cell types release exosomes, and exosomes are found in all biological fluids, making them accessible biomarkers. Significantly, exosomes can carry a biologically potent cargo, which can alter the phenotype of recipient cells. In the cardiovascular system exosomes have been primarily studied for their role in mediating the beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells after myocardial injury. Exosomes released by cardiac cells in disease states, such as myocardial ischemia, can potentially have important pathophysiologic effects on other cardiac cells as well as on distant organs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. MicroRNA cluster miR-17-92 Cluster in Exosomes Enhance Neuroplasticity and Functional Recovery After Stroke in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hongqi; Katakowski, Mark; Wang, Fengjie; Qian, Jian-Yong; Liu, Xian Shuang; Ali, Meser M; Buller, Benjamin; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) harvested exosomes are hypothesized as the major paracrine effectors of MSCs. In vitro, the miR-17-92 cluster promotes oligodendrogenesis, neurogenesis, and axonal outgrowth. We, therefore, investigated whether the miR-17-92 cluster-enriched exosomes harvested from MSCs transfected with an miR-17-92 cluster plasmid enhance neurological recovery compared with control MSC-derived exosomes. Rats subjected to 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion were intravenously administered miR-17-92 cluster-enriched exosomes, control MSC exosomes, or liposomes and were euthanized 28 days post-middle cerebral artery occlusion. Histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Golgi-Cox staining were used to assess dendritic, axonal, synaptic, and myelin remodeling. Expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog and activation of its downstream proteins, protein kinase B, mechanistic target of rapamycin, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β in the peri-infarct region were measured by means of Western blots. Compared with the liposome treatment, both exosome treatment groups exhibited significant improvement of functional recovery, but miR-17-92 cluster-enriched exosome treatment had significantly more robust effects on improvement of neurological function and enhancements of oligodendrogenesis, neurogenesis, and neurite remodeling/neuronal dendrite plasticity in the ischemic boundary zone (IBZ) than the control MSC exosome treatment. Moreover, miR-17-92 cluster-enriched exosome treatment substantially inhibited phosphatase and tensin homolog, a validated miR-17-92 cluster target gene, and subsequently increased the phosphorylation of phosphatase and tensin homolog downstream proteins, protein kinase B, mechanistic target of rapamycin, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β compared with control MSC exosome treatment. Our data suggest that treatment of stroke with tailored exosomes enriched with the miR-17-92 cluster increases neural plasticity

  1. Exosomes from dental pulp stem cells rescue human dopaminergic neurons from 6-hydroxy-dopamine-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmalavičiūtė, Akvilė; Tunaitis, Virginijus; Pivoraitė, Ugnė; Venalis, Algirdas; Pivoriūnas, Augustas

    2015-07-01

    Stem cells derived from the dental pulp of human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) have unique neurogenic properties that could be potentially exploited for therapeutic use. The importance of paracrine SHED signaling for neuro-regeneration has been recognized, but the exact mechanisms behind these effects are presently unknown. In the present study, we investigated the neuro-protective potential of exosomes and micro-vesicles derived from SHEDs on human dopaminergic neurons during oxidative stress-induced by 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA). ReNcell VM human neural stem cells were differentiated into dopaminergic neurons and treated with 100 μmol/L of 6-OHDA alone or in combination with exosomes or micro-vesicles purified by ultracentrifugation from SHEDs cultivated in serum-free medium under two conditions: in standard two-dimensional culture flasks or on laminin-coated micro-carriers in a bioreactor. Real-time monitoring of apoptosis was performed with the use of time-lapse confocal microscopy and the CellEvent Caspase-3/7 green detection reagent. Exosomes but not micro-vesicles derived from SHEDs grown on the laminin-coated three-dimensional alginate micro-carriers suppressed 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons by approximately 80% throughout the culture period. Strikingly, no such effects were observed for the exosomes derived from SHEDs grown under standard culture conditions. Our results suggest that exosomes derived from SHEDs are considered as new potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exosomal tetraspanins mediate cancer metastasis by altering host microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Li, Jun; Liu, Shuo; Wang, Teng; Ianni, Alessandro; Bober, Eva; Braun, Thomas; Xiang, Rong; Yue, Shijing

    2017-09-22

    The metastases of malignant tumors develop through a cascade of events. The establishment of a pre-metastatic micro-environment is initiated by communication between tumors and host. Exosomes come into focus as the most potent intercellular communicators playing a pivotal role in this process. Cancer cells release exosomes into the extracellular environment prior to metastasis. Tetraspanin is a type of 4 times transmembrane proteins. It may be involved in cell motility, adhesion, morphogenesis, as well as cell and vesicular membrane fusion. The exosomal tetraspanin network is a molecular scaffold connecting various proteins for signaling transduction. The complex of tetraspanin-integrin determines the recruiting cancer exosomes to pre-metastatic sites. Tetraspanin is a key element for the target cell selection of exosomes uptake that may lead to the reprogramming of target cells. Reprogrammed target cells assist pre-metastatic niche formation. Previous reviews have described the biogenesis, secretion and intercellular interaction of exosomes in various tumors. However, there is a lack of reviews on the topic of exosomal tetraspanin in the context of cancer. In this review, we will describe the main characteristics of exosomal tetraspanin in cancer cells. We will also discuss how the cancer exosomal tetraspanin alters extracellular environment and regulates cancer metastasis.

  3. Characteristics and Roles of Exosomes in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Yan-Wei; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2017-03-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized biological membrane-enclosed vesicles that contain a cell-specific cargo of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids that are released and taken up by most cell types, thereby inducing expression and functional changes via horizontal transfer of cargos between cells. Thus, exosomes present a largely unknown "cell-to-cell" communication system, which is now increasingly being investigated for diagnostic and therapeutic use in cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on the properties and roles of exosomes in a variety of physiological and pathological settings related to CVD. We focus on available information on exosome-mediated intercellular communication relevant to myocardial injury, repair, and regeneration. Finally, we address the promise of exosomes as valuable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, and their potential use as therapeutic tools in CVD. Exosomes remain largely unexplored for therapeutic use in the field of cardiovascular diagnosis and medicine. A more detailed characterization of cardiac exosomes shed by different components of the heart will be of fundamental importance to address specific changes in the profile of exosomal microRNAs and proteins, which will enable the clinical use of exosomes as minimally invasive diagnostic tools and vehicles for delivery of targeted therapies for CVD.

  4. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickney, Zachary; Losacco, Joseph; McDevitt, Sophie; Zhang, Zhiwen; Lu, Biao

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell-cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickney, Zachary, E-mail: zstickney@scu.edu; Losacco, Joseph, E-mail: jlosacco@scu.edu; McDevitt, Sophie, E-mail: smmcdevitt@scu.edu; Zhang, Zhiwen, E-mail: zzhang@scu.edu; Lu, Biao, E-mail: blu2@scu.edu

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell–cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  6. Glioma cells promote angiogenesis through the release of exosomes containing long non-coding RNA POU3F3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, H-L; Hu, G-W; Chen, Y; Liu, Y; Tu, W; Lu, Y-M; Wu, L; Xu, G-H

    2017-03-01

    Angiogenesis is a key event in the progression of gliomas, and emerging evidence suggests that exosomes are signaling extracellular organelles that modulate the tumor microenvironment and promote angiogenesis and tumor progression. This study aimed to explore the mechanism by which glioma-derived exosomes affect angiogenesis. qRT-PCR was used to determine the expression level of linc-POU3F3 in glioma tissue as well as glioma cell lines. Ultrafiltration combined with a purification method was used to isolate exosomes derived from A172 cells (A172-Exo) and linc-POU3F3 shRNA-treated A172 cells (shA172-Exo). Transmission electron microscopy, Western blot and tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS) were used to identify exosomes. In vitro migration, proliferation, and tube formation experiments, as well as in vivo CAM assays, were used to analyze the pro-angiogenesis ability of exosomes. qRT-PCR and Western blot were used to identify expression levels of angiogenesis-related genes and proteins in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) after being cultured with exosomes. The levels of linc-POU3F3 were upregulated in glioma tissue and significantly correlated with the advanced tumor stage. A172 cells exhibited the highest expression level. A172-Exo was similar to shA172-Exo (50-100 nm in diameter) and expressed Alix, Tsg101 and CD9, while the expression level of linc-POU3F3 in A172-Exo was significantly higher than that in shA172-Exo. HBMECs rapidly internalized A172-Exo and shA172-Exo, and the linc-POU3F3 expression level in HBMECs treated with A172-Exo was significantly higher than the level in HBMECs treated with shA172-Exo. A172-Exo exhibited better function in promoting HBMECs migration, proliferation, tubular-like structure formation in vitro and arteriole formation in vivo. The gene and protein expression level of bFGF, bFGFR, VEGFA, and Angio in HBMECs treated with A172-Exo was much higher than that of HBMECs treated with shA172-Exo. These results

  7. Exosomes from NSC-34 Cells Transfected with hSOD1-G93A Are Enriched in miR-124 and Drive Alterations in Microglia Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pinto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons (MNs. Evidences indicate that ALS is a non-cell autonomous disease in which glial cells participate in both disease onset and progression. Exosomal transfer of mutant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (mSOD1 from cell-to-cell was suggested to contribute to disease dissemination. Data from our group and others showed that exosomes from activated cells contain inflammatory-related microRNAs (inflamma-miRNAs that recapitulate the donor cell. While glia-derived exosomes and their effects in neurons have been addressed by several studies, only a few investigated the influence of motor neuron (MN-derived exosomes in other cell function, the aim of the present study. We assessed a set of inflamma-miRs in NSC-34 MN-like cells transfected with mutant SOD1(G93A and extended the study into their derived exosomes (mSOD1 exosomes. Then, the effects produced by mSOD1 exosomes in the activation and polarization of the recipient N9 microglial cells were investigated. Exosomes in coculture with N9 microglia and NSC-34 cells [either transfected with either wild-type (wt human SOD1 or mutant SOD1(G93A] showed to be transferred into N9 cells. Increased miR-124 expression was found in mSOD1 NSC-34 cells and in their derived exosomes. Incubation of mSOD1 exosomes with N9 cells determined a sustained 50% reduction in the cell phagocytic ability. It also caused a persistent NF-kB activation and an acute generation of NO, MMP-2, and MMP-9 activation, as well as upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, MHC-II, and iNOS gene expression, suggestive of induced M1 polarization. Marked elevation of IL-10, Arginase 1, TREM2, RAGE, and TLR4 mRNA levels, together with increased miR-124, miR-146a, and miR-155, at 24 h incubation, suggest the switch to mixed M1 and M2 subpopulations in the exosome-treated N9 microglial cells. Exosomes from mSOD1 NSC-34 MNs also enhanced the number

  8. Perturbations in the Urinary Exosome in Transplant Rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigdel, Tara K.; NG, Yolanda; Lee, Sangho; Nicora, Carrie D.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2015-01-05

    Background: Urine exosomes, vesicles exocytosed into urine by all renal epithelial cell types, occur under normal physiologic and disease states. Exosome contents may mirror disease-specific proteome perturbations in kidney injury. Analysis methodologies for the exosomal fraction of the urinary proteome were developed and for comparing the urinary exosomal fraction versus unfractionated proteome for biomarker discovery. Methods: Urine exosomes were isolated by centrifugal filtration from mid-stream, second morning void, urine samples collected from kidney transplant recipients with and without biopsy matched acute rejection. The proteomes of unfractionated whole urine (Uw) and urine exosomes (Uexo) underwent mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics analysis. The proteome data were analyzed for significant differential protein abundances in acute rejection (AR). Results: Identifications of 1018 and 349 proteins, Uw and Uexo fractions, respectively, demonstrated a 279 protein overlap between the two urinary compartments with 25%(70) of overlapping proteins unique to Uexoand represented membrane bound proteins (p=9.31e-7). Of 349 urine exosomal proteins identified in transplant patients 220 were not previously identified in the normal urine exosomal fraction. Uexo proteins (11), functioning in the inflammatory / stress response, were more abundant in patients with biopsy-confirmed acute rejection, 3 of which were exclusive to Uexo. Uexo AR-specific biomarkers (8) were also detected in Uw, but since they were observed at significantly lower abundances in Uw, they were not significant for AR in Uw. Conclusions: A rapid urinary exosome isolation method and quantitative measurement of enriched Uexo proteins was applied. Urine proteins specific to the exosomal fraction were detected either in unfractionated urine (at low abundances) or by Uexo fraction analysis. Perturbed proteins in the exosomal compartment of urine collected from kidney transplant patients were

  9. Collection and extraction of saliva DNA for next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Michael R; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Li, Ning; Ray, William C; Bartlett, Christopher W

    2014-08-27

    The preferred source of DNA in human genetics research is blood, or cell lines derived from blood, as these sources yield large quantities of high quality DNA. However, DNA extraction from saliva can yield high quality DNA with little to no degradation/fragmentation that is suitable for a variety of DNA assays without the expense of a phlebotomist and can even be acquired through the mail. However, at present, no saliva DNA collection/extraction protocols for next generation sequencing have been presented in the literature. This protocol optimizes parameters of saliva collection/storage and DNA extraction to be of sufficient quality and quantity for DNA assays with the highest standards, including microarray genotyping and next generation sequencing.

