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Sample records for salinity responsive ests

  1. A comprehensive resource of drought- and salinity- responsive ESTs for gene discovery and marker development in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

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    Srinivasan Ramamurthy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L., an important grain legume crop of the world is seriously challenged by terminal drought and salinity stresses. However, very limited number of molecular markers and candidate genes are available for undertaking molecular breeding in chickpea to tackle these stresses. This study reports generation and analysis of comprehensive resource of drought- and salinity-responsive expressed sequence tags (ESTs and gene-based markers. Results A total of 20,162 (18,435 high quality drought- and salinity- responsive ESTs were generated from ten different root tissue cDNA libraries of chickpea. Sequence editing, clustering and assembly analysis resulted in 6,404 unigenes (1,590 contigs and 4,814 singletons. Functional annotation of unigenes based on BLASTX analysis showed that 46.3% (2,965 had significant similarity (≤1E-05 to sequences in the non-redundant UniProt database. BLASTN analysis of unique sequences with ESTs of four legume species (Medicago, Lotus, soybean and groundnut and three model plant species (rice, Arabidopsis and poplar provided insights on conserved genes across legumes as well as novel transcripts for chickpea. Of 2,965 (46.3% significant unigenes, only 2,071 (32.3% unigenes could be functionally categorised according to Gene Ontology (GO descriptions. A total of 2,029 sequences containing 3,728 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were identified and 177 new EST-SSR markers were developed. Experimental validation of a set of 77 SSR markers on 24 genotypes revealed 230 alleles with an average of 4.6 alleles per marker and average polymorphism information content (PIC value of 0.43. Besides SSR markers, 21,405 high confidence single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 742 contigs (with ≥ 5 ESTs were also identified. Recognition sites for restriction enzymes were identified for 7,884 SNPs in 240 contigs. Hierarchical clustering of 105 selected contigs provided clues about stress- responsive

  2. Response of Stream Biodiversity to Increasing Salinization

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    Hawkins, C. P.; Vander Laan, J. J.; Olson, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We used a large data set of macroinvertebrate samples collected from streams in both reference-quality (n = 68) and degraded (n = 401) watersheds in the state of Nevada, USA to assess relationships between stream biodiversity and salinity. We used specific electrical conductance (EC)(μS/cm) as a measure of salinity, and applied a previously developed EC model to estimate natural, baseflow salinity at each stream. We used the difference between observed and predicted salinity (EC-Diff) as a measure of salinization associated with watershed degradation. Observed levels of EC varied between 22 and 994 μS/cm across reference sites and 22 to 3,256 uS/cm across non-reference sites. EC-Diff was as high as 2,743 μS/cm. We used a measure of local biodiversity completeness (ratio of observed to expected number of taxa) to assess ecological response to salinity. This O/E index decreased nearly linearly up to about 25% biodiversity loss, which occurred at EC-Diff of about 300 μS/cm. Too few sites had EC-Diff greater than 300 μS/cm to draw reliable inferences regarding biodiversity response to greater levels of salinization. EC-Diff increased with % agricultural land use, mine density, and % urban land use in the watersheds implying that human activities have been largely responsible for increased salinization in Nevada streams and rivers. Comparison of biological responses to EC and other stressors indicates that increased salinization may be the primary stressor causing biodiversity loss in these streams and that more stringent salinity water quality standards may be needed to protect aquatic life.

  3. GPR Phase Response to Fracture Saline Tracers

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    Tsoflias, G. P.; Becker, M.

    2016-12-01

    Flow in fractured rock is highly heterogeneous and difficult to predict. Groundwater, geothermal and hydrocarbon resource development requires knowledge of fracture fluid flow properties. Geophysical methods such as seismic, electrical and electromagnetic, have been used to image fracture systems. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been shown to image fractures and monitor saline tracers in groundwater aquifers. Previous studies have considered primarily the amplitude response of GPR signals. In this work we examine the phase response of GPR in a series of controlled field experiments spanning over a decade. We compare field observations to analytical models and FDTD numerical simulations of the phase response of GPR signals to saline tracers in fractures. We show that changes in the electrical conductivity of fracture fluid cause predictable and detectable phase changes in reflected and transmitted GPR signals through fractures. Lower frequency signals (MHz range) show greater sensitivity to fluid electrical conductivity changes, while being relatively insensitive to fracture aperture. Phase changes over time (time lapse) are used to image channeled flow through discrete fractures and to monitor tracer breakthrough. Although GPR is used extensively in near-surface groundwater investigations, deployment in boreholes can allow adaptation of the technology to monitor saline tracers in hydrocarbon and geothermal systems.

  4. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress

    OpenAIRE

    Negr?o, S.; Schm?ckel, S. M.; Tester, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant?s physiology, making it difficult to study in toto. Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant?s response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. Scope and conclusions We discuss how to quantify the impact of sa...

  5. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrão, S.; Schmöckel, S. M.; Tester, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant’s physiology, making it difficult to study in toto. Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant’s response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. Scope and conclusions We discuss how to quantify the impact of salinity on different traits, such as relative growth rate, water relations, transpiration, transpiration use efficiency, ionic relations, photosynthesis, senescence, yield and yield components. We also suggest some guidelines to assist with the selection of appropriate experimental systems, imposition of salinity stress, and obtaining and analysing relevant physiological data using appropriate indices. We illustrate how these indices can be used to identify relationships amongst the proposed traits to identify which traits are the most important contributors to salinity tolerance. Salinity tolerance is complex and involves many genes, but progress has been made in studying the mechanisms underlying a plant’s response to salinity. Nevertheless, several previous studies on salinity tolerance could have benefited from improved experimental design. We hope that this paper will provide pertinent information to researchers on performing proficient assays and interpreting results from salinity tolerance experiments. PMID:27707746

  6. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress

    KAUST Repository

    Negrão, Sónia

    2016-10-06

    Background Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant’s physiology, making it difficult to study in toto. Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant’s response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. Scope and conclusions We discuss how to quantify the impact of salinity on different traits, such as relative growth rate, water relations, transpiration, transpiration use efficiency, ionic relations, photosynthesis, senescence, yield and yield components. We also suggest some guidelines to assist with the selection of appropriate experimental systems, imposition of salinity stress, and obtaining and analysing relevant physiological data using appropriate indices. We illustrate how these indices can be used to identify relationships amongst the proposed traits to identify which traits are the most important contributors to salinity tolerance. Salinity tolerance is complex and involves many genes, but progress has been made in studying the mechanisms underlying a plant’s response to salinity. Nevertheless, several previous studies on salinity tolerance could have benefited from improved experimental design. We hope that this paper will provide pertinent information to researchers on performing proficient assays and interpreting results from salinity tolerance experiments.

  7. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrão, S; Schmöckel, S M; Tester, M

    2017-01-01

    Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant's physiology, making it difficult to study in toto Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant's response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. We discuss how to quantify the impact of salinity on different traits, such as relative growth rate, water relations, transpiration, transpiration use efficiency, ionic relations, photosynthesis, senescence, yield and yield components. We also suggest some guidelines to assist with the selection of appropriate experimental systems, imposition of salinity stress, and obtaining and analysing relevant physiological data using appropriate indices. We illustrate how these indices can be used to identify relationships amongst the proposed traits to identify which traits are the most important contributors to salinity tolerance. Salinity tolerance is complex and involves many genes, but progress has been made in studying the mechanisms underlying a plant's response to salinity. Nevertheless, several previous studies on salinity tolerance could have benefited from improved experimental design. We hope that this paper will provide pertinent information to researchers on performing proficient assays and interpreting results from salinity tolerance experiments. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  8. Amazon Plume Salinity Response to Ocean Teleconnections

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    Pedro Tyaquiçã

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST variability strongly influences rainfall changes in the Amazon River basin, which impacts on the river discharge and consequently the sea surface salinity (SSS in the Amazon plume. An Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis was performed using 46 years of SST, rainfall, and SSS datasets, in order to establish the relationship between these variables. The first three modes of SST/rainfall explained 87.83% of the total covariance. Pacific and Atlantic SSTs led Amazon basin rainfall events by 4 months. The resultant SSS in the western tropical North Atlantic (WTNA lagged behind basin rainfall by 3 months, with 75.04% of the total covariance corresponding to the first four EOF modes. The first EOF mode indicated a strong SSS pattern along the coast that was connected to negative rainfall anomalies covering the Amazon basin, linked to El Niño events. A second pattern also presented positive SSS anomalies, when the rainfall was predominantly over the northwestern part of the Amazon basin, with low rainfall around the Amazon River mouth. The pattern with negative SSS anomalies in the WTNA was associated with the fourth mode, when positive rainfall anomalies were concentrated in the northwest part of South America. The spatial rainfall structure of this fourth mode was associated with the spatial rainfall distribution found in the third EOF mode of SST vs. rainfall, which was a response to La Niña Modoki events. A statistical analysis for the 46 year period and monthly anomaly composites for 2008 and 2009 indicated that La Niña Modoki events can be used for the prediction of low SSS patterns in the WNTA.

  9. Nonlinear Allometric Equation for Crop Response to Soil Salinity

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    E. Misle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Crop response to soil salinity has been extensively studied, from empirical works to modelling approach, being described by different equations, first as a piecewise linear model. The equation employed can differ with actual response, causing miscalculation in practical situations, particularly at the higher extremes of the curve. The aim of this work is to propose a new equation, which allows determining the full response to salinity of plant species and to provide a verification using different experimental data sets. A new nonlinear equation is exposed supported by the allometric approach, in which the allometric exponent is salinity-dependent and decreases with the increase in relative salinity. A conversion procedure of parameters of the threshold-slope model is presented; also, a simple procedure for estimating the maximum salinity (zero-yield point when data sets are incomplete is exposed. The equation was tested in a wide range of experimental situations, using data sets from published works, as well as new measurements on seed germination. The statistical indicators of quality (R2, absolute sum of squares and standard deviation of residuals showed that the equation accurately fits the tested empirical results. The new equation for determining crop response to soil salinity is able to follow the response curve of any crop with remarkable accuracy and flexibility. Remarkable characteristics are: a maximum at minimum salinity, a maximum salinity point can be found (zero-yield depending on the data sets, and a meaningful inflection point, as well as the two points at which the slope of the curve equals unity, can be found.

  10. Wheat Response to a Soil Previously Irrigated with Saline Water

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    Vito Sardo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A research was conducted aimed at assessing the response of rainfed, lysimeter-grown wheat to various levels of soil salinity, in terms of dry mass production, inorganic and organic components, sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS and sucrose synthase (SS activity. One additional scope was the assessment of soil ability to recover from applied salts by means of winter precipitations. The results confirmed the relatively high salt tolerance of wheat, as demonstrated by the mechanisms enacted by plants to contrast salinity at root and leaf level. Some insight was gained in the relationships between salinity and the various inorganic and organic components, as well as with SPS and SS activity. It was demonstrated that in a year with precipitations well below the average values (305 mm vs 500 the leaching action of rain was sufficient to eliminate salts accumulated during summer irrigation with saline water.

  11. Salinity Response in Chloroplasts: Insights from Gene Characterization

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    Jinwei Suo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is a severe abiotic stress limiting agricultural yield and productivity. Plants have evolved various strategies to cope with salt stress. Chloroplasts are important photosynthesis organelles, which are sensitive to salinity. An understanding of molecular mechanisms in chloroplast tolerance to salinity is of great importance for genetic modification and plant breeding. Previous studies have characterized more than 53 salt-responsive genes encoding important chloroplast-localized proteins, which imply multiple vital pathways in chloroplasts in response to salt stress, such as thylakoid membrane organization, the modulation of photosystem II (PS II activity, carbon dioxide (CO2 assimilation, photorespiration, reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging, osmotic and ion homeostasis, abscisic acid (ABA biosynthesis and signaling, and gene expression regulation, as well as protein synthesis and turnover. This review presents an overview of salt response in chloroplasts revealed by gene characterization efforts.

  12. Phenotypic and metabolic responses to drought and salinity of four contrasting lentil accessions

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    Muscolo, A.; Junker, A.; Klukas, C.; Weigelt-Fischer, K.; Riewe, D.; Altmann, T.

    2015-01-01

    Drought and salinity are among the major abiotic stresses which, often inter-relatedly, adversely affect plant growth and productivity. Plant stress responses depend on the type of stress, on its intensity, on the species, and also on the genotype. Different accessions of a species may have evolved different mechanisms to cope with stress and to complete their life cycles. This study is focused on lentil, an important Mediterranean legume with high quality protein for the human diet. The effects of salinity and drought on germination and early growth of Castelluccio di Norcia (CAST), Pantelleria (PAN), Ustica (UST), and Eston (EST) accessions were evaluated to identify metabolic and phenotypic traits related to drought and/or salinity stress tolerance. The results showed a relationship between imposed stresses and performance of the cultivars. According to germination frequencies, the accession ranking was as follows: NaCl resistant > susceptible, PAN > UST > CAST > EST; polyethylene glycol (PEG) resistant > susceptible, CAST > UST > EST > PAN. Seedling tolerance rankings were: NaCl resistant > susceptible, CAST ≈ UST > PAN ≈ EST; PEG resistant > susceptible, CAST > EST ≈ UST > PAN. Changes in the metabolite profiles, mainly quantitative rather than qualitative, were observed in the same cultivar in respect to the treatments, and among the cultivars under the same treatment. Metabolic differences in the stress tolerance of the different genotypes were related to a reduction in the levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. The relevant differences, between the most NaCl-tolerant genotype (PAN) and the most sensitive one (EST) were related to the decrease in the threonic acid level. Stress-specific metabolite indicators were also identified: ornithine and asparagine as markers of drought stress and alanine and homoserine as markers of salinity stress. PMID:25969553

  13. Osmotic responses of Dunaliella to the changes of salinity.

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    Chen, Hui; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2009-05-01

    Some species in genus Dunaliella are unique in their remarkable abilities to accumulate large numbers of beta-carotene and thrive in media containing a wide range of NaCl concentrations ranging from about 0.05 M to saturation (around 5.5 M). The algae contain no rigid polysaccharide cell wall and thus have been found to be able to rapidly change their volume and shape in response to changes in the extracellular hypo- or hyper-osmotic pressure. In osmotic adjustment, the osmoregulatory response of Dunaliella functions to maintain osmotic balance at high salinities by synthesis and varying the intracellular concentration of glycerol. In this review, we describe the osmotic response process of Dunaliella under salinity stress, including the changes of cell volume, intracellular ions concentration, intracellular glycerol concentration, and the expression of some salt-induced genes. Some specific proteins and enzymes can be induced by different salinities in osmotic response process. In addition, we introduce the exogenous expression of salt-related genes of Dunaliella salina in plants and microorganisms for the purpose of confirming the functions of related genes, proteins, and enzymes. The aim of this review is to emphasize the importance of the studies on the mechanisms of osmotic adjustments of Dunaliella in order to develop its unique osmotic characteristics. It is prospected that future research should pay attention to the specific signal transduction pathway and the mechanism of osmoregulation, and to improve the salt tolerance of higher plants by using salt-tolerant genes of Dunaliella.

  14. Understanding salinity responses and adopting ‘omics-based’ approaches to generate salinity tolerant cultivars of rice

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    Das, Priyanka; Nutan, Kamlesh K.; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.; Pareek, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the main constraints affecting production of rice worldwide, by reducing growth, pollen viability as well as yield of the plant. Therefore, detailed understanding of the response of rice towards soil salinity at the physiological and molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. Various approaches have been adopted by molecular biologists or breeders to understand the mechanism for salinity tolerance in plants and to develop salt tolerant rice cultivars. Genome wide analysis using ‘omics-based’ tools followed by identification and functional validation of individual genes is becoming one of the popular approaches to tackle this task. On the other hand, mutation breeding and insertional mutagenesis has also been exploited to obtain salinity tolerant crop plants. This review looks into various responses at cellular and whole plant level generated in rice plants toward salinity stress thus, evaluating the suitability of intervention of functional genomics to raise stress tolerant plants. We have tried to highlight the usefulness of the contemporary ‘omics-based’ approaches such as genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and phenomics towards dissecting out the salinity tolerance trait in rice. In addition, we have highlighted the importance of integration of various ‘omics’ approaches to develop an understanding of the machinery involved in salinity response in rice and to move forward to develop salt tolerant cultivars of rice. PMID:26442026

  15. Understanding Salinity Responses and Adopting ‘Omics-based’ Approaches to Generate Salinity Tolerant Cultivars of Rice

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    Priyanka eDas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is one of the main constraints affecting production of rice worldwide, by reducing growth, pollen viability as well as yield of the plant. Therefore, detailed understanding of the response of rice towards soil salinity at the physiological and molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. Various approaches have been adopted by molecular biologists or breeders to understand the mechanism for salinity tolerance in plants and to develop salt tolerant rice cultivars. Genome wide analysis using ‘omics-based’ tools followed by identification and functional validation of individual genes is becoming one of the popular approaches to tackle this task. On the other hand, mutation breeding and insertional mutagenesis has also been exploited to obtain salinity tolerant crop plants. This review looks into various responses at cellular and whole plant level generated in rice plants towards salinity stress thus, evaluating the suitability of intervention of functional genomics to raise stress tolerant plants. We have tried to highlight the usefulness of the contemporary ‘omics-based’ approaches such as genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and phenomics towards dissecting out the salinity tolerance trait in rice. In addition, we have highlighted the importance of integration of various ‘omics’ approaches to develop an understanding of the machinery involved in salinity response in rice and to move forward to develop salt tolerant cultivars of rice.

  16. Transcript profiling of salinity stress responses by large-scale expressed sequence tag analysis in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

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    Kore-eda, Shin; Cushman, Mary Ann; Akselrod, Inna; Bufford, Davina; Fredrickson, Monica; Clark, Elizabeth; Cushman, John C

    2004-10-27

    The common ice plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, is a halophytic (salt-loving) member of the Aizoaceae, which switches from C3 photosynthesis to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) when exposed to salinity or water-deficit stress. CAM is a metabolic adaptation of photosynthetic carbon fixation that improves water use efficiency by shifting net CO2 uptake to the night, thereby reducing transpirational water loss. To improve our understanding of the molecular genetic underpinnings and control mechanisms for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and other salinity stress response adaptations, a total of 9733 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from cDNAs derived from leaf tissues of well-watered and salinity-stressed (0.5 M NaCl for 30 and 48 h) were characterized. Clustering and assembly of these ESTs resulted in the identification of a total of 3676 tentative unique gene sequences (1249 tentative consensus sequences and 2427 singleton ESTs) expressed in leaves of ice plant under unstressed and salinity stressed conditions. The same number (2782) of ESTs from each library (total=8346 ESTs) were randomly selected and analyzed to compare expression profiles among the control and salt stressed leaf tissues. EST frequencies for transcripts encoding CAM-related enzymes, pathogenesis-related, senescence-associated, cell death-related, and stress-related proteins such as heat shock proteins (HSPs), chaperones, early light-inducible proteins, ion homeostasis, antioxidative stress, detoxification, and biosynthetic enzymes for osmoprotectants increased 2-12-fold in cDNA libraries constructed from salt stressed plants. In contrast, the frequency of ESTs encoding light-harvesting and photosystem complexes and C3 photosynthetic enzymes decreased 4-fold overall following salinity stress with transcripts for ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) subunits decreasing 7-fold. Moreover, stressed plants contained a higher percentage of ESTs encoding novel and/or functionally

  17. Comparative study of transcriptional and physiological responses to salinity stress in two contrasting Populus alba L. genotypes.

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    Beritognolo, Isacco; Harfouche, Antoine; Brilli, Federico; Prosperini, Gianluca; Gaudet, Muriel; Brosché, Mikael; Salani, Francesco; Kuzminsky, Elena; Auvinen, Petri; Paulin, Lars; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Loreto, Francesco; Valentini, Riccardo; Mugnozza, Giuseppe Scarascia; Sabatti, Maurizio

    2011-12-01

    Soil salinity is an important limiting factor to tree growth and productivity. Populus alba L. is a moderately salt-tolerant species and its natural populations are adapted to contrasting environments, thus providing genetic resources to identify key genes for tolerance to abiotic stress, such as salinity. To elucidate the molecular and genetic basis of variation for salinity tolerance in P. alba, we analyzed the short-term ecophysiological and transcriptome response to salinity. Two contrasting genotypes, 6K3, salt sensitive, and 14P11, salt tolerant, originating from North and South Italy, respectively, were challenged with salt stress (200 mM NaCl). Sodium accumulated in the leaves of salt-treated plants and its concentration increased with time. The net photosynthesis was strongly reduced by salinity in both genotypes, with 6K3 being significantly more affected than 14P11. The transcriptional changes in leaves were analyzed using cDNA microarrays containing about 7000 stress-related poplar expressed sequence tags (EST). A microarray experiment based on RNA pooling showed a number of salinity--regulated transcripts that markedly increased from 3 h to 3 days of salinity treatment. Thus, a detailed analysis was performed on replicated plants collected at 3 days, when ~20% of transcripts showed significant change induced by salinity. In 6K3, there were more genes with decreased expression than genes with increased expression, whereas such a difference was not found in 14P11. Most transcripts with decreased expression were shared between the two genotypes, whereas transcripts with increased expression were mostly regulated in a genotype-specific manner. The commonly decreased transcripts (71 genes) were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. These biological processes were consistent with the strong inhibition of photosynthesis, caused by salinity. The commonly increased transcripts (13 genes) were functionally related

  18. Simulation of Quinoa (Chenopodium Quinoa Willd.) response to soil salinity using the saltmed model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Plauborg, Finn; Ahmadi, Seyed Hamid

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a crop with high tolerance to salinity and drought and its response to varying soil moisture and salinity levels was studied in a field lysimeter experiment. Quinoa (cv. Titicaca) was irrigated with different concentrations of saline water (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40...

  19. Morphological responses of forage sorghums to salinity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significant differences in stem diameter were found between the frequently and the least frequently watered plants, and stem diameter decreased with increasing salinity. Leaf firing increased with increasing salinity reaching 59.9% in the extreme salinity treatment of 15 dS m-1, and it increased with increasing water stress ...

  20. Growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinity: development and function of shoot hydraulic systems require saline conditions.

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    Nguyen, Hoa T; Stanton, Daniel E; Schmitz, Nele; Farquhar, Graham D; Ball, Marilyn C

    2015-02-01

    Halophytic eudicots are characterized by enhanced growth under saline conditions. This study combines physiological and anatomical analyses to identify processes underlying growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinities ranging from fresh- to seawater conditions. Following pre-exhaustion of cotyledonary reserves under optimal conditions (i.e. 50% seawater), seedlings of A. marina were grown hydroponically in dilutions of seawater amended with nutrients. Whole-plant growth characteristics were analysed in relation to dry mass accumulation and its allocation to different plant parts. Gas exchange characteristics and stable carbon isotopic composition of leaves were measured to evaluate water use in relation to carbon gain. Stem and leaf hydraulic anatomy were measured in relation to plant water use and growth. Avicennia marina seedlings failed to grow in 0-5% seawater, whereas maximal growth occurred in 50-75% seawater. Relative growth rates were affected by changes in leaf area ratio (LAR) and net assimilation rate (NAR) along the salinity gradient, with NAR generally being more important. Gas exchange characteristics followed the same trends as plant growth, with assimilation rates and stomatal conductance being greatest in leaves grown in 50-75% seawater. However, water use efficiency was maintained nearly constant across all salinities, consistent with carbon isotopic signatures. Anatomical studies revealed variation in rates of development and composition of hydraulic tissues that were consistent with salinity-dependent patterns in water use and growth, including a structural explanation for low stomatal conductance and growth under low salinity. The results identified stem and leaf transport systems as central to understanding the integrated growth responses to variation in salinity from fresh- to seawater conditions. Avicennia marina was revealed as an obligate halophyte, requiring saline conditions for development of the transport systems

  1. Respon Varietas Unggul Kacang Tanah Terhadap Cekaman Salinitas Responses of Groundnut Varieties to Salinity Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Taufiq, Abdullah; Kristiono, Afandi; Harnowo, Didik

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity has negative effect on crop growth and crop productivity. Information on the response of groundnut varieties to salinity is required for varietal selection adaptable to saline soil condition. The research was conducted at the greenhouse of Indonesian Legume and Tuber Crops Research Institute (Iletri), Malang, East Java from July to September 2013. The objective of the research was to study the effect of salinity on groundnut growth.Ten groundnut varieties, consisted of seven va...

  2. Transcriptomic response to low salinity stress in gills of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

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    Hu, Dongxu; Pan, Luqing; Zhao, Qun; Ren, Qin

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (L. vannamei), is one of the most farmed species. Salinity is an important environmental factor that affects its growth and distribution. However, the molecular mechanism of the shrimp in response to salinity stress remains largely unclear. High-throughput sequencing is a helpful tool to analyze the molecular response to salinity challenge in shrimp. In the present study, the transcriptomic responses of the gills in L. vannamei under low salinity stress were detected by Illumina's digital gene expression system. A total of 10,725,789 and 10,827,411 reads were generated from the non-changed and low salinity changed groups, respectively. 64,590 Unigenes with an average length of 764 bp were generated. Compared with the control, 585 genes were differentially expressed under low salinity. GO functional analysis and KEGG pathway analysis indicated some vital genes in response to the challenge. Ten genes related to osmoregulation and ambient salinity adaption were selected to validate the DGE results by RT-qPCR. This work provides valuable information to study the mechanism of salinity adaption in L. vannamei. Genes and pathways from the results will be beneficial to reveal the molecular basis of osmoregulation. It also gives an insight into the response to the salinity challenge in L. vannamei. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Responses of Nile tilapia to different levels of water salinity

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    Rafael Vieira de Azevedo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A 45 day experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of water salinity on the performance, haematological parameters and histological characteristics of the gills of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. The water salinity levels evaluated were: 0, 7, 14 and 21 g L-1. Nile tilapia specimens (1.62 ± 0.01 g, distributed into 20 fibreglass tanks (100 L at a density of 15 fish per tank. There were no significant differences of the water salinity levels on daily feed intake; however, there were differences (P 0.05 between these levels. Regarding the haematological parameters, it was observed that the percentage of the haematocrits and the erythrocyte count were influenced (P < 0.05 by the water salinity level, which was not observed for the leukocyte count. The observed histopathological alterations were chloride cell hypertrophy, epithelial lifting, structure alteration, telangiectasia, primary lamellae cells aggregation, fusion and occurrence of aneurisms of different sizes in some secondary lamellae. Regarding the frequency of gills infection intensity, there were slight changes between the salinities of 0, 7 and 14 g L-1 and moderate changes at 21 g L-1. It is concluded that Nile tilapia can be reared in water salinities of up to 7 g L-1 without damage to the parameters evaluated in this work.

  4. Reclamation of Sodic-Saline Soils. Barley Crop Response

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    Giovanna Cucci

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed at assessing the salinity and sodicity effects of two soil types submitted to correction on barley crop. The two soils, contained in cylindrical pots (0.40 m in size and 0.60 m h supplied with a bottom valve for the collection of drainage water and located under shed to prevent the leaching action of rainfall, were clay-textured and saline and sodic-saline at barley seeding, as they had been cultivated for 4 consecutive years with different herbaceous species irrigated with 9 types of brackish water. In 2002-2003 the 2 salinized and sodium-affected soils (ECe and ESP ranging respectively from 5.84-20.27 dSm-1 to 2.83-11.19%, submitted to correction, were cultivated with barley cv Micuccio, and irrigated with fresh water (ECw = 0.5 dS m-1 and SAR = 0.45 whenever 30% of the maximum soil available moisture was lost by evapotranspiration. Barley was shown to be a salt-tolerant species and did not experience any salt stress when grown in soils with an initial ECe up to 11 dS m-1. When it was grown in more saline soils (initial ECe of about 20 dS m-1, despite the correction, it showed a reduction in shoot biomass and kernel yield by 26% and 36% respectively, as compared to less saline soils.

  5. Growth and Physiological Responses of Phaseolus Species to Salinity Stress

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    J. S. Bayuelo-Jiménez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the changes on growth, photosynthesis, water relations, soluble carbohydrate, and ion accumulation, for two salt-tolerant and two salt-sensitive Phaseolus species grown under increasing salinity (0, 60 and 90 mM NaCl. After 20 days exposure to salt, biomass was reduced in all species to a similar extent (about 56%, with the effect of salinity on relative growth rate (RGR confined largely to the first week. RGR of salt-tolerant species was reduced by salinity due to leaf area ratio (LAR reduction rather than a decline in photosynthetic capacity, whereas unit leaf rate and LAR were the key factors in determining RGR on salt-sensitive species. Photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance decreased gradually with salinity, showing significant reductions only in salt-sensitive species at the highest salt level. There was little difference between species in the effect of salinity on water relations, as indicated by their positive turgor. Osmotic adjustment occurred in all species and depended on higher K+, Na+, and Cl− accumulation. Despite some changes in soluble carbohydrate accumulation induced by salt stress, no consistent contributions in osmotic adjustment could be found in this study. Therefore, we suggest that tolerance to salt stress is largely unrelated to carbohydrate accumulation in Phaseolus species.

  6. Comprehensive phenotypic analysis of rice (Oryza sativa) response to salinity stress

    KAUST Repository

    Pires, Inês S.

    2015-07-22

    Increase in soil salinity levels is becoming a major cause of crop yield losses worldwide. Rice (Oryza sativa) is the most salt-sensitive cereal crop, and many studies have focused on rice salinity tolerance, but a global understanding of this crop\\'s response to salinity is still lacking. We systematically analyzed phenotypic data previously collected for 56 rice genotypes to assess the extent to which rice uses three known salinity tolerance mechanisms: shoot-ion independent tolerance (or osmotic tolerance), ion exclusion, and tissue tolerance. In general, our analyses of different phenotypic traits agree with results of previous rice salinity tolerance studies. However, we also established that the three salinity tolerance mechanisms mentioned earlier appear among rice genotypes and that none of them is predominant. Against the pervasive view in the literature that the K+/Na+ ratio is the most important trait in salinity tolerance, we found that the K+ concentration was not significantly affected by salt stress in rice, which puts in question the importance of K+/Na+ when analyzing rice salt stress response. Not only do our results contribute to improve our global understanding of salt stress response in an important crop, but we also use our results together with an extensive literature research to highlight some issues commonly observed in salinity stress tolerance studies and to propose solutions for future experiments.

  7. Growth response of eight tropical turfgrass species to salinity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Irrigation seawater of different salinity levels (0, 24, 48 and 72 dSm-1) were applied to experimental plants grown in a plastic pots filled with a mixture of sand and peat (9:1). The results were analyzed using SAS and treatment means were compared using LSD Test. The results indicated that Paspalum.

  8. Genotypic variation in the response of tomato to salinity | Turhan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to determine the predictive screening parameters that can be applied at early development stages of tomato plants, 18 tomato cultivars were grown in nutrient solution with 12 dS m-1 NaCl. The research was conducted in a completely randomized design with tree replications. The relationships among the salinity ...

  9. Genetic analysis of salinity responses in Medicago genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reduced availability of clean water in arid and semi-arid regions will require the use of low-quality/alternative waters for irrigation. The main consideration for using low-quality/alternative waters is often their salt concentration. Plants respond to salinity stress through a complex network of p...

  10. Seagrass proliferation precedes mortality during hypo-salinity events: a stress-induced morphometric response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J Collier

    Full Text Available Halophytes, such as seagrasses, predominantly form habitats in coastal and estuarine areas. These habitats can be seasonally exposed to hypo-salinity events during watershed runoff exposing them to dramatic salinity shifts and osmotic shock. The manifestation of this osmotic shock on seagrass morphology and phenology was tested in three Indo-Pacific seagrass species, Halophila ovalis, Halodule uninervis and Zostera muelleri, to hypo-salinity ranging from 3 to 36 PSU at 3 PSU increments for 10 weeks. All three species had broad salinity tolerance but demonstrated a moderate hypo-salinity stress response--analogous to a stress induced morphometric response (SIMR. Shoot proliferation occurred at salinities <30 PSU, with the largest increases, up to 400% increase in shoot density, occurring at the sub-lethal salinities <15 PSU, with the specific salinity associated with peak shoot density being variable among species. Resources were not diverted away from leaf growth or shoot development to support the new shoot production. However, at sub-lethal salinities where shoots proliferated, flowering was severely reduced for H. ovalis, the only species to flower during this experiment, demonstrating a diversion of resources away from sexual reproduction to support the investment in new shoots. This SIMR response preceded mortality, which occurred at 3 PSU for H. ovalis and 6 PSU for H. uninervis, while complete mortality was not reached for Z. muelleri. This is the first study to identify a SIMR in seagrasses, being detectable due to the fine resolution of salinity treatments tested. The detection of SIMR demonstrates the need for caution in interpreting in-situ changes in shoot density as shoot proliferation could be interpreted as a healthy or positive plant response to environmental conditions, when in fact it could signal pre-mortality stress.

  11. Immune response of the short neck clam Paphia malabarica to salinity stress using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, Deodatta S; Khandeparker, Lidita

    2017-08-01

    Paphia malabarica is a predominant and commercially important bivalve in India, persistently challenged by wavering salinity in a monsoon-influenced estuary. To examine the organism's immunological response under such a condition we challenged P. malabarica with different salinities (0, 5, 15, 25 and 35) for varied periods using a two-way experimental approach (in vitro and in vivo). This is the first study to report the response of P. malabarica hemocytes to salinity stress from a monsoon-influenced estuary on the southwest coast of India. Evaluation of total hemocytes count, mortality, lysosomal content, reactive oxygen species production, phagocytic and esterase activity was carried out using flow cytometric analysis. In both the experimental conditions, hemocyte parameters were significantly compromised at lower salinities (0 and 5) with an evident immuno-salinity tolerance range of 15-35. The damaging impact of 0 and 5 salinities on hemocyte function intensified with a longer exposure period, indicating that prolonged exposure to low salinity could be detrimental to bivalve wellness if they are pushed beyond their tolerance range which is usually observed during the monsoon. Further studies should focus on the interactive effect of salinity tagged with different stressors influencing biology of P. malabarica. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Growth response of eight tropical turfgrass species to salinity | Uddin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Irrigation seawater of different salinity levels (0, 24, 48 and 72 dSm-1) were applied to experimental plants grown in a plastic pots filled with a mixture of sand and peat ... affinis (narrowleaf carpet grass) (NCG) experienced a 50% shoot growth reduction at the EC of 39.8, 36.5, 26.1, 25.9, 21.7, 22.4, 17.0 and 18.3 dSm-1, ...

  13. Physiological Responses to Salinity Vary with Proximity to the Ocean in a Coastal Amphibian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Gareth R; Brodie, Edmund D; Neuman-Lee, Lorin A; Mohammadi, Shabnam; Brusch, George A; Hopkins, Zoë M; French, Susannah S

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater organisms are increasingly exposed to elevated salinity in their habitats, presenting physiological challenges to homeostasis. Amphibians are particularly vulnerable to osmotic stress and yet are often subject to high salinity in a variety of inland and coastal environments around the world. Here, we examine the physiological responses to elevated salinity of rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa) inhabiting a coastal stream on the Pacific coast of North America and compare the physiological responses to salinity stress of newts living in close proximity to the ocean with those of newts living farther upstream. Although elevated salinity significantly affected the osmotic (body weight, plasma osmolality), stress (corticosterone), and immune (bactericidal ability) responses of newts, animals found closer to the ocean were generally less reactive to salt stress than those found farther upstream. Our results provide possible evidence for some physiological tolerance in this species to elevated salinity in coastal environments. As freshwater environments become increasingly saline and more stressful, understanding the physiological tolerances of vulnerable groups such as amphibians will become increasingly important to our understanding of their abilities to respond, to adapt, and, ultimately, to survive.

  14. Response of stream invertebrates to short-term salinization: a mesocosm approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañedo-Argüelles, Miguel; Grantham, Theodore E; Perrée, Isabelle; Rieradevall, Maria; Céspedes-Sánchez, Raquel; Prat, Narcís

    2012-07-01

    Salinization is a major and growing threat to freshwater ecosystems, yet its effects on aquatic invertebrates have been poorly described at a community-level. Here we use a controlled experimental setting to evaluate short-term stream community responses to salinization, under conditions designed to replicate the duration (72 h) and intensity (up to 5 mS cm(-1)) of salinity pulses common to Mediterranean rivers subjected to mining pollution during runoff events. There was a significant overall effect, but differences between individual treatments and the control were only significant for the highest salinity treatment. The community response to salinization was characterized by a decline in total invertebrate density, taxon richness and diversity, an increase in invertebrate drift and loss of the most sensitive taxa. The findings indicate that short-term salinity increases have a significant impact on the stream invertebrate community, but concentrations of 5 mS cm(-1) are needed to produce a significant ecological response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Contribution of different dispersal sources to the metabolic response of lake bacterioplankton following a salinity change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, Jérôme; Langenheder, Silke; Berga, Mercè; Lindström, Eva S

    2017-01-01

    Dispersal can modify how bacterial community composition (BCC) changes in response to environmental perturbations, yet knowledge about the functional consequences of dispersal is limited. Here we hypothesized that changes in bacterial community production in response to a salinity disturbance depend on the possibility to recruit cells from different dispersal sources. To investigate this, we conducted an in situ mesocosm experiment where bacterial communities of an oligotrophic lake were exposed to different salinities (0, 18, 36 psu) for 2 weeks and subjected to dispersal of cells originating from sediments, air (mesocosms open to air deposition), both or none. BCC was determined using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and bacterial production was measured by 3 H leucine uptake. Bacterial production differed significantly among salinity treatments and dispersal treatments, being highest at high salinity. These changes were associated with changes in BCC and it was found that the identity of the main functional contributors differed at different salinities. Our results further showed that after a salinity perturbation, the response of bacterial communities depended on the recruitment of taxa, including marine representatives (e.g., Alphaproteobacteria Loktanella, Erythrobacter and the Gammaproteobacterium Rheiheimera) from dispersal sources, in which atmospheric deposition appeared to play a major role. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Growth and photosynthetic responses to salinity of the salt-marsh shrub Atriplex portulacoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Davy, Anthony J; Fernández-Muñoz, Francisco; Castellanos, Eloy M; Luque, Teresa; Figueroa, M Enrique

    2007-09-01

    Atriplex (Halimione) portulacoides is a halophytic, C(3) shrub. It is virtually confined to coastal salt marshes, where it often dominates the vegetation. The aim of this study was to investigate its growth responses to salinity and the extent to which these could be explained by photosynthetic physiology. The responses of young plants to salinity in the range 0-700 mol m(-3) NaCl were investigated in a glasshouse experiment. The performance of plants was examined using classical growth analysis, measurements of gas exchange (infrared gas analysis), determination of chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics (modulated fluorimeter) and photosynthetic pigment concentrations; total ash, sodium, potassium and nitrogen concentrations, and relative water content were also determined. Plants accumulated Na(+) approximately in proportion to external salinity. Salt stimulated growth up to an external concentration of 200 mol m(-3) NaCl and some growth was maintained at higher salinities. The main determinant of growth response to salinity was unit leaf rate. This was itself reflected in rates of CO(2) assimilation, which were not affected by 200 mol m(-3) but were reduced at higher salinities. Reductions in net photosynthetic rate could be accounted for largely by lower stomatal conductance and intercellular CO(2) concentration. Apart from possible effects of osmotic shock at the beginning of the experiment, salinity did not have any adverse effect on photosystem II (PSII). Neither the quantum efficiency of PSII (Phi(PSII)) nor the chlorophyll fluorescence ratio (F(v)/F(m)) were reduced by salinity, and lower mid-day values recovered by dawn. Mid-day F(v)/F(m) was in fact depressed more at low external sodium concentration, by the end of the experiment. The growth responses of the hygro-halophyte A. portulacoides to salinity appear largely to depend on changes in its rate of photosynthetic gas exchange. Photosynthesis appears to be limited mainly through stomatal conductance

  17. Physiological changes of pepper accessions in response to salinity and water stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia López-Serrano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available New sources of water stress and salinity tolerances are needed for crops grown in marginal lands. Pepper is considered one of the most important crops in the world. Many varieties belong to the genus Capsicum spp., and display wide variability in tolerance/sensitivity terms in response to drought and salinity stress. The objective was to screen seven salt/drought-tolerant pepper accessions to breed new cultivars that could overcome abiotic stresses, or be used as new crops in land with water and salinity stress. Fast and effective physiological traits were measured to achieve the objective. The present study showed wide variability of the seven pepper accessions in response to both stresses. Photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and transpiration reduced mainly under salinity due to stomatal and non-stomatal (Na+ accumulation constraints and, to a lesser extent, in the accessions grown under water stress. A positive relationship between CO2 fixation and fresh weight generation was observed for both stresses. Decreases in Ys and YW and increased proline were observed only when accessions were grown under salinity. However, these factors were not enough to alleviate salt effects and an inverse relation was noted between plant salt tolerance and proline accumulation. Under water stress, A31 was the least affected and A34 showed the best tolerance to salinity in terms of photosynthesis and biomass.

  18. Salinity-Dependent Adhesion Response Properties of Aluminosilicate (K-Feldspar) Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Bärbel; Ceccato, Marcel; Andersson, Martin Peter

    2017-01-01

    Flooding sandstone oil reservoirs with low salinity water can lead to a significant increase in oil recovery, a phenomenon called "the low salinity effect". Although there are many factors that contribute to this response, the surface tension on the pore walls is an important one. Sandstone...... is composed predominantly of quartz with some clay, but feldspar grains are often also present. While the wettability of quartz and clay surfaces has been thoroughly investigated, little is known about the adhesion properties of feldspar. We explored the interaction of model oil compounds, molecules...... in well sorted sandstone. Adhesion forces, measured with the chemical force mapping (CFM) mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed a low salinity effect on the fresh feldspar surfaces. Adhesion force, measured with -COO(H)-functionalized tips, was 60% lower in artificial low salinity seawater (LS...

  19. Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) physiological, chemical and growth responses to irrigation with saline water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirich, Abdelaziz; Omari, Halima El; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    was carried out on pot experiments. Differences in water uptake and plant growth; as well as proline, soluble sugar, and Na+ and K+ contents of the plant were quantified. The results showed a negative relationship between increasing water salinity and most of the measured plant growth parameters. Irrigation...... and soluble sugars as osmolytes produced by chickpea to mitigate the effect of salinity stress. The added value of these results is that the crop's responses to salinity are quantified. The obtained values can be used to determine 'threshold values'; should the salinity of the irrigation water go above......Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the third most important food legume grown in the world and a favourite food crop in Morocco. Morocco is a semi-arid country with limited fresh water resources. In order to meet the food demand, increasing attention is being given to the use of non...

  20. Simulating the Response of Estuarine Salinity to Natural and Anthropogenic Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Paramygin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The response of salinity in Apalachicola Bay, Florida to changes in water management alternatives and storm and sea level rise is studied using an integrated high-resolution hydrodynamic modeling system based on Curvilinear-grid Hydrodynamics in 3D (CH3D, an oyster population model, and probability analysis. The model uses input from river inflow, ocean and atmospheric forcing and is verified with long-term water level and salinity data, including data from the 2004 hurricane season when four hurricanes impacted the system. Strong freshwater flow from the Apalachicola River and good connectivity of the bay to the ocean allow the estuary to restore normal salinity conditions within a few days after the passage of a hurricane. Various scenarios are analyzed; some based on observed data and others using altered freshwater inflow. For observed flow, simulated salinity agrees well with the observed values. In scenarios that reflect increased water demand (~1% upstream of the Apalachicola River, the model results show slightly (less than 5% increased salinity inside the Bay. A worst-case sea-level rise (~1 m by 2100 could increase the bay salinity by up to 20%. A hypothesis that a Sumatra gauge may not fully represent the flow into Apalachicola Bay was tested and appears to be substantiated.

  1. Differences in salinity tolerance and gene expression between two populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in response to salinity stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Foged; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Meier, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    in salinity tolerance and gene expression among Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from two populations distributed across a steep salinity gradient, we observed high mortality (45% North Sea cod and 80% Baltic Sea cod) in a reciprocal common garden setup. Quantitative RT-PCR assays for expression of hsp70 and Na....... The findings strongly suggest that Atlantic cod are adapted to local saline conditions, despite relatively low levels of neutral genetic divergence between populations...

  2. Potential nitrate removal in a coastal freshwater sediment (Haringvliet Lake, The Netherlands) and response to salinization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, A.M.; Canavan, R.W.; Slomp, C.P.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen transformations and their response to salinization were studied in bottom sediment of a coastal freshwater lake (Haringvliet Lake, The Netherlands). The lake was formed as the result of a river impoundment along the south-western coast of the Netherlands, and is currently targeted for

  3. Growth and physiological response of tall oat grass to salinity stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to evaluate the responses of tall oat grass plants to increasing salinity, we measured plant growth, ion contents, photosynthetic gas exchange, lipid peroxidation, and proline accumulation in four salt concentrations. Two tall oatgrass genotypes, ZXY03P-367 and ZXY03P-443, were grown for 14 days in greenhouse ...

  4. Intestinal response to salinity challenge in the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Jarabo, I; Barany, A; Jerez-Cepa, I; Mancera, J M; Fuentes, J

    2017-02-01

    Fish are continuously forced to actively absorb or expel water and ions through epithelia. Most studies have focused on the gill due to its role in Na+ and Cl- trafficking. However, comparatively few studies have focused on the changing function of the intestine in response to external salinity. Therefore, the present study investigated the main intestinal changes of long-term acclimation of the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) to 5, 15, 38 and 55ppt. Through the measurement of short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chambers and biochemical approaches, we described a clear anterior/posterior functional regionalization of the intestine in response to salinity. The use of specific inhibitors in Ussing chamber experiments, revealed that the bumetanide-sensitive Na+/K+/Cl- co-transporters are the main effectors of Cl- uptake in both anterior intestine and rectum. Additionally, the use of the anion exchanger specific inhibitor, DIDS, showed a salinity/region dependency of anion exchanger function. Moreover, we also described ouabain-sensitive Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) and Bafilomycin A1-sensitive H+-ATPase activities (HA), which displayed changes related to salinity and intestinal region. However, the most striking result of the present study is the description of an omeprazole-sensitive H+/K+-ATPase (HKA) in the rectum of Senegalese sole. Its activity was consistently measurable and increased at lower salinities, reaching rates even higher than those of the NKA. Together our results provide new insights into the changing role of the intestine in response to external salinity in teleost fish. The rectal activity of HKA offers an alternative/cooperative mechanism with the HA in the final processing of intestinal water absorption by apical titration of secreted bicarbonate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Variable salinity responses of 12 alfalfa genotypes and comparative expression analyses of salt-response genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twelve alfalfa genotypes that were selected for biomass under salinity, differences in Na and Cl concentrations in shoots and K/Na ratio were evaluated in this long-term salinity experiment. The selected plants were cloned to reduce genetic variability within each genotype. Salt tolerance (ST) index...

  6. Growth responses of Phragmites karka - a candidate for second generation biofuel from degraded saline lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer Ahmed, Muhammad; Shoukat, Erum; Abideen, Zainul; Aziz, Irfan; Gulzar, Salman; Ajmal Khan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Global changes like rapidly increasing population, limited fresh water resources, increasing salinity and aridity are the major causes of land degradation. Increasing feed production for bioenergy through direct and indirect land use cause major threat to biodiversity besides competing with food resources. Growing halophytes on saline lands would provide alternate source of energy without compromising food and cash crop farming. Phragmites karkahas recently emerged as a potential bio-fuel crop, which maintains optimal growth at 100 mM NaCl with high ligno-cellulosic biomass. However, temporal and organ specific plant responses under salinity needs to be understood for effective management of degraded saline lands. This study was designed to investigate variation in growth, water relations, ion-flux, damage markers, soluble sugars, stomatal stoichiometry and photosynthetic responses of P. karka to short (0-7 days) and long (15-30 days) term exposure with 0 (control), 100 (moderate) and 300 (high) mM NaCl. A reduced shoot growth ( 45%) during earlier (within 7 days) phase was observed in 300 mM NaCl compared to control and moderate salinity. Reduced leaf elongation rate and leaf senescence from 7th day in 300 mM NaCl (and later in moderate salinity) correspond to increasing hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents. Leaf turgor loss represents the osmotic effect of NaCl at both concentrations, however turgor recovered completely in moderate salinity within a week. Plant appeared to use both organic solutes (soluble sugars) and ions (Na++K++Cl-) for osmotic adjustment along with improved water use efficiency under saline conditions. Turgor loss in high salinity (300 mM NaCl) was related to increased bulk elastic modulus and decreased hydraulic capacitance which ultimately resulted in low water potential. Leaf Na+ and Cl- accumulation increased earlier (from 7th day) in 300 mM NaCl and later in 100 mM. Higher ion sequestration in different organs was found in the

  7. Morpho-physiological response of Acacia auriculiformis as influenced by seawater induced salinity stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, A.; Rahman, M.; Nihad, S.A.I.; Howlader, R.A.; Akand, M.H.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study: To evaluate the morpho-physiological changes of Acacia auriculiformis in response to seawater induced salinity stress along with its tolerance limit. Area of study: Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Bangladesh. Material and methods: Three saline treatments (4, 8, 12 dS m-1) were applied to six-month aged Acacia auriculiformis seedlings from January 2014 to June 2014 and the tap water was used as control treatment. To observe salinity effects, the following parameters were measured by using various established techniques: plant height and leaf number, plant biomass, shoot and root distribution as well as shoot and root density, water uptake capacity (WUC), water saturation deficit (WSD) and water retention capacity (WRC), exudation rate, and cell membrane stability. Main results: Diluted seawater caused a notable reduction in shoot and root distribution in addition to shoot and root density, though plant height, leaf number and plant biomass were found to be decreased to some extent compared to control plants. Water status of the plant also altered when plants were subjected to salinity stress. Nevertheless, membrane stability revealed good findings towards salinity tolerance. Research highlights: Considering the above facts, despite salinity exerts some negative effects on overall plant performance, interestingly the percent reduction value doesn’t exceed 50% as compared to control plants, and the plants were successful to tolerate salinity stress till the end of the experiment (150 days) through adopting some tolerance mechanisms. Abbreviations used: BSMRAU (Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University); RCBD (randomized complete block design); DATI (days after treatment imposition); RWC (relative water content); WUC (water uptake capacity); WSD (water saturation deficit); WRC (water retention capacity); FW (fresh weight); DW (dry weight); TW (turgid weight); ROS (reactive oxygen species). (Author)

  8. Mycorrhizal symbiosis and response of sorghum plants to combined drought and salinity stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Keunho; Toler, Heather; Lee, Jaehoon; Ownley, Bonnie; Stutz, Jean C; Moore, Jennifer L; Augé, Robert M

    2006-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis can confer increased host resistance to drought stress, although the effect is unpredictable. Since AM symbiosis also frequently increases host resistance to salinity stress, and since drought and salinity stress are often linked in drying soils, we speculated that the AM influence on plant drought response may be partially the result of AM influence on salinity stress. We tested the hypothesis that AM-induced effects on drought responses would be more pronounced when plants of comparable size are exposed to drought in salinized soils. In two greenhouse experiments, several water relations characteristics were measured in sorghum plants colonized by Glomus intraradices (Gi), Gigaspora margarita (Gm) or a mixture of AM species, during a sustained drought following exposure to salinity treatments (NaCl stress, osmotic stress via concentrated macronutrients, or soil leaching). The presence of excess salt in soils widened the difference in drought responses between AM and nonAM plants in just two instances. Days required for plants to reach stomatal closure were similar for Gi and nonAM plants exposed to drought alone, but with exposure to combined NaCl and drought stress, stomates of Gi plants remained open 17-22% longer than in nonAM plants. Promotion of stomatal conductance by Gm occurred with exposure to NaCl/drought stress but not with drought alone or with soil leaching before drought. In other instances, however, the addition of salt tended to nullify an AM-induced change in drought response. Our findings confirm that AM fungi can alter host response to drought but do not lend much support to the idea that AM-induced salt resistance might help explain why AM plants can be more resilient to drought stress than their nonAM counterparts.

  9. Effects of salinity on the immune response of an 'osmotic generalist' bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Jorge S; Abad-Gómez, José M; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M; Masero, José A

    2013-01-01

    Salt stress can suppress the immune function of fish and other aquatic animals, but such an effect has not yet been examined in air-breathing vertebrates that frequently cope with waters (and prey) of contrasting salinities. We investigated the effects of seawater salinity on the strength and cost of mounting an immune response in the dunlin Calidris alpina, a long-distance migratory shorebird that shifts seasonally from freshwater environments during the breeding season to marine environments during migration and the winter period. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced skin swelling, basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass, fat stores, and plasma ions were measured in dunlins acclimated to either freshwater or seawater (salinity: 0.3 and 35.0 ‰, respectively). Seawater-acclimated dunlins mounted a PHA-induced swelling response that was up to 56 % weaker than those held under freshwater conditions, despite ad libitum access to food. Freshwater-acclimated dunlins significantly increased their relative BMR 48 h after PHA injection, whereas seawater-acclimated dunlins did not. However, this differential immune and metabolic response between freshwater- and seawater-acclimated dunlins was not associated with significant changes in body mass, fat stores or plasma ions. Our results indicate that the strength of the immune response of this small-sized migratory shorebird was negatively influenced by the salinity of marine habitats. Further, these findings suggest that the reduced immune response observed under saline conditions might not be caused by an energy or nutrient limitation, and raise questions about the role of osmoregulatory hormones in the modulation of the immune system.

  10. Responses of prophenoloxidase system and related defence parameters of Litopenaeus vannamei to low salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Luqing; Xie, Peng; Hu, Fawen

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of low salinity (26 and 21) on the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system and related defence parameters in the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The results showed that low salinity induced a significant increase of dopamine (DA) concentration in haemolymph at 6 h of the experiment; on the other hand, total haemocyte count (THC), differential haemocyte count (DHC) and PO activity decreased over time to the lowest level at 24 h and remained low thereafter. Serine Protease (SP) and Proteinase Inhibitor (PI) activity in the two lower salinity treatments decreased to the lowest level at 12 and 24 h, respectively, and both recovered to the control level at 72 h. In contrast, α2- macroglobulin (α2M) activity in the two lower salinity treatments peaked at 24 h and then decreased to the control level at 72 h. Therefore, it may be concluded that stress-induced DA plays an important temporary role in neurotransmission and causes immune response in L. vannamei in adapting to salinity changes.

  11. Temperature and salinity effects on cadmium toxicity on lethal and sublethal responses of Amphibalanus amphitrite nauplii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Veronica; Gambardella, Chiara; Canepa, Sara; Costa, Elisa; Faimali, Marco; Garaventa, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The official protocol of an ecotoxicological assay employing larvae of the crustacean Amphibalanus amphitrite as a model organism has recently been published by the Italian regulatory authority UNICHIM. Such assay is now one of the applicable tests for water quality assessment under Italian law. While specific temperature and salinity values are recommended by ecotoxicology bioassay protocols for test set up, little information is available on response changes in case of parameter variations. In particular, information is totally lacking for this innovative model organism. Under the standard test protocol, 20°C and 37‰ temperature and salinity, respectively, are required to be set in A. amphitrite bioassay. In order to evaluate the environmental relevance of the test, laboratory experiments simulating the effect on larval responses due to variations of temperature and salinity expected in field collected samples were carried out. The effect of temperature and salinity changes on different end-points, involving increasing sensitivity levels, has been investigated, with and without the presence of cadmium nitrate, Cd(NO3)2, as a reference toxicant, to determine the possible interactions between pollutants and environmental parameters fluctuations. Three end-points - mortality, immobilization, and swimming speed alteration - were measured in order to evaluate the impact of a wide range of temperature (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40°C) and salinity values (10, 20, 30, 37, 40, 50, 60, 70‰) on response variation after 24 and 48h of exposure. For each parameter, a Non-Effect Range (NER) - namely the limit values within which no effect related to environmental parameter changes is observed - has been defined. For both parameters, NER resulted to be wider for the less sensitive end-points - such as mortality and immobilization - and for shorter exposure time (24h). Later, the same end-points have been evaluated by exposing the same organisms to a reference toxic

  12. Identification and profiling of salinity stress-responsive proteins in Sorghum bicolor seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngara, Rudo; Ndimba, Roya; Borch-Jensen, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    sorghum variety, MN1618, were planted and grown on solid MS growth medium with or without 100mM NaCl. Heat shock protein expression immunoblotting assays demonstrated that this salt treatment induced stress within natural physiological parameters for our experimental material. 2D PAGE in combination...... with MS/MS proteomics techniques were used to separate, visualise and identify salinity stress responsive proteins in young sorghum leaves. Out of 281 Coomassie stainable spots, 118 showed statistically significant responses (p...

  13. Deep sequencing analysis of transcriptomes in Aspergillus oryzae in response to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Ma, Long; Hu, Zhihong; Li, Haoran; Ai, Mingqiang; Long, Chuannan; Zeng, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Characterization of the changes after various stimuli is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to the changing condition. Aspergillus oryzae is widely used for the industrial production of soy sauce, which always encounter changes within a complex environment, such as salinity stress. However, the protective biochemical mechanisms of A. oryzae against salinity stress are poorly understood. In this study, we successfully characterized the fermentative behavior, transcriptomic profiles, and metabolite changes of A. oryzae in response to salinity stress. The results showed that salt treatment of A. oryzae inhibited the fungal development and conidia formation. Transcriptomic analysis showed an upregulated expression of the genes related to arginine accumulation and oleic acid synthesis. The results of qRT-PCR were further confirmed by the reliability and availability of the differentially expressed genes obtained from the transcriptome analysis. Metabolomic analysis revealed that the corresponding intracellular accumulation of arginine and oleic acid were also increased in response to the salinity stress. All of the results provide a global transcriptome characterization of the salt adaptation process in A. oryzae, and offer multiple target genes for salt tolerance improvement via genetic engineering.

  14. Understanding the complex nature of salinity and drought-stress response in cereals using proteomics technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngara, Rudo; Ndimba, Bongani K

    2014-03-01

    Worldwide, crop productivity is drastically reduced by drought and salinity stresses. In order to develop food crops with increased productivity in marginal areas, it is important to first understand the nature of plant stress response mechanisms. In the past decade, proteomics tools have been extensively used in the study of plants' proteome responses under experimental conditions mimicking drought and salinity stresses. A lot of proteomic data have been generated using different experimental designs. However, the precise roles of these proteins in stress tolerance are yet to be elucidated. This review summarises the applications of proteomics in understanding the complex nature of drought and salinity stress effects on plants, particularly cereals and also highlights the usefulness of sorghum as the next logical model crop for use in understanding drought and salinity tolerance in cereals. With the vast amount of proteomic data that have been generated to date, a call for integrated efforts across the agricultural, biotechnology, and molecular biology sectors is also highlighted in an effort to translate proteomics data into increased food productivity for the world's growing population. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative responses of Catharanthus roseus to salinity and biofertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônia L. R. Neves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The development of agriculture in the northeastern semi-arid region depends, at least in part, on the correct exploitation and efficient use of natural resources. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the use of saline water on morphophysiological responses and sensory analysis of ‘Boa noite’ plants (Catharanthus roseus in soil fertilized with bovine biofertilizer. A completely randomized design was used in the split plot arrangement, the plots being formed by the five irrigation water salinity levels (0.5, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 dS m-1, and the subplots by two frequencies of application of the 150 mL pot-1 of liquid bovine biofertilizer (divided into one and five times, with five replicates. The analysed variables were: leaf gas exchange relative chlorophyll index, biometry, dry matter (leaf, stems, flowers and roots and sensory analysis (general appearance and buyers’ preference. Quantitative (growth and physiological and qualitative (sensory analysis responses show that Catharanthus roseus plants can be produced using saline water at the level of 2.5 dS m-1, and the plants of this treatment were preferred by the judges in sensory analysis. Biofertilizer application frequency did not attenuate the effects of salinity. Therefore, the liquid bovine biofertilizer can be applied all at once, reducing costs.

  16. Elevated CO2and salinity are responsible for phenolics-enrichment in two differently pigmented lettuces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgherri, Cristina; Pérez-López, Usue; Micaelli, Francesco; Miranda-Apodaca, Jon; Mena-Petite, Amaia; Muñoz-Rueda, Alberto; Quartacci, Mike Frank

    2017-06-01

    Both salt stress and high CO 2 level, besides influencing secondary metabolism, can affect oxidative status of plants mainly acting in an opposite way with salinity provoking oxidative stress and elevated CO 2 alleviating it. The aim of the present work was to study the changes in the composition of phenolic acids and flavonoids as well as in the antioxidant activity in two differently pigmented lettuce cvs (green or red leaf) when submitted to salinity (200 mM NaCl) or elevated CO 2 (700 ppm) or to their combination in order to evaluate how a future global change can affect lettuce quality. Following treatments, the red cv. always maintained higher levels of antioxidant secondary metabolites as well as antioxidant activity, proving to be more responsive to altered environmental conditions than the green one. Overall, these results suggest that the application of moderate salinity or elevated CO 2 , alone or in combination, can induce the production of some phenolics that increase the health benefits of lettuce. In particular, moderate salinity was able to induce the synthesis of the flavonoids quercetin, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide and quercitrin. Phenolics-enrichment as well as a higher antioxidant capacity were also observed under high CO 2 with the red lettuce accumulating cyanidin, free chlorogenic acid, conjugated caffeic and ferulic acid as well as quercetin, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, rutin, quercitrin and kaempferol. When salinity was present in combination with elevated CO 2 , reduction in yield was prevented and a higher presence of phenolic compounds, in particular luteolin, was observed compared to salinity alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Plant behaviour under combined stress: tomato responses to combined salinity and pathogen stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yuling; Kissoudis, Christos; Yan, Zhe; Visser, Richard G F; van der Linden, Gerard

    2017-12-13

    Crop plants are subjected to a variety of stresses during their lifecycle, including abiotic stress factors such as salinity and biotic stress factors such as pathogens. Plants have developed a multitude of defense and adaption responses to these stress factors. In the field, different stress factors mostly occur concurrently resulting in a new state of stress, the combined stress. There is evidence that plant resistance to pathogens can be attenuated or enhanced by abiotic stress factors. With stress tolerance research being mostly focused on plant responses to individual stresses, the understanding of a plants' ability to adapt to combined stresses is limited. In the last few years, we studied powdery mildew resistance under salt stress conditions in the model crop plant tomato with the aim to understand the requirements to achieve plant resilience to a wider array of combined abiotic and biotic stress combinations. We uncovered specific responses of tomato plants to combined salinity-pathogen stress, which varied with salinity intensity and plant resistance genes. Moreover, hormones, with their complex regulation and cross-talk, were shown to play a key role in the adaption of tomato plants to the combined stress. In this review, we attempt to understand the complexity of plant responses to abiotic and biotic stress combinations, with a focus on tomato responses (genetic control and cross talk of signaling pathways) to combined salinity and pathogen stresses. Further, we provide recommendations on how to design novel strategies for breeding crops with a sustained performance under diverse environmental conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Salares versus coastal ecotypes of quinoa: Salinity responses in Chilean landraces from contrasting habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Karina B; Aloisi, Iris; Del Duca, Stefano; Canelo, Valentina; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Silva, Herman; Biondi, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a highly salt-tolerant species subdivided into five ecotypes and exhibiting broad intra-specific differences in tolerance levels. In a greenhouse study, Chilean landraces belonging either to the salares (R49) or coastal lowlands (VI-1, Villarrica) ecotype with contrasting agro-ecological origins were investigated for their responses to high salinity. The effects of two levels of salinity, 100 (T1) and 300 (T2) mM NaCl, on plant growth and on some physiological parameters were measured. Leaf and root Na(+) accumulation differed among landraces. T2 reduced growth and seed yield in all landraces with maximum inhibition relative to controls in R49. Salinity negatively affected chlorophyll and total polyphenol content (TPC) in VI-1 and Villarrica but not R49. Germination on saline or control media of seeds harvested from plants treated or not with NaCl was sometimes different; the best performing landrace was R49 insofar as 45-65% of seeds germinated on 500 mM NaCl-containing medium. In all landraces, average seedling root length declined strongly with increasing NaCl concentration, but roots of R49 were significantly longer than those of VI-1 and Villarrica up to 300 mM NaCl. Salt caused increases in seed TPC relative to controls, but radical scavenging capacity was higher only in seeds from T2 plants of R49. Total SDS-extractable seed proteins were resolved into distinct bands (10-70 kDa) with some evident differences between landraces. Salt-induced changes in protein patterns were landrace-specific. The responses to salinity of the salares landrace are discussed in relation to its better adaptation to an extreme environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Response of tomato plants to a step-change in root zone salinity, under two different transpiration regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Stanghellini, C.; Challa, H.

    2002-01-01

    The response of a tomato crop to a step-change in salinity was investigated under different potential transpiration conditions. A crop growing for 5 months under saline irrigation water (EC 9 dS m−1) was given thereafter a standard nutrient solution with an EC of 2 dS m−1. The previous effects of

  20. Effects of the amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuations on antioxidant responses in juvenile tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairnar, S.A.; Tian, X.; Dong, S.; Fang, Z.; Solanki, B.V.; Shanthanagouda, H.A.

