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Sample records for salinity tolerance engineered

  1. Genetic engineering of the glyoxalase pathway in tobacco leads to enhanced salinity tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla-Pareek, S. L.; Reddy, M. K.; Sopory, S. K.

    2003-01-01

    The glyoxalase pathway involving glyoxalase I (gly I) and glyoxalase II (gly II) enzymes is required for glutathione-based detoxification of methylglyoxal. We had earlier indicated the potential of gly I as a probable candidate gene in conferring salinity tolerance. We report here that overexpression of gly I+II together confers improved salinity tolerance, thus offering another effective strategy for manipulating stress tolerance in crop plants. We have overexpressed the gly II gene either alone in untransformed plants or with gly I transgenic background. Both types of these transgenic plants stably expressed the foreign protein, and the enzyme activity was also higher. Compared with nontransformants, several independent gly II transgenic lines showed improved capability for tolerating exposure to high methylglyoxal and NaCl concentration and were able to grow, flower, and set normal viable seeds under continuous salinity stress conditions. Importantly, the double transgenic lines always showed a better response than either of the single gene-transformed lines and WT plants under salinity stress. Ionic measurements revealed higher accumulation of Na+ and K+ in old leaves and negligible accumulation of Na+ in seeds of transgenic lines as compared with the WT plants. Comparison of various growth parameters and seed production demonstrated that there is hardly any yield penalty in the double transgenics under nonstress conditions and that these plants suffered only 5% loss in total productivity when grown in 200 mM NaCl. These findings establish the potential of manipulation of the glyoxalase pathway for increased salinity tolerance without affecting yield in crop plants. PMID:14638937

  2. Salinity tolerance in halophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Timothy J; Colmer, Timothy D

    2008-01-01

    Halophytes, plants that survive to reproduce in environments where the salt concentration is around 200 mm NaCl or more, constitute about 1% of the world's flora. Some halophytes show optimal growth in saline conditions; others grow optimally in the absence of salt. However, the tolerance of all halophytes to salinity relies on controlled uptake and compartmentalization of Na+, K+ and Cl- and the synthesis of organic 'compatible' solutes, even where salt glands are operative. Although there is evidence that different species may utilize different transporters in their accumulation of Na+, in general little is known of the proteins and regulatory networks involved. Consequently, it is not yet possible to assign molecular mechanisms to apparent differences in rates of Na+ and Cl- uptake, in root-to-shoot transport (xylem loading and retrieval), or in net selectivity for K+ over Na+. At the cellular level, H+-ATPases in the plasma membrane and tonoplast, as well as the tonoplast H+-PPiase, provide the trans-membrane proton motive force used by various secondary transporters. The widespread occurrence, taxonomically, of halophytes and the general paucity of information on the molecular regulation of tolerance mechanisms persuade us that research should be concentrated on a number of 'model' species that are representative of the various mechanisms that might be involved in tolerance.

  3. Improving salinity tolerance of plants through conventional breeding and genetic engineering: An analytical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad; Akram, Nudrat Aisha

    2009-01-01

    The last century has witnessed a substantial improvement in yield potential, quality and disease resistance in crops. This was indeed the outcome of conventional breeding, which was achieved with little or no knowledge of underlying physiological and biochemical phenomena related to a trait. Also the resources utilized on programs involving conventional breeding were not of great magnitude. Plant breeders have also been successful during the last century in producing a few salt-tolerant cultivars/lines of some potential crops through conventional breeding, but this again has utilized modest resources. However, this approach seems now inefficient due to a number of reasons, and alternatively, genetic engineering for improving crop salt tolerance is being actively followed these days by the plant scientists, world-over. A large number of transgenic lines with enhanced salt tolerance of different crops can be deciphered from the literature but up to now only a very few field-tested cultivars/lines are known despite the fact that considerable resources have been expended on the sophisticated protocols employed for generating such transgenics. This review analytically compares the achievements made so far in terms of producing salt-tolerant lines/cultivars through conventional breeding or genetic engineering.