  10. CHROMOGRANIN A DETECTION IN SALIVA OF TYPE 2 DIABETES PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Soell

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromogranin A is present in secretion granules of nerve, endocrine and immune cells and is a precursor of several peptides with antibacterial and antifungal properties at micromolar concentrations.Our aim in this prospective, double blind study, was to determine the expression of chromogranin A and its peptides at protein level in saliva of type 2 diabetic patients and thereby to obtain a new non-invasive diagnostic means for the future.Saliva was taken from 30 type 2 diabetic patients and 30 healthy individuals at the same time interval in the morning without any oral stimuli. Circadianic periodics in protein productions have been avoided. The presence of chromogranin A and its derived peptides was determined in whole saliva, after centrifugation at 40C for 12 min at 14 000 rpm, by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Immunoblotting (Western Blot. To ensure same protein concentrations Bradford protein quantification assay has been performed before.For the first time, we have determined an overexpression of chromogranin A in saliva of diabetic patients in 100% of the individuals.Chromogranin A, a circulating biomarker for epithelial tumours, is also overexpressed in saliva of type 2 diabetic patients. To confirm our results, more studies with a large amount of patients is necessary.

  11. CLL Exosomes Modulate the Transcriptome and Behaviour of Recipient Stromal Cells and Are Selectively Enriched in miR-202-3p

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mosavar; Rubbi, Carlos; Liu, Luning; Slupsky, Joseph R.; Kalakonda, Nagesh

    2015-01-01

    Bi-directional communication with the microenvironment is essential for homing and survival of cancer cells with implications for disease biology and behaviour. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the role of the microenvironment on malignant cell behaviour is well described. However, how CLL cells engage and recruit nurturing cells is poorly characterised. Here we demonstrate that CLL cells secrete exosomes that are nanovesicles originating from the fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, to shuttle proteins, lipids, microRNAs (miR) and mRNAs to recipient cells. We characterise and confirm the size (50–100 nm) and identity of the CLL-derived exosomes by Electron microscopy (EM), Atomic force microscopy (AFM), flow cytometry and western blotting using both exosome- and CLL-specific markers. Incubation of CLL-exosomes, derived either from cell culture supernatants or from patient plasma, with human stromal cells shows that they are readily taken up into endosomes, and induce expression of genes such as c-fos and ATM as well as enhance proliferation of recipient HS-5 cells. Furthermore, we show that CLL exosomes encapsulate abundant small RNAs and are enriched in certain miRs and specifically hsa-miR-202-3p. We suggest that such specific packaging of miR-202-3p into exosomes results in enhanced expression of ‘suppressor of fused’ (Sufu), a Hedgehog (Hh) signalling intermediate, in the parental CLL cells. Thus, our data show that CLL cells secrete exosomes that alter the transcriptome and behaviour of recipient cells. Such communication with microenvironment is likely to have an important role in CLL disease biology. PMID:26509439

  12. CLL Exosomes Modulate the Transcriptome and Behaviour of Recipient Stromal Cells and Are Selectively Enriched in miR-202-3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mosavar; Rubbi, Carlos; Liu, Luning; Slupsky, Joseph R; Kalakonda, Nagesh

    2015-01-01

    Bi-directional communication with the microenvironment is essential for homing and survival of cancer cells with implications for disease biology and behaviour. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the role of the microenvironment on malignant cell behaviour is well described. However, how CLL cells engage and recruit nurturing cells is poorly characterised. Here we demonstrate that CLL cells secrete exosomes that are nanovesicles originating from the fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, to shuttle proteins, lipids, microRNAs (miR) and mRNAs to recipient cells. We characterise and confirm the size (50-100 nm) and identity of the CLL-derived exosomes by Electron microscopy (EM), Atomic force microscopy (AFM), flow cytometry and western blotting using both exosome- and CLL-specific markers. Incubation of CLL-exosomes, derived either from cell culture supernatants or from patient plasma, with human stromal cells shows that they are readily taken up into endosomes, and induce expression of genes such as c-fos and ATM as well as enhance proliferation of recipient HS-5 cells. Furthermore, we show that CLL exosomes encapsulate abundant small RNAs and are enriched in certain miRs and specifically hsa-miR-202-3p. We suggest that such specific packaging of miR-202-3p into exosomes results in enhanced expression of 'suppressor of fused' (Sufu), a Hedgehog (Hh) signalling intermediate, in the parental CLL cells. Thus, our data show that CLL cells secrete exosomes that alter the transcriptome and behaviour of recipient cells. Such communication with microenvironment is likely to have an important role in CLL disease biology.

  13. EBV-gp350 confers B-cell tropism to tailored exosomes and is a neo-antigen in normal and malignant B cells--a new option for the treatment of B-CLL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Ruiss

    Full Text Available gp350, the major envelope protein of Epstein-Barr-Virus, confers B-cell tropism to the virus by interacting with the B lineage marker CD21. Here we utilize gp350 to generate tailored exosomes with an identical tropism. These exosomes can be used for the targeted co-transfer of functional proteins to normal and malignant human B cells. We demonstrate here the co-transfer of functional CD154 protein on tailored gp350+ exosomes to malignant B blasts from patients with B chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL, rendering B blasts immunogenic to tumor-reactive autologous T cells. Intriguingly, engulfment of gp350+ exosomes by B-CLL cells and presentation of gp350-derived peptides also re-stimulated EBV-specific T cells and redirected the strong antiviral cellular immune response in patients to leukemic B cells. In essence, we show that gp350 alone confers B-cell tropism to exosomes and that these exosomes can be further engineered to simultaneously trigger virus- and tumor-specific immune responses. The simultaneous exploitation of gp350 as a tropism molecule for tailored exosomes and as a neo-antigen in malignant B cells provides a novel attractive strategy for immunotherapy of B-CLL and other B-cell malignancies.

  14. EBV-gp350 confers B-cell tropism to tailored exosomes and is a neo-antigen in normal and malignant B cells--a new option for the treatment of B-CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiss, Romana; Jochum, Simon; Mocikat, Ralph; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Zeidler, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    gp350, the major envelope protein of Epstein-Barr-Virus, confers B-cell tropism to the virus by interacting with the B lineage marker CD21. Here we utilize gp350 to generate tailored exosomes with an identical tropism. These exosomes can be used for the targeted co-transfer of functional proteins to normal and malignant human B cells. We demonstrate here the co-transfer of functional CD154 protein on tailored gp350+ exosomes to malignant B blasts from patients with B chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), rendering B blasts immunogenic to tumor-reactive autologous T cells. Intriguingly, engulfment of gp350+ exosomes by B-CLL cells and presentation of gp350-derived peptides also re-stimulated EBV-specific T cells and redirected the strong antiviral cellular immune response in patients to leukemic B cells. In essence, we show that gp350 alone confers B-cell tropism to exosomes and that these exosomes can be further engineered to simultaneously trigger virus- and tumor-specific immune responses. The simultaneous exploitation of gp350 as a tropism molecule for tailored exosomes and as a neo-antigen in malignant B cells provides a novel attractive strategy for immunotherapy of B-CLL and other B-cell malignancies.

  15. EBV-gp350 Confers B-Cell Tropism to Tailored Exosomes and Is a Neo-Antigen in Normal and Malignant B Cells—A New Option for the Treatment of B-CLL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiss, Romana; Jochum, Simon; Mocikat, Ralph; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Zeidler, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    gp350, the major envelope protein of Epstein-Barr-Virus, confers B-cell tropism to the virus by interacting with the B lineage marker CD21. Here we utilize gp350 to generate tailored exosomes with an identical tropism. These exosomes can be used for the targeted co-transfer of functional proteins to normal and malignant human B cells. We demonstrate here the co-transfer of functional CD154 protein on tailored gp350+ exosomes to malignant B blasts from patients with B chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), rendering B blasts immunogenic to tumor-reactive autologous T cells. Intriguingly, engulfment of gp350+ exosomes by B-CLL cells and presentation of gp350-derived peptides also re-stimulated EBV-specific T cells and redirected the strong antiviral cellular immune response in patients to leukemic B cells. In essence, we show that gp350 alone confers B-cell tropism to exosomes and that these exosomes can be further engineered to simultaneously trigger virus- and tumor-specific immune responses. The simultaneous exploitation of gp350 as a tropism molecule for tailored exosomes and as a neo-antigen in malignant B cells provides a novel attractive strategy for immunotherapy of B-CLL and other B-cell malignancies. PMID:22022385

  16. [The acoustic indicator of saliva under stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalenkova, M A; Mikhaĭlova, Z D; Klemin, V A; Korkotashvili, L V; Abanin, A M; Klemina, A V; Dolgov, V V

    2014-03-01

    The situation of stress affects various organs and systems that results in development of functional disorders and/or somatic diseases. As a result, different noninvasive, including salivary, techniques of diagnostic of stress conditions are in the process of development. The dynamics of acoustic indicator of saliva is studied during the period of passing the exams. The relationship of indicator with levels of potassium, sodium, glucose and protein of saliva was analyzed. The sampling consisted of 102 students of 5 and 6 academic years of medical university. To detect the acoustic indicator of saliva acoustic analyzer AKBa-01- "BIOM" was applied. The level of potassium and sodium in saliva was detected using method of flame photometry. The level of glucose in saliva was detected by glucose oxydase technique using analyzer "EXAN-G". The protein in saliva was detected by biuretic technique. The correlation between acoustic indicator of saliva and analyzed indicators of saliva was established.

  17. Enrichment of selective miRNAs in exosomes and delivery of exosomal miRNAs in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duo; Lee, Heedoo; Zhu, Ziwen; Minhas, Jasleen K; Jin, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by cells and contain various molecules including protein, lipid, and DNA/RNA. They are crucial mediators of the intercellular communication and serve as promising vehicles for drug delivery and gene therapy. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) may serve as new and potentially powerful targets for therapeutic interventions against various human diseases. However, steadily and effectively delivering miRNA mimics or inhibitors to target cells remains a major obstacle. To enhance the efficacy of exosome-mediated delivery of miRNA molecules, it is crucial to develop a convenient and efficient method to enrich specific miRNAs or antisense oligos in isolated exosomes. Here we report a novel method to prepare specific miRNA molecule-loaded exosomes. Using a modified calcium chloride-mediated transfection method, we successfully enhanced the designated miRNA mimics or inhibitors in isolated exosomes directly, instead of transfecting their mother cells. We also compared this method with direct transfection of exosomes using electroporation. Both methods confirmed that exosomes can serve as cargos to deliver a robustly increased amount of selected miRNA mimic(s) or inhibitor(s) to the recipient cells. Delivery of these miRNA molecule enriched-exosomes subsequently results in highly efficient overexpression or deletion of the designated miRNAs in the recipient cells both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, we confirmed that exosome-delivered miRNA mimics or inhibitors are functional in the recipient cells. Collectively, we developed a novel protocol to conveniently manipulate exosomal miRNAs with high efficiency and successfully deliver the exosomal miRNA molecules to recipient cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. ARSENIC SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SALIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Determination of arsenic species in human saliva is potentially useful for biomonitoring of human exposure to arsenic and for studying arsenic metabolism. However, there is no report on the speciation analysis of arsenic in saliva. Methods: Arsenic species in saliva ...

  19. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A saliva...

  1. MHC class II-associated proteins in B-cell exosomes and potential functional implications for exosome biogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.; Balkom, B.W.M. van; Aalberts, M.; Heck, A.J.R. van; Wauben, M.; Stoorvogel, W.

    2010-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells secrete major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) carrying exosomes with unclear physiological function(s). Exosomes are first generated as the intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of a specific type of multivesicular body, and are then secreted by fusion of

  2. A Method for Isolation of Extracellular Vesicles and Characterization of Exosomes from Brain Extracellular Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-González, Rocío; Gauthier, Sebastien A; Kumar, Asok; Saito, Mitsuo; Saito, Mariko; Levy, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV), including exosomes, secreted vesicles of endocytic origin, and microvesicles derived from the plasma membrane, have been widely isolated and characterized from conditioned culture media and bodily fluids. The difficulty in isolating EV from tissues, however, has hindered their study in vivo. Here, we describe a novel method designed to isolate EV and characterize exosomes from the extracellular space of brain tissues. The purification of EV is achieved by gentle dissociation of the tissue to free the brain extracellular space, followed by sequential low-speed centrifugations, filtration, and ultracentrifugations. To further purify EV from other extracellular components, they are separated on a sucrose step gradient. Characterization of the sucrose step gradient fractions by electron microscopy demonstrates that this method yields pure EV preparations free of large vesicles, subcellular organelles, or debris. The level of EV secretion and content are determined by assays for acetylcholinesterase activity and total protein estimation, and exosomal identification and protein content are analyzed by Western blot and immuno-electron microscopy. Additionally, we present here a method to delipidate EV in order to improve the resolution of downstream electrophoretic analysis of EV proteins.