    2016-11-01

    To understand the tolerance of tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis, to varying salinities, the effects of the amplitude (2, 4, 6 and 8 g/L) and frequency (2, 4 and 8 days) of salinity fluctuations on the activities of antioxidant responses, including acidic phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) from antioxidant system in liver, muscle, gills and kidney were investigated in this study. The results showed that the antioxidant responses of tongue sole were highly tissue-specific during the varying salinity fluctuations. In all tissues, ACP and AKP activity was found to be highest at moderate salinity fluctuations compared to the control, low and high salinity treatments (p<0.05). SOD and CAT activities had significant effect due to salinity fluctuations in all tissues (p<0.05), except in hepatic and renal tissues. Variations in branchial SOD activity proved that salinity fluctuations had greater impact on tongue sole at moderate and high fluctuating salinities compared to the control and low fluctuating salinities, whereas the branchial CAT activities showed contrasting trend. Further, cortisol levels were significantly affected in lower and higher salinity fluctuations. However, plasma cortisol levels remained low in moderate salinity fluctuations and control (p<0.05). Taken together, the results indicated that salinity fluctuations could effectively stimulate and enhance the antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver, kidney, gills and muscle of the juvenile tongue sole, thus effectively eliminating the excessive reactive oxygen species and minimizing the body damage in tongue sole or could be for any other euryhaline teleosts. (Author)

  1. Quinoa Seed Quality Response to Sodium Chloride and Sodium Sulfate Salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Geyang; Peterson, Adam J; Morris, Craig F; Murphy, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is an Andean crop with an edible seed that both contains high protein content and provides high quality protein with a balanced amino acid profile in embryonic tissues. Quinoa is a halophyte adapted to harsh environments with highly saline soil. In this study, four quinoa varieties were grown under six salinity treatments and two levels of fertilization, and then evaluated for quinoa seed quality characteristics, including protein content, seed hardness, and seed density. Concentrations of 8, 16, and 32 dS m(-1) of NaCl and Na2SO4, were applied to the soil medium across low (1 g N, 0.29 g P, 0.29 g K per pot) and high (3 g N, 0.85 g P, 0.86 g K per pot) fertilizer treatments. Seed protein content differed across soil salinity treatments, varieties, and fertilization levels. Protein content of quinoa grown under salinized soil ranged from 13.0 to 16.7%, comparable to that from non-saline conditions. NaCl and Na2SO4 exhibited different impacts on protein content. Whereas the different concentrations of NaCl did not show differential effects on protein content, the seed from 32 dS m(-1) Na2SO4 contained the highest protein content. Seed hardness differed among varieties, and was moderately influenced by salinity level (P = 0.09). Seed density was affected significantly by variety and Na2SO4 concentration, but was unaffected by NaCl concentration. The samples from 8 dS m(-1) Na2SO4 soil had lower density (0.66 g/cm(3)) than those from 16 dS m(-1) and 32 dS m(-1) Na2SO4, 0.74 and 0.72g/cm(3), respectively. This paper identifies changes in critical seed quality traits of quinoa as influenced by soil salinity and fertility, and offers insights into variety response and choice across different abiotic stresses in the field environment.

  2. Quinoa Seed Quality Response to Sodium Chloride and Sodium Sulfate Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geyang eWu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd. is an Andean crop with an edible seed that both contains high protein content and provides high quality protein with a balanced amino acid profile in embryonic tissues. Quinoa is a halophyte adapted to harsh environments with highly saline soil. In this study, four quinoa varieties were grown under six salinity treatments and two levels of fertilization, and then evaluated for quinoa seed quality characteristics, including protein content, seed hardness, and seed density. Concentrations of 8, 16, and 32 dS m-1 of NaCl and Na2SO4, were applied to the soil medium across low (1 g N, 0.29 g P, 0.29 g K per pot and high (3 g N, 0.85 g P, 0.86 g K per pot fertilizer treatments. Seed protein content differed across soil salinity treatments, varieties, and fertilization levels. Protein content of quinoa grown under salinized soil ranged from 13.0% to 16.7%, comparable to that from non-saline conditions. NaCl and Na2SO4 exhibited different impacts on protein content. Whereas the different concentrations of NaCl did not show differential effects on protein content, the seed from 32 dS m-1 Na2SO4 contained the highest protein content. Seed hardness differed among varieties, and was moderately influenced by salinity level (P = 0.09. Seed density was affected significantly by variety and Na2SO4 concentration, but was unaffected by NaCl concentration. The samples from 8 dS m-1 Na2SO4 soil had lower density (0.66 g/cm3 than those from 16 dS m-1 and 32 dS m-1 Na2SO4, 0.74 and 0.72g/cm3, respectively. This paper identifies changes in critical seed quality traits of quinoa as influenced by soil salinity and fertility, and offers insights into variety response and choice across different abiotic stresses in the field environment.

  3. Brain endoplasmic reticulum stress mechanistically distinguishes the saline-intake and hypertensive response to deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Fusakazu; Jo, Hiromi; Hilzendeger, Aline M; Thompson, Anthony P; Cassell, Martin D; Rutkowski, D Thomas; Davisson, Robin L; Grobe, Justin L; Sigmund, Curt D

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress has become an important mechanism in hypertension. We examined the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in mediating the increased saline-intake and hypertensive effects in response to deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt. Intracerebroventricular delivery of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid did not affect the magnitude of hypertension, but markedly decreased saline-intake in response to DOCA-salt. Increased saline-intake returned after tauroursodeoxycholic acid was terminated. Decreased saline-intake was also observed after intracerebroventricular infusion of 4-phenylbutyrate, another chemical chaperone. Immunoreactivity to CCAAT homologous binding protein, a marker of irremediable endoplasmic reticulum stress, was increased in the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus of DOCA-salt mice, but the signal was absent in control and CCAAT homologous binding protein-deficient mice. Electron microscopy revealed abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum structure (decrease in membrane length, swollen membranes, and decreased ribosome numbers) in the subfornical organ consistent with endoplasmic reticulum stress. Subfornical organ-targeted adenoviral delivery of GRP78, a resident endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, decreased DOCA-salt-induced saline-intake. The increase in saline-intake in response to DOCA-salt was blunted in CCAAT homologous binding protein-deficient mice, but these mice exhibited a normal hypertensive response. We conclude that (1) brain endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates the saline-intake, but not blood pressure response to DOCA-salt, (2) DOCA-salt causes endoplasmic reticulum stress in the subfornical organ, which when attenuated by GRP78 blunts saline-intake, and (3) CCAAT homologous binding protein may play a functional role in DOCA-salt-induced saline-intake. The results suggest a mechanistic distinction between the importance of endoplasmic reticulum stress in

  4. Effects of salinity on olfactory toxicity and behavioral responses of juvenile salmonids from copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Frank; Mudrock, Emma; Labenia, Jana; Baldwin, David

    2016-06-01

    Dissolved copper is one of the more pervasive and toxic constituents of stormwater runoff and is commonly found in stream, estuary, and coastal marine habitats of juvenile salmon. While stormwater runoff does not usually carry copper concentrations high enough to result in acute lethality, they are of concern because sublethal concentrations of copper exposure have been shown to both impair olfactory function and alter behavior in various species in freshwater. To compare these results to other environments that salmon are likely to encounter, experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of salinity on the impairment of olfactory function and avoidance of copper. Copper concentrations well within the range of those found in urban watersheds, have been shown to diminish or eliminate the olfactory response to the amino acid, l-serine in freshwater using electro-olfactogram (EOG) techniques. The olfactory responses of both freshwater-phase and seawater-phase coho and seawater-phase Chinook salmon, were tested in freshwater or seawater, depending on phase, and freshwater-phase coho at an intermediate salinity of 10‰. Both 10‰ salinity and full strength seawater protected against the effects of 50μg copper/L. In addition to impairing olfactory response, copper has also been shown to alter salmon behavior by causing an avoidance response. To determine whether copper will cause avoidance behavior at different salinities, experiments were conducted using a multi-chambered experimental tank. The circular tank was divided into six segments by water currents so that copper could be contained within one segment yet fish could move freely between them. The presence of individual fish in each of the segments was counted before and after introduction of dissolved copper (experiments were also conducted with a submerged structural element. The presence of sub-lethal levels of dissolved copper altered the behavior of juvenile Chinook salmon by inducing an avoidance

  5. Transcriptional profiling of chickpea genes differentially regulated in response to high-salinity, cold and drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Edwin CK

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated chickpea (Cicer arietinum has a narrow genetic base making it difficult for breeders to produce new elite cultivars with durable resistance to major biotic and abiotic stresses. As an alternative to genome mapping, microarrays have recently been applied in crop species to identify and assess the function of putative genes thought to be involved in plant abiotic stress and defence responses. In the present study, a cDNA microarray approach was taken in order to determine if the transcription of genes, from a set of previously identified putative stress-responsive genes from chickpea and its close relative Lathyrus sativus, were altered in chickpea by the three abiotic stresses; drought, cold and high-salinity. For this, chickpea genotypes known to be tolerant and susceptible to each abiotic stress were challenged and gene expression in the leaf, root and/or flower tissues was studied. The transcripts that were differentially expressed among stressed and unstressed plants in response to the particular stress were analysed in the context of tolerant/susceptible genotypes. Results The transcriptional change of more than two fold was observed for 109, 210 and 386 genes after drought, cold and high-salinity treatments, respectively. Among these, two, 15 and 30 genes were consensually differentially expressed (DE between tolerant and susceptible genotypes studied for drought, cold and high-salinity, respectively. The genes that were DE in tolerant and susceptible genotypes under abiotic stresses code for various functional and regulatory proteins. Significant differences in stress responses were observed within and between tolerant and susceptible genotypes highlighting the multiple gene control and complexity of abiotic stress response mechanism in chickpea. Conclusion The annotation of these genes suggests that they may have a role in abiotic stress response and are potential candidates for tolerance/susceptibility.

  6. Responses of growth, antioxidants and gene expression in smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) to various levels of salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Abigail J; Xu, Jichen; Xu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salinity is a major environmental factor limiting the productivity and quality of crop plants. While most cereal crops are salt-sensitive, several halophytic grasses are able to maintain their growth under saline conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms for salinity responses in halophytic grasses would contribute to the breeding of salt-tolerant cereal and turf species belonging to the Poaceae family. Smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) is a dominant native halophytic grass in the Hackensack Meadowlands, the coastal salt marshes located in northeastern New Jersey. The goals of this study were to examine the growth pattern of S. alterniflora in a salinity gradient and identify an optimal range of salinity for its maximal growth. The regulation of its antioxidant system and gene expression under supraoptimal salinity conditions was also investigated. Our results showed that a salinity of 4 parts per thousand (ppt) (68 mM) was most favorable for the growth of S. alterniflora, followed by a non-salt environment. S. alterniflora responded to salts in the environment by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities and the expression of stress-induced proteins such as ALDH, HVA22 and PEPC. The plant may tolerate salinity up to the concentration of sea water, but any salinity above 12 ppt retarded its growth and altered the expression of genes encoding critical proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Physiological responses of dietary tryptophan fed Labeo rohita to temperature and salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M S; Pal, A K; Sahu, N P; Ciji, A; Meena, D K; Das, P

    2013-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to elucidate the possible effects of dietary L-tryptophan (TRP) in Labeo rohita based on growth performance and physio-biochemical responses. In the experiment I, a 60-day feeding trial was carried out to elucidate the effects of dietary TRP enrichment on growth performance and physio-biochemical responses. In the experiment II, the TRP pre-fed L. rohita, from experiment I, was exposed to temperature and salinity stress to evaluate stress-mitigating efficacy of TRP. In L. rohita, dietary supplementation of TRP showed significant effect on weight gain percentage and feed conversion ratio but not on blood glucose. A significant increase in RNA content and RNA/DNA ratio upon TRP supplementation was observed and was positively correlated with growth performance. The results of experiment II indicated that weight gain percentage, serum T3 and T4 levels were significantly reduced in groups that were exposed to temperature and salinity stress and fed diets without TRP supplementation. However, dietary supplementation of TRP significantly augmented weight gain percentage in stress-exposed groups. Tryptophan supplementation helped in bringing back T3 and T4 levels comparable with control. A significant increase in superoxide dismutase, catalase, Adenosine triphosphatase, blood glucose and serum cortisol was observed in temperature- and salinity-exposed groups fed without TRP-supplemented diets. However, TRP supplementation was found to be effective in restoring the above parameters. The results of these experiments suggest that dietary TRP supplementation augments growth, lowers energy demand and helps in mitigating thermal and salinity stress in L. rohita. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Responses of the brackish-water amphipod Gammarus duebeni (crustacea) to saline sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. B.; Johnson, I.

    Soon after the openiing of the Looe sewage treatment works (Cornwall, southwest England) in 1973, it became colonized by the brackish-water amphipod Gammarus duebeni Liljeborg. The works is unusual as it operates with saline sewage and has a tidally-based pattern of salinity fluctuation (S=13 to 34). Various responses of this unique amphipod population (sewage amphipods) have been compared with G. duebeni from the adjacent Looe River estuary (estuarine amphipods) in an attempt to identify long-term responses to sewage. Sewage amphipods were significantly smaller than their estuarine equivalents; the sewage population was biased significantly to males, whereas the sex ratio of the estuarine population significantly favours females. Compared with the estuary, the consistently lower oxygen levels in the works were reflected in significant differences in metabolism. Sewage amphipods maintained high levels of activity under hypoxia ( e.g. swimming), and the higher survival and lower rates of lactic acid accumulation under anoxia than estuarine individuals. In addition, sewage amphipods recovered more rapidly from anoxia and had a lower critical oxygen tension (p c) than estuarine amphipods. Sewage amphipods are exposed to higher levels of heavy metals associated with the domestic sewage and zinc concentrations are particularly elevated in the works. Exposure to elevated zinc concentrations resulted in similar patterns of body zinc uptake for sewage and estuarine Gammarus at high (30) and low (10) salinity, with zinc regulation apparently occuring to an external threshold of 200 γmgZn·dm -3. No consistent interpopulational differences in the effect ofzinc on zinc uptake or on osmoregulation have been identified. However, sewage amphipods had higher survival at all zinc/salinity combinations compared with estuarine individuals. These indicate that sewage amphipods are adapted to the unusual combination of conditions prevailing in the treatment works and, if reproductive

  9. Chromatin changes in response to drought, salinity, heat, and cold stresses in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Myong eKim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is essential to regulate genes and genome activities. In plants, the alteration of histone modification and DNA methylation are coordinated with changes in the expression of stress-responsive genes to adapt to environmental changes. Several chromatin regulators have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stress-responsive gene networks under abiotic stress conditions. Specific histone modification sites and the histone modifiers that regulate key stress-responsive genes have been identified by genetic and biochemical approaches, revealing the importance of chromatin regulation in plant stress responses. Recent studies have also suggested that histone modification plays an important role in plant stress memory. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the regulation and alteration of histone modification (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, and SUMOylation in response to the abiotic stresses, drought, high-salinity, heat, and cold in plants.

  10. RNA-Seq analysis of salinity stress-responsive transcriptome in the liver of spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the most prominent abiotic factors, which greatly influence reproduction, development, growth, physiological and metabolic activities of fishes. Spotted sea bass (Lateolabrax maculatus, as a euryhaline marine teleost, has extraordinary ability to deal with a wide range of salinity changes. However, this species is devoid of genomic resources, and no study has been conducted at the transcriptomic level to determine genes responsible for salinity regulation, which impedes the understanding of the fundamental mechanism conferring tolerance to salinity fluctuations. Liver, as the major metabolic organ, is the key source supplying energy for iono- and osmoregulation in fish, however, little attention has been paid to its salinity-related functions but which should not be ignored. In this study, we perform RNA-Seq analysis to identify genes involved in salinity adaptation and osmoregulation in liver of spotted sea bass, generating from the fishes exposed to low and high salinity water (5 vs 30ppt. After de novo assembly, annotation and differential gene expression analysis, a total of 455 genes were differentially expressed, including 184 up-regulated and 271 down-regulated transcripts in low salinity-acclimated fish group compared with that in high salinity-acclimated group. A number of genes with a potential role in salinity adaptation for spotted sea bass were classified into five functional categories based on the gene ontology (GO and enrichment analysis, which include genes involved in metabolites and ion transporters, energy metabolism, signal transduction, immune response and structure reorganization. The candidate genes identified in L. maculates liver provide valuable information to explore new pathways related to fish salinity and osmotic regulation. Besides, the transcriptomic sequencing data supplies significant resources for identification of novel genes and further studying biological questions in spotted sea bass.

  11. Abnormal increase in urinary aquaporin-2 excretion in response to hypertonic saline in essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graffe Carolina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulation of the expression/shuttling of the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2 and the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC in renal collecting duct principal cells has been found in animal models of hypertension. We tested whether a similar dysregulation exists in essential hypertension. Methods We measured urinary excretion of AQP2 and ENaC β-subunit corrected for creatinine (u-AQP2CR, u-ENaCβ-CR, prostaglandin E2 (u-PGE2 and cyclic AMP (u-cAMP, fractional sodium excretion (FENa, free water clearance (CH2O, as well as plasma concentrations of vasopressin (AVP, renin (PRC, angiotensin II (Ang II, aldosterone (Aldo, and atrial and brain natriuretic peptide (ANP, BNP in 21 patients with essential hypertension and 20 normotensive controls during 24-h urine collection (baseline, and after hypertonic saline infusion on a 4-day high sodium (HS diet (300 mmol sodium/day and a 4-day low sodium (LS diet (30 mmol sodium/day. Results At baseline, no differences in u-AQP2CR or u-ENaCβ-CR were measured between patients and controls. U-AQP2CR increased significantly more after saline in patients than controls, whereas u-ENaCβ-CR increased similarly. The saline caused exaggerated natriuretic increases in patients during HS intake. Neither baseline levels of u-PGE2, u-cAMP, AVP, PRC, Ang II, Aldo, ANP, and BNP nor changes after saline could explain the abnormal u-AQP2CR response. Conclusions No differences were found in u-AQP2CR and u-ENaCβ-CR between patients and controls at baseline. However, in response to saline, u-AQP2CR was abnormally increased in patients, whereas the u-ENaCβ-CR response was normal. The mechanism behind the abnormal AQP2 regulation is not clarified, but it does not seem to be AVP-dependent. Clinicaltrial.gov identifier NCT00345124.

  12. Electrical and seismic response of saline permafrost soil during freeze - Thaw transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxin; Nakagawa, Seiji; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Dafflon, Baptiste; Hubbard, Susan

    2017-11-01

    We conducted laboratory studies on the geophysical signals from Arctic saline permafrost soils to help understand the physical and mechanical processes during freeze-thaw cycles. Our results revealed low electrical resistivity (freezing process, affected by concurrent changes of temperature, salinity, and ice formation. An anomalous induced polarization response was first observed during the transient period of supercooling and the onset of ice nucleation. Seismic measurements showed a characteristic maximal attenuation at the temperatures immediately below the freezing point, followed by a decrease with decreasing temperature. The calculated elastic moduli showed a non-hysteric response during the freeze - thaw cycle, which was different from the concurrently measured electrical resistivity response where a differential resistivity signal is observed depending on whether the soil is experiencing freezing or thawing. The differential electrical resistivity signal presents challenges for unfrozen water content estimation based on Archie's law. Using an improved formulation of Archie's law with a variable cementation exponent, the unfrozen water content estimation showed a large variation depending on the choice of the resistivity data during either a freezing or thawing cycle. Combining the electrical and seismic results, we suggest that, rather than a large hysteresis in the actual unfrozen water content, the shift of the resistivity response may reflect the changes of the distribution pattern of the unfrozen water (or ice) in the soil matrix during repeated freeze and thaw processes. Collectively, our results provide an improved petrophysical understanding of the physical and mechanical properties of saline permafrost during freeze - thaw transitions, and suggest that large uncertainty may exist when estimating the unfrozen water content using electrical resistivity data.

  13. Transcriptomic responses to salinity stress in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

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    Xuelin Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low salinity is one of the main factors limiting the distribution and survival of marine species. As a euryhaline species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is considered to be tolerant to relative low salinity. The genes that regulate C. gigas responses to osmotic stress were monitored using the next-generation sequencing of whole transcriptome with samples taken from gills. By RNAseq technology, transcript catalogs of up- and down-regulated genes were generated from the oysters exposed to low and optimal salinity seawater. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Through Illumina sequencing, we reported 1665 up-regulated transcripts and 1815 down-regulated transcripts. A total of 45771 protein-coding contigs were identified from two groups based on sequence similarities with known proteins. As determined by GO annotation and KEGG pathway mapping, functional annotation of the genes recovered diverse biological functions and processes. The genes that changed expression significantly were highly represented in cellular process and regulation of biological process, intracellular and cell, binding and protein binding according to GO annotation. The results highlighted genes related to osmoregulation, signaling and interactions of osmotic stress response, anti-apoptotic reactions as well as immune response, cell adhesion and communication, cytoskeleton and cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Through more than 1.5 million sequence reads and the expression data of the two libraries, the study provided some useful insights into signal transduction pathways in oysters and offered a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to hypoosmotic stress for oysters. In addition, the characterization of C. gigas transcriptome will not only provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms about the response to osmotic stress of the oysters, but also facilitate research into biological processes to find underlying physiological

  14. Transcriptomic response to thermal and salinity stress in introduced and native sympatric Palaemon caridean shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Amandine D; Smith, Steve; Green, Andy J; Rico, Ciro; Lejeusne, Christophe

    2017-10-25

    Organisms develop local adaptations to cope with spatially and temporally variable environments such as estuarine habitats, where abiotic parameters such as salinity and temperature fluctuate continuously. Studying the regulation of gene expression in a variable environment allows us to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of these adaptations and the relative roles of the genetic and plastic response. The transcriptomes of the European native Palaemon longirostris (PL) and the introduced P. macrodactylus (PM) shrimps are described and compared after an experiment simulating summer conditions in the Guadalquivir Estuary, Spain. Specimens, collected in the Guadalquivir Estuary, were maintained at a temperature and salinity of 20 °C and 5 ppt for the control, and 30 °C and 15 ppt for the stress treatment. A large amount of differential gene expression was observed: 16,013 and 2,594 for PL and PM respectively. Functionally annotated unigenes revealed some differences, with PL seemingly having to face stronger physiological stress than PM. Thus, PM seems to have greater resistance than PL under conditions of high temperature and salinity. These results constitute a step forward in the understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of genetic adaptation of native invertebrates, and alien taxa that have successfully invaded estuaries in temperate regions around the world.

  15. Mitochondrial GPX1 silencing triggers differential photosynthesis impairment in response to salinity in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Melo, Yugo; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Martins, Márcio O; Passaia, Gisele; Sousa, Rachel H V; Neto, Milton C Lima; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Silveira, Joaquim A G

    2016-08-01

    The physiological role of plant mitochondrial glutathione peroxidases is scarcely known. This study attempted to elucidate the role of a rice mitochondrial isoform (GPX1) in photosynthesis under normal growth and salinity conditions. GPX1 knockdown rice lines (GPX1s) were tested in absence and presence of 100 mM NaCl for 6 d. Growth reduction of GPX1s line under non-stressful conditions, compared with non-transformed (NT) plants occurred in parallel to increased H2 O2 and decreased GSH contents. These changes occurred concurrently with photosynthesis impairment, particularly in Calvin cycle's reactions, since photochemical efficiency did not change. Thus, GPX1 silencing and downstream molecular/metabolic changes modulated photosynthesis differentially. In contrast, salinity induced reduction in both phases of photosynthesis, which were more impaired in silenced plants. These changes were associated with root morphology alterations but not shoot growth. Both studied lines displayed increased GPX activity but H2 O2 content did not change in response to salinity. Transformed plants exhibited lower photorespiration, water use efficiency and root growth, indicating that GPX1 could be important to salt tolerance. Growth reduction of GPX1s line might be related to photosynthesis impairment, which in turn could have involved a cross talk mechanism between mitochondria and chloroplast originated from redox changes due to GPX1 deficiency. © 2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. ABA control of plant macroelement membrane transport systems in response to water deficit and high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2014-04-01

    Plant growth and productivity are adversely affected by various abiotic stressors and plants develop a wide range of adaptive mechanisms to cope with these adverse conditions, including adjustment of growth and development brought about by changes in stomatal activity. Membrane ion transport systems are involved in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis during exposure to stress and ion transport activity is regulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation networks that respond to stress conditions. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), which is produced rapidly in response to drought and salinity stress, plays a critical role in the regulation of stress responses and induces a series of signaling cascades. ABA signaling involves an ABA receptor complex, consisting of an ABA receptor family, phosphatases and kinases: these proteins play a central role in regulating a variety of diverse responses to drought stress, including the activities of membrane-localized factors, such as ion transporters. In this review, recent research on signal transduction networks that regulate the function ofmembrane transport systems in response to stress, especially water deficit and high salinity, is summarized and discussed. The signal transduction networks covered in this review have central roles in mitigating the effect of stress by maintaining plant homeostasis through the control of membrane transport systems. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Soil and plant responses from land application of saline-sodic waters: Implications of management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, G.F.; King, L.A.; Ganjegunte, G.K. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department for Renewable Resources

    2008-09-15

    Land application of co-produced waters from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells is one management option used in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana. Unfortunately the co-produced CBNG waters may be saline and/or sodic. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of irrigation with CBNG waters on soils and plants in the PRB. Soil properties and vegetation responses resulting from 1 to 4 yr of saline sodic water (electrical conductivity (EC) 1.6-4.8 dS m{sup -1} sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), 17-57 mmol L- applications were studied during 2003 and 2004 field seasons on sites (Ustic Torriorthent Haplocambid, Haplargid and Paleargid) representing native range grasslands seeded grass hayfields and alfalfa hayfields. Parameters measured from each irrigated site were compared directly with representative non-irrigated sites. Soil chemical and physical parameters including pH, EC, SAR, exchangeable sodium percent, texture, bulk density, infiltration and Darcy flux rates, were measured at various depth intervals to 120 cm. Mulitple-year applications of saline sodic water produced consistent trends of increased soil EC AND SAR values to depths of 30 cm reduced surface infiltration rates and lowered Darcy flux rates to 120 cm. Significant differences (p {le} 0.05) were determined between irrigated and non-irrigated areas for EC, SAR infiltration rates and Darcy flux (p {le} 0.10) at most sites. Saline sodic CBNG water applications significantly increased native perennial grass biomass production and cover on irrigated as compared with non-irrigated sites; however overall species evenness decreased. Biological effects were variable and complex reflecting site-specific conditions and water and soil management strategies.

  18. Growth and photosynthetic responses of the cordgrass Spartina maritima to CO2 enrichment and salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Naranjo, E; Redondo-Gómez, S; Andrades-Moreno, L; Davy, A J

    2010-10-01

    Future climatic scenarios combine increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) and rising sea levels. Spartina maritima is a C(4) halophyte that is an important pioneer and ecosystem engineer in salt marshes of the Atlantic coast of southern Europe. A glasshouse experiment investigated the combined effects on its growth and photosynthetic apparatus of approximately doubling CO(2) concentration (from 380 to 700 μmol mol(-1)) at a range of salinity (0, 171 and 510 mM NaCl). We measured relative growth rates, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic pigment concentrations, and total ash, Na(+), K(2+), Ca(2+) and N concentrations. Elevated CO(2) stimulated growth of S. maritima by c. 65% at all external salinities; this growth enhancement was associated with greater net photosynthetic rate (A) and improved leaf water relations. A increased despite a drop in stomatal conductance in response to 700 μmol mol(-1) CO(2). CO(2) and salinity had a marked overall effect on the photochemical (PSII) apparatus and the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. Φ(PSII) values at midday decreased significantly with external salinity in plants grown at 380 μmol mol(-1) CO(2); and F(v)/F(m) and Φ(PSII) values were higher at 700 μmol mol(-1) CO(2) in presence of NaCl. Plant nutrient concentrations declined under elevated CO(2), which can be ascribed to the dilution effect caused by an increase in biomass. The results suggest that the productivity S. maritima and the ecosystem services it provides will increase in likely future climatic scenarios. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Salinity changes relative to the response to anthropogenic forcing and internal variability in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Nadya; Buckley, Martha

    2017-04-01

    Over the past few decades, surface waters in the subpolar North Atlantic have experienced substantial fluctuations, including periods of rapid cooling and freshening alternating with the periods of enhanced warming, salinification, and decreased circulation of the gyre. Since these waters feed the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation, such changes have the potential to impact the global ocean circulation and future climate states. A number of potential causes for the observed changes have been suggested, including those related to the strength of the ocean circulation and heat transports, as well as other factors, such as anthropogenic aerosol forcing or changes in surface fluxes. Here we assess how the observed warming/salinification events fit into the long-term picture, focusing on variations in upper-ocean salinity. Salinification of the subpolar North Atlantic may seem counter-intuitive to the reported long-term increase in freshwater supply to the region from river discharge and ice melting, sparking debates about whether the freshening of the subpolar gyre has ceased, and whether the recent salinification, if continued, will be able to forestall the projected slowdown of the overturning circulation. Using a suite of in situ salinity observations spanning the last 60 years, modern satellite salinity observations from Aquarius and SMOS missions, and multi-decadal realizations from global climate models, we estimate the likelihood of such salinity changes in the context of the historical record, contemporary estimates, and future projections. Results are discussed in terms of the probability of occurrence of a decade-long salinification in the presence of the background freshening in response to anthropogenic forcing. In particular, computed probabilities suggest that such "unusual" salinification events are plausible under the strong influence of internal, decadal-to-interdecadal variability.

  20. Response of Brassica napus L grains to the interactive effect of salinity and salicylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salarizdah Mohammadreza

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a serious environmental problem that has negative effect on plant growth, production and photosynthesis. Fresh and dry plant weights decreases with salinity treatments. The very important role of salicylic acid (SA in response to different stress and modification and decline damages due to stresses has established in different studies. In this research, effect of grain soaking presowing in (0, 1, 1.5, 2 and 5 mM of salicylic acid (SA and NaCl (0, 4, 8 and 12 dsm-1 on canola (Brassica napus L was studied. Increasing of NaCl level reduced the germination percentage(GP, Average velocity of germination (AVG and growth parameters of 15-day old seedlings in compared to control plants. pretreated of SA in content 1mM significantly increased the germination percentage, and in contents more than of 1mM reduced the germination percentage in seeds under salinity stress. SA in content 1mM increased RWC, root and shoot of fresh weight in the stressed seedlings. Increasing of NaCl level increased Electrolyte leakage and MDA content in the stress seedling. electrolyte leakage and MDA content were markedly reduced under salt stress with SA 1mM than without. It was concluded that SA could be used as a potential growth regulator to improve salt tolerance in canola. Our observations indicate that, although SA is not essential for germination under normal growth conditions, it plays a promotive role in seed germination under high salinity by reducing oxidative damage.

  1. Transcriptome analyses reveal genotype- and developmental stage-specific molecular responses to drought and salinity stresses in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rohini; Shankar, Rama; Thakkar, Bijal; Kudapa, Himabindu; Krishnamurthy, Lakshmanan; Mantri, Nitin; Varshney, Rajeev K; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-13

    Drought and salinity are the major factors that limit chickpea production worldwide. We performed whole transcriptome analyses of chickpea genotypes to investigate the molecular basis of drought and salinity stress response/adaptation. Phenotypic analyses confirmed the contrasting responses of the chickpea genotypes to drought or salinity stress. RNA-seq of the roots of drought and salinity related genotypes was carried out under control and stress conditions at vegetative and/or reproductive stages. Comparative analysis of the transcriptomes revealed divergent gene expression in the chickpea genotypes at different developmental stages. We identified a total of 4954 and 5545 genes exclusively regulated in drought-tolerant and salinity-tolerant genotypes, respectively. A significant fraction (~47%) of the transcription factor encoding genes showed differential expression under stress. The key enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, such as carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, lipid metabolism, generation of precursor metabolites/energy, protein modification, redox homeostasis and cell wall component biogenesis, were affected by drought and/or salinity stresses. Interestingly, transcript isoforms showed expression specificity across the chickpea genotypes and/or developmental stages as illustrated by the AP2-EREBP family members. Our findings provide insights into the transcriptome dynamics and components of regulatory network associated with drought and salinity stress responses in chickpea.

  2. Response to recharge variation of thin rainwater lenses and their mixing zone with underlying saline groundwater

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    S. Eeman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In coastal zones with saline groundwater, fresh groundwater lenses may form due to infiltration of rain water. The thickness of both the lens and the mixing zone, determines fresh water availability for plant growth. Due to recharge variation, the thickness of the lens and the mixing zone are not constant, which may adversely affect agricultural and natural vegetation if saline water reaches the root zone during the growing season. In this paper, we study the response of thin lenses and their mixing zone to variation of recharge. The recharge is varied using sinusoids with a range of amplitudes and frequencies. We vary lens characteristics by varying the Rayleigh number and Mass flux ratio of saline and fresh water, as these dominantly influence the thickness of thin lenses and their mixing zone. Numerical results show a linear relation between the normalised lens volume and the main lens and recharge characteristics, enabling an empirical approximation of the variation of lens thickness. Increase of the recharge amplitude causes increase and the increase of recharge frequency causes a decrease in the variation of lens thickness. The average lens thickness is not significantly influenced by these variations in recharge, contrary to the mixing zone thickness. The mixing zone thickness is compared to that of a Fickian mixing regime. A simple relation between the travelled distance of the centre of the mixing zone position due to variations in recharge and the mixing zone thickness is shown to be valid for both a sinusoidal recharge variation and actual records of daily recharge data. Starting from a step response function, convolution can be used to determine the effect of variable recharge in time. For a sinusoidal curve, we can determine delay of lens movement compared to the recharge curve as well as the lens amplitude, derived from the convolution integral. Together the proposed equations provide us with a first order approximation of lens

  3. Response to recharge variation of thin rainwater lenses and their mixing zone with underlying saline groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeman, S.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Leijnse, A.; de Louw, P. G. B.; Maas, C.

    2012-10-01

    In coastal zones with saline groundwater, fresh groundwater lenses may form due to infiltration of rain water. The thickness of both the lens and the mixing zone, determines fresh water availability for plant growth. Due to recharge variation, the thickness of the lens and the mixing zone are not constant, which may adversely affect agricultural and natural vegetation if saline water reaches the root zone during the growing season. In this paper, we study the response of thin lenses and their mixing zone to variation of recharge. The recharge is varied using sinusoids with a range of amplitudes and frequencies. We vary lens characteristics by varying the Rayleigh number and Mass flux ratio of saline and fresh water, as these dominantly influence the thickness of thin lenses and their mixing zone. Numerical results show a linear relation between the normalised lens volume and the main lens and recharge characteristics, enabling an empirical approximation of the variation of lens thickness. Increase of the recharge amplitude causes increase and the increase of recharge frequency causes a decrease in the variation of lens thickness. The average lens thickness is not significantly influenced by these variations in recharge, contrary to the mixing zone thickness. The mixing zone thickness is compared to that of a Fickian mixing regime. A simple relation between the travelled distance of the centre of the mixing zone position due to variations in recharge and the mixing zone thickness is shown to be valid for both a sinusoidal recharge variation and actual records of daily recharge data. Starting from a step response function, convolution can be used to determine the effect of variable recharge in time. For a sinusoidal curve, we can determine delay of lens movement compared to the recharge curve as well as the lens amplitude, derived from the convolution integral. Together the proposed equations provide us with a first order approximation of lens characteristics using

  4. Response to recharge variation of thin lenses and their mixing zone with underlying saline groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeman, S.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Leijnse, A.; de Louw, P. G. B.; Maas, C.

    2012-01-01

    In coastal zones with saline groundwater, fresh groundwater lenses may form due to infiltration of rain water. The thickness of both the lens and the mixing zone, determines fresh water availability for plant growth. Due to recharge variation, the thickness of the lens and the mixing zone are not constant, which may adversely affect agricultural and natural vegetation if saline water reaches the root zone during the growing season. In this paper, we study the response of thin lenses and their mixing zone to variation of recharge. The recharge is varied using sinusoids with a range of amplitudes and frequencies. We vary lens characteristics by varying the Rayleigh number and Mass flux ratio of saline and fresh water, as these dominantly influence the thickness of thin lenses and their mixing zone. Numerical results show a linear relation between the normalized lens volume and the main lens and recharge characteristics, enabling an analytical approximation of the variation of lens thickness. Increase of the recharge amplitude causes increase, and increase of recharge frequency causes decrease in the variation of lens thickness. The average lens thickness is not significantly influenced by these variations in recharge, contrary to the mixing zone thickness. The mixing zone thickness is compared to that of a Fickian mixing regime. A simple relation between the travelled distance of the center of the mixing zone position due to variations in recharge and the mixing zone thickness is shown to be valid for both a sinusoidal recharge variation and actual records of daily recharge data. Starting from a step response function, convolution can be used to determine the effect of variable recharge in time. For a sinusoidal curve, we can determine delay of lens movement compared to the recharge curve as well as the lens amplitude, derived from the convolution integral. Together the proposed equations provide us with a first order approximation of lens characteristics using basic

  5. Effects of direct and gradual salinity exposure on carrot (Daucus carota L.) seeds and recovery response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinity is a major cause of abiotic stress in arid and semi-arid climates that substantially reduces crop yield. This study evaluated the effects of salinity on germination and early seedling growth of two carrot cultivars in vitro under varying salinity levels. Salinity was induced by incorporatin...

  6. Morphological and structural plasticity of grassland species in response to a gradient in saline-sodic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y; Song, Y; Li, G; Drake, P L; Zheng, W; Li, Z; Zhou, D

    2015-11-01

    The abundance and distribution of species can be ascribed to both environmental heterogeneity and stress tolerance, with the latter measure sometimes associated with phenotypic plasticity. Although phenotypic plasticity varies predictably in response to common forms of stress, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the response of species to high saline-sodic soils. We compared the phenotypic plasticity of three pairs of high and low saline-sodic tolerant congeners from the families Poaceae (Leymus chinensis versus L. secalinus), Fabaceae (Lespedeza davurica versus L. bicolor) and Asteraceae (Artemisia mongolica versus A. sieversiana) in a controlled pot experiment in the Songnen grassland, China. The low tolerant species, L. secalinus and A. sieversiana exhibited higher plasticity in response to soil salinity and sodicity than their paired congeners. Highly tolerant species, L. chinensis and A. mongolica, had higher values for several important morphological traits, such as shoot length and total biomass under the high saline-sodic soil treatment than their paired congeners. In contrast, congeners from the family Fabaceae, L. davurica and L. bicolor, did not exhibit significantly different plasticity in response to soil salinity and sodicity. All species held a constant reproductive effort in response to saline-sodic soil stress. The different responses between low and high tolerant species offer an explanation for the distribution patterns of these species in the Songnen grassland. Highly tolerant species showed less morphological plasticity over a range of saline-sodic conditions than their paired congeners, which may manifest as an inability to compete with co-occurring species in locations where saline-sodic soils are absent. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  7. The Salinity Responsive Mechanism of a Hydroxyproline-Tolerant Mutant of Peanut Based on Digital Gene Expression Profiling Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiongming Sui

    Full Text Available Soil salinity seriously limits plant growth and yield. Strategies have been developed for plants to cope with various environmental stresses during evolution. To screen for the broad-spectrum genes and the molecular mechanism about a hydroxyproline-tolerant mutant of peanut with enhanced salinity resistance under salinity stress, digital gene expression (DGE sequencing was performed in the leaves of salinity-resistant mutant (S2 and Huayu20 as control (S4 under salt stress. The results indicate that major transcription factor families linked to salinity stress responses (NAC, bHLH, WRKY, AP2/ERF are differentially expressed in the leaves of peanut under salinity stress. In addition, genes related to cell wall loosening and stiffening (xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases, peroxidases, lipid transfer protein, expansin, extension, late embryogenesis abundant protein family, fatty acid biosynthesis and metabolism (13-lipoxygenase omega-6 fatty acid desaturase, omega-3 fatty acid desaturase and some previously reported stress-related genes encoding proteins such as defensin, universal stress protein, metallothionein, peroxidase etc, and some other known or unknown function stress related genes, have been identified. The information from this study will be useful for further research on the mechanism of salinity resistance and will provide a useful genomic resource for the breeding of salinity resistance variety in peanut.

  8. Genetic variation of transgenerational plasticity of offspring germination in response to salinity stress and the seed transcriptome of Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Wendy T; Chang, Peter L; Moriuchi, Ken S; Friesen, Maren L

    2015-04-01

    Transgenerational plasticity provides phenotypic variation that contributes to adaptation. For plants, the timing of seed germination is critical for offspring survival in stressful environments, as germination timing can alter the environmental conditions a seedling experiences. Stored seed transcripts are important determinants of seed germination, but have not previously been linked with transgenerational plasticity of germination behavior. In this study we used RNAseq and growth chamber experiments of the model legume M. trucantula to test whether parental exposure to salinity stress influences the expression of stored seed transcripts and early offspring traits and test for genetic variation. We detected genotype-dependent parental environmental effects (transgenerational plasticity) on the expression levels of stored seed transcripts, seed size, and germination behavior of four M. truncatula genotypes. More than 50% of the transcripts detected in the mature, ungerminated seed transcriptome were annotated as regulating seed germination, some of which are involved in abiotic stress response and post-embryonic development. Some genotypes showed increased seed size in response to parental exposure to salinity stress, but no parental environmental influence on germination timing. In contrast, other genotypes showed no seed size differences across contrasting parental conditions but displayed transgenerational plasticity for germimation timing, with significantly delayed germination in saline conditions when parental plants were exposed to salinity. In genotypes that show significant transgenerational plastic germination response, we found significant coexpression networks derived from salt responsive transcripts involved in post-transcriptional regulation of the germination pathway. Consistent with the delayed germination response to saline conditions in these genotypes, we found genes associated with dormancy and up-regulation of abscisic acid (ABA). Our results

  9. Capturing Arabidopsis root architecture dynamics with ROOT-FIT reveals diversity in responses to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkowska, Magdalena M; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Mol, Selena; Feron, Richard; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Haring, Michel A; Testerink, Christa

    2014-11-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles in water extraction efficiency and ion exclusion. To establish which RSA parameters are responsive to salt stress, we performed a detailed time course experiment in which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings were grown on agar plates under different salt stress conditions. We captured RSA dynamics with quadratic growth functions (root-fit) and summarized the salt-induced differences in RSA dynamics in three growth parameters: MR elongation, average LR elongation, and increase in number of LRs. In the ecotype Columbia-0 accession of Arabidopsis, salt stress affected MR elongation more severely than LR elongation and an increase in LRs, leading to a significantly altered RSA. By quantifying RSA dynamics of 31 different Arabidopsis accessions in control and mild salt stress conditions, different strategies for regulation of MR and LR meristems and root branching were revealed. Different RSA strategies partially correlated with natural variation in abscisic acid sensitivity and different Na(+)/K(+) ratios in shoots of seedlings grown under mild salt stress. Applying root-fit to describe the dynamics of RSA allowed us to uncover the natural diversity in root morphology and cluster it into four response types that otherwise would have been overlooked. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Soil and plant responses from land application of saline-sodic waters: implications of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, George F; King, Lyle A; Ganjegunte, Girisha K

    2008-01-01

    Land application of co-produced waters from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells is one management option used in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana. Unfortunately, the co-produced CBNG waters may be saline and/or sodic. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of irrigation with CBNG waters on soils and plants in the PRB. Soil properties and vegetation responses resulting from 1 to 4 yr of saline-sodic water (electrical conductivity [EC], 1.6-4.8 dS m(-1); sodium adsorption ratio [SAR], 17-57 mmol(1/2) L(-1/2)) applications were studied during 2003 and 2004 field seasons on sites (Ustic Torriorthent, Haplocambid, Haplargid, and Paleargid) representing native range grasslands, seeded grass hayfields, and alfalfa hayfields. Parameters measured from each irrigated site were compared directly with representative non-irrigated sites. Soil chemical and physical parameters, including pH, EC, SAR, exchangeable sodium percent, texture, bulk density, infiltration, and Darcy flux rates, were measured at various depth intervals to 120 cm. Multiple-year applications of saline-sodic water produced consistent trends of increased soil EC and SAR values to depths of 30 cm, reduced surface infiltration rates, and lowered Darcy flux rates to 120 cm. Significant differences (p sodic CBNG water applications significantly increased native perennial grass biomass production and cover on irrigated as compared with non-irrigated sites; however, overall species evenness decreased. Biological effects were variable and complex, reflecting site-specific conditions and water and soil management strategies.

  11. The transcriptome of the novel dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Alveolata: Dinophyceae: response to salinity examined by 454 sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagnes David JS

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina is increasingly studied in experimental, ecological and evolutionary contexts. Its basal phylogenetic position within the dinoflagellates make O. marina useful for understanding the origin of numerous unusual features of the dinoflagellate lineage; its broad distribution has lent O. marina to the study of protist biogeography; and nutritive flexibility and eurytopy have made it a common lab rat for the investigation of physiological responses of marine heterotrophic flagellates. Nevertheless, genome-scale resources for O. marina are scarce. Here we present a 454-based transcriptome survey for this organism. In addition, we assess sequence read abundance, as a proxy for gene expression, in response to salinity, an environmental factor potentially important in determining O. marina spatial distributions. Results Sequencing generated ~57 Mbp of data which assembled into 7, 398 contigs. Approximately 24% of contigs were nominally identified by BLAST. A further clustering of contigs (at ≥ 90% identity revealed 164 transcript variant clusters, the largest of which (Phosphoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide synthase was composed of 28 variants displaying predominately synonymous variation. In a genomic context, a sample of 5 different genes were demonstrated to occur as tandem repeats, separated by short (~200-340 bp inter-genic regions. For HSP90 several intergenic variants were detected suggesting a potentially complex genomic arrangement. In response to salinity, analysis of 454 read abundance highlighted 9 and 20 genes over or under expressed at 50 PSU, respectively. However, 454 read abundance and subsequent qPCR validation did not correlate well - suggesting that measures of gene expression via ad hoc analysis of sequence read abundance require careful interpretation. Conclusion Here we indicate that tandem gene arrangements and the occurrence of multiple transcribed

  12. Responses of three tomato cultivars to sea water salinity 1. Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of sea water salinity (1500, 2500 and 3500 ppm) on the growth of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cultivars (Trust, Grace and Plitz) was studied. The sea water salinity delayed seed germination and reduced germination percentage especially with increasing salinity level. Chlorophyll b content was higher than ...

  13. Ultrastructural and physiological responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plantlets to gradient saline stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui-Juan; Yang, Hong-Yu; Bai, Jiang-Ping; Liang, Xin-Yue; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Jun-Lian; Wang, Di; Zhang, Jin-Lin; Niu, Shu-Qi; Chen, Ying-Long

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that impacts plant growth and reduces the productivity of field crops. Compared to field plants, test tube plantlets offer a direct and fast approach to investigate the mechanism of salt tolerance. Here we examined the ultrastructural and physiological responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. c.v. “Longshu No. 3”) plantlets to gradient saline stress (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mM NaCl) with two consequent observations (2 and 6 weeks, respectively). The results showed that, with the increase of external NaCl concentration and the duration of treatments, (1) the number of chloroplasts and cell intercellular spaces markedly decreased, (2) cell walls were thickened and even ruptured, (3) mesophyll cells and chloroplasts were gradually damaged to a complete disorganization containing more starch, (4) leaf Na and Cl contents increased while leaf K content decreased, (5) leaf proline content and the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) increased significantly, and (6) leaf malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased significantly and stomatal area and chlorophyll content decline were also detected. Severe salt stress (200 mM NaCl) inhibited plantlet growth. These results indicated that potato plantlets adapt to salt stress to some extent through accumulating osmoprotectants, such as proline, increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as CAT and SOD. The outcomes of this study provide ultrastructural and physiological insights into characterizing potential damages induced by salt stress for selecting salt-tolerant potato cultivars. PMID:25628634

  14. Osmoregulatory response of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) to changes in environmental salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Francisco J; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Martín del Río, María P; Mancera, Juan M

    2007-10-01

    The osmoregulatory response of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup 1858) to 14-day exposure and throughout 17-day exposure to different environmental salinities was investigated. A linear relationship was observed between environmental salinity and gill Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity whereas kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity was unaffected. Two osmoregulatory periods could be distinguished according to variations in plasma osmolality: an adjustment period and a chronic regulatory period. No major changes in plasma osmolality and ions levels were registered at the end of the 14- to 17-day exposure period, indicating an efficient adaptation of the osmoregulatory system. Plasma levels of glucose and lactate were elevated in hypersaline water, indicating the importance of these energy substrates in these environments. Glucose was increased during hyper-osmoregulation but only in the adjustment period. Cortisol proved to be a good indicator of chronic stress and stress induced by transfer to the different osmotic conditions. This work shows that S. senegalensis is able to acclimate to different osmotic conditions during short-term exposure.

  15. Vegetation response to soil salinity and waterlogging in three saltmarsh hydrosequences through macronutrients distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferronato, Chiara; Speranza, Maria; Ferroni, Lucia; Buscaroli, Alessandro; Vianello, Gilmo; Vittori Antisari, Livia

    2018-01-01

    Saltmarshes consist of soil hydrosequences, where the complex interactions between water tide fluctuations, soil physicochemical properties and plant colonization contribute to the triggering of the pedogenetic processes and consequently to the stability of the saltmarsh edges. In this study, the composition and richness of the vegetation cover were investigated along soil transects in three different saltmarshes. With the aim to investigate the response of the vegetation to the soil hydroperiod and its influence on the availability of soil nutrients, plant and soil samples were collected in four representative sites on each saltmarsh transect (hydrosequence). Among the different species of saltmarshes, L. vulgare and S. europaea colonized intertidal areas, where an accumulation of nutrients (Ca, K, P, S and Na) and organic C and total N (OC and TN, respectively) was found. These intertidal areas are the "critical transition zones", which drive the transition between the terrestrial and the aquatic systems along the increase of soil salinity and water saturation. Among the different element cycles analysed in the soil-plant system, the analysis of the Na and S dynamic, through both bioconcentration and translocation indexes, explains the different adaptation mechanisms to different salinity and waterlogging stressors. The limiting of the species areal was generally associated firstly with a decrease in their Na and S bioconcentration factor and, to a lesser extent, with the increase in their Na and S translocation.

  16. Long Term Salinity Stress Reveals Variety Specific Differences in Root Oxidative Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad SENADHEERA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinity stress induces oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS: superoxide radicals, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and hydroxyl radicals. Activities of both enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidant system and related growth parameters were studied in the roots of the salt tolerant rice variety FL478 and the sensitive variety IR29 in response to long term stress (12 d induced by 50 mmol/L NaCl. The comparative study showed that FL478 maintained higher relative growth rate and lower Na+/K+ in the roots than IR29 due to a higher membrane stability index that effectively exclude Na+. Lower TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance content in FL478 roots indicated that its membrane was relatively unaffected by ROS despite high H2O2 content recorded under the salinity stress. Relatively higher superoxide dismutase activity along with a parallel increase in transcript level of superoxide dismutase (Os07g46990 in FL478 indicated that this protein might make a vital contribution to salt stress tolerance. Although the content of ascorbic acid remained unchanged in FL478, the activity of ascorbic peroxidases (APOXs was reduced comparably in the both varieties. Transcriptomic data showed that a larger number of peroxidase genes were upregulated in FL478 compared to IR29 and several of which might provide engineering targets to improve rice salt tolerance.

  17. Growth, Physiological, Biochemical, and Ionic Responses of Morus alba L. Seedlings to Various Salinity Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mulberry (Morus alba L., a moderately salt-tolerant tree species, is considered to be economically important. In this study, 1-year-old mulberry seedlings cultivated in soil under greenhouse conditions were treated with five concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCl; 0%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, and 0.5% for 3 and 21 days. Plant growth parameters were not affected by 0.1% NaCl, but significant reductions were observed after treatment with 0.2%, 0.3%, and 0.5% NaCl. The malondialdehyde content and cell membrane stability of mulberry seedlings exposed to 0.1% NaCl did not change, indicating that mulberry is not significantly affected by low-salinity conditions. The Na contents of various organs did not increase significantly in response to 0.1% NaCl, but the K:Na, Mg:Na, and Ca:Na ratios of various organs were affected by NaCl. Marked changes in the levels of major compatible solutes (proline, soluble sugars, and soluble proteins occurred in both the leaves and roots of NaCl-treated seedlings relative to control seedlings. Under severe saline conditions (0.5% NaCl, the ability of mulberry to synthesize enzymatic antioxidants may be impaired.

  18. Transcriptome analysis of Crossostephium chinensis provides insight into the molecular basis of salinity stress responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Yang

    Full Text Available Soil salinization is becoming a limitation to the utilization of ornamental plants worldwide. Crossostephium chinensis (Linnaeus Makino is often cultivated along the southeast coast of China for its desirable ornamental qualities and high salt tolerance. However, little is known about the genomic background of the salt tolerance mechanism in C. chinensis. In the present study, we used Illumina paired-end sequencing to systematically investigate leaf transcriptomes derived from C. chinensis seedlings grown under normal conditions and under salt stress. A total of 105,473,004 bp of reads were assembled into 163,046 unigenes, of which 65,839 (40.38% of the total and 54,342 (33.32% of the total were aligned in Swiss-Prot and Nr protein, respectively. A total of 11,331 (6.95% differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified among three comparisons, including 2,239 in 'ST3 vs ST0', 5,880 in 'ST9 vs ST3' and 9,718 in 'ST9 vs ST0', and they were generally classified into 26 Gene Ontology terms and 58 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway terms. Many genes encoding important transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, MYB, and AP2/EREBP and proteins involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, plant hormone signal transduction, amino acid biosynthesis, plant-pathogen interactions and carbohydrate metabolism, among others, were substantially up-regulated under salt stress. These genes represent important candidates for studying the salt-response mechanism and molecular biology of C. chinensis and its relatives. Our findings provide a genomic sequence resource for functional genetic assignments in C. chinensis. These transcriptome datasets will help elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for salt-stress tolerance in C. chinensis and facilitate the breeding of new stress-tolerant cultivars for high-saline areas using this valuable genetic resource.

  19. Response of Chlorophyll, Carotenoid and SPAD-502 Measurement to Salinity and Nutrient Stress in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Haleem Shah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress can alter key physiological constituents and functions in green plants. Improving the capacity to monitor this response in a non-destructive manner is of considerable interest, as it would offer a direct means of initiating timely corrective action. Given the vital role that plant pigments play in the photosynthetic process and general plant physiological condition, their accurate estimation would provide a means to monitor plant health and indirectly determine stress response. The aim of this work is to evaluate the response of leaf chlorophyll and carotenoid (Ct content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. to changes in varying application levels of soil salinity and fertilizer applied over a complete growth cycle. The study also seeks to establish and analyze relationships between measurements from a SPAD-502 instrument and the leaf pigments, as extracted at the anthesis stage. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted in triplicate by employing distinct treatments of both soil salinity and fertilizer dose at three levels. Results showed that higher doses of fertilizer increased the content of leaf pigments across all levels of soil salinity. Likewise, increasing the level of soil salinity significantly increased the chlorophyll and Ct content per leaf area at all levels of applied fertilizer. However, as an adaptation process and defense mechanism under salinity stress, leaves were found to be thicker and narrower. Thus, on a per-plant basis, increasing salinity significantly reduced the chlorophyll (Chlt and Ct produced under each fertilizer treatment. In addition, interaction effects of soil salinity and fertilizer application on the photosynthetic pigment content were found to be significant, as the higher amounts of fertilizer augmented the detrimental effects of salinity. A strong positive (R2 = 0.93 and statistically significant (p < 0.001 relationship between SPAD-502 values and Chlt and between SPAD-502 values and Ct content

  20. Response of Chlorophyll, Carotenoid and SPAD-502 Measurement to Salinity and Nutrient Stress in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Syed Haleem

    2017-09-12

    Abiotic stress can alter key physiological constituents and functions in green plants. Improving the capacity to monitor this response in a non-destructive manner is of considerable interest, as it would offer a direct means of initiating timely corrective action. Given the vital role that plant pigments play in the photosynthetic process and general plant physiological condition, their accurate estimation would provide a means to monitor plant health and indirectly determine stress response. The aim of this work is to evaluate the response of leaf chlorophyll and carotenoid (C-t) content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to changes in varying application levels of soil salinity and fertilizer applied over a complete growth cycle. The study also seeks to establish and analyze relationships between measurements from a SPAD-502 instrument and the leaf pigments, as extracted at the anthesis stage. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted in triplicate by employing distinct treatments of both soil salinity and fertilizer dose at three levels. Results showed that higher doses of fertilizer increased the content of leaf pigments across all levels of soil salinity. Likewise, increasing the level of soil salinity significantly increased the chlorophyll and Ct content per leaf area at all levels of applied fertilizer. However, as an adaptation process and defense mechanism under salinity stress, leaves were found to be thicker and narrower. Thus, on a per-plant basis, increasing salinity significantly reduced the chlorophyll (Chl(t)) and Ct produced under each fertilizer treatment. In addition, interaction effects of soil salinity and fertilizer application on the photosynthetic pigment content were found to be significant, as the higher amounts of fertilizer augmented the detrimental effects of salinity. A strong positive (R-2 = 0.93) and statistically significant (p < 0.001) relationship between SPAD-502 values and Chlt and between SPAD-502 values and Ct content (R-2 = 0

  1. Soil salinity and matric potential interaction on water use, water use efficiency and yield response factor of bean and wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataar, Mahnaz; Mohhamadi, Mohammad Hossien; Shabani, Farzin

    2018-02-08

    We studied the effects of soil matric potential and salinity on the water use (WU), water use efficiency (WUE) and yield response factor (Ky), for wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Mahdavi) and bean (Phaseoulus vulgaris cv. COS16) in sandy loam and clay loam soils under greenhouse conditions. Results showed that aeration porosity is the predominant factor controlling WU, WUE, Ky and shoot biomass (Bs) at high soil water potentials. As matric potential was decreased, soil aeration improved, with Bs, WU and Ky reaching maximum value at -6 to -10 kPa, under all salinities. Wheat WUE remained almost unchanged by reduction of matric potential under low salinities (EC ≤ 8 dSm-1), but increased under higher salinities (EC ≥ 8 dSm-1), as did bean WUE at all salinities, as matric potential decreased to -33 kPa. Wheat WUE exceeds that of bean in both sandy loam and clay loam soils. WUE of both plants increased with higher shoot/root ratio and a high correlation coefficient exists between them. Results showed that salinity decreases all parameters, particularly at high potentials (h = -2 kPa), and amplifies the effects of waterlogging. Further, we observed a strong relationship between transpiration (T) and root respiration (Rr) for all experiments.

  2. Contrasting responses of salinity-stressed salt-tolerant and intolerant winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars to ozone pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y H; Li, X; Li, Y G; Miao, B H; Xu, H; Simmons, M; Yang, X H

    2012-03-01

    Contrasting winter wheat cultivars, salt-tolerant DK961 and intolerant JN17, which sown in no salinity (-S) and salinity (+S) boxes were exposed to charcoal filtered air (CF) and elevated O(3) (+O(3)) in open top chambers (OTCs) for 30 days. In -S DK961 and JN17 plants, +O(3) DK961 and JN17 plants had significantly lower light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (A(sat), 26% and 24%), stomatal conductance (g(s), 20% and 32%) and chlorophyll contents (10% and 21%), while O(3) considerably increased foliar electrolyte leakage (13% and 39%), malondialdehyde content (9% and 23%), POD activity and ABA content. However, responses of these parameters to O(3) were significant in DK961 but not in JN17 in +S treatment. Correlation coefficient of DK961 reached significance level of 0.01, but it was not significant in JN17 under interaction of O(3) and salinity. O(3)-induced reductions were larger in shoot than in root in both cultivars. Results indicate that the salt-tolerant cultivar sustained less damage from salinity than did the intolerant cultivar but was severely injured by O(3) under +S condition. Therefore, selecting for greater salt tolerance may not lead to the expected gains in yield in areas of moderate (100 mM) salinity when O(3) is present in high concentrations. In contrast, salinity-induced stomatal closure effectively reduced sensitivity to O(3) in the salt-intolerant cultivar. Hence we suggest salt-tolerant winter wheat cultivars might be well adapted to areas of high (>100 mM) salinity and O(3) stress, while intolerant cultivars might be adaptable to areas of mild/moderate salinity but high O(3) pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell type-specific responses to salinity - the epidermal bladder cell transcriptome of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dong-Ha; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Pantoja, Omar; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J; Dassanayake, Maheshi

    2015-08-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant) exhibits extreme tolerance to salt. Epidermal bladder cells (EBCs), developing on the surface of aerial tissues and specialized in sodium sequestration and other protective functions, are critical for the plant's stress adaptation. We present the first transcriptome analysis of EBCs isolated from intact plants, to investigate cell type-specific responses during plant salt adaptation. We developed a de novo assembled, nonredundant EBC reference transcriptome. Using RNAseq, we compared the expression patterns of the EBC-specific transcriptome between control and salt-treated plants. The EBC reference transcriptome consists of 37 341 transcript-contigs, of which 7% showed significantly different expression between salt-treated and control samples. We identified significant changes in ion transport, metabolism related to energy generation and osmolyte accumulation, stress signalling, and organelle functions, as well as a number of lineage-specific genes of unknown function, in response to salt treatment. The salinity-induced EBC transcriptome includes active transcript clusters, refuting the view of EBCs as passive storage compartments in the whole-plant stress response. EBC transcriptomes, differing from those of whole plants or leaf tissue, exemplify the importance of cell type-specific resolution in understanding stress adaptive mechanisms. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Physiological response in the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to variable salinity and oxygen conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgreen, Kim; Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms involved in acclimation to variable salinity and oxygen levels and their interaction were studied in European flounder. The fish were acclimated for two weeks to freshwater (1 ‰ salinity), brackish water (11 ‰) or full strength seawater (35 ‰) under normoxic conditions...... (water Po2 = 158 mmHg) and then subjected to 48 h of continued normoxia or hypoxia at a level (Po2 = 54 mmHg) close to but above the critical Po2. Plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] increased with increasing salinity, but the rises were limited, reflecting an effective extracellular osmoregulation....... Muscle water content was the same at all three salinities, indicating complete cell volume regulation. Gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity did not change with salinity, but hypoxia caused a 25 % decrease in branchial Na+/K+-ATPase activity at all three salinities. Furthermore, hypoxia induced a significant...