  4. Effects of salt stress on wild type and vte4 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana: Model plant to engineer tolerance towards salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalatbari Amir Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major environmental constraints impairing plant distribution and yield is believed to be salt stress. Additionally, engineered abiotic stress resistance or/and tolerance is considered as an indispensable target in order to enhance plant productivity. In this study, the effects of salinity on physiological and morphological of wild type (Columbia-0 and vte4 mutant Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated under different NaCl concentrations. These salt treatments, including control condition, 50mM and 100mM NaCl were imposed on the plants. Each salt treatment was replicated three times in a complete randomized design with factorial arrangement. Wild type and mutant A.thaliana plants were subjected to the abiotic stress (salinity for up to 11 days to evaluate the parameters of growth, development and water relations. As a result, the performance of wild type plants was stronger than vte4 mutant under different salt treatments. Under control condition, rosette dry weight, maximum quantum efficiency (PSII and specific leaf area obtained the highest values of 13.85 mg, considered, wild type A.thaliana recorded higher value of 0.82 gW/gFW for relative water content (RWC under 50mM NaCl whereas mutant plants gained the value of 0.78 gW/gFW under the same condition. However, root mass fraction indicated an increase for both wild type and vte4 mutant plants after 11 days of salt stress onset. The reduction of water potential was observed for wild type and mutant A.thaliana where it scored -1.3 MPa and -1.4, respectively. As a conclusion, these findings implied that under different salt treatments morphological and physiological responses of wild type and vte4 mutant were affected in which wild type plants showed more tolerance. Lack of γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ -TMT gene in vte4 seemed to impair defence mechanism of this mutant against salinity.

  5. Genomics Approaches For Improving Salinity Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongpiur, Ramsong Chantre; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata; Pareek, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major factors which reduces crop production worldwide. Plant responses to salinity are highly complex and involve a plethora of genes. Due to its multigenicity, it has been difficult to attain a complete understanding of how plants respond to salinity. Genomics has progressed tremendously over the past decade and has played a crucial role towards providing necessary knowledge for crop improvement. Through genomics, we have been able to identify and characterize the genes involved in salinity stress response, map out signaling pathways and ultimately utilize this information for improving the salinity tolerance of existing crops. The use of new tools, such as gene pyramiding, in genetic engineering and marker assisted breeding has tremendously enhanced our ability to generate stress tolerant crops. Genome editing technologies such as Zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 also provide newer and faster avenues for plant biologists to generate precisely engineered crops. PMID:27499683

  6. Salinity Tolerance Turfgrass: History and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamal Uddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Land and water resources are becoming scarce and are insufficient to sustain the burgeoning population. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic stresses affecting agricultural productions across the world. Cultivation of salt-tolerant turfgrass species may be promising option under such conditions where poor quality water can also be used for these crops. Coastal lands in developing countries can be used to grow such crops, and seawater can be used for irrigation of purposes. These plants can be grown using land and water unsuitable for conventional crops and can provide food, fuel, fodder, fibber, resin, essential oils, and pharmaceutical products and can be used for landscape reintegration. There are a number of potential turfgrass species that may be appropriate at various salinity levels of seawater. The goal of this review is to create greater awareness of salt-tolerant turfgrasses, their current and potential uses, and their potential use in developing countries. The future for irrigating turf may rely on the use of moderate- to high-salinity water and, in order to ensure that the turf system is sustainable, will rely on the use of salt-tolerant grasses and an improved knowledge of the effects of salinity on turfgrasses.

  7. Population specific salinity tolerance in eelgrass (Zostera marina)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Tiina Elina; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Boström, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is one of the main factors impacting distribution of marine plants and sub-optimal salinities may result in increased resource use and decreased production.We studied the performance and salinity tolerance of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) originating from two regions with different ambient...... salinities: a low saline (salinity 6) and a high saline (salinity 20) population. Plants fromboth populationswere exposed to a series of fixed salinities (2, 4, 6, 9, 12.5, 15, 20 and 25) for 5 weeks. Both plant origin and salinity affected plant performance significantly. Plant production decreasedwith...... decreasing salinity in both populations,while mortality increased in lowsalinity only in plants originating from the high saline population. The better performance of the low saline population in the lowest salinities indicates a horizontal shift in salinity tolerance among populationswith different origin...

  8. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarizes current data concerning Na(+) and K(+) concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows choosing specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX, and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between non-selective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is discussed and

  9. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim eVolkov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarises current data concerning Na+ and K+ concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows to choose specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between nonselective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is

  10. Production of salinity tolerant Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of salinity tolerant Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus through traditional and modern breeding methods: II. Application of genetically modified breeding by introducing foreign DNA into fish gonads.

  11. Screening of recombinant inbred lines for salinity tolerance in bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screening a large number of plants for salinity tolerance is not easy, therefore this investigation