  3. B lymphocytes and macrophages release cell membrane deposited C3-fragments on exosomes with T cell response-enhancing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Krisztián; Végh, Péter; Prechl, József; Kerekes, Krisztina; Kovács, János; Csikós, György; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna

    2008-04-01

    Recently exosomes have been shown to play important roles in several immune phenomena. These small vesicles contain MHC proteins along with co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules, and mediate antigen presentation to T cells. In the present study we show that upon incubation with autologous serum, murine macrophages and B cells--but not T lymphocytes--fix C3-fragments covalently to the cell membrane and release them on exosomes in a time dependent fashion. While in the case of human B lymphocytes CR2 has been shown to serve as the main C3b-acceptor site, here we clearly demonstrate that cells derived from CR1/2 KO animals also have the capacity to fix C3b covalently. This finding points to a major difference between human and murine systems, and suggests the existence of additional acceptor sites on the cell membrane. Here we show that C3-fragment containing exosomes derived from OVA loaded antigen presenting cells induce a significantly elevated T cell response in the presence of suboptimal antigen stimulus. These data reveal a novel function of cell surface-deposited C3-fragments and provide further evidence for the role of exosomes secreted by antigen presenting cells. Since fixation of C3b to plasma membranes can be substantial in the presence of pathogens; moreover tumor cells are also known to activate the complement system resulting in complement-deposition, C3-carrying exosomes released by these cells may play an important immunomodulatory role in vivo, as well.

  4. [Application of saliva in disease diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xingqun, Cheng; Xuedong, Zhou; Xin, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Saliva is secreted by salivary glands and performs a variety of functions, including mouth cleaning and protection, antibacterial activity, and digestion. With the rapid progress in salivaomics, saliva became recognized as a potential pool of biological markers. Being a non-invasive and safe source, saliva is a potential substitute for blood in diagnosis and prognosis of diseases. This review summarizes the latest advancement in saliva-related studies and presents the potential value of saliva in early diagnosis of oral diseases, such as dental caries, periodontal disease, cancer, diabetes, and other systemic disorders. Saliva biomarkers can reveal changes ranging from changes in biochemical index, DNA, RNA, and proteins to the diversification of microbiota structure. By integrating recent data, this paper discusses the clinical significance and application prospect of saliva in early diagnosis of diseases and in translational and precision medicine.

  5. Exosome Proteome of U-87MG Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohyun Chun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membrane vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter secreted by many cell types, and are associated with a wide range of physiological and/or pathological processes. Exosomes containing proteins, lipids, mRNA, and microRNA contribute to cell-to-cell communication and cell-to-environment regulation, however, their biological functions are not yet fully understood. In this report, exosomes in the glioblastoma cell line, U-87MG, were isolated and the proteome was investigated. In addition, exosome proteome changes in U-87MG cells exposed to a low temperature were investigated to elucidate whether the exosome proteome could respond to an external stimulus. Cell culture medium was collected, and exosomes were isolated by continuous centrifugation eliminating cell debris, nucleic acids, and other particles. The morphology of exosomes was observed by cryo-tunneling electron microscopy. According to 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, certain proteins including collagen type VI alpha 1, putative RNA-binding protein 15B chain A, substrate induced remodeling of the active site regulates HTRA1, coatomer protein complex-subunit beta 2, myosin-heavy chain 1, and keratin-type I cytoskeletal 9 showed differences between the control proteome and the low temperature-exposed proteome.

  6. Exosomes: Nanoparticulate tools for RNA interference and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabipour, Fahimeh; Barati, Nastaran; Johnston, Thomas P; Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-07-01

    Exosomes are naturally occurring extracellular vesicles released by most mammalian cells in all body fluids. Exosomes are known as key mediators in cell-cell communication and facilitate the transfer of genetic and biochemical information between distant cells. Structurally, exosomes are composed of lipids, proteins, and also several types of RNAs which enable these vesicles to serve as important disease biomarkers. Moreover, exosomes have emerged as novel drug and gene delivery tools owing to their multiple advantages over conventional delivery systems. Recently, increasing attention has been focused on exosomes for the delivery of drugs, including therapeutic recombinant proteins, to various target tissues. Exosomes are also promising vehicles for the delivery of microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, which is usually hampered by rapid degradation of these RNAs, as well as inefficient tissue specificity of currently available delivery strategies. This review highlights the most recent accomplishments and trends in the use of exosomes for the delivery of drugs and therapeutic RNA molecules. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Exosomes and Their Therapeutic Potentials of Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes, a group of vesicles originating from the multivesicular bodies (MVBs, are released into the extracellular space when MVBs fuse with the plasma membrane. Numerous studies indicate that exosomes play important roles in cell-to-cell communication, and exosomes from specific cell types and conditions display multiple functions such as exerting positive effects on regeneration in many tissues. It is widely accepted that the therapeutic potential of stem cells may be mediated largely by the paracrine factors, so harnessing the paracrine effects of stem and progenitor cells without affecting these living, replicating, and potentially pluripotent cell populations is an advantage in terms of safety and complexity. Ascending evidence indicated that exosomes might be the main components of paracrine factors; thus, understanding the role of exosomes in each subtype of stem cells is far-reaching. In this review, we discuss the functions of exosomes from different types of stem cells and emphasize the therapeutic potentials of exosomes, providing an alternative way of developing strategies to cure diseases.

  8. Exosomes from uninfected cells activate transcription of latent HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Robert A; Schwab, Angela; DeMarino, Catherine; Akpamagbo, Yao; Lepene, Benjamin; Kassaye, Seble; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2017-07-14

    HIV-1 infection causes AIDS, infecting millions worldwide. The virus can persist in a state of chronic infection due to its ability to become latent. We have previously shown a link between HIV-1 infection and exosome production. Specifically, we have reported that exosomes transport viral proteins and RNA from infected cells to neighboring uninfected cells. These viral products could then elicit an innate immune response, leading to activation of the Toll-like receptor and NF-κB pathways. In this study, we asked whether exosomes from uninfected cells could activate latent HIV-1 in infected cells. We observed that irrespective of combination antiretroviral therapy, both short- and long-length viral transcripts were increased in wild-type HIV-1-infected cells exposed to purified exosomes from uninfected cells. A search for a possible mechanism for this finding revealed that the exosomes increase RNA polymerase II loading onto the HIV-1 promoter in the infected cells. These viral transcripts, which include trans-activation response (TAR) RNA and a novel RNA that we termed TAR-gag, can then be packaged into exosomes and potentially be exported to neighboring uninfected cells, leading to increased cellular activation. To better decipher the exosome release pathways involved, we used siRNA to suppress expression of ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins and found that ESCRT II and IV significantly control exosome release. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes from uninfected cells activate latent HIV-1 in infected cells and that true transcriptional latency may not be possible in vivo, especially in the presence of combination antiretroviral therapy.

  9. Perturbations in the Urinary Exosome in Transplant Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara eSigdel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urine exosomes are small vesicles exocytosed into the urine by all renal epithelial cell types under normal physiologic and disease states. Urine exosomal proteins may mirror disease specific proteome perturbations in kidney injury. Analysis methodologies for the exosomal fraction of the urinary proteome were developed for comparing the urinary exosomal fraction versus unfractionated proteome for biomarker discovery. Urine exosomes were isolated by centrifugal filtration of urine samples collected from kidney transplant patients with and without acute rejection, which were biopsy matched. The proteomes of unfractionated whole urine (Uw and urine exosomes (Ue underwent mass spectroscopy-based quantitative proteonomics analysis. The proteome data were analyzed for significant differential protein abundances in acute rejection (AR. A total of 1018 proteins were identified in Uw and 349 proteins in Ue. 279 overlapped between the two urinary compartments and 70 proteins were unique to the Ue compartment. Of 349 exosomal proteins identified from transplant patients,220 had not been previously identified in the normal Ue fraction. 11 Ue proteins, functionally involved in an inflammatory and stress response, were more abundant in urine samples from patients with acute rejection, 3 of which are exclusive to the Ue fraction. Ue AR-specific biomarkers(8 were also detected in Uw, but since they were observed at significantly lower abundances in Uw, they were not significant for AR in Uw. A rapid urinary exosome isolation method and quantitative measurement of enriched Ue proteins was applied. Perturbed proteins in the exosomal compartment of urine collected from kidney transplant patients were specific to inflammatory responses, and were not observed in the Ue fraction from normal healthy subjects. Ue specific protein alterations in renal disease provide potential mechanistic insights and offer a unique panel of sensitive biomarkers for monitoring AR.

  10. SALIVA SEBAGAI UJI SARING OSTEOPOROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niniarty Z. Djamal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease, and is characterized by low bone mass and microstructure deterioration of the bone, which leads to increased risk of fracture. Biomarker of bone metabolism can be seen as beginning of bone loss and first detection before imbalanced bone turnover comes. Biomarker of bone formation as serum bone alkaline fosfatase, osteocalcin (OC, procollagen type I, and biomarker of bone resorption as urine pyridinoline (Pyd and deoxypyridinoline (Dpd crosslinks, hydroxyprolin. The simultaneous examination of serum OC and urine Pyd or Dpd as a very good screening test for determination of bone imbalanced at the moment of the menopausal or the beginning of the pasca menopausal. Saliva as a potential diagnostic fluid for the assessment of osteoporosis biomarker concentrations. The study found elevated three classic warning signs for osteopororsis os OC, Dpd and 116 in the saliva of sheep without ovaries, which were similar to the levels of signs found in their blood and urine. Expectations, that the test may become available within five years and one day the test may be able to be performed at home like pregnancy test. Osteoporosis biomarker in saliva suggested detected of bone mass density easier. Beside that can be used as a method of early diagnostic and as a monitor therapy that as salinity of the examinations of bone mass on radiology.

  11. HIF-1-mediated production of exosomes during hypoxia is protective in renal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xiangjun; Yao, Qisheng; Liu, Yutao; Zhang, Hao; Dong, Zheng

    2017-10-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced and secreted by cells to mediate intercellular communication. The production and function of exosomes in kidney tissues and cells remain largely unclear. Hypoxia is a common pathophysiological condition in kidneys. This study was designed to characterize exosome production during hypoxia of rat renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs), investigate the regulation by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), and determine the effect of the exosomes on ATP-depletion-induced tubular cell injury. Hypoxia did not change the average sizes of exosomes secreted by RPTCs, but it significantly increased exosome production in a time-dependent manner. HIF-1 induction with dimethyloxalylglycine also promoted exosome secretion, whereas pharmacological and genetic suppression of HIF-1 abrogated the increase of exosome secretion under hypoxia. The exosomes from hypoxic RPTCs had inhibitory effects on apoptosis of RPTCs following ATP depletion. The protective effects were lost in the exosomes from HIF-1α knockdown cells. It is concluded that hypoxia stimulates exosome production and secretion in renal tubular cells. The exosomes from hypoxic cells are protective against renal tubular cell injury. HIF-1 mediates exosome production during hypoxia and contributes to the cytoprotective effect of the exosomes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Syndecan-syntenin-ALIX regulates the biogenesis of exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baietti, Maria Francesca; Zhang, Zhe; Mortier, Eva; Melchior, Aurélie; Degeest, Gisèle; Geeraerts, Annelies; Ivarsson, Ylva; Depoortere, Fabienne; Coomans, Christien; Vermeiren, Elke; Zimmermann, Pascale; David, Guido

    2012-06-03

    The biogenesis of exosomes, small secreted vesicles involved in signalling processes, remains incompletely understood. Here, we report evidence that the syndecan heparan sulphate proteoglycans and their cytoplasmic adaptor syntenin control the formation of exosomes. Syntenin interacts directly with ALIX through LYPX(n)L motifs, similarly to retroviral proteins, and supports the intraluminal budding of endosomal membranes. Syntenin exosomes depend on the availability of heparan sulphate, syndecans, ALIX and ESCRTs, and impact on the trafficking and confinement of FGF signals. This study identifies a key role for syndecan-syntenin-ALIX in membrane transport and signalling processes.

  13. Interaction profiling identifies the human nuclear exosome targeting complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Christensen, Marianne Spangsberg; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard

    2011-01-01

    The RNA exosome is a conserved degradation machinery, which obtains full activity only when associated with cofactors. The most prominent activator of the yeast nuclear exosome is the RNA helicase Mtr4p, acting in the context of the Trf4p/Air2p/Mtr4p polyadenylation (TRAMP) complex. The existence...... from nucleoli, and consistently NEXT is specifically required for the exosomal degradation of promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). We also detect putative homolog TRAMP subunits hTRF4-2 (Trf4p) and ZCCHC7 (Air2p) in hRRP6 and hMTR4 precipitates. However, at least ZCCHC7 function is restricted...