  5. The combined effect of salinity and heat reveals a specific physiological, biochemical and molecular response in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Rosa M; Mestre, Teresa C; Mittler, Ron; Rubio, Francisco; Garcia-Sanchez, Francisco; Martinez, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have described the response mechanisms of plants to salinity and heat applied individually; however, under field conditions some abiotic stresses often occur simultaneously. Recent studies revealed that the response of plants to a combination of two different stresses is specific and cannot be deduced from the stresses applied individually. Here, we report on the response of tomato plants to a combination of heat and salt stress. Interestingly, and in contrast to the expected negative effect of the stress combination on plant growth, our results show that the combination of heat and salinity provides a significant level of protection to tomato plants from the effects of salinity. We observed a specific response of plants to the stress combination that included accumulation of glycine betaine and trehalose. The accumulation of these compounds under the stress combination was linked to the maintenance of a high K(+) concentration and thus a lower Na(+) /K(+) ratio, with a better performance of the cell water status and photosynthesis as compared with salinity alone. Our findings unravel new and unexpected aspects of the response of plants to stress combination and provide a proposed list of enzymatic targets for improving crop tolerance to the abiotic field environment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Involvement of the plant antioxidative response in the differential growth sensitivity to salinity of leaves vs roots during cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Nirit; Shoresh, Michal; Xu, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2010-10-15

    Sensitivity to salinity varies between plant organs and between cells of different developmental stages within a single organ. The physiological and molecular bases for the differential responses are not known. Exposure of plants to salinity is known to induce formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are involved in damage mechanisms but also in cell growth processes. The objective of this study was to elucidate developmental-stage-specific and organ-specific involvement of oxidative defense in the plant response to salinity in maize (Zea mays L.). Plants were grown in nutrient solution containing 1mM NaCl (control) or 80mM NaCl. The oxidative stress response and damage symptoms along the cell developmental gradient in growing and mature tissue of leaves and roots were examined. Unlike leaves, roots did not suffer oxidative damage in either growing or mature cells and demonstrated reduced antioxidant response. This may reflect different requirements of ROS for growth mechanisms of leaf and root cells. In leaves, growing tissue demonstrated higher stimulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity under salinity than mature tissue, whereas mature tissue demonstrated higher stimulation of catalase. These results indicate differential roles for these ROS-scavenging enzymes at different cell developmental stages. Because ROS are required for cell expansion, the higher increase in SOD and APX activities in the growing leaf cells that resulted in reduction of ROS content under salinity could lead to the inhibition of cell growth under salinity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Using transcriptomics to identify differential gene expression in response to salinity among Australian Phragmites australis clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Donald Holmes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Common Reed (Phragmites australis is a frequent component of inland, and coastal, wetlands in temperate zones worldwide. Ongoing environmental changes have resulted in the decline of this species in many areas and invasive expansion in others. In the Gippsland Lakes coastal waterway system in south-eastern Australia, increasing salinity is thought to have contributed to the loss of fringing P. australis reed beds leading to increased shoreline erosion. A major goal of restoration in this waterway is to address the effect of salinity by planting a genetically-diverse range of salt-tolerant P. australis lineages. This has prompted an interest in examining the variation in salinity tolerance among lineages and the underlying basis of this variation. Transcriptomics is an approach for identifying variation in genes and their expression levels associated with the exposure of plants to environmental stressors. In this paper we present initial results of the first comparative culm transcriptome analysis of P. australis clones. After sampling plants from sites of varied surface water salinity across the Gippsland Lakes, replicates from three clones from highly saline sites (>18 g L-1 TDS and three from low salinity sites (<6 g L-1 were grown in containers irrigated with either fresh (<0.1 g L-1 or saline water (16 g L-1. An RNA-Seq protocol was used to generate sequence data from culm tissues from the 12 samples allowing an analysis of differential gene expression. Among the key findings, we identified several genes uniquely up- or down-regulated in clones from highly saline sites when irrigated with saline water relative to clones from low salinity sites. These included the relative higher expression levels of genes associated with photosynthesis and lignan biosynthesis indicative of a greater ability of these clones to maintain growth under saline conditions. Combined with growth data from a parallel study, our data suggests local adaptation of

  8. Study of phytohormone profile and oxidative metabolism as key process to identification of salinity response in tomato commercial genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-González, Alejandro; Navarro-León, Eloy; Albacete, Alfonso; Blasco, Begoña; Ruiz, Juan M

    2017-09-01

    Climatic change, intensive agriculture, and worsening water quality induce abiotic stress conditions for plants. Among these factors, salinity stress is a limit factor for plant growth. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the phytohormones role and oxidative metabolism in response to salt stress of two genotypes of tomato cv. Grand Brix and cv. Marmande RAF, the crops were carried out in a growth chamber. Salinity stress reduces biomass and relative growth rate (RGR) in both genotypes, this effect being greater in cv. Marmande RAF. These results, together with main stress indicator response, the O 2 .- , indicate that cv. Marmande RAF is more sensitive to Saline stress. Grand Brix showed less oxidative stress, because it presented greater detoxification of the O 2 - , due to SOD enzyme activity induction and greater antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, Grand Brix has a better hormonal profile adapted to salt stress resistance, the accumulation of IAA, GA4 and CKs and their beneficial role against oxidative stress could make the difference between resistance and sensitivity to salt stress. On the other hand, a lower ACC concentration, ethylene precursor, combined with a greater O 2 .- detoxification in the cv. Grand Brix could play a fundamental role in tolerance to saline stress. Besides, an increase in ABA levels promotes better stomatal closure, better photosynthesis control and a lower rate of water loss. This data could be essential to select plants with greater resistance to saline stress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Comparative sodium transport patterns provide clues for understanding salinity and metal responses in aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibener, S A; Richardi, V S; Buchwalter, D B

    2016-02-01

    The importance of insects in freshwater ecosystems has led to their extensive use in ecological monitoring programs. As freshwater systems are increasingly challenged by salinization and metal contamination, it is important to understand fundamental aspects of aquatic insect physiology (e.g., osmoregulatory processes) that contribute to insect responses to these stressors. Here we compared the uptake dynamics of Na as NaCl, NaHCO3 and Na2SO4 in the caddisfly Hydropsyche betteni across a range of Na concentrations (0.06-15.22 mM) encompassing the vast majority of North American freshwater ecosystems. Sulfate as the major anion resulted in decreased Na uptake rates relative to the chloride and bicarbonate salts. A comparison of Na (as NaHCO3) turnover rates in the caddisfly Hydropsyche sparna and the mayfly Maccaffertium sp. revealed different patterns in the 2 species. Both species appeared to tightly regulate their whole body sodium concentrations (at ∼47±1.8 μmol/g wet wt) across a range of Na concentrations (0.06-15.22 mM) over 7 days. However, at the highest Na concentration (15.22 mM), Na uptake rates in H. sparna (419.1 μM Na g(-1) hr(-1) wet wt) appeared close to saturation while Na uptake rates in Maccaffertium sp. were considerably faster (715 g μM Na g(-1) hr(-1) wet wt) and appeared to not be close to saturation. Na efflux studies in H. sparna revealed that loss rates are commensurate with uptake rates and are responsive to changes in water Na concentrations. A comparison of Na uptake rates (at 0.57 mM Na) across 9 species representing 4 major orders (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera and Diptera) demonstrated profound physiological differences across species after accounting for the influence of body weight. Faster Na uptake rates were associated with species described as being sensitive to salinization in field studies. The metals silver (Ag) and copper (Cu), known to be antagonistic to Na uptake in other aquatic taxa did not generally

  10. Early life history responses of tidal wetland plants to sea-level rise and salinization in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change is likely to alter the spatial distribution of abiotic gradients in estuaries, potentially increasing stress in tidal wetland plants. Using field and lab manipulations, we examined inter-specific variation in responses to elevated salinity and inundation in the Ore...

  11. The proteome response of salt-resistant and salt-sensitive barley genotypes to long-term salinity stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatehi, F.; Hosseinzadeh, A.; Alizadeh, H.; Brimavandi, T.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Responses of plants to salinity stress and the development of salt tolerance are extremely complex. Proteomics is a powerful technique to identify proteins associated with a particular environmental or developmental signal. We employed a proteomic approach to further understand the mechanism of

  12. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) modulates its proteome differentially in response to salinity, cadmium and their combination stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Rita; Bashir, Humayra; Ahmad, Javed; Iqbal, Muhammad; Qureshi, M Irfan

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination and salinity are common stressors in agricultural soils all over the globe. Sensitivity and modulation of plant proteome lead to proper signal execution and adaptation to abiotic stress via molecular responses, which strengthen plant defence system. A comparative proteomic study, employing 2DE-MALDI TOF/TOF MS, of Spinacia oleracea plants exposed to cadmium (50 μg CdCl2 g(-1) soil), salinity (10 mg NaCl g(-1) soil) and their combination (NaCl + Cd) was conducted to understand the minimum common adaptation to multiple stress. Analysis of 2D gel maps showed significant increase and decrease in relative abundance of 14 and 39 proteins by Cd; 11 and 46 by salinity and 22 and 37 by combined stress of Cd and salinity, respectively. Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) helped in the identification of maturase K and PPD4 with increased relative abundance under all stresses; whereas salinity stress and combination stress silenced the presence of one protein (polycomb protein EZ2) and two proteins (cellulose synthase-like protein and ubiquitin conjugation factor E4), respectively. The identified proteins were functionally associated with signal transduction (15%), protein synthesis (16%), stress response and defence (33%), photosynthesis (13%), plant growth/cell division (9%), energy generation (4%), transport (4%), secondary metabolism (3%), and cell death (3%); clearly indicating the importance and necessity of keeping a higher ratio of defence and disease-responsive proteins. The results suggest that plant may increase the abundance of defence proteins and may also lower the abundance of catabolic proteins. Proteins with altered ratios of abundance belonged to different functional categories, suggesting that plants have differential mechanisms to respond to Cd, salinity, and their combined stress, but with unique sets of proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Sulfate transporters in the plant’s response to drought and salinity: regulation and possible functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine eGallardo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought and salinity are two frequently combined abiotic stresses that affect plant growth, development, and crop productivity. Sulfate, and molecules derived from this anion such as glutathione, play important roles in the intrinsic responses of plants to such abiotic stresses. Therefore, understanding how plants facing environmental constraints re-equilibrate the flux of sulfate between and within different tissues might uncover perspectives for improving tolerance against abiotic stresses. In this review, we took advantage of genomics and post-genomics resources available in Arabidopsis thaliana and in the model legume species Medicago truncatula to highlight and compare the regulation of sulfate transporter genes under drought and salt stress. We also discuss their possible function in the plant’s response and adaptation to abiotic stresses and present prospects about the potential benefits of mycorrhizal associations, which by facilitating sulfate uptake may assist plants to cope with abiotic stresses. Several transporters are highlighted in this review that appear promising targets for improving sulfate transport capacities of crops under fluctuating environmental conditions.

  14. Plant responses to heterogeneous salinity: growth of the halophyte Atriplex nummularia is determined by the root-weighted mean salinity of the root zone

    OpenAIRE

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Barrett-Lennard, Edward G.; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinity is generally spatially heterogeneous, but our understanding of halophyte physiology under such conditions is limited. The growth and physiology of the dicotyledonous halophyte Atriplex nummularia was evaluated in split-root experiments to test whether growth is determined by: (i) the lowest; (ii) the highest; or (iii) the mean salinity of the root zone. In two experiments, plants were grown with uniform salinities or horizontally heterogeneous salinities (10–450mM NaCl in the lo...

  15. Emergence, forage production, and ion relations of alfalfa in response to saline waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L) is an important crop utilized in regions under irrigation commonly impacted by salinity. In this study we evaluate the effect of salinity, as a continual process, from emergence to mature plant growth in successive harvests. We studied emergence, biomass production, salt ...

  16. Oxidative stress responses in gills of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) at different salinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, Kiki Syaputri; Novianty, Zahra; Saputri, Miftahul Rohmah; Irawan, Bambang; Soegianto, Agoes

    2017-08-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the impact of different salinities on the levels of CAT, GSH and MDA of the gills of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Nile tilapia was treated by exposure to salinities concentration 0 ‰, 5 ‰ and 10 ‰. Research models were weakened and sacrificed, then took the left and right sides of the gills. The result of gills homogenity was centrifuged for supernatan, then supernatan was proceed with testing levels of CAT, GSH and MDA by ELISA assay methods. The levels of CAT in gills were significantly higher at 10 ‰ than at 5 ‰ and 0 ‰. The levels of GSH in gills were significantly higher at 0 ‰ than 5 ‰. The levels of GSH in gills at 5 ‰ and 10 ‰ salinities were not significantly different. The levels of MDA in gills at salinity 10 ‰ and 5 ‰ were higher than in control gills at 0 ‰ salinities. This occurs because the salinity of 10 ‰ salinity was optimal for live of fish tilapia. In conclusion, salinity impact the increasing of CAT, GSH, and MDA levels in gills of Nile tilapia.

  17. Responses of spinach to salinity and nutrient deficiency in growth, physiology and nutritional value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinity and nutrient depleted soil are major constraints to crop production, especially for vegetable crops. The effects of salinity and nutrient deficiency on spinach were evaluated in sand cultures under greenhouse conditions. Plants were watered every day with Hoagland nutrition solution, depriv...

  18. Spinach biomass yield and physiological response to interactive salinity and water stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical shortages of fresh water throughout arid regions means that growers must face the choice of applying insufficient fresh water, applying saline water, or consider the option of combined water and salt stress. The best approach to manage drought and salinity is evaluation of the impact of wat...

  19. Responses of respiration and photosynthesis of Scenedesmus protuberans Fritsch to gradual and steep salinity increases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flameling, I.A.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of an increase in salinity on the physiology of the halotolerant chlorophyte Scenedesmus protuberans was studied in light-limited continuous cultures. It was observed that a gradual, as well as a steep increase in salinity resulted in lower biomass. However, the mechanisms by which this

  20. Response of high yielding rice varieties to NaCl salinity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinity is one the biggest constraint to obtain crop potential yield throughout paddy fields in some part of the coastal line of rice cultivated area in Iran. In order to find resistant varieties and study the reaction of some newly released high yielding varieties to different levels of salinity of irrigation water an experiment was ...

  1. Capturing Arabidopsis Root Architecture Dynamics with root-fit Reveals Diversity in Responses to Salinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julkowska, M.M.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Mol, S.; Feron, R.; de Boer, G.J.; Haring, M.A.; Testerink, C.

    2014-01-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles

  2. Digital gene expression analysis in hemocytes of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei in response to low salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qun; Pan, Luqing; Ren, Qin; Hu, Dongxu

    2015-02-01

    The white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei has been greatly impacted by low salinity stress. To gain knowledge on the immune response in L. vannamei under such stress, we investigated digital gene expression (DEG) in L. vannamei hemocytes using the deep-sequencing platform Illumina HiSeq 2000. In total, 38,155 high quality unigenes with average length 770 bp were generated; 145 and 79 genes were identified up- or down-regulated, respectively. Functional categorization and pathways of the differentially expressed genes revealed that immune signaling pathways, cellular immunity, humoral immunity, apoptosis, cellular protein synthesis, lipid transport and energy metabolism were the differentially regulated processes occurring during low salinity stress. These results will provide a resource for subsequent gene expression studies regarding environmental stress and a valuable gene information for a better understanding of immune mechanisms of L. vannamei under low salinity stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential Responses of Two Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Italica Cultivars to Salinity and Nutritional Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokri Zaghdoud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative responses of two broccoli cultivars (Brassica oleracea var. Italica, cv. Parthenon and cv. Naxos to a 15 d exposure to different NaCl levels were investigated. Salinity led to increased concentrations of Na+ and Cl− ions in both cultivars, a disruption of the endogenous minerals levels in the shoots and roots—that varied with the cultivar and salt concentration—and decreases in the osmotic potential (Ψπ, root hydraulic conductance (L0, and stomatal conductance (Gs. The reduced biomass of Naxos at moderate NaCl indicates greater sensitivity to salinity, compared with Parthenon. Parthenon accumulated more soluble sugars, for osmotic adjustment, whereas Naxos accumulated proline, which gave the two cultivars differing nutritional characteristics. The total glucosinolates (GSLs content was not affected by salinity in Parthenon while it decreased significantly in Naxos as a consequence of the decrease in the indole GSL. However, Naxos accumulated more aliphatic GSLs under salt stress than Parthenon, which confers on this cultivar a greater nutritional value when cultivated under salinity.These results suggest that, at distinct salinity levels, each broccoli cultivar adopts a specific strategy, indicating the crucial role of the genetic background on the organoleptic and nutritional properties that each cultivar acquires.

  4. Differential responses of two broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Italica) cultivars to salinity and nutritional quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghdoud, Chokri; Alcaraz-López, Carlos; Mota-Cadenas, César; Martínez-Ballesta, María del Carmen; Moreno, Diego A; Ferchichi, Ali; Carvajal, Micaela

    2012-01-01

    The comparative responses of two broccoli cultivars (Brassica oleracea var. Italica, cv. Parthenon and cv. Naxos) to a 15 d exposure to different NaCl levels were investigated. Salinity led to increased concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions in both cultivars, a disruption of the endogenous minerals levels in the shoots and roots-that varied with the cultivar and salt concentration-and decreases in the osmotic potential (Ψ(π)), root hydraulic conductance (L(0)), and stomatal conductance (G(s)). The reduced biomass of Naxos at moderate NaCl indicates greater sensitivity to salinity, compared with Parthenon. Parthenon accumulated more soluble sugars, for osmotic adjustment, whereas Naxos accumulated proline, which gave the two cultivars differing nutritional characteristics. The total glucosinolates (GSLs) content was not affected by salinity in Parthenon while it decreased significantly in Naxos as a consequence of the decrease in the indole GSL. However, Naxos accumulated more aliphatic GSLs under salt stress than Parthenon, which confers on this cultivar a greater nutritional value when cultivated under salinity.These results suggest that, at distinct salinity levels, each broccoli cultivar adopts a specific strategy, indicating the crucial role of the genetic background on the organoleptic and nutritional properties that each cultivar acquires.

  5. Clonal variation in response to salinity and flooding stress in four marsh macrophytes of the northern gulf of Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R.J.; Rafferty, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in stress tolerance can be an important factor influencing plant population structure in coastal wetland habitats. We studied clones of four species of emergent marsh macrophytes native to the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana, USA, to examine variation in response to salinity and flooding stress under controlled greenhouse conditions. Clones of Distichlis spicata, Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus californicus, and Schoenoplectus robustus were collected across the coastal zone of Louisiana. After vegetative propagation through at least three generations to remove acclimation to field conditions, four to six clones of each species were selected for use in the experiment. Treatments consisted of three salinity levels and two water depths, and species were assigned to either a brackish marsh (P. australis, S. californicus) or salt marsh (D. spicata, S. robustus) group for treatment application. Treatment effects on plant growth (stem number, total height, and mean height, and aboveground and belowground biomass) were examined, and physicochemical characteristics within treatments (redox potential, and interstitial water pH, salinity, temperature, and nutrients) were monitored. Clonal variation in growth was indicated in all species, and was more pronounced in D. spicata and P. australis than in S. californicus and S. robustus. Distichlis spicata and P. australis clones were assigned to relative categories of low, intermediate, and high tolerance to the imposed stressors. Similar generalizations on clonal stress tolerance were not possible for the two Schoenoplectus species. Overall species response to imposed stressors was also identified through non-statistical comparisons. Phragmites australis was more tolerant than S. californicus of increased salinity. Distichlis spicata was more tolerant of increased salinity but less tolerant of increased water depth than was S. robustus. Our results suggest that information on species

  6. Effects of various pollutant mixtures on immune responses of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) collected at a salinity gradient in the Danish belt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höher, N.; Köhler, A.; Strand, Jakob

    The Baltic Sea is a unique semi-enclosed sea with a steady salinity gradient (5‰ to 30‰). Organisms have adapted to such low salinities, but are suspected to be more susceptible to stress. Within the frame of the integrated environmental monitoring BONUS+ project “BEAST” (Biological Effects...... of Anthropogenic Chemical Stress) the applicability of immune responses as salinity independent biomarkers for toxic effects in the blue mussel was investigated at 5 stations in the Danish Belt Sea (Baltic Sea) in autumn 2009. These stations were characterised by a salinity range (10.9 to 18.8‰) and different...... Roskilde Fjord and Isefjord (18.8‰, high concentrations of HCHs, Hg and As). Both, phagocytic activity and total haemocyte count were shown to be influenced by Cu and PCBs, but not by salinity. Cytotoxic activities, in contrast, were dependent on salinity as well as HCH concentrations. Overall, salinity...

  7. Exploring jasmonates in the hormonal network of drought and salinity responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRiemann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Present and future food security is a critical issue compounded by the consequences of climate change on agriculture. Stress perception and signal transduction in plants causes changes in gene or protein expression which lead to metabolic and physiological responses. Phytohormones play a central role in the integration of different upstream signals into different adaptive outputs such as changes in the activity of ion-channels, protein modifications, protein degradation and gene expression. Phytohormone biosynthesis and signalling, and recently also phytohormone crosstalk have been investigated intensively, but the function of jasmonates under abiotic stress is still only partially understood. Although most aspects of jasmonate biosynthesis, crosstalk and signal transduction appear to be similar for biotic and abiotic stress, novel aspects have emerged that seem to be unique for the abiotic stress response. Here, we review the knowledge on the role of jasmonates under drought and salinity. The crosstalk of jasmonate biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways with those of abscisic acid (ABA is particularly taken into account due to the well-established, central role of ABA under abiotic stress. Likewise, the accumulating evidence of crosstalk of jasmonate signalling with other phytohormones is considered as important element of an integrated phytohormonal response. Finally, protein post-translational modification (PTM, which can also occur without de novo transcription, is treated with respect to its implications for phytohormone biosynthesis, signalling and crosstalk. To breed climate-resilient crop varieties, integrated understanding of the molecular processes is required to modulate and tailor particular nodes of the network to positively affect stress tolerance.

  8. Modeling daily soil salinity dynamics in response to agricultural and environmental changes in coastal Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payo, Andrés.; Lázár, Attila N.; Clarke, Derek; Nicholls, Robert J.; Bricheno, Lucy; Mashfiqus, Salehin; Haque, Anisul

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of salt movement in the soil is a prerequisite for devising appropriate management strategies for land productivity of coastal regions, especially low-lying delta regions, which support many millions of farmers around the world. At present, there are no numerical models able to resolve soil salinity at regional scale and at daily time steps. In this research, we develop a novel holistic approach to simulate soil salinization comprising an emulator-based soil salt and water balance calculated at daily time steps. The method is demonstrated for the agriculture areas of coastal Bangladesh (˜20,000 km2). This shows that we can reproduce the dynamics of soil salinity under multiple land uses, including rice crops, combined shrimp and rice farming, as well as non-rice crops. The model also reproduced well the observed spatial soil salinity for the year 2009. Using this approach, we have projected the soil salinity for three different climate ensembles, including relative sea-level rise for the year 2050. Projected soil salinity changes are significantly smaller than other reported projections. The results suggest that inter-season weather variability is a key driver of salinization of agriculture soils at coastal Bangladesh.

  9. Species-specific and transgenerational responses to increasing salinity in sympatric freshwater gastropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suski, Jamie G.; Salice, Christopher J.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater salinization is a global concern partly attributable to anthropogenic salt contamination. The authors examined the effects of increased salinity (as NaCl, 250-4,000 µS/cm, specific conductance) on two sympatric freshwater gastropods (Helisoma trivolvis and Physa pomillia). Life stage sensitivities were determined by exposing naive eggs or naive juveniles (through adulthood and reproduction). Additionally, progeny eggs from the juvenile-adult exposures were maintained at their respective parental salinities to examine transgenerational effects. Naive H. trivolvis eggs experienced delayed development at specific conductance > 250 µS/cm; reduced survivorship and reproduction were also seen in juvenile H. trivolvis at 4,000 µS/cm. Survival and growth of P. pomilia were not affected by increased salinity following egg or juvenile exposures. Interestingly, the progeny of H. trivolvis exposed to higher salinity may have gained tolerance to increased salinity whereas P. pomilia progeny may have experienced negative transgenerational effects. The present study demonstrates that freshwater snail species vary in their tolerance to salinization and also highlights the importance of multigenerational studies, as stressor impacts may not be readily apparent from shorter term exposures.

  10. A Single Locus Is Responsible for Salinity Tolerance in a Chinese Landrace Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengdao; Johnson, Peter; Lu, Chao; Zhou, Meixue

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Salinity and waterlogging are two major abiotic stresses severely limiting barley production. The lack of a reliable screening method makes it very hard to improve the tolerance through breeding programs. Methods This work used 188 DH lines from a cross between a Chinese landrace variety, TX9425 (waterlogging and salinity tolerant), and a Japanese malting barley, Naso Nijo (waterlogging and salinity sensitive), to identify QTLs associated with the tolerance. Results Four QTLs were found for waterlogging tolerance. The salinity tolerance was evaluated with both a hydroponic system and in potting mixture. In the trial with potting mixture, only one major QTL was identified to associate with salinity tolerance. This QTL explained nearly 50% of the phenotypic variation, which makes it possible for further fine mapping and cloning of the gene. This QTL was also identified in the hydroponic experiment for different salt-related traits. The position of this QTL was located at a similar position to one of the major QTLs for waterlogging tolerance, indicating the possibility of similar mechanisms controlling both waterlogging and salinity tolerance. Conclusion The markers associated with the QTL provided a unique opportunity in breeding programs for selection of salinity and waterlogging tolerance. PMID:22916210

  11. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria in Response to Salinity Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Lin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰- and hyper (35‰-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰. The osmolality, [Na+], and [Cl-] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore

  12. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na(+)], and [Cl(-)] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  13. Response of rice advance line PB-95 to potassium application in saline-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Shahzada Munawar; Sarfraz, Muhammad; Hafeez, Mudassar

    2007-09-01

    A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the response of rice crop to potassium fertilization in saline-sodic soil during 2005. Soil samples were collected before transplanting of rice crop and analysed for physical and chemical properties of the soil. In this experiment five rates of K2O (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 kg ha(-1)) were applied in the presence of basal doses of N and P2O5 i.e., 110 and 90 kg ha(-1), respectively. Whole of P, K and 1/2 of N were applied at the time of rice transplanting. Twelve and halfkg ha(-1) ZnSO4 was also applied 15 days after rice transplanting. The remaining half of N was applied 30 days after rice transplanting. The system of layout was Randomized Complete Block Design with four replications. The net plot size was 6x4 m. Fertilizer sources of NPK were urea, TSP and SOP, respectively. Rice salt tolerant line PB-95 was used as test crops. The data of growth parameters and yield was recorded and samples of paddy and straw were collected treatment-wise and analysed for N, P and K contents. Soil samples after harvesting the crop were also collected, processed and analysed for the changes in the extractable soil K. The results showed that increasing rates of potassium fertilizer increased the number of tillers m(-2), plant height (cm), 1000-paddy weight and paddy as well as straw yield significantly. Maximum paddy (3.24 t ha(-1)) and straw (3.92 t ha(-1)) yields were obtained in T5 (100 kg K2O ha(-1)) which was at par with T4 (75 kg K2O ha(-1)). With increasing rates of potassium fertilizer, concentration of potassium in paddy and straw increased significantly. After harvesting the crop, the extractable potassium contents of soil increased from that of the original soil. It was concluded from the results that there was an increase of 30.65% in paddy over control by applying potassium (100 kg K2O ha(-1)) in saline-sodic soil.

  14. Insights into the physiological responses of the facultative halophyte Aeluropus littoralis to the combined effects of salinity and phosphorus availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbi Zribi, Ons; Barhoumi, Zouhaier; Kouas, Saber; Ghandour, Mohamed; Slama, Ines; Abdelly, Chedly

    2015-09-15

    In this work, we investigate the physiological responses to P deficiency (5μM KH2PO4=D), salt stress (400mM NaCl=C+S), and their combination (D+S) on the facultative halophyte Aeluropus littoralis to understand how plants adapt to these combined stresses. When individually applied, both P deficiency and salinity significantly restricted whole plant growth, with a more marked effect of the latter stress. However, the effects of the two stresses were not additive in plant biomass production since the response of plants to combined salinity and P deficiency was similar to that of plants grown under salt stress alone. In addition the observed features under salinity alone are kept when plants are simultaneously subjected to the combined effects of salinity and P deficiency such as biomass partitioning; the synthesis of proline and the K(+)/Na(+) selectivity ratio. Thus, increasing P availability under saline conditions has no significant effect on salt tolerance in this species. Plants cultivated under the combined effects of salinity and P deficiency exhibited the lowest leaf water potential. This trend was associated with a high accumulation of Na(+), Cl(-) and proline in shoots of salt treated plants suggesting the involvement of these solutes in osmotic adjustment. Proline could be involved in other physiological processes such as free radical scavenging. Furthermore, salinity has no significant effect on phosphorus acquisition when combined with a low P supply and it significantly decreased this parameter when combined with a sufficient P supply. This fact was probably due to salt's effect on P transporters. In addition, shoot soluble sugars accumulation under both P deficiency treatments with and without salt likely play an important role in the adaptation of A. littoralis plants to P shortage applied alone or combined with salinity. Moreover, there was a strong correlation between shoot and root intracellular acid phosphatase activity and phosphorus use

  15. Phloem sap proteome studied by iTRAQ provides integrated insight into salinity response mechanisms in cucumber plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huaifu; Xu, Yanli; Du, Changxia; Wu, Xue

    2015-07-01

    Cucumber is an economically important crop as well as a model system for plant vascular biology. Salinity is one of the major environmental factors limiting plant growth. Here, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics approach for comparative analysis of protein abundances in cucumber phloem sap in response to salt. A total of 745 distinct proteins were identified and 111 proteins were differentially expressed upon salinity in sensitive and tolerant cultivars, of which 69 and 65 proteins changed significantly in sensitive and tolerant cultivars, respectively. A bioinformatics analysis indicated that cucumber phloem employed a combination of induced metabolism, protein turnover, common stress response, energy and transport, signal transduction and regulation of transcription, and development proteins as protection mechanisms against salinity. The proteins that were mapped to the carbon fixation pathway decreased in abundance in sensitive cultivars and had no change in tolerant cultivars under salt stress, suggesting that this pathway may promote salt tolerance by stabilizing carbon fixation and maintaining the essential energy and carbohydrates in tolerant cultivars. This study leads to a better understanding of the salinity mechanism in cucumber phloem and provides a list of potential gene targets for the further engineering of salt tolerance in plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of Proteome Response to Saline and Zinc Stress in Lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eLucini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc salts occurring in soils can exert an osmotic stress toward plants. However, being zinc a heavy metal, some more specific effects on plant metabolisms can be forecast. In this work, lettuce has been used as a model to investigate salt and zinc stresses at proteome level through a shotgun tandem MS proteomic approach. The effect of zinc stress in lettuce, in comparison with NaCl stress, was evaluated to dissect between osmotic/oxidative stress-related effects, from those changes specifically related to zinc.The analysis of proteins exhibiting a fold change of 3 as minimum (on log 2 normalized abundances, revealed the involvement of photosynthesis (via stimulation of chlorophyll synthesis and enhanced role of photosystem I as well as stimulation of photophosphorylation. Increased glycolytic supply of energy substrates and ammonium assimilation (through formation of glutamine synthetase were also induced by zinc in soil. Similarly, protein metabolism (at both transcriptional and ribosomal level, heat shock proteins and proteolysis were affected. According to their biosynthetic enzymes, hormones appear to be altered by both the treatment and the time point considered: ethylene biosynthesis was enhanced, while production of abscisic acid was up-regulated at the earlier time point to decrease markedly and gibberellins were decreased at the later one.Besides aquaporin PIP2 synthesis, other osmotic/oxidative stress related compounds were enhanced under zinc stress, i.e. proline, hydroxycinnamic acids, ascorbate, sesquiterpene lactones and terpenoids biosynthesis.Although the proteins involved in the response to zinc stress and to salinity were substantially the same, their abundance changed between the two treatments. Lettuce response to zinc was more prominent at the first sampling point, yet showing a faster adaptation than under NaCl stress. Indeed, lettuce plants showed an adaptation after 30 days of stress, in a more pronounced way in the case

  17. Responses of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) to salinity and temperature regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adolf, Verena Isabelle

    Water scarcity, soil salinity and high temperatures are the major causes of yield losses worldwide. The halophytic crop quinoa that originates in the South American Andes, provides very nutritious seeds and can tolerate high levels of soil salinity. It is therefore considered an option to sustain...... crop production in other salt affected areas worldwide. The large genetic variability within the species may allow the selection of varieties for cultivation under various climatic conditions. In the study, intra-species differences of quinoa’s tolerance to salinity in terms of biomass production...... and a number of physiological traits were assessed. The Mediterranean region increasingly suffers from soil salinization, and could therefore benefit from quinoa cultivation. However, highly salt tolerant quinoa cultivars originate in the cool Andean highland. Hence, for a successful production of quinoa...

  18. Detritus-based assemblage responses under salinity stress conditions in a disused aquatic artificial ecosystem

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cerfolli, Fulvio; Bellisario, Bruno; Battisti, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    .... In this work, we report the comparison between biomass and abundance in a set of detritus-based macrozoobenthic assemblages located in six sampling pools with different salinity in an artificial aquatic ecosystem...

  19. Physiological and Growth Responses of Six Turfgrass Species Relative to Salinity Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamal Uddin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for salinity-tolerant turfgrasses is increasing due to augmented use of effluent or low-quality water (sea water for turf irrigation and the growing turfgrass industry in coastal areas. Experimental plants, grown in plastic pots filled with a mixture of river sand and KOSASR peat (9 : 1, were irrigated with sea water at different dilutions imparting salinity levels of 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, or 48 dS m-1. Salinity tolerance was evaluated on the basis of leaf firing, shoot and root growth reduction, proline content, and relative water content. Paspalum vaginatum was found to be most salt tolerant followed by Zoysia japonica and Zoysia matrella, while Digitaria didactyla, Cynodon dactylon “Tifdwarf,” and Cynodon dactylon “Satiri” were moderately tolerant. The results indicate the importance of turfgrass varietal selection for saline environments.

  20. Responses to ozone pollution of alfalfa exposed to increasing salinity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Albino; Chiarandà, Fabrizio Quaglietta; Cefariello, Roberto; Fagnano, Massimo

    2009-05-01

    Stomatal closure and biosynthesis of antioxidant molecules are two fundamental components of the physiological machinery that lead to stress adaptation during plant's exposure to salinity. Since high stomatal resistance may also contribute in counteracting O(3) damages, we hypothesized that soil salinization may increase O(3) tolerance of crops. An experiment was performed with alfalfa grown in filtered (AOT40=0 in both years) and non-filtered (AOT40=9.7 in 2005 and 6.9 ppm h in 2006) open-top chambers. Alfalfa yield was reduced by O(3) (-33%) only in plants irrigated with salt-free water, while the increasing levels of soil salinity until 1.06 dS m(-1) reduced both stomatal conductance and plant O(3) uptake, thus linearly reducing O(3) effects on yield. Therefore a reliable flux-based model for assessing the effects of O(3) on crop yield should take into account soil salinity.

  1. Chlorophyll, Soluble Sugar and Flower Dry Weight of German Chamomile in Response to Methyl Jasmonate under Salinity Stress

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    F. Salimi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Using plant growth regulators at the stresses environment can improve plant growth and crop production. Hence, in this research response of photosynthesis rate, chlorophyll, soluble sugar and flower dry weight of chamomile to methyl jasmonate under different salinity levels was studied. Values of 0 (control, 75, 150, 225 and 300μM methyl jasmonate (MeJA with salinity levels of 2, 6, 10 and 14 dS/m was evaluated as a factorial experiment based on a randomized complete block design with three replications. The effect of MeJA and salinity was significant for photosynthesis rate, leaf temperature difference (T, relative water content (RWC, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll, soluble sugar and flower dry weight. Also, MeJA × salinity interaction affected all traits except T. The highest value of photosynthetic rate (9.99 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1 , chlorophyll a, b and total chlorophyll, in averaging 5.98, 41.18 and 45.10 mg g-1, respectively, and flower dry weight (3.73 g pot-1 were obtained at 75μM MeJA and 6 dS/m salinity. But, there was no significant difference between 75μM MeJA×6 dS/m and 75μM MeJA×2dS/m for RWC and flower dry weight traits. Maximum soluble sugar was achieved at 75μM MeJA×14 dS/m treatment. In general, using of MeJA increased RWC and decreased undesirable effects of salinity. With decreasing RWC photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll and flower dry weight decreased, but T increased.

  2. Differences in behavioral responses of Eurytemora affinis (Copepoda, Calanoida) adults to salinity variations

    OpenAIRE

    Michalec, François Gaël; Souissi, Sami; Dur, Gaël; Mahjoub, Mohamed Sofiene; Schmitt, François G; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Estuarine copepods undergo strong and frequent salinity variations caused by alternating tides. Salinity is known to be a major parameter in the ecology of copepods from brackish waters but its effects on small scale behavior are relatively unclear. In this study we used 2-dimensional laboratory filming techniques to record swimming paths of the three reproductive stages (i.e. male, non-ovigerous female and ovigerous female) of E. affinis from the Seine estuary, under diff...

  3. Response of photosynthetic systems to salinity stress in the desert cyanobacterium Scytonema javanicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinlu; Jin, Liang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Cai, Wenkai; Liu, Yongding; Wang, Gaohong

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the physiological and biochemical characteristics of Scytonema javanicum, a pioneer species isolated from desert biological crusts, under salinity stress. Pigment analysis showed that salinity decreased chlorophyll a and phycocyanin content, while low salinity increased carotenoid concentration and high salinity decreased carotenoid concentration. Salinity also inhibited CO2 assimilation rate and photosynthetic oxygen evolution in this cyanobacterium. Chlorophyll a fluorescence transient parameters (φPo, φEo, ψO, RC/ABS, RC/CS, PIABS, and PICS) were decreased under salt stress, while dVo/dto(Mo), Vj and φDo were increased. The decrease of ETRmax and Yield and the change of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients showed that salt stress had an important influence on photosynthesis. These results indicated that the effects of salinity stress on photosynthesis in S. javanicum may depend on the inhibition of electron transport and the inactivation of the reaction centers, but this inhibition may occur in the electron transport pathway at the PSII donor and acceptor sites.

  4. Differential responses of cell wall bound phenolic compounds in sensitive and tolerant varieties of rice in response to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Poulami; De, Bratati

    2017-10-03

    In plants, cell wall bound phenolics change in response to stress. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of NaCl induced stress on wall bound phenolics in four rice varieties, of which two (Bhutnath, Nonabokra) were salt tolerant and two (MTU 7029, Sujala) were salt sensitive. After germination, seedlings were grown in hydroponic solution and subjected to salinity stress (25 mM, 50 mM, 100 mM and 150 mM NaCl) on day 12. Wall bound phenolic compounds were determined by GC-MS based metabolite analysis. Total seven wall bound phenols were identified from the leaf tissues and eight from the root tissues. Ferulic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid were found in all the four varieties. After NaCl treatment, these two wall bound phenols increased in the leaves of tolerant varieties only. Significant inverse correlation between leaf length and leaf fresh weight with wall bound ferulic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid in Nonabokra suggests the positive role of these wall bound phenolics in salt tolerance.

  5. Transcriptome analysis of hexaploid hulless oat in response to salinity stress.

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    Bin Wu

    Full Text Available Oat is a cereal crop of global importance used for food, feed, and forage. Understanding salinity stress tolerance mechanisms in plants is an important step towards generating crop varieties that can cope with environmental stresses. To date, little is known about the salt tolerance of oat at the molecular level. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying salt tolerance in oat, we investigated the transcriptomes of control and salt-treated oat using RNA-Seq.Using Illumina HiSeq 4000 platform, we generated 72,291,032 and 356,891,432 reads from non-stressed control and salt-stressed oat, respectively. Assembly of 64 Gb raw sequence data yielded 128,414 putative unique transcripts with an average length of 1,189 bp. Analysis of the assembled unigenes from the salt stressed and control libraries indicated that about 65,000 unigenes were differentially expressed at different stages. Functional annotation showed that ABC transporters, plant hormone signal transduction, plant-pathogen interactions, starch and sucrose metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, and other secondary metabolite pathways were enriched under salt stress. Based on the RPKM values of assembled unigenes, 24 differentially expressed genes under salt stress were selected for quantitative RT-PCR validation, which successfully confirmed the results of RNA-Seq. Furthermore, we identified 18,039 simple sequence repeats, which may help further elucidate salt tolerance mechanisms in oat.Our global survey of transcriptome profiles of oat plants in response to salt stress provides useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying salt tolerance in this crop. These findings also represent a rich resource for further analysis of salt tolerance and for breeding oat with improved salt tolerance through the use of salt-related genes.

  6. Salinization and Saline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most conspicuous phenomena of water-quality degradation, particularly in arid and semi-arid zones, is salinization of water and soil resources. Salinization is a long-term phenomenon, and during the last century many aquifers and river basins have become unsuitable for human consumption owing to high levels of salinity. Future exploitation of thousands of wells in the Middle East and in many other water-scarce regions in the world depends, to a large extent, on the degree and rate of salinization. Moreover, every year a large fraction of agricultural land is salinized and becomes unusable.Salinization is a global environmental phenomenon that affects many different aspects of our life (Williams, 2001a, b): changing the chemical composition of natural water resources (lakes, rivers, and groundwater), degrading the quality of water supply to the domestic and agriculture sectors, contribution to loss of biodiversity, taxonomic replacement by halotolerant species ( Williams, 2001a, b), loss of fertile soil, collapse of agricultural and fishery industries, changing of local climatic conditions, and creating severe health problems (e.g., the Aral Basin). The damage due to salinity in the Colorado River Basin alone, for example, ranges between 500 and 750 million per year and could exceed 1 billion per year if the salinity in the Imperial Dam increases from 700 mg L-1 to 900 mg L-1 (Bureau of Reclamation, 2003, USA). In Australia, accelerating soil salinization has become a massive environmental and economic disaster. Western Australia is "losing an area equal to one football oval an hour" due to spreading salinity ( Murphy, 1999). The annual cost for dryland salinity in Australia is estimated as AU700 million for lost land and AU$130 million for lost production ( Williams et al., 2002). In short, the salinization process has become pervasive.Salinity in water is usually defined by the chloride content (mg L-1) or total dissolved solids content (TDS, mg L-1or g

  7. Evaluation of the Aqua‎Crop Model to Simulate Maize Yiled Response under Salinity Stress

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    Aida Mehrazar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limited water resources and its salinity uptrend has caused reducing water and soil quality and consequently reducing the crop production. Thus, use of saline water is the management strategies to decrease drought and water crisis. Furthermore, simulation models are valuable tools for improving on-farm water management and study about the effects of water quality and quantity on crop yield.. The AquaCrop model has recently been developed by the FAO which has the ability to check the production process under different propositions. The initial version of the model was introduced for simulation of crop yield and soil water movement in 2007, that the effect of salinity on crop yield was not considered. Version 4 of the model was released in 2012 in which also considered the effects of salinity on crop yield and simulation of solute Transmission in soil profile. Material and methods: In this project, evaluation of the AquaCrop model and its accuracy was studied in the simulating yield of maize under salt stress. This experiment was conducted in Karaj, on maize hybrid (Zea ma ys L in a sandy soil for investigation of salinity stress on maize yield in 2011-2012. This experiment was conducted in form of randomized complete block design in four replications and five levels of salinity treatments including 0, 4.53, 9.06, 13.59 and 18.13 dS/m at the two times sampling. To evaluate the effect of different levels of salinity on the yield of maize was used Version 4 AquaCrop model and SAS ver 9.1 software .The model calibration was performed by comparing the results of the field studies and the results of simulations in the model. In calculating the yield under different scenarios of salt stress by using AquaCrop, the model needs climate data, soil data, vegetation data and information related to farm management. The effects of salinity on yield and some agronomic and physiological traits of hybrid maize (Shoot length, root length, dry weight

  8. Plant responses to heterogeneous salinity: growth of the halophyte Atriplex nummularia is determined by the root-weighted mean salinity of the root zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Barrett-Lennard, Edward G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2012-11-01

    Soil salinity is generally spatially heterogeneous, but our understanding of halophyte physiology under such conditions is limited. The growth and physiology of the dicotyledonous halophyte Atriplex nummularia was evaluated in split-root experiments to test whether growth is determined by: (i) the lowest; (ii) the highest; or (iii) the mean salinity of the root zone. In two experiments, plants were grown with uniform salinities or horizontally heterogeneous salinities (10-450 mM NaCl in the low-salt side and 670 mM in the high-salt side, or 10 mM NaCl in the low-salt side and 500-1500 mM in the high-salt side). The combined data showed that growth and gas exchange parameters responded most closely to the root-weighted mean salinity rather than to the lowest, mean, or highest salinity in the root zone. In contrast, midday shoot water potentials were determined by the lowest salinity in the root zone, consistent with most water being taken from the least negative water potential source. With uniform salinity, maximum shoot growth was at 120-230 mM NaCl; ~90% of maximum growth occurred at 10 mM and 450 mM NaCl. Exposure of part of the roots to 1500 mM NaCl resulted in an enhanced (+40%) root growth on the low-salt side, which lowered root-weighted mean salinity and enabled the maintenance of shoot growth. Atriplex nummularia grew even with extreme salinity in part of the roots, as long as the root-weighted mean salinity of the root zone was within the 10-450 mM range.

  9. Effect of Saline Solution on the Electrical Response of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Nanocomposites

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    Hammad Younes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of saline solution on the electrical resistance of single wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy nanocomposites have been investigated experimentally. Ultrasonic assisted fabricated 1.0% and 0.5 W/W% SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites are integrated into a Kelvin structure by smear cast the nanocomposites on a glass wafer. Four metal pads are deposited on the nanocomposites using the beam evaporator and wires are tethered using soldering. The effect of saline solution on the electrical resistance of the nanocomposites is studied by adding drop of saline solution to the surface of the fabricated nanocomposites and measuring electrical resistance. Moreover, the nanocomposites are soaked completely into 3 wt.% saline solution and real-time measurement of the electrical resistance is conducted. It is found that a drop of saline solution on the surface of the nanocomposites film increases the resistance by 50%. Furthermore, the real-time measurement reveals a 40% increase in the resistance of the nanocomposites film. More importantly, the nanocomposites are successfully reset by soaking in DI water for four hours. This study may open the door for using SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites as scale sensors in oil and gas industry.

  10. Salinity contamination response to changes in irrigation management. Application of geochemical codes

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    Iker Garcia-Garizabal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Salinity contamination caused by irrigation has been widely studied but the analysis of geochemical processes regarding agronomic variables has not adequately been considered yet. The research presented here analyzes the influence of changes in irrigation management on salinity contamination, through the use of geochemical modeling techniques, in an agricultural basin during the hydrological year of 2001 and within the period 2005-2008. The results indicate that the changes implemented in irrigation management reduced the masses of salts exported in 72%, although water salinity increased by 25% (this salinity level does not restrict its use for irrigation. The different ionic ratios in drainage water, the results of the salinity balances, and the results of geochemical calculations (mass balances and speciation-solubility indicate, mainly, precipitation of calcite, dissolution of gypsum and halite and cation exchange. The salt contamination index decreased from approximately 70% to levels close to those presented in modern irrigation areas, indicating that the changes in irrigation management were effective. Petrocalcic genesis and punctual sodification of soils can constitute an agroenvironmental problem that requires adequate management of irrigation and drainage considering future modernization of irrigation areas.

  11. Morphological and physiological responses of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. plants to salinity.

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    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available Salinization usually plays a primary role in soil degradation, which consequently reduces agricultural productivity. In this study, the effects of salinity on growth parameters, ion, chlorophyll, and proline content, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities, and lipid peroxidation of two cotton cultivars, [CCRI-79 (salt tolerant and Simian 3 (salt sensitive], were evaluated. Salinity was investigated at 0 mM, 80 mM, 160 mM, and 240 mM NaCl for 7 days. Salinity induced morphological and physiological changes, including a reduction in the dry weight of leaves and roots, root length, root volume, average root diameter, chlorophyll and proline contents, net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. In addition, salinity caused ion imbalance in plants as shown by higher Na+ and Cl- contents and lower K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ concentrations. Ion imbalance was more pronounced in CCRI-79 than in Simian3. In the leaves and roots of the salt-tolerant cultivar CCRI-79, increasing levels of salinity increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, and glutathione reductase (GR, but reduced catalase (CAT activity. The activities of SOD, CAT, APX, and GR in the leaves and roots of CCRI-79 were higher than those in Simian 3. CAT and APX showed the greatest H2O2 scavenging activity in both leaves and roots. Moreover, CAT and APX activities in conjunction with SOD seem to play an essential protective role in the scavenging process. These results indicate that CCRI-79 has a more effective protection mechanism and mitigated oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation by maintaining higher antioxidant activities than those in Simian 3. Overall, the chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and Chl (a+b contents, net photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, SOD, CAT, APX, and GR activities showed the most significant variation between the two cotton cultivars.

  12. Growth and Landscape Performance of Ten Herbaceous Species in Response to Saline Water Irrigation1

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Genhua; Rodriguez, Denise S.; Aguiniga, Lizzie

    2007-01-01

    Ten herbaceous perennials and groundcovers were grown in raised beds from June to September in a dry, hot desert environment and micro-spray drip irrigated with synthesized saline solutions at electrical conductivity of 0.8 (tap water), 3.2, or 5.4 dS/m. Plant height and two perpendicular widths were recorded monthly to calculate the growth index. Landscape performance was assessed monthly by visual scores. Salinity did not affect the visual scores in Achillea millefolium L., Gaillardia arist...

  13. Characterization and expression of glutamate dehydrogenase in response to acute salinity stress in the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

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    Yueru Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH is a key enzyme for the synthesis and catabolism of glutamic acid, proline and alanine, which are important osmolytes in aquatic animals. However, the response of GDH gene expression to salinity alterations has not yet been determined in macro-crustacean species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: GDH cDNA was isolated from Eriocheir sinensis. Then, GDH gene expression was analyzed in different tissues from normal crabs and the muscle of crabs following transfer from freshwater (control directly to water with salinities of 16‰ and 30‰, respectively. Full-length GDH cDNA is 2,349 bp, consisting of a 76 bp 5'- untranslated region, a 1,695 bp open reading frame encoding 564 amino acids and a 578 bp 3'- untranslated region. E. sinensis GDH showed 64-90% identity with protein sequences of mammalian and crustacean species. Muscle was the dominant expression source among all tissues tested. Compared with the control, GDH expression significantly increased at 6 h in crabs transferred to 16‰ and 30‰ salinity, and GDH expression peaked at 48 h and 12 h, respectively, with levels approximately 7.9 and 8.5 fold higher than the control. The free amino acid (FAA changes in muscle, under acute salinity stress (16‰ and 30‰ salinities, correlated with GDH expression levels. Total FAA content in the muscle, which was based on specific changes in arginine, proline, glycine, alanine, taurine, serine and glutamic acid, tended to increase in crabs following transfer to salt water. Among these, arginine, proline and alanine increased significantly during salinity acclimation and accounted for the highest proportion of total FAA. CONCLUSIONS: E. sinensis GDH is a conserved protein that serves important functions in controlling osmoregulation. We observed that higher GDH expression after ambient salinity increase led to higher FAA metabolism, especially the synthesis of glutamic acid, which increased the synthesis of

  14. Wheal-and-flare responses to intradermally injected adenosine 5'-monophosphate, hypertonic saline, and histamine: comparison of atopic and nonatopic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukanovic, R; Finnerty, J P; Holgate, S T

    1989-09-01

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) in increasing concentrations, and saline solutions of corresponding tonicity, were injected intradermally in seven atopic and seven normal subjects. Skin wheal-and-flare responses were elicited in a dose-dependent fashion in all subjects, and no difference was found between responses produced by AMP and responses produced by saline of corresponding tonicity. Also, no difference in response to AMP and saline was found between atopic and nonatopic subjects. We further investigated, in seven atopic subjects, whether the skin wheal-and-flare response to the single, highest dose of AMP, saline, and histamine could be inhibited by preadministration of 180 mg of terfenadine, a potent H1 antagonist. A significant inhibition of the wheal-and-flare response to histamine and no significant inhibition to AMP were found. There was a significant inhibition of the flare response caused by hypertonic saline but no inhibition of the wheal response. We interpret these findings as indicating that AMP does not specifically lead to mast cell degranulation in the skin and that there are functional differences between cutaneous and lung mast cells. The observation that terfenadine significantly inhibited the flare response to hypertonic saline suggests that this stimulus produced histamine release.

  15. Crescimento do melão Pele de Sapo, em níveis de salinidade e estágio de desenvolvimento da planta Growth of 'Pele de Sapo' muskmelon under salinity levels and development stage of plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiana C. de Medeiros

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As áreas de cultivo com intensa evaporação, deficiência em drenagem e uso inadequado de fertilizantes, têm aumentado os problemas com a salinidade, prejudicando o rendimento das culturas. O experimento foi conduzido com o objetivo de se avaliar a alocação de massa seca do meloeiro, em função dos diferentes níveis de salinidade da água de irrigação e estágios de desenvolvimento da planta, em Mossoró, RN. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso, em parcelas subdivididas apresentando, nas parcelas, cinco níveis de salinidade da água de irrigação (0,54, 1,48, 2,02, 3,03 e 3,90 dS m-1 e, nas subparcelas, quatro épocas de coleta de plantas em função dos estágios de seu desenvolvimento (15, 30, 45 e 60 dias após o transplante - DAT correspondendo às fases de crescimento inicial, floração plena, frutificação plena e anterior ao início da colheita, respectivamente, com quatro repetições. Todos os parâmetros de crescimento avaliados foram afetados pela salinidade da água de irrigação. O efeito da salinidade da água sobre a área foliar específica e a massa seca das folhas, foi variável de acordo com a fase de desenvolvimento das plantas. As variáveis mais afetadas pela salinidade da água de irrigação foram a área foliar e a massa seca de frutos, com redução de 28,9 e 24,6%, respectivamente. O maior acúmulo de massa seca no meloeiro Pele de Sapo ocorreu no período entre 30 e 45 dias após o transplantio.The region of Mossoró, RN, Brazil, underwent increasing problems with soil salinity and melon crop yields, mainly in areas with intense evaporation, deficient drainage and inadequate fertilizer use. With this concern, dry mass accumulation in different muskmelon plant organs was evaluated in a trial combining different irrigation water salinity levels and crop growth stages. The experiment was conducted in completely randomized block design with split plot arrangement, having four

  16. Intraspecific variation in growth of marsh macrophytes in response to salinity and soil type: Implications for wetland restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic diversity within plant populations can influence plant community structure along environmental gradients. In wetland habitats, salinity and soil type are factors that can vary along gradients and therefore affect plant growth. To test for intraspecific growth variation in response to these factors, a greenhouse study was conducted using common plants that occur in northern Gulf of Mexico brackish and salt marshes. Individual plants of Distichlis spicata, Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus californicus, and Schoenoplectus robustus were collected from several locations along the coast in Louisiana, USA. Plant identity, based on collection location, was used as a measure of intraspecific variability. Prepared soil mixtures were organic, silt, or clay, and salinity treatments were 0 or 18 psu. Significant intraspecific variation in stem number, total stem height, or biomass was found in all species. Within species, response to soil type varied, but increased salinity significantly decreased growth in all individuals. Findings indicate that inclusion of multiple genets within species is an important consideration for marsh restoration projects that include vegetation plantings. This strategy will facilitate establishment of plant communities that have the flexibility to adapt to changing environmental conditions and, therefore, are capable of persisting over time. ?? Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation 2009.

  17. Synergic effect of salinity and CO2 enrichment on growth and photosynthetic responses of the invasive cordgrass Spartina densiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Alvarez, Rosario; Cambrollé, Jesús; Gandullo, Jacinto; Figueroa, M Enrique

    2010-06-01

    Spartina densiflora is a C(4) halophytic species that has proved to have a high invasive potential which derives from its clonal growth and its physiological plasticity to environmental factors, such as salinity. A greenhouse experiment was designed to investigate the synergic effect of 380 and 700 ppm CO(2) at 0, 171, and 510 mM NaCl on the growth and the photosynthetic apparatus of S. densiflora by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. PEPC activity and total ash, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations were determined, as well as the C/N ratio. Elevated CO(2) stimulated growth of S. densiflora at 0 and 171 mM NaCl external salinity after 90 d of treatment. This growth enhancement was associated with a greater leaf area and improved leaf water relations rather than with variations in net photosynthetic rate (A). Despite the fact that stomatal conductance decreased in response to 700 ppm CO(2) after 30 d of treatment, A was not affected. This response of A to elevated CO(2) concentration might be explained by an enhanced PEPC carboxylation capacity. On the whole, plant nutrient concentrations declined under elevated CO(2), which can be ascribed to the dilution effect caused by an increase in biomass and the higher water content found at 700 ppm CO(2). Finally, CO(2) and salinity had a marked overall effect on the photochemical (PSII) apparatus and the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments.

  18. Antioxidant responses in Mesopodopsis zeylanica at varying salinity to detect mercury influence in culture ponds

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Das, P.B.; Jena, K.; Maharana, D.; Desai, S.R.

    addition. CAT increased significantly from 5 to 15 psu before Hg influence, and GST increased after addition of the metal. However, a reduction in both these enzymes is evident at higher salinities (25 psu) with or without Hg. The energy cost involved...

  19. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagina, Kseniya P; Lubyaga, Yulia A; Shatilina, Zhanna; Bedulina, Daria; Gurkov, Anton; Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Baduev, Boris; Kondrateva, Elizaveta S; Gubanov, Mikhail; Zadereev, Egor; Sokolova, Inna; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase) and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate). Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming) was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress.

  20. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagina, Kseniya P.; Lubyaga, Yulia A.; Shatilina, Zhanna; Bedulina, Daria; Gurkov, Anton; Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V.; Baduev, Boris; Kondrateva, Elizaveta S.; Gubanov, Mikhail; Zadereev, Egor; Sokolova, Inna

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase) and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate). Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming) was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress. PMID:27896024

  1. Living in Environments with Contrasting Salinities: A Review of Physiological and Behavioural Responses in Waterbirds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutiérrez, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Migratory shorebirds inhabit environments that may yield contrasting salinity-temperature regimes—with widely varying osmoregulatory demands, even within a given species—and the question is: by which physiological means and at which organisational level do they show adjustments with respect to these

  2. Salinity modulates thermotolerance, energy metabolism and stress response in amphipods Gammarus lacustris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kseniya P. Vereshchagina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and salinity are important abiotic factors for aquatic invertebrates. We investigated the influence of different salinity regimes on thermotolerance, energy metabolism and cellular stress defense mechanisms in amphipods Gammarus lacustris Sars from two populations. We exposed amphipods to different thermal scenarios and determined their survival as well as activity of major antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and parameters of energy metabolism (content of glucose, glycogen, ATP, ADP, AMP and lactate. Amphipods from a freshwater population were more sensitive to the thermal challenge, showing higher mortality during acute and gradual temperature change compared to their counterparts from a saline lake. A more thermotolerant population from a saline lake had high activity of antioxidant enzymes. The energy limitations of the freshwater population (indicated by low baseline glucose levels, downward shift of the critical temperature of aerobic metabolism and inability to maintain steady-state ATP levels during warming was observed, possibly reflecting a trade-off between the energy demands for osmoregulation under the hypo-osmotic condition of a freshwater environment and protection against temperature stress.

  3. Ecophysiological response of Crambe maritima to airborne and soil-borne salinity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, A.C.; Broekman, R.A.; Groot, M.P.; Rozema, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: There is a need to evaluate the salt tolerance of plant species that can be cultivated as crops under saline conditions. Crambe maritima is a coastal plant, usually occurring on the driftline, with potential use as a vegetable crop. The aim of this experiment was to determine

  4. Dynamics of growth and water relations of Fodderbeet and Seabeat in response to salinity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, B.H.; Rozema, J.; Broekman, R.A.; Salim, M.

    2000-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions with two subspecies of beet, fodderbeet (Beta vulgaris cv. Majoral) and seabeet (Beta maritima), under saline conditions. Growth and physiological parameters (dry weight, leaf area, water relations and net photosynthesis) were recorded. The

  5. Comparison of corn yield response to plant water stress caused by salinity and by drought

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katerji, N.; Hoorn, van J.W.; Hamdy, A.; Mastrorilli, M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of water stress on corn yield was studied in a salinity experiment and in a drought experiment. The plant water status was determined by measuring the pre-dawn leaf water potential regularly during the whole growing season and expressed by the water stress day index (WSDI). The yield

  6. Response to recharge variation of thin rainwater lenses and their mixing zone with underlying saline groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eeman, S.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Leijnse, A.; Louw, de P.G.B.; Maas, C.

    2012-01-01

    In coastal zones with saline groundwater, fresh groundwater lenses may form due to infiltration of rain water. The thickness of both the lens and the mixing zone, determines fresh water availability for plant growth. Due to recharge variation, the thickness of the lens and the mixing zone are not

  7. Growth and Landscape Performance of Ten Herbaceous Species in Response to Saline Water Irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Genhua; Rodriguez, Denise S; Aguiniga, Lizzie

    2007-01-01

    Ten herbaceous perennials and groundcovers were grown in raised beds from June to September in a dry, hot desert environment and micro-spray drip irrigated with synthesized saline solutions at electrical conductivity of 0.8 (tap water), 3.2, or 5.4 dS/m. Plant height and two perpendicular widths were recorded monthly to calculate the growth index. Landscape performance was assessed monthly by visual scores. Salinity did not affect the visual scores in Achillea millefolium L., Gaillardia aristata Pursh, Lantana x hybrida 'New Gold', Lonicera japonica Thunb. 'Halliana', and Rosmarinus officinalis L. 'Huntington Carpet' throughout the experiment. Glandularia canadensis (L.) Nutt. 'Homestead Purple' performed better than Glandularia x hybrida (Grönland & Rümpler) G. L. Nesom & Pruski. Lantana montevidensis (Spreng.) Brig. had lower visual scores at 5.4 dS/m compared to the control and 3.2 dS/m. Most plants of Rudbeckia hirta L. did not survive when irrigated at 3.2 dS/m or 5.4 dS/m. Shoot biomass of A. millefolium, G. aristata, L. x hybrida, L. japonica, R. officinalis, and V. macdougalii was not influenced by the salinity of irrigation water. Therefore, A. millefolium, G. aristata, L. x hybrida, L. japonica, and R. officinalis can be irrigated with non-potable water at salinity up to 5.4 dS/m with little reduction in growth and aesthetic appearance.

  8. Evaluation of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) populations' response to salinity stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa is a moderately salt tolerant crop with high economic return, therefore more suitable for production with lower quality water than most high value crops. This study was conducted to examine the effects of the irrigation water salt type (ST=Cl- or SO4 2-) and five salinity levels (ECiw= 0.85,...

  9. The Photosynthesis, Na(+)/K(+) Homeostasis and Osmotic Adjustment of Atriplex canescens in Response to Salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Qing; Guo, Huan; Wang, Suo-Min; Zhao, Bingyu; Zhang, Jin-Lin; Ma, Qing; Yin, Hong-Ju; Bao, Ai-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Atriplex canescens (fourwing saltbush) is a C4 perennial fodder shrub with excellent resistance to salinity. However, the mechanisms underlying the salt tolerance in A. canescens are poorly understood. In this study, 5-weeks-old A. canescens seedlings were treated with various concentrations of external NaCl (0-400 mM). The results showed that the growth of A. canescens seedlings was significantly stimulated by moderate salinity (100 mM NaCl) and unaffected by high salinity (200 or 400 mM NaCl). Furthermore, A. canescens seedlings showed higher photosynthetic capacity under NaCl treatments (except for 100 mM NaCl treatment) with significant increases in net photosynthetic rate and water use efficiency. Under saline conditions, the A. canescens seedlings accumulated more Na(+) in either plant tissues or salt bladders, and also retained relatively constant K(+) in leaf tissues and bladders by enhancing the selective transport capacity for K(+) over Na(+) (ST value) from stem to leaf and from leaf to bladder. External NaCl treatments on A. canescens seedlings had no adverse impact on leaf relative water content, and this resulted from lower leaf osmotic potential under the salinity conditions. The contribution of Na(+) to the leaf osmotic potential (Ψs) was sharply enhanced from 2% in control plants to 49% in plants subjected to 400 mM NaCl. However, the contribution of K(+) to Ψs showed a significant decrease from 34% (control) to 9% under 400 mM NaCl. Interestingly, concentrations of betaine and free proline showed significant increase in the leaves of A. canescens seedlings, these compatible solutes presented up to 12% of contribution to Ψs under high salinity. These findings suggest that, under saline environments, A. canescens is able to enhance photosynthetic capacity, increase Na(+) accumulation in tissues and salt bladders, maintain relative K(+) homeostasis in leaves, and use inorganic ions and compatible solutes for osmotic adjustment which may contribute

  10. Physiological response to salinity stress and tolerance mechanics of Populus euphratica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun Yan; Si, Jian Hua; Feng, Qi; Deo, Ravinesh C; Yu, Teng Fei; Li, Pei Du

    2017-10-02

    The salinity stress inhibits the growth of Populus euphratica (P. euphratica), and the extent of inhibition tends to increase with a rise of salt concentration while the net photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and internal CO 2 concentration are seen to decline with increasing salt concentration. Compared with the control group, the percentage decline is found to be about 48.50, 15.72, 42.09, and 48.33%, respectively. Although all chlorophyll fluorescence of P. euphratica exhibits a typical O-J-I-P curve in differently concentrated salt solutions, salinity stress shows a significant influence on the value of J and I step (P salinity stress was seen to induce a decrease in variable fluorescence (Fv)/maximal fluorescence value by 2.32, 8.78, 12.80, 12.93, 16.46, and 19.63% treated by 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, and 300-mM salt solution compared with the control group, respectively. Salinity stress appeared also to induce a decrease in Fv/minimal fluorescence values by a magnitude of 5.22, 16.02, 18.06, 22.95, 26.34, and 32.19% in P. euphratica treated by 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, and 300-mM salt solution relative to the control group, respectively. An increase in the content of malondialdehyde amounted to 4.12, 25.59, 34.60, 68.11, 70.72, and 67.68% in P. euphratica treated by 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, and 300-mM salt solution compared to the control group, respectively. In terms of the content of proline, the salinity stress induced an increase by 4.94, 29.49, 53.20, 77.65, 82.46, and 90.68% in P. euphratica treated by 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, and 300-mM salt solution, respectively.

  11. Response to salinity in the homoploid hybrid species Helianthus paradoxus and its progenitors H. annuus and H. petiolaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrenberg, Sophie; Edelist, Cécile; Lexer, Christian; Rieseberg, Loren

    2008-01-01

    Summary To contribute to the understanding of ecological differentiation in speciation, we compared salinity responses of the halophytic diploid hybrid species Helianthus paradoxus and its glycophytic progenitors Helianthus annuus and Helianthus petiolaris. Plants of three populations of each species were subjected to a control (nonsaline) and three salinity treatments, including one simulating the ion composition in the habitat of H. paradoxus. Relative to the control, saline treatments led to a 17% biomass increase in H. paradoxus while its progenitors suffered 19–33% productivity reductions and only in H. paradoxus, leaf contents of potassium, calcium, and magnesium were strongly reduced. Under all treatments, H. paradoxus allocated more resources to roots, was more succulent, and had higher leaf contents of sodium (> 200 mmol l−1 tissue water) and sulfur than its progenitor species. These results suggest that salt tolerance and thus speciation of H. paradoxus is related to sodium replacing potassium, calcium and magnesium as vacuolar osmotica. The evolutionary and genetic mechanisms likely to be involved are discussed. PMID:16626481

  12. Physiological response of Cucurbita pepo var. pepo mycorrhized by Sonoran desert native arbuscular fungi to drought and salinity stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Valle, Citlalli; Esqueda, Martín; Gutiérrez, Aldo; Castellanos, Alejandro E; Gardea, Alfonso A; Berbara, Ricardo

    Plants response to symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) under water stress is important to agriculture. Under abiotic stress conditions native fungi are more effective than exotics in improving plant growth and water status. Mycorrhization efficiency is related to soil fungi development and energy cost-benefit ratio. In this study, we assessed the effect on growth, water status and energy metabolism of Cucurbita pepo var. pepo when inoculated with native AMF from the Sonoran desert Mexico (mixed isolate and field consortium), and compared with an exotic species from a temperate region, under drought, low and high salinity conditions. Dry weights, leaf water content, water and osmotic potentials, construction costs, photochemistry and mycorrhization features were quantified. Under drought and low salinity conditions, the mixed isolate increased plant growth and leaf water content. Leaf water potential was increased only by the field consortium under drought conditions (0.5-0.9MPa). Under high salinity, the field consortium increased aerial dry weight (more than 1g) and osmotic potential (0.54MPa), as compared to non-mycorrhized controls. Plants inoculated with native AMF, which supposedly diminish the effects of stress, exhibited low construction costs, increased photochemical capacity, and grew larger external mycelia in comparison to the exotic inoculum. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation by arbuscular mycorrhizae of the integrated physiological response to salinity in plants: new challenges in physiological and molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Porcel, Rosa; Azcón, Charo; Aroca, Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    Excessive salt accumulation in soils is a major ecological and agronomical problem, in particular in arid and semi-arid areas. Excessive soil salinity affects the establishment, development, and growth of plants, resulting in important losses in productivity. Plants have evolved biochemical and molecular mechanisms that may act in a concerted manner and constitute the integrated physiological response to soil salinity. These include the synthesis and accumulation of compatible solutes to avoid cell dehydration and maintain root water uptake, the regulation of ion homeostasis to control ion uptake by roots, compartmentation and transport into shoots, the fine regulation of water uptake and distribution to plant tissues by the action of aquaporins, the reduction of oxidative damage through improved antioxidant capacity and the maintenance of photosynthesis at values adequate for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis can help the host plants to cope with the detrimental effects of high soil salinity. There is evidence that AM symbiosis affects and regulates several of the above mentioned mechanisms, but the molecular bases of such effects are almost completely unknown. This review summarizes current knowledge about the effects of AM symbiosis on these physiological mechanisms, emphasizing new perspectives and challenges in physiological and molecular studies on salt-stress alleviation by AM symbiosis.