  14. Saliva and Serum Protein Exchange at the Tooth Enamel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, D; Helmerhorst, E J; Oppenheim, F G

    2017-04-01

    The acquired enamel pellicle is an oral, fluid-derived protein layer that forms on the tooth surface. It is a biologically and clinically important integument that protects teeth against enamel demineralization, and abrasion. Tooth surfaces are exposed to different proteinaceous microenvironments depending on the enamel location. For instance, tooth surfaces close to the gingival sulcus contact serum proteins that emanate via this sulcus, which may impact pellicle composition locally. The aims of this study were to define the major salivary and serum components that adsorb to hydroxyapatite, to study competition among them, and to obtain preliminary evidence in an in vivo saliva/serum pellicle model. Hydroxyapatite powder was incubated with saliva and serum, and the proteins that adsorbed were identified by mass spectrometry. To study competition, saliva and serum proteins were labeled with CyDyes, mixed in various proportions, and incubated with hydroxyapatite. In vivo competition was assessed using a split-mouth design, with half the buccal tooth surfaces coated with serum and the other half with saliva. After exposure to the oral environment for 0 min, 30 min and 2 h, the pellicles were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In pure saliva- or serum-derived pellicles, 82 and 84 proteins were identified, respectively. When present concomitantly, salivary protein adsorbers effectively competed with serum protein adsorbers for the hydroxyapatite surface. Specifically, acidic proline-rich protein, cystatin, statherin and protein S100-A9 proteins competed off apolipoproteins, complement C4-A, haptoglobin, transthyretin and serotransferrin. In vivo evidence further supported the replacement of serum proteins by salivary proteins. In conclusion, although significant numbers of serum proteins emanate from the gingival sulcus, their ability to participate in dental pellicle formation is likely reduced in the presence of strong salivary protein adsorbers. The functional properties of the

  15. Functions of Cancer-Derived Extracellular Vesicles in Immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernek, Liliana; Düchler, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, constitute an important element of intercellular communication by carrying a variety of molecules from producer to target cells. The transport of mRNA and miRNA can directly modulate gene expression in the target cells. The miRNA content in exosomes is characteristic for the cell from which the vesicles were derived enabling the usage of exosomes as biomarkers for the diagnosis various diseases, including cancer. Cancer-derived exosomes support the survival and progression of tumors in many ways and also contribute to the neutralization of the anti-cancer immune response. Exosomes participate in all known mechanisms by which cancer evades the immune system. They influence the differentiation and activation of immune suppressor cells, they modulate antigen presentation, and are able to induce T-cell apoptosis. Although cancer-derived exosomes mainly suppress the immune system and facilitate tumor progression, they are also important sources of tumor antigens with potential clinical application in stimulating immune responses. This review summarizes how exosomes assist cancer to escape immune recognition and to acquire control over the immune system.

  16. Programmed Fetal Membrane Senescence and Exosome-Mediated Signaling: A Mechanism Associated With Timing of Human Parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Menon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human parturition is an inflammatory process that involves both fetal and maternal compartments. The precise immune cell interactions have not been well delineated in human uterine tissues during parturition, but insights into human labor initiation have been informed by studies in animal models. Unfortunately, the timing of parturition relative to fetal maturation varies among viviparous species—indicative of different phylogenetic clocks and alarms—but what is clear is that important common pathways must converge to control the birth process. Herein, we hypothesize a novel signaling mechanism initiated by human fetal membrane aging and senescence-associated inflammation. Programmed events of fetal membrane aging coincide with fetal growth and organ maturation. Mechanistically, senescence involves in telomere shortening and activation of p38 mitogen-activated signaling kinase resulting in aging-associated phenotypic transition. Senescent tissues release inflammatory signals that are propagated via exosomes to cause functional changes in maternal uterine tissues. In vitro, oxidative stress causes increased release of inflammatory mediators (senescence-associated secretory phenotype and damage-associated molecular pattern markers that can be packaged inside the exosomes. These exosomes traverse through tissues layers, reach maternal tissues to increase overall inflammatory load transitioning them from a quiescent to active state. Animal model studies have shown that fetal exosomes can travel from fetal to the maternal side. Thus, aging fetal membranes and membrane-derived exosomes cargo fetal signals to the uterus and cervix and may trigger parturition. This review highlights a novel hypothesis in human parturition research based on data from ongoing research using human fetal membrane model system.

  17. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Saliva Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Jopi J W; Raittila, Jussi; Rieppo, Lassi; Lappalainen, Reijo; Kullaa, Arja M; Myllymaa, Sami

    2016-09-01

    Saliva provides a valuable tool for assessing oral and systemic diseases, but concentrations of salivary components are very small, calling the need for precise analysis methods. In this work, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy using transmission and photoacoustic (PA) modes were compared for quantitative analysis of saliva. The performance of these techniques was compared with a calibration series. The linearity of spectrum output was verified by using albumin-thiocyanate (SCN(-)) solution at different SCN(-) concentrations. Saliva samples used as a comparison were obtained from healthy subjects. Saliva droplets of 15 µL were applied on the silicon sample substrate, 6 drops for each specimen, and dried at 37 ℃ overnight. The measurements were carried out using an FT-IR spectrometer in conjunction with an accessory unit for PA measurements. The findings with both transmission and PA modes mirror each other. The major bands presented were 1500-1750 cm(-1) for proteins and 1050-1200 cm(-1) for carbohydrates. In addition, the distinct spectral band at 2050 cm(-1) derives from SCN(-) anions, which is converted by salivary peroxidases to hypothiocyanate (OSCN(-)). The correlation between the spectroscopic data with SCN(-) concentration (r > 0.990 for transmission and r = 0.967 for PA mode) was found to be significant (P < 0.01), thus promising to be utilized in future applications. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Saliva sampling in global clinical studies: the impact of low sampling volume on performance of DNA in downstream genotyping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The collection of viable DNA samples is an essential element of any genetics research programme. Biological samples for DNA purification are now routinely collected in many studies with a variety of sampling methods available. Initial observation in this study suggested a reduced genotyping success rate of some saliva derived DNA samples when compared to blood derived DNA samples prompting further investigation. Methods Genotyping success rate was investigated to assess the suitability of using saliva samples in future safety and efficacy pharmacogenetics experiments. The Oragene® OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit was used to collect and extract DNA from saliva from 1468 subjects enrolled in global clinical studies. Statistical analysis evaluated the impact of saliva sample volume of collection on the quality, yield, concentration and performance of saliva DNA in genotyping assays. Results Across 13 global clinical studies that utilized the Oragene® OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit there was variability in the volume of saliva sample collection with ~31% of participants providing 0.5 mL of saliva, rather than the recommended 2 mL. While the majority of saliva DNA samples provided high quality genotype data, collection of 0.5 mL volumes of saliva contributed to DNA samples being significantly less likely to pass genotyping quality control standards. Assessment of DNA sample characteristics that may influence genotyping outcomes indicated that saliva sample volume, DNA purity and turbidity were independently associated with sample genotype pass rate, but that saliva collection volume had the greatest effect. Conclusion When employing saliva sampling to obtain DNA, it is important to encourage all study participants to provide sufficient sample to minimize potential loss of data in downstream genotyping experiments. PMID:23759220

  19. The human cap-binding complex is functionally connected to the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Refsing; Domanski, Michal; Kristiansen, Maiken S

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear processing and quality control of eukaryotic RNA is mediated by the RNA exosome, which is regulated by accessory factors. However, the mechanism of exosome recruitment to its ribonucleoprotein (RNP) targets remains poorly understood. Here we report a physical link between the human exosome...... of combinatorial depletion of CBCN and exosome components underscore the functional relevance of CBC-exosome bridging at the level of target RNA. Specifically, CBCA suppresses read-through products of several RNA families by promoting their transcriptional termination. We suggest that the RNP 5' cap links...... transcription termination to exosomal RNA degradation through CBCN....

  20. Exploiting leech saliva to treat osteoarthritis: A provocative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin L. Cooper

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant and animal-derived products are crucial components in complementary and alternative medicine. Although modern medicine has provided numerous innovations and advancements, these often fail to reveal new and dependable, inexpensive treatments nor real cures that are relatively free of adverse side effects. We present evidence that hirudotherapy, which utilizes leeches, improves certain diseases, including osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis, a disease in joints, could benefit from use of medicinal peptides found in leech saliva, components of its immune system.

  1. Saliva as a diagnostic fluid. Literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Martí-Álamo, Silvia; Mancheño-Franch, Aisha; Marzal-Gamarra, Cristina; Carlos-Fabuel, Laura

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in diagnosis based on the analysis of saliva. This is a simple, non-invasive method of obtaining oral samples which is safe for both the health worker and the patient, not to mention allowing for simple and cost-efficient storage. The majority of studies use general saliva samples in their entirety, complex fluids containing both local and systemic sources and whose composition corresponds to that of the blood. General saliva contains a considerable amount of desqu...

  2. Saliva as a diagnostic fluid: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Martí Álamo, Silvia; Mancheño Franch, Aisha; Marzal Gamarra, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in diagnosis based on the analysis of saliva. This is a simple, non-invasive method of obtaining oral samples which is safe for both the health worker and the patient, not to mention allowing for simple and cost-efficient storage. The majority of studies use general saliva samples in their entirety, complex fluids containing both local and systemic sources and whose composition corresponds to that of the blood. General saliva contains a considerable ...

  3. Heparanase activates the syndecan-syntenin-ALIX exosome pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bart Roucourt Sofie Meeussen Jie Bao Pascale Zimmermann Guido David

    2015-01-01

    ... for transport accessory component ALIX. Here we investigated the role of heparanase, the only mammalian enzyme able to cleave heparan sulfate internally, in the syndecan-synten- in-ALIX exosome biogenesis pathway...

  4. Functional delivery of viral miRNAs via exosomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. Michiel Pegtel; Katherine Cosmopoulos; David A. Thorley-Lawson; Monique A. J. van Eijndhoven; Erik S. Hopmans; Jelle L. Lindenberg; Tanja D. de Gruijl; Thomas Würdinger; Jaap M. Middeldorp; Elliott Kieff

    2010-01-01

    .... Interestingly, miRNAs are secreted actively through small vesicles called "exosomes" that protect them from degradation by RNases, suggesting that these miRNAs may function outside the cell in which they were produced...

  5. Detection of Zika virus in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Didier; Roche, Claudine; Nhan, Tu-Xuan; Robin, Emilie; Teissier, Anita; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai

    2015-07-01

    During the largest Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak ever reported that occurred from October 2013 to March 2014 in French Polynesia, we observed that several patients presenting the symptoms of acute phase Zika fever were tested negative in blood by ZIKV real-time PCR (RT-PCR). As we have previously detected ZIKV RNA in the saliva of a young child, we investigated the use of saliva as an alternative sample for routine ZIKV RNA detection. Over a 6 month period, 1,067 samples collected from 855 patients presenting symptoms of Zika fever (saliva only, blood only or both samples) were tested using a specific ZIKV RT-PCR. A medical questionnaire was available for most of the patients. ZIKV was more frequently detected in saliva compared to blood. For the 182 patients with both samples collected, tests were positive for 35 (19.2%) in saliva while negative in blood and tests were positive for 16 (8.8%) in blood while negative in saliva; the difference in mean days after symptoms onset and the percentage of the main symptoms of Zika fever for patients only positive in saliva or in blood was not significant. The use of saliva sample increased the rate of molecular detection of ZIKV at the acute phase of the disease but did not enlarge the window of detection of ZIKV RNA. Saliva was of particular interest when blood was difficult to collect (children and neonates especially). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Exosomal proteins as potential diagnostic markers in advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristine Raaby; Paulsen, Birgitte Sandfeld; Bæk, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    control subjects based on the differential display of exosomal protein markers. Methods: Plasma was isolated from 109 NSCLC patients with advanced stage (IIIa–IV) disease and 110 matched control subjects initially suspected of having cancer, but diagnosed to be cancer free. The Extracellular Vesicle Array......-derived vesicles displaying various proteins on their membrane surfaces. In addition, they are readily available in blood samples where they constitute potential biomarkers of human diseases, such as cancer. Here, we examine the potential of distinguishing non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients from...