  14. Phytoplankton response to high salinity and nutrient limitation in the eastern Adriatic marine lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Carić

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton and physical-chemical parameters were investigated for the first time in the only natural hyperhaline marine lakes (salinity > 40 along Croatia’s Adriatic coast, Mala Solina and Velika Solina. Two periods were recognized during the one-year investigation: one euhaline-mesotrophic from December to May and one hyperhaline- eutrophic from June to November. Nutrient limitation appears to have been important in defining the lakes’ seasonal phytoplankton composition. Phosphate was most likely limiting from October to December, silicate from January to April, and nitrogen from June to September when nitrate was depleted. Diatoms were most abundant in November to January, when temperature and salinity were low and nitrate and ammonium were high. They collapsed in March when silicate was depleted. Amphora, Navicula, and other naviculoid diatoms were the most frequent genera. Nitzschia longissima was the most abundant species. Dinoflagellate dominance began in June in Mala Solina and in March in Velika Solina. It continued while temperature, salinity, phosphate, and silicate were high. Oxyrrhis marina was the most abundant dinoflagellate (3.2 x 106 cells L-1. Nanophytoplankton was the dominant size fraction. Chroococoid cyanobacteria were most abundant from May to October, reaching 2.9 x 107 cells L-1 in July. Both nanophytoplankton and small microphytoplankton, such as Oxyrrhis, Scrippsiella, and Tetraselmis, were most abundant under hyperhaline, N-depleted conditions. Toxic and harmful taxa (e.g. Alexandrium, Dinophysis, expanding in Mediterranean waters, were not recorded in the lakes.

  15. Effect of gender on physiological and behavioural responses of Gammarus roeseli (Crustacea Amphipoda) to salinity and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sornom, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.sornom@umail.univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France); Felten, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.felten@univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France); Medoc, Vincent, E-mail: medoc@univ-metz.f [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire de Biogeosciences, equipe Ecologie Evolutive, CNRS UMR 5561, 6 Bd Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Sroda, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.sroda@umail.univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France); Rousselle, Philippe, E-mail: rousselle@univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France); Beisel, Jean-Nicolas, E-mail: beisel@sciences.univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France)

    2010-05-15

    The importance of potentially interacting factors in organisms responses to a stress are often ignored or underestimated in ecotoxicology. In laboratory experiments we investigated how gender, temperature and age influence the behaviour and the physiology of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli under salinity stress. Our results revealed a significant higher sensitivity of females in survival, ventilation and ionoregulation whereas no inter-age differences were reported. Water temperature also exerted a significant effect in survival and ventilation of G. roeseli. Some of those factors appeared to interact significantly. This study provides evidence that gender can affect organisms responses to a stressor and consequently has to be considered while assessing a stress impact. We discussed the potential relationships between biological and behavioural responses. - Influence of gender, age and temperature in a gammarid responses to a stress.

  16. Nutrient composition, forage parameters, and antioxidant capacity of alfalfa (Medicago sativa, L.) in response to saline irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although alfalfa is moderately tolerant of salinity, the effects of salinity on nutrient composition and forage parameters are poorly understood. In addition, there are no data on the effect of salinity on the antioxidant capacity of alfalfa. We evaluated four non-dormant, salinity-tolerant commerci...

  17. Identification of tissue-specific, abiotic stress-responsive gene expression patterns in wine grape (Vitis vinifera L. based on curation and mining of large-scale EST data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cramer Grant R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abiotic stresses, such as water deficit and soil salinity, result in changes in physiology, nutrient use, and vegetative growth in vines, and ultimately, yield and flavor in berries of wine grape, Vitis vinifera L. Large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs were generated, curated, and analyzed to identify major genetic determinants responsible for stress-adaptive responses. Although roots serve as the first site of perception and/or injury for many types of abiotic stress, EST sequencing in root tissues of wine grape exposed to abiotic stresses has been extremely limited to date. To overcome this limitation, large-scale EST sequencing was conducted from root tissues exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. Results A total of 62,236 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were generated from leaf, berry, and root tissues from vines subjected to abiotic stresses and compared with 32,286 ESTs sequenced from 20 public cDNA libraries. Curation to correct annotation errors, clustering and assembly of the berry and leaf ESTs with currently available V. vinifera full-length transcripts and ESTs yielded a total of 13,278 unique sequences, with 2302 singletons and 10,976 mapped to V. vinifera gene models. Of these, 739 transcripts were found to have significant differential expression in stressed leaves and berries including 250 genes not described previously as being abiotic stress responsive. In a second analysis of 16,452 ESTs from a normalized root cDNA library derived from roots exposed to multiple, short-term, abiotic stresses, 135 genes with root-enriched expression patterns were identified on the basis of their relative EST abundance in roots relative to other tissues. Conclusions The large-scale analysis of relative EST frequency counts among a diverse collection of 23 different cDNA libraries from leaf, berry, and root tissues of wine grape exposed to a variety of abiotic stress conditions revealed distinct, tissue-specific expression

  18. Identification of tissue-specific, abiotic stress-responsive gene expression patterns in wine grape (Vitis vinifera L.) based on curation and mining of large-scale EST data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Abiotic stresses, such as water deficit and soil salinity, result in changes in physiology, nutrient use, and vegetative growth in vines, and ultimately, yield and flavor in berries of wine grape, Vitis vinifera L. Large-scale expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated, curated, and analyzed to identify major genetic determinants responsible for stress-adaptive responses. Although roots serve as the first site of perception and/or injury for many types of abiotic stress, EST sequencing in root tissues of wine grape exposed to abiotic stresses has been extremely limited to date. To overcome this limitation, large-scale EST sequencing was conducted from root tissues exposed to multiple abiotic stresses. Results A total of 62,236 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from leaf, berry, and root tissues from vines subjected to abiotic stresses and compared with 32,286 ESTs sequenced from 20 public cDNA libraries. Curation to correct annotation errors, clustering and assembly of the berry and leaf ESTs with currently available V. vinifera full-length transcripts and ESTs yielded a total of 13,278 unique sequences, with 2302 singletons and 10,976 mapped to V. vinifera gene models. Of these, 739 transcripts were found to have significant differential expression in stressed leaves and berries including 250 genes not described previously as being abiotic stress responsive. In a second analysis of 16,452 ESTs from a normalized root cDNA library derived from roots exposed to multiple, short-term, abiotic stresses, 135 genes with root-enriched expression patterns were identified on the basis of their relative EST abundance in roots relative to other tissues. Conclusions The large-scale analysis of relative EST frequency counts among a diverse collection of 23 different cDNA libraries from leaf, berry, and root tissues of wine grape exposed to a variety of abiotic stress conditions revealed distinct, tissue-specific expression patterns, previously

  19. Involvement of abscisic acid in the response of Medicago sativa plants in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, F; López-Gómez, M; Tejera, N A; Lluch, C

    2014-06-01

    Legumes are classified as salt-sensitive crops with their productivity particularly affected by salinity. Abcisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the response to environmental stresses as signal molecule which led us to study its role in the response of nitrogen fixation and antioxidant metabolism in root nodules of Medicago sativa under salt stress conditions. Adult plants inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti were treated with 1 μM and 10 μM ABA two days before 200 mM salt addition. Exogenous ABA together with the salt treatment provoked a strong induction of the ABA content in the nodular tissue which alleviated the inhibition induced by salinity in the plant growth and nitrogen fixation. Antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) were induced by ABA pre-treatments under salt stress conditions which together with the reduction of the lipid peroxidation, suggest a role for ABA as signal molecule in the activation of the nodular antioxidant metabolism. Interaction between ABA and polyamines (PAs), described as anti-stress molecules, was studied being detected an induction of the common polyamines spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) levels by ABA under salt stress conditions. In conclusion, ABA pre-treatment improved the nitrogen fixation capacity under salt stress conditions by the induction of the nodular antioxidant defenses which may be mediated by the common PAs Spd and Spm that seems to be involved in the anti-stress response induced by ABA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Response of Blood Perfusion at ST 36 Acupoint after Drinking Cold Glucose or Saline Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guangjun; Jia, Shuyong; Li, Hongyan; Wang, Ze; Tian, Yuying; Zhang, Weibo

    2017-01-01

    Skin blood flux (SkBF) changes caused by drinking cold water are generally associated with vagal tone and osmotic factors in digestive system. According to acupuncture theory, change of SkBF at ST 36 might reflect the functional changes of digestive system. The aim of this study is to analyze the changes of SkBF after drinking 3°C 0.9% saline or 5% glucose injection by monitor blood flux at bilateral ST 36. The results indicated that, after drinking different cold water, the change ratio of S...

  1. Response of Blood Perfusion at ST 36 Acupoint after Drinking Cold Glucose or Saline Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin blood flux (SkBF changes caused by drinking cold water are generally associated with vagal tone and osmotic factors in digestive system. According to acupuncture theory, change of SkBF at ST 36 might reflect the functional changes of digestive system. The aim of this study is to analyze the changes of SkBF after drinking 3°C 0.9% saline or 5% glucose injection by monitor blood flux at bilateral ST 36. The results indicated that, after drinking different cold water, the change ratio of SkBF at right side ST 36 has been different. Because all solutions have the same temperature (3°C and both saline and glucose solution have the same osmolality, suggesting that the SkBF changes resulting from drinking cold water are not regulated just by the vagal tone and osmolality, there must have been other factors. These results have not been consistent with the frequency domain results of heart rate variability (HRV analysis. Coherence analysis of blood flux signals at bilateral ST 36 indicated that there have been different coherence-frequency curves among different groups in special frequency bands, which suggested that coherence analysis might provide a potential tool to evaluate different status.

  2. Responsive Stabilization of Nanoparticles for Extreme Salinity and High-Temperature Reservoir Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranka, Mikhil; Brown, Paul; Hatton, T Alan

    2015-09-09

    Colloidal stabilization of nanoparticles under extreme salinity and high temperature conditions is a key challenge in the development of next generation technologies for subsurface reservoir characterization and oil recovery. Polyelectrolytes have been investigated as nanoparticle stabilizers, but typically fail at high ionic strengths and elevated temperatures due to excessive charge screening and dehydration. We report an approach to nanoparticle stabilization that overcomes these limitations, and exploits the antipolyelectrolyte phenomenon, in which screening of intrachain electrostatic interactions causes a polyzwitterion chain to undergo a structural transition from a collapsed globule to a more open coil-like regime with increases in ionic strength and temperature. Small-angle neutron scattering on a model zwitterionic polymer in solution indicated an increase in both radius of gyration and excluded volume parameter of the polymer with increases in ionic strength and temperature. The model zwitterion was subsequently incorporated within a polymeric stabilizer for nanoparticles under harsh reservoir conditions, and used to functionalize hydrophilic (silica) as well as hydrophobic (polystyrene) nanoparticles. Long-term colloidal stability was achieved at salt concentrations up to 120,000 mg/dm3 at 90 °C, approximately twice the stability limit previously reported in the literature. The approach can be broadly generalized to a large class of synthetic polyzwitterions, and can be adapted to a wide variety of other colloidal systems in which demands placed by extreme salinity and temperature conditions must be met.

  3. Capturing Arabidopsis Root Architecture Dynamics with root-fit Reveals Diversity in Responses to Salinity1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkowska, Magdalena M.; Hoefsloot, Huub C.J.; Mol, Selena; Feron, Richard; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Haring, Michel A.; Testerink, Christa

    2014-01-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles in water extraction efficiency and ion exclusion. To establish which RSA parameters are responsive to salt stress, we performed a detailed time course experiment in which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings were grown on agar plates under different salt stress conditions. We captured RSA dynamics with quadratic growth functions (root-fit) and summarized the salt-induced differences in RSA dynamics in three growth parameters: MR elongation, average LR elongation, and increase in number of LRs. In the ecotype Columbia-0 accession of Arabidopsis, salt stress affected MR elongation more severely than LR elongation and an increase in LRs, leading to a significantly altered RSA. By quantifying RSA dynamics of 31 different Arabidopsis accessions in control and mild salt stress conditions, different strategies for regulation of MR and LR meristems and root branching were revealed. Different RSA strategies partially correlated with natural variation in abscisic acid sensitivity and different Na+/K+ ratios in shoots of seedlings grown under mild salt stress. Applying root-fit to describe the dynamics of RSA allowed us to uncover the natural diversity in root morphology and cluster it into four response types that otherwise would have been overlooked. PMID:25271266

  4. Mitigation of nitrite toxicity by increased salinity is associated with multiple physiological responses: A case study using an economically important model species, the juvenile obscure puffer (Takifugu obscurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tang, Hengxing; Zhang, Xingxing; Xue, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xuexia; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Nitrite is a common pollutant in water and is highly toxic to aquatic animals. To reveal the mechanism of salinity in attenuating nitrite toxicity to fish, we measured the physiological responses of juvenile Takifugu obscurus exposed to nitrite concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L) under different salinity levels (0, 10, and 20 ppt) for 96 h. Salinity increased the survival rates of juvenile T. obscurus exposed to nitrite. Changes in key hematological parameters, antioxidant system, malondialdehyde, Na + /K + -ATPase, and HSP70 indicated that nitrite induced considerable damage to juveniles; salinity mitigated the harmful effects. This finding reflects similar changing trends in both antioxidants and their gene expressions among different tissues. We applied an overall index, an integrated biomarker response (IBR), that increased under high-nitrite condition but recovered to the normal levels under salinity treatment. Analysis of the selected detection indices and IBR values showed that the overall mitigating effect of salinity on nitrite toxicity seems to be at sub-cellular level and associated with complicated physiological responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of salinity on the cellular physiological responses of Natrinema sp. J7-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjun Mei

    Full Text Available The halophilic archaea (haloarchaea live in hyersaline environments such as salt lakes, salt ponds and marine salterns. To cope with the salt stress conditions, haloarchaea have developed two fundamentally different strategies: the "salt-in" strategy and the "compatible-solute" strategy. Although investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance to high salt concentrations has made outstanding achievements, experimental study from the aspect of transcription is rare. In the present study, we monitored cellular physiology of Natrinema sp. J7-2 cells incubated in different salinity media (15%, 25% and 30% NaCl from several aspects, such as cellular morphology, growth, global transcriptome and the content of intracellular free amino acids. The results showed that the cells were polymorphic and fragile at a low salt concentration (15% NaCl but had a long, slender rod shape at high salt concentrations (25% and 30% NaCl. The cells grew best in 25% NaCl, mediocre in 30% NaCl and struggled in 15% NaCl. An RNA-seq analysis revealed differentially expressed genes (DEGs in various salinity media. A total of 1,148 genes were differentially expressed, consisting of 719 DEGs (348 up-regulated and 371 down-regulated genes between cells in 15% vs 25% NaCl, and 733 DEGs (521 up-regulated and 212 down-regulated genes between cells in 25% vs 30% NaCl. Moreover, 304 genes were commonly differentially expressed in both 15% vs 25% and 25% vs30% NaCl. The DEGs were enriched in different KEGG metabolic pathways, such as amino acids, glycerolipid, ribosome, nitrogen, protoporphyrin, porphyrin and porhiniods. The intracellular predominant free amino acids consisted of the glutamate family (Glu, Arg and Pro, aspartate family (Asp and aromatic amino acids (Phe and Trp, especially Glu and Asp.

  6. Proteomic response of Hordeum vulgare cv. Tadmor and Hordeum marinum to salinity stress: Similarities and differences between a glycophyte and a halophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Maršálová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Response to a high salinity treatment of 300 mM NaCl was studied in a cultivated barley Hordeum vulgare Syrian cultivar Tadmor and in a halophytic wild barley Hordeum marinum. Differential salinity tolerance of H. marinum and H. vulgare is underlied by qualitative and quantitative differences in proteins involved in a variety of biological processes. The major aim was to identify proteins underlying differential salinity tolerance between the two barley species. Analyses of plant water content, osmotic potential and accumulation of proline and dehydrin proteins under high salinity revealed a relatively higher water saturation deficit in H. marinum than in H. vulgare while H. vulgare had lower osmotic potential corresponding with high levels of proline and dehydrins. Analysis of proteins soluble upon boiling isolated from control and salt-treated crown tissues revealed similarities as well as differences between H. marinum and H. vulgare. The similar salinity responses of both barley species lie in enhanced levels of stress-protective proteins such as defence-related proteins from late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA family, several chaperones from heat shock protein (HSP family, and others such as GrpE. However, there have also been found significant differences between H. marinum and H. vulgare salinity response indicating an active stress acclimation in H. marinum while stress damage in H. vulgare. An active acclimation to high salinity in H. marinum is underlined by enhanced levels of several stress-responsive transcription factors from basic leucine zipper (bZIP and nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC families. In salt-treated H. marinum, enhanced levels of proteins involved in energy metabolism such as glycolysis, ATP metabolism, and photosynthesis-related proteins indicate an active acclimation to enhanced energy requirements during an establishment of novel plant homeostasis. In contrast, changes at proteome level in salt-treated H

  7. Plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of perch Perca fluviatilis in response to different salinities and temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Emil Aputsiaq Flindt; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2017-01-01

    with salinity at 10 and 20° C. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope was lowest at salinity of 15 at 5° C, yet at 20° C, they were lowest at a salinity of 0. A cost of osmoregulation (SMR at a salinity of 0 and 15 compared with SMR at a salinity of 10) could only be detected at a salinity of 15 at 20...... of osmoregulation (28%) at a salinity of 15 at 20° C indicates that the cost of osmoregulation in P. fluviatilis increases with temperature under hyperosmotic conditions and a power analysis showed that the cost of osmoregulation could be lower than 12·5% under other environmental conditions. The effect of salinity...

  8. Comparative physiological and growth responses of tomato and pepper plants to fertilizer induced salinity and salt stress under greenhouse conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Eraslan, Figen; Güneş, Aydın; İnal, Ali; Çiçek, Nuray; Alpaslan, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    Fertilizer induced salinity adversely affects plant growth through its ionic and osmotic effects as in ordinary salinity caused by toxic ions (Na, Cl, etc.). In this study, to determine the ionic and osmotic effects of fertilizer induced salinity and NaCl salinity on growth, ascorbic acid, proline and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation and stomatal resistance (SR), relative water content (RWC), malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of tomato and pepper plants subjected to different tr...

  9. Trocas gasosas e teores de minerais no feijão-de-corda irrigado com água salina em diferentes estádios Gas exchange and mineral concentration in cowpea irrigated with saline water at different stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia L. R. Neves

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se este trabalho com o objetivo de estudar os efeitos da aplicação de água salina nos diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento de plantas de feijão-de-corda sobre as trocas gasosas, o crescimento e os teores de minerais. O experimento foi conduzido no campo e obedeceu o delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com cinco tratamentos e cinco repetições. Os tratamentos utilizados foram: T1 - água do poço (CEa de 0,8 dS m-1 durante todo o ciclo (controle; T2 - água salina (CEa de 5,0 dS m-1 durante todo o ciclo; T3, T4 e T5 - água salina de 0 a 22, de 23 a 42 e de 43 a 62 dias após o plantio (DAP, respectivamente. As plantas dos tratamentos T3, T4 e T5 foram irrigadas com água do poço nas demais fases do ciclo. Realizaram-se, ao longo do ciclo da cultura, medições de trocas gasosas e se determinaram a produção de matéria seca e os teores de Na+, Cl-, K+, Ca2+, N e P. Os tratamentos T2 e T3 em relação ao T1 (controle, reduziram as taxas de fotossíntese e transpiração e as taxas de crescimento vegetativo e provocaram acúmulo, especialmente de Na+ e Cl-, porém se verificou, nas plantas do T3, recuperação de todas essas variáveis ao final do ciclo da cultura. As alterações no acúmulo de Na+ e Cl- nas plantas dos tratamentos T4 e T5 não foram suficientes para provocar efeitos significativos nas trocas gasosas nem nas taxas de crescimento da cultura, em comparação com as plantas do T1.The objective of this paper was to evaluate the effect of irrigation with saline water, applied at different development stages of cowpea, on gas exchange, growth and nutrient concentration. The experiment was set up in the field, in a completely randomized block design, with five treatments and five repetitions. The treatments studied were: T1 - Groundwater with electrical conductivity (ECw of 0.8 dS m-1 during the whole crop cycle (control; T2 - saline water (ECw = 5.0 dS m-1 during the whole crop cycle; T3, T4 and T5 - saline water from 0

  10. Water relations, nutrient content and developmental responses of Euonymus plants irrigated with water of different degrees of salinity and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Bellot, María José; Alvarez, Sara; Castillo, Marco; Bañón, Sebastián; Ortuño, María Fernanda; Sánchez-Blanco, María Jesús

    2013-07-01

    For 20 weeks, the physiological responses of Euonymus japonica plants to different irrigation sources were studied. Four irrigation treatments were applied at 100 % water holding capacity: control (electrical conductivity (EC) plants were rewatered with the same amount and quality of irrigation water as the control plants. Despite the differences in the chemical properties of the water used, the plants irrigated with NaCl and WW showed similar alterations in growth and size compared with the control even at the end of the recovery period. Leaf number was affected even when the EC of the irrigation water was of 1.7 dS m(-1) (IW), indicating the salt sensitivity of this parameter. Stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthesis (Pn), as well as stem water potential (Ψstem), were most affected in plants irrigated with the most saline waters (NaCl and WW). At the end of the experiment the above parameters recovered, while IW plants showed similar values to the control. The higher Na(+) and Cl(+) uptake by NaCl and WW plants led them to show osmotic adjustment throughout the experiment. The highest amount of boron found in WW plants did not affect root growth. Wastewater can be used as a water management strategy for ornamental plant production, as long as the water quality is not too saline, since the negative effect of salt on the aesthetic value of plants need to be taken into consideration.

  11. Indicators: Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinity is the dissolved salt content of a body of water. Excess salinity, due to evaporation, water withdrawal, wastewater discharge, and other sources, is a chemical sterssor that can be toxic for aquatic environments.

  12. Transcriptomic analysis reveals importance of ROS and phytohormones in response to short-term salinity stress in Populus tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingyu; Meng, Yu; Ma, Jing; Zhao, Xiulian; Cheng, Tielong; Ji, Jing; Chang, Ermei; Meng, Chen; Deng, Nan; Chen, Lanzhen; Shi, Shengqing; Jiang, Zeping

    2015-01-01

    Populus tomentosa (Chinese white poplar) is well adapted to various extreme environments, and is considered an important species to study the effects of salinity stress on poplar trees. To decipher the mechanism of poplar's rapid response to short-term salinity stress, we firstly detected the changes in H2O2 and hormone, and then profiled the gene expression pattern of 10-week-old seedling roots treated with 200 mM NaCl for 0, 6, 12, and 24 h (h) by RNA-seq on the Illumina-Solexa platform. Physiological determination showed that the significant increase in H2O2 began at 6 h, while that in hormone ABA was at 24 h, under salt stress. Compared with controls (0 h), 3991, 4603, and 4903 genes were up regulated, and 1408, 2206, and 3461 genes were down regulated (adjusted P ≤ 0.05 and |log2Ratio|≥1) at 6, 12, and 24 h time points, respectively. The Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation revealed that the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were highly enriched in hormone- and reactive oxygen species-related biological processes, including "response to oxidative stress or abiotic stimulus," "peroxidase activity," "regulation of transcription," "hormone synthetic and metabolic process," "hormone signal transduction," "antioxidant activity," and "transcription factor activity." Moreover, K-means clustering demonstrated that DEGs (total RPKM value>12 from four time points) could be categorized into four kinds of expression trends: quick up/down over 6 or 12 h, and slow up/down over 24 h. Of these, DEGs involved in H2O2- and hormone- producing and signal-related genes were further enriched in this analysis, which indicated that the two kinds of small molecules, hormones and H2O2, play pivotal roles in the short-term salt stress response in poplar. This study provides a basis for future studies of the molecular adaptation of poplar and other tree species to salinity stress.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis reveals importance of ROS and phytohormones in response to short-term salinity stress in Populus tomentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu eZheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Populus tomentosa (Chinese white poplar is well adapted to various extreme environments, and is considered an important species to study the effects of salinity stress on poplar trees. To decipher the mechanism of poplar’s rapid response to short-term salinity stress, we firstly detected the changes in H2O2 and hormone, and then profiled the gene expression pattern of ten-week-old seedling roots treated with 200 mM NaCl for 0, 6, 12 and 24 hours (h by RNA-seq on the Illumina-Solexa platform. Physiological determination showed that the significant increase in H2O2 began at 6 h, while that in hormone ABA was at 24 h, under salt stress. Compared with controls (0 h, 3991, 4603 and 4903 genes were up regulated, and 1408, 2206 and 3461 genes were down regulated (adjusted P-value ≤ 0.05 and |log2Ratio|≥1 at 6, 12, and 24 h time points, respectively. The Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway annotation revealed that the differentially expressed genes (DEGs were highly enriched in hormone- and reactive oxygen species-related biological processes, including ‘response to oxidative stress or abiotic stimulus’, ‘peroxidase activity’, ‘regulation of transcription’, ‘hormone synthetic and metabolic process’, ‘hormone signal transduction’, ‘antioxidant activity’ and ‘transcription factor activity’. Moreover, K-means clustering demonstrated that DEGs (total RPKM value>12 from four time points could be categorized into four kinds of expression trends: quick up/down over 6 h or 12 h, and slow up/down over 24 h. Of these, DEGs involved in H2O2- and hormone- producing and signal-related genes were further enriched in this analysis, which indicated that the two kinds of small molecules, hormones and H2O2, play pivotal roles in the short-term salt stress response in poplar. This study provides a basis for future studies of the molecular adaptation of poplar and other tree species to salinity

  14. Evapotranspiration and water balance of an anthropogenic coastal desert wetland: responses to fire, inflows and salinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Edward P.; Mexicano, Lourdes; Garcia-Hernandez, Jaqueline; Nagler, Pamela L.; Gomez-Sapiens, Martha M.; Tang, Dawei; Lomeli, Marcelo A.; Ramírez-Hernández, Jorge; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) and other water balance components were estimated for Cienega de Santa Clara, an anthropogenic brackish wetland in the delta of the Colorado River in Mexico. The marsh is in the Biosphere Reserve of the Upper Gulf of California and Delta of the Colorado River, and supports a high abundance and diversity of wildlife. Over 95% of its water supply originates as agricultural drain water from the USA, sent for disposal in Mexico. This study was conducted from 2009 to 2011, before, during and after a trial run of the Yuma Desalting Plant in the USA, which will divert water from the wetland and replace it with brine from the desalting operation. The goal was to estimate the main components in the water budget to be used in creating management scenarios for this marsh. We used a remote sensing algorithm to estimate ET from meteorological data and Enhanced Vegetation Index values from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on the Terra satellite. ET estimates from the MODIS method were then compared to results from a mass balance of water and salt inflows and outflows over the study period. By both methods, mean annual ET estimates ranged from 2.6 to 3.0 mm d−1, or 50 to 60% of reference ET (ETo). Water entered at a mean salinity of 2.6 g L−1 TDS and mean salinity in the wetland was 3.73 g L−1 TDS over the 33 month study period. Over an annual cycle, 54% of inflows supported ET while the rest exited the marsh as outflows; however, in winter when ET was low, up to 90% of the inflows exited the marsh. An analysis of ET estimates over the years 2000–2011 showed that annual ET was proportional to the volume of inflows, but was also markedly stimulated by fires. Spring fires in 2006 and 2011 burned off accumulated thatch, resulting in vigorous growth of new leaves and a 30% increase in peak summer ET compared to non-fire years. Following fires, peak summer ET estimates were equal to ETo, while in non-fire years peak ET was

  15. Isolation of ESTs from cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) leaves treated with inducers of the defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verica, Joseph A; Maximova, Siela N; Strem, Mary D; Carlson, John E; Bailey, Bryan A; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2004-11-01

    Pathogenic diseases represent a major constraint to the growth and yield of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.). Ongoing research on model plant systems has revealed that defense responses are activated via signaling pathways mediated by endogenous signaling molecules such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene. Activation of plant defenses is associated with changes in the expression of large numbers of genes. To gain a better understanding of defense responses in cacao, we have employed suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA libraries, macroarray hybridization analysis, high throughput DNA sequencing and bioinformatics to identify cacao genes induced by these signaling molecules. Additionally, we investigated gene activation by a phytotoxic elicitor-like protein, Nep1. We have identified a unigene set of 1,256 members, including 330 members representing genes induced during the defense response.

  16. Taxonomic and functional diversity provides insight into microbial pathways and stress responses in the saline Qinghai Lake, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyuan Huang

    Full Text Available Microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycles contribute to the global climate system and have sensitive responses and feedbacks to environmental stress caused by climate change. Yet, little is known about the effects of microbial biodiversity (i.e., taxonmic and functional diversity on biogeochemical cycles in ecosytems that are highly sensitive to climate change. One such sensitive ecosystem is Qinghai Lake, a high-elevation (3196 m saline (1.4% lake located on the Tibetan Plateau, China. This study provides baseline information on the microbial taxonomic and functional diversity as well as the associated stress response genes. Illumina metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets were generated from lake water samples collected at two sites (B and E. Autotrophic Cyanobacteria dominated the DNA samples, while heterotrophic Proteobacteria dominated the RNA samples at both sites. Photoheterotrophic Loktanella was also present at both sites. Photosystem II was the most active pathway at site B; while, oxidative phosphorylation was most active at site E. Organisms that expressed photosystem II or oxidative phosphorylation also expressed genes involved in photoprotection and oxidative stress, respectively. Assimilatory pathways associated with the nitrogen cycle were dominant at both sites. Results also indicate a positive relationship between functional diversity and the number of stress response genes. This study provides insight into the stress resilience of microbial metabolic pathways supported by greater taxonomic diversity, which may affect the microbial community response to climate change.

  17. Antioxidative responses of Ocimum basilicum to sodium chloride or sodium sulphate salinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarchoune, I; Sgherri, C; Izzo, R; Lachaal, M; Ouerghi, Z; Navari-Izzo, F

    2010-09-01

    Soils and ground water in nature are dominated by chloride and sulphate salts. There have been several studies concerning NaCl salinity, however, little is known about the Na(2)SO(4) one. The effects on antioxidative activities of chloride or sodium sulphate in terms of the same Na(+) equivalents (25 mM Na(2)SO(4) and 50 mM NaCl) were studied on 30 day-old plants of Ocimum basilicum L., variety Genovese subjected to 15 and 30 days of treatment. Growth, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), relative ion leakage ratio (RLR), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), ascorbate and glutathione contents as well as the activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11); glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) and peroxidases (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) were determined. In leaves, growth was more depressed by 25 mM Na(2)SO(4) than 50 mM NaCl. The higher sensitivity of basil to Na(2)SO(4) was associated with an enhanced accumulation of H(2)O(2), an inhibition of APX, GR and POD activities (with the exception of POD under the 30-day-treatment) and a lower regeneration of reduced ascorbate (AsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH). However, the changes in the antioxidant metabolism were enough to limit oxidative damage, explaining the fact that RLR and TBARS levels were unchanged under both Na(2)SO(4) and NaCl treatment. Moreover, for both salts the 30-day-treatment reduced H(2)O(2) accumulation, unchanged RLR and TBARS levels, and enhanced the levels of antioxidants and antioxidative enzymes, thus achieving an adaptation mechanism against reactive oxygen species. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Going with the Flow: Detection of Drift in Response to Hypo-Saline Stress by the Estuarine Benthic Diatom Cylindrotheca closterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cristiano V. M.; Romero-Romero, Sonia; Lourençato, Lucio F.; Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Blasco, Julián; Gretz, Michael R.; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Ribeiro, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Avoidance response is a well-known mechanism for escaping environmental stress. For organisms with reduced active movement, such as benthic microalgae, drifting could be a specifically selected mean of avoiding less favorable environments. To test this hypothesis, a system was developed to assess if hypo-saline stress triggers drift in the estuarine benthic diatom Cylindrotheca closterium. Concurrently, the effects of salinity on growth inhibition were also investigated in order to compare the sensitivity of this endpoint with the drift response, and to estimate the immediate population decline caused by both drift and population growth responses. It was verified that the salinity value that inhibited the algal population growth by 50% (IGS50) was 19, while the salinity value that triggered the drift response by 50% of the population (TDS50) was 15. These results indicate that drift is an identifiable response triggered to escape stressful environments. The combination of the two responses (population growth and drift) showed that population decline based exclusively on the inhibition of population growth may result in an underestimation of the risk, compared with the decline when drifting to avoid stress is also taken into account. PMID:24260535

  19. The response of digestive enzyme activity in the mature Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis (Decapoda: Brachyura, to gradual increase of salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Wang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mature Chinese mitten crabs, Eriocheir sinensis, were exposed to brackish water or seawater as an obligatory part of their reproductive migration. Physiological and biochemical reorganization were needed to adapt them to this migration. To understand the digestive adjustments of Eriocheir sinensis at biochemical level during this transformation from freshwater to seawater, the response of the activity of five digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, pepsin, trypsin and lipase in the hepatopancreas to salinities increasing gradually from 0 (freshwater to 35 (seawater was analysed in mature females and males. Digestive enzymes exhibited significantly higher activities in the hepatopancreas of males than those of females, except lipase. In females, amylase, pepsin and trypsin activities began to decrease significantly as the salinity reached 28, and cellulase activity decreased at 35; in males, a considerable decrease in the activity of digestive enzymes, except lipase, was observed at 21 and higher salinities, while an increase was observed at 14. Reduced enzyme activities at elevated salinities suggest that the digestive capacity of crabs for diets becomes weak, and all these digestive enzymes participated in digestive adjustments during osmoregulation. The initial salinity which induced the decrease of enzyme activity was lower in males than in females, indicating that females were more tolerant to elevated salinities than males from the point of digestive biochemical modulation.

  20. Comparative gas exchange and growth responses of C3 and C4 beach species grown at different salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, T M

    1978-01-01

    Comparative laboratory gas exchange and relative growth rate experiments were conducted on three native California coastal strand species at four salinity treatment levels. Relative mesophyll conductance sensitivities to salinity of Atriplex leucophylla (Moq.) D. Dietr. (C4) and Atriplex californica Moq. in D.C. (C3) were nearly identical. Mesophyll conductances of both species were stimulated by moderate levels of salinity. Mesophyll conductances of Abronia maritima Nutt. ex Wats. (C3) were highest in the absence of salinity and depressed by increasing levels of salinity. Increasing levels of salinity generally decreased net photosynthesis and leaf conductances but increased water use efficiencies. The C4 species, Atriplex leucophylla, had higher mesophyll conductances and water use efficiencies at all salinity levels than the C3 species. The effects of salinity on relative growth and net assimilation rates of greenhouse grown plants were not directly correlated with the effects on net photosynthesis measured in the laboratory. Growth of Abronia maritima was greatly stimulated by low levels of salinity whereas photosynthesis was substantially inhibited. The possible significance of C4 photosynthesis in relation to salinity is discussed.

  1. Interactive effects of salinity and low potassium on growth, physiology response of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. W01-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Y. T.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Houttuynia cordata Thunb. is a plant enrichment in potassium in plant was reported. Salinity and low potassium availability are important environmental factors restricting plant growth and productivity throughout the world. The interactive effects of salinity and potassium on growth, water content, chlorophyll content, lipid peroxidation content, ion accumulations and K+/Na+ ratio, and organic accumulations as well as oxidative enzymes were investigated in Houttuynia cordata Thunb.. Plants of three-leaf-stage were selected for uniformity, then treated with four levels of Na+ (50, 100, 200 mmol/L and K+(0, 0.6, 1.2, 2.4 mmol/L for 20 days. Plant biomass production, ratio of root and shoot, root numbers, water content and MDA content significantly declined in the combined effect of salinity and K+ deprivation, and increased with salinity. However, salinity in conjunction with K+ deprivation led to an increase on leaf chlorophyll content, which even increased with increasing salinity levels. As expected, K+ content in plant was positive correlated with supplementary K+ concentrations, while Na+ was well correlated with salinity, especially enhanced by the interactive effects of salinity and K+ deprivation. Soluble sugar and proline contents remarkable increased by the highest salinity. SOD activity also substantial increased by the highest salinity, and increased with supplementary K+ concentrations. However, elevated CAT and POD activities were not accompanied with an increase in SOD activity.

  2. Hypertonic saline enhances host response to bacterial challenge by augmenting receptor-independent neutrophil intracellular superoxide formation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to determine whether hypertonic saline (HTS) infusion modulates the host response to bacterial challenge. METHODS: Sepsis was induced in 30 Balb-C mice by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli (5 x 107 organisms per animal). In 10 mice, resuscitation was performed at 0 and 24 hours with a 4 mL\\/kg bolus of HTS (7.5% NaCl), 10 animals received 4 mL\\/kg of normal saline (0.9% NaCl), and the remaining animals received 30 mL\\/kg of normal saline. Samples of blood, spleen, and lung were cultured at 8 and 36 hours. Polymorphonucleocytes were incubated in isotonic or hypertonic medium before culture with E. coli. Phagocytosis was assessed by flow cytometry, whereas intracellular bacterial killing was measured after inhibition of phagocytosis with cytochalasin B. Intracellular formation of free radicals was assessed by the molecular probe CM-H(2)DCFDA. Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase p38 and ERK-1 phosphorylation, and nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation were determined. Data are represented as means (SEM), and an analysis of variance test was performed to gauge statistical significance. RESULTS: Significantly reduced bacterial culture was observed in the animals resuscitated with HTS when compared with their NS counterparts, in blood (51.8 +\\/- 4.3 vs. 82.0 +\\/- 3.3 and 78.4 +\\/- 4.8, P = 0.005), lung (40.0 +\\/- 4.1 vs. 93.2 +\\/- 2.1 and 80.9 +\\/- 4.7, P = 0.002), and spleen (56.4 +\\/- 3.8 vs. 85.4 +\\/- 4.2 and 90.1 +\\/- 5.9, P = 0.05). Intracellular killing of bacteria increased markedly (P = 0.026) and superoxide generation was enhanced upon exposure to HTS (775.78 +\\/- 23.6 vs. 696.57 +\\/- 42.2, P = 0.017) despite inhibition of MAP kinase and NFkappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: HTS significantly enhances intracellular killing of bacteria while attenuating receptor-mediated activation of proinflammatory cascades.

  3. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Salinity Stress-Responsive miRNAs in Wild Emmer Wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kewei Feng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of endogenous small noncoding RNAs which regulate diverse molecular and biochemical processes at a post-transcriptional level in plants. As the ancestor of domesticated wheat, wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides has great genetic potential for wheat improvement. However, little is known about miRNAs and their functions on salinity stress in wild emmer. To obtain more information on miRNAs in wild emmer, we systematically investigated and characterized the salinity-responsive miRNAs using deep sequencing technology. A total of 88 conserved and 124 novel miRNAs were identified, of which 50 were proven to be salinity-responsive miRNAs, with 32 significantly up-regulated and 18 down-regulated. miR172b and miR1120a, as well as mi393a, were the most significantly differently expressed. Targets of these miRNAs were computationally predicted, then Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG analysis found that the targets of salinity-responsive miRNAs were enriched in transcription factors and stress-related proteins. Finally, we investigated the expression profiles of seven miRNAs ranging between salt-tolerant and sensitive genotypes, and found that they played critical roles in salinity tolerance in wild emmer. Our results systematically identified the salinity-responsive miRNAs in wild emmer, not only enriching the miRNA resource but also laying the foundation for further study on the biological functions and evolution of miRNAs in wild wheat and beyond.

  4. Is man responsible for global warming?; L'homme est-il responsable du rechauffement climatique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, A

    2009-07-01

    According to politicians, ecologists and mass media, it is now certain that with our CO{sub 2} emissions, we are all responsible for a major global warming to come with dramatic consequences. But, is this affirmation indisputable? Are we all responsible for the rise of sea level and the summer thawing of the arctic ice shelf? Is this expected global warming without precedent? And is CO{sub 2}, necessary for life, the cause of our misfortune? The answers commonly claimed are maybe more complex in reality and the climate question more subtle than it looks like. This book tries to decode the wheels of the climate machine and the share of human responsibility in climate change. (J.S.)

  5. Response of soil physicochemical properties and enzyme activities to long-term reclamation of coastal saline soil, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuefeng; Pu, Lijie; Wang, Qiqi; Zhu, Ming; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Meng

    2017-12-31

    Soil enzyme activity during different years of reclamation and land use patterns could indicate changes in soil quality. The objective of this research is to explore the dynamics of 5 soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, amylase, urease, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) involved in C, N, and P cycling and their responses to changes in soil physicochemical properties resulting from long-term reclamation of coastal saline soil. Soil samples from a total of 55 sites were collected from a coastal reclamation area with different years of reclamation (0, 7, 32, 40, 63a) in this study. The results showed that both long-term reclamation and land use patterns have significant effects on soil physicochemical properties and enzyme activities. Compared with the bare flat, soil water content, soil bulk density, pH and electrical conductivity showed a decreasing trend after reclamation, whereas soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus tended to increase. Dehydrogenase, amylase and acid phosphatase activities initially increased and then decreased with increasing years of reclamation, whereas urease and alkaline phosphatase activities were characterized by an increase-decrease-increase trend. Moreover, urease, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase activities exhibited significant differences between coastal saline soil with 63years of reclamation and bare flat, whereas dehydrogenase and amylase activities remained unchanged. Aquaculture ponds showed higher soil water content, pH and EC but lower soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus than rapeseed, broad bean and wheat fields. Rapeseed, broad bean and wheat fields displayed higher urease and alkaline phosphatase activities and lower dehydrogenase, amylase and acid phosphatase activities compared with aquaculture ponds. Redundancy analysis revealed that the soil physicochemical properties explained 74.5% of the variation in soil enzyme activities and that an obvious relationship

  6. Physiological responses of three soybean species (Glycine soja, G. gracilis, and G. max cv. Melrose) to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoran; Song, Jinhui; Dong, Lijun; Wang, Di; Zhang, Shuling; Liu, Jianfeng

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the mechanism for salt tolerance in wild soybean (Glycine soja) can help researchers improve that trait in cultivated soybean lines. We analyzed the effects of excess NaCl on the growth, physiology, and ion distribution in three soybean species: wild G. soja (W8), semi-wild G. gracilis (SW18), and the cultivated salt-sensitive G. max (cv. Melrose). These comparisons revealed that, under salt stress, shoot and root lengths and biomass (either shoot or root dry weights) were significantly higher for the W8 genotype than for the other two. Most of the morphological parameters for roots from the W8 plants were also increased, including total length, specific root length, and surface area. However, the average root diameter for W8 was significantly lower than that of either SW18 or 'Melrose' soybeans. In response to salinity, photosynthesis was suppressed to a greater extent in 'Melrose' than in W8. The relatively higher tolerance shown by W8 plants was also associated with lower levels of malondialdehyde, hydrogen peroxide, and relative electrical conductivity, but higher activities by superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, as well as more free proline and glycine betaine. In addition, the W8 plants contained less Na + and Cl - , but more K + , and they had a higher K + /Na + ratio in their leaves and roots when compared with either SW18 or 'Melrose' plants. Therefore, the W8 genotype performs better in terms of seedling growth, photosynthetic characteristics, and physiological indexes. These findings provide guidance for developing new soybean cultivars with improved tolerance to salt stress. Our data also contribute to the knowledge base for plant salt tolerance as a tool for increasing the yields of other crops in high-salinity soils.

  7. Salinity in rose production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Reis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rose is one of the most important ornamental plants in the world. However, the cultivation systems used for roses often impose salt stress. Saline conditions occur naturally in some regions or by human activity in others with use of low quality water or excessive fertilizer application. In general, roses are considered sensitive to salinity. However, tolerance levels can be different among roses species and cultivars. Therefore, studies are needed that take into account characteristics of each species and how the exposure to salinity occurs. Management of water and nutrients can be important tools for mitigating the effects of high salt concentrations. Also, advances in biotechnology can be used for a better understanding of the physiological responses to salinity and to develop more salt tolerant rose cultivars. Thus, this paper aims to review the progress made and future prospects of salinity tolerance in commercial rose production.

  8. The Response of Fodderbeet to Salinity : Introduction of a non-conventional fodder crop (Fodderbeet) to salt affected lands of Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, B.H.

    2007-01-01

    Summary In the experiments described in this thesis on fodderbeet Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris cv. Majoral and seabeet Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima grown under saline conditions the seed germination of four fodderbeet Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris cultivars was first studied in response to

  9. RNA-seq analysis of the response of the halophyte, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant) to high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Suzuki, Takamasa; Nishikawa, Kouki; Agarie, Sakae; Ishiguro, Sumie; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that convey salt tolerance in plants is a crucial issue for increasing crop yield. The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) is a halophyte that is capable of growing under high salt conditions. For example, the roots of ice plant seedlings continue to grow in 140 mM NaCl, a salt concentration that completely inhibits Arabidopsis thaliana root growth. Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for this high level of salt tolerance in a halophyte has the potential of revealing tolerance mechanisms that have been evolutionarily successful. In the present study, deep sequencing (RNAseq) was used to examine gene expression in ice plant roots treated with various concentrations of NaCl. Sequencing resulted in the identification of 53,516 contigs, 10,818 of which were orthologs of Arabidopsis genes. In addition to the expression analysis, a web-based ice plant database was constructed that allows broad public access to the data. The results obtained from an analysis of the RNAseq data were confirmed by RT-qPCR. Novel patterns of gene expression in response to high salinity within 24 hours were identified in the ice plant when the RNAseq data from the ice plant was compared to gene expression data obtained from Arabidopsis plants exposed to high salt. Although ABA responsive genes and a sodium transporter protein (HKT1), are up-regulated and down-regulated respectively in both Arabidopsis and the ice plant; peroxidase genes exhibit opposite responses. The results of this study provide an important first step towards analyzing environmental tolerance mechanisms in a non-model organism and provide a useful dataset for predicting novel gene functions.

  10. RNA-seq analysis of the response of the halophyte, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant to high salinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironaka Tsukagoshi

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanisms that convey salt tolerance in plants is a crucial issue for increasing crop yield. The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum is a halophyte that is capable of growing under high salt conditions. For example, the roots of ice plant seedlings continue to grow in 140 mM NaCl, a salt concentration that completely inhibits Arabidopsis thaliana root growth. Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for this high level of salt tolerance in a halophyte has the potential of revealing tolerance mechanisms that have been evolutionarily successful. In the present study, deep sequencing (RNAseq was used to examine gene expression in ice plant roots treated with various concentrations of NaCl. Sequencing resulted in the identification of 53,516 contigs, 10,818 of which were orthologs of Arabidopsis genes. In addition to the expression analysis, a web-based ice plant database was constructed that allows broad public access to the data. The results obtained from an analysis of the RNAseq data were confirmed by RT-qPCR. Novel patterns of gene expression in response to high salinity within 24 hours were identified in the ice plant when the RNAseq data from the ice plant was compared to gene expression data obtained from Arabidopsis plants exposed to high salt. Although ABA responsive genes and a sodium transporter protein (HKT1, are up-regulated and down-regulated respectively in both Arabidopsis and the ice plant; peroxidase genes exhibit opposite responses. The results of this study provide an important first step towards analyzing environmental tolerance mechanisms in a non-model organism and provide a useful dataset for predicting novel gene functions.

  11. Change in coccolith size and morphology due to response to temperature and salinity in coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) isolated from the Bering and Chukchi seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Kazuko; Satoh, Manami; Harada, Naomi; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Strains of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) collected from the subarctic North Pacific and Arctic oceans in 2010 were established as clone cultures and have been maintained in the laboratory at 15 °C and 32 ‰ salinity. To study the physiological responses of coccolith formation to changes in temperature and salinity, growth experiments and morphometric investigations were performed on two strains, namely MR57N isolated from the northern Bering Sea and MR70N at the Chukchi Sea. This is the first report of a detailed morphometric and morphological investigation of Arctic Ocean coccolithophore strains. The specific growth rates at the logarithmic growth phases in both strains markedly increased as temperature was elevated from 5 to 20 °C, although coccolith productivity (estimated as the percentage of calcified cells) was similar at 10-20 % at all temperatures. On the other hand, the specific growth rate of MR70N was affected less by changes in salinity in the range 26-35 ‰, but the proportion of calcified cells decreased at high and low salinities. According to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, coccolith morphotypes can be categorized into Type B/C on the basis of their biometrical parameters. The central area elements of coccoliths varied from thin lath type to well-calcified lath type when temperature was increased or salinity was decreased, and coccolith size decreased simultaneously. Coccolithophore cell size also decreased with increasing temperature, although the variation in cell size was slightly greater at the lower salinity level. This indicates that subarctic and arctic coccolithophore strains can survive in a wide range of seawater temperatures and at lower salinities with change in their morphology. Because all coccolith biometric parameters followed the scaling law, the decrease in coccolith size was caused simply by the reduced calcification. Taken together, our results suggest that calcification productivity may

  12. Responses to changes in Ca2+ supply in two Mediterranean evergreens, Phillyrea latifolia and Pistacia lentiscus, during salinity stress and subsequent relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattini, Massimiliano; Traversi, Maria Laura

    2008-10-01

    Changes in root-zone Ca(2+) concentration affect a plant's performance under high salinity, an issue poorly investigated for Mediterranean xerophytes, which may suffer from transient root-zone salinity stress in calcareous soils. It was hypothesized that high-Ca(2+) supply may affect differentially the response to salinity stress of species differing in their strategy of Na(+) allocation at organ level. Phillyrea latifolia and Pistacia lentiscus, which have been reported to greatly differ for Na(+) uptake and transport rates to the leaves, were studied. Methods In plants exposed to 0 mM or 200 mM NaCl and supplied with 2.0 mM or 8.0 mM Ca(2+), under 100 % solar irradiance, measurements were conducted of (a) gas exchange, PSII photochemistry and plant growth; (b) water and ionic relations; (c) the activity of superoxide dismutase and the lipid peroxidation; and (d) the concentration of individual polyphenols. Gas exchange and plant growth were also estimated during a period of relief from salinity stress. Key Results The performance of Pistacia lentiscus decreased to a significantly smaller degree than that of Phillyrea latifolia because of high salinity. Ameliorative effects of high-Ca(2+) supply were more evident in Phillyrea latifolia than in Pistacia lentiscus. High-Ca(2+) reduced steeply the Na(+) transport to the leaves in salt-treated Phillyrea latifolia, and allowed a faster recovery of gas exchange and growth rates as compared with low-Ca(2+) plants, during the period of relief from salinity. Salt-induced biochemical adjustments, mostly devoted to counter salt-induced oxidative damage, were greater in Phillyrea latifolia than in Pistacia lentiscus. An increased Ca(2+) : Na(+) ratio may be of greater benefit for Phillyrea latifolia than for Pistacia lentiscus, as in the former, adaptive mechanisms to high root-zone salinity are primarily devoted to restrict the accumulation of potentially toxic ions in sensitive shoot organs.

  13. The depressor response to intracerebroventricular hypotonic saline is sensitive to TRPV4 antagonist RN1734

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire H Feetham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have shown that the periventricular region of the brain, including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN, is critical to sensing and responding to changes in plasma osmolality. Further studies also implicate the transient receptor potential ion channel, type V4 (TRPV4 channel in this homeostatic behaviour. In previous work we have shown that TRPV4 ion channels couple to calcium-activated potassium channels in the PVN to decrease action potential firing frequency in response to hypotonicity. In the present study we investigated whether, similarly, intracerebroventricular (ICV application of hypotonic solutions modulated cardiovascular parameters, and if so whether this was sensitive to a TRPV4 channel inhibitor. We found that ICV injection of 270mOsmol artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF decreased mean blood pressure, but not heart rate, compared to naïve mice or mice injected with 300mOsmol ACSF. This effect was abolished by treatment with the TRPV4 inhibitor RN1734. These data suggest that periventricular targets within the brain are capable of generating depressor action in response to TRPV4 ion channel activation. Potentially, in the future, the TRPV4 channel, or the TRPV4–KCa coupling mechanism, may serve as a therapeutic target for treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  14. The depressor response to intracerebroventricular hypotonic saline is sensitive to TRPV4 antagonist RN1734

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feetham, Claire H.; Nunn, Nicolas; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Several reports have shown that the periventricular region of the brain, including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), is critical to sensing and responding to changes in plasma osmolality. Further studies also implicate the transient receptor potential ion channel, type V4 (TRPV4) channel in this homeostatic behavior. In previous work we have shown that TRPV4 ion channels couple to calcium-activated potassium channels in the PVN to decrease action potential firing frequency in response to hypotonicity. In the present study we investigated whether, similarly, intracerebroventricular (ICV) application of hypotonic solutions modulated cardiovascular parameters, and if so whether this was sensitive to a TRPV4 channel inhibitor. We found that ICV injection of 270 mOsmol artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) decreased mean blood pressure, but not heart rate, compared to naïve mice or mice injected with 300 mOsmol ACSF. This effect was abolished by treatment with the TRPV4 inhibitor RN1734. These data suggest that periventricular targets within the brain are capable of generating depressor action in response to TRPV4 ion channel activation. Potentially, in the future, the TRPV4 channel, or the TRPV4–KCa coupling mechanism, may serve as a therapeutic target for treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25954200

  15. Hypertonic Saline in Conjunction with High-Dose Furosemide Improves Dose-Response Curves in Worsening Refractory Congestive Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Salvatore; Di Gaudio, Francesca; La Rocca, Vincenzo; Balistreri, Fabio; Greco, Massimiliano; Torres, Daniele; Lupo, Umberto; Rizzo, Giuseppina; di Pasquale, Pietro; Indelicato, Sergio; Cuttitta, Francesco; Butler, Javed; Parrinello, Gaspare

    2015-10-01

    Diuretic responsiveness in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) is better assessed by urine production per unit diuretic dose than by the absolute urine output or diuretic dose. Diuretic resistance arises over time when the plateau rate of sodium and water excretion is reached prior to optimal fluid elimination and may be overcome when hypertonic saline solution (HSS) is added to high doses of furosemide. Forty-two consecutively hospitalized patients with refractory CHF were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to furosemide doses (125 mg, 250 mg, 500 mg) so that all patients received intravenous furosemide diluted in 150 ml of normal saline (0.9%) in the first step (0-24 h) and the same furosemide dose diluted in 150 ml of HSS (1.4%) in the next step (24-48 h) as to obtain 3 groups as follows: Fourteen patients receiving 125 mg (group 1), fourteen patients receiving 250 mg (group 2), and fourteen patients receiving 500 mg (group 3) of furosemide. Urine samples of all patients were collected at 30, 60, and 90 min, and 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 24 h after infusion. Diuresis, sodium excretion, osmolality, and furosemide concentration were evaluated for each urine sample. After randomization, 40 patients completed the study. Two patients, one in group 2 and one in group 3 dropped out. Patients in group 1 (125 mg furosemide) had a mean age of 77 ± 17 years, 43% were male, 6 (43%) had heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and 64% were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV; the mean age of patients in group 2 (250 mg furosemide) was 80 ± 8.1 years, 15% were male, 5 (38%) had HFpEF, and 84% were in NYHA class IV; and the mean age of patients in group 3 (500 mg furosemide) was 73 ± 12 years, 54% were male, 6 (46%) had HFpEF, and 69% were in NYHA class IV. HSS added to furosemide increased total urine output, sodium excretion, urinary osmolality, and furosemide urine delivery in all patients and at all time points. The percentage increase was 18,14, and

  16. Physiological Response to Salinity and Alkalinity of Rice Genotypes of Varying Salt Tolerance Grown in Field Lysimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Rao, P.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity and alkalinity seriously threaten rice production in south Asia. Improving screening methodologies to identify sources of tolerance for improved breeding for salt tolerant rice is of continuing importance. Rice genotypes of varying salt tolerance, such as tolerant (T, semi-tolerant (ST, and sensitive (S, were grown in field lysimeters in saline soil of ECe 4 and 8 mS cm-1 and alkali soil of pH 9.5 and 9.8 in North India and analyzed for chlorophyll (Chl, sugar, starch and proline in leaves. Chlorophyll a and b decreased due to salinity in all the tolerance groups. However, Chl a was not much affected but chl b increased with alkalinity. Under high stress both at ECe 8 and pH 9.8 Chl a and b were more in tolerant than in sensitive genotypes. The ratio of Chl a/b was similar in T, ST and S genotypes under salinity stress. Sugar accumulation was higher in T compared to S under normal conditions but under salinity or alkalinity stress the differences were not significant. Leaf starch was highest in T, intermediate in ST and lowest in S genotypes in normal as well as under salinity and alkalinity stress. There was decrease in starch with salinity and alkalinity stress only in T group but not in ST and S group. Proline increased significantly in all the tolerance groups even at low salinity of ECe 4 mS cm -1 or pH 9.5. The salt tolerant genotypes of rice maintained higher levels of Chl a and b, starch and proline under high salinity and alkalinity stress and are the robust criteria for tolerating high salinity and alkalinity.

  17. Monitoring the Short-Term Response to Salt Exposure of Two Genetically Distinct Phragmites australis Clones with Different Salinity Tolerance Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achenbach, Luciana; Brix, Hans

    2014-01-01

    in the 15-minute experiment. The Greeny-type also recovered after the 70-minute exposure, but not the Land-type. We conclude that the response to osmotic stress is genotype-dependent and that the salt-tolerant clone possesses very efficient signaling pathways to detect changes in the soil water potential......Aims: Two genetically distinct clones of Phragmites australis were used to investigate the immediate response induced by osmotic stress. The study aimed at elucidating if the response time, the inhibition rate and the recovery from salinity stress vary between these two genotypes. The experimental...... salt concentrations (20 and 40 parts per thousand salinity). Important findings: The osmotic stress induced stomata closure and reduction of Pmax and E for both clones. The clone-specific responses as measured through physiological parameters were negatively correlated with exposure time and salt...

  18. Differential Proteins Expressed in Rice Leaves and Grains in Response to Salinity and Exogenous Spermidine Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweena Saleethong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous application of spermidine (Spd has been reported to modulate physiological processes and alleviate salt-induced damage to growth and productivity of several plants including rice. Employing a proteomic approach, we aimed at identifying rice leaf and grain proteins differentially expressing under salt stress, and in response to Spd prior to NaCl treatment. A total of 9 and 20 differentially expressed protein spots were identified in the leaves of salt-tolerant (Pokkali and salt-sensitive (KDML105 rice cultivars, respectively. Differential proteins common to both cultivars included a photosynthetic light reaction protein (oxygen-evolving complex protein 1, enzymes of Calvin cycle and glycolysis (fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and triose-phosphate isomerase, malate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase and a hypothetical protein (OsI_18213. Most proteins were present at higher intensities in Pokkali leaves. The photosynthetic oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2 was detected only in Pokkali and was up-regulated by salt-stress and further enhanced by Spd treatment. All three spots identified as superoxide dismutase in KDML105 were up-regulated by NaCl but down-regulated when treated with Spd prior to NaCl, indicating that Spd acted directly as antioxidants. Important differential stress proteins detected in mature grains of both rice cultivars were late embryogenesis abundant proteins with protective roles and an antioxidant protein, 1-Cys-peroxiredoxin. Higher salt tolerance of Pokkali partly resulted from higher intensities and more responsiveness of the proteins relating to photosynthesis light reactions, energy metabolism, antioxidant enzymes in the leaves, and stress proteins with protective roles in the grains.

  19. Effects of salinity on the transcriptome of growing maize leaf cells point at cell-age specificity in the involvement of the antioxidative response in cell growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchik, Michael; Bernstein, Nirit

    2013-01-16

    Salinity inhibits growth and development of most plants. The response to salinity is complex and varies between plant organs and stages of development. It involves challenges of ion toxicities and deficiencies as well as osmotic and oxidative stresses. The range of functions affected by the stress is reflected in elaborate changes to the transcriptome. The mechanisms involved in the developmental-stage specificity of the inhibitory responses are not fully understood. The present study took advantage of the well characterized developmental progression that exists along the maize leaf, for identification of salinity induced, developmentally-associated changes to the transcriptome. Differential subtraction screening was conducted for cells of two developmental stages: from the center of the growth zone where the expansion rate is highest, and from older cells at a more distal location of the growing zone where the expansion rate is lower and the salinity restrictive effects are more pronounced. Real-Time PCR analysis was used for validation of the expression of selected genes. The salinity-induced changes demonstrated an age-related response of the growing tissue, with elevation of salinity-damages with increased age. Growth reduction, similar to the elevation of percentage dry matter (%DM), and Na and Cl concentrations were more pronounced in the older cells. The differential subtraction screening identified genes encoding to proteins involved in antioxidant defense, electron transfer and energy, structural proteins, transcription factors and photosynthesis proteins. Of special interest is the higher induced expression of genes involved in antioxidant protection in the young compared to older cells, which was accompanied by suppressed levels of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2-). This was coupled with heightened expression in the older cells of genes that enhance cell-wall rigidity, which points at reduced potential for cell expansion. The results demonstrate a

  20. Responses to Drought and Salinity in the Endangered Species Ligularia sibirica (L. Cass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Natalia Matei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The negative effects of environmental stress factors on plant distribution and survival are increasing due to climate change and anthropogenic activities. We have analysed some responses to abiotic stress in Ligularia sibirica, a postglacial relict that is critically endangered in Europe. L. sibirica seedlings were subjected to water or salt stress treatments in the greenhouse. After the treatments, plant material was harvested and several growth parameters were measured; leaf contents of common osmolytes, the degree of oxidative stress affecting the plants and the level of antioxidant phenolic compounds were also determined. Both, drought and, especially, salt stress had a negative effect on the growth of L. sibirica plants. Treated plants showed an increase in proline (Pro and total soluble sugars (TSS levels, stronger under salt stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA, an oxidative stress biomarker contents almost doubled, and antioxidant phenolics increased significantly in salt-stressed, but not in water-stressed plants. Pro accumulation can be used as a salt and drought stress biomarker in L. sibirica and, together with TSS, likely contributes to osmotic adjustment under stress. Increase of antioxidant phenolics appears to partly compensate the salt-induced generation of oxidative stress.

  1. Growth response and toxin concentration of cultured Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum to varying salinity and temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedaria, Alice Ilaya; Luckas, Bernd; Reinhardt, Katrin; Azanza, Rhodora V

    2007-09-15

    The growth and toxin production of a Philippine Pyrodinium bahamense isolate in nutrient replete batch cultures were investigated under conditions affected by varying salinity, temperature and combined effects of salinity and temperature. Early exponential growth stage was reached after 7 days with a cell division rate of 0.26 div day(-1). The toxin content reached a peak of 298 fmol cell-1 at mid exponential phase and rapidly declined to 54 fmol cell-1 as it approached the death phase. Only three sets of toxins composed of STX, dcSTX and B1 were detected in which STX made up to 85-98 mol%toxincell-1. P. bahamense was able to grow in salinities and temperatures ranging from 26 per thousand to 36 per thousand and 23 to 36 degrees C, respectively. The optimum growth under varying salinity and temperature conditions was observed at 36 per thousand and 25 degrees C. Toxin content reached a peak of 376 fmol cell-1 at 25 degrees C and was lower (80-116 fmol cell-1) at higher temperatures (32-35 degrees C). Combined effects of salinity and temperature showed that P. bahamense was not able to grow at low salinity and temperature (i.e. below 26 per thousand-28 degrees C). Optimum growth was observed in higher salinities at all temperature conditions.