  7. Effects of storage temperature on airway exosome integrity for diagnostic and functional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, Rosario; Zhao, Yingxin; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Popov, Vsevolod L; Wang, Hongwang; Kalubowilage, Madumali; Zhang, Yueqing; Luisi, Jonathan; Sun, Hong; Culbertson, Christopher T; Bossmann, Stefan H; Motamedi, Massoud; Brasier, Allan R

    2017-01-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles contain biological molecules specified by cell-type of origin and modified by microenvironmental changes. To conduct reproducible studies on exosome content and function, storage conditions need to have minimal impact on airway exosome integrity. Aim: We compared surface properties and protein content of airway exosomes that had been freshly isolated vs. those that had been treated with cold storage or freezing. Methods: Mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) exosomes purified by differential ultracentrifugation were analysed immediately or stored at +4°C or -80°C. Exosomal structure was assessed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and charge density (zeta potential, ζ). Exosomal protein content, including leaking/dissociating proteins, were identified by label-free LC-MS/MS. Results: Freshly isolated BALF exosomes exhibited a mean diameter of 95 nm and characteristic morphology. Storage had significant impact on BALF exosome size and content. Compared to fresh, exosomes stored at +4°C had a 10% increase in diameter, redistribution to polydisperse aggregates and reduced ζ. Storage at -80°C produced an even greater effect, resulting in a 25% increase in diameter, significantly reducing the ζ, resulting in multilamellar structure formation. In fresh exosomes, we identified 1140 high-confidence proteins enriched in 19 genome ontology biological processes. After storage at room temperature, 848 proteins were identified. In preparations stored at +4°C, 224 proteins appeared in the supernatant fraction compared to the wash fractions from freshly prepared exosomes; these proteins represent exosome leakage or dissociation of loosely bound "peri-exosomal" proteins. In preparations stored at -80°C, 194 proteins appeared in the supernatant fraction, suggesting that distinct protein groups leak from exosomes at different storage temperatures. Conclusions: Storage destabilizes the surface

  8. Perspective Insights of Exosomes in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Critical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Tasleem Jan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous entities of endocytic origin. Their production by a wide variety of cells in eukaryotes implicates their roles in the execution of essential processes, especially cellular communication. Exosomes are secreted under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and their actions on neighboring and distant cells lead to the modulations of cellular behaviors. They also assist in the delivery of disease causing entities, such as prions, α-syn, and tau, and thus, facilitate spread to non-effected regions and accelerate the progressions of neurodegenerative diseases. The characterization of exosomes, provides information on aberrant processes, and thus, exosome analysis has many clinical applications. Because they are associated with the transport of different cellular entities across the blood-brain barrier (BBB, exosomes might be useful for delivering drugs and other therapeutic molecules to brain. Herein, we review roles played by exosomes in different neurodegenerative diseases, and the possibilities of using them as diagnostic biomarkers of disease progression, drug delivery vehicles and in gene therapy.

  9. Perspective Insights of Exosomes in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Critical Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Malik, Mudasir A.; Rahman, Safikur; Yeo, Hye R.; Lee, Eun J.; Abdullah, Tasduq S.; Choi, Inho

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous entities of endocytic origin. Their production by a wide variety of cells in eukaryotes implicates their roles in the execution of essential processes, especially cellular communication. Exosomes are secreted under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and their actions on neighboring and distant cells lead to the modulations of cellular behaviors. They also assist in the delivery of disease causing entities, such as prions, α-syn, and tau, and thus, facilitate spread to non-effected regions and accelerate the progressions of neurodegenerative diseases. The characterization of exosomes, provides information on aberrant processes, and thus, exosome analysis has many clinical applications. Because they are associated with the transport of different cellular entities across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), exosomes might be useful for delivering drugs and other therapeutic molecules to brain. Herein, we review roles played by exosomes in different neurodegenerative diseases, and the possibilities of using them as diagnostic biomarkers of disease progression, drug delivery vehicles and in gene therapy. PMID:29033828

  10. An innovative method for exosome quantification and size measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdiani, Arash; Maier, Anatol; Pinto, Antonio; Barth, Mareike; Akhyari, Payam; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2015-01-17

    Although the biological importance of exosomes has recently gained an increasing amount of scientific and clinical attention, much is still unknown about their complex pathways, their bioavailability and their diverse functions in health and disease. Current work focuses on the presence and the behavior of exosomes (in vitro as well as in vivo) in the context of different human disorders, especially in the fields of oncology, gynecology and cardiology. Unfortunately, neither a consensus regarding a gold standard for exosome isolation exists, nor is there an agreement on such a method for their quantitative analysis. As there are many methods for the purification of exosomes and also many possibilities for their quantitative and qualitative analysis, it is difficult to determine a combination of methods for the ideal approach. Here, we demonstrate nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), a semi-automated method for the characterization of exosomes after isolation from human plasma by ultracentrifugation. The presented results show that this approach for isolation, as well as the determination of the average number and size of exosomes, delivers reproducible and valid data, as confirmed by other methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  11. Metabolic and Signaling Functions of Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, P; Vardaki, I; Occhionero, A; Panaretakis, T

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles have gained tremendous attention in the recent years as a novel mechanism of cell to cell communication. There are several types of extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles, exosome, like vesicles, apoptotic bodies that differ mainly in the mechanism of biogenesis and secretion. The most well studied type of extracellular vesicles are the exosomes which are endosome-derived vesicles with a diameter of 50-150nm and enriched in ESCRT proteins including Alix, TSG101, Hsp70, and tetraspanins. It is now well established that exosomes promote tumor growth, alter the tumor microenvironment, facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells in an organotropic manner, modulate immune responses, and mediate resistance to therapy. Exosomes have also been recently implicated in an emerging hallmark of cancer, the cancer cell metabolism. The metabolic state of the cell defines, to a certain extent, both the rate of secretion and the molecular content of tumor-derived exosomes. Furthermore, exosomes have been shown to possess intrinsic metabolic activity since they can synthesize ATP by glycolysis. It follows that exosomes carry a number of metabolic enzymes and metabolites, including lactate, PGE, LDH isoforms, pyruvate, and monocarboxylate transporters. Last but not the least, exosomes are implicated in fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol metabolism and are thought to be crucial for the transcellular metabolism procedure. Uptake of exosomes is thought to alter the intracellular metabolic state of the cell. In summary, we describe the state of the art on the role of metabolism in the secretion, uptake, and the biological effects of exosomes in the metabolism of recipient cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ixodes scapularis saliva mitigates inflammatory cytokine secretion during Anaplasma phagocytophilum stimulation of immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Gang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ixodes scapularis saliva enables the transmission of infectious agents to the mammalian host due to its immunomodulatory, anesthetic and anti-coagulant properties. However, how I. scapularis saliva influences host cytokine secretion in the presence of the obligate intracellular rickettsial pathogen Anaplasma phagocytophilum remains elusive. Methods Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs were stimulated with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and A. phagocytophilum. Cytokine secretion was measured in the presence and absence of I. scapularis saliva. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were also stimulated with Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α in the presence and absence of I. scapularis saliva and interleukin (IL-8 was measured. Results I. scapularis saliva inhibits inflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages during stimulation of Toll-like (TLR and Nod-like receptor (NLR signaling pathways. The effect of I. scapularis saliva on immune cells is not restricted to murine macrophages because decreasing levels of interleukin (IL-8 were observed after TNF-α stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. I. scapularis saliva also mitigates pro-inflammatory cytokine response by murine macrophages during challenge with A. phagocytophilum. Conclusions These findings suggest that I. scapularis may inhibit inflammatory cytokine secretion during rickettsial transmission at the vector-host interface.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 in tick saliva regulates macrophage cell migration and cytokine profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites that suppress the host’s immune and inflammatory responses by secreting immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory molecules in their saliva. In previous studies we have shown that tick salivary gland extract (SGE) and saliva from Dermacentor variabilis have distinct effects on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated IC-21 macrophage and NIH3T3-L1 fibroblast migration. Since tick saliva contains a high concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent modulator of inflammation, we used a PGE2 receptor antagonist to evaluate the role of PGE2 in the different migratory responses induced by saliva and its impact on macrophage cytokine profile. Methods Adult ticks were fed on female New Zealand white rabbits for 5-8 days. Female ticks were stimulated with dopamine/theophylline to induce salivation and saliva was pooled. Competitive enzyme immunoassays (EIA) were used to measure saliva PGE2 content and the changes in macrophage intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. The effects of tick saliva on macrophage and fibroblast migration were assessed in the absence and presence of the PGE2 receptor antagonist, AH 6809, using blind well chamber assays. A cytokine antibody array was used to examine the effects of tick saliva on macrophage cytokine secretion. Statistical significance was determined by one-way ANOVA; Student Newman-Kuels post-test was used for multiple comparisons. Results The saliva-induced increase in PDGF-stimulated macrophage migration was reversed by AH 6809. The inhibition of PDGF-stimulated fibroblast migration by saliva was also antagonist-sensitive. Tick saliva induced macrophages to secrete copious amounts of PGE2, and conditioned medium from these cells caused an AH 6809-sensitive inhibition of stimulated fibroblast migration, showing that macrophages can regulate fibroblast activity. We show that tick saliva decreased the secretion of the pro

  14. Cells release subpopulations of exosomes with distinct molecular and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willms, Eduard; Johansson, Henrik J; Mäger, Imre; Lee, Yi; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Sadik, Mariam; Alaarg, Amr; Smith, C I Edvard; Lehtiö, Janne; El Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A; Vader, Pieter

    2016-03-02

    Cells release nano-sized membrane vesicles that are involved in intercellular communication by transferring biological information between cells. It is generally accepted that cells release at least three types of extracellular vesicles (EVs): apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. While a wide range of putative biological functions have been attributed to exosomes, they are assumed to represent a homogenous population of EVs. We hypothesized the existence of subpopulations of exosomes with defined molecular compositions and biological properties. Density gradient centrifugation of isolated exosomes revealed the presence of two distinct subpopulations, differing in biophysical properties and their proteomic and RNA repertoires. Interestingly, the subpopulations mediated differential effects on the gene expression programmes in recipient cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that cells release distinct exosome subpopulations with unique compositions that elicit differential effects on recipient cells. Further dissection of exosome heterogeneity will advance our understanding of exosomal biology in health and disease and accelerate the development of exosome-based diagnostics and therapeutics.

  15. Exosome Cofactors Connect Transcription Termination to RNA Processing by Guiding Terminated Transcripts to the Appropriate Exonuclease within the Nuclear Exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyumin; Heo, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Iktae; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Minkyu

    2016-06-17

    The yeast Nrd1 interacts with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNApII) through its CTD-interacting domain (CID) and also associates with the nuclear exosome, thereby acting as both a transcription termination and RNA processing factor. Previously, we found that the Nrd1 CID is required to recruit the nuclear exosome to the Nrd1 complex, but it was not clear which exosome subunits were contacted. Here, we show that two nuclear exosome cofactors, Mpp6 and Trf4, directly and competitively interact with the Nrd1 CID and differentially regulate the association of Nrd1 with two catalytic subunits of the exosome. Importantly, Mpp6 promotes the processing of Nrd1-terminated transcripts preferentially by Dis3, whereas Trf4 leads to Rrp6-dependent processing. This suggests that Mpp6 and Trf4 may play a role in choosing a particular RNA processing route for Nrd1-terminated transcripts within the exosome by guiding the transcripts to the appropriate exonuclease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Adipose stem cell-derived nanovesicles inhibit emphysema primarily via an FGF2-dependent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Sun; Kim, Ji-Young; Cho, RyeonJin; Shin, Dong-Myung; Lee, Sei Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy using stem cells has produced therapeutic benefits in animal models of COPD. Secretory mediators are proposed as one mechanism for stem cell effects because very few stem cells engraft after injection into recipient animals. Recently, nanovesicles that overcome the disadvantages of natural exosomes have been generated artificially from cells. We generated artificial nanovesicles from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) using sequential penetration through polycarbonate membranes. ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles displayed a 100 nm-sized spherical shape similar to ASC-derived natural exosomes and expressed both exosomal and stem cell markers. The proliferation rate of lung epithelial cells was increased in cells treated with ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles compared with cells treated with ASC-derived natural exosomes. The lower dose of ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles had similar regenerative capacity compared with a higher dose of ASCs and ASC-derived natural exosomes. In addition, FGF2 levels in the lungs of mice treated with ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles were increased. The uptake of ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles was inhibited by heparin, which is a competitive inhibitor of heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is associated with FGF2 signaling. Taken together, the data indicate that lower doses of ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles may have beneficial effects similar to higher doses of ASCs or ASC-derived natural exosomes in an animal model with emphysema, suggesting that artificial nanovesicles may have economic advantages that warrant future clinical studies. PMID:28082743

  17. Adipose stem cell-derived nanovesicles inhibit emphysema primarily via an FGF2-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Sun; Kim, Ji-Young; Cho, RyeonJin; Shin, Dong-Myung; Lee, Sei Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2017-01-13

    Cell therapy using stem cells has produced therapeutic benefits in animal models of COPD. Secretory mediators are proposed as one mechanism for stem cell effects because very few stem cells engraft after injection into recipient animals. Recently, nanovesicles that overcome the disadvantages of natural exosomes have been generated artificially from cells. We generated artificial nanovesicles from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) using sequential penetration through polycarbonate membranes. ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles displayed a 100 nm-sized spherical shape similar to ASC-derived natural exosomes and expressed both exosomal and stem cell markers. The proliferation rate of lung epithelial cells was increased in cells treated with ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles compared with cells treated with ASC-derived natural exosomes. The lower dose of ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles had similar regenerative capacity compared with a higher dose of ASCs and ASC-derived natural exosomes. In addition, FGF2 levels in the lungs of mice treated with ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles were increased. The uptake of ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles was inhibited by heparin, which is a competitive inhibitor of heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is associated with FGF2 signaling. Taken together, the data indicate that lower doses of ASC-derived artificial nanovesicles may have beneficial effects similar to higher doses of ASCs or ASC-derived natural exosomes in an animal model with emphysema, suggesting that artificial nanovesicles may have economic advantages that warrant future clinical studies.

  18. EXOSOMES: CAN DOCTORS STILL IGNORE THEIR EXISTENCE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste Caruso Bavisotto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With this invited commentary we want to draw the attention of young medical doctors, the main readers of this journal, towards the existence and importance of a group of nanovesicles released by human cells: the exosomes. These vesicles are incontinently secreted as a mean of cell-to-cell communication. They are involved in a number of physiologic processes as well as in the pathogenesis of, virtually, all human diseases. They can be isolated from all biological fluids, like blood, urine, sweat, sperm, crevicular fluid, bile, etc., and their composition in terms of proteins, RNA and lipids is different in pathology that in physiologic conditions. It is therefore possible to predict that they will become an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool in medicine.

  19. Exosomes as potent regulators of HCC malignancy and potential bio-tools in clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Zhen; Jiang, Chunping; Wu, Junhua; Ding, Yitao

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles about 30~100 nm in diameter and formed from inward budding of the limiting membrane of multi-vesicular bodies (MVB). Exosomes are secreted by most cell types (including hepatocellular carcinoma cells) into the extracellular environment and can be isolated from various body fluids. Exosomes have broad biological function through delivering contained molecules to the target cells. Although limited studies on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) exosomes, increas...

  20. Isolation and characterization of exosomes from cell culture supernatants and biological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Théry, Clotilde; Amigorena, Sebastian; Raposo, Graça; Clayton, Aled

    2006-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles found in cell culture supernatants and in different biological fluids. Exosomes form in a particular population of endosomes, called multivesicular bodies (MVBs), by inward budding into the lumen of the compartment. Upon fusion of MVBs with the plasma membrane, these internal vesicles are secreted. Exosomes possess a defined set of membrane and cytosolic proteins. The physiological function of exosomes is still a matter of debate, but increasing results in...

  1. Saliva Parameters and Erosive Wear in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, N.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J.; Bronkhorst, E. M.; Truin, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 +/- 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately.

  2. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale. PMID:26402242

  3. Saliva Proteins of Vector Culicoides Modify Structure and Infectivity of Bluetongue Virus Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darpel, Karin E.; Langner, Kathrin F. A.; Nimtz, Manfred; Anthony, Simon J.; Brownlie, Joe; Takamatsu, Haru-Hisa; Mellor, Philip S.; Mertens, Peter P. C.

    2011-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) are related orbiviruses, transmitted between their ruminant hosts primarily by certain haematophagous midge vectors (Culicoides spp.). The larger of the BTV outer-capsid proteins, ‘VP2’, can be cleaved by proteases (including trypsin or chymotrypsin), forming infectious subviral particles (ISVP) which have enhanced infectivity for adult Culicoides, or KC cells (a cell-line derived from C. sonorensis). We demonstrate that VP2 present on purified virus particles from 3 different BTV strains can also be cleaved by treatment with saliva from adult Culicoides. The saliva proteins from C. sonorensis (a competent BTV vector), cleaved BTV-VP2 more efficiently than those from C. nubeculosus (a less competent / non-vector species). Electrophoresis and mass spectrometry identified a trypsin-like protease in C. sonorensis saliva, which was significantly reduced or absent from C. nubeculosus saliva. Incubating purified BTV-1 with C. sonorensis saliva proteins also increased their infectivity for KC cells ∼10 fold, while infectivity for BHK cells was reduced by 2–6 fold. Treatment of an ‘eastern’ strain of EHDV-2 with saliva proteins of either C. sonorensis or C. nubeculosus cleaved VP2, but a ‘western’ strain of EHDV-2 remained unmodified. These results indicate that temperature, strain of virus and protein composition of Culicoides saliva (particularly its protease content which is dependent upon vector species), can all play a significant role in the efficiency of VP2 cleavage, influencing virus infectivity. Saliva of several other arthropod species has previously been shown to increase transmission, infectivity and virulence of certain arboviruses, by modulating and/or suppressing the mammalian immune response. The findings presented here, however, demonstrate a novel mechanism by which proteases in Culicoides saliva can also directly modify the orbivirus particle structure, leading to

  4. Saliva proteins of vector Culicoides modify structure and infectivity of bluetongue virus particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin E Darpel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV are related orbiviruses, transmitted between their ruminant hosts primarily by certain haematophagous midge vectors (Culicoides spp.. The larger of the BTV outer-capsid proteins, 'VP2', can be cleaved by proteases (including trypsin or chymotrypsin, forming infectious subviral particles (ISVP which have enhanced infectivity for adult Culicoides, or KC cells (a cell-line derived from C. sonorensis. We demonstrate that VP2 present on purified virus particles from 3 different BTV strains can also be cleaved by treatment with saliva from adult Culicoides. The saliva proteins from C. sonorensis (a competent BTV vector, cleaved BTV-VP2 more efficiently than those from C. nubeculosus (a less competent/non-vector species. Electrophoresis and mass spectrometry identified a trypsin-like protease in C. sonorensis saliva, which was significantly reduced or absent from C. nubeculosus saliva. Incubating purified BTV-1 with C. sonorensis saliva proteins also increased their infectivity for KC cells ∼10 fold, while infectivity for BHK cells was reduced by 2-6 fold. Treatment of an 'eastern' strain of EHDV-2 with saliva proteins of either C. sonorensis or C. nubeculosus cleaved VP2, but a 'western' strain of EHDV-2 remained unmodified. These results indicate that temperature, strain of virus and protein composition of Culicoides saliva (particularly its protease content which is dependent upon vector species, can all play a significant role in the efficiency of VP2 cleavage, influencing virus infectivity. Saliva of several other arthropod species has previously been shown to increase transmission, infectivity and virulence of certain arboviruses, by modulating and/or suppressing the mammalian immune response. The findings presented here, however, demonstrate a novel mechanism by which proteases in Culicoides saliva can also directly modify the orbivirus particle structure, leading to

  5. Saliva in forensic odontology: A comprehensive update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Susmita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, saliva has attracted much interest among researchers especially in the field of forensic sciences. This complex body fluid is gaining popularity due to its ease of collection, safety in handling and its close relationship with plasma. Analysis of saliva for serological testing and cellular content has proved to be of wide use in crime detection, drug and alcohol abuse, hormone identification, cases of poisoning and animal bites. There is a need for forensic laboratories to automate the settings specific for saliva as routinely done for blood or urine in order to consider saliva as the primary investigating tool in the absence of other body fluids. This update is aimed at highlighting the many uses of saliva in the practice of forensic odontology.

  6. Release of luminal exosomes contributes to TLR4-mediated epithelial antimicrobial defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoku Hu

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles released by most cell types from multi-vesicular endosomes. They are speculated to transfer molecules to neighboring or distant cells and modulate many physiological and pathological procedures. Exosomes released from the gastrointestinal epithelium to the basolateral side have been implicated in antigen presentation. Here, we report that luminal release of exosomes from the biliary and intestinal epithelium is increased following infection by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. Release of exosomes involves activation of TLR4/IKK2 signaling through promoting the SNAP23-associated vesicular exocytotic process. Downregulation of let-7 family miRNAs by activation of TLR4 signaling increases SNAP23 expression, coordinating exosome release in response to C. parvum infection. Intriguingly, exosomes carry antimicrobial peptides of epithelial cell origin, including cathelicidin-37 and beta-defensin 2. Activation of TLR4 signaling enhances exosomal shuttle of epithelial antimicrobial peptides. Exposure of C. parvum sporozoites to released exosomes decreases their viability and infectivity both in vitro and ex vivo. Direct binding to the C. parvum sporozoite surface is required for the anti-C. parvum activity of released exosomes. Biliary epithelial cells also increase exosomal release and display exosome-associated anti-C. parvum activity following LPS stimulation. Our data indicate that TLR4 signaling regulates luminal exosome release and shuttling of antimicrobial peptides from the gastrointestinal epithelium, revealing a new arm of mucosal immunity relevant to antimicrobial defense.

  7. Purified horse milk exosomes contain an unpredictable small number of major proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey E. Sedykh

    2017-06-01

    The article describes the morphology and the protein content of major horse milk exosomes for the first time. Our results on the decrease of major protein number identified in exosomal preparations after gel filtration may be important to the studies of biological functions of pure exosomes.

  8. Announcing , the Official Journal of the American Society for Exosomes and Microvesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Gould

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This editorial article introduces the new scientific journal Exosomes and Microvesicles (EXMV , the official journal of the American Society for Exosomes and Microvesicles (ASEMV, and describes its editorial line and mission in relation to the role of the Society, the state of the art of the study of exosomes and microvesicles, and the overall approach of the publication.

  9. The saliva microbiome of Pan and Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Nasidze, Ivan; Quinque, Dominique; Li, Mingkun; Horz, Hans-Peter; André, Claudine; Garriga, Rosa M; Halbwax, Michel; Fischer, Anne; Stoneking, Mark

    2013-09-11

    It is increasingly recognized that the bacteria that live in and on the human body (the microbiome) can play an important role in health and disease. The composition of the microbiome is potentially influenced by both internal factors (such as phylogeny and host physiology) and external factors (such as diet and local environment), and interspecific comparisons can aid in understanding the importance of these factors. To gain insights into the relative importance of these factors on saliva microbiome diversity, we here analyze the saliva microbiomes of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) from two sanctuaries in Africa, and from human workers at each sanctuary. The saliva microbiomes of the two Pan species are more similar to one another, and the saliva microbiomes of the two human groups are more similar to one another, than are the saliva microbiomes of human workers and apes from the same sanctuary. We also looked for the existence of a core microbiome and find no evidence for a taxon-based core saliva microbiome for Homo or Pan. In addition, we studied the saliva microbiome from apes from the Leipzig Zoo, and found an extraordinary diversity in the zoo ape saliva microbiomes that is not found in the saliva microbiomes of the sanctuary animals. The greater similarity of the saliva microbiomes of the two Pan species to one another, and of the two human groups to one another, are in accordance with both the phylogenetic relationships of the hosts as well as with host physiology. Moreover, the results from the zoo animals suggest that novel environments can have a large impact on the microbiome, and that microbiome analyses based on captive animals should be viewed with caution as they may not reflect the microbiome of animals in the wild.

  10. Exosomes as Mediators of the Systemic Adaptations to Endurance Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Adeel; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2017-05-10

    Habitual endurance exercise training is associated with multisystemic metabolic adaptations that lower the risk of inactivity-associated disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Identification of complex systemic signaling networks responsible for these benefits are of great interest because of their therapeutic potential in metabolic diseases; however, specific signals that modulate the multisystemic benefits of exercise in multiple tissues and organs are only recently being discovered. Accumulated evidence suggests that muscle and other tissues have an endocrine function and release peptides and nucleic acids into the circulation in response to acute endurance exercise to mediate the multisystemic adaptations. Factors released from skeletal muscle have been termed myokines and we propose that the total of all factors released in response to endurance exercise (including peptides, nucleic acids, and metabolites) be termed, "exerkines." We propose that many of the exerkines are released within extracellular vesicles called exosomes, which regulate peripheral organ cross talk. Exosomes (30-140 nm) and larger microvesicles [MVs] (100-1000 nm) are subcategories of extracellular vesicles that are released into the circulation. Exosomes contain peptides and several nucleic acids (microRNA [miRNA], messenger RNA [mRNA], mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA]) and are involved in intercellular/tissue exchange of their contents. An acute bout of endurance exercise increases circulating exosomes that are hypothesized to mediate organ cross talk to promote systemic adaptation to endurance exercise. Further support for the role of exosomes (and possibly MVs) in mediating the systemic benefits of exercise comes from the fact that the majority of the previously reported myokines/exerkines are found in extracellular vesicles databases (Vesiclepedia and ExoCarta). We propose that exosomes isolated from athletes following exercise or exosomes bioengineered to incorporate

  11. Human vascular endothelial cells transport foreign exosomes from cow's milk by endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Rio Jati; Manca, Sonia; Friemel, Taylor; Sukreet, Sonal; Nguyen, Christopher; Zempleni, Janos