  2. Chitinase gene responses and tissue sensitivity in an intertidal mud crab (Macrophthalmus japonicus) following low or high salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Kim, Won-Seok; Park, Kiyun; Kim, Jongkyu; Lee, Moon-Ock; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2015-05-01

    Changes in salinity affect the physiological status of the marine habitat including that of the intertidal mud crab Macrophthalmus japonicus. Chitinases play significant biological roles in crustaceans such as morphogenesis, nutrient digestion, and pathogen defense. In this study, the osmoregulatory function of three chitinase gene transcripts was determined compared to seawater (SW, 31 ± 1 psu) in M. japonicus gills and hepatopancreas under different salinities (10, 25, and 40 psu) for 1, 4, and 7 days. In SW-exposed crab, quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed chitinase 1 (Mj-chi1) and chitinase 4 (Mj-chi4) transcripts constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues with strong expression in hepatopancreas, but chitinase 5 (Mj-chi5) showed highest expression in stomach. When exposed to different salinities, Mj-chi1 showed significant up-regulation at day 4 whereas Mj-chi4 showed late up-regulation (day 7) at all the salinities in hepatopancreas. In the gills, early up-regulation (day 1) in Mj-chi1 and time-dependent late up-regulation (day 7) in Mj-chi4 at high salinity were observed. These results indicate the possibility of using Mj-chi4 as a marker against salinity changes. Moreover, our results further suggest that Mj-chi1 and Mj-chi4 transcriptions were significantly affected by changes in salinity; however, Mj-chi5 in gills was less affected by salinity and showed no effect in hepatopancreas. Thus, chitinase transcription modulations in the gills are more sensitive than hepatopancreas to salinity stress. Further, present data indicate the possible existence of different physiological roles among chitinase gene families, which need to be clarified in more detail by future biochemical and physiological functional studies.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of Portunus trituberculatus in response to salinity stress provides insights into the molecular basis of osmoregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjian Lv

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus, which is naturally distributed in the coastal waters of Asia-Pacific countries, is an important farmed species in China. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic factors that influence not only the distribution and abundance of crustaceans, it is also an important factor for artificial propagation of the crab. To better understand the interaction between salinity stress and osmoregulation, we performed a transcriptome analysis in the gills of Portunus trituberculatus challenged with salinity stress, using the Illumina Deep Sequencing technology. RESULTS: We obtained 27,696,835, 28,268,353 and 33,901,271 qualified Illumina read pairs from low salinity challenged (LC, non-challenged (NC, and high salinity challenged (HC Portunus trituberculatus cDNA libraries, respectively. The overall de novo assembly of cDNA sequence data generated 94,511 unigenes, with an average length of 644 bp. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that 1,705 genes differentially expressed in salinity stress compared to the controls, including 615 and 1,516 unigenes in NC vs LC and NC vs HC respectively. GO functional enrichment analysis results showed some differentially expressed genes were involved in crucial processes related to osmoregulation, such as ion transport processes, amino acid metabolism and synthesis processes, proteolysis process and chitin metabolic process. CONCLUSION: This work represents the first report of the utilization of the next generation sequencing techniques for transcriptome analysis in Portunus trituberculatus and provides valuable information on salinity adaptation mechanism. Results reveal a substantial number of genes modified by salinity stress and a few important salinity acclimation pathways, which will serve as an invaluable resource for revealing the molecular basis of osmoregulation in Portunus trituberculatus. In addition, the most comprehensive sequences of transcripts

  4. Growth, water status and nutrient accumulation of seedlings of Cassia fistula L. in response to soil salinity

    OpenAIRE

    Hardikar, Seema Abhay; Pandey, Amar Nath

    2011-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to assess the effect of soil salinity on emergence, growth, water status, proline content and mineral accumulation of seedlings of Cassia fistula L. (Fabaceae). NaCl was added to the soil and salinity was maintained at 0.2, 2.1, 3.9, 6.2, 8.1, 10.0 and 11.9 dSm-1. Salinity caused reduction in water content and water potential of tissues that resulted in internal water deficit to plants. Consequently, seedling growth significant...

  5. Salinity effects on behavioural response to hypoxia in the non-native Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus from Florida Everglades wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, P.J.; Loftus, W.F.; Fontaine, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the hypoxia tolerance of the Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus over a range of salinities. The species was very tolerant of hypoxia, using aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and buccal bubble holding when oxygen tensions dropped to <20 mmHg (c. 1??0 mg l-1) and 6 mmHg, respectively. Salinity had little effect on the hypoxia tolerance of C. urophthalmus, except that bubble holding was more frequent at the higher salinities tested. Levels of aggression were greatest at the highest salinity. The ASR thresholds of C. urophthalmus were similar to native centrarchid sunfishes from the Everglades, however, aggression levels for C. uropthalmus were markedly higher. ?? 2009 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Comparisons of normal saline and lactated Ringer's resuscitation on hemodynamics, metabolic responses, and coagulation in pigs after severe hemorrhagic shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martini, Wenjun Z; Cortez, Douglas S; Dubick, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    .... For the military, questions continue to arise regarding efficacy of normal saline (NS) vs. lactated Ringer's (LR). Thus, this study compared the effects of LR and NS after severe hemorrhage in pigs...

  7. Physiological Responses and Ovarian Development of Female Chinese Mitten Crab Eriocheir sinensis Subjected to Different Salinity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Long

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salinity plays a key role affecting ovarian development, osmoregulation and metabolism of female Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis during reproductive migration. In this study, female E. sinensis after their puberty molt were subjected to four salinities of 0, 6, 12, and 18‰ for 40 days to investigate the salinity effects on their ovarian development as well as a range of important physiological parameters. Elevated salinity accelerated the ovarian development with ovigerous crabs found at salinity treatments of 12 and 18‰ despite no copulation had occurred. Meanwhile the survival rate of female crabs showed a decreasing trend with increasing salinity. Higher salinity also led to increased hemolymph Na+, K+, Ca2+, Cl−, and Mg2+ concentrations. The 6‰ treatment had the highest contents of hemolymph total and major free amino acids while the Na+/K+ -ATPase activity in the posterior gills was the lowest among treatments. Total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (∑n-3PUFA and n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio in the anterior gills showed a decreasing trend with salinity while 18‰ had the highest ∑PUFA and ∑n-6PUFA. The ∑n-3PUFA content and n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio of the posterior gills showed a fluctuating pattern and the highest value was detected at 0‰, while an increasing trend was found for the ∑n-6PUFA with increasing salinity. The hemolymph glucose showed a decreasing trend with increasing salinity and the highest total cholesterol in hemolymph was detected at 12‰. The 18‰ treatment had the highest levels of hemolymph γ-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase, as well as glucose, urea and acid phosphatase in hepatopancreas while the highest hemolymph superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde were detected at 0‰. Overall, the results showed that salinity increase from freshwater to brackish conditions led to lower metabolism, accelerated ovarian development, and the appearance of ovigerous crabs without

  8. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Auler Junior, Jose Otavio Costa

    2015-08-01

    Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. Hypertonic saline infusion after intratracheal hydrochloric

  9. Interactive effects of salinity and low potassium on growth, physiology response of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. W01-100

    OpenAIRE

    Zou Y. T.; Dai S.; Li J. Y.; Liu Z. Q.; Wu W.

    2012-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb. is a plant enrichment in potassium in plant was reported. Salinity and low potassium availability are important environmental factors restricting plant growth and productivity throughout the world. The interactive effects of salinity and potassium on growth, water content, chlorophyll content, lipid peroxidation content, ion accumulations and K+/Na+ ratio, and organic accumulations as well as oxidative enzymes were investigated in Houttuynia cordata Thunb.. Plants ...

  10. Physiological and biochemical responses of the forage legume Trifolium alexandrinum to different saline conditions and nitrogen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhaier, Barhoumi; Mariem, Maatallah; Mokded, Rabhi; Rouached, Aida; Alsane, Khaldoun; Chedly, Abdelly; Abderrazek, Smaoui; Abdallah, Atia

    2016-05-01

    Salinity stress reduces plant productivity, but low levels of salinity often increase plant growth rates in some species. We herein describe the effects of salinity on plant growth while focusing on nitrogen use. We treated Trifolium alexandrinum with two nitrogen concentrations and salinity levels and determined growth rates, mineral concentrations, nitrogen use efficiency, photosynthesis rates, and nitrate reductase (NR, E.C. 1.6.6.1) and glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) activities. The T. alexandrinum growth rate increased following treatment with 100 mM NaCl in low nitrogen (LN) and high nitrogen (HN) conditions. Salt treatment also increased root volume, intrinsic water use efficiency, and nitrogen use efficiency in LN and HN conditions. These changes likely contributed to higher biomass production. Salinity also increased accumulations of sodium, chloride, and phosphate, but decreased potassium and calcium levels and total nitrogen concentrations in all plant organs independently of the available nitrogen level. However, the effect of salt treatment on magnesium and nitrate concentrations in photosynthetic organs depended on nitrogen levels. Salt treatment reduced photosynthesis rates in LN and HN conditions because of inhibited stomatal conductance. The effects of salinity on leaf NR and GS activities depended on nitrogen levels, with activities increasing in LN conditions. In saline conditions, LN availability resulted in optimal growth because of low chloride accumulation and increases in total nitrogen concentrations, nitrogen use efficiency, and NR and GS activities in photosynthetic organs. Therefore, T. alexandrinum is a legume forage crop that can be cultivated in low-saline soils where nitrogen availability is limited.

  11. Salinity Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  12. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Taxol® (paclitaxel) promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ) elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day) to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation. PMID:22530557

  13. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Sangram K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxol® (paclitaxel promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation.

  14. Influência do tempo de aclimatação na resposta do cajueiro à salinidade Influence of acclimatization time on response of cashew plant to salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. A. Brilhante

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A resposta das plantas à salinidade depende de fatores fisiológicos, bioquímicos e genéticos. Com este trabalho, objetivou-se estudar o impacto do tempo de aclimatação à solução nutritiva sobre a resposta do cajueiro à salinidade. Plantas de Anarcadium occidentale L., CCP06, cultivadas em vermiculita durante 28 dias, foram transferidas para solução nutritiva de Hoagland com 1/10 de sua força iônica, onde permaneceram por 1 e 7 dias. Ao final dos dois tempos, a solução nutritiva foi suplementada com 200 mM de NaCl, condições em que as plantas foram cultivadas por 0, 12, 24, 48 e 72 h. As plantas aclimatadas por 7 dias á solução de Hoagland apresentaram sinais fisiológicos mais compatíveis com a tolerância ao NaCl, como menor acumulação de Na+ e, também, menores danos nas membranas, peroxidação dos lipídeos, degradação de proteínas, acumulação de aminoácidos livres e acumulação de prolina. A amônia livre foi o melhor indicador da intensidade do estresse salino. Os danos de membranas aumentaram com a acumulação de Na+ nas folhas. Os resultados evidenciam que o tempo de aclimatação das raízes à solução nutritiva influencia a expressão de fatores capazes de atenuar os efeitos do estresse salino.The plant response to salinity depends on physiological, biochemical and genetic factors and on their interaction with external environment. This work aimed to study the impact of adaptation time in nutrient solution on the cashew response to salinity. Seedlings of Anacardium occidentale L (CCP06 grown in vermiculite, for 28 days, were placed to grow in 1/10 ionic strength Hoagland solution for 1 and 7 days. At the end of each time the solution was supplemented with 200 mM NaCl, and under this condition the plants were monitored for 0, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. The 7 days Hoagland solution acclimated plants had physiological index more compatible to tolerance to NaCl such as low Na+ accumulation and also low membrane

  15. Response to non-uniform salinity in the root zone of the halophyte Atriplex nummularia: growth, photosynthesis, water relations and tissue ion concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazihizina, Nadia; Colmer, Timothy D; Barrett-Lennard, Edward G

    2009-09-01

    Soil salinity is often heterogeneous, yet the physiology of halophytes has typically been studied with uniform salinity treatments. An evaluation was made of the growth, net photosynthesis, water use, water relations and tissue ions in the halophytic shrub Atriplex nummularia in response to non-uniform NaCl concentrations in a split-root system. Atriplex nummularia was grown in a split-root system for 21 d, with either the same or two different NaCl concentrations (ranging from 10 to 670 mm), in aerated nutrient solution bathing each root half. Non-uniform salinity, with high NaCl in one root half (up to 670 mm) and 10 mm in the other half, had no effect on shoot ethanol-insoluble dry mass, net photosynthesis or shoot pre-dawn water potential. In contrast, a modest effect occurred for leaf osmotic potential (up to 30 % more solutes compared with uniform 10 mm NaCl treatment). With non-uniform NaCl concentrations (10/670 mm), 90 % of water was absorbed from the low salinity side, and the reduction in water use from the high salinity side caused whole-plant water use to decrease by about 30 %; there was no compensatory water uptake from the low salinity side. Leaf Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations were 1.9- to 2.3-fold higher in the uniform 670 mm treatment than in the 10/670 mm treatment, whereas leaf K(+) concentrations were 1.2- to 2.0-fold higher in the non-uniform treatment. Atriplex nummularia with one root half in 10 mm NaCl maintained net photosynthesis, shoot growth and shoot water potential even when the other root half was exposed to 670 mm NaCl, a concentration that inhibits growth by 65 % when uniform in the root zone. Given the likelihood of non-uniform salinity in many field situations, this situation would presumably benefit halophyte growth and physiology in saline environments.

  16. Germination of dimorphic seeds of Suaeda aralocaspica in response to light and salinity conditions during and after cold stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ling Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cold stratification is a requirement for seed dormancy breaking in many species, and thus it is one of the important factors for the regulation of timing of germination. However, few studies have examined the influence of various environmental conditions during cold stratification on subsequent germination, and no study has compared such effects on the performance of dormant versus non-dormant seeds. Seeds of halophytes in the cold desert might experience different light and salinity conditions during and after cold stratification. As such, dimorphic seeds (non-dormant brown seeds and black seeds with non-deep physiological dormancy of Suaeda aralocaspica were cold stratified under different light (12 h light–12 h darkness photoperiod or continuous darkness or salinity (0, 200 or 1,000 mmol L-1 NaCl conditions for 20 or 40 days. Then stratified seeds were incubated under different light or salinity conditions at daily (12/12 h temperature regime of 10:25 °C for 20 days. For brown seeds, cold stratification was also part of the germination period. In contrast, almost no black seeds germinated during cold stratification. The longer the cold stratification, the better the subsequent germination of black seeds, regardless of light or salinity conditions. Light did not influence germination of brown seeds. Germination of cold-stratified black seeds was inhibited by darkness, especially when they were stratified in darkness. With an increase in salinity at the stage of cold stratification or germination, germination percentages of both seed morphs decreased. Combinational pre-treatments of cold stratification and salinity did not increase salt tolerance of dimorphic seeds in germination phase. Thus, light and salinity conditions during cold stratification partly interact with these conditions during germination stage and differentially affect germination of dimorphic seeds of S. aralocaspica.

  17. High-density genetic map and identification of QTLs for responses to temperature and salinity stresses in the model brown alga Ectocarpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avia, Komlan; Coelho, Susana M.; Montecinos, Gabriel J.; Cormier, Alexandre; Lerck, Fiona; Mauger, Stéphane; Faugeron, Sylvain; Valero, Myriam; Cock, J. Mark; Boudry, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Deciphering the genetic architecture of adaptation of brown algae to environmental stresses such as temperature and salinity is of evolutionary as well as of practical interest. The filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus sp. is a model for the brown algae and its genome has been sequenced. As sessile organisms, brown algae need to be capable of resisting the various abiotic stressors that act in the intertidal zone (e.g. osmotic pressure, temperature, salinity, UV radiation) and previous studies have shown that an important proportion of the expressed genes is regulated in response to hyposaline, hypersaline or oxidative stress conditions. Using the double digest RAD sequencing method, we constructed a dense genetic map with 3,588 SNP markers and identified 39 QTLs for growth-related traits and their plasticity under different temperature and salinity conditions (tolerance to high temperature and low salinity). GO enrichment tests within QTL intervals highlighted membrane transport processes such as ion transporters. Our study represents a significant step towards deciphering the genetic basis of adaptation of Ectocarpus sp. to stress conditions and provides a substantial resource to the increasing list of tools generated for the species. PMID:28256542

  18. Physiological and biochemical responses to the exogenous application of proline of tomato plants irrigated with saline water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kahlaoui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In scope of crop salinity tolerance, an experiment was carried out in a field using saline water (6.57 dS m−1 and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI on two tomato cultivars (Solanum lycopersicum, cv. Rio Grande and Heinz-2274 in a salty clay soil. Exogenous application of proline was done by foliar spray at two concentrations: 10 and 20 mg L−1, with a control (saline water without proline, during the flowering stage. Significant higher increases in proline and total soluble protein contents, glutamine synthetase (GS, EC6.3.1.2 activities and decreases in proline oxidase (l-proline: O2 Oxidoreductase, EC1.4.3.1 activities were detected in both tomato cultivars when irrigated with saline water (6.57 dS m−1 and exogenously applied by the lower concentration of proline. Taking in consideration the obtained results, it was concluded that the foliar spray of low concentration of proline can increase the tolerance of both cultivars of tomato to salinity under field conditions.

  19. Fossil pigments as indicators of phototrophic response to salinity and climatic change in lakes of Western Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinebrooke, R. D.; Hall, R. I.; Leavitt, R. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Cumming, B. F. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Lab

    1998-03-01

    Changes in fossil pigments among 111 saline lakes in British Columbia were quantified and past changes in phototrophic communities in three closed-basin prairie lakes (Antelope Lake, Kenosee Lake and Clearwater Lake) were reconstructed. Using redundancy analysis, it was found that pigment concentrations were greatest in deep stratified lakes but were unaffected by ion concentrations, pH or conductivity. Algal standing crop was correlated only with fossil measures of total algal abundance, however, relative abundance of fossil carotenoids varied with lake chemistry. Increase in salinity caused fucoxanthin to be replaced by lutein-zeaxanthin and diatoxanthin, while alloxanthin and myxoxanthophyll were most commonly found in lakes with low calcium and high dissolved organic carbon content. Post-depositional degradation did not appear to alter the relation between pigment abundance and environmental characteristics. Considered as a whole, these results suggest that in saline lakes, fossil pigments are paleoecological proxies for phototrophic community change. 43 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Study of the Biochemical Responses and Enzymatic Activity of GF677 (Peach and Almond Hybrid Rootstock to In Vitro Salinity Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mashayekhi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Salinity is the most significant abiotic factor limiting crop productivity and several physiological responses, including modification of ion balance, water status, mineral nutrition, stomatal behavior, photosynthetic efficiency and so on. The GF677 (Prunuspersica×Prunusamygdalus is widelyusedas rootstock for peach and almond. It is mainly used as a rootstock because of its resistance to drought, calcic soil and Fe deficiency. Nowadays, using tissue culture techniques is very popular for the selection of plant resistant to abiotic stress (in vitro salinity; because in vitro conditions are more controllable than in vivo conditions and the large number of genotypes can be evaluated in a limited space. For example, in the field, plants are exposed to variable biological and climatic conditions which result in some interaction effects. In other words, the nutrition and climatic effects are easily controllable in the in vitro conditions all over the year. The objective of this study is to identify biochemical markers of salinity stress of GF677 rootstock under in vitro conditions. Materials and Methods: Plantlets of GF677 rootstock were subcultured into the Murashige and Skoog (MS proliferation medium containing1 mg/l BA (6-Benzyladenineand 0.1 mg/l NAA (naphthaline acetic acid with different concentrations (0, 40, 80 and 120 mM of sodium chloride (NaCl with four replicates. Cultures were transferred to the growth chamber with temperature of 25±2°C, relative humidity of 70%, under a 16/8 h (day/night photoperiod. Data were collected at the end of the experiment (6th weeks. Antioxidant enzymes activity (catalase and peroxidase,total protein content, proline content, soluble sugars, and Na and Cl were measured. The experiments were set up in a completely randomized design (CRD with four replicates (a vessel in each replicate and statistical analysis was performed using MSTAT-C program. Means were separated according to the Duncan

  1. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of Camelina sativa to mine drought stress-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanth, Bashistha Kumar; Kumari, Shipra; Choi, Seo Hee; Ha, Hye-Jeong; Lee, Geung-Joo

    2015-11-06

    Camelina sativa is an oil-producing crop belonging to the family of Brassicaceae. Due to exceptionally high content of omega fatty acid, it is commercially grown around the world as edible oil, biofuel, and animal feed. A commonly referred 'false flax' or gold-of-pleasure Camelina sativa has been interested as one of biofuel feedstocks. The species can grow on marginal land due to its superior drought tolerance with low requirement of agricultural inputs. This crop has been unexploited due to very limited transcriptomic and genomic data. Use of gene-specific molecular markers is an important strategy for new cultivar development in breeding program. In this study, Illumina paired-end sequencing technology and bioinformatics tools were used to obtain expression profiling of genes responding to drought stress in Camelina sativa BN14. A total of more than 60,000 loci were assembled, corresponding to approximately 275 K transcripts. When the species was exposed to 10 kPa drought stress, 100 kPa drought stress, and rehydrated conditions, a total of 107, 2,989, and 982 genes, respectively, were up-regulated, while 146, 3,659, and 1189 genes, respectively, were down-regulated compared to control condition. Some unknown genes were found to be highly expressed under drought conditions, together with some already reported gene families such as senescence-associated genes, CAP160, and LEA under 100 kPa soil water condition, cysteine protease, 2OG, Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase, and RAD-like 1 under rehydrated condition. These genes will be further validated and mapped to determine their function and loci. This EST library will be favorably applied to develop gene-specific molecular markers and discover genes responsible for drought tolerance in Camelina species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Salinity effects on behavioural response to hypoxia in the non-native Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus from Florida Everglades wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, P J; Loftus, W F; Fontaine, J A

    2009-04-01

    This study quantified the hypoxia tolerance of the Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus over a range of salinities. The species was very tolerant of hypoxia, using aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and buccal bubble holding when oxygen tensions dropped to Everglades, however, aggression levels for C. uropthalmus were markedly higher.

  3. Intraspecific and phenotypic variation in salinity responses of invasive Spartina densiflora from Pacific estuaries of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinity and tidal inundation induce physiological stress in vascular plant species and influence their distribution and productivity in estuarine wetlands. Plants in these wetlands are subjected to climate change and magnified physiological stresses as these key abiotic processes increase with sea...

  4. Proteomic and biochemical responses of canola (Brassica napus L.) exposed to salinity stress and exogenous lipoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Mustafa; Akçalı, Nermin; Terzi, Hakan

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the mitigating effects of exogenous lipoic acid (LA) on NaCl toxicity, proteomic, biochemical and physiological changes were investigated in the leaves of canola (Brassica napus L.) seedlings. Salinity stress decreased the growth parameters and contents of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH), and increased the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), proline, cysteine and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The foliar application of LA alleviated the toxic effects of salinity stress on canola seedlings and notably decreased MDA content and increased growth parameters, cysteine content, and activities of CAT and POD. In the proteomic analyses, total proteins from the leaves of control, LA, NaCl and NaCl+LA treated-seedlings were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). A total of 28 proteins were differentially expressed. Of these, 21 proteins were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These proteins had functions related to photosynthesis, stress defense, energy metabolism, signal transduction, protein folding and stabilization indicating that LA might play important roles in salinity through the regulation of photosynthesis, stress defense and signal transduction related proteins. The proteomic findings have provided new insight to reveal the effect of LA on salinity stress for the first time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Synergic effect of salinity and zinc stress on growth and photosynthetic responses of the cordgrass, Spartina densiflora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Andrades-Moreno, Luis; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Parra, Raquel; Valera-Burgos, Javier; Aroca, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Spartina densiflora is a C4 halophytic species that has proved to have a high invasive potential which derives from its physiological plasticity to environmental factors, such as salinity. It is found in coastal marshes of south-west Spain, growing over sediments with between 1 mmol l−1 and 70 mmol l−1 zinc. A glasshouse experiment was designed to investigate the synergic effect of zinc from 0 mmol l−1 to 60 mmol l−1 at 0, 1, and 3% NaCl on the growth and the photosynthetic apparatus of S. densiflora by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and gas exchange, and its recovery after removing zinc. Antioxidant enzyme activities and total zinc, sodium, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, and nitrogen concentrations were also determined. Spartina densiflora showed the highest growth at 1 mmol l−1 zinc and 1% NaCl after 90 d of treatment; this enhanced growth was supported by the measurements of net photosynthetic rate (A). Furthermore, there was a stimulatory effect of salinity on accumulation of zinc in tillers of this species. Zinc concentrations >1 mmol l−1 reduced growth of S. densiflora, regardless of salinity treatments. This declining growth may be attributed to a decrease in A caused by diffusional limitation of photosynthesis, owing to the modification of the potassium/calcium ratio. Also, zinc and salinity had a marked overall effect on the photochemical (photosystem II) apparatus, partially mediated by the accumulation of H2O2 and subsequent oxidative damage. However, salinity favoured the recovery of the photosynthetic apparatus to the toxic action of zinc, and enhanced the nutrient uptake. PMID:21841175

  6. The Functional and Regulatory Mechanisms of the Thellungiella salsuginea Ascorbate Peroxidase 6 (TsAPX6 in Response to Salinity and Water Deficit Stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeqin Li

    Full Text Available Soil salinization is a resource and ecological problem in the world. Thellungiella salsuginea is becoming a new model plant because it resembles its relative species, Arabidopsis thaliana, in small genome and short life cycle. It is highly tolerant to salinity and drought stresses. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX is an enzyme that clears H2O2 in plants. The function and molecular and regulation mechanisms of APX in T. salsuginea have rarely been reported. In this study, an APX gene, TsApx6, was cloned from T. salsuginea and its responses to abiotic stresses in transgenic Arabidopsis were studied. Under high salinity treatment, the expression of TsApx6 was significantly induced. Under drought treatment, overexpression of TsApx6 increased the survival rate and reduced leaf water loss rate in Arabidopsis. Compared to the wild type plants, high salinity treatment reduced the concentrations of MDA, H2O2 and proline but elevated the activities of APX, GPX, CAT and SOD in the TsApx6-overexpressing plants. Meanwhile, germination rate, cotyledon greening, and root length were improved in the transgenic plants compared to the wild type plants under salt and water deficit conditions. Based on these findings, TsApx6 has an important function in the resistance of plants to certain abiotic stresses. The TsApx6 promoter sequence was obtained using Genome Walking technology. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that it contains some cis-acting elements related to stress response. The treatments of salt, dehydration, and ABA induced the expression of Gus gene under the regulation of the TsApx6 promoter. Mutation analysis showed that the MBS motif present in the TsApx6 promoter might be a key negative regulatory element which has an important effect on the growth and developmental process of plants.

  7. The Functional and Regulatory Mechanisms of the Thellungiella salsuginea Ascorbate Peroxidase 6 (TsAPX6) in Response to Salinity and Water Deficit Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeqin; Zhang, Jilong; Li, Jingxiao; Li, Hongjie; Zhang, Genfa

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinization is a resource and ecological problem in the world. Thellungiella salsuginea is becoming a new model plant because it resembles its relative species, Arabidopsis thaliana, in small genome and short life cycle. It is highly tolerant to salinity and drought stresses. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) is an enzyme that clears H2O2 in plants. The function and molecular and regulation mechanisms of APX in T. salsuginea have rarely been reported. In this study, an APX gene, TsApx6, was cloned from T. salsuginea and its responses to abiotic stresses in transgenic Arabidopsis were studied. Under high salinity treatment, the expression of TsApx6 was significantly induced. Under drought treatment, overexpression of TsApx6 increased the survival rate and reduced leaf water loss rate in Arabidopsis. Compared to the wild type plants, high salinity treatment reduced the concentrations of MDA, H2O2 and proline but elevated the activities of APX, GPX, CAT and SOD in the TsApx6-overexpressing plants. Meanwhile, germination rate, cotyledon greening, and root length were improved in the transgenic plants compared to the wild type plants under salt and water deficit conditions. Based on these findings, TsApx6 has an important function in the resistance of plants to certain abiotic stresses. The TsApx6 promoter sequence was obtained using Genome Walking technology. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that it contains some cis-acting elements related to stress response. The treatments of salt, dehydration, and ABA induced the expression of Gus gene under the regulation of the TsApx6 promoter. Mutation analysis showed that the MBS motif present in the TsApx6 promoter might be a key negative regulatory element which has an important effect on the growth and developmental process of plants.

  8. under salinity stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... (2002) reported that K and Zn deficiencies in the plant were mainly induced by soil salinity. Zhang et al. (2011) investigated the effects of applying different concentra- tions of the macronutrients K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ on the responses of contrasting rice (O. sativa L.) genotypes under salt stress. A solution ...

  9. Resposta de cultivares de alface à salinidade da solução nutritiva com rejeito salino em hidroponia Response of lettuce cultivars to nutrient solution salinity with saline rejects in hydropony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nildo da S Dias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available No processo de dessalinização se gera, além da água potável, um rejeito altamente salino e de poder poluente elevado, o qual pode ser utilizado na produção agrícola rentável dependendo da adoção de práticas culturais adequadas e da tolerância das plantas às condições salinas. Nos últimos anos a tendência tem sido a substituição da agricultura convencional por sistemas hidropônicos de cultivos, considerados um dos mais eficientes no uso de água. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi analisar a resposta de duas cultivares de alface sob sistema hidropônico de cultivo (Lactuca sativa L., cvs. Verônica e Babá de verão em diferentes níveis de salinidade da solução nutritiva preparadas com água de abastecimento, água de rejeito coletada no dessalinizador e da sua diluição com água de abastecimento a 75, 50 e 25%, resultando em condutividades elétricas da solução nutritiva (CEs de 1,1; 2,4; 3,6; 4,7 e 5,7 dS m-1 após as diluições e adição de fertilizantes. Ocorreu variação genotípica sob as variáveis de crescimento e produção da alface, exceto para o número de folhas, sendo a cultivar Babá de verão a que produziu maior rendimento, independentemente do nível de salinidade e, portanto, a cultivar mais tolerante à salinidade da água com rejeito salino.In desalination process, besides the potable water, highly salty and polluted water (brine is generated, which can be used for producing profitable crops depending on the adequate cultural practices as well as on the plant ability of reacting to saline conditions. The trend in recent years has been towards conversion of conventional agriculture to soilless agriculture which is considered to be a more efficient use of water system. The aim of this research was to examine the response of two lettuce cultivars (Lactuca sativa L. cvs. Veronica, Babá de verão under hydroponic system to different levels of salinity of the nutrient solutions prepared with tap water

  10. Variations in osmotic adjustment and water relations of Sphaerophysa kotschyana: Glycine betaine, proline and choline accumulation in response to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiztugay, Evren; Ozfidan-Konakci, Ceyda; Kucukoduk, Mustafa; Duran, Yagmur

    2014-12-01

    Sphaerophysa kotschyana Boiss. is naturally distributed in overly salty regions. The key to the completion of the life cycles of S. kotschyana in harsh saline soils may be hidden in changes of its osmo-protectants, but there is currently no information about the interaction between osmotic adjustment and water relations in adaptation to saline conditions. The aim of this article was to determine growth, relative growth rate (RGR), relative water content (RWC), osmotic potential (ΨΠ), photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and osmo-protectant contents [proline (Pro), choline (Cho) and glycine betaine (GB)] in S. kotschyana leaves and roots exposed to 0, 150 or 300 mM NaCl for 7 and 14 d (days). The results clearly showed that the reductions in growth, RWC, Fv/Fm, RGR and ΨΠ were more pronounced at 300 mM, especially after 14 d. In the same group, the highest increase in TBARS was recorded in roots (126%) and leaves (31%). The induction at 150 mM was not as high. Therefore, roots appear to be the most vulnerable part of this plant. Moreover, S. kotschyana was able to withstand short-term low salinity. The osmo-protectant accumulation in S. kotschyana as a salinity acclimation or adaptation was sufficient for toleration of low salt concentration (150 mM). In contrast, the plants exposed to the highest NaCl concentration (300 mM) were not able to maintain the ability to prevent water loss because of further decrease in root/shoot ratio of fresh weight (FW) and dry weight (DW), RWC and RGR.

  11. Morpho-anatomical, physiological and biochemical adjustments in response to root zone salinity stress and high solar radiation in two Mediterranean evergreen shrubs, Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattini, Massimiliano; Remorini, Damiano; Pinelli, Patrizia; Agati, Giovanni; Saracini, Erica; Traversi, Maria Laura; Massai, Rossano

    2006-01-01

    Salt- and light-induced changes in morpho-anatomical, physiological and biochemical traits were analysed in Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus with a view to explaining their ecological distribution in the Mediterranean basin. In plants exposed to 20 or 100% solar radiation and supplied with 0 or 200 mm NaCl, measurements were conducted for ionic and water relations and photosynthetic performance, leaf morpho-anatomical and optical properties and tissue-specific accumulation of tannins and flavonoids. Net carbon gain and photosystem II (PSII) efficiency decreased less in P. lentiscus than in M. communis when exposed to salinity stress, the former having a superior ability to use Na(+) and Cl(-) for osmotic adjustment. Morpho-anatomical traits also allowed P. lentiscus to protect sensitive targets in the leaf from the combined action of salinity stress and high solar radiation to a greater degree than M. communis. Salt and light-induced increases in carbon allocated to polyphenols, particularly to flavonoids, were greater in M. communis than in P. lentiscus, and appeared to be related to leaf oxidative damage. Our data may conclusively explain the negligible distribution of M. communis in open Mediterranean areas suffering from salinity stress, and suggest a key antioxidant function of flavonoids in response to different stressful conditions.

  12. Molecular dissection of Oryza sativa salt-induced RING Finger Protein 1 (OsSIRP1): possible involvement in the sensitivity response to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sun-Goo; Kim, Jung Ju; Lim, Sung Don; Park, Yong Chan; Moon, Jun-Cheol; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2016-10-01

    Ubiquitination-mediated protein degradation via Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ligase plays an important role in plant responses to abiotic stress conditions. Many plant studies have found that RING proteins regulate the perception of various abiotic stresses and signal transduction. In this study, Oryza sativa salt-induced RING Finger Protein 1 (OsSIRP1) gene was selected randomly from 44 Oryza sativa RING Finger Proteins (OsRFPs) genes highly expressed in rice roots exposed to salinity stress. Transcript levels of OsSIRP1 in rice leaves after various stress treatments, including salt, heat, drought and hormone abscisic acid (ABA), were observed. Poly-ubiquitinated products of OsSIRP1 were investigated via an in vitro ubiquitination assay.35S:OsSIRP1-EYFP was distributed in the cytosol of untreated and salt-treated rice protoplasts. Heterogeneous overexpression of OsSIRP1 in Arabidopsis reduced tolerance for salinity stress during seed germination and root growth. Our findings indicate that OsSIRP1 acts as a negative regulator of salinity stress tolerance mediated by the ubiquitin 26S proteasome system. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  13. A genome-wide identification of the miRNAome in response to salinity stress in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Mahmoud W; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Zheng, Yun; Ji, Bo; Al-Yahyai, Rashid; Farooq, Sardar A

    2015-01-01

    Although date palm is relatively salt-tolerant, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms that contribute to its salt tolerance. Only recently, investigators have uncovered microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation, which is critical for typical plant development and adaptation to stress conditions such as salinity. To identify conserved and novel miRNAs in date palm and to characterize miRNAs that could play a role in salt tolerance, we have generated sRNA libraries from the leaves and roots of NaCl-treated and untreated seedlings of date palm. Deep sequencing of these four sRNA libraries yielded approximately 251 million reads. The bioinformatics analysis has identified 153 homologs of conserved miRNAs, 89 miRNA variants, and 180 putative novel miRNAs in date palm. Expression profiles under salinity revealed differential regulation of some miRNAs in date palm. In leaves, 54 of the identified miRNAs were significantly affected and the majority (70%) of them were upregulated, whereas in roots, 25 of the identified miRNAs were significantly affected and 76% of them were upregulated by the salinity stress. The salt-responsiveness of some of these miRNAs was further validated using semi-quantitative PCR (qPCR). Some of the predicted targets for the identified miRNA include genes with known functions in plant salt tolerance, such as potassium channel AKT2-like proteins, vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein, calcium-dependent and mitogen-activated proteins. As one of the first cultivated trees in the world that can tolerate a wide range of abiotic stresses, date palm contains a large population of conserved and non-conserved miRNAs that function at the post-transcriptional level. This study provided insights into miRNA-mediated gene expression that are important for adaptation to salinity in date palms.

  14. Effect of various Na/K ratios in low-salinity well water on growth performance and physiological response of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyu; Tan, Beiping; Yang, Jinfang; Lin, Yingbo; Chi, Shuyan; Dong, Xiaohui; Yang, Qihui

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the influence of sodium to potassium (Na/K) ratios on the growth performance and physiological response of the Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vananmei), various concentrations of KCl were added to low-salinity well water (salinity 4) in an 8-week culture trial. Six treatments with Na/K ratios of 60:1, 42:1, 33:1, 23:1, 17:1, and 14:1 were replicated in triplicate. The highest weight-gain rate (3 506±48)% and survival rate (89.38±0.88)% was observed in well water with Na/K ratios of 23:1 and 42:1, respectively, while the feed conversion ratio (1.02±0.01), oxygen consumption, and ammonia-N excretion rate was the lowest in the medium with a Na/K ratio of 23:1. Gill Na+-K+-ATPase activity, as an indicator of osmoregulation, peaked in the treatment where the Na/K ratio was 17:1. The total hemocyte count, respiratory burst, and immune-related enzyme activities (ALP, LSZ, PO, and SOD) of L. vananmei were affected significantly by Na/K ratios ( Pvannamei cultures is feasible. Na/K ratios ranging from 23:1 to 33:1 might improve survival and growth. Immunity and disease resistance are also closely related to the Na/K ratio of the low-salinity well water. The findings may contribute to the development of more efficient K + remediation strategies for L. vananmei culture in low-salinity well water.

  15. Difference in yield and physiological features in response to drought and salinity combined stress during anthesis in Tibetan wild and cultivated barleys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imrul Mosaddek Ahmed

    Full Text Available Soil salinity and drought are the two most common and frequently co-occurring abiotic stresses constraining crop growth and productivity. Greenhouse pot experiments were conducted to investigate the tolerance potential and mechanisms of Tibetan wild barley genotypes (XZ5, drought-tolerant; XZ16, salinity/aluminum tolerant during anthesis compared with salinity-tolerant cv CM72 in response to separate and combined stresses (D+S of drought (4% soil moisture, D and salinity (S. Under salinity stress alone, plants had higher Na(+ concentrations in leaves than in roots and stems. Importantly, XZ5 and XZ16 had substantially increased leaf K(+ concentrations; XZ16 was more efficient in restricting Na(+ loading in leaf and maintained a lower leaf Na(+/K(+ ratio. Moreover, a significant decrease in cell membrane stability index (CMSI and an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA were accompanied by a dramatic decrease in total biomass under D+S treatment. We demonstrated that glycine-betaine and soluble sugars increased significantly in XZ5 and XZ16 under all stress conditions, along with increases in protease activity and soluble protein contents. Significant increases were seen in reduced ascorbate (ASA and reduced glutathione (GSH contents, and in activities of H(+K(+-, Na(+K(+-, Ca(++Mg(++-, total- ATPase, and antioxidant enzymes under D+S treatment in XZ5 and XZ16 compared to CM72. Compared with control, all stress treatments significantly reduced grain yield and 1000-grain weight; however, XZ5 and XZ16 were less affected than CM72. Our results suggest that high tolerance to D+S stress in XZ5 and XZ16 is closely related to the lower Na(+/K(+ ratio, and enhanced glycine-betaine and soluble protein and sugar contents, improved protease, ATPase activities and antioxidative capacity for scavenging reactive oxygen species during anthesis. These results may provide novel insight into the potential responses associated with increasing D+S stress in wild barley

  16. Expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) ethylene response factor gene MsERF8 in tobacco plants enhances resistance to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tingting; Yang, Qingchuan; Gruber, Margaret; Kang, Junmei; Sun, Yan; Ding, Wang; Zhang, Tiejun; Zhang, Xinquan

    2012-05-01

    Ethylene response factors (ERF) play crucial roles in plant development and response to stresses. Here, a novel cDNA fragment (MsERF8) encoding an ERF protein with an AP2 domain was isolated and characterized from alfalfa. The MsERF8 cDNA has an open reading frame of 603 bp and encodes a nuclear protein of 201 amino acids. Q-RT-PCR analysis revealed that MsERF8 was strongly enriched in roots and leaves compared with stems, flower buds and flowers of mature alfalfa plants. Bioinformatic analysis of the MsERF8 promoter indicated a number of elements associated with stress-related responses, and MsERF8 transcripts in alfalfa seedlings were induced by NaCl, PEG6000, Al(2)(SO(4))(3) and five different hormones. Expression of MsERF8 in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in higher tolerance to salinity than with non-transgenic plants. This data shows that MsERF8 is a gene which prevents or alleviates salinity damage and has strong potential to impart salt tolerance to other crop plants.

  17. Identification of FXYD Protein Genes in a Teleost: Tissue-specific Expression and Response to Salinity Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    It is increasingly clear, that alterations in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase kinetics to fit the demands in specialized cell types, is vital for the enzyme to execute its different physiological roles in diverse tissues. In addition to tissue dependent expression of isoforms of the conventional subunits, alph....... In addition to identify novel FXYD isoforms, these studies are the first to show the tissue dependence in their expression and modulation by salinity in any teleosts. Key words: Atlantic salmon, Na+,K+-ATPase, Osmoregulation, Salmo salar, QPCR....

  18. The long-term resistance mechanisms, critical irrigation threshold and relief capacity shown by Eugenia myrtifolia plants in response to saline reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Motos, José Ramón; Hernández, José Antonio; Álvarez, Sara; Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Sánchez-Blanco, María Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Salts present in irrigation water are serious problems for commercial horticulture, particularly in semi-arid regions. Reclaimed water (RW) typically contains, among others elements, high levels of salts, boron and heavy metal. Phytotoxic ion accumulation in the substrate has been linked to different electric conductivities of the treatments. Based on these premises, we studied the long-term effect of three reclaimed water treatments with different saline concentrations on Eugenia myrtifolia plants. We also looked at the ability of these plants to recover when no drainage was applied. The RW with the highest electric conductivity (RW3, EC = 6.96 dS m-1) provoked a number of responses to salinity in these plants, including: 1) accumulation and extrusion of phytotoxic ions in roots; 2) a decrease in the shoot/root ratio, leaf area, number of leaves; 3) a decrease in root hydraulic conductivity, leaf water potential, the relative water content of leaves, leaf stomatal conductance, the leaf photosynthetic rate, water-use efficiency and accumulated evapotranspiration in order to limit water loss; and 4) changes in the antioxidant defence mechanisms. These different responses induced oxidative stress, which can explain the damage caused in the membranes, leading to the death of RW3 plants during the relief period. The behaviour observed in RW2 plants was slightly better compared with RW3 plants, although at the end of the experiment about 55% of the RW2 plants also died, however RW containing low salinity level (RW1, EC = 2.97 dS m-1) can be effective for plant irrigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Tissue-Specific and Cation/Anion-Specific DNA Methylation Variations Occurred in C. virgata in Response to Salinity Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Cao, Donghui; Liu, Jie; Wang, Xiaoping; Geng, Shujuan; Liu, Bao; Shi, Decheng

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is a widespread environmental problem limiting productivity and growth of plants. Halophytes which can adapt and resist certain salt stress have various mechanisms to defend the higher salinity and alkalinity, and epigenetic mechanisms especially DNA methylation may play important roles in plant adaptability and plasticity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the different influences of various single salts (NaCl, Na2SO4, NaHCO3, Na2CO3) and their mixed salts on halophyte Chloris. virgata from the DNA methylation prospective, and discover the underlying relationships between specific DNA methylation variations and specific cations/anions through the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis. The results showed that the effects on DNA methylation variations of single salts were ranked as follows: Na2CO3> NaHCO3> Na2SO4> NaCl, and their mixed salts exerted tissue-specific effects on C. virgata seedlings. Eight types of DNA methylation variations were detected and defined in C. virgata according to the specific cations/anions existed in stressful solutions; in addition, mix-specific and higher pH-specific bands were the main type in leaves and roots independently. These findings suggested that mixed salts were not the simple combination of single salts. Furthermore, not only single salts but also mixed salts showed tissue-specific and cations/anions-specific DNA methylation variations. PMID:24223802

  20. Tissue-specific and cation/anion-specific DNA methylation variations occurred in C. virgata in response to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Cao, Donghui; Liu, Jie; Wang, Xiaoping; Geng, Shujuan; Liu, Bao; Shi, Decheng

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is a widespread environmental problem limiting productivity and growth of plants. Halophytes which can adapt and resist certain salt stress have various mechanisms to defend the higher salinity and alkalinity, and epigenetic mechanisms especially DNA methylation may play important roles in plant adaptability and plasticity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the different influences of various single salts (NaCl, Na2SO4, NaHCO3, Na2CO3) and their mixed salts on halophyte Chloris. virgata from the DNA methylation prospective, and discover the underlying relationships between specific DNA methylation variations and specific cations/anions through the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis. The results showed that the effects on DNA methylation variations of single salts were ranked as follows: Na2CO3> NaHCO3> Na2SO4> NaCl, and their mixed salts exerted tissue-specific effects on C. virgata seedlings. Eight types of DNA methylation variations were detected and defined in C. virgata according to the specific cations/anions existed in stressful solutions; in addition, mix-specific and higher pH-specific bands were the main type in leaves and roots independently. These findings suggested that mixed salts were not the simple combination of single salts. Furthermore, not only single salts but also mixed salts showed tissue-specific and cations/anions-specific DNA methylation variations.

  1. Saline agriculture in Mediterranean environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Maggio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is increasingly affecting world's agricultural land causing serious yield loss and soil degradation. Understanding how we could improve crop productivity in salinized environments is therefore critical to meet the challenging goal of feeding 9.3 billion people by 2050. Our comprehension of fundamental physiological mechanisms in plant salt stress adaptation has greatly advanced over the last decades. However, many of these mechanisms have been linked to salt tolerance in simplified experimental systems whereas they have been rarely functionally proven in real agricultural contexts. In-depth analyses of specific crop-salinity interactions could reveal important aspects of plant salt stress adaptation as well as novel physiological/agronomic targets to improve salinity tolerance. These include the developmental role of root vs. shoot systems respect to water-ion homeostasis, morphological vs. metabolic contributions to stress adaptation, developmental processes vs. seasonal soil salinity evolution, residual effects of saline irrigation in non-irrigated crops, critical parameters of salt tolerance in soil-less systems and controlled environments, response to multiple stresses. Finally, beneficial effects of salinization on qualitative parameters such as stress-induced accumulation of high nutritional value secondary metabolites should be considered, also. In this short review we attempted to highlight the multifaceted nature of salinity in Mediterranean agricultural systems by summarizing most experimental activity carried out at the Department of Agricultural Engineering and Agronomy of University of Naples Federico II in the last few years.

  2. Leucine aminopeptidase RNAs, proteins, and activities increase in response to water deficit, salinity, and the wound signals systemin, methyl jasmonate, and abscisic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao; Gu; Pautot; Bray; Walling

    1999-08-01

    LapA RNAs, proteins, and activities increased in response to systemin, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, water deficit, and salinity in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Salicylic acid inhibited wound-induced increases of LapA RNAs. Experiments using the ABA-deficient flacca mutant indicated that ABA was essential for wound and systemin induction of LapA, and ABA and systemin acted synergistically to induce LapA gene expression. In contrast, pin2 (proteinase inhibitor 2) was not dependent on exogenous ABA. Whereas both LapA and le4 (L. esculentum dehydrin) were up-regulated by increases in ABA, salinity, and water deficit, only LapA was regulated by octadecanoid pathway signals. Comparison of LapA expression with that of the PR-1 (pathogenesis-related 1) and GluB (basic beta-1,3-glucanase) genes indicated that these PR protein genes were modulated by a systemin-independent jasmonic acid-signaling pathway. These studies showed that at least four signaling pathways were utilized during tomato wound and defense responses. Analysis of the expression of a LapA1:GUS gene in transgenic plants indicated that the LapA1 promoter was active during floral and fruit development and was used during vegetative growth only in response to wounding, Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato infection, or wound signals. This comprehensive understanding of the regulation of LapA genes indicated that this regulatory program is distinct from the wound-induced pin2, ABA-responsive le4, and PR protein genes.

  3. H2O2 and ABA signaling are responsible for the increased Na+ efflux and water uptake in Gossypium hirsutum L. roots in the non-saline side under non-uniform root zone salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangqiang; Luo, Zhen; Dong, Hezhong; Eneji, A Egrinya; Li, Weijiang

    2016-04-01

    Non-uniform root salinity increases the Na(+)efflux, water use, and growth of the root in non-saline side, which may be regulated by some form of signaling induced by the high-salinity side. However, the signaling and its specific function have remained unknown. Using a split-root system to simulate a non-uniform root zone salinity in Gossypium hirsutum L., we showed that the up-regulated expression of sodium efflux-related genes (SOS1, SOS2, PMA1, and PMA2) and water uptake-related genes (PIP1 and PIP2) was possibly involved in the elevated Na(+) efflux and water use in the the roots in the non-saline side. The increased level of indole acetic acid (IAA) in the non-saline side was the likely cause of the increased root growth. Also, the abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2 contents in roots in the non-saline side increased, possibly due to the increased expression of their key biosynthesis genes, NCED and RBOHC, and the decreased expression of ABA catabolic CYP707A genes. Exogenous ABA added to the non-saline side induced H2O2 generation by up-regulating the RBOHC gene, but this was decreased by exogenous fluridone. Exogenous H2O2 added to the non-saline side reduced the ABA content by down-regulating NCED genes, which can be induced by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) treatment in the non-saline side, suggesting a feedback mechanism between ABA and H2O2.Both exogenous ABA and H2O2 enhanced the expression of SOS1, PIP1;7 ,PIP2;2, and PIP2;10 genes, but these were down-regulated by fluridone and DPI, suggesting that H2O2 and ABA are important signals for increasing root Na(+) efflux and water uptake in the roots in the non-saline side. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Estímulos emocionais: processamento sensorial e respostas motoras Emotional stimuli: sensory processing and motor responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Volchan

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A emoção pode ser funcionalmente considerada como uma disposição à ação que prepara o organismo para comportamentos relacionados à aproximação e esquiva. Para preparar uma saída motora apropriada, o organismo tem que ser eficiente na codificação de estímulos relevantes. Neste trabalho, apresentamos evidências a partir de estudos de neuroimagem que revelam que a visualização de imagens emocionais promove uma maior ativação do córtex visual do que a observação de figuras neutras. Além desta facilitação do processamento sensorial, os estímulos emocionais desencadeiam reações somáticas e vegetativas. Registros da dinâmica postural e da freqüência cardíaca enquanto voluntários assistiam a um bloco de figuras desagradáveis revelou uma redução significativa na oscilação corporal e bradicardia. Uma investigação paralela mostrou que o tempo de reação também lentifica após a visualização de figuras negativas. Este conjunto de respostas - imobilidade, bradicardia e tempo de reação mais lento - pode refletir o engajamento do sistema defensivo, similar às reações defensivas desencadeadas em ambiente natural por estímulos ameaçadores distantes. Em resumo, o sistema afetivo influencia um nível precoce de codificação sensorial e a saída motora favorecendo, portanto, disposições para as ações apropriadas.Emotion can be functionally considered as action dispositions preparing the organism for either avoidance- or approach- related behaviors. In order to prepare an appropriate behavioral output, the organism has to be efficient in the encoding of relevant stimuli. We herein present evidence from neuroimaging studies that seeing emotional and arousing pictures leads to greater activation in visual cortex than seeing neutral ones. In addition to this facilitation of sensory processing, emotional stimuli prompt somatic and vegetative reactions. Recordings of postural oscillations and heart rate while

  5. Reproductive stage physiological and transcriptional responses to salinity stress in reciprocal populations derived from tolerant (Horkuch) and susceptible (IR29) rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Samsad; Haque, Taslima; Elias, Sabrina M.; Rahman, Md. Sazzadur; Biswas, Sudip; Schwartz, Scott; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.; Walia, Harkamal; Juenger, Thomas E.; Seraj, Zeba I.

    2017-04-01

    Global increase in salinity levels has made it imperative to identify novel sources of genetic variation for tolerance traits, especially in rice. The rice landrace Horkuch, endemic to the saline coastal area of Bangladesh, was used in this study as the source of tolerance in reciprocal crosses with the sensitive but high-yielding IR29 variety for discovering transcriptional variation associated with salt tolerance in the resulting populations. The cytoplasmic effect of the Horkuch background in leaves under stress showed functional enrichment for signal transduction, DNA-dependent regulation and transport activities. In roots the enrichment was for cell wall organization and macromolecule biosynthesis. In contrast, the cytoplasmic effect of IR29 showed upregulation of apoptosis and downregulation of phosphorylation across tissues relative to Horkuch. Differential gene expression in leaves of the sensitive population showed downregulation of GO processes like photosynthesis, ATP biosynthesis and ion transport. Roots of the tolerant plants conversely showed upregulation of GO terms like G-protein coupled receptor pathway, membrane potential and cation transport. Furthermore, genes involved in regulating membrane potentials were constitutively expressed only in the roots of tolerant individuals. Overall our work has developed genetic resources and elucidated the likely mechanisms associated with the tolerance response of the Horkuch genotype.

  6. Time course of biochemical, physiological and molecular responses to field-mimicked conditions of drought, salinity and recovery in two maize lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eMorari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought and salinity stresses will have a high impact on future crop productivity, due to climate change and the increased competition for land, water and energy. The response to drought (WS, salinity (SS and the combined stresses (WS+SS was monitored in two maize lines: the inbred B73 and an F1 commercial stress-tolerant hybrid. A protocol mimicking field progressive stress conditions was developed and its effect on plant growth analyzed at different time points. The results indicated that the stresses limited growth in the hybrid and arrested it in the inbred line. In SS, the two genotypes had different ion accumulation and translocation capacity, particularly for Na+ and Cl-. Moreover, the hybrid perceived the stress, reduced all the analyzed physiological parameters, and kept them reduced until the recovery. B73 decreased all physiological parameters more gradually, being affected mainly by SS. Both lines recovered better from WS than the other stresses. Molecular analysis revealed a diverse modulation of some stress markers in the two genotypes, reflecting their different capacity to cope with stresses. Combining biochemical and physiological data with expression analyses yielded insight into the mechanisms regulating the different stress tolerance of the two lines.

  7. Halophilic microorganisms are responsible for the rosy discolouration of saline environments in three historical buildings with mural paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenauer, Jörg D; Jurado, Valme; Piñar, Guadalupe; Miller, Ana Z; Santner, Markus; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    A number of mural paintings and building materials from monuments located in central and south Europe are characterized by the presence of an intriguing rosy discolouration phenomenon. Although some similarities were observed among the bacterial and archaeal microbiota detected in these monuments, their origin and nature is still unknown. In order to get a complete overview of this biodeterioration process, we investigated the microbial communities in saline environments causing the rosy discolouration of mural paintings in three Austrian historical buildings using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques as well as microscopic techniques. The bacterial communities were dominated by halophilic members of Actinobacteria, mainly of the genus Rubrobacter. Representatives of the Archaea were also detected with the predominating genera Halobacterium, Halococcus and Halalkalicoccus. Furthermore, halophilic bacterial strains, mainly of the phylum Firmicutes, could be retrieved from two monuments using special culture media. Inoculation of building materials (limestone and gypsum plaster) with selected isolates reproduced the unaesthetic rosy effect and biodeterioration in the laboratory.

  8. Halophilic Microorganisms Are Responsible for the Rosy Discolouration of Saline Environments in Three Historical Buildings with Mural Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenauer, Jörg D.; Jurado, Valme; Piñar, Guadalupe; Miller, Ana Z.; Santner, Markus; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    A number of mural paintings and building materials from monuments located in central and south Europe are characterized by the presence of an intriguing rosy discolouration phenomenon. Although some similarities were observed among the bacterial and archaeal microbiota detected in these monuments, their origin and nature is still unknown. In order to get a complete overview of this biodeterioration process, we investigated the microbial communities in saline environments causing the rosy discolouration of mural paintings in three Austrian historical buildings using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques as well as microscopic techniques. The bacterial communities were dominated by halophilic members of Actinobacteria, mainly of the genus Rubrobacter. Representatives of the Archaea were also detected with the predominating genera Halobacterium, Halococcus and Halalkalicoccus. Furthermore, halophilic bacterial strains, mainly of the phylum Firmicutes, could be retrieved from two monuments using special culture media. Inoculation of building materials (limestone and gypsum plaster) with selected isolates reproduced the unaesthetic rosy effect and biodeterioration in the laboratory. PMID:25084531

  9. The long-term resistance mechanisms, critical irrigation threshold and relief capacity shown by Eugenia myrtifolia plants in response to saline reclaimed water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acosta-Motos, José Ramón; Hernández, José Antonio; Álvarez, Sara

    2017-01-01

    to different electric conductivities of the treatments. Based on these premises, we studied the long-term effect of three reclaimed water treatments with different saline concentrations on Eugenia myrtifolia plants. We also looked at the ability of these plants to recover when no drainage was applied. The RW...... water potential, the relative water content of leaves, leaf stomatal conductance, the leaf photosynthetic rate, water-use efficiency and accumulated evapotranspiration in order to limit water loss; and 4) changes in the antioxidant defence mechanisms. These different responses induced oxidative stress......Salts present in irrigation water are serious problems for commercial horticulture, particularly in semi-arid regions. Reclaimed water (RW) typically contains, among others elements, high levels of salts, boron and heavy metal. Phytotoxic ion accumulation in the substrate has been linked...

  10. Practically Saline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Schroeder MD

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2, and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak.

  11. Gene expression polymorphisms and ESTs associated with gravitropic response of subterranean branch meristems and growth habit in Leymus wildryes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parminder Kaur; Ivan W. Mott; Steven R. Larson; B. Shaun Bushman; Alvaro G. Hernandez; W. Ryan Kim; Lei Liu; Mark A. Mikel

    2008-01-01

    Negatively orthogeotropic (NOGT) tiller and diageotropic (DGT) rhizome meristems develop from the same type of lateral axillary meristems and phytomer structure. Although subterranean NOGT and DGT buds appear similar, they display different responses to gravity and perhaps other cues governing branch angle and overall growth habit (GH). Leymus wildryes show remarkable...

  12. Stochastic Modeling of Soil Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suweis, Samir; Rinaldo, Andrea; van der Zee, Sjoerd E. A. T. M.; Maritan, Amos; Porporato, Amilcare

    2010-05-01

    Large areas of cultivated land worldwide are affected by soil salinity. Estimates report that 10% of arable land in over 100 countries, and nine million km2 are salt affected, especially in arid and semi-arid regions. High salinity causes both ion specific and osmotic stress effects, with important consequences for plant production and quality. Salt accumulation in the root zone may be due to natural factors (primary salinization) or due to irrigation (secondary salinization). Simple (e.g., vertically averaged over the soil depth) coupled soil moisture and salt balance equations have been used in the past. Despite their approximations, these models have the advantage of parsimony, thus allowing a direct analysis of the interplay of the main processes. They also provide the ideal starting point to include external, random hydro-climatic fluctuations in the analysis of long-term salinization trends. We propose a minimalist stochastic model of primary soil salinity, in which the rate of soil salinization is determined by the balance between dry and wet salt deposition and the intermittent leaching events caused by rainfall events. The long term probability density functions of salt mass and concentration are found by reducing the coupled soil moisture and salt mass balance equation to a stochastic differential equation driven by multiplicative Poisson noise. The novel analytical solutions provide insight on the interplay of the main soil, plant and climate parameters responsible for long-term soil salinization. In fact, soil salinity statistics are obtained as a function of climate, soil and vegetation parameters. These, in turn, can be combined with soil moisture statistics to obtain a full characterization of soil salt concentrations and the ensuing risk of primary salinization. In particular, the solutions show the existence of two quite distinct regimes, the first one where the mean salt mass remains nearly constant with increasing rainfall frequency, and the

  13. A Solanum lycopersicum × Solanum pimpinellifolium Linkage Map of Tomato Displaying Genomic Locations of R-Genes, RGAs, and Candidate Resistance/Defense-Response ESTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun; Zhang, Liping; Niño-Liu, David; Ashrafi, Hamid; Foolad, Majid R.

    2008-01-01

    We have identified an accession (LA2093) within the tomato wild species Solanum pimpinellifolium with many desirable characteristics, including biotic and abiotic stress tolerance and good fruit quality. To utilize the full genetic potential of LA2093 in tomato breeding, we have developed a linkage map based on an F2 population of a cross between LA2093 and a tomato breeding line, using 115 RFLP, 94 EST, and 41 RGA markers. The map spanned 1002.4 cM of the 12 tomato chromosomes with an average marker distance of 4.0 cM. The length of the map and linear order of the markers were in good agreement with the published maps of tomato. The ESTs were chosen based on their sequence similarities with known resistance or defense-response genes, signal-transduction factors, transcriptional regulators, and genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins. Locations of several ESTs and RGAs coincided with locations of several known tomato resistance genes and quantitative resistance loci (QRLs), suggesting that candidate-gene approach may be effective in identifying and mapping new R genes. This map will be useful for marker-assisted exploitation of desirable traits in LA2093 and other S. pimpinellifolium accessions, and possibly for utilization of genetic variation within S. lycopersicum. PMID:19223983

  14. Stochastic Modeling of Soil Salinity

    CERN Document Server

    Suweis, S; Van der Zee, S E A T M; Daly, E; Maritan, A; Porporato, A; 10.1029/2010GL042495

    2012-01-01

    A minimalist stochastic model of primary soil salinity is proposed, in which the rate of soil salinization is determined by the balance between dry and wet salt deposition and the intermittent leaching events caused by rainfall events. The long term probability density functions of salt mass and concentration are found by reducing the coupled soil moisture and salt mass balance equation to a single stochastic differential equation driven by multiplicative Poisson noise. The novel analytical solutions provide insight on the interplay of the main soil, plant and climate parameters responsible for long-term soil salinization. In particular, they show the existence of two distinct regimes, one where the mean salt mass remains nearly constant (or decreases) with increasing rainfall frequency, and another where mean salt content increases markedly with increasing rainfall frequency. As a result, relatively small reductions of rainfall in drier climates may entail dramatic shifts in long-term soil salinization trend...

  15. Geomorphic response of a continental margin to tectonic and eustatic variations, the Levant margin during the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Moshe, Liran; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Enzel, Yehouda; Uri, Schattner

    2017-04-01

    During the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.97±0.01-5.33 Ma) the Mediterranean Levant margin experienced major eustatic and sedimentary cycles as well as tectonic motion along the nearby Dead Sea fault plate boundary. New structures formed along this margin with morphology responding to these changes. Our study focuses on changes in this morphology across the margin. It is based on interpretation of three 3D seismic reflection volumes from offshore Israel. Multi-attribute analysis aided the extraction of key reflectors. Morphologic analysis of these data quantified interacting eustasy, sedimentation, and tectonics. Late Messinian morphologic domains include: (a) continental shelf; (b) 'Delta' anticline, forming a ridge diagonal to the strike of the margin; (c) southward dipping 'Hadera' valley, separating between (a) and (b); (d) 'Delta Gap' - a water gap crossing perpendicular to the anticline axis, exhibiting a sinuous thalweg; (e) continental slope. Drainage across the margin developed in several stages. Remains of turbidite flows crossing the margin down-slope were spotted across the 'Delta' anticline. These flows accumulated with the MSC evaporate sequence and prior to the anticline folding. Rising of the anticline, above the then bathymetry, either blocked or diverted the turbidites. That rising also defined the Hadera valley. In-situ evaporates, covering the valley floor, are, in turn covered by a fan-delta at the distal end of the valley. The fan-delta complex contains eroded evaporites and Lago-Mare fauna. Its top is truncated by dendritic fluvial channels that drained towards the Delta Gap. The Delta Gap was carved through the Delta ridge in a morphological and structural transition zone. We propose that during the first stages of the MSC (5.97±0.01-5.59 ma) destabilization of the continental slope due to oscillating sea level produced gravity currents that flowed through the pre-existing Delta anticline. Subsequent folding of the Delta anticline

  16. Response of nitrogen dynamics in semi-natural and agricultural grassland soils to experimental variation in tide and salinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunisse, A.M.; Loeb, R.; Miletto, M.; Lamers, L.P.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Verhoeven, J.T.A.

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of rehabilitation efforts to enhance the ecological value of closed-off estuaries, we studied the effects of restoring a tidal movement and seawater incursion on soil nitrogen conversion rates and vegetation response of semi-natural and agricultural grasslands in an outdoor mesocosm

  17. Evaluation of superabsorbent efficiency in response to dehydration frequencies, salinity and temperature and its effect on yield and quality of cotton under deficit irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid-Reza Fallahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Reduced availability of water resources in many arid countries including Iran, particularly in response to the indiscriminate harvesting of water reservoirs and climate change, has created concerns. Therefore, the sustainable use of water resources especially in agriculture is a necessity for these countries. Strategies such as deficit irrigation and superabsorbent application are two important ways for improving water use efficiency in agricultural lands. In deficit irrigation the crop must be irrigated less than its required water. Therefore, some reduction may occur in crop yield, but the savings in water will improve the water use efficiency (Akbari Nodehi, 2011. Superabsorbent polymers also increase the nutrients and water holding capacity of soil for a long time and thereby reduce crop water requirement. However, the effectiveness of these materials could be affected by dehydration frequencies, temperature and irrigation water quality (Karimi et al., 2009. Due to the limitation of water resources in many parts of Iran, the aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of cotton production under deficit irrigation along with application of different rates of superabsorbent. In addition, simulation of superabsorbent efficiency at different levels of salinity, temperature and dehydration frequencies (swelling and de-swelling were the other objectives in this study. Materials and methods 1. Laboratory experiments In these experiments the effects of temperature (4, 10, 20, 30 and 40 °C, salinity (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% NaCl solutions at two temperatures of 10 and 25°C and frequency of partial dehydration (from 1 to 5 stages watering and 70% dewatering were simulated on water absorption capacity of superabsorbent polymer at laboratory of environmental stresses, Sarayan Faculty of Agriculture, Birjand University. 2- Field experiment This experiment was designed at Research Station of Sarayan Faculty of Agriculture

  18. Responses to salinity in invasive cordgrass hybrids and their parental species (Spartina) in a scenario of sea level rise and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods: Salinity is one of the main abiotic factors in salt marshes. Studies rooted to analyzed salinity tolerance of halophytes may help to relate their physiological tolerances with distribution limits in the field. Climate change-induced sea level rise and higher temperatures...