    2016-05-15

    Encapsulation of microRNAs in exosomes confers protection against degradation and a vehicle for shuttling of microRNAs between cells and tissues, and cellular uptake by endocytosis. Exosomes can be found in foods including milk. Humans absorb cow's milk exosomes and deliver the microRNA cargo to peripheral tissues, consistent with gene regulation by dietary nucleic acids across species boundaries. Here, we tested the hypothesis that human vascular endothelial cells transport milk exosomes by endocytosis, constituting a step crucial for the delivery of dietary exosomes and their cargo to peripheral tissues. We tested this hypothesis by using human umbilical vein endothelial cells and fluorophore-labeled exosomes isolated from cow's milk. Exosome uptake followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Vmax = 0.057 ± 0.004 ng exosome protein × 40,000 cells/h; Km = 17.97 ± 3.84 μg exosomal protein/200 μl media) and decreased by 80% when the incubation temperature was lowered from 37°C to 4°C. When exosome surface proteins were removed by treatment with proteinase K, or transport was measured in the presence of the carbohydrate competitor d-galactose or measured in the presence of excess unlabeled exosomes, transport rates decreased by 45% to 80% compared with controls. Treatment with an inhibitor of endocytosis, cytochalasin D, caused a 50% decrease in transport. When fluorophore-labeled exosomes were administered retro-orbitally, exosomes accumulated in liver, spleen, and lungs in mice. We conclude that human vascular endothelial cells transport bovine exosomes by endocytosis and propose that this is an important step in the delivery of dietary exosomes and their cargo to peripheral tissues. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  13. Exosome platform for diagnosis and monitoring of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the release of membranous structures by cells into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. With activation, injury, stress, transformation or infection, cells express proteins and RNAs associated with the cellular responses to these events. The exosomes released by these cells can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids linked to these physiologic events. This review focuses on exosomes associated with traumatic brain injury, which may be both diagnostic and a causative factor in the progression of the injury. Based on current data, exosomes play essential roles as conveyers of intercellular communication and mediators of many of the pathological conditions associated with development, progression and therapeutic failures and cellular stress in a variety of pathologic conditions. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodelling, signal pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer, chemoresistance, immunologic activation and genetic exchange. These circulating exosomes not only represent a central mediator of the pro-inflammatory microenvironment linked with secondary brain injury, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and monitoring of neurodegenerative progression. PMID:25135964

  14. Molecular lipidomics of exosomes released by PC-3 prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llorente, A.; Skotland, T.; Sylvanne, T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular lipid composition of exosomes is largely unknown. In this study, sophisticated shotgun and targeted molecular lipidomic assays were performed for in-depth analysis of the lipidomes of the metastatic prostate cancer cell line, PC-3, and their released exosomes. This study, based...... in the quantification of approximately 280 molecular lipid species, provides the most extensive lipid analysis of cells and exosomes to date. Interestingly, major differences were found in the lipid composition of exosomes compared to parent cells. Exosomes show a remarkable enrichment of distinct lipids, demonstrating...

  15. Exosomal proteins as prognostic biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Birgitte Sandfeld; Aggerholm-Pedersen, N; Bæk, R

    2016-01-01

    for optimal treatment. We here evaluate exosomes by protein phenotyping as a prognostic biomarker in NSCLC. METHODS: Exosomes from plasma of 276 NSCLC patients were phenotyped using the Extracellular Vesicle Array; 49 antibodies captured the proteins on the exosomes, and a cocktail of biotin......BACKGROUND: Use of exosomes as biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an intriguing approach in the liquid-biopsy era. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles with membrane-bound proteins that reflect their originating cell. Prognostic biomarkers are needed to improve patient selection...

  16. Exosomes participate in the carcinogenesis and the malignant behavior of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yunmeng; Fu, Guangzhen; Ye, Yafei; Ming, Liang

    2017-05-01

    In order to summarize the role of exosomes in invasion and metastasis in gastric cancer (GC). Exosomes are vesicles of endocytic origin ranging from 30 to 100 nm in size; they are composed of a lipid bilayer and contain DNA, mRNA, miRNA, circular RNA and multiple proteins. Recently, increasing evidence shows that exosomes play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of GC. In this review, we focus on the latest findings on GC exosomes, mainly summarizing their role in invasion and metastasis in GC. Then, exosomes? potential functions as novel diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers for GC are briefly discussed. At last, we prospect the clinical application perspective of exosomes in GC. Exosomes play a vital role in gastric cancer carcinogenesis and metastasis.

  17. Angiogenic Mechanisms of Human CD34+ Stem Cell Exosomes in the Repair of Ischemic Hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiyalagan, Prabhu; Liang, Yaxuan; Kim, David; Misener, Sol; Thorne, Tina; Kamide, Christine E; Klyachko, Ekaterina; Losordo, Douglas W; Hajjar, Roger J; Sahoo, Susmita

    2017-04-28

    Paracrine secretions seem to mediate therapeutic effects of human CD34+ stem cells locally transplanted in patients with myocardial and critical limb ischemia and in animal models. Earlier, we had discovered that paracrine secretion from human CD34+ cells contains proangiogenic, membrane-bound nanovesicles called exosomes (CD34Exo). Here, we investigated the mechanisms of CD34Exo-mediated ischemic tissue repair and therapeutic angiogenesis by studying their miRNA content and uptake. When injected into mouse ischemic hindlimb tissue, CD34Exo, but not the CD34Exo-depleted conditioned media, mimicked the beneficial activity of their parent cells by improving ischemic limb perfusion, capillary density, motor function, and their amputation. CD34Exo were found to be enriched with proangiogenic miRNAs such as miR-126-3p. Knocking down miR-126-3p from CD34Exo abolished their angiogenic activity and beneficial function both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, injection of CD34Exo increased miR-126-3p levels in mouse ischemic limb but did not affect the endogenous synthesis of miR-126-3p, suggesting a direct transfer of stable and functional exosomal miR-126-3p. miR-126-3p enhanced angiogenesis by suppressing the expression of its known target, SPRED1, simultaneously modulating the expression of genes involved in angiogenic pathways such as VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), ANG1 (angiopoietin 1), ANG2 (angiopoietin 2), MMP9 (matrix metallopeptidase 9), TSP1 (thrombospondin 1), etc. Interestingly, CD34Exo, when treated to ischemic hindlimbs, were most efficiently internalized by endothelial cells relative to smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, demonstrating a direct role of stem cell-derived exosomes on mouse endothelium at the cellular level. Collectively, our results have demonstrated a novel mechanism by which cell-free CD34Exo mediates ischemic tissue repair via beneficial angiogenesis. Exosome-shuttled proangiogenic miRNAs may signify amplification of stem

  18. The Role of Exosomal VP40 in Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleet, Michelle L; DeMarino, Catherine; Lepene, Benjamin; Aman, M Javad; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2017-04-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) can cause a devastating hemorrhagic disease, leading to death in a short period of time. After infection, the resulting EBOV disease results in high levels of circulating cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, coagulopathy, and bystander lymphocyte apoptosis in humans and nonhuman primates. The VP40 matrix protein of EBOV is essential for viral assembly and budding from the host cell. Recent data have shown that VP40 exists in the extracellular environment, including in exosomes, and exosomal VP40 can impact the viability of recipient immune cells, including myeloid and T cells, through the regulation of the RNAi and endosomal sorting complexes required for transport pathways. In this study, we discuss the latest findings of the impact of exosomal VP40 on immune cells in vitro and its potential implications for pathogenesis in vivo.

  19. Exosomal MicroRNA-15a Transfer from the Pancreas Augments Diabetic Complications by Inducing Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalden, Tengku Ain; Macgregor-Das, Anne M; Kannan, Sangeetha Marimuthu; Dunkerly-Eyring, Brittany; Khaliddin, Nurliza; Xu, Zhenhua; Fusco, Anthony P; Yazib, Syatirah Abu; Chow, Rhuen Chiou; Duh, Elia J; Halushka, Marc K; Steenbergen, Charles; Das, Samarjit

    2017-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), one type of noncoding RNA, modulate post-transcriptional gene expression in various pathogenic pathways in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Currently, little is known about how miRNAs influence disease pathogenesis by targeting cells at a distance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of exosomal miRNAs during T2D. We show that miR-15a is increased in the plasma of diabetic patients, correlating with disease severity. miR-15 plays an important role in insulin production in pancreatic β-cells. By culturing rat pancreatic β-cells (INS-1) cells in high-glucose media, we identified a source of increased miR-15a in the blood as exosomes secreted by pancreatic β-cells. We postulate that miR-15a, produced in pancreatic β-cells, can enter the bloodstream and contribute to retinal injury. miR-15a overexpression in Müller cells can be induced by exposing Müller cells to exosomes derived from INS-1 cells under high-glucose conditions and results in oxidative stress by targeting Akt3, which leads to apoptotic cell death. The in vivo relevance of these findings is supported by results from high-fat diet and pancreatic β-cell-specific miR-15a -/- mice. This study highlights an important and underappreciated mechanism of remote cell-cell communication (exosomal transfer of miRNA) and its influence on the development of T2D complications. Our findings suggest that circulating miR-15a contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes and supports the concept that miRNAs released by one cell type can travel through the circulation and play a role in disease progression via their transfer to different cell types, inducing oxidative stress and cell injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 913-930.

  20. Saliva: A fluid in search of a diagnostic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since saliva has been studied for more than 50 years and is relatively easy to collect, it is reasonable to ask why saliva is not in wider use as a diagnostic fluid. Here we discuss the criteria for diagnostic tests for diseases, barriers to use saliva for diagnostic testing, and the possibility of overcoming barriers to acceptance of saliva for diagnosis.

  1. Saliva: A fluid in search of a diagnostic use

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Liu

    2015-01-01

    Since saliva has been studied for more than 50 years and is relatively easy to collect, it is reasonable to ask why saliva is not in wider use as a diagnostic fluid. Here we discuss the criteria for diagnostic tests for diseases, barriers to use saliva for diagnostic testing, and the possibility of overcoming barriers to acceptance of saliva for diagnosis.

  2. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi, E-mail: tajima@nirs.go.jp

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  3. Saliva: a reliable sample matrix in bioanalytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschl, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Saliva is gaining increasing attention as a bioanalytical sample matrix. Mostly because of the easy and noninvasive collection, it is not only beneficial in endocrinological and behavioral science, but also in pediatrics. Saliva also has the advantage of being the only body fluid which can be collected even during physical exercise, for example, during sportive activities, and there are physiological characteristics that make it superior to serum/plasma or urine for specific scientific questions. This review provides an insight into the physiology of saliva formation, explaining how certain compounds enter this bodily fluid, and gives advice for collection, storage and analytical methods. Finally, it presents a number of reliable and proven applications for saliva analysis from scientific fields including endocrinology, sports medicine, forensics and immunology.

  4. Zika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167531.html Zika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: Study Research with ... HealthDay News) -- Scientists have some interesting news about Zika: You're unlikely to get the virus from ...

  5. Saliva diagnostics - Current views and directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor-Urbanowicz, Karolina Elżbieta; Martin Carreras-Presas, Carmen; Aro, Katri; Tu, Michael; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Wong, David Tw

    2017-03-01

    In this review, we provide an update on the current and future applications of saliva for diagnostic purposes. There are many advantages of using saliva as a biofluid. Its collection is fast, easy, inexpensive, and non-invasive. In addition, saliva, as a "mirror of the body," can reflect the physiological and pathological state of the body. Therefore, it serves as a diagnostic and monitoring tool in many fields of science such as medicine, dentistry, and pharmacotherapy. Introduced in 2008, the term "Salivaomics" aimed to highlight the rapid development of knowledge about various "omics" constituents of saliva, including: proteome, transcriptome, micro-RNA, metabolome, and microbiome. In the last few years, researchers have developed new technologies and validated a wide range of salivary biomarkers that will soon make the use of saliva a clinical reality. However, a great need still exists for convenient and accurate point-of-care devices that can serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. In addition, there is an urgent need to decipher the scientific rationale and mechanisms that convey systemic diseases to saliva. Another promising technology called liquid biopsy enables detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and fragments of tumor DNA in saliva, thus enabling non-invasive early detection of various cancers. The newly developed technology-electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM) provides near perfect detection of actionable mutations in lung cancer patients. These recent advances widened the salivary diagnostic approach from the oral cavity to the whole physiological system, and thus point towards a promising future of salivary diagnostics for personalized individual medicine applications including clinical decisions and post-treatment outcome predictions. Impact statement The purpose of this mini-review is to make an update about the present and future applications of saliva as a diagnostic biofluid in many fields of science such as dentistry

  6. Saliva diagnostics – Current views and directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor-Urbanowicz, Karolina Elżbieta; Martin Carreras-Presas, Carmen; Aro, Katri; Tu, Michael; Wong, David TW

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we provide an update on the current and future applications of saliva for diagnostic purposes. There are many advantages of using saliva as a biofluid. Its collection is fast, easy, inexpensive, and non-invasive. In addition, saliva, as a “mirror of the body,” can reflect the physiological and pathological state of the body. Therefore, it serves as a diagnostic and monitoring tool in many fields of science such as medicine, dentistry, and pharmacotherapy. Introduced in 2008, the term “Salivaomics” aimed to highlight the rapid development of knowledge about various “omics” constituents of saliva, including: proteome, transcriptome, micro-RNA, metabolome, and microbiome. In the last few years, researchers have developed new technologies and validated a wide range of salivary biomarkers that will soon make the use of saliva a clinical reality. However, a great need still exists for convenient and accurate point-of-care devices that can serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. In addition, there is an urgent need to decipher the scientific rationale and mechanisms that convey systemic diseases to saliva. Another promising technology called liquid biopsy enables detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and fragments of tumor DNA in saliva, thus enabling non-invasive early detection of various cancers. The newly developed technology—electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM) provides near perfect detection of actionable mutations in lung cancer patients. These recent advances widened the salivary diagnostic approach from the oral cavity to the whole physiological system, and thus point towards a promising future of salivary diagnostics for personalized individual medicine applications including clinical decisions and post-treatment outcome predictions. Impact statement The purpose of this mini-review is to make an update about the present and future applications of saliva as a diagnostic biofluid in many fields of science such

  7. The human core exosome interacts with differentially localized processive RNases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomecki, Rafal; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a ribonucleolytic complex involved in RNA processing and turnover. It consists of a nine-subunit catalytically inert core that serves a structural function and participates in substrate recognition. Best defined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, enzymatic activity comes......, identity and arrangements of its catalytic subunits in different vertebrates remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the association of two different Dis3p homologs--hDIS3 and hDIS3L--with the human exosome core. Interestingly, these factors display markedly different intracellular localizations: hDIS3...