  19. Identification of ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. microRNAs using RNA-Seq and their putative roles in high salinity responses in seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Pin Chiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (common or crystalline ice plant is a useful model for studying molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance. The morphology, physiology, metabolism, and gene expression of ice plant have been studied and large-scale analyses of gene expression profiling have drawn an outline of salt tolerance in ice plant. A rapid root growth to a sudden increase in salinity was observed in ice plant seedlings. Using a fluorescent dye to detect Na+, we found that ice plant roots respond to an increased flux of Na+ by either secreting or storing Na+ in specialized cells. High-throughput sequencing was used to identify small RNA profiles in three-day-old seedlings treated with or without 200 mM NaCl. In total, 135 conserved miRNAs belonging to 21 families were found. The hairpin precursor of 19 conserved mcr-miRNAs and 12 novel mcr-miRNAs were identified. After 6 h of salt stress, the expression of most mcr-miRNAs showed decreased relative abundance, whereas the expression of their corresponding target genes showed increased mRNA relative abundance. The cognate target genes are involved in a broad range of biological processes: transcription factors that regulate growth and development, enzymes that catalyze miRNA biogenesis for the most conserved mcr-miRNA, and proteins that are involved in ion homeostasis and drought-stress responses for some novel mcr-miRNAs. Analyses of the functions of target genes revealed that cellular processes, including growth and development, metabolism, and ion transport activity are likely to be enhanced in roots under salt stress. The expression of eleven conserved miRNAs and two novel miRNAs were correlated reciprocally with predicted targets within hours after salt stress exposure. Several conserved miRNAs have been known to regulate root elongation, root apical meristem activity, and lateral root formation. Based upon the expression pattern of miRNA and target genes in combination with the

  20. Identification of Ice Plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) MicroRNAs Using RNA-Seq and Their Putative Roles in High Salinity Responses in Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chih-Pin; Yim, Won C; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Ohnishi, Miwa; Mimura, Tetsuro; Cushman, John C; Yen, Hungchen E

    2016-01-01

    The halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (common or crystalline ice plant) is a useful model for studying molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance. The morphology, physiology, metabolism, and gene expression of ice plant have been studied and large-scale analyses of gene expression profiling have drawn an outline of salt tolerance in ice plant. A rapid root growth to a sudden increase in salinity was observed in ice plant seedlings. Using a fluorescent dye to detect Na(+), we found that ice plant roots respond to an increased flux of Na(+) by either secreting or storing Na(+) in specialized cells. High-throughput sequencing was used to identify small RNA profiles in 3-day-old seedlings treated with or without 200 mM NaCl. In total, 135 conserved miRNAs belonging to 21 families were found. The hairpin precursor of 19 conserved mcr-miRNAs and 12 novel mcr-miRNAs were identified. After 6 h of salt stress, the expression of most mcr-miRNAs showed decreased relative abundance, whereas the expression of their corresponding target genes showed increased mRNA relative abundance. The cognate target genes are involved in a broad range of biological processes: transcription factors that regulate growth and development, enzymes that catalyze miRNA biogenesis for the most conserved mcr-miRNA, and proteins that are involved in ion homeostasis and drought-stress responses for some novel mcr-miRNAs. Analyses of the functions of target genes revealed that cellular processes, including growth and development, metabolism, and ion transport activity are likely to be enhanced in roots under salt stress. The expression of eleven conserved miRNAs and two novel miRNAs were correlated reciprocally with predicted targets within hours after salt stress exposure. Several conserved miRNAs have been known to regulate root elongation, root apical meristem activity, and lateral root formation. Based upon the expression pattern of miRNA and target genes in combination with the observation of Na

  1. Trichoderma-Plant Root Colonization: Escaping Early Plant Defense Responses and Activation of the Antioxidant Machinery for Saline Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Yariv; Landau, Udi; Cuadros-Inostroza, Álvaro; Takayuki, Tohge; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Chet, Ilan; Viterbo, Ada; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are versatile opportunistic plant symbionts which can colonize the apoplast of plant roots. Microarrays analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots inoculated with Trichoderma asperelloides T203, coupled with qPCR analysis of 137 stress responsive genes and transcription factors, revealed wide gene transcript reprogramming, proceeded by a transient repression of the plant immune responses supposedly to allow root colonization. Enhancement in the expression of WRKY18 and WRKY40, which stimulate JA-signaling via suppression of JAZ repressors and negatively regulate the expression of the defense genes FMO1, PAD3 and CYP71A13, was detected in Arabidopsis roots upon Trichoderma colonization. Reduced root colonization was observed in the wrky18/wrky40 double mutant line, while partial phenotypic complementation was achieved by over-expressing WRKY40 in the wrky18 wrky40 background. On the other hand increased colonization rate was found in roots of the FMO1 knockout mutant. Trichoderma spp. stimulate plant growth and resistance to a wide range of adverse environmental conditions. Arabidopsis and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants treated with Trichoderma prior to salt stress imposition show significantly improved seed germination. In addition, Trichoderma treatment affects the expression of several genes related to osmo-protection and general oxidative stress in roots of both plants. The MDAR gene coding for monodehydroascorbate reductase is significantly up-regulated and, accordingly, the pool of reduced ascorbic acid was found to be increased in Trichoderma treated plants. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC)-deaminase silenced Trichoderma mutants were less effective in providing tolerance to salt stress, suggesting that Trichoderma, similarly to ACC deaminase producing bacteria, can ameliorate plant growth under conditions of abiotic stress, by lowering ameliorating increases in ethylene levels as well as promoting an elevated antioxidative capacity

  2. Alleviation of salt stress by enterobacter sp. EJ01 in tomato and Arabidopsis is accompanied by up-regulation of conserved salinity responsive factors in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangmin; Jang, Ye-Jin; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Oh, Byung-Taek; Chae, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kui-Jae

    2014-02-01

    Microbiota in the niches of the rhizosphere zones can affect plant growth and responses to environmental stress conditions via mutualistic interactions with host plants. Specifically, some beneficial bacteria, collectively referred to as Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPRs), increase plant biomass and innate immunity potential. Here, we report that Enterobacter sp. EJ01, a bacterium isolated from sea china pink (Dianthus japonicus thunb) in reclaimed land of Gyehwa-do in Korea, improved the vegetative growth and alleviated salt stress in tomato and Arabidopsis. EJ01 was capable of producing 1-aminocy-clopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase and also exhibited indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production. The isolate EJ01 conferred increases in fresh weight, dry weight, and plant height of tomato and Arabidopsis under both normal and high salinity conditions. At the molecular level, short-term treatment with EJ01 increased the expression of salt stress responsive genes such as DREB2b, RD29A, RD29B, and RAB18 in Arabidopsis. The expression of proline biosynthetic genes (i.e. P5CS1 and P5CS2) and of genes related to priming processes (i.e. MPK3 and MPK6) were also up-regulated. In addition, reactive oxygen species scavenging activities were enhanced in tomatoes treated with EJ01 in stressed conditions. GFP-tagged EJ01 displayed colonization in the rhizosphere and endosphere in the roots of Arabidopsis. In conclusion, the newly isolated Enterobacter sp. EJ01 is a likely PGPR and alleviates salt stress in host plants through multiple mechanisms, including the rapid up-regulation of conserved plant salt stress responsive signaling pathways.

  3. Laboratory experiment to study the effect of salinity variations on benthic foraminiferal species - Pararotalia nipponica (Asano)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Kurtarkar, S.R.

    Culture experiment has been carried out to observe the response of Pararotalia nipponica (Asano) to different salinities and its salinity tolerance limits. The specimens of P. nipponica kept in 33‰ saline water achieved optimum growth, while rest...

  4. Genome-wide analysis of DUF221 domain-containing gene family in Oryza species and identification of its salinity stress-responsive members in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, Showkat Ahmad; Pani, Dipti Ranjan; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    DUF221 domain-containing genes (DDP genes) play important roles in developmental biology, hormone signalling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. Therefore to understand their structural and evolutionary relationship, we did a genome-wide analysis of this important gene family in rice. Further, through comparative genomics, DDP genes from Oryza sativa subsp. (indica), nine different wild species of rice and Arabidopsis were also identified. We also found an expansion of the DDP gene families in rice and Arabidopsis which is due to the segmental duplication events in some of the gene family members. In general, a highly purifying selection was found acting on all the deduced paralogous and orthologous DDP gene pairs. The data from microarray and subsequent qRT-PCR analysis revealed that although several OsDDPs were differentially regulated under salinity stress, yet OsDDP6 was upregulated at all the developmental stages in salt tolerant rice genotype, FL478. Interestingly, OsDDP6 was found to be involved in proline metabolism pathway as indicated by protein network analysis. The diverse gene structures, varied transmembrane topologies and the differential expression patterns implied the functional diversity in DDP genes. Therefore, the comprehensive evolutionary analysis of DDP genes from different Oryza species and Arabidopsis performed in this study will provide the basis for further functional validation studies vis-à-vis DDP genes of rice and other plant species.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of DUF221 domain-containing gene family in Oryza species and identification of its salinity stress-responsive members in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Showkat Ahmad Ganie

    Full Text Available DUF221 domain-containing genes (DDP genes play important roles in developmental biology, hormone signalling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. Therefore to understand their structural and evolutionary relationship, we did a genome-wide analysis of this important gene family in rice. Further, through comparative genomics, DDP genes from Oryza sativa subsp. (indica, nine different wild species of rice and Arabidopsis were also identified. We also found an expansion of the DDP gene families in rice and Arabidopsis which is due to the segmental duplication events in some of the gene family members. In general, a highly purifying selection was found acting on all the deduced paralogous and orthologous DDP gene pairs. The data from microarray and subsequent qRT-PCR analysis revealed that although several OsDDPs were differentially regulated under salinity stress, yet OsDDP6 was upregulated at all the developmental stages in salt tolerant rice genotype, FL478. Interestingly, OsDDP6 was found to be involved in proline metabolism pathway as indicated by protein network analysis. The diverse gene structures, varied transmembrane topologies and the differential expression patterns implied the functional diversity in DDP genes. Therefore, the comprehensive evolutionary analysis of DDP genes from different Oryza species and Arabidopsis performed in this study will provide the basis for further functional validation studies vis-à-vis DDP genes of rice and other plant species.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of DUF221 domain-containing gene family in Oryza species and identification of its salinity stress-responsive members in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, Showkat Ahmad; Pani, Dipti Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    DUF221 domain-containing genes (DDP genes) play important roles in developmental biology, hormone signalling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. Therefore to understand their structural and evolutionary relationship, we did a genome-wide analysis of this important gene family in rice. Further, through comparative genomics, DDP genes from Oryza sativa subsp. (indica), nine different wild species of rice and Arabidopsis were also identified. We also found an expansion of the DDP gene families in rice and Arabidopsis which is due to the segmental duplication events in some of the gene family members. In general, a highly purifying selection was found acting on all the deduced paralogous and orthologous DDP gene pairs. The data from microarray and subsequent qRT-PCR analysis revealed that although several OsDDPs were differentially regulated under salinity stress, yet OsDDP6 was upregulated at all the developmental stages in salt tolerant rice genotype, FL478. Interestingly, OsDDP6 was found to be involved in proline metabolism pathway as indicated by protein network analysis. The diverse gene structures, varied transmembrane topologies and the differential expression patterns implied the functional diversity in DDP genes. Therefore, the comprehensive evolutionary analysis of DDP genes from different Oryza species and Arabidopsis performed in this study will provide the basis for further functional validation studies vis-à-vis DDP genes of rice and other plant species. PMID:28846681

  7. Responses of trophic structure and zooplankton community to salinity and temperature in Tibetan lakes: Implication for the effect of climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiuqi; Xu, Lei; Hou, Juzhi; Liu, Zhengwen; Jeppesen, Erik; Han, Bo-Ping

    2017-11-01

    Warming has pronounced effects on lake ecosystems, either directly by increased temperatures or indirectly by a change in salinity. We investigated the current status of zooplankton communities and trophic structure in 45 Tibetan lakes along a 2300 m altitude and a 76 g/l salinity gradient. Freshwater to hyposaline lakes mainly had three trophic levels: phytoplankton, small zooplankton and fish/Gammarus, while mesosaline to hypersaline lakes only had two: phytoplankton and large zooplankton. Zooplankton species richness declined significantly with salinity, but did not relate with temperature. Furthermore, the decline in species richness with salinity in lakes with two trophic levels was much less abrupt than in lakes with three trophic levels. The structural variation of the zooplankton community depended on the length of the food chain, and was significantly explained by salinity as the critical environmental variable. The zooplankton community shifted from dominance of copepods and small cladoceran species in the lakes with low salinity and three trophic levels to large saline filter-feeding phyllopod species in those lakes with high salinity and two trophic levels. The zooplankton to phytoplankton biomass ratio was positively related with temperature in two-trophic-level systems and vice versa in three-trophic-level systems. As the Tibetan Plateau is warming about three times faster than the global average, our results imply that warming could have a considerable impact on the structure and function of Tibetan lake ecosystems, either via indirect effects of salinization/desalinization on species richness, composition and trophic structure or through direct effects of water temperature on trophic interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunological responses of turbot (Psetta maxima) to nodavirus infection or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC) stimulation, using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analysis and cDNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung C; Osborne, Jane A; Montes, Ariana; Dios, Sonia; Nerland, Audun H; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Brown, Laura L; Johnson, Stewart C

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the immunological responses of turbot to nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation, we constructed cDNA libraries from liver, kidney and gill tissues of nodavirus-infected fish and examined the differential gene expression within turbot kidney in response to nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation using a turbot cDNA microarray. Turbot were experimentally infected with nodavirus and samples of each tissue were collected at selected time points post-infection. Using equal amount of total RNA at each sampling time, we made three tissue-specific cDNA libraries. After sequencing 3230 clones we obtained 3173 (98.2%) high quality sequences from our liver, kidney and gill libraries. Of these 2568 (80.9%) were identified as known genes and 605 (19.1%) as unknown genes. A total of 768 unique genes were identified. The two largest groups resulting from the classification of ESTs according to function were the cell/organism defense genes (71 uni-genes) and apoptosis-related process (23 uni-genes). Using these clones, a 1920 element cDNA microarray was constructed and used to investigate the differential gene expression within turbot in response to experimental nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation. Kidney tissue was collected at selected times post-infection (HPI) or stimulation (HPS), and total RNA was isolated for microarray analysis. Of the 1920 genes studied on the microarray, we identified a total of 121 differentially expressed genes in the kidney: 94 genes from nodavirus-infected animals and 79 genes from those stimulated with pIC. Within the nodavirus-infected fish we observed the highest number of differentially expressed genes at 24 HPI. Our results indicate that certain genes in turbot have important roles in immune responses to nodavirus infection and dsRNA stimulation.

  9. Farmer’s decision parameters on diversification and supply responses to dryland salinity - modelling across the Australian wheat-sheep zone

    OpenAIRE

    Culas, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Dryland salinity has resulted from clearing of deep-rooted plant species for farming. Farm diversification with trees and perennial pasture species may therefore reverse this problem. However, current opinion is that existing land uses are close to economic optimum and therefore changes involving perennials may not be viewed as desirable. Socially there is a trade-off between the opportunity cost of changing existing land use with the perennials and the current salinity reduction targets. In ...

  10. Glutamate dehydrogenase and Na+-K+ ATPase expression and growth response of Litopenaeus vannamei to different salinities and dietary protein levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erchao; Arena, Leticia; Lizama, Gabriel; Gaxiola, Gabriela; Cuzon, Gerard; Rosas, Carlos; Chen, Liqiao; van Wormhoudt, Alain

    2011-03-01

    Improvement in the osmoregulation capacity via nutritional supplies is vitally important in shrimp aquaculture. The effects of dietary protein levels on the osmoregulation capacity of the Pacific white shrimp ( L. vannamei) were investigated. This involved an examination of growth performance, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and Na+-K+ ATPase mRNA expression,, and GDH activity in muscles and gills. Three experimental diets were formulated, containing 25%, 40%, and 50% dietary protein, and fed to the shrimp at a salinity of 25. After 20 days, no significant difference was observed in weight gain, though GDH and Na+-K+ ATPase gene expression and GDH activity increased with higher dietary protein levels. Subsequently, shrimp fed diets with 25% and 50% dietary protein were transferred into tanks with salinities of 38 and 5, respectively, and sampled at weeks 1 and 2. Shrimp fed with 40% protein at 25 in salinity (optimal conditions) were used as a control. Regardless of the salinities, shrimp fed with 50% dietary protein had significantly higher growth performance than other diets; no significant differences were found in comparison with the control. Shrimp fed with 25% dietary protein and maintained at salinities of 38 and 5 had significantly lower weight gain values after 2 weeks. Ambient salinity change also stimulated the hepatosomatic index, which increased in the first week and then recovered to a relatively normal level, as in the control, after 2 weeks. These findings indicate that in white shrimp, the specific protein nutrient and energy demands related to ambient salinity change are associated with protein metabolism. Increased dietary protein level could improve the osmoregulation capacity of L. vannamei with more energy resources allocated to GDH activity and expression.

  11. Oleic acid vs saline solution lung lavage-induced acute lung injury: effects on lung morphology, pressure-volume relationships, and response to positive end-expiratory pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Thomas; Meinhardt, Juergen P; Herrmann, Peter; Weiss, Andreas; Quintel, Michael; Pelosi, Paolo

    2006-08-01

    To compare two lung injury models (oleic acid [OA] and saline solution washout [SW]) regarding lung morphology, regional inflation, and recruitment during static pressure-volume (PV) curves, and the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) below and above the lower inflection point (Pflex). Fourteen adult pigs underwent OA or SW lung injury. Lung volumes were measured using CT. PV curves were obtained with simultaneous CT scanning at lung apex and base. Fractional inflation and recruitment were compared to data on PEEP above and below Pflex. Severity of lung injury was comparable. At zero PEEP, SW showed an increased amount of edema and poorly aerated lung volume, recruitment during inspiration, and a better oxygenation response with PEEP. Whole-lung PV curves were similar in both models, reflecting changes in alveolar inflation or deflation. On the inspiratory PV limb, recruitment and inflation were on the same line, while there was a substantial difference between deflation and derecruitment on the expiratory limb. PEEP-induced recruitment at lung apex and base was at or above the derecruitment line on the expiratory limb and showed no relationship to the whole-lung expiratory PV curve. The following conclusions were made: (1) OA and SW models are comparable in mechanics but not in lung injury characteristics; (2) neither inspiratory nor expiratory whole-lung PV curves are useful to select PEEP in order to optimize recruitment; and (3) after recruitment, there is no difference in derecruitment between the models at high PEEP, while more collapse occurs at lower PEEP in the basal sections of SW lungs.

  12. Individual vs. combinatorial effect of elevated CO2 conditions and salinity stress on Arabidopsis thaliana liquid cultures: Comparing the early molecular response using time-series transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta Bhaskar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we investigated the individual and combinatorial effect of elevated CO2 conditions and salinity stress on the dynamics of both the transcriptional and metabolic physiology of Arabidopsis thaliana liquid hydroponic cultures over the first 30 hours of continuous treatment. Both perturbations are of particular interest in plant and agro-biotechnological applications. Moreover, within the timeframe of this experiment, they are expected to affect plant growth to opposite directions. Thus, a major objective was to investigate whether this expected "divergence" was valid for the individual perturbations and to study how it is manifested under the combined stress at two molecular levels of cellular function, using high-throughput analyses. Results We observed that a high salinity has stronger effect than elevated CO2 at both the transcriptional and metabolic levels, b the transcriptional responses to the salinity and combined stresses exhibit strong similarity, implying a robust transcriptional machinery acting to the salinity stress independent of the co-occurrence of elevated CO2, c the combinatorial effect of the two perturbations on the metabolic physiology is milder than of the salinity stress alone. Metabolomic analysis suggested that the beneficial role of elevated CO2 on salt-stressed plants within the timeframe of this study should be attributed to the provided additional resources; these allow the plants to respond to high salinity without having to forfeit other major metabolic functions, and d 9 h-12 h and 24 h of treatment coincide with significant changes in the metabolic physiology under any of the investigated stresses. Significant differences between the acute and longer term responses were observed at both molecular levels. Conclusions This study contributes large-scale dynamic omic data from two levels of cellular function for a plant system under various stresses. It provides an additional example

  13. Eficiência de utilização de água e nutrientes em plantas de feijão-de-corda irrigadas com água salina em diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento Water and nutrient use efficiency in cowpea irrigated with saline water at different growth stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudivan F. de Lacerda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar os efeitos do uso de água salina em diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento de plantas de feijão-de-corda sobre a eficiência de utilização de água e de nutrientes. O experimento foi conduzido no campo e obedeceu ao delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com cinco tratamentos e cinco repetições. Os tratamentos empregados foram: T1 - água de poço com condutividade elétrica (CEa de 0,8 dS m-1 durante todo o ciclo; T2 - água salina (CEa de 5,0 dS m-1 durante todo o ciclo; T3, T4 e T5 - água salina de 0 a 22 dias após o plantio (DAP, de 23 a 42 DAP e de 43 a 62 DAP, respectivamente. As plantas dos tratamentos T3, T4 e T5 foram irrigadas com água de poço nas demais fases do ciclo. Aos 8; 23; 43 e 63 DAP, as plantas foram colhidas e determinaram-se a matéria seca total e de grãos, a eficiência no uso da água, considerando a produção de matéria seca total (EUA P e a produção de grãos (EUA GR, e a eficiência de utilização de nutrientes (K, Ca, N, P, Fe, Cu, Zn e Mn. A aplicação de água salina durante todo o ciclo (T2 reduziu a EUA P e a EUA GR, enquanto a aplicação de água na fase inicial do ciclo (T3 reduziu a EUA GR e a eficiência de utilização da maioria dos nutrientes. Por outro lado, a irrigação com água salina dos 23 aos 42 DAP (T4 e dos 43 aos 62 DAP (T5 não afetou as eficiências nos usos de água e de nutrientes.The objective of this paper was to evaluate the effect of the saline water applied at different development stages of cowpea plants, on water and nutrient use efficiency. The experiment was set up in the field, during the dry season. A completely randomized block design, with five treatments and five repetitions was adopted. The treatments studied were: T1 - (groundwater with electrical conductivity (ECw of 0.8 dS m-1 during the whole crop cycle; T2 - saline water (ECw = 5.0 dS m-1 during the whole crop cycle; T3, T4 and T5 - saline water from 0 to 22 days after

  14. Climate response and spatial-temporal model on the inter-annual change of winter temperature-salinity in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-kun; Miao, Qing-sheng; Yang, Yang; Xu, Shan-shan

    2017-01-01

    Spatial distributions and time variation characteristics were analyzed using Rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (REOF) and spectrum analysis methods using surface and bottom temperature and salinity data in February of 1976-2013 along 30°N section in the East China Sea. Result showed that temperature trends can be divided into western part and east part, salinity trend divided into western, middle and eastern part. The first mode of surface temperature presented a quasi-equilibrium trend and the range was higher in the near-shore than the offshores, first mode of bottom temperature presented a decreasing trend; surface salinity had a decreasing trend and the extent was higher in the near-shore than the offshores, the bottom salinity showed a decreasing trend in recent years. The temperature inter-annual variability related to El Niño closely; short-term shocks of salinity related to El Niño, and long-term changes had something to do with PDO.

  15. Spatial pattern formation of coastal vegetation in response to external gradients and positive feedbacks affecting soil porewater salinity: A model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Smith, T. J.; Teh, S.Y.; Koh, H. L.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal vegetation of South Florida typically comprises salinity-tolerant mangroves bordering salinity-intolerant hardwood hammocks and fresh water marshes. Two primary ecological factors appear to influence the maintenance of mangrove/hammock ecotones against changes that might occur due to disturbances. One of these is a gradient in one or more environmental factors. The other is the action of positive feedback mechanisms, in which each vegetation community influences its local environment to favor itself, reinforcing the boundary between communities. The relative contributions of these two factors, however, can be hard to discern. A spatially explicit individual-based model of vegetation, coupled with a model of soil hydrology and salinity dynamics is presented here to simulate mangrove/hammock ecotones in the coastal margin habitats of South Florida. The model simulation results indicate that an environmental gradient of salinity, caused by tidal flux, is the key factor separating vegetation communities, while positive feedback involving the different interaction of each vegetation type with the vadose zone salinity increases the sharpness of boundaries, and maintains the ecological resilience of mangrove/hammock ecotones against small disturbances. Investigation of effects of precipitation on positive feedback indicates that the dry season, with its low precipitation, is the period of strongest positive feedback. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA).

  16. Response of Chlorophyll, Relative Water Content and Protein Percentage of Safflower Leaves to Salinity and Foliar Calcium, Potassium and Magnesium Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Attarzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of Ca, K, and Mn foliar spray on chlorophyll and relative water contents of safflower (cv. Padideh leaves under salinity condition a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replications was conducted at Vali-e-Asr University Greenhouse in 2011. Factors were salinity with four levels: 0, 500, 1000, and 1500 mg NaCl kg -1, and foliar spraying of plants with four levels: distilled water, 10 mM CaNo3, 10 mM K2HPO4 and 1 mM MnSo4. Spraying were applied two weeks after emergence and continued every 2 weeks. Results showed that 1500 mg NaCl reduced SPAD value, leaf chlorophyll fluorescence and relative water content. However, increasing salinity induced higher leaf water saturation. Foliar spraying of plants with MnSO4, K2HPO4 and CaNo3 nutrients, also reduced SPAD value. Foliar application of plants with Ca(NO32 increased leaf protein in 500 mg NaCl and without salinity. Application of MnSo4 increased chlorophyll b, a+b and also chlorophyll a (in 500 mg NaCl. Thus, in respect to the positive role of calcium and manganese in the production and preservation of chlorophyll and protein, foliar spray application can be a suitable strategy to reduce crop losses under salinity conditions.

  17. Evaluation of the long-term variability of seawater salinity and temperature in response to natural and anthropogenic stressors in the Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhakeem, Abubaker; Elshorbagy, Walid

    2013-11-15

    Evaluating the long-term variability of the seawater salinity and temperature due to climate change is a limiting economical and operational factor in planning the design of new and expansion of existing desalination plants. This need is amplified in the Arabian Gulf due to the natural arid climate and anthropological stresses related to energy exploration and ongoing major developments. The lack of data in this region further adds additional dimension to the problem. The present work represents a systematic innovative approach to evaluate the anticipated long-term changes in the seawater salinity and temperature under the stresses of projected climate change and massive industrial effluents using statistical correlation and hydrodynamic simulation. The proposed approach employs the direct relation between the net freshwater losses (evaporation) entrenched with the investigated stressors and the mean sea salinity and sea temperature variation of an inverse estuary to formulate the statistical correlation and the hydrodynamic simulation conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pretreated cheese whey wastewater management by agricultural reuse: chemical characterization and response of tomato plants Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. under salinity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Ana R; Carvalho, Fátima; Rivas, Javier; Patanita, Manuel; Dôres, Jóse

    2013-10-01

    The agricultural reuse of pretreated industrial wastewater resulting from cheese manufacture is shown as a suitable option for its disposal and management. This alternative presents attractive advantages from the economic and pollution control viewpoints. Pretreated cheese whey wastewater (CWW) has high contents of biodegradable organic matter, salinity and nutrients, which are essential development factors for plants with moderate to elevated salinity tolerance. Five different pretreated CWW treatments (1.75 to 10.02 dS m(-1)) have been applied in the tomato plant growth. Fresh water was used as a control run (average salinity level=1.44 dS m(-1)). Chemical characterization and indicator ratios of the leaves, stems and roots were monitored. The sodium and potassium leaf concentrations increased linearly with the salinity level in both cultivars, Roma and Rio Grande. Similar results were found in the stem sodium content. However, the toxic sodium accumulations in the cv. Roma exceeded the values obtained in the cv. Rio Grande. In this last situation, K and Ca uptake, absorption, transport and accumulation capacities were presented as tolerance mechanisms for the osmotic potential regulation of the tissues and for the ion neutralization. Consequently, Na/Ca and Na/K ratios presented lower values in the cv. Rio Grande. Na/Ca ratio increased linearly with the salinity level in leaves and stems, regardless of the cultivar. Regarding the Na/K ratio, the values demonstrated competition phenomena between the ions for the cv. Rio Grande. Despite the high chloride content of the CWW, no significant differences were observed for this nutrient in the leaves and stems. Thus, no nitrogen deficiency was demonstrated by the interaction NO3(-)/Cl(-). Nitrogen also contributes to maintain the water potential difference between the tissues and the soil. Na, P, Cl and N radicular concentrations were maximized for high salinity levels (≥2.22 dS m(-1)) of the pretreated CWW. © 2013

  19. [Response of reactive oxygen metabolism in melon chloroplasts to short-term salinity-alkalinity stress regulated by exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Li-pan; Hu, Xiao-hui; Pan, Xiong-bo; Ren, Wen-qi

    2015-12-01

    The regulatory effect of exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melon chloroplasts under short-term salinity-alkalinity stress were investigated in melon variety 'Jinhui No. 1', which was cultured with deep flow hydroponics. The result showed that under salinity-alkalinity stress, the photosynthetic pigment content, MDA content, superoxide anion (O₂·) production rate and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) content in chloroplast increased significantly, the contents of antioxidants ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) increased, and the activities of H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase were inhibited obviously. With exogenous GABA application, the accumulations of O₂·, MDA and H₂O₂ induced by salinity-alkalinity stress were inhibited. Exogenous GABA alleviated the increase of photosynthetic pigment content, improved the activity of SOD, enzymes of AsA-GSH cycle, total AsA and total GSH while decreased the AsA/DHA ratio and GSH/GSSH ratio. Foliar GABA could enhance the H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase activities. Our results suggested that the exogenous GABA could accelerate the ROS metabolism in chloroplast, promote the recycle of AsA-GSH, and maintain the permeability of cell membrane to improve the ability of melon chloroplast against salinity-alkalinity stress.

  20. Past 100 Ky surface salinity-gradient response in the eastern Arabian Sea to the summer monsoon variation recorded by delta super(18)O of G. sacculifer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chodankar, A.R.; Banakar, V.K.; Oba, T.

    flux to the Bay of Bengal and hence summer monsoon intensity. The north-south contrast in the sea level corrected (residual)-delta sup(18) O sub(G. sacculifer) can be interpreted as a measure of surface salinity-contrast between those two locations...

  1. Contrasting physiological responses to high salinity between two varieties of corn 'Lluteño' (salt tolerant and 'Jubilee' (salt sensitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libertad Carrasco-Ríos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available 'Lluteño' is the only one corn capable to prosper in the Valley of Lluta under saline conditions (EC = 9.1 dS m-1. This cultivar has been little studied and there is no current information about its growth and about the possible mechanisms involved in its tolerance to salts. The aim of this research was to compare the growth of young plants of corn (Zea mays L. 'Lluteño' to that of the bred 'Jubilee', both grown under different salt concentrations, to characterize the absorption and distribution of Na+ and other nutrients in the plant and to evaluate the effect of the saline conditions in the osmotic adjustment in both cultivars. The plants of 21 d old were subjected for 15 d to two saline treatments: 50 and 100 mM NaCl. The accumulation of DM was reduced from 5.12 to 1.80 g plant-1 in 'Jubilee' and 5.53 to 4.12 g plant-1 in 'Lluteño' (P d" 0.05. 'Lluteño' showed to be more tolerant to salt stress that 'Jubilee' by greatest accumulation of biomass under saline conditions, it was associated with a lower accumulation of Na+, steadiness of K+ and Ca²+ content and accumulation of osmolytes in leaves. The latter affecting positively the maintenance of relative water content and the osmotic adjustment of this cultivar in the leaves.

  2. Hydrologic modeling in a marsh-mangrove ecotone: Predicting wetland surface water and salinity response to restoration in the Ten Thousand Islands region of Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michot, B.D.; Meselhe, E.A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Shrestha, Surendra; From, Andrew S.; Patino, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    At the fringe of Everglades National Park in southwest Florida, United States, the Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge (TTINWR) habitat has been heavily affected by the disruption of natural freshwater flow across the Tamiami Trail (U.S. Highway 41). As the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) proposes to restore the natural sheet flow from the Picayune Strand Restoration Project area north of the highway, the impact of planned measures on the hydrology in the refuge needs to be taken into account. The objective of this study was to develop a simple, computationally efficient mass balance model to simulate the spatial and temporal patterns of water level and salinity within the area of interest. This model could be used to assess the effects of the proposed management decisions on the surface water hydrological characteristics of the refuge. Surface water variations are critical to the maintenance of wetland processes. The model domain is divided into 10 compartments on the basis of their shared topography, vegetation, and hydrologic characteristics. A diversion of +10% of the discharge recorded during the modeling period was simulated in the primary canal draining the Picayune Strand forest north of the Tamiami Trail (Faka Union Canal) and this discharge was distributed as overland flow through the refuge area. Water depths were affected only modestly. However, in the northern part of the refuge, the hydroperiod, i.e., the duration of seasonal flooding, was increased by 21 days (from 115 to 136 days) for the simulation during the 2008 wet season, with an average water level rise of 0.06 m. The average salinity over a two-year period in the model area just south of Tamiami Trail was reduced by approximately 8 practical salinity units (psu) (from 18 to 10 psu), whereas the peak dry season average was reduced from 35 to 29 psu (by 17%). These salinity reductions were even larger with greater flow diversions (+20%). Naturally, the reduction

  3. Effect of elevated pCO2 on metabolic responses of porcelain crab (Petrolisthes cinctipes) Larvae exposed to subsequent salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Seth H; Zarate, Sonia; Smith, Edmund H; Gaylord, Brian; Hosfelt, Jessica D; Hill, Tessa M

    2014-01-01

    Future climate change is predicted to alter the physical characteristics of oceans and estuaries, including pH, temperature, oxygen, and salinity. Investigating how species react to the influence of such multiple stressors is crucial for assessing how future environmental change will alter marine ecosystems. The timing of multiple stressors can also be important, since in some cases stressors arise simultaneously, while in others they occur in rapid succession. In this study, we investigated the effects of elevated pCO2 on oxygen consumption by larvae of the intertidal porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes when exposed to subsequent salinity stress. Such an exposure mimics how larvae under future acidified conditions will likely experience sudden runoff events such as those that occur seasonally along portions of the west coast of the U.S. and in other temperate systems, or how larvae encounter hypersaline waters when crossing density gradients via directed swimming. We raised larvae in the laboratory under ambient and predicted future pCO2 levels (385 and 1000 µatm) for 10 days, and then moved them to seawater at ambient pCO2 but with decreased, ambient, or elevated salinity, to monitor their respiration. While larvae raised under elevated pCO2 or exposed to stressful salinity conditions alone did not exhibit higher respiration rates than larvae held in ambient conditions, larvae exposed to elevated pCO2 followed by stressful salinity conditions consumed more oxygen. These results show that even when multiple stressors act sequentially rather than simultaneously, they can retain their capacity to detrimentally affect organisms.

  4. Effect of elevated pCO2 on metabolic responses of porcelain crab (Petrolisthes cinctipes Larvae exposed to subsequent salinity stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth H Miller

    Full Text Available Future climate change is predicted to alter the physical characteristics of oceans and estuaries, including pH, temperature, oxygen, and salinity. Investigating how species react to the influence of such multiple stressors is crucial for assessing how future environmental change will alter marine ecosystems. The timing of multiple stressors can also be important, since in some cases stressors arise simultaneously, while in others they occur in rapid succession. In this study, we investigated the effects of elevated pCO2 on oxygen consumption by larvae of the intertidal porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes when exposed to subsequent salinity stress. Such an exposure mimics how larvae under future acidified conditions will likely experience sudden runoff events such as those that occur seasonally along portions of the west coast of the U.S. and in other temperate systems, or how larvae encounter hypersaline waters when crossing density gradients via directed swimming. We raised larvae in the laboratory under ambient and predicted future pCO2 levels (385 and 1000 µatm for 10 days, and then moved them to seawater at ambient pCO2 but with decreased, ambient, or elevated salinity, to monitor their respiration. While larvae raised under elevated pCO2 or exposed to stressful salinity conditions alone did not exhibit higher respiration rates than larvae held in ambient conditions, larvae exposed to elevated pCO2 followed by stressful salinity conditions consumed more oxygen. These results show that even when multiple stressors act sequentially rather than simultaneously, they can retain their capacity to detrimentally affect organisms.

  5. Surface drifters measuring sea water salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverdin, Gilles; Centurioni, Luca; Sena-Martins, Meike; Garcia-Ladona, Emilio; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Salvador, Joaquin; Sommer, Anna; Boutin, Jacqueline

    2017-04-01

    Surface drifters have been introduced in the early 1990s by P.P. Niiler to measure the salinity of the near-surface water as well as its temperature. First, they were deployed to document large scale advection of surface salinity fronts, such as during TOGA-COARE (1991). More recently, salinity drifter data were used for three purposes: 1 - provide in situ data coverage for validation of sea surface (SSS) products, such as provided by band-L microwave radiometry from satellite missions, Aquarius, SMOS, SMAP 2 - provide data for better understanding upper ocean response to air-sea interactions, such as during rainfall, or near-surface warming during low wind events 3 - provide estimates of surface advection of salinity features and their contribution to ocean freshwater budget We will review the drifters that have been deployed and where data were collected, the challenges encountered in correcting the data, ongoing plans and future developments. A comparison of salinity data of more than 60 SVP drifters to SMOS and Aquarius SSS fields in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre illustrates the potential for validating products from satellite missions over more than a year (SPURS-1 2012-2013 experiment). Data collocated during tropical rain events illustrate a short-term response of near-surface salinity and temperature that can be quantified, although we lack precise collocated wind data. It is rather consistent with independently-derived surface salinity response to rain based on SMOS salinity retrievals, and model estimations. An extreme case of close to 10 psu near-surface salinity drop due to rainfall is presented. Recent salinity drifter deployments in the rainy region of the eastern Pacific ITCZ (SPURS-2 2016 experiment) illustrate the small time and space scale variability associated with freshwater lenses in this region. Some data from a new tag (surpact) will be presented with simultaneous estimates of sea state, rain rate, temperature and salinity during rain

  6. Molecular characterization and expression of AMP-activated protein kinase in response to low-salinity stress in the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Erchao; Xu, Zhixin; Wang, Shifeng; Chen, Ke; Wang, Xiaodan; Li, Tongyu; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao

    2016-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) serves as a major regulator of cellular energy metabolism by activating ATP production pathways and blocking ATP consumption. However, information on AMPK genes in aquatic animals is limited. In this study, three subunits of AMPK were cloned from the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The full-length cDNAs of the α, β and γ subunits were 1617, 1243 and 3467bp long, respectively, with open reading frames of 1566, 873 and 2988bp encoding for 521, 290 and 996 amino acids, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignments of the three subunits showed that the functional domains in the L. vannamei proteins retained the highest similarity with those of other animals, at 89%, 58%, and 75%, respectively. The expression levels of the three subunits were higher in the muscle and gills than in the eyestalk and hepatopancreas. The mRNA levels of AMPK-α and AMPK-β were up-regulated in the hepatopancreas and muscle after acute low-salinity stress at 3psu for 6h compared with control salinity at 20psu. After 8-week salinity stress at 3psu, AMPK-α and AMPK-β mRNA levels in the hepatopancreas were significantly higher than those of the control at 30psu. However, in the muscle only AMPK-γ mRNA was significantly up-regulated at low salinity relative to controls. Muscle and hepatopancreas showed increases in AMPK protein after 6h exposure to low salinity, but there were no differences seen after long term acclimation. The change patterns of protein were slightly differing from the mRNA patterns due to the distinguishing function of individual subunits of AMPK. These findings confirm that three AMPK subunits are present in L. vannamei and that all encode proteins with conserved functional domains. The three AMPK subunits are all regulated at the transcriptional and protein levels to manage excess energy expenditure during salinity stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochar Mitigates Salinity Stress in Potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhtar, S S; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Liu, Fulai

    2015-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted in a climate-controlled greenhouse to investigate the growth, physiology and yield of potato in response to salinity stress under biochar amendment. It was hypothesized that addition of biochar may improve plant growth and yield by mitigating the negative effect...... capability of biochar. Results indicated that biochar was capable to ameliorate salinity stress by adsorbing Na+. Increasing salinity level resulted in significant reductions of shoot biomass, root length and volume, tuber yield, photosynthetic rate (An), stomatal conductance (gs), midday leaf water...... with the respective non-biochar control. Decreased Na+, Na+/K+ ratio and increased K+ content in xylem with biochar amendment also indicated its ameliorative effects on potato plants in response to salinity stress. The results suggested that incorporation of biochar might be a promising approach for enhancing crop...

  8. Salinity and water quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of salinity on greenhouse grown crops, especially when grown in substrate systems, differs from the impact of salinity on crops grown under field conditions. The most striking difference between greenhouse and field conditions is the overall much higher concentrations of nutrients in

  9. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  10. Remote sensing of salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The complex dielectric constant of sea water is a function of salinity at 21 cm wavelength, and sea water salinity can be determined by a measurement of emissivity at 21 cm along with a measurement of thermodynamic temperature. Three aircraft and one helicopter experiments using two different 21 cm radiometers were conducted under different salinity and temperature conditions. Single or multiple ground truth measurements were used to calibrate the data in each experiment. It is inferred from these experiments that accuracies of 1 to 2%/OO are possible with a single surface calibration point necessary only every two hours if the following conditions are met--water temperatures above 20 C, salinities above 10%/OO, and level plane flight. More frequent calibration, constraint of the aircraft's orientation to the same as it was during calibration, and two point calibration (at a high and low salinity level) rather than single point calibration may give even better accuracies in some instances.

  11. How rice Glycogen Synthase Kinase-like 5 (OsGSK5) integrates salinity stress response to source-sink adaptation: a proposed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitisaksakul, Maysaya; Dong, Shaoyun; Beckles, Diane M

    2017-11-13

    We have previously shown that overexpression of GSK3-like kinase 5 in rice (OsGSK5) was associated with higher starch accumulation and better growth under severe salinity stress. Short-term (14)CO2 feeding experiments suggested that OsGSK5 promoted higher flux to starch accumulation in the roots under this condition and that this mechanism may help to underscore the better growth characteristics observed. Here, we expand upon this hypothesis and consider (i) how OsGSK5 action could fit into a signaling model that integrates salinity stress to changes in starch metabolism, and (ii) how this would facilitate whole plant physiological adaptions in source-to-sink partitioning. We also discuss additional functions of OsGSK5, necessary to support this adaptive mechanism.

  12. Comparisons of Normal Saline and Lactated Ringer’s Resuscitation on Hemodynamics, Metabolic Responses, and Coagulation in Pigs after Severe Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    J 2003, 20(4):316–318. 9. Awad S, Allison SP, Lobo DN: The history of 0.9% saline. Clin Nutr 2008, 27(2):179–188. 10. Belani KG, Palahniuk RJ: Kidney...correlations. Ann Emerg Med 1986, 15(12):1392–1395. 35. Bickell WH, Wall MJ Jr, Pepe PE, Martin RR, Ginger VF, Allen MK, Mattox KL: Immediate versus delayed

  13. Transboundary geophysical mapping of geological elements and salinity distribution critical for the assessment of future sea water intrusion in response to sea level rise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jørgensen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical techniques are increasingly being used as tools for characterising the subsurface, and they are generally required to develop subsurface models that properly delineate the distribution of aquifers and aquitards, salt/freshwater interfaces, and geological structures that affect groundwater flow. In a study area covering 730 km2 across the border between Germany and Denmark, a combination of an airborne electromagnetic survey (performed with the SkyTEM system, a high-resolution seismic survey and borehole logging has been used in an integrated mapping of important geological, physical and chemical features of the subsurface. The spacing between flight lines is 200–250 m which gives a total of about 3200 line km. About 38 km of seismic lines have been collected. Faults bordering a graben structure, buried tunnel valleys, glaciotectonic thrust complexes, marine clay units, and sand aquifers are all examples of geological structures mapped by the geophysical data that control groundwater flow and to some extent hydrochemistry. Additionally, the data provide an excellent picture of the salinity distribution in the area and thus provide important information on the salt/freshwater boundary and the chemical status of groundwater. Although the westernmost part of the study area along the North Sea coast is saturated with saline water and the TEM data therefore are strongly influenced by the increased electrical conductivity there, buried valleys and other geological elements are still revealed. The mapped salinity distribution indicates preferential flow paths through and along specific geological structures within the area. The effects of a future sea level rise on the groundwater system and groundwater chemistry are discussed with special emphasis on the importance of knowing the existence, distribution and geometry of the mapped geological elements, and their control on the groundwater salinity distribution is assessed.

  14. Antioxidant enzyme activities and hormonal status in response to Cd stress in the wetland halophyte Kosteletzkya virginica under saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui-Ming; Lefèvre, Isabelle; Albacete, Alfonso; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco; Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Díaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Quinet, Muriel; Ruan, Cheng-Jiang; Hernández, José Antonio; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Lutts, Stanley

    2013-03-01

    Salt marshes constitute major sinks for heavy metal accumulation but the precise impact of salinity on heavy metal toxicity for halophyte plant species remains largely unknown. Young seedlings of Kosteletzkya virginica were exposed during 3 weeks in nutrient solution to Cd 5 µM in the presence or absence of 50 mM NaCl. Cadmium (Cd) reduced growth and shoot water content and had major detrimental effect on maximum quantum efficiency (F(v) /F(m) ), effective quantum yield of photosystem II (Y(II)) and electron transport rates (ETRs). Cd induced an oxidative stress in relation to an increase in O(2) (•-) and H(2) O(2) concentration and lead to a decrease in endogenous glutathione (GSH) and α-tocopherol in the leaves. Cd not only increased leaf zeatin and zeatin riboside concentration but also increased the senescing compounds 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and abscisic acid (ABA). Salinity reduced Cd accumulation already after 1 week of stress but was unable to restore shoot growth and thus did not induce any dilution effect. Salinity delayed the Cd-induced leaf senescence: NaCl reduced the deleterious impact of Cd on photosynthesis apparatus through an improvement of F(v) /F(m) , Y(II) and ETR. Salt reduced oxidative stress in Cd-treated plants through an increase in GSH, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid synthesis and an increase in glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity. Additional salt reduced ACC and ABA accumulation in Cd+NaCl-treated leaves comparing to Cd alone. It is concluded that salinity affords efficient protection against Cd to the halophyte species K. virginica, in relation to an improved management of oxidative stress and hormonal status. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  15. Responses of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of the facultative halophyte and C3-CAM intermediate species Mesembryanthemum crystallinum to salinity and high irradiance stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broetto, Fernando; Monteiro Duarte, Heitor; Lüttge, Ulrich

    2007-07-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. (Aizoaceae) is a facultative annual halophyte and a C(3)-photosynthesis/crassulacean acid metabolism intermediate species currently used as a model plant in stress physiology. Both salinity and high light irradiance stress are known to induce CAM in this species. The present study was performed to provide a diagnosis of alterations at the photosystem II level during salinity and irradiance stress. Plants were subjected for up to 13 days to either 0.4M NaCl salinity or high irradiance of 1000 micromol m(-2)s(-1), as well as to both stress factors combined (LLSA=low light plus salt; HLCO=high light of 1000 micromol m(-2)s(-1), no salt; HLSA=high light plus salt). A control of LLCO=low light of 200 micromol m(-2)s(-1), no salt was used. Parameters of chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII) were measured with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer. HLCO and LLSA conditions induced a weak degree of CAM with day/night changes of malate levels (Deltamalate) of approximately 12mM in the course of the experiment, while HLSA induced stronger CAM of Deltamalate approximately 20 mM. Effective quantum yield of PSII, DeltaF/F'(m), was only slightly affected by LLSA, somewhat reduced during the course of the experiment by HLCO and clearly reduced by HLSA. Potential quantum efficiency of PSII, F(v)/F(m), at predawn times was not affected by any of the conditions, always remaining at 0.8, showing that there was no acute photoinhibition. During the course of the days HL alone (HLCO) also did not elicit photoinhibition; salt alone (LLSA) caused acute photoinhibition which was amplified by the combination of the two stresses (HLSA). Non-photochemical, NPQ, quenching remained low (crystallinum expresses effective stress tolerance mechanisms but photosynthetic capacity is reduced by the synergistic effects of salinity and light irradiance stress combined.

  16. Groundwater dynamic, temperature and salinity response to the tide in Patagonian marshes: Observations on a coastal wetland in San José Gulf, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, María del Pilar; Carol, Eleonora; Hernández, Mario A.; Bouza, Pablo J.

    2015-10-01

    The processes regulating the relationship between tidal flows and shallow groundwater dynamics, temperature and salinity in a coastal wetland in an arid climate are analysed in a detailed field study carried out in the marsh located at Playa Fracasso (Argentina). The continuous records of groundwater level, temperature and electrical conductivity from a transect perpendicular to the coastline were studied during a period ranging from summer to winter, together with the information obtained in hydrogeomorphological field surveys and soil profiles. An assessment of the processes conditioning marsh hydrology was carried out contemplating seasonal (summer-winter) and periodical variations caused by tidal flows. The study showed that the dynamics of groundwater in relation to tidal flows depends almost exclusively on the infiltration of tidal water when the marsh is flooded during spring tides (syzygy), with an increase in the groundwater discharge level at the onset of syzygy. The differences in temperature between sea and continental water were very useful in defining the origin of the different contributions. Groundwater salinity is mainly associated with the leaching of the soil salts that enter with the sea water infiltrating during flood events. The presence of saline soils in the marsh is regulated by the evapotranspiration predominating in arid zones. The conceptual hydrological model suggested may help in the understanding of the hydrological processes in other similar marshes of Patagonia, as well as in coastal wetlands of arid zones worldwide.

  17. Responses of free radical metabolism to air exposure or salinity stress, in crabs (Callinectes danae and C. ornatus) with different estuarine distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Carolina A; Togni, Valéria G; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2011-10-01

    The swimming crabs Callinectes danae and C. ornatus are found in bays and estuaries, but C. danae is more abundant in lower salinities, while C. ornatus remains restricted to areas of higher salinity. Experimental crabs of both species were submitted to: air exposure (Ae, 3h), reimmersion in 33‰ (control) sea water (SW) (Ri, 1h) following air exposure; hyposaline (Ho, 10‰ for 2h) or hypersaline (He, 40‰ for 2h) SW, then return to control 33‰ SW (RHo and RHe, for 1h). Hemolymph was sampled for osmolality and chloride determinations. Activity of antioxidant enzymes [glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase, glutathione-S-transferase] and levels of carbonyl proteins and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) were evaluated in hepatopancreas, muscle, anterior and posterior gills. In Ho groups, hemolymph concentrations were lower in both species, compared to He groups. C. danae displayed higher control activities of GPX (hepatopancreas and muscle) and catalase (all four tissues) than C. ornatus. C. ornatus presented increased activities of catalase and GPX in Ae, Ri, and He groups. Increased TBARS was seen in C. ornatus tissues (He group). The more euryhaline species displayed higher constitutive activities of antioxidant enzymes, and the less euryhaline species exhibited activation of these enzymes when exposed to air or hyper-salinity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. GmPHD5 acts as an important regulator for crosstalk between histone H3K4 di-methylation and H3K14 acetylation in response to salinity stress in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulated evidence suggest that specific patterns of histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs and their crosstalks may determine transcriptional outcomes. However, the regulatory mechanisms of these "histone codes" in plants remain largely unknown. Results In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that a salinity stress inducible PHD (plant homeodomain finger domain containing protein GmPHD5 can read the "histone code" underlying the methylated H3K4. GmPHD5 interacts with other DNA binding proteins, including GmGNAT1 (an acetyl transferase, GmElongin A (a transcription elongation factor and GmISWI (a chromatin remodeling protein. Our results suggest that GmPHD5 can recognize specific histone methylated H3K4, with preference to di-methylated H3K4. Here, we illustrate that the interaction between GmPHD5 and GmGNAT1 is regulated by the self-acetylation of GmGNAT1, which can also acetylate histone H3. GmGNAT1 exhibits a preference toward acetylated histone H3K14. These results suggest a histone crosstalk between methylated H3K4 and acetylated H3K14. Consistent to its putative roles in gene regulation under salinity stress, we showed that GmPHD5 can bind to the promoters of some confirmed salinity inducible genes in soybean. Conclusion Here, we propose a model suggesting that the nuclear protein GmPHD5 is capable of regulating the crosstalk between histone methylation and histone acetylation of different lysine residues. Nevertheless, GmPHD5 could also recruit chromatin remodeling factors and transcription factors of salt stress inducible genes to regulate their expression in response to salinity stress.

  19. An inland and a coastal population of the Mediterranean xero-halophyte species Atriplex halimus L. differ in their ability to accumulate proline and glycinebetaine in response to salinity and water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hassine, Abir; Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Bouzid, Sadok; Lutts, Stanley

    2008-01-01

    Soil salinity and drought compromise water uptake and lead to osmotic adjustment in xero-halophyte plant species. These important environmental constraints may also have specific effects on plant physiology. Stress-induced accumulation of osmocompatible solutes was analysed in two Tunisian populations of the Mediteranean shrub Atriplex halimus L.-plants originating from a salt-affected coastal site (Monastir) or from a non-saline semi-arid area (Sbikha)-were exposed to nutrient solution containing either low (40 mM) or high (160 mM) doses of NaCl or 15% polyethylene glycol. The low NaCl dose stimulated plant growth in both populations. Plants from Monastir were more resistant to high salinity and exhibited a greater ability to produce glycinebetaine in response to salt stress. Conversely, plants from Sbikha were more resistant to water stress and displayed a higher rate of proline accumulation. Proline accumulated as early as 24 h after stress imposition and such accumulation was reversible. By contrast, glycinebetaine concentration culminated after 10 d of stress and did not decrease after the stress relief. The highest salt resistance of Monastir plants was not due to a lower rate of Na(+) absorption; plants from this population exhibited a higher stomatal conductance and a prodigal water-use strategy leading to lower water-use efficiency than plants from Sbikha. Exogenous application of proline (1 mM) improved the level of drought resistance in Monastir plants through a decrease in oxidative stress quantified by the malondialdehyde concentration, while the exogenous application of glycinebetaine improved the salinity resistance of Sbikha plants through a positive effect on photosystem II efficiency.

  20. Potencial evocado auditivo de estado estável em audiologia pediátrica Auditory steady state response in pediatric audiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Emilia Linares

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A principal questão que envolve o diagnóstico audiológico infantil é a determinação de procedimentos que configurem resultados confiáveis e objetivos, que possam ser utilizados na predição dos limiares auditivos por frequência específica. OBJETIVO: Correlacionar os achados do potencial evocado auditivo de estado estável (PEAEE com outros exames em crianças com perda auditiva neurossensorial. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo de coorte contemporânea com corte transversal. 23 crianças de ambos os gêneros e com idades entre 1 e 7 anos realizaram PEAEE, audiometria de reforço visual, potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico (PEATE clique e tone burst e medida do reflexo acústico para aplicação da regra de predição do limiar auditivo a partir do reflexo acústico. RESULTADOS: A correlação entre o PEAEE e audiometria variou de 0.70 a 0.93, para o PEATE-clique (2k e 4kHz variou de 0.83 a 0.89, para o tone burst variou de 0.73 a 0.93. A concordância entre o PEAEE e a regra de predição do limiar auditivo foi considerada moderada. CONCLUSÃO: Houve correlação significativa entre o PEAEE e audiometria, assim como para o PEATE clique (2k e 4kHz e para o PEATE tone burst. O reflexo acústico pode ser usado para acrescentar informações ao diagnóstico infantil.The main issue regarding pediatric audiology diagnosis is determining procedures to configure reliable results which can be used to predict frequency-specific hearing thresholds. AIM: To investigate the correlation between auditory steady-state response (ASSR with other tests in children with sensorineural hearing loss. METHODS: Prospective cross-sectional contemporary cohort study. Twenty-three children (ages 1 to 7; mean, 3 years old were submitted to ASSR, behavioral audiometry, click audiometry brain stem response (ABR, tone burst ABR, and predicting hearing level from the acoustic reflex. RESULTS: the correlation between behavioral thresholds and ASSR was

  1. Na+/K+-ATPase and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in the gills of the aquatic air-breathing fish Trichogaster microlepis in response to salinity variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Yen; Chao, Pei-Lin; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2010-03-01

    The aquatic air-breathing fish, Trichogaster microlepis, can be found in fresh water and estuaries. We further evaluated the changes in two important osmoregulatory enzymes, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), in the gills when fish were subjected to deionized water (DW), fresh water (FW), and salinated brackish water (salinity of 10 g/L). Fish were sampled only 4 days after experimental transfer. The mortality, plasma osmolality, and Na(+) concentration were higher in 10 g/L acclimated fish, while their muscle water content decreased with elevated external salinity. The highest NKA protein abundance was found in the fish gills in 10 g/L, and NKA activity was highest in the DW and 10 g/L acclimated fish. The VHA protein levels were highest in 10 g/L, and VHA activity was highest in the DW treatment. From immunohistochemical results, we found three different cell populations: (1) NKA-immunoreactive (NKA-IR) cells, (2) both NKA-IR and HA-IR cells, and (3) HA-IR cells. NKA-IR cells in the lamellar and interlamellar regions significantly increased in DW and 10 g/L treatments. Only HA-IR cells in the lamellar region were significantly increased in DW. In the interlamellar region, there was no difference in the number of HA-IR cells among the three treated. From these results, T. microlepis exhibited osmoregulatory ability in DW and 10 g/L treatments. The cell types involved in ionic regulation were also examined with immunofluorescence staining; three ionocyte types were found which were similar to the zebrafish model. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Saline water irrigation of quinoa and chickpea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirich, A.; Jelloul, A.; Choukr-Allah, R.

    2014-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted in the south of Morocco to evaluate the response of chickpea and quinoa to different irrigation water salinity treatments (1, 4, 7 and 10 dS m-1 for chickpea and 1, 10, 20 and 30 dS m-1 for quinoa). Increasing salinity affected significantly (P ... and height and caused delay and reduction in seed emergence, quinoa was shown to be more resistant than chickpea. Dry biomass, seed yield, harvest index and crop water productivity were affected significantly (P ... and seed yield for both quinoa and chickpea while increasing salinity resulted in increase - in the case of quinoa - and decrease - in the case of chickpea - in harvest index and crop water productivity. Na+ and Na+/K+ ratio increased with increasing irrigation water salinity, while K+ content decreased...

  3. Molecular analysis and its expression of a pou homeobox protein gene during development and in response to salinity stress from brine shrimp, Artemia sinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Qing; Hou, Lin; Yi, Nan; Zhang, Riu-Feng; Zou, Xiang-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Brine shrimps of the genus Artemia are aquatic species of economic importance because of their important significance to aquaculture and are used as a model species in physiology and developmental biology. Research on Artemia POU homeobox gene function will enhance our understanding of the physiological and developmental processes of POU homeobox gene in animals. Herein, a full-length cDNA encoding an Artemia POU homeobox protein gene 1 (APH-1) from Artemia sinica (designated as As-APH-1) was cloned and characterized by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) method. The As-APH-1 gene encoded a protein of 388 amino acid polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 42.85kDa and an isoelectric point of 6.90 and the protein belongs to the POU III family. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that A. sinica As-APH-1 protein sequence shared a conserved POU homeobox domain with other species. The early and persistent expression of As-APH-1 in the naupliar stages by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and whole-mount embryonic immunohistochemistry suggest that As-APH-1 functions very early in the salt gland and may be required continuously in this organ. Later in development, expression of As-APH-1 begins to dramatically decrease and disappear in salt gland of the sub-adult Artemia. In addition, we also discovered that As-APH-1 increased obviously as the salinity increased, indicating that As-APH-1 might be used as a good indicator of salinity stress. In summary, we are the first to identify the As-APH-1 gene and to determine its gene expression patterns in early embryogenesis stages and in different salinity stress in brine shrimp, A. sinica. The result of expression of As-APH-1 affected by salinity changes will provide us further understanding of the underlying mechanisms of osmoregulation in Artemia early embryonic development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression patterns of WRKY genes in di-haploid Populus simonii × P. nigra in response to salinity stress revealed by quantitative real-time PCR and RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengji; Wang, Jiying; Yao, Wenjing; Zhou, Boru; Li, Renhua; Jiang, Tingbo

    2014-10-01

    Spatio-temporal expression patterns of 13 out of 119 poplar WRKY genes indicated dynamic and tissue-specific roles of WRKY family proteins in salinity stress tolerance. To understand the expression patterns of poplar WRKY genes under salinity stress, 51 of the 119 WRKY genes were selected from di-haploid Populus simonii × P. nigra by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). We used qRT-PCR to profile the expression of the top 13 genes under salinity stress across seven time points, and employed RNA-Seq platforms to cross-validate it. Results demonstrated that all the 13 WRKY genes were expressed in root, stem, and leaf tissues, but their expression levels and overall patterns varied notably in these tissues. Regarding overall gene expression in roots, the 13 genes were significantly highly expressed at all six time points after the treatment, reaching the plateau of expression at hour 9. In leaves, the 13 genes were similarly up-regulated from 3 to 12 h in response to NaCl treatment. In stems, however, expression levels of the 13 genes did not show significant changes after the NaCl treatment. Regarding individual gene expression across the time points and the three tissues, the 13 genes can be classified into three clusters: the lowly expressed Cluster 1 containing PthWRKY28, 45 and 105; intermediately expressed Clusters 2 including PthWRKY56, 88 and 116; and highly expressed Cluster 3 consisting of PthWRKY41, 44, 51, 61, 62, 75 and 106. In general, genes in Cluster 2 and 3 displayed a dynamic pattern of "induced amplification-recovering", suggesting that these WRKY genes and corresponding pathways may play a critical role in mediating salt response and tolerance in a dynamic and tissue-specific manner.

  5. Stochastic modeling of soil salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suweis, S.; Porporato, A. M.; Daly, E.; van der Zee, S.; Maritan, A.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    A minimalist stochastic model of primary soil salinity is proposed, in which the rate of soil salinization is determined by the balance between dry and wet salt deposition and the intermittent leaching events caused by rainfall events. The equations for the probability density functions of salt mass and concentration are found by reducing the coupled soil moisture and salt mass balance equations to a single stochastic differential equation (generalized Langevin equation) driven by multiplicative Poisson noise. Generalized Langevin equations with multiplicative white Poisson noise pose the usual Ito (I) or Stratonovich (S) prescription dilemma. Different interpretations lead to different results and then choosing between the I and S prescriptions is crucial to describe correctly the dynamics of the model systems. We show how this choice can be determined by physical information about the timescales involved in the process. We also show that when the multiplicative noise is at most linear in the random variable one prescription can be made equivalent to the other by a suitable transformation in the jump probability distribution. We then apply these results to the generalized Langevin equation that drives the salt mass dynamics. The stationary analytical solutions for the probability density functions of salt mass and concentration provide insight on the interplay of the main soil, plant and climate parameters responsible for long term soil salinization. In particular, they show the existence of two distinct regimes, one where the mean salt mass remains nearly constant (or decreases) with increasing rainfall frequency, and another where mean salt content increases markedly with increasing rainfall frequency. As a result, relatively small reductions of rainfall in drier climates may entail dramatic shifts in longterm soil salinization trends, with significant consequences, e.g. for climate change impacts on rain fed agriculture.

  6. The Role of Ethylene in Plants Under Salinity Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Chen, Hao-Wei; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    Although the roles of ethylene in plant response to salinity and other stresses have been extensively studied, there are still some obscure points left to be clarified. Generally, in Arabidopsis and many other terrestrial plants, ethylene signaling is indispensable for plant rapid response and tolerance to salinity stress. However, a few studies showed that functional knock-out of some ACSs increased plant salinity-tolerance, while overexpression of them caused more sensitivity. This seems to be contradictory to the known opinion that ethylene plays positive roles in salinity response. Differently, ethylene in rice may play negative roles in regulating seedling tolerance to salinity. The main positive ethylene signaling components MHZ7/OsEIN2, MHZ6/OsEIL1, and OsEIL2 all negatively regulate the salinity-tolerance of rice seedlings. Recently, several different research groups all proposed a negative feedback mechanism of coordinating plant growth and ethylene response, in which several ethylene-inducible proteins (including NtTCTP, NEIP2 in tobacco, AtSAUR76/77/78, and AtARGOS) act as inhibitors of ethylene response but activators of plant growth. Therefore, in addition to a summary of the general roles of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in salinity response, this review mainly focused on discussing (i) the discrepancies between ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in salinity response, (ii) the divergence between rice and Arabidopsis in regulation of salinity response by ethylene, and (iii) the possible negative feedback mechanism of coordinating plant growth and salinity response by ethylene. PMID:26640476

  7. Changes in cellular distribution regulate SKD1 ATPase activity in response to a sudden increase in environmental salinity in halophyte ice plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Yingtzy; Chiang, Chih-Pin; Yen, Hungchen Emilie

    2013-01-01

    Halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. (ice plant) rapidly responds to sudden increases in salinity in its environment by activating specific salt-tolerant mechanisms. One major strategy is to regulate a series of ion transporters and proton pumps to maintain cellular Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis. Plant SKD1 (suppressor of K(+) transport growth defect 1) proteins accumulate in cells actively engaged in the secretory processes, and play a critical role in intracellular protein trafficking. Ice plant SKD1 redistributes from the cytosol to the plasma membrane hours after salt stressed. In combination with present knowledge of this protein, we suggest that stress facilitates SKD1 movement to the plasma membrane where ADP/ATP exchange occurs, and functions in the regulation of membrane components such as ion transporters to avoid ion toxicity.

  8. Cloning and expression of retinoblastoma-binding protein 4 gene in embryo diapause termination and in response to salinity stress from brine shrimp Artemia sinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolu; Yao, Feng; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Xiaolin; Zheng, Ren; Jia, Baolin; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2016-10-15

    Retinoblastoma binding protein 4 (RBBP4) is a nuclear protein with four WD-repeat sequences and thus belongs to a highly conserved subfamily of proteins with such domains. This retinoblastoma-binding protein plays an important role in nucleosome assembly and histone modification, which influences gene transcription and regulates cell cycle and proliferation. Artemia sinica (brine shrimp) undergoes an unusual diapause process under stress conditions of high salinity and low temperature. However, the role of RBBP4 in diapause termination of embryo development in A. sinica remains unknown. Here, the full-length cDNA of the As-rbbp4 gene was obtained from A. sinica and found to contain 1411 nucleotides, including a 1281 bp open reading frame (ORF), 63 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 67-bp 3'-UTR, which encodes a 427 amino acid (48 kDa) protein. Bioinformatic analysis indicated As-RBBP4 to be mainly located in the nucleus, with a theoretical isoelectric point of 4.79. Protein sequence domain analysis showed that As-RBBP4 is a conserved protein, especially in the WD40 domain. No specificity in expression of this gene was observed in tissues or organs by in situ hybridization. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses of As-RBBP4 gene and protein expression, respectively, showed notably high levels at 10 h and a subsequent downward trend. Obvious trends in upregulation of As-RBBP4 were observed under conditions of low temperature and high salinity stress. As-E2F1 and As-CyclinE also presented similar trends as that of As-RBBP4 in Western blots. Analysis of the RBBP4 expression in early embryonic development of A. sinica indicated that this protein plays an important role in diapause termination and cell cycle regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. EST-SSR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user2

    2013-02-27

    Feb 27, 2013 ... databases in silico approaches. The objectives of the present study are: (1) To analyze the distribution and frequency of EST-SSRs in the expressed portion of the radish genome; (2) to develop a comprehensive set of novel EST-SSR markers for radish;. (3) to assess their polymorphism in a set of 48 radish.

  10. Effects of Soil Salinity on Sucrose Metabolism in Cotton Fiber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Peng

    Full Text Available Cotton (Gosspium hirsutum L. is classified as a salt tolerant crop. However, its yield and fiber quality are negatively affected by soil salinity. Studies on the enzymatic differences in sucrose metabolism under different soil salinity levels are lacking. Therefore, field experiments, using two cotton cultivars, CCRI-79 (salt-tolerant and Simian 3 (salt-sensitive, were conducted in 2013 and 2014 at three different salinity levels (1.15 dS m-1 [low soil salinity], 6.00 dS m-1 [medium soil salinity], and 11.46 dS m-1 [high soil salinity]. The objective was to elucidate the effects of soil salinity on sucrose content and the activity of key enzymes that are related to sucrose metabolism in cotton fiber. Results showed that as the soil salinity increased, cellulose content, sucrose content, and sucrose transformation rate declined; the decreases in cellulose content and sucrose transformation rate caused by the increase in soil salinity were more in Simian 3 than those in CCRI-79. With increase in soil salinity, activities of sucrose metabolism enzymes sucrose phophate synthase (SPS, acidic invertase, and alkaline invertase were decreased, whereas sucrose synthase (SuSy activity increased. However, the changes displayed in the SuSy and SPS activities in response to increase in soil salinity were different and the differences were large between the two cotton cultivars. These results illustrated that suppressed cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism under high soil salinity were mainly due to the change in SPS, SuSy, and invertase activities, and the difference in cellulose synthesis and sucrose metabolism in fiber for the two cotton cultivars in response to soil salinity was determined mainly by both SuSy and SPS activities.

  11. Effects of Salinity and Nutrient Addition on Mangrove Excoecaria agallocha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaping; Ye, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Effects of salinity on seed germination and growth of young (1 month old) and old (2-year old) seedlings of Excoecaria agallocha were investigated. Combined effects of salinity and nutrient level were also examined on old seedlings. Seed germination was best at 0 and 5 psu salinity. 15 psu salinity significantly delayed root initiation and decreased final establishment rate. All seeds failed to establish at 25 psu salinity. Young seedlings performed best at 0 and 5 psu, but growth was stunned at 15 psu, and all seedlings died within 90 days at 25 psu. Old seedlings grew best at salinities below 5 psu and they survived the whole cultivation at 25 psu. This indicated that E. agallocha increased salt tolerance over time. Gas exchange was significantly compromised by salinities above 15 psu but evidently promoted by high nutrient. Proline accumulated considerably at high nutrient, and its contents increased from 0 to 15 psu but decreased at 25 psu salinity. Lipid peroxidation was aggravated by increasing salinity beyond 15 psu but markedly alleviated by nutrient addition. These responses indicated that E. agallocha was intolerant to high salinity but it can be greatly enhanced by nutrient addition. PMID:24691495

  12. N-Acetylcysteine plus Saline Hydration versus Saline Hydration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in patients undergoing coronary angiography pretreated with N-acetylcysteine NAC plus saline hydration or saline hydration alone and to determine the association between various risk factors and RCIN. Methods: Patients were ...

  13. Response of gaseous carbon emissions to low-level salinity increase in tidal marsh ecosystem of the Min River estuary, southeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minjie; Ren, Hongchang; Ren, Peng; Li, Jiabing; Wilson, Benjamin J; Tong, Chuan

    2017-02-01

    Although estuarine tidal marshes are important contributors to the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the relationship between carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) emission, and environmental factors, with respect to estuarine marshes, has not been clarified thoroughly. This study investigated the crucial factors controlling the emission of CO2 and CH4 from a freshwater marsh and a brackish marsh located in a subtropical estuary in southeastern China, as well as their magnitude. The duration of the study period was November 2013 to October 2014. Relevant to both the field and incubation experiments, the CO2 and CH4 emissions from the two marshes showed pronounced seasonal variations. The CO2 and CH4 emissions from both marshes demonstrated significant positive correlations with the air/soil temperature (pwater/tide water Cl- and SO42- (psalinity of less than 5‰. The findings of this study could have important implications for estimating the global warming contributions of estuarine marshes along differing salinity gradients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Simultaneous expression of abiotic stress responsive transcription factors, AtDREB2A, AtHB7 and AtABF3 improves salinity and drought tolerance in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittal Pruthvi

    Full Text Available Drought, salinity and extreme temperatures are the most common abiotic stresses, adversely affecting plant growth and productivity. Exposure of plants to stress activates stress signalling pathways that induce biochemical and physiological changes essential for stress acclimation. Stress tolerance is governed by multiple traits, and importance of a few traits in imparting tolerance has been demonstrated. Under drought, traits linked to water mining and water conservation, water use efficiency and cellular tolerance (CT to desiccation are considered to be relevant. In this study, an attempt has been made to improve CT in drought hardy crop, peanut (Arachis hypogaea L., cv. TMV2 by co-expressing stress-responsive transcription factors (TFs, AtDREB2A, AtHB7 and AtABF3, associated with downstream gene expression. Transgenic plants simultaneously expressing these TFs showed increased tolerance to drought, salinity and oxidative stresses compared to wild type, with an increase in total plant biomass. The transgenic plants exhibited improved membrane and chlorophyll stability due to enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging and osmotic adjustment by proline synthesis under stress. The improvement in stress tolerance in transgenic lines were associated with induced expression of various CT related genes like AhGlutaredoxin, AhAldehyde reductase, AhSerine threonine kinase like protein, AhRbx1, AhProline amino peptidase, AhHSP70, AhDIP and AhLea4. Taken together the results indicate that co-expression of stress responsive TFs can activate multiple CT pathways, and this strategy can be employed to improve abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

  15. The control of saline groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, T.

    1963-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of the watertable, water-conducting properties of the soil, climatic factors and groundwater salinity on the salinization of soils in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Areas, Australia.

    Average daily capillary flow rates were calculated from measured salinization (by

  16. Adaptive Response of Listeria monocytogenes to Heat, Salinity and Low pH, after Habituation on Cherry Tomatoes and Lettuce Leaves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poimenidou, Sofia V; Chatzithoma, Danai-Natalia; Nychas, George-John; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of habituation of Listeria monocytogenes on cherry tomatoes or lettuce leaves on its subsequent response to inhibitory levels of acid, osmotic and heat stress...

  17. Temperature and salinity profile data collected by NOAA's Navigation Response Team 5 during operations along the northeast US coast, May 2005 - March 2006 (NODC Accession 0002673)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and the Northeast US coast from the NAVIGATION RESPONSE TEAM 5 from 03 May...

  18. Genomics Approaches For Improving Salinity Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongpiur, Ramsong Chantre; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata; Pareek, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major factors which reduces crop production worldwide. Plant responses to salinity are highly complex and involve a plethora of genes. Due to its multigenicity, it has been difficult to attain a complete understanding of how plants respond to salinity. Genomics has progressed tremendously over the past decade and has played a crucial role towards providing necessary knowledge for crop improvement. Through genomics, we have been able to identify and characterize the genes involved in salinity stress response, map out signaling pathways and ultimately utilize this information for improving the salinity tolerance of existing crops. The use of new tools, such as gene pyramiding, in genetic engineering and marker assisted breeding has tremendously enhanced our ability to generate stress tolerant crops. Genome editing technologies such as Zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 also provide newer and faster avenues for plant biologists to generate precisely engineered crops. PMID:27499683

  19. Resposta de genótipos de milho ao estresse salino em condições hidropônicas Response of maize genotypes to saline stress in hydroponic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Willadino

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Quatro genótipos de milho (Zea mays L., Jatinã C3 anão, BR-201, V-190 e LW-1, foram avaliados quanto à tolerância ao estresse salino (0, 50 e 100 mM NaCl em condições hidropônicas. As plantas submetidas a 100 mM de NaCl durante 29 dias apresentaram uma redução na produção de matéria seca superior a 50%, e uma redução na área foliar superior a 75%, quando comparadas ao tratamento controle (0 mM NaCl. Dentre os quatro genótipos estudados, a linha pura LW-1 apresentou produção de matéria seca e área foliar inferiores aos demais. O aumento dos níveis de sal na solução resultou em uma diminuição da taxa de crescimento da parte aérea e da raiz, de todos os genótipos. O sistema radicular apresentou os maiores teores de sódio e também os maiores decréscimos na taxa de crescimento relativo, evidenciando o efeito negativo da acumulação deste cátion. O número e o tamanho dos estômatos não sofreram alterações em conseqüência do estresse salino.Four maize (Zea mays L. genotypes, Jatinã C3 anão, BR-201, V-190 and LW-1, grown under hidroponic conditions, were evaluated for their tolerance to saline stress imposed by three salt levels (0, 50 and 100 mM NaCl. Plants submitted to 100 mM NaCl for 29 days had 50% lower dry matter production and 75% reduced leaf area, as compared to the control (0 mM NaCl plants. Among the four genotypes studied, LW-1, a pure line, produced the least dry matter and leaf area. The increase salt levels in solution decreased the growth rate of both shoot and root in all genotypes. Roots had the largest sodium concentration and also showed the largest decrease in the relative growth rate, demonstrading the negative effect of sodium accumulation. The number and size of the stomata were not affected by saline stress.

  20. Salinity-dependent limitation of photosynthesis and oxygen exchange in microbial mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Kühl, Michael; Nübel, U.

    1999-01-01

    was specific for each community and in accordance with optimal performance at the respective salinity of origin. This pattern was lost after long-term exposure to varying salinities when responses to salinity were found to approach a general pattern of decreasing photosynthesis and oxygen exchange capacity...... with increasing salinity. Exhaustive measurements of oxygen export in the light, oxygen consumption in the dark and gross photosynthesis indicated that a salinity-dependent limitation of all three parameters occurred. Maximal values for all three parameters decreased exponentially with increasing salinity...

  1. EST Vocabulary Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia D.S. Bell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at contributing to the investigation on the instruction of EST (English for Science and Technology vocabulary, in terms of receptive use of the language. It evaluates the effectiveness of two teaching approaches to the acquisition of vocabulary. The first approach consisted of teaching vocabulary through the use of dictionaries, where the words were merely translated into the learners’ L1 or defined in the target language thus promoting superficial level of word processing. The second approach employed activities promoting deep level of word processing. Data were analysed quantitatively. Results indicated that the two approaches seem to have some equipotentiality, as far as EST vocabulary is concerned.

  2. Coagulation processes of kaolinite and montmorillonite in calm, saline water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Qing-He; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.

    2018-03-01

    A three dimensional numerical model for simulating the coagulation processes of colloids has been performed by monitoring the time evolution of particle number concentration, the size distribution of aggregates, the averaged settling velocity, the collision frequency, and the collision efficiency in quiescent water with selected salinities. This model directly simulates all interaction forces between particles based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory, and thus, can reveal the collision and coagulation processes of colloidal suspensions. Although using perfect spherical particles in the modeling, the results were compared with those for kaolinite and montmorillonite suspensions to demonstrate the capability of simulating the responses of these particles with highly irregular shape. The averaged settling velocity of kaolinite aggregates in quiescent saline water reached a maximum of 0.16 mm/s when the salinity increasing to about 3, and then, exhibited little dependence on salinity thereafter. Model simulations results (by choosing specific values that represent kaolinite's characteristics) indicate a similar trend: rapid decrease of the particle number concentration (i.e., rapidly flocculated, and thus, settling velocity also increases rapidly) when salinity increases from 0 to 2, and then, only increased slightly when salinity was further increased from 5 to 20. The collision frequency for kaolinite only decreases slightly with increasing salinity because that the fluid density and viscosity increase slightly in sea water. It suggests that the collision efficiency for kaolinite rises rapidly at low salinities and levels off at high salinity. For montmorillonite, the settling velocity of aggregates in quiescent saline water continuedly increases to 0.022 mm/s over the whole salinity range 0-20, and the collision efficiency for montmorillonite rises with increasing salinities.

  3. Osmotic and hydraulic adjustment of mangrove saplings to extreme salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Alonzo, Rodrigo; López-Portillo, Jorge; Moctezuma, Coral; Bartlett, Megan K; Sack, Lawren

    2016-12-01

    Salinity tolerance in plant species varies widely due to adaptation and acclimation processes at the cellular and whole-plant scales. In mangroves, extreme substrate salinity induces hydraulic failure and ion excess toxicity and reduces growth and survival, thus suggesting a potentially critical role for physiological acclimation to salinity. We tested the hypothesis that osmotic adjustment, a key type of plasticity that mitigates salinity shock, would take place in coordination with declines in whole-plant hydraulic conductance in a common garden experiment using saplings of three mangrove species with different salinity tolerances (Avicennia germinans L., Rhizophora mangle L. and Laguncularia racemosa (L.) C.F. Gaertn., ordered from higher to lower salinity tolerance). For each mangrove species, four salinity treatments (1, 10, 30 and 50 practical salinity units) were established and the time trajectories were determined for leaf osmotic potential (Ψs), stomatal conductance (gs), whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant) and predawn disequilibrium between xylem and substrate water potentials (Ψpdd). We expected that, for all three species, salinity increments would result in coordinated declines in Ψs, gs and Kplant, and that the Ψpdd would increase with substrate salinity and time of exposure. In concordance with our predictions, reductions in substrate water potential promoted a coordinated decline in Ψs, gs and Kplant, whereas the Ψpdd increased substantially during the first 4 days but dissipated after 7 days, indicating a time lag for equilibration after a change in substratum salinity. Our results show that mangroves confront and partially ameliorate acute salinity stress via simultaneous reductions in Ψs, gs and Kplant, thus developing synergistic physiological responses at the cell and whole-plant scales. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Acute and Subacute Toxicity of 7.5% Hypertonic Saline-6% Dextran-70 (HSD) in Dogs. 2. Biochemical and Behavioral Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    hypernatremia . Thus, as part of the new drug the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of b Defense. (AR 360-5) application to FDA for HSD. the...clinical concern in response to hypernatiem~a. 120 [In the present study, a cause-effect relationship between 100 " hypernatremia and behavioral

  5. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiplicity of expression of Na+,K+-ATPase alpha-subunit isoforms in the gill of Atlantic salmon: quantification and cellular localisation in response to salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steffen; Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2009-01-01

    but occasionally also on lamellae. Overall, the salinity-induced variation in labelling pattern and intensity matched the quantification data. In conclusion, the predominant switching of Na+,K+-ATPase -subunit isoform mRNA during salinity acclimation reflects a marked remodelling of mitochondrion-rich cells (MRCs...

  7. Changes in essential oil and morpho-physiological traits of tarragon (Artemisia dracuncalus L. in responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, AMF (Glomus intraradices N.C. Schenck & G.S. Sm. inoculation under salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Lamian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF (Glomus intraradices N.C. Schenck & G.S. Sm. inoculation and salinity effect on qualitative and quantitative changes in tarragon yield. Treatments included inoculation, and non-inoculation of AMF, and five salinity levels of irrigation water (with the electrical conductivity of 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 dS m-1. The results showed the plant height, SPAD value, number of leaves, dry mass of leaves and shoot per plant were reduced under salinity condition. The various levels of salinity decreased the content of tarragon essential oil and some its components consist of α-pinene, limonene, Z-ocimene, E-ocimene, and methyl chavicol while, it increased the content of bornyl acetate, eugenol, methyl eugenol, caryophyllene, germacrene, and α-farnesene. AMF inoculation without salinity had the greatest positive effect on the evaluated traits of tarragon. Also, it improved the morpho-physiological traits under salinity due to alleviation of the harmful effects of salinity. Although the essential oil content was reduced with the AMF inoculation, the methyl chavicol amount was increased by the AMF inoculation under salinity condition.

  8. JcDREB2, a Physic Nut AP2/ERF Gene, Alters Plant Growth and Salinity Stress Responses in Transgenic Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuehui; Liu, Kun; Zhang, Ju; Li, Xiaoli; Xu, Kedong; Zhang, Yi; Qi, Jing; Yu, Deshui; Wang, Jian; Li, Chengwei

    2017-01-01

    Transcription factors of the AP2/ERF family play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, a physic nut AP2/ERF gene, JcDREB2, was functionally characterized. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that JcDREB2 was expressed mainly in the leaf and could be induced by abscisic acid but suppressed by gibberellin (GA) and salt. Transient expression of a JcDREB2-YFP fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts cells suggested that JcDREB2 is localized in the nucleus. Rice plants overexpressing JcDREB2 exhibited dwarf and GA-deficient phenotypes with shorter shoots and roots than those of wild-type plants. The dwarfism phenotype could be rescued by the application of exogenous GA3. The expression levels of GA biosynthetic genes including OsGA20ox1, OsGA20ox2, OsGA20ox4, OsGA3ox2, OsCPS1, OsKO2, and OsKAO were significantly reduced in plants overexpressing JcDREB2. Overexpression of JcDREB2 in rice increased sensitivity to salt stress. Increases in the expression levels of several salt-tolerance-related genes in response to salt stress were impaired in JcDREB2-overexpressing plants. These results demonstrated not only that JcDREB2 influences GA metabolism, but also that it can participate in the regulation of the salt stress response in rice.

  9. Salinity tolerance in halophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Timothy J; Colmer, Timothy D

    2008-01-01

    Halophytes, plants that survive to reproduce in environments where the salt concentration is around 200 mm NaCl or more, constitute about 1% of the world's flora. Some halophytes show optimal growth in saline conditions; others grow optimally in the absence of salt. However, the tolerance of all halophytes to salinity relies on controlled uptake and compartmentalization of Na+, K+ and Cl- and the synthesis of organic 'compatible' solutes, even where salt glands are operative. Although there is evidence that different species may utilize different transporters in their accumulation of Na+, in general little is known of the proteins and regulatory networks involved. Consequently, it is not yet possible to assign molecular mechanisms to apparent differences in rates of Na+ and Cl- uptake, in root-to-shoot transport (xylem loading and retrieval), or in net selectivity for K+ over Na+. At the cellular level, H+-ATPases in the plasma membrane and tonoplast, as well as the tonoplast H+-PPiase, provide the trans-membrane proton motive force used by various secondary transporters. The widespread occurrence, taxonomically, of halophytes and the general paucity of information on the molecular regulation of tolerance mechanisms persuade us that research should be concentrated on a number of 'model' species that are representative of the various mechanisms that might be involved in tolerance.

  10. Durum wheat seedlings in saline conditions: Salt spray versus root-zone salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Carmelina; Bottega, Stefania

    2016-02-01

    Salinity is an increasingly serious problem with a strong negative impact on plant productivity. Though many studies have been made on salt stress induced by high NaCl concentrations in the root-zone, few data concern the response of plants to saline aerosol, one of the main constraints in coastal areas. In order to study more in depth wheat salinity tolerance and to evaluate damage and antioxidant response induced by various modes of salt application, seedlings of Triticum turgidum ssp. durum, cv. Cappelli were treated for 2 and 7 days with salt in the root-zone (0, 50 and 200 mM NaCl) or with salt spray (400 mM NaCl + 0 or 200 mM NaCl in the root-zone). Seedlings accumulated Na+ in their leaves and therefore part of their ability to tolerate high salinity seems to be due to Na+ leaf tissue tolerance. Durum wheat, confirmed as a partially tolerant plant, shows a higher damage under airborne salinity, when both an increase in TBA-reactive material (indicative of lipid peroxidation) and a decrease in root growth were recorded. A different antioxidant response was activated, depending on the type of salt supply. Salt treatment induced a depletion of the reducing power of both ascorbate and glutathione while the highest contents of proline were detected under salt spray conditions. In the short term catalase and ascorbate peroxidase co-operated with glutathione peroxidase in the scavenging of hydrogen peroxide, in particular in salt spray-treated plants. From our data, the durum wheat cultivar Cappelli seems to be sensitive to airborne salinity.

  11. Cuticle hydrocarbons in saline aquatic beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Botella-Cruz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons are the principal component of insect cuticle and play an important role in maintaining water balance. Cuticular impermeability could be an adaptative response to salinity and desiccation in aquatic insects; however, cuticular hydrocarbons have been poorly explored in this group and there are no previous data on saline species. We characterized cuticular hydrocarbons of adults and larvae of two saline aquatic beetles, namely Nebrioporus baeticus (Dytiscidae and Enochrus jesusarribasi (Hydrophilidae, using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The CHC profile of adults of both species, characterized by a high abundance of branched alkanes and low of unsaturated alkenes, seems to be more similar to that of some terrestrial beetles (e.g., desert Tenebrionidae compared with other aquatic Coleoptera (freshwater Dytiscidae. Adults of E. jesusarribasi had longer chain compounds than N. baeticus, in agreement with their higher resistance to salinity and desiccation. The more permeable cuticle of larvae was characterized by a lower diversity in compounds, shorter carbon chain length and a higher proportion of unsaturated hydrocarbons compared with that of the adults. These results suggest that osmotic stress on aquatic insects could exert a selection pressure on CHC profile similar to aridity in terrestrial species.

  12. Cuticle hydrocarbons in saline aquatic beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella-Cruz, María; Villastrigo, Adrián; Pallarés, Susana; López-Gallego, Elena; Millán, Andrés; Velasco, Josefa

    2017-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are the principal component of insect cuticle and play an important role in maintaining water balance. Cuticular impermeability could be an adaptative response to salinity and desiccation in aquatic insects; however, cuticular hydrocarbons have been poorly explored in this group and there are no previous data on saline species. We characterized cuticular hydrocarbons of adults and larvae of two saline aquatic beetles, namely Nebrioporus baeticus (Dytiscidae) and Enochrus jesusarribasi (Hydrophilidae), using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The CHC profile of adults of both species, characterized by a high abundance of branched alkanes and low of unsaturated alkenes, seems to be more similar to that of some terrestrial beetles (e.g., desert Tenebrionidae) compared with other aquatic Coleoptera (freshwater Dytiscidae). Adults of E. jesusarribasi had longer chain compounds than N. baeticus, in agreement with their higher resistance to salinity and desiccation. The more permeable cuticle of larvae was characterized by a lower diversity in compounds, shorter carbon chain length and a higher proportion of unsaturated hydrocarbons compared with that of the adults. These results suggest that osmotic stress on aquatic insects could exert a selection pressure on CHC profile similar to aridity in terrestrial species.

  13. ASSESSING THE IMPACTS OF SALINITY AND NUTRIENT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy seagrass beds were once found throughout the shallow areas of Narragansett Bay, R.I. but have disappeared due to infilling, pollution and disease. In Greenwich Bay, a highly developed embayment within Narragansett Bay, Ruppia maritima has colonized an area on the northern shore once dominated by Zostera marina. This area is sandy, which may allow groundwater seepage. Ruppia is extremely salinity tolerant, and may also be more nutrient tolerant than Zostera. A six week microcosm experiment at two salinity (20 and 30 ppt) and 4 nutrient (0, 5, 10, and 30 µM inorganic N) levels to test their relative tolerance was conducted in 2014. Treatments were renewed daily to simulate tidal flushing and the exposure water was dosed with 15N for the first week of the experiment. At the end of the experiment, the plants were weighed and measured, and dried for later isotopic analysis. In the first experiment, Ruppia had significant structural responses to both nutrients and salinity; there was a slight decline in root weight and a decrease in the total number of shoots with increasing nutrients. Average Ruppia blade length decreased with increasing nutrients and this decrease was more evident at 30 ppt. In contrast, Zostera had no significant structural differences. For both species, there were no differences in shoot or root/rhizome weights in any treatment, nor were there differences in isotopic results due to salinity. However, δ15N in the tissue increase

  14. Microbial amelioration of crop salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian C; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    The use of soil and irrigation water with a high content of soluble salts is a major limiting factor for crop productivity in the semi-arid areas of the world. While important physiological insights about the mechanisms of salt tolerance in plants have been gained, the transfer of such knowledge into crop improvement has been limited. The identification and exploitation of soil microorganisms (especially rhizosphere bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi) that interact with plants by alleviating stress opens new alternatives for a pyramiding strategy against salinity, as well as new approaches to discover new mechanisms involved in stress tolerance. Although these mechanisms are not always well understood, beneficial physiological effects include improved nutrient and water uptake, growth promotion, and alteration of plant hormonal status and metabolism. This review aims to evaluate the beneficial effects of soil biota on the plant response to saline stress, with special reference to phytohormonal signalling mechanisms that interact with key physiological processes to improve plant tolerance to the osmotic and toxic components of salinity. Improved plant nutrition is a quite general beneficial effect and may contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis of toxic ions under saline stress. Furthermore, alteration of crop hormonal status to decrease evolution of the growth-retarding and senescence-inducing hormone ethylene (or its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid), or to maintain source-sink relations, photosynthesis, and biomass production and allocation (by altering indole-3-acetic acid and cytokinin biosynthesis) seem to be promising target processes for soil biota-improved crop salt tolerance.

  15. The responses of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies to typhoon forcing: The vertical temperature-salinity structure changes associated with the horizontal convergence/divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan-Shan; Sun, Liang; Wu, Qiaoyan; Yang, Yuan-Jian

    2017-06-01

    The responses of the cyclonic eddies (CEs) and anticyclonic eddies (AEs) to typhoon forcing in the Western North Pacific Ocean (WNPO) are analyzed using Argo profiles. Both CEs and AEs have the primary cooling at the surface (0-10 m depth) and deep upwelling from the top of thermocline (200 m depth) down to deeper ocean shortly after typhoon forcing. Due to the deep upwelling, part of warm and fresh water at the top of AEs move out of the eddy, which leads to a colder and saltier subsurface in the AEs after the passage of the typhoon. In contrast, the inflow of warm and fresh water heats and freshens the subsurface in the CEs to compensate the cooling induced by the typhoon. This explains why the observed strong SST cooling were much less than modeled, since the AEs are more frequent than CEs in the WNPO. It indicates that there is divergence (convergence) of warm and fresh water in the surface of AEs (subsurface of CEs). The divergence-convergence effects of the AEs and CEs lead to the secondary cooling center locate at a shallow layer of 100 m in the AEs and a much deeper layer of 350 m in the CEs. This shallow divergence-convergence flow could lead a shallow overturning flow in upper oceans, which may potentially influences the large-scale ocean circulations and climates.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryThe warm and fresh water diverges from anti-cyclonic eddies (AEs) but converges into the cyclonic eddies (CEs), in response to typhoon forcing. This explains why the observed strong SST cooling were much less than modeled, since the AEs are more frequent than CEs in the Western North Pacific Ocean. And it also shift the secondary cooling center to a shallow layer of 100 m in the AEs and to a much deeper layer of 350 m in the CEs. This shallow divergence-convergence flow could lead a shallow overturning flow in upper oceans, which may potentially influences the large-scale ocean circulations, biomass concentration and climates.

  16. Adaptive Response of Listeria monocytogenes to Heat, Salinity and Low pH, after Habituation on Cherry Tomatoes and Lettuce Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poimenidou, Sofia V; Chatzithoma, Danai-Natalia; Nychas, George-John; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens found on fresh produce may encounter low temperatures, high acidity and limited nutrient availability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of habituation of Listeria monocytogenes on cherry tomatoes or lettuce leaves on its subsequent response to inhibitory levels of acid, osmotic and heat stress. Habituation was performed by inoculating lettuce coupons, whole cherry tomatoes or tryptic soy broth (TSB) with a three-strains composite of L. monocytogenes, which were further incubated at 5°C for 24 hours or 5 days. Additionally, cells grown overnight in TSB supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSBYE) at 30°C were used as control cells. Following habituation, L. monocytogenes cells were harvested and exposed to: (i) pH 3.5 adjusted with lactic acid, acetic acid or hydrochloric acid (HCl), and pH 1.5 (HCl) for 6 h; (ii) 20% NaCl and (iii) 60°C for 150 s. Results showed that tomato-habituated L. monocytogenes cells were more tolerant (P tomato-habituated cells were highly sensitized. Prolonged starvation on fresh produce (5 days vs. 24 h) increased resistance to osmotic and acid stress, but reduced thermotolerance, regardless of the pre-exposure environment (i.e., tomatoes, lettuce or TSB). These results indicate that L. monocytogenes cells habituated on fresh produce at low temperatures might acquire resistance to subsequent antimicrobial treatments raising important food safety implications.

  17. Effect of salinity stress on growth and carbohydrate metabolism in three rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars differing in salinity tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanagul, Wattana; Thitisaksakul, Maysaya

    2008-10-01

    Rice seedlings cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 (salt-sensitive), Luang Anan (moderately salt-tolerant) and Pokkali (salt-tolerant) were exposed to 0, 50, 100 and 150 mM NaCI for 9 d. Salinity stress caused reduction in leaf relative water contents in all cultivars. Shoot length of cv. Pokkali was least affected by salinity stress whereas increased root length in response to salinity stress was apparent in cvs. Khao Dawk Mali 105 and Luang Anan. Increased salinity level also caused reduction in fresh and dry weights in cvs. Khao Dawk Mali 105 and Luang Anan, but had no effect in cv. Pokkali except at 150 mM. Accumulation of total soluble sugars and sucrose in mature leaves were observed in cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 exposed to high level of salinity whereas their concentrations in cvs. Luang Anan and Pokkali remained the same as control plants. Accumulation of sucrose in cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 was suggested to be resulted from the alteration of photosynthate partitioning since the activities of sucrose phosphate synthase were not affected by salinity in this cultivar. On the contrary, salinity stress induced an accumulation of starch in cv. Pokkali. It is suggested that partitioning sugars into starch may involve in salinity tolerance by avoiding metabolic alterations.

  18. Adaptive Response of Listeria monocytogenes to Heat, Salinity and Low pH, after Habituation on Cherry Tomatoes and Lettuce Leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia V Poimenidou

    Full Text Available Pathogens found on fresh produce may encounter low temperatures, high acidity and limited nutrient availability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of habituation of Listeria monocytogenes on cherry tomatoes or lettuce leaves on its subsequent response to inhibitory levels of acid, osmotic and heat stress. Habituation was performed by inoculating lettuce coupons, whole cherry tomatoes or tryptic soy broth (TSB with a three-strains composite of L. monocytogenes, which were further incubated at 5°C for 24 hours or 5 days. Additionally, cells grown overnight in TSB supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSBYE at 30°C were used as control cells. Following habituation, L. monocytogenes cells were harvested and exposed to: (i pH 3.5 adjusted with lactic acid, acetic acid or hydrochloric acid (HCl, and pH 1.5 (HCl for 6 h; (ii 20% NaCl and (iii 60°C for 150 s. Results showed that tomato-habituated L. monocytogenes cells were more tolerant (P < 0.05 to acid or osmotic stress than those habituated on lettuce, and habituation on both foods resulted in more stress resistant cells than prior growth in TSB. On the contrary, the highest resistance to heat stress (P < 0.05 was exhibited by the lettuce-habituated L. monocytogenes cells followed by TSB-grown cells at 5°C for 24 h, whereas tomato-habituated cells were highly sensitized. Prolonged starvation on fresh produce (5 days vs. 24 h increased resistance to osmotic and acid stress, but reduced thermotolerance, regardless of the pre-exposure environment (i.e., tomatoes, lettuce or TSB. These results indicate that L. monocytogenes cells habituated on fresh produce at low temperatures might acquire resistance to subsequent antimicrobial treatments raising important food safety implications.

  19. A genome-wide perspective of miRNAome in response to high temperature, salinity and drought stresses in Brassica juncea (Czern L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur R Bhardwaj

    Full Text Available Micro RNAs (miRNAs are involved in diverse biological processes including adaptive response towards abiotic stresses. To unravel small RNAs and more specifically miRNAs that can potentially regulate determinants of abiotic stress tolerance, next generation sequencing of B. juncea seedlings subjected to high temperature, high salt and drought conditions was carried out. With the help of UEA sRNA workbench software package, 51 conserved miRNAs belonging to 30 miRNA families were identified. As there was limited genomic information available for B. juncea, we generated and assembled its genome sequence at a low coverage. Using the generated sequence and other publically available Brassica genomic/transcriptomic resources as mapping reference, 126 novel (not reported in any plant species were discovered for the first time in B. juncea. Further analysis also revealed existence of 32 and 37 star sequences for conserved and novel miRNAs, respectively. The expression of selected conserved and novel miRNAs under conditions of different abiotic stresses was revalidated through universal TaqMan based real time PCR. Putative targets of identified conserved and novel miRNAs were predicted in B. rapa to gain insights into functional roles manifested by B. juncea miRNAs. Furthermore, SPL2-like, ARF17-like and a NAC domain containing protein were experimentally validated as targets of miR156, miR160 and miR164 respectively. Investigation of gene ontologies linked with targets of known and novel miRNAs forecasted their involvement in various biological functions.

  20. CitEST libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luísa P. Natividade Targon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain a better understanding of what is citrus, 33 cDNA libraries were constructed from different citrus species and genera. Total RNA was extracted from fruits, leaves, flowers, bark, seeds and roots, and subjected or not to different biotic and abiotic stresses (pathogens and drought and at several developmental stages. To identify putative promoter sequences, as well as molecular markers that could be useful for breeding programs, one shotgun library was prepared from sweet orange (Citrus sinensis var. Olimpia. In addition, EST libraries were also constructed for a citrus pathogen, the oomycete Phythophthora parasitica in either virulent or avirulent form. A total of 286,559 cDNA clones from citrus were sequenced from their 5’ end, generating 242,790 valid reads of citrus. A total of 9,504 sequences were produced in the shotgun library and the valid reads were assembled using CAP3. In this procedure, we obtained 1,131 contigs and 4,083 singletons. A total of 19,200 cDNA clones from P. parasitica were sequenced, resulting in 16,400 valid reads. The number of ESTs generated in this project is, to our knowledge, the largest citrus sequence database in the world.

  1. Daily Changes in CO2 and Water Vapor Exchange, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Leaf Water Relations in the Halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum during the Induction of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Response to High NaCl Salinity 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus; Gademann, Rolf

    1991-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of net CO2 exchange, water vapor exchange, and leaf water relations were performed in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum during the development of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in response to high NaCl salinity in the rooting medium. Determinations of chlorophyll a fluorescence were used to estimate relative changes in electron transport rate. Alterations in leaf mass per unit area, which—on a short-term basis—largely reflect changes in water content, were recorded continuously with a beta-gauge. Turgor pressure of mesophyll cells was determined with a pressure probe. As reported previously (K Winter, DJ von Willert [1972] Z Pflanzenphysiol 67: 166-170), recently expanded leaves of plants grown under nonsaline conditions showed gas-exchange characteristics of a C3 plant. Although these plants were not exposed to any particular stress treatment, water content and turgor pressure regularly decreased toward the end of the 12 hour light periods and recovered during the following 12 hours of darkness. When the NaCl concentration of the rooting medium was raised to 400 millimolar, in increments of 100 millimolar given at the onset of the photoperiods for 4 consecutive days, leaf water content and turgor pressure decreased by as much as 30 and 60%, respectively, during the course of the photoperiods. These transient decreases probably triggered the induction of the biochemical machinery which is required for CAM to operate. After several days at 400 millimolar NaCl, when leaves showed features typical of CAM, overall turgor pressure and leaf mass per unit area had increased above the levels before onset of the salt treatment, and diurnal alterations in leaf water content were reduced. Net carbon gain during photoperiods and average intercellular CO2 partial pressures at which net CO2 uptake occurred, progressively decreased upon salinization. Reversible diurnal depressions in leaf conductance and net CO2 uptake, with minima recorded in the

  2. Salinity Adaptation and the Contribution of Parental Environmental Effects in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriuchi, Ken S; Friesen, Maren L; Cordeiro, Matilde A; Badri, Mounawer; Vu, Wendy T; Main, Bradley J; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Nuzhdin, Sergey V; Strauss, Sharon Y; von Wettberg, Eric J B

    2016-01-01

    High soil salinity negatively influences plant growth and yield. Some taxa have evolved mechanisms for avoiding or tolerating elevated soil salinity, which can be modulated by the environment experienced by parents or offspring. We tested the contribution of the parental and offspring environments on salinity adaptation and their potential underlying mechanisms. In a two-generation greenhouse experiment, we factorially manipulated salinity concentrations for genotypes of Medicago truncatula that were originally collected from natural populations that differed in soil salinity. To compare population level adaptation to soil salinity and to test the potential mechanisms involved we measured two aspects of plant performance, reproduction and vegetative biomass, and phenological and physiological traits associated with salinity avoidance and tolerance. Saline-origin populations had greater biomass and reproduction under saline conditions than non-saline populations, consistent with local adaptation to saline soils. Additionally, parental environmental exposure to salt increased this difference in performance. In terms of environmental effects on mechanisms of salinity adaptation, parental exposure to salt spurred phenological differences that facilitated salt avoidance, while offspring exposure to salt resulted in traits associated with greater salt tolerance. Non-saline origin populations expressed traits associated with greater growth in the absence of salt while, for saline adapted populations, the ability to maintain greater performance in saline environments was also associated with lower growth potential in the absence of salt. Plastic responses induced by parental and offspring environments in phenology, leaf traits, and gas exchange contribute to salinity adaptation in M. truncatula. The ability of plants to tolerate environmental stress, such as high soil salinity, is likely modulated by a combination of parental effects and within-generation phenotypic

  3. Salinity Adaptation and the Contribution of Parental Environmental Effects in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriuchi, Ken S.; Friesen, Maren L.; Cordeiro, Matilde A.; Badri, Mounawer; Vu, Wendy T.; Main, Bradley J.; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Strauss, Sharon Y.; von Wettberg, Eric J. B.

    2016-01-01

    High soil salinity negatively influences plant growth and yield. Some taxa have evolved mechanisms for avoiding or tolerating elevated soil salinity, which can be modulated by the environment experienced by parents or offspring. We tested the contribution of the parental and offspring environments on salinity adaptation and their potential underlying mechanisms. In a two-generation greenhouse experiment, we factorially manipulated salinity concentrations for genotypes of Medicago truncatula that were originally collected from natural populations that differed in soil salinity. To compare population level adaptation to soil salinity and to test the potential mechanisms involved we measured two aspects of plant performance, reproduction and vegetative biomass, and phenological and physiological traits associated with salinity avoidance and tolerance. Saline-origin populations had greater biomass and reproduction under saline conditions than non-saline populations, consistent with local adaptation to saline soils. Additionally, parental environmental exposure to salt increased this difference in performance. In terms of environmental effects on mechanisms of salinity adaptation, parental exposure to salt spurred phenological differences that facilitated salt avoidance, while offspring exposure to salt resulted in traits associated with greater salt tolerance. Non-saline origin populations expressed traits associated with greater growth in the absence of salt while, for saline adapted populations, the ability to maintain greater performance in saline environments was also associated with lower growth potential in the absence of salt. Plastic responses induced by parental and offspring environments in phenology, leaf traits, and gas exchange contribute to salinity adaptation in M. truncatula. The ability of plants to tolerate environmental stress, such as high soil salinity, is likely modulated by a combination of parental effects and within-generation phenotypic

  4. Stochastic modeling of soil salinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suweis, S.; Rinaldo, A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Daly, E.; Maritan, A.

    2010-01-01

    A minimalist stochastic model of primary soil salinity is proposed, in which the rate of soil salinization is determined by the balance between dry and wet salt deposition and the intermittent leaching events caused by rainfall events. The long term probability density functions of salt mass and

  5. Cold, salinity and drought stresses: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Shilpi; Tuteja, Narendra

    2005-12-15

    World population is increasing at an alarming rate and is expected to reach about six billion by the end of year 2050. On the other hand food productivity is decreasing due to the effect of various abiotic stresses; therefore minimizing these losses is a major area of concern for all nations to cope with the increasing food requirements. Cold, salinity and drought are among the major stresses, which adversely affect plants growth and productivity; hence it is important to develop stress tolerant crops. In general, low temperature mainly results in mechanical constraint, whereas salinity and drought exerts its malicious effect mainly by disrupting the ionic and osmotic equilibrium of the cell. It is now well known that the stress signal is first perceived at the membrane level by the receptors and then transduced in the cell to switch on the stress responsive genes for mediating stress tolerance. Understanding the mechanism of stress tolerance along with a plethora of genes involved in stress signaling network is important for crop improvement. Recently, some genes of calcium-signaling and nucleic acid pathways have been reported to be up-regulated in response to both cold and salinity stresses indicating the presence of cross talk between these pathways. In this review we have emphasized on various aspects of cold, salinity and drought stresses. Various factors pertaining to cold acclimation, promoter elements, and role of transcription factors in stress signaling pathway have been described. The role of calcium as an important signaling molecule in response to various stress signals has also been covered. In each of these stresses we have tried to address the issues, which significantly affect the gene expression in relation to plant physiology.

  6. High salinity wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linarić, M; Markić, M; Sipos, L

    2013-01-01

    The shock effect, survival and ability of activated sludge to acclimatize to wastewater containing different concentrations of NaCl and Na2SO4 were investigated under laboratory conditions. To accomplish this, the potential penetration of a sewage system by seawater as a consequence of storm surge flooding was simulated. The experiments were conducted using activated sludge taken from the aeration tank of a communal wastewater treatment plant and adding different concentrations up to 40 g/L of NaCl and 4.33 g/L of Na2SO4. The effects of salinity on the activated sludge were monitored for 5 weeks based on the values of pH, dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids, volatile suspended solids, sludge volume, sludge volume index, electrokinetic potential, respirometric measurements and enzymatic activity. The addition of salt sharply reduced or completely inhibited the microbial activity in activated sludge. When salt concentrations were below 10 g/L NaCl, microorganisms were able to acclimatize in several weeks and achieve the same initial activity as in raw sludge samples. When the salt concentration was above 30 g/L NaCl, the acclimatization process was very slow or impossible.

  7. NOAA Average Annual Salinity (3-Zone)

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The 3-Zone Average Annual Salinity Digital Geography is a digital spatial framework developed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. These salinity...

  8. EST2Prot: Mapping EST sequences to proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin David M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EST libraries are used in various biological studies, from microarray experiments to proteomic and genetic screens. These libraries usually contain many uncharacterized ESTs that are typically ignored since they cannot be mapped to known genes. Consequently, new discoveries are possibly overlooked. Results We describe a system (EST2Prot that uses multiple elements to map EST sequences to their corresponding protein products. EST2Prot uses UniGene clusters, substring analysis, information about protein coding regions in existing DNA sequences and protein database searches to detect protein products related to a query EST sequence. Gene Ontology terms, Swiss-Prot keywords, and protein similarity data are used to map the ESTs to functional descriptors. Conclusion EST2Prot extends and significantly enriches the popular UniGene mapping by utilizing multiple relations between known biological entities. It produces a mapping between ESTs and proteins in real-time through a simple web-interface. The system is part of the Biozon database and is accessible at http://biozon.org/tools/est/.

  9. Management of Burn Injuries by Daily soaking in Normal Saline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patients were soaked in normal saline for at least one hour daily, prior to dressing with topical application of silver sulphadiazine. Scalds were responsible for 67 per cent of the cases while naked flame, including kerosene explosion and therapeutic burns were responsible for the rest. The burns were categorised as ...

  10. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  11. Optical sensor for seawater salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, C; Klimant, I; Krause, C; Werner, T; Mayr, T; Wolfbeis, O S

    2000-01-01

    An optical sensor for the measurement of salinity in seawater has been developed. It is based on a chloride-quenchable fluorescent probe (lucigenin) immobilized on a Nafion film. Two approaches for measuring salinity via chloride concentration are presented. In the first, a change in salinity corresponds to a change in the fluorescence intensity of lucigenin. In the second, the fluorescence intensity information is converted into a phase angle information by adding an inert phosphorescent reference luminophore (a ruthenium complex entrapped in poly(acrylonitrile) beads). Under these conditions, the chloride-dependent fluorescence intensity of lucigenin can be converted into a chloride-dependent fluorescence phase shift which serves as the analytical information. This scheme is referred to as dual lifetime referencing (DLR). The sensor was used to determine the salinity in seawater and brackish water of the North Sea.

  12. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have salinity data. *These services are for testing and evaluation use...

  13. Mechanism of Salinity Tolerance in Plants: Physiological, Biochemical, and Molecular Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress limiting growth and productivity of plants in many areas of the world due to increasing use of poor quality of water for irrigation and soil salinization. Plant adaptation or tolerance to salinity stress involves complex physiological traits, metabolic pathways, and molecular or gene networks. A comprehensive understanding on how plants respond to salinity stress at different levels and an integrated approach of combining molecular tools with physiological and biochemical techniques are imperative for the development of salt-tolerant varieties of plants in salt-affected areas. Recent research has identified various adaptive responses to salinity stress at molecular, cellular, metabolic, and physiological levels, although mechanisms underlying salinity tolerance are far from being completely understood. This paper provides a comprehensive review of major research advances on biochemical, physiological, and molecular mechanisms regulating plant adaptation and tolerance to salinity stress. PMID:24804192

  14. Respuesta de algunas variedades de clavel estándar a cuatro razas fisiológicas de Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Dianthi Response of some standard carnation varieties to four physiological

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbeláez Germán

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Sesenta y ocho variedades de clavel estándar se evaluaron par su respuesta patológica a las razas fisiológicas 1, 2, 4 Y 8 de Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi. Solamente las variedades Bogotá, Fabiana y Pesco fueron resistentes a las cuatro razas del patógeno. Las variedades Giallo y Jole fueron susceptibles a todas las razas. La raza fisiológica más patogénica fue la raza 2, la cual es la raza predominante en Colombia, seguida de la raza 8. Las razas 1 y 4 presentaron menor patogenicidad. En esta investigación, se propone un nuevo juego de variedades diferenciales para la identificación de las razas de Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi.Sixty eight standard carnation varieties were evaluated for their pathological response to the physiological races 1, 2 , 4 and 8 of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi. Only Bogota, Fabiana and Pesco varieties were resistant to all races. The varieties Giallo and Jole were susceptible to the four races. The race 2, which is the predominant race in Colombia, was the most pathogenic of the four races, followed by race 8. Races 1 and 4 were less pathogenic. In this study, we propose a new set of differential varieties to identify physiological races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi in Colombia.

  15. Development of a coastal drought index using salinity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul; Darby, Lisa S.

    2017-01-01

    A critical aspect of the uniqueness of coastal drought is the effects on the salinity dynamics of creeks, rivers, and estuaries. The location of the freshwater–saltwater interface along the coast is an important factor in the ecological and socioeconomic dynamics of coastal communities. Salinity is a critical response variable that integrates hydrologic and coastal dynamics including sea level, tides, winds, precipitation, streamflow, and tropical storms. The position of the interface determines the composition of freshwater and saltwater aquatic communities as well as the freshwater availability for water intakes. Many definitions of drought have been proposed, with most describing a decline in precipitation having negative impacts on the water supply. Indices have been developed incorporating data such as rainfall, streamflow, soil moisture, and groundwater levels. These water-availability drought indices were developed for upland areas and may not be ideal for characterizing coastal drought. The availability of real-time and historical salinity datasets provides an opportunity for the development of a salinity-based coastal drought index. An approach similar to the standardized precipitation index (SPI) was modified and applied to salinity data obtained from sites in South Carolina and Georgia. Using the SPI approach, the index becomes a coastal salinity index (CSI) that characterizes coastal salinity conditions with respect to drought periods of higher-saline conditions and wet periods of higher-freshwater conditions. Evaluation of the CSI indicates that it provides additional coastal response information as compared to the SPI and the Palmer hydrologic drought index, and the CSI can be used for different estuary types and for comparison of conditions along coastlines.

  16. Saline waters and soil quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Dazzi

    Full Text Available The processes of secondary salinization due to anthropic actions are considered one of the most important environmental emergencies owing to their level of dangerousness. The soils of the dry areas of the Mediterranean basin are particularly prone to these processes. In such environments, it is imperative to resort to irrigation that allow for the reduction of risks due to soil moisture deficit and for the stabilization of yields. Frequently, saline waters are used that cause a lowering of the soil quality. If on one hand the presence of salts can benefit the soils mainly improving soil structure, on the other high levels of salts produce negative effects on soils and crops.When sodium prevails problems of soil quality can rise such as structure degradation, low hydraulic conductivity, soil sealing. The processes of secondary soil salinization due to the use of saline waters for irrigation are particularly evident in our Country among others. In Italy, saline soils are mainly distributed in long strips of the coastal belt of the Tyrrhenian sea and Adriatic sea, in the coastal belt of Apulia, Basilicata and Sardinia and in wide areas of Sicily. It is not possible to suggest general actions to combat soil salinization because we must take into consideration that in the relationship soil-water two different quality concept interact: one linked to the soils, the other to the waters.

  17. Saline waters and soil quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Dazzi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The processes of secondary salinization due to anthropic actions are considered one of the most important environmental emergencies owing to their level of dangerousness. The soils of the dry areas of the Mediterranean basin are particularly prone to these processes. In such environments, it is imperative to resort to irrigation that allow for the reduction of risks due to soil moisture deficit and for the stabilization of yields. Frequently, saline waters are used that cause a lowering of the soil quality. If on one hand the presence of salts can benefit the soils mainly improving soil structure, on the other high levels of salts produce negative effects on soils and crops.When sodium prevails problems of soil quality can rise such as structure degradation, low hydraulic conductivity, soil sealing. The processes of secondary soil salinization due to the use of saline waters for irrigation are particularly evident in our Country among others. In Italy, saline soils are mainly distributed in long strips of the coastal belt of the Tyrrhenian sea and Adriatic sea, in the coastal belt of Apulia, Basilicata and Sardinia and in wide areas of Sicily. It is not possible to suggest general actions to combat soil salinization because we must take into consideration that in the relationship soil-water two different quality concept interact: one linked to the soils, the other to the waters.

  18. Effect of volume loading with 1 liter intravenous infusions of 0.9% saline, 4% succinylated gelatine (Gelofusine) and 6% hydroxyethyl starch (Voluven) on blood volume and endocrine responses: a randomized, three-way crossover study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Dileep N; Stanga, Zeno; Aloysius, Mark M; Wicks, Catherine; Nunes, Quentin M; Ingram, Katharine L; Risch, Lorenz; Allison, Simon P

    2010-02-01

    To study the changes in blood volume and hormones controlling sodium and water homeostasis after infusions of 0.9% saline, Gelofusine (4% succinylated gelatin in 0.7% saline, weight-average molecular weight 30 kD), and Voluven (6% hydroxyethyl starch in 0.9% saline, weight-average molecular weight 130 kD) in healthy volunteers. Randomized, three-way crossover study. University teaching hospital. Ten healthy adult male volunteers. Volunteers received 1-L infusions of 0.9% saline, Gelofusine, and Voluven over 1 hr on three occasions. Body weight, hematocrit, serum biochemistry, and plasma concentrations of vasopressin, aldosterone, brain natriuretic peptide, and total renin were measured before infusion and hourly thereafter for 6 hrs. Changes in body water, blood volume, and extravascular fluid volume were calculated. Although changes in body weight (total body water) after the infusions were similar, blood volume expansion by the two colloids was significantly greater than that produced by 0.9% saline (p < .01). At the end of infusions, 68%, 21%, and 16% of the infused volumes of 0.9% saline, Gelofusine, and Voluven, respectively, had escaped from the intravascular space to the extravascular space. Over the 6 hrs, the magnitude and duration of blood volume expansion by the two colloids were similar (p = .70). There were no significant differences in urinary volume, osmolality, and sodium content after the three infusions. Hormonal changes were similar after the three infusions, with the increase in natriuretic peptide being transient. The reduction in aldosterone and total renin concentrations was more sustained. The effects of Gelofusine and Voluven were similar despite the 100 kD difference in weight-average molecular weight. Excretion of an acute fluid load containing sodium and chloride may be dependent on a sustained suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system rather than on natriuretic peptides.

  19. Larval tolerance to salinity in three species of Australian anuran: an indication of saline specialisation in Litoria aurea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Kearney

    Full Text Available Recent anthropogenic influences on freshwater habitats are forcing anuran populations to rapidly adapt to high magnitude changes in environmental conditions or face local extinction. We examined the effects of ecologically relevant elevated salinity levels on larval growth, metamorphosis and survival of three species of Australian anuran; the spotted marsh frog (Limnodynastes tasmaniensis, the painted burrowing frog (Neobatrachus sudelli and the green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea, in order to better understand the responses of these animals to environmental change. Elevated salinity (16% seawater negatively impacted on the survival of L. tasmaniensis (35% survival and N sudelli (0% survival, while reduced salinity had a negative impact on L. aurea. (16% seawater: 85% survival; 0.4% seawater: 35% survival. L. aurea tadpoles survived in salinities much higher than previously reported for this species, indicating the potential for inter-populations differences in salinity tolerance. In L. tasmaniensis and L. aurea, development to metamorphosis was fastest in low and high salinity treatments suggesting it is advantageous for tadpoles to invest energy in development in both highly favourable and developmentally challenging environments. We propose that this response might either maximise potential lifetime fecundity when tadpoles experience favourable environments, or, facilitate a more rapid escape from pond environments where there is a reduced probability of survival.

  20. Quantifying salinity-induced changes on estuarine benthic fauna: The potential implications of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, S.; Wood, P. J.; Elliott, M.

    2017-11-01

    Coastal and estuarine systems worldwide are under threat from global climate change, with potential consequences including an increase in salinities and incursion of saltwater into areas currently subject to tidal and non-tidal freshwater regimes. It is commonly assumed that climate-driven increases in estuarine salinities and saline incursion will be directly reflected in an upstream shift in species distributions and patterns of community composition based on salinity tolerance. This study examined the responses of benthos to medium-term salinity changes in two macrotidal river-estuary systems in SE England to test whether these responses may be representative of climate-induced salinity changes over the long-term. The study reinforced the effect of salinity, related to tidal incursion, as the primary environmental driver of benthic species distribution and community composition. Salinity, however, acted within a hierarchy of factors followed by substratum type, with biotic competition and predator-prey relationships superimposed on these. The assumption that increasing salinities will be directly reflected in a shift in species distributions and patterns of community composition upstream over the long-term was shown to be over simplistic and not representative of a complex and highly variable system. Relative Sea Level Rise (RSLR) projections were predicted to increase estuarine salinities and saline incursion in the study estuaries, which together with projected reductions in river flow will have important consequences for estuarine structure and function, particularly in tidal limnetic zones, despite estuarine communities being pre-adapted to cope with fluctuating salinities. The study identified, however, that limnic-derived fauna inhabiting these zones may demonstrate greater tolerance to salinity change than is currently recognised, and may persist where salinity increases are gradual and zones unbounded.

  1. AcEST: DK955597 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |A8M3M9|A8M3M9_SALAI Putative uncharacterized protein OS=Salin... 36 1.3 tr|A6FWQ8|A6FWQ8_9DELT Dimethylarginina...NEASDLLPVHSSALLRAHGARRGFWTVLDEGPVEQCLALLLELDDGTWTAH 63 >tr|A6FWQ8|A6FWQ8_9DELT Dimethylargininase OS=Plesioc

  2. Population differentiation for germination and early seedling root growth traits under saline conditions in the annual legume Medicago truncatula (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Matilde A; Moriuchi, Ken S; Fotinos, Tonya D; Miller, Kelsey E; Nuzhdin, Sergey V; von Wettberg, Eric J; Cook, Douglas R

    2014-03-01

    Seedling establishment and survival are highly sensitive to soil salinity and plants that evolved in saline environments are likely to express traits that increase fitness in those environments. Such traits are of ecological interest and they may have practical value for improving salt tolerance in cultivated species. We examined responses to soil salinity and tested potential mechanisms of salt tolerance in Medicago truncatula, using genotypes that originated from natural populations occurring on saline and nonsaline soils. Germination and seedling responses were quantified and compared between saline and nonsaline origin genotypes. Germination treatments included a range of sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations in both offspring and parental environments. Seedling treatments included NaCl, abscisic acid (ABA), and potassium chloride (KCl). Saline origin genotypes displayed greater salinity tolerance for germination and seedling traits relative to nonsaline origin genotypes. We observed population specific differences for the effects of salinity on time to germination and for the impact of parental environment on germination rates. ABA and NaCl treatments had similar negative effects on root growth, although relative sensitivities differed, with saline population less sensitive to NaCl and more sensitive to ABA compared to their nonsaline counterparts. We report population differentiation for germination and seedling growth traits under saline conditions among populations derived from saline and nonsaline environments. These observations are consistent with a syndrome of adaptations for salinity tolerance during early plant development, including traits that are common among saline environments and those that are idiosyncratic to local populations.

  3. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity... fresh or salt water may change existing salinity gradients. For example, partial blocking of the...

  4. Saline nasal irrigation for upper respiratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabago, David; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2009-11-15

    Saline nasal irrigation is an adjunctive therapy for upper respiratory conditions that bathes the nasal cavity with spray or liquid saline. Nasal irrigation with liquid saline is used to manage symptoms associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Less conclusive evidence supports the use of spray and liquid saline nasal irrigation to manage symptoms of mild to moderate allergic rhinitis and acute upper respiratory tract infections. Consensus guidelines recommend saline nasal irrigation as a treatment for a variety of other conditions, including rhinitis of pregnancy and acute rhinosinusitis. Saline nasal irrigation appears safe, with no reported serious adverse events. Minor adverse effects can be avoided with technique modification and salinity adjustment.

  5. Proteomics, metabolomics and ionomics perspectives of salinity tolerance in halophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASHA KUMARI YADAV

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Halophytes are plants which naturally survive in saline environment. They account for approximately 1% of the total flora of the world. They include both dicots and monocots and are distributed mainly in arid, semi-arid inlands and saline wet lands along the tropical and sub-tropical coasts. Salinity tolerance in halophytes depends on a set of ecological and physiological characteristics that allow them to grow and flourish in high saline conditions. The ability of halophytes to tolerate high salt is determined by the effective coordination between various physiological processes, metabolic pathways and protein or gene networks responsible for delivering salinity tolerance. The salinity responsive proteins belong to diverse functional classes such as photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, stress/defence, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction and membrane transport. The important metabolites which are involved in salt tolerance of halophytes are proline and proline analogue (4-hydroxy-N-methyl proline, glycine betaine, pinitol, myo-inositol, mannitol, sorbitol, O-methylmucoinositol and polyamines. In halophytes, the synthesis of specific proteins and osmotically active metabolites control ion and water flux and support scavenging of oxygen radicals under salt stress condition. The present review summarizes the salt tolerance mechanisms of halophytes by elucidating the recent studies that have focused on proteomic, metabolomic and ionomic aspects of various halophytes in response to salinity. By integrating the information from halophytes and its comparison with glycophytes could give an overview of salt tolerance mechanisms in halophytes, thus laying down the pavement for development of salt tolerant crop plants through genetic modification and effective breeding strategies.

  6. Physiological effects of salinity on Delta Smelt, Hypomesus transpacificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Brittany D; Hung, Tien-Chieh; Baxter, Randall D; Teh, Swee J

    2016-02-01

    Abiotic factors like salinity are relevant to survival of pelagic fishes of the San Francisco Bay Estuary. We tested the effects of 4 parts per thousand (ppt) salinity increases on Delta Smelt (DS) in a laboratory experiment simulating salinity increases that might occur around the low-salinity zone (LSZ) (salinity increase for analyses of hematocrit, plasma osmolality, muscle water content, gill chloride cell (CC) Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and apoptosis after being weighed and measured (n = 3 tanks per treatment). No apparent increase in length or weight occurred nor did a difference in survival. Following step-increases in SW, hematocrit increased over time. Other fish responses generally showed a pattern; specifically plasma osmolality became elevated at 1 day and diminished over 4 days in SW. Percent muscle water content (%) did not show significant changes. CCs showed increased NKA, cell size and apoptosis over time in SW, indicating that CCs turnover in DS. The cell renewal process takes days, at least over 19 days. In summary, DS are affected by salinities of the LSZ and ≤10 ppt, though they employ physiological strategies to acclimate.

  7. Estímulo discriminativo de extinção produzido por respostas de observação em pombos Discriminative stimulus of extinction produced by observing responses in pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Yukio Tomanari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pombos privados de comida foram expostos a tentativas que podiam terminar com ou sem a apresentação de comida independentemente de qualquer resposta. Durante uma tentativa, bicadas podiam mudar a cor do disco de resposta de branco para verde (S+ ou vermelho (S- a depender do acionamento (ou não do comedouro. Em linha de base, bicadas produziam ambas as cores em intervalos médios variáveis de 15 s. Em duas condições experimentais distintas, tandem VI DRH foi empregado na produção, ora de S+, ora de S-. Resultados mostraram que o esquema tandem levou a uma diminuição geral na freqüência de estímulos discriminativos produzidos, marcadamente na de S+, mas não na de S-. Esses dados fornecem suporte para o modelo de reforçamento condicionado baseado na redução da incerteza.Food-deprived pigeons were given a series of trials in which half ended with response- independent food presentation and half without it. During a trial, pecking the key could change its color from white to green (S+ or red (S-, depending on whether food was programmed or not. In baseline conditions, pecks produced both stimuli (colors on a 15-s variable-interval schedule. In two different conditions, tandem VI DRH was applied to produce either S+ or S-. Results showed that the tandem contingency resulted in a general decrease in the discriminative stimulus production, markedly to S+, but not to S-. The findings are consistent with the uncertainty-reduction model of conditioned reinforcement.

  8. Soil Salinity Retrieval from Advanced Multi-Spectral Sensor with Partial Least Square Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwang Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Improper use of land resources may result in severe soil salinization. Timely monitoring and early warning of soil salinity is in urgent need for sustainable development. This paper addresses the possibility and potential of Advanced Land Imager (ALI for mapping soil salinity. In situ field spectra and soil salinity data were collected in the Yellow River Delta, China. Statistical analysis demonstrated the importance of ALI blue and near infrared (NIR bands for soil salinity. A partial least square regression (PLSR model was established between soil salinity and ALI-convolved field spectra. The model estimated soil salinity with a R2 (coefficient of determination, RPD (ratio of prediction to deviation, bias, standard deviation (SD and root mean square error (RMSE of 0.749, 3.584, 0.036 g∙kg−1, 0.778 g∙kg−1 and 0.779 g∙kg−1. The model was then applied to atmospherically corrected ALI data. Soil salinity was underestimated for moderately (soil salinity within 2–4 g∙kg−1 and highly saline (soil salinity >4 g∙kg−1 soils. The underestimates increased with the degree of soil salinization, with a maximum value of ~4 g∙kg−1. The major contribution for the underestimation (>80% may result from data inaccuracy other than model ineffectiveness. Uncertainty analysis confirmed that improper atmospheric correction contributed to a very conservative uncertainty of 1.3 g∙kg−1. Field sampling within remote sensing pixels was probably the major source responsible for the underestimation. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness of PLSR model in retrieving soil salinity from new-generation multi-spectral sensors. This is very valuable for achieving worldwide soil salinity mapping with low cost and considerable accuracy.