  8. An inhibitor of phospholipase D in saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Rex M. C.; Hemington, Norma

    1974-01-01

    1. Bovine, dog and human saliva contain substances which inhibit the soluble phospholipase D present in grass leaf or celery stalk. 2. The inhibitor in bovine saliva is of high molecular weight and exhibits considerable stability to heat, acids and alkalis. 3. The inhibitor has been purified free from salivary mucoprotein. 4. It is suggested that the inhibitor could protect the upper alimentary tract of a herbage-eating animal from the necrotic action of phospholipase D. PMID:4376946

  9. Identification of archaeal proteins that affect the exosome function in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palhano Fernando L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The archaeal exosome is formed by a hexameric RNase PH ring and three RNA binding subunits and has been shown to bind and degrade RNA in vitro. Despite extensive studies on the eukaryotic exosome and on the proteins interacting with this complex, little information is yet available on the identification and function of archaeal exosome regulatory factors. Results Here, we show that the proteins PaSBDS and PaNip7, which bind preferentially to poly-A and AU-rich RNAs, respectively, affect the Pyrococcus abyssi exosome activity in vitro. PaSBDS inhibits slightly degradation of a poly-rA substrate, while PaNip7 strongly inhibits the degradation of poly-A and poly-AU by the exosome. The exosome inhibition by PaNip7 appears to depend at least partially on its interaction with RNA, since mutants of PaNip7 that no longer bind RNA, inhibit the exosome less strongly. We also show that FITC-labeled PaNip7 associates with the exosome in the absence of substrate RNA. Conclusions Given the high structural homology between the archaeal and eukaryotic proteins, the effect of archaeal Nip7 and SBDS on the exosome provides a model for an evolutionarily conserved exosome control mechanism.

  10. Isolation of exosomes from whole blood by integrating acoustics and microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxi; Ouyang, Yingshi; Wang, Zeyu; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Chuyi; Li, Hui; Li, Peng; Quinn, David; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Sadovsky, Yoel; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-10-03

    Exosomes are nanoscale extracellular vesicles that play an important role in many biological processes, including intercellular communications, antigen presentation, and the transport of proteins, RNA, and other molecules. Recently there has been significant interest in exosome-related fundamental research, seeking new exosome-based biomarkers for health monitoring and disease diagnoses. Here, we report a separation method based on acoustofluidics (i.e., the integration of acoustics and microfluidics) to isolate exosomes directly from whole blood in a label-free and contact-free manner. This acoustofluidic platform consists of two modules: a microscale cell-removal module that first removes larger blood components, followed by extracellular vesicle subgroup separation in the exosome-isolation module. In the cell-removal module, we demonstrate the isolation of 110-nm particles from a mixture of micro- and nanosized particles with a yield greater than 99%. In the exosome-isolation module, we isolate exosomes from an extracellular vesicle mixture with a purity of 98.4%. Integrating the two acoustofluidic modules onto a single chip, we isolated exosomes from whole blood with a blood cell removal rate of over 99.999%. With its ability to perform rapid, biocompatible, label-free, contact-free, and continuous-flow exosome isolation, the integrated acoustofluidic device offers a unique approach to investigate the role of exosomes in the onset and progression of human diseases with potential applications in health monitoring, medical diagnosis, targeted drug delivery, and personalized medicine.

  11. Urinary Exosomes: The Potential for Biomarker Utility, Intercellular Signaling and Therapeutics in Urological Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Carrie A; Blackwell, Robert H; Foreman, Kimberly E; Kuo, Paul C; Flanigan, Robert C; Gupta, Gopal N

    2016-05-01

    Exosomes are small secreted vesicles that contain proteins, mRNA and miRNA with the potential to alter signaling pathways in recipient cells. While exosome research has flourished, few publications have specifically considered the role of genitourinary cancer shed exosomes in urine, their implication in disease progression and their usefulness as noninvasive biomarkers. In this review we examined the current literature on the role of exosomes in intercellular communication and as biomarkers, and their potential as delivery vehicles for therapeutic applications in bladder, prostate and renal cancer. We searched PubMed® and Google® with the key words prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, exosomes, microvesicles and urine. Relevant articles, including original research studies and reviews, were selected based on contents. A review of this literature was generated. Cancer exosomes can be isolated from urine using various techniques. Cancer cells have been found to secrete more exosomes than normal cells. These exosomes have a role in cellular communication by interacting with and depositing their cargo in target cells. Bladder, prostate and renal cancer exosomes have been shown to enhance migration, invasion and angiogenesis. These exosomes have also been shown to increase proliferation, confer drug resistance and promote immune evasion. Urinary exosomes can be isolated from bladder, kidney and prostate cancer. They serve as a potential reservoir for biomarker identification. Exosomes also have potential for therapeutics as siRNA or pharmacological agents can be loaded into exosomes. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparing Properties (Concentration, PH and mutans streptococcus Saliva in Both Status Resting Saliva and Stimulated Saliva in Preschoolers of Kerman city

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Farokh-Gisour,; Hadis Fatholah Nejhad; Hamid Reza Poureslami

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed to compare the characteristics (concentration, PH and mutans streptococcus) saliva in both status resting saliva and stimulated saliva in preschoolers of Kerman city. In this study, 100 children aged 5 years among patients admitted to the pediatric ward of Kerman dental school and dental offices, some experts in Kerman dental school participated. Resting and stimulated saliva (after chewing oral paraffin) children collected and in concentrations, PH and the amount...

  13. Exosomes and their Application in Biomedical Field: Difficulties and Advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Jafar; Ajezi, Saeed; Avci, Çığır Biray; Karimipour, Mohammad; Geranmayeh, Mohammad Hossein; Nourazarian, Alireza; Sokullu, Emel; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Rahbarghazi, Reza

    2017-05-11

    The science of gene therapy has experienced a controversial history. At first, the initial concept that various disorders become curable by gene transferring was very exciting and challengeable. However, the problems and difficulties related to emerging techniques and unwanted side effects seen in some patients who have undergone gene therapy make some questions against the safety of novel molecular medicine approach. In line with this statement, discovery and developing a good bio-vector possessing low toxicity and high efficiency rate are the most important issues in gene therapy field. Introducing exosomes as vectors for gene delivery gives us a new opportunity in gene-based therapy. Exosomes, ranging from 30 to 120 nm in diameter, have unique lipid and protein composition. These nanostructures participate in cell-to-cell cross-talk, regulation of immune system, and the transport of genetic material. Besides the inherent potency of exosomes in gene therapy, a better understanding of their biology, characteristics, production, targeting, and cargo loading still need to be elucidated. In the current review, we exclusively focused on the various facets of exosomes and their importance as a bio-shuttle in gene therapy.

  14. Identification of a Nuclear Exosome Decay Pathway for Processed Transcripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meola, Nicola; Domanski, Michal; Karadoulama, Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    , the Zn-finger protein ZCCHC8, and the RNA-binding factor RBM7. NEXT primarily targets early and unprocessed transcripts, which demands a rationale for how the nuclear exosome recognizes processed RNAs. Here, we describe the poly(A) tail exosome targeting (PAXT) connection, which comprises the ZFC3H1 Zn......The RNA exosome is fundamental for the degradation of RNA in eukaryotic nuclei. Substrate targeting is facilitated by its co-factor Mtr4p/hMTR4, which links to RNA-binding protein adaptors. One example is the trimeric human nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT) complex, which is composed of hMTR4......-knuckle protein as a central link between hMTR4 and the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein PABPN1. Individual depletion of ZFC3H1 and PABPN1 results in the accumulation of common transcripts that are generally both longer and more extensively polyadenylated than NEXT substrates. Importantly, ZFC3H1/PABPN1 and ZCCHC8...

  15. The non-targeted effects of radiation are perpetuated by exosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mayah, Ammar; Bright, Scott; Chapman, Kim [Genomic Instability Group, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Irons, Sarah [Insect Virus Research Group, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Luo, Ping [Izon Science Ltd., The Oxford Science Park, Magdalen Centre, Robert Robinson Avenue, Oxford OX4 4GA (United Kingdom); Carter, David [Chromatin and non-coding RNA, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Goodwin, Edwin [The New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Kadhim, Munira, E-mail: mkadhim@brookes.ac.uk [Genomic Instability Group, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induces a DNA damaging process in bystander cells through cell–cell signalling. • Exosome RNA and protein molecules play crucial roles in bystander effects. • Cell progeny inherit the ability to secret bystander effect-inducing exosomes. • This mechanism is most likely accountable for the propagation of GI. - Abstract: Exosomes contain cargo material from endosomes, cytosol, plasma membrane and microRNA molecules, they are released by a number of non-cancer and cancer cells into both the extracellular microenvironment and body fluids such as blood plasma. Recently we demonstrated radiation-induced non-targeted effects [NTE: genomic instability (GI) and bystander effects (BE)] are partially mediated by exosomes, particularly the RNA content. However the mechanistic role of exosomes in NTE is yet to be fully understood. The present study used MCF7 cells to characterise the longevity of exosome-induced activity in the progeny of irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells. Exosomes extracted from conditioned media of irradiated and bystander progeny were added to unirradiated cells. Analysis was carried out at 1 and 20/24 population doublings following medium/exosome transfer for DNA/chromosomal damage. Results confirmed exosomes play a significant role in mediating NTE of ionising radiation (IR). This effect was remarkably persistent, observed >20 doublings post-irradiation in the progeny of bystander cells. Additionally, cell progeny undergoing a BE were themselves capable of inducing BE in other cells via exosomes they released. Furthermore we investigated the role of exosome cargo. Culture media from cells exposed to 2 Gy X-rays was subjected to ultracentrifugation and four inoculants prepared, (a) supernatants with exosomes removed, and pellets with (b) exosome proteins denatured, (c) RNA degraded, and (d) a combination of protein–RNA inactivation. These were added to separate populations of unirradiated cells. The BE was

  16. Clinical implications of carcinoembryonic antigen distribution in serum exosomal fraction-Measurement by ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Serum exosomal proteins have great potential as indicators of disease status in cancer, inflammatory or metabolic diseases. The association of a fraction of various serum proteins such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA with circulating exosomes has been debated. The establishment of a method to measure the exosomal fraction of such proteins might help resolve this controversy. The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs to measure serum exosomal molecules, for example CEA, is rare in research laboratories and totally absent in clinical biology. In this study, we optimized a method for assessment of serum exosomal molecules combining a treatment by volume-excluding polymers to isolate the exosomes, their subsequent solubilization in an assay buffer and ELISA.One hundred sixteen consecutive patients with colorectal cancer were enrolled for this study between June 2015 and June 2016 at Wakayama Medical University Hospital (WMUH. Whole blood samples were collected from patients during surgery. Exosomes were isolated using the ExoQuick reagent, solubilized in an assay buffer and subjected to CEA detection by ELISA. The procedure of serum exosome isolation and the formulation of the assay buffer used for the ELISA were optimized in order to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the assay.A five-fold increase in the concentration of the exosomes in the assay buffer (using initial serum volume as a reference and the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA resulted in more accurate measurements of the serum exosomal CEA. The thawing temperature of frozen serum samples before exosome extraction was also optimized. A validation study that included one hundred sixteen patients with colorectal cancer demonstrated that serum exosomal CEA from samples thawed at 25°C exhibited a better AUC value, sensitivity, and specificity as well as a more correct classification than serum CEA.We optimized an easy and rapid detection method for assessment of

  17. Urinary Exosomal MicroRNA Profiling in Incipient Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Albuminuria is an early sign but not a strong predictor of diabetic kidney disease (DKD. Owing to their high stability, urinary exosomal miRNAs can be useful predictors of the progression of early-stage DKD to renal failure; fluid biopsies are ideal for detecting abnormalities in these miRNAs. The aim of this study was to identify novel differentially expressed miRNAs as urine biomarkers for type 2 DKD by comparing between patients of type 2 diabetes (T2D with and without macroalbuminuria. Methods. Ten patients with T2D, including five who had no renal disease and five with macroalbuminuria (DKD G1-2A3, were selected for this study. Exosome- (UExo- derived miRNA profiles were used to identify candidate biomarkers, a subset of which was verified using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results. A total of 496 UExo-