  9. Salinity and light interactively affect neotropical mangrove seedlings at the leaf and whole plant levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hoffman, Laura; Anten, Niels P R; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Ackerly, David D

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the interactive effects of salinity and light on Avicennia germinans mangrove seedlings in greenhouse and field experiments. We hypothesized that net photosynthesis, growth, and survivorship rates should increase more with an increase in light availability for plants growing at low salinity than for those growing at high salinity. This hypothesis was supported by our results for net photosynthesis and growth. Net daily photosynthesis did increase more with increasing light for low-salinity plants than for high-salinity plants. Stomatal conductance, leaf-level transpiration, and internal CO(2) concentrations were lower at high than at low salinity. At high light, the ratio of leaf respiration to assimilation was 2.5 times greater at high than at low salinity. Stomatal limitations and increased respiratory costs may explain why, at high salinity, seedlings did not respond to increased light availability with increased net photosynthesis. Seedling mass and growth rates increased more with increasing light availability at low than at high salinity. Ratios of root mass to leaf mass were higher at high salinity, suggesting that either water or nutrient limitations may have limited seedling growth at high salinity in response to increasing light. The interactive effects of salinity and light on seedling size and growth rates observed in the greenhouse were robust in the field, despite the presence of other factors in the field--such as inundation, nutrient gradients, and herbivory. In the field, seedling survivorship was higher at low than at high salinity and increased with light availability. Interestingly, the positive effect of light on seedling survivorship was stronger at high salinity, indicating that growth and survivorship rates are decoupled. In general, this study demonstrates that environmental effects at the leaf-level also influence whole plant growth in mangroves.

  10. Seed priming to alleviate salinity stress in germinating seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ehab A

    2016-03-15

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that affect crop production in arid and semiarid areas. Seed germination and seedling growth are the stages most sensitive to salinity. Salt stress causes adverse physiological and biochemical changes in germinating seeds. It can affect the seed germination and stand establishment through osmotic stress, ion-specific effects and oxidative stress. The salinity delays or prevents the seed germination through various factors, such as a reduction in water availability, changes in the mobilization of stored reserves and affecting the structural organization of proteins. Various techniques can improve emergence and stand establishment under salt conditions. One of the most frequently utilized is seed priming. The process of seed priming involves prior exposure to an abiotic stress, making a seed more resistant to future exposure. Seed priming stimulates the pre-germination metabolic processes and makes the seed ready for radicle protrusion. It increases the antioxidant system activity and the repair of membranes. These changes promote seed vigor during germination and emergence under salinity stress. The aim of this paper is to review the recent literature on the response of plants to seed priming under salinity stress. The mechanism of the effect of salinity on seed germination is discussed and the seed priming process is summarized. Physiological, biochemical and molecular changes induced by priming that lead to seed enhancement are covered. Plants' responses to some priming agents under salinity stress are reported based on the best available data. For a great number of crops, little information exists and further research is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of alkalinity and salinity at low and high light intensity on hydrogen isotope fractionation of long-chain alkenones produced by

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, G.M.; Pfannerstill, E.Y.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; van der Meer, M.T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, hydrogen isotopes of longchainalkenones have been shown to be a promising proxy forreconstructing paleo sea surface salinity due to a strong hydrogenisotope fractionation response to salinity across differentenvironmental conditions. However, to date, the decouplingof the

  12. Transcriptome Profiling and Molecular Pathway Analysis of Genes in Association with Salinity Adaptation in Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Xu

    Full Text Available Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus is a freshwater fish but can tolerate a wide range of salinities. The mechanism of salinity adaptation at the molecular level was studied using RNA-Seq to explore the molecular pathways in fish exposed to 0, 8, or 16 (practical salinity unit, psu. Based on the change of gene expressions, the differential genes unions from freshwater to saline water were classified into three categories. In the constant change category (1, steroid biosynthesis, steroid hormone biosynthesis, fat digestion and absorption, complement and coagulation cascades were significantly affected by salinity indicating the pivotal roles of sterol-related pathways in response to salinity stress. In the change-then-stable category (2, ribosomes, oxidative phosphorylation, signaling pathways for peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, and fat digestion and absorption changed significantly with increasing salinity, showing sensitivity to salinity variation in the environment and a responding threshold to salinity change. In the stable-then-change category (3, protein export, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, tight junction, thyroid hormone synthesis, antigen processing and presentation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis-keratan sulfate were the significantly changed pathways, suggesting that these pathways were less sensitive to salinity variation. This study reveals fundamental mechanism of the molecular response to salinity adaptation in O. niloticus, and provides a general guidance to understand saline acclimation in O. niloticus.

  13. The Potential Roles of the G1LEA and G3LEA Proteins in Early Embryo Development and in Response to Low Temperature and High Salinity in Artemia sinica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Late embryogenesis abundant proteins (LEA are stress resistance-related proteins that play crucial roles in protecting against desiccation, cold and high salinity in a variety of animals and plants. However, the expression pattern, distribution and functions of LEA proteins in the post-diapause period of Artemia sinica, and under high salinity and low temperature stresses, remain unknown. In this study, the complete cDNA sequences of the group 1 LEA (As-g1lea and group 3 LEA (As-g3lea genes from A. sinica were cloned. The expression patterns and location of As-G1LEA and As-G1LEA were investigated. The protein abundances of As-G1LEA, As-G3LEA and Trehalase were analyzed during different developmental stages of the embryo and under low temperature and high salinity stresses in A. sinica. The full-length cDNA of As-g1lea was 960 bp, encoding a 182 amino acid protein, and As-g3lea was 2089 bp, encoding a 364 amino acid protein. As-g1lea and As-g3lea showed their highest expressions at 0 h of embryonic development and both showed higher relative expression in embryonic, rather than adult, development stages. The abundances of As-G1LEA, As-G3LEA and trehalose were upregulated under low temperature and downregulated under high salinity stress. These two genes did not show any tissue or organ specific expression. Our results suggested that these LEA proteins might play a pivotal role in stress tolerance in A. sinica.

  14. An EST database from saffron stigmas

    OpenAIRE

    Chiusano Maria Luisa; Pizzichini Daniele; D'Agostino Nunzio; Giuliano Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Saffron (Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae) flowers have been used as a spice and medicinal plant ever since the Greek-Minoan civilization. The edible part – the stigmas – are commonly considered the most expensive spice in the world and are the site of a peculiar secondary metabolism, responsible for the characteristic color and flavor of saffron. Results We produced 6,603 high quality Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from a saffron stigma cDNA library. This collection is access...

  15. QuEST: Robust Quantum Gadgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    of novel and robust perturbation theory gadgets , the construction of scalable stabilizer Hamiltonians, and methods for achieving the fault-tolerant... theory gadgets 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 1 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Aram Harrow a...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0170 QuEST: Robust Quantum Gadgets Aram Harrow University of Washington Computer Science & Engineering Box 352350 Seattle, WA

  16. Comparison of Leaf Sheath Transcriptome Profiles with Physiological Traits of Bread Wheat Cultivars under Salinity Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Takahashi

    Full Text Available Salinity stress has significant negative effects on plant biomass production and crop yield. Salinity tolerance is controlled by complex systems of gene expression and ion transport. The relationship between specific features of mild salinity stress adaptation and gene expression was analyzed using four commercial varieties of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum that have different levels of salinity tolerance. The high-throughput phenotyping system in The Plant Accelerator at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility revealed variation in shoot relative growth rate and salinity tolerance among the four cultivars. Comparative analysis of gene expression in the leaf sheaths identified genes whose functions are potentially linked to shoot biomass development and salinity tolerance. Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress. In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth. These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

  17. Comparison of Leaf Sheath Transcriptome Profiles with Physiological Traits of Bread Wheat Cultivars under Salinity Stress

    KAUST Repository

    Takahashi, Fuminori

    2015-08-05

    Salinity stress has significant negative effects on plant biomass production and crop yield. Salinity tolerance is controlled by complex systems of gene expression and ion transport. The relationship between specific features of mild salinity stress adaptation and gene expression was analyzed using four commercial varieties of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) that have different levels of salinity tolerance. The high-throughput phenotyping system in The Plant Accelerator at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility revealed variation in shoot relative growth rate and salinity tolerance among the four cultivars. Comparative analysis of gene expression in the leaf sheaths identified genes whose functions are potentially linked to shoot biomass development and salinity tolerance. Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early “osmotic” phase of salinity stress. In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth. These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

  18. Comparison of Leaf Sheath Transcriptome Profiles with Physiological Traits of Bread Wheat Cultivars under Salinity Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trittermann, Christine; Berger, Bettina; Roy, Stuart J.; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tester, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress has significant negative effects on plant biomass production and crop yield. Salinity tolerance is controlled by complex systems of gene expression and ion transport. The relationship between specific features of mild salinity stress adaptation and gene expression was analyzed using four commercial varieties of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) that have different levels of salinity tolerance. The high-throughput phenotyping system in The Plant Accelerator at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility revealed variation in shoot relative growth rate and salinity tolerance among the four cultivars. Comparative analysis of gene expression in the leaf sheaths identified genes whose functions are potentially linked to shoot biomass development and salinity tolerance. Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early “osmotic” phase of salinity stress. In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth. These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions. PMID:26244554

  19. Comparison of Leaf Sheath Transcriptome Profiles with Physiological Traits of Bread Wheat Cultivars under Salinity Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Fuminori; Tilbrook, Joanne; Trittermann, Christine; Berger, Bettina; Roy, Stuart J; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tester, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress has significant negative effects on plant biomass production and crop yield. Salinity tolerance is controlled by complex systems of gene expression and ion transport. The relationship between specific features of mild salinity stress adaptation and gene expression was analyzed using four commercial varieties of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) that have different levels of salinity tolerance. The high-throughput phenotyping system in The Plant Accelerator at the Australian Plant Phenomics Facility revealed variation in shoot relative growth rate and salinity tolerance among the four cultivars. Comparative analysis of gene expression in the leaf sheaths identified genes whose functions are potentially linked to shoot biomass development and salinity tolerance. Early responses to mild salinity stress through changes in gene expression have an influence on the acquisition of stress tolerance and improvement in biomass accumulation during the early "osmotic" phase of salinity stress. In addition, results revealed transcript profiles for the wheat cultivars that were different from those of usual stress-inducible genes, but were related to those of plant growth. These findings suggest that, in the process of breeding, selection of specific traits with various salinity stress-inducible genes in commercial bread wheat has led to adaptation to mild salinity conditions.

  20. Regeneration and abnormality in benthic foraminifer Rosalina leei: Implications in reconstructing past salinity changes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurtarkar, S.R.; Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Linshy, V.N.

    A laboratory culture experiment has been conducted to assess the response of marginal marine benthic foraminifer Rosalina leei to salinity and associated pH changes. Live specimens of Rosalina leei were subjected to a range (10-35 psu) of salinity...

  1. Effects of salinity on growth of plant species from terrestrializing fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stofberg, S.F.; Klimkovska, A.; Paulissen, M.P.C.P.; Witte, J.Ph.M.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrializing lowland fens may be temporarily exposed to elevated surface water salinity, which may have serious consequences for nature conservation. We investigated the response of five fresh water fen plant species to elevated salinity. In a controlled greenhouse experiment, these species were

  2. Effects of salinity on growth of plant species from terrestrializing fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stofberg, S.F.; Klimkowska, A.; Paulissen, M.P.C.P.; Witte, J.P.M.; van der Zee, S.E.A.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrializing lowland fens may be temporarily exposed to elevated surface water salinity, which may have serious consequences for nature conservation. We investigated the response of five fresh water fen plant species to elevated salinity.In a controlled greenhouse experiment, these species were

  3. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  4. Salinity guidelines for irrigation: Case studies from Water Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is suggested that a more dynamic approach be used for managing salinity under irrigation at farm level,. i.e. the use of models. Amongst others, future research should focus on determining the spatial and temporal distribution of salt in irrigated soils. Keywords: crop response, electrical conductivity, sodium adsorption ratio, ...

  5. Salinization alters fluxes of bioreactive elements from stream ecosystems across land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S.; Kaushal, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    There has been increased salinization of fresh water over decades due to the use of road salt deicers, wastewater discharges, saltwater intrusion, human-accelerated weathering, and groundwater irrigation. Salinization can mobilize bioreactive elements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur) chemically via ion exchange and/or biologically via influencing of microbial activity. However, the effects of salinization on coupled biogeochemical cycles are still not well understood. We investigated potential impacts of increased salinization on fluxes of bioreactive elements from stream ecosystems (sediments and riparian soils) to overlying stream water and evaluated the implications of percent urban land use on salinization effects. Two-day incubations of sediments and soils with stream and deionized water across three salt levels were conducted at eight routine monitoring stations across a land-use gradient at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Results indicated (1) salinization typically increased sediment releases of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (ammonium + ammonia + dissolved organic nitrogen), and sediment transformations of nitrate; (2) salinization generally decreased DOC aromaticity and fluxes of soluble reactive phosphorus from both sediments and soils; (3) the effects of increased salinization on sediment releases of DOC and TKN and DOC quality increased with percentage watershed urbanization. Biogeochemical responses to salinization varied between sediments and riparian soils in releases of DOC and DIC, and nitrate transformations. The differential responses of riparian soils and sediments to increased salinization were likely due to differences in organic matter sources and composition. Our results suggest that short-term increases in salinization can cause releases of significant amounts of labile organic

  6. An EST database from saffron stigmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Nunzio; Pizzichini, Daniele; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Background Saffron (Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae) flowers have been used as a spice and medicinal plant ever since the Greek-Minoan civilization. The edible part – the stigmas – are commonly considered the most expensive spice in the world and are the site of a peculiar secondary metabolism, responsible for the characteristic color and flavor of saffron. Results We produced 6,603 high quality Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from a saffron stigma cDNA library. This collection is accessible and searchable through the Saffron Genes database http://www.saffrongenes.org. The ESTs have been grouped into 1,893 Clusters, each corresponding to a different expressed gene, and annotated. The complete set of raw EST sequences, as well as of their electopherograms, are maintained in the database, allowing users to investigate sequence qualities and EST structural features (vector contamination, repeat regions). The saffron stigma transcriptome contains a series of interesting sequences (putative sex determination genes, lipid and carotenoid metabolism enzymes, transcription factors). Conclusion The Saffron Genes database represents the first reference collection for the genomics of Iridaceae, for the molecular biology of stigma biogenesis, as well as for the metabolic pathways underlying saffron secondary metabolism. PMID:17925031

  7. An EST database from saffron stigmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiusano Maria Luisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saffron (Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae flowers have been used as a spice and medicinal plant ever since the Greek-Minoan civilization. The edible part – the stigmas – are commonly considered the most expensive spice in the world and are the site of a peculiar secondary metabolism, responsible for the characteristic color and flavor of saffron. Results We produced 6,603 high quality Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs from a saffron stigma cDNA library. This collection is accessible and searchable through the Saffron Genes database http://www.saffrongenes.org. The ESTs have been grouped into 1,893 Clusters, each corresponding to a different expressed gene, and annotated. The complete set of raw EST sequences, as well as of their electopherograms, are maintained in the database, allowing users to investigate sequence qualities and EST structural features (vector contamination, repeat regions. The saffron stigma transcriptome contains a series of interesting sequences (putative sex determination genes, lipid and carotenoid metabolism enzymes, transcription factors. Conclusion The Saffron Genes database represents the first reference collection for the genomics of Iridaceae, for the molecular biology of stigma biogenesis, as well as for the metabolic pathways underlying saffron secondary metabolism.

  8. An EST database from saffron stigmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Nunzio; Pizzichini, Daniele; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2007-10-09

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L., Iridaceae) flowers have been used as a spice and medicinal plant ever since the Greek-Minoan civilization. The edible part - the stigmas - are commonly considered the most expensive spice in the world and are the site of a peculiar secondary metabolism, responsible for the characteristic color and flavor of saffron. We produced 6,603 high quality Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from a saffron stigma cDNA library. This collection is accessible and searchable through the Saffron Genes database http://www.saffrongenes.org. The ESTs have been grouped into 1,893 Clusters, each corresponding to a different expressed gene, and annotated. The complete set of raw EST sequences, as well as of their electopherograms, are maintained in the database, allowing users to investigate sequence qualities and EST structural features (vector contamination, repeat regions). The saffron stigma transcriptome contains a series of interesting sequences (putative sex determination genes, lipid and carotenoid metabolism enzymes, transcription factors). The Saffron Genes database represents the first reference collection for the genomics of Iridaceae, for the molecular biology of stigma biogenesis, as well as for the metabolic pathways underlying saffron secondary metabolism.

  9. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Dong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis.

  10. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Huabing; Lu, Huizhi

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran) after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Dong

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis.

  12. Plasticity to salinity and transgenerational effects in the nonnative shrub Baccharis halimifolia: Insights into an estuarine invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caño, Lidia; Fuertes-Mendizabal, Teresa; García-Baquero, Gonzalo; Herrera, Mercedes; González-Moro, M Begoña

    2016-05-01

    Abiotic constraints act as selection filters for plant invasion in stressful habitats. Adaptive phenotypic plasticity and transgenerational effects play a major role in colonization of heterogeneous habitats when the scale of environmental variation is smaller than that of gene flow. We investigated how plasticity and parental salinity conditions influence the performance of the invasive dioecious shrub Baccharis halimifolia, which replaces heterogeneous estuarine communities in Europe with monospecific and continuous stands. In two greenhouse experiments, we grew plants derived from seeds and cuttings collected through interspersed patches differing in edaphic salinity from an invasive population. We estimated parental environmental salinity from leaf Na(+) content in parental plants, and we measured fitness and ion homeostasis of the offspring grown in contrasting salinity conditions. Baccharis halimifolia tolerates high salinity but experiences drastic biomass reduction at moderate salinity. At moderate salinity, responses to salinity are affected by the parental salinity: flowering initiation in seedlings and male cuttings is positively correlated with parental leaf Na(+) content, and biomass is positively correlated with maternal leaf Na(+) in female cuttings and seedlings. Plant height, leaf production, specific leaf area, and ionic homeostasis at the low part of the gradient are also affected by parental salinity, suggesting enhanced shoot growth as parental salinity increases. Our results support plasticity to salinity and transgenerational effects as factors with great potential to contribute to the invasive ability of B. halimifolia through estuarine communities of high conservation value. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  13. Salinity: Electrical conductivity and total dissolved solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of soil salinity is a quantification of the total salts present in the liquid portion of the soil. Soil salinity is important in agriculture because salinity reduces crop yields by reducing the osmotic potential making it more difficult for the plant to extract water, by causing spe...

  14. Assessing the impacts of salinity and nutrient stress to Ruppia ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy seagrass beds were once found throughout the shallow areas of Narragansett Bay, R.I. but have disappeared due to infilling, pollution and disease. In Greenwich Bay, a highly developed embayment within Narragansett Bay, Ruppia maritima has colonized an area on the northern shore historically dominated by Zostera marina. Ruppia is extremely salinity tolerant, and may also be more nutrient tolerant than Zostera. To test this hypothesis 6-week microcosm experiments were conducted in the summers of 2014 and 2015. Microcosms were renewed daily to simulate tidal flushing and the water column was dosed with a 15N tracer for the first week of the experiments. In the 2014 microcosm experiment two salinity (20, 30 ppt) and four nutrient (0, 5, 10, 30 µM inorganic N) levels were used to test the species’ relative tolerance. This experiment yielded structurally significant results for Ruppia but no significant differences were detected for Zostera. In 2015 this experiment was performed for a second time with lower salinity (5, 30 ppt) and higher nutrients (0, 30, 100, 300, 1000 µM inorganic N) in order to determine Zostera’s tolerance to nutrient and salinity stress and confirm the previously observed Ruppia results. Both species had significant structural responses to the nutrient and salinity variables. Isotopic analysis run on above-ground tissue indicated that with increasing nutrient levels δ15N in the seagrass shoots increased, suggesting that nutrients

  15. Contributions of groundwater conditions to soil and water salinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ramsis B.; Otto, Claus J.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.

    Salinization is the process whereby the concentration of dissolved salts in water and soil is increased due to natural or human-induced processes. Water is lost through one or any combination of four main mechanisms: evaporation, evapotranspiration, hydrolysis, and leakage between aquifers. Salinity increases from catchment divides to the valley floors and in the direction of groundwater flow. Salinization is explained by two main chemical models developed by the authors: weathering and deposition. These models are in agreement with the weathering and depositional geological processes that have formed soils and overburden in the catchments. Five soil-change processes in arid and semi-arid climates are associated with waterlogging and water. In all represented cases, groundwater is the main geological agent for transmitting, accumulating, and discharging salt. At a small catchment scale in South and Western Australia, water is lost through evapotranspiration and hydrolysis. Saline groundwater flows along the beds of the streams and is accumulated in paleochannels, which act as a salt repository, and finally discharges in lakes, where most of the saline groundwater is concentrated. In the hummocky terrains of the Northern Great Plains Region, Canada and USA, the localized recharge and discharge scenarios cause salinization to occur mainly in depressions, in conjunction with the formation of saline soils and seepages. On a regional scale within closed basins, this process can create playas or saline lakes. In the continental aquifers of the rift basins of Sudan, salinity increases along the groundwater flow path and forms a saline zone at the distal end. The saline zone in each rift forms a closed ridge, which coincides with the closed trough of the groundwater-level map. The saline body or bodies were formed by evaporation coupled with alkaline-earth carbonate precipitation and dissolution of capillary salts. Résumé La salinisation est le processus par lequel la

  16. Assessment of soil salinity problems in agricultural areas through spatial and temporal remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elwahed, Mohammed Saifeldeen

    This study is aimed at addressing the capability of using remote sensing data in detecting and tracking soil salinization variability using a series of experimental methodologies. In a controlled experiment, the spectral reflectance changes associated with salt crust formation on soil surfaces were tracked in order to detect the optimum moisture levels for salinity detection and recognize the influence of soil texture on salinity-induced spectral changes. In another experiment, lettuce plants were utilized to assess plant biophysical responses to moderate salinity levels with canopy-level reflectance data. An FR-ASD spectrometer was used to collect reflectance data in the 400-2500 nm spectral region. Finally, MODIS satellite data were employed to analyze the temporal profiles of selected high (8-11 dS/m), moderate (4-6 dS/m) and none (1-3 dS/m), salt affected sites in the Nile Delta, Egypt. The analyses of spectral data revealed that the use of remote sensing data to discriminate salinity levels in soils is highly affected by moisture content and texture. At low moisture contents, salts have high reflectance in the VIS-NIR spectral region but low reflectance in SWIR region. Spectral ambiguity with soil salinity was found across soil texture types. Significant relationships were found between plant chlorophyll content and the REP index (R2 = 0.97), and dry biomass with SAVI values (R2 = 0.94) under different salinity treatments. The spectral vegetation indices (VI's), SAVI and REP, and water indices (WI's) were found to be effective in discriminating between plants growing under moderate conditions of soil salinity and a non-saline condition. The combination between VI's and WI's was found to be useful in improving the ability to assess salinity stressed plants from non-stressed plants. Finally, MODIS results showed separability between canopy seasonal growth under high saline (HS) and non-saline (NS) conditions based on phenology. Canopies growing under HS

  17. The Aquarius Salinity Retrieval Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank; Hilburn, Kyle; Lagerloef, Gary; Le Vine, David

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this presentation gives an overview over the Aquarius salinity retrieval algorithm. The instrument calibration [2] converts Aquarius radiometer counts into antenna temperatures (TA). The salinity retrieval algorithm converts those TA into brightness temperatures (TB) at a flat ocean surface. As a first step, contributions arising from the intrusion of solar, lunar and galactic radiation are subtracted. The antenna pattern correction (APC) removes the effects of cross-polarization contamination and spillover. The Aquarius radiometer measures the 3rd Stokes parameter in addition to vertical (v) and horizontal (h) polarizations, which allows for an easy removal of ionospheric Faraday rotation. The atmospheric absorption at L-band is almost entirely due to molecular oxygen, which can be calculated based on auxiliary input fields from numerical weather prediction models and then successively removed from the TB. The final step in the TA to TB conversion is the correction for the roughness of the sea surface due to wind, which is addressed in more detail in section 3. The TB of the flat ocean surface can now be matched to a salinity value using a surface emission model that is based on a model for the dielectric constant of sea water [3], [4] and an auxiliary field for the sea surface temperature. In the current processing only v-pol TB are used for this last step.

  18. Infusion of hypertonic saline (7.5% NaCl) causes minor immunological changes in normovolaemic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens Aage Kølsen; Nielsen, J O D; Bendtzen, K

    2004-01-01

    Haemorrhagic shock is treated effectively by infusion of hypertonic saline/colloid solutions. Furthermore, previous studies found hypertonicity to affect immune responses in animals and in human blood cell cultures. It is unknown, however, whether hypertonic saline infusion affects immune responses...

  19. Remote Sensing Soil Salinity Map for the San Joaquin Vally, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudiero, E.; Skaggs, T. H.; Anderson, R. G.; Corwin, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Soil salinization is a major natural hazard to worldwide agriculture. We present a remote imagery approach that maps salinity within a range (i.e., salinities less than 20 dS m-1, when measured as the electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extract), accuracy, and resolution most relevant to agriculture. A case study is presented for the western San Joaquin Valley (WSJV), California, USA (~870,000 ha of farmland) using multi-year Landsat 7 ETM+ canopy reflectance and the Canopy Response Salinity Index (CRSI). Highly detailed salinity maps for 22 fields (542 ha) established from apparent soil electrical conductivity directed sampling were used as ground-truth (sampled in 2013), totaling over 5000 pixels (30×30 m) with salinity values in the range of 0 to 35.2 dS m-1. Multi-year maximum values of CRSI were used to model soil salinity. In addition, soil type, elevation, meteorological data, and crop type were evaluated as covariates. The fitted model (R2=0.73) was validated: i) with a spatial k-folds (i.e., leave-one-field-out) cross-validation (R2=0.61), ii) versus salinity data from three independent fields (sampled in 2013 and 2014), and iii) by determining the accuracy of the qualitative classification of white crusted land as extremely-saline soils. The effect of land use change is evaluated over 2396 ha in the Broadview Water District from a comparison of salinity mapped in 1991 with salinity predicted in 2013 from the fitted model. From 1991 to 2013 salinity increased significantly over the selected study site, bringing attention to potential negative effects on soil quality of shifting from irrigated agriculture to fallow-land. This is cause for concern since over the 3 years of California's drought (2010-2013) the fallow land in the WSJV increased from 12.7% to 21.6%, due to drastic reduction in water allocations to farmers.

  20. Global Identification of MicroRNAs and Their Targets in Barley under Salinity Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Licao; Feng, Kewei; Liu, Fuyan; Du, Xianghong; Tong, Wei; Nie, Xiaojun; Ji, Wanquan; Weining, Song

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is a major limiting factor for agricultural production worldwide. A better understanding of the mechanisms of salinity stress response will aid efforts to improve plant salt tolerance. In this study, a combination of small RNA and mRNA degradome sequencing was used to identify salinity responsive-miRNAs and their targets in barley. A total of 152 miRNAs belonging to 126 families were identified, of which 44 were found to be salinity responsive with 30 up-regulated and 25 down-regulated respectively. The majority of the salinity-responsive miRNAs were up-regulated at the 8h time point, while down-regulated at the 3h and 27h time points. The targets of these miRNAs were further detected by degradome sequencing coupled with bioinformatics prediction. Finally, qRT-PCR was used to validate the identified miRNA and their targets. Our study systematically investigated the expression profile of miRNA and their targets in barley during salinity stress phase, which can contribute to understanding how miRNAs respond to salinity stress in barley and other cereal crops. PMID:26372557

  1. Hydrogeologic processes in saline systems: Playas, sabkhas, and saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yechieli, Y.; Wood, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Pans, playas, sabkhas, salinas, saline lakes, and salt flats are hydrologically similar, varying only in their boundary conditions. Thus, in evaluating geochemical processes in these systems, a generic water and solute mass-balance approach can be utilized. A conceptual model of a coastal sabkha near the Arabian Gulf is used as an example to illustrate the various water and solute fluxes. Analysis of this model suggests that upward flux of ground water from underlying formations could be a major source of solutes in the sabkha, but contribute only a small volume of the water. Local rainfall is the main source of water in the modeled sabkha system with a surprisingly large recharge-to-rainfall ratio of more than 50%. The contribution of seawater to the solute budget depends on the ratio of the width of the supratidal zone to the total width and is generally confined to a narrow zone near the shoreline of a typical coastal sabkha. Because of a short residence time of water, steady-state flow is expected within a short time (50,000 years). The solute composition of the brine in a closed saline system depends largely on the original composition of the input water. The high total ion content in the brine limits the efficiency of water-rock interaction and absorption. Because most natural systems are hydrologically open, the chemistry of the brines and the associated evaporite deposits may be significantly different than that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. Seasonal changes in temperature of the unsaturated zone cause precipitation of minerals in saline systems undergoing evaporation. Thus, during the hot dry season months, minerals exhibit retrograde solubility so that gypsum, anhydrite and calcite precipitate. Evaporation near the surface is also a major process that causes mineral precipitation in the upper portion of the unsaturated zone (e.g. halite and carnallite), provided that the relative humidity of the atmosphere is less than the activity of water

  2. Aquatic insects in a multistress environment: cross-tolerance to salinity and desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallarés, Susana; Botella-Cruz, María; Arribas, Paula; Millán, Andrés; Velasco, Josefa

    2017-04-01

    Exposing organisms to a particular stressor may enhance tolerance to a subsequent stress, when protective mechanisms against the two stressors are shared. Such cross-tolerance is a common adaptive response in dynamic multivariate environments and often indicates potential co-evolution of stress traits. Many aquatic insects in inland saline waters from Mediterranean-climate regions are sequentially challenged with salinity and desiccation stress. Thus, cross-tolerance to these physiologically similar stressors could have been positively selected in insects of these regions. We used adults of the saline water beetles Enochrus jesusarribasi (Hydrophilidae) and Nebrioporus baeticus (Dytiscidae) to test cross-tolerance responses to desiccation and salinity. In independent laboratory experiments, we evaluated the effects of (i) salinity stress on the subsequent resistance to desiccation and (ii) desiccation stress (rapid and slow dehydration) on the subsequent tolerance to salinity. Survival, water loss and haemolymph osmolality were measured. Exposure to stressful salinity improved water control under subsequent desiccation stress in both species, with a clear cross-tolerance (enhanced performance) in N. baeticus In contrast, general negative effects on performance were found under the inverse stress sequence. The rapid and slow dehydration produced different water loss and haemolymph osmolality dynamics that were reflected in different survival patterns. Our finding of cross-tolerance to salinity and desiccation in ecologically similar species from distant lineages, together with parallel responses between salinity and thermal stress previously found in several aquatic taxa, highlights the central role of adaption to salinity and co-occurring stressors in arid inland waters, having important implications for the species' persistence under climate change. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Waterborne cadmium and zinc uptake in a euryhaline teleost Acanthopagrus schlegeli acclimated to different salinities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Li [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wang Wenxiong [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: wwang@ust.hk

    2007-08-30

    Metal uptake and toxicity in marine fish are usually much lower than those in freshwater fish, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated Cd and Zn uptake by the euryhaline black sea bream (Acanthopagrus schlegeli) over a salinity range from 0 to 35 psu. Cd and Zn uptake increased as salinity decreased. The gills were the most sensitive organs in response to salinity change, and played a more important role in Cd and Zn uptake at a lower salinity. Cd and Zn uptake in the viscera contributed to 34-36% of the overall accumulation at full salinity (35 psu), but decreased to 13-16% in freshwater despite the increase of uptake rate. Water permeability, drinking, and major ion uptake (Ca) in the fish at different salinities were also concurrently examined. The overall water uptake was comparable, whereas the drinking rate decreased at lowered salinities. In contrast, the Ca uptake increased significantly with decreasing salinity. The responses of Cd and Zn uptake to salinity challenge were correlated with the Ca uptake, suggesting that they may be taken up through the Ca uptake pathway. At a constant salinity, Cd and Zn uptake increased with reducing Ca concentration, indicating the competitive effect of Ca on metal uptake. Ca channel blockers (verapamil and lanthanum) significantly reduced the uptake of Cd, Zn, and Ca when the fish were acclimated in freshwater, but had no impact on their uptake in marine water. Furthermore, the chloride cell number in the gills could not explain the lower Cd and Zn uptake in seawater. Our results indicated that both ambient physicochemical factors and the physiological responses of fish resulted in difference of metal uptake in marine and freshwater environments.

  4. Salinity and sensitivity to endocrine disrupting chemicals: A comparison of reproductive endpoints in small-bodied fish exposed under different salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosker, Thijs; Santoro, Giacomo; Melvin, Steven D

    2017-09-01

    The influence of salinity on toxicity outcomes has been demonstrated for various contaminants, but has received limited attention for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Short-term laboratory tests using small-bodied fish are an important tool for evaluating impacts of EDCs on reproduction. Tests have been developed for both freshwater and estuarine/marine species, providing an opportunity to assess whether concentrations at which small-bodied fish respond to EDCs may be influenced by salinity. We conducted a semi-quantitative review of short-term laboratory tests with small-bodied fish exposed to EDCs, including 59 studies under freshwater conditions (7 species) and 23 studies conducted under saline conditions (5 species). We focused on two model estrogens [17α-ethinylestradiol and 17β-estradiol (E2)], and three androgens (17β-trenbolone, 5α-dihydrotestosterone and 17α-methyltestosterone). The lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC LOW ) for key reproductive endpoints was recorded, including sex-steroid and vitellogenin (VTG) levels, fecundity and fertilization. In 65.2% of cases, responses occurred at lower doses under freshwater compared to saline conditions, compared to only 4.3% of cases where fish responded to lower doses under saline conditions. The potential influence of salinity was more pronounced when estrogenic compounds were considered separately, with fish responding to lower doses under fresh compared to saline conditions in 90.5% of cases. Fecundity and E2 level were identified as the most sensitive endpoints for evaluating EDCs regardless of salinity. Interestingly, female VTG levels were a sensitive endpoint under freshwater but not saline conditions. Overall, our results suggest that salinity may be an important factor influencing how small-bodied fish respond to environmental EDCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Population specific salinity tolerance in eelgrass (Zostera marina)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Tiina Elina; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Boström, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is one of the main factors impacting distribution of marine plants and sub-optimal salinities may result in increased resource use and decreased production.We studied the performance and salinity tolerance of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) originating from two regions with different ambient...... salinities: a low saline (salinity 6) and a high saline (salinity 20) population. Plants fromboth populationswere exposed to a series of fixed salinities (2, 4, 6, 9, 12.5, 15, 20 and 25) for 5 weeks. Both plant origin and salinity affected plant performance significantly. Plant production decreasedwith...... decreasing salinity in both populations,while mortality increased in lowsalinity only in plants originating from the high saline population. The better performance of the low saline population in the lowest salinities indicates a horizontal shift in salinity tolerance among populationswith different origin...

  6. Chemotactic responses to gas oil of Halomonas spp. strains isolated from saline environments in Argentina Respuesta quimiotáctica hacia gas oil de cepas de Halomonas spp. aisladas de ambientes salinos de Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián D´Ippólito

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two halophilic bacterial strains isolated from saline habitats in Argentina grew in the presence of gas oil. They were identified as Halomonas spp. and Nesterenkonia sp. by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing. Chemotaxis towards gas oil was observed in Halomonas spp. by using swimming assays.En el presente trabajo se aislaron dos cepas bacterianas halofílicas a partir de muestras obtenidas en ambientes salinos de Argentina, que crecieron en presencia de gasoil como única fuente de carbono. Las cepas aisladas se identificaron como Halomonas spp. y Nesterenkonia sp. mediante secuenciación del gen del ARN ribosomal 16S. En ensayos de swimming, las cepas del genero Halomonas spp. mostraron una respuesta quimiotáctica hacia el gas oil.

  7. The effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on the performance of the mangrove Avicennia germinans over a range of salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reef, Ruth; Winter, Klaus; Morales, Jorge; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Reef, Dana L; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2015-07-01

    By increasing water use efficiency and carbon assimilation, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations could potentially improve plant productivity and growth at high salinities. To assess the effect of elevated CO2 on the salinity response of a woody halophyte, we grew seedlings of the mangrove Avicennia germinans under a combination of five salinity treatments [from 5 to 65 parts per thousand (ppt)] and three CO2 concentrations (280, 400 and 800 ppm). We measured survivorship, growth rate, photosynthetic gas exchange, root architecture and foliar nutrient and ion concentrations. The salinity optima for growth shifted higher with increasing concentrations of CO2 , from 0 ppt at 280 ppm to 35 ppt at 800 ppm. At optimal salinity conditions, carbon assimilation rates were significantly higher under elevated CO2 concentrations. However, at salinities above the salinity optima, salinity had an expected negative effect on mangrove growth and carbon assimilation, which was not alleviated by elevated CO2 , despite a significant improvement in photosynthetic water use efficiency. This is likely due to non-stomatal limitations to growth at high salinities, as indicated by our measurements of foliar ion concentrations that show a displacement of K(+) by Na(+) at elevated salinities that is not affected by CO2 . The observed shift in the optimal salinity for growth with increasing CO2 concentrations changes the fundamental niche of this species and could have significant effects on future mangrove distribution patterns and interspecific interactions. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Using a trait-based approach to link microbial community composition and functioning to soil salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Kristin; Fierer, Noah; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Our knowledge of the dynamics structuring microbial communities and the consequences this has for soil functions is rudimentary. In particular, predictions of the response of microbial communities to environmental change and the implications for associated ecosystem processes remain elusive. Understanding how environmental factors structure microbial communities and regulate the functions they perform is key to a mechanistic understanding of how biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change. Soil salinization is an agricultural problem in many parts of the world. The activity of soil microorganisms is reduced in saline soils compared to non-saline soil. However, soil salinity often co-varies with other factors, making it difficult to assign responses of microbial communities to direct effects of salinity. A trait-based approach allows us to connect the environmental factor salinity with the responses of microbial community composition and functioning. Salinity along a salinity gradient serves as a filter for the community trait distribution of salt tolerance, selecting for higher salt tolerance at more saline sites. This trait-environment relationship can be used to predict responses of microbial communities to environmental change. Our aims were to (i) use salinity along natural salinity gradients as an environmental filter, and (ii) link the resulting filtered trait-distributions of the communities (the trait being salt tolerance) to the community composition. Soil samples were obtained from two replicated salinity gradients along an Australian salt lake, spanning a wide range of soil salinities (0.1 dS m-1 to >50 dS m-1). In one of the two gradients salinity was correlated with pH. Community trait distributions for salt tolerance were assessed by establishing dose-dependences for extracted bacterial communities using growth rate assays. In addition, functional parameters were measured along the salt gradients. Community composition of sites was compared

  9. Sweet pepper production in substrate in response to salinity, nutrient solution management and training system Produção de pimentão cultivado em substrato em resposta à salinidade, manejo da solução nutritiva e sistema de condução

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José S Rubio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the marketable fruit yield of sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum cv. Orlando in function of the management of nutrient solution with training system. Plants were grown on coconut coir dust under greenhouse conditions in the southeast of Spain. A randomized block design in split-split plot with four blocks was used to test the effect of the nutrient solution strength (full or half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution, training system (two and three stems per plant and water salinity (saline and non-saline on total and marketable yield, fruit quality, and fruit mineral concentration. Salt treatment decreased fruit yield by decreasing the fruit fresh weight but not the number of fruits per plant. Under saline and non-saline conditions, the higher yield of fruits was obtained in plants watered with half-strength Hoagland solution, and grown with three stems per plant. Blossom end rot incidence increased under saline conditions or using full-strength Hoagland solution, but decreased with the combination of half-strength Hoagland solution and three-stem training system. Salt treatment also decreased fruit quality in all the treatments due to a decrease in PO2-, SO4(2-, Fe2+;3+, Cu1+;2+ and Mn2+ concentrations, and fruit shape index. Likewise, plants exposed to salinity and watered with half-strength Hoagland solution and trained with three stems showed a reduction in juice glucose and fructose concentration. Based on these results, an increase of the marketable fruit yield could be obtained under non or moderate saline conditions with the implementation of suitable culture practices.Este experimento teve como objetivo avaliar a produção comercial de pimentão doce (Capsicum annuum cv. Orlando em função do manejo da solução nutritiva, da salinidade e do sistema de condução. As plantas de pimentão doce foram cultivadas em substrato de fibra de coco em casa de vegetação no sudeste da Espanha

  10. Resposta da aplicação do 1-MCP em frutos de mamoeiro 'Golden' em diferentes estádios de maturação Responses of 1-MCP applications in 'Golden' papaya fruits on differents maturation stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Silva de Souza

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de fatores que influenciam no processo de amadurecimento é fundamental para o planejamento do processo de comercialização, principalmente em frutos com padrão de respiração climatérico e perecível, como é o caso do mamão. Nesse trabalho, avaliou-se o efeito da aplicação do 1-MCP (1-metilciclopropeno sobre o amadurecimento de frutos de mamoeiro nos estádios 0; 1 e 2 de maturação. O 1-MCP diminui a produção de etileno (≈79% e a taxa respiratória (≈45%, principalmente em frutos no estádio 0 de maturação. O uso deste inibidor da ação do etileno retardou a perda de coloração verde da casca dos frutos, principalmente em frutos nos estádios 0 e 1 de maturação. Houve redução na perda de firmeza do fruto e do mesocarpo nos estádios 1 e 2. Entretanto, em frutos no estádio 0 de maturação, a firmeza do mesocarpo manteve-se alta, o que pode comprometer a aceitação destes frutos pelo consumidor. O teor de sólidos solúveis não foi influenciado pela aplicação do 1-MCP. O efeito do 1-MCP na redução da atividade das enzimas PME e PG foi maior em frutos nos estádios 0 e 1 de maturação em comparação a frutos no estádio 2 de maturação. A atividade da PME demonstrou crescente aumento ao longo do período de armazenamento, porém a atividade da PG permaneceu baixa ao longo dos cinco primeiros dias, com aumento posterior. Os resultados mostraram que a PME exerce influência significativa na perda de firmeza da polpa nos primeiros dias, com atuação posterior da PG. O 1-MCP mostrou-se eficiente em retardar o processo de amadurecimento de frutos de mamoeiro, tornando-se mais eficiente quando associado a estádios de maturação iniciais.The study of factors that influence the process of ripening is critical for planning the marketing process, mainly in standard breathing climacteric and perishing fruits, as it is the case of papaya. In this work it was evaluated the effect of the application of 1-MCP (1

  11. Genetic variation in southern USA rice genotypes for salinity tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa B De Leon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The success of a rice breeding program in developing salt tolerant varieties depends on genetic variation and the salt stress response of adapted and donor rice germplasm. In this study, we used a combination of morphological and physiological traits in multivariate analyses to elucidate the phenotypic and genetic variation in salinity tolerance of thirty Southern USA rice genotypes, along with nineteen donor genotypes with varying degrees of tolerance. Significant genotypic variation and correlations were found among the salt injury score (SIS, ion leakage, chlorophyll reduction, shoot length reduction, shoot K+ concentration, and shoot Na+/K+ ratio. Using these parameters, the combined methods of cluster analysis and discriminant analysis validated the salinity response of known genotypes and classified most of the USA varieties into sensitive groups, except for three and seven varieties placed in the tolerant and moderately tolerant groups, respectively. Discriminant function and MANOVA delineated the differences in tolerance and suggested no differences between sensitive and highly sensitive groups. DNA profiling using simple sequence repeat markers showed narrow genetic diversity among USA genotypes. However, the overall genetic clustering was mostly due to subspecies and grain type differentiation and not by varietal grouping based on salinity tolerance. Among the donor genotypes, Nona Bokra, Pokkali, and its derived breeding lines remained the donors of choice for improving salinity tolerance during the seedling stage. However, due to undesirable agronomic attributes and photosensitivity of these donors, alternative genotypes such as TCCP266, Geumgangbyeo, and R609 are recommended as useful and novel sources of salinity tolerance for USA rice breeding programs.

  12. Stabilising nanofluids in saline environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anssari, Sarmad; Arif, Muhammad; Wang, Shaobin; Barifcani, Ahmed; Iglauer, Stefan

    2017-12-15

    Nanofluids (i.e. nanoparticles dispersed in a fluid) have tremendous potential in a broad range of applications, including pharmacy, medicine, water treatment, soil decontamination, or oil recovery and CO 2 geo-sequestration. In these applications nanofluid stability plays a key role, and typically robust stability is required. However, the fluids in these applications are saline, and no stability data is available for such salt-containing fluids. We thus measured and quantified nanofluid stability for a wide range of nanofluid formulations, as a function of salinity, nanoparticle content and various additives, and we investigated how this stability can be improved. Zeta sizer and dynamic light scattering (DLS) principles were used to investigate zeta potential and particle size distribution of nanoparticle-surfactant formulations. Also scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the physicochemical aspects of the suspension. We found that the salt drastically reduced nanofluid stability (because of the screening effect on the repulsive forces between the nanoparticles), while addition of anionic surfactant improved stability. Cationic surfactants again deteriorated stability. Mechanisms for the different behaviour of the different formulations were identified and are discussed here. We thus conclude that for achieving maximum nanofluid stability, anionic surfactant should be added. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative Molecular Phenotyping of Gill Remodeling in a Cichlid Fish Responding to Salinity Stress*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kültz, Dietmar; Li, Johnathon; Gardell, Alison; Sacchi, Romina

    2013-01-01

    A two-tiered label-free quantitative (LFQ) proteomics workflow was used to elucidate how salinity affects the molecular phenotype, i.e. proteome, of gills from a cichlid fish, the euryhaline tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). The workflow consists of initial global profiling of relative tryptic peptide abundances in treated versus control samples followed by targeted identification (by MS/MS) and quantitation (by chromatographic peak area integration) of validated peptides for each protein of interest. Fresh water acclimated tilapia were independently exposed in separate experiments to acute short-term (34 ppt) and gradual long-term (70 ppt, 90 ppt) salinity stress followed by molecular phenotyping of the gill proteome. The severity of salinity stress can be deduced with high technical reproducibility from the initial global label-free quantitative profiling step alone at both peptide and protein levels. However, an accurate regulation ratio can only be determined by targeted label-free quantitative profiling because not all peptides used for protein identification are also valid for quantitation. Of the three salinity challenges, gradual acclimation to 90 ppt has the most pronounced effect on gill molecular phenotype. Known salinity effects on tilapia gills, including an increase in the size and number of mitochondria-rich ionocytes, activities of specific ion transporters, and induction of specific molecular chaperones are reflected in the regulation of abundances of the corresponding proteins. Moreover, specific protein isoforms that are responsive to environmental salinity change are resolved and it is revealed that salinity effects on the mitochondrial proteome are nonuniform. Furthermore, protein NDRG1 has been identified as a novel key component of molecular phenotype restructuring during salinity-induced gill remodeling. In conclusion, besides confirming known effects of salinity on gills of euryhaline fish, molecular phenotyping reveals novel insight into

  14. Quantitative molecular phenotyping of gill remodeling in a cichlid fish responding to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kültz, Dietmar; Li, Johnathon; Gardell, Alison; Sacchi, Romina

    2013-12-01

    A two-tiered label-free quantitative (LFQ) proteomics workflow was used to elucidate how salinity affects the molecular phenotype, i.e. proteome, of gills from a cichlid fish, the euryhaline tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). The workflow consists of initial global profiling of relative tryptic peptide abundances in treated versus control samples followed by targeted identification (by MS/MS) and quantitation (by chromatographic peak area integration) of validated peptides for each protein of interest. Fresh water acclimated tilapia were independently exposed in separate experiments to acute short-term (34 ppt) and gradual long-term (70 ppt, 90 ppt) salinity stress followed by molecular phenotyping of the gill proteome. The severity of salinity stress can be deduced with high technical reproducibility from the initial global label-free quantitative profiling step alone at both peptide and protein levels. However, an accurate regulation ratio can only be determined by targeted label-free quantitative profiling because not all peptides used for protein identification are also valid for quantitation. Of the three salinity challenges, gradual acclimation to 90 ppt has the most pronounced effect on gill molecular phenotype. Known salinity effects on tilapia gills, including an increase in the size and number of mitochondria-rich ionocytes, activities of specific ion transporters, and induction of specific molecular chaperones are reflected in the regulation of abundances of the corresponding proteins. Moreover, specific protein isoforms that are responsive to environmental salinity change are resolved and it is revealed that salinity effects on the mitochondrial proteome are nonuniform. Furthermore, protein NDRG1 has been identified as a novel key component of molecular phenotype restructuring during salinity-induced gill remodeling. In conclusion, besides confirming known effects of salinity on gills of euryhaline fish, molecular phenotyping reveals novel insight into

  15. A global algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. McDougall

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater – 2010 has defined the thermodynamic properties of seawater in terms of a new salinity variable, Absolute Salinity, which takes into account the spatial variation of the composition of seawater. Absolute Salinity more accurately reflects the effects of the dissolved material in seawater on the thermodynamic properties (particularly density than does Practical Salinity.

    When a seawater sample has standard composition (i.e. the ratios of the constituents of sea salt are the same as those of surface water of the North Atlantic, Practical Salinity can be used to accurately evaluate the thermodynamic properties of seawater. When seawater is not of standard composition, Practical Salinity alone is not sufficient and the Absolute Salinity Anomaly needs to be estimated; this anomaly is as large as 0.025 g kg−1 in the northernmost North Pacific. Here we provide an algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity Anomaly for any location (x, y, p in the world ocean.

    To develop this algorithm, we used the Absolute Salinity Anomaly that is found by comparing the density calculated from Practical Salinity to the density measured in the laboratory. These estimates of Absolute Salinity Anomaly however are limited to the number of available observations (namely 811. In order to provide a practical method that can be used at any location in the world ocean, we take advantage of approximate relationships between Absolute Salinity Anomaly and silicate concentrations (which are available globally.

  16. Managing the Economics of Soil Salinity

    OpenAIRE

    Hadrich, Joleen C.

    2011-01-01

    Saline soils result in decreased crop growth and yield with the potential for losing productive farm land. Enterprise budget analysis was extended to include the fixed costs of installing tile drainage to manage soil salinity in the Red River Valley of North Dakota for corn, soybeans, wheat, sugar beets, and barley. Installing tile drainage to manage soil salinity decreased per acre crop profitability from 19-49% due to the large upfront capital investment of tile drainage. These losses can b...

  17. Effects of hypertonic saline vs normal saline in lactate depuration after cardiovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atehortúa-López, Luis Horacio; Mendoza-Franco, Ray; Escobar-Serna, José Fernando; Urrego, Luis Alejandro; Alzate, Fernando; Jaimes, Fabian

    2017-03-11

    The postoperative care of patients exposed to cardiac surgery frequently require a thorough reanimation with intravenous fluids but crystalloid solutions like normal saline may increase the interstitial edema, and also it is well known that fluid overload increases mortality. To compare the effect of 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS) with 0.9% normal saline (NS) in the lactate depuration and the hemodynamic response of patients during the first day after on-pump cardiovascular surgery. Patients who were 18 years of age and older with coronary artery disease and/or heart valve disease, and who went to bypass surgery and/or cardiac valve replacement were included and randomly allocated to receive 4mL/kg of HS or NS intravenously for 30min once were admitted to the ICU. We measured lactate, arterial blood gases, HR, CVP and PWP on 0, 6, 12 and 24h after being admitted to the ICU. The analysis was carried out with an intention-to-treat principle. A total of 494 patients were evaluated and 102 were included and assigned to the HS groups (51 patients) or NS (51 patients). Participants' average age was 59±14 years and 59.8% were men. We did not observe any statistically significant difference between two groups in the lactate depuration or in any of the secondary outcomes. Our study failed to show better lactate depuration using a dose of HS, and did not evidence a higher incidence of adverse effects in the HS group. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Biochemical and Anatomical Changes and Yield Reduction in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) under Varied Salinity Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, M. A.; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hanafi, M. M.; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Selamat, Ahmad; Rafii, M. Y.; Latif, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Five Malaysian rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties, MR33, MR52, MR211, MR219, and MR232, were tested in pot culture under different salinity regimes for biochemical response, physiological activity, and grain yield. Three different levels of salt stresses, namely, 4, 8, and 12 dS m−1, were used in a randomized complete block design with four replications under glass house conditions. The results revealed that the chlorophyll content, proline, sugar content, soluble protein, free amino acid, and yield per plant of all the genotypes were influenced by different salinity levels. The chlorophyll content was observed to decrease with salinity level but the proline increased with salinity levels in all varieties. Reducing sugar and total sugar increased up to 8 dS m−1 and decreased up to 12 dS m−1. Nonreducing sugar decreased with increasing the salinity levels in all varieties. Soluble protein and free amino acid also decreased with increasing salinity levels. Cortical cells of MR211 and MR232 did not show cell collapse up to 8 dS m−1 salinity levels compared to susceptible checks (IR20 and BRRI dhan29). Therefore, considering all parameters, MR211 and MR232 showed better salinity tolerance among the tested varieties. Both cluster and principal component analyses depict the similar results. PMID:24579076

  19. Environmental tolerances of rare and common mangroves along light and salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangremond, Emily M; Feller, Ilka C; Sousa, Wayne P

    2015-12-01

    Although mangroves possess a variety of morphological and physiological adaptations for life in a stressful habitat, interspecific differences in survival and growth under different environmental conditions can shape their local and geographic distributions. Soil salinity and light are known to affect mangrove performance, often in an interactive fashion. It has also been hypothesized that mangroves are intrinsically shade intolerant due to the high physiological cost of coping with saline flooded soils. To evaluate the relationship between stress tolerance and species distributions, we compared responses of seedlings of three widespread mangrove species and one narrow endemic mangrove species in a factorial array of light levels and soil salinities in an outdoor laboratory experiment. The more narrowly distributed species was expected to exhibit a lower tolerance of potentially stressful conditions. Two of the widespread species, Avicennia germinans and Lumnitzera racemosa, survived and grew well at low-medium salinity, regardless of light level, but performed poorly at high salinity, particularly under high light. The third widespread species, Rhizophora mangle, responded less to variation in light and salinity. However, at high salinity, its relative growth rate was low at every light level and none of these plants flushed leaves. As predicted, the rare species, Pelliciera rhizophorae, was the most sensitive to environmental stressors, suffering especially high mortality and reduced growth and quantum yield under the combined conditions of high light and medium-high salinity. That it only thrives under shaded conditions represents an important exception to the prevailing belief that halophytes are intrinsically constrained to be shade intolerant.

  20. Salinity Effects on Germination Properties ofPurslane (Portulaca oleracea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m Kafi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to study seed germination and seedling growth responses of purslane to different levels of salinity, an experiment was conducted in a completely randomized desgin with six levels of salinity (0, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 dS/m using NaCl and five replications. Persentage and rate of germination, length and dry weight of radicle and plumule were measured, and ratio radicle to plumule length, mean germination time and seedling vigor index were calculated. The results showed that up to 28 dS/m salinity did not impose any significant different in germination percentage compared with control, but in 35 dS/m salinity it decreased to 19%. germination rate did not show any significant different up to 14 dS/m in comparison with control but beyond this level it significantly decreased with increasing salt stress. Mean germination time up to 21 dS/m did not have significant different in comparison with control, but increased with increasing salinity significantly. Length, fresh and dry weight of radicle and plumule, and seedling vigor index significantly decreased by increasing salinity. Ratio of radicle to plumule length decreased with increasing salt concentration, but there were not significant different among salt levels. According to the results, the germination stage of purslane is remarkably resistant to elevated levels of salinity and it seems that by exerting proper management in farms, it could be established in saline environments. Keywords: Plumule, Radicle, Seedlings of purslane

  1. A meta-analysis of soil salinization effects on nitrogen pools, cycles and fluxes in coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghua; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    Salinity intrusion caused by land subsidence resulting from increasing groundwater abstraction, decreasing river sediment loads and increasing sea level because of climate change has caused widespread soil salinization in coastal ecosystems. Soil salinization may greatly alter nitrogen (N) cycling in coastal ecosystems. However, a comprehensive understanding of the effects of soil salinization on ecosystem N pools, cycling processes and fluxes is not available for coastal ecosystems. Therefore, we compiled data from 551 observations from 21 peer-reviewed papers and conducted a meta-analysis of experimental soil salinization effects on 19 variables related to N pools, cycling processes and fluxes in coastal ecosystems. Our results showed that the effects of soil salinization varied across different ecosystem types and salinity levels. Soil salinization increased plant N content (18%), soil NH4(+) (12%) and soil total N (210%), although it decreased soil NO3(-) (2%) and soil microbial biomass N (74%). Increasing soil salinity stimulated soil N2 O fluxes as well as hydrological NH4(+) and NO2(-) fluxes more than threefold, although it decreased the hydrological dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) flux (59%). Soil salinization also increased the net N mineralization by 70%, although salinization effects were not observed on the net nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in this meta-analysis. Overall, this meta-analysis improves our understanding of the responses of ecosystem N cycling to soil salinization, identifies knowledge gaps and highlights the urgent need for studies on the effects of soil salinization on coastal agro-ecosystem and microbial N immobilization. Additional increases in knowledge are critical for designing sustainable adaptation measures to the predicted intrusion of salinity intrusion so that the productivity of coastal agro-ecosystems can be maintained or improved and the N losses and pollution of the natural

  2. SOIL SALINITY MAPPING USING MULTITEMPORAL LANDSAT DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Azabdaftari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is one of the most important problems affecting many areas of the world. Saline soils present in agricultural areas reduce the annual yields of most crops. This research deals with the soil salinity mapping of Seyhan plate of Adana district in Turkey from the years 2009 to 2010, using remote sensing technology. In the analysis, multitemporal data acquired from LANDSAT 7-ETM+ satellite in four different dates (19 April 2009, 12 October 2009, 21 March 2010, 31 October 2010 are used. As a first step, preprocessing of Landsat images is applied. Several salinity indices such as NDSI (Normalized Difference Salinity Index, BI (Brightness Index and SI (Salinity Index are used besides some vegetation indices such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, RVI (Ratio Vegetation Index, SAVI (Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index and EVI (Enhamced Vegetation Index for the soil salinity mapping of the study area. The field’s electrical conductivity (EC measurements done in 2009 and 2010, are used as a ground truth data for the correlation analysis with the original band values and different index image bands values. In the correlation analysis, two regression models, the simple linear regression (SLR and multiple linear regression (MLR are considered. According to the highest correlation obtained, the 21st March, 2010 dataset is chosen for production of the soil salinity map in the area. Finally, the efficiency of the remote sensing technology in the soil salinity mapping is outlined.

  3. Salinity Temperature and Roughness Remote Scanner (STARRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides spatially continuous high-resolution surface salinity imagery in a synoptic manner from small aircraft. Its output complements data collected from...

  4. AcEST: DK955055 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available I2 Definition sp|Q4VBI2|IR3IP_DANRE Immediate early response 3-interacting protein 1 OS=Danio rerio Align le...ignificant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q4VBI2|IR3IP_DANRE Immediate early response 3-interacting pro... 40 0... sp|Q3B8G7|IR3IP_XENLA Immediate early response 3-interacting pro... 38 0.031 sp|P85007|IR3IP_RAT Immediate ...early response 3-interacting prote... 38 0.040 sp|Q9CR20|IR3IP_MOUSE Immediate early response 3-interacting ...pro... 37 0.068 sp|Q9Y5U9|IR3IP_HUMAN Immediate early response 3-interacting pro... 37 0.068 sp|Q1JQC2|IR3IP_BOVIN Immediate

  5. Evaluation of Different Rice Genotypes Tolerance to Saline Irrigation Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jafari Rad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the responses of seven rice genotypes (Khazar, SA13, Deylam, Sange Joe, Sepidrud, 831 and T5 to different levels of irrigation water salinity, and determining grain yield based on tolerance indices, a CRD based factorial pot experiment with five levels of irrigation water salinity (1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 dSm-1 and three replications was carried out at Rice Research Institute of Iran in 2011. Indices such as SSI, TOL, MP, GMP, HM, STI, YI and YSI were calculated and their correlations with grain yield were estimated for both stress and non-stress conditions. Results indicated significant differences among genotypes and the indices within both conditions. Results also showed that STI and MP indices could be considered as the best indices to screen salt tolerant genotypes. Among the genotypes used in the experiment, T5 produced the highest yield in both non-stress (19.71 g/plant and stress (10.69 g/plant conditions, while the lowest yield in normal (11.84 g/plant and stressful (4.29 g/plant conditions was recorded for Deylam and Khazar, respectively. The highest and the lowest percentage of yield reduction were found in Khazar (69.49% and Sange Joe (31.48% in stressful conditions, respectively. Overall, genotypes T5, 831, Sepidrud and Sange Joe can probably be considered as superior high yielding genotypes in both saline and non-saline conditions for further research.

  6. Plasticity of gene expression according to salinity in the testis of broodstock and F1 black-chinned tilapia, Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avarre, Jean-Christophe; Guinand, Bruno; Dugué, Rémi; Cosson, Jacky; Legendre, Marc; Panfili, Jacques; Durand, Jean-Dominique

    2014-01-01

    ...) displays remarkable acclimation capacities. When exposed to drastic changes of salinity, which can be the case in its natural habitat, it develops quick physiological responses and keeps reproducing...

  7. Soil salinity detection from satellite image analysis: an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Md Manjur; Islam, Md Tazmul; Jamil, Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This paper attempts to detect soil salinity from satellite image analysis using remote sensing and geographic information system. Salinity intrusion is a common problem for the coastal regions of the world. Traditional salinity detection techniques by field survey and sampling are time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing and geographic information system offer economic and efficient salinity detection, monitoring, and mapping. To predict soil salinity, an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data was used to develop a multiple regression equation. The correlations between different indices and field data of soil salinity were calculated to find out the highly correlated indices. The best regression model was selected considering the high R (2) value, low P value, and low Akaike's Information Criterion. About 20% variation was observed between the field data and predicted EC from the satellite image analysis. The precision of this salinity detection technique depends on the accuracy and uniform distribution of field data.

  8. AcEST: BP916010 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5QMV0_ORYSJ cDNA clone:J023047L09, full insert sequen... 71 3e-11 tr|A8IXU3|A8IXU3_BRACM Altered response to gravity...bjct: 364 GSSSSRYPTESPENGNIDGKDKSSKKKWFNLNLNRSDK 401 >tr|A8IXU3|A8IXU3_BRACM Altered response to gravity 1 O

  9. AcEST: DK962505 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TrEMBL tr_hit_id Q1HGG1 Definition tr|Q1HGG1|Q1HGG1_9ROSI Abscisic acid responsive element-binding protein 2 OS=Populus suav...ROSI Abscisic acid responsive element-binding protein 2 OS=Populus suaveolens GN=ABF2 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 406

  10. AcEST: DK962639 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ein 2 ... 80 1e-14 sp|Q12091|DAP1_YEAST Damage response protein 1 OS=Saccharomyces ... 75 3e-13 sp|A2CES0|CB...A 197 >sp|Q12091|DAP1_YEAST Damage response protein 1 OS=Saccharomyces cerevisiae GN=DAP1 PE=1 SV=1 Length =

  11. AcEST: DK958022 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t (release 56.9) Link to BlastX Result : Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id Q3B8G7 Definition sp|Q3B8G7|IR3IP_XENLA Immediate...diate early response 3-interacting pro... 49 2e-05 sp|Q4VBI2|IR3IP_DANRE Immediat...e early response 3-interacting pro... 49 3e-05 sp|P85007|IR3IP_RAT Immediate early ...response 3-interacting prote... 45 2e-04 sp|Q9CR20|IR3IP_MOUSE Immediate early response 3-interacting pro...... 45 3e-04 sp|Q9Y5U9|IR3IP_HUMAN Immediate early response 3-interacting pro... 45 3e-04 sp|Q1JQC2|IR3IP_BOVIN Immediate

  12. Salinity-induced changes in protein expression in the halophytic plant Nitraria sphaerocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinhui; Cheng, Tielong; Wang, Pengkai; Liu, Weidong; Xiao, Jiao; Yang, Yunqiang; Hu, Xiangyang; Jiang, Zeping; Zhang, Shougong; Shi, Jisen

    2012-09-18

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress that inhibits plant growth and development. Plants have evolved complex adaptive mechanisms that respond to salinity stress. However, an understanding of how plants respond to salinity stress is far from being complete. In particular, how plants survive salinity stress via alterations to their intercellular metabolic networks and defense systems is largely unknown. To delineate the responses of Nitraria sphaerocarpa cell suspensions to salinity, changes in their protein expression patterns were characterized by a comparative proteomic approach. Cells that had been treated with 150 mM NaCl for 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9 days developed several stress-related phenotypes, including those affecting morphology and biochemical activities. Of ~1100 proteins detected in 2-DE gel patterns, 130 proteins showed differences in abundance with more than 1.5-fold when cells were stressed by salinity. All but one of these proteins was identified by MS and database searching. The 129 spots contained 111 different proteins, including those involved in signal transduction, cell rescue/defense, cytoskeleton and cell cycle, protein folding and assembly, which were the most significantly affected. Taken together, our results provide a foundation to understand the mechanism of salinity response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Aquarius Instrument and Salinity Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius has been designed to map the surface salinity field of the global ocean from space a parameter important for understanding ocean circulation and its relationship to climate and the global water cycle. Salinity is measured remotely from space by measuring the thermal emission from the ocean surface. This is done at the low frequency end of the microwave spectrum (e.g. 1.4 GHz) where the emission is sufficiently sensitive to changes in salinity to be detected with sophisticated radiometers. The goal is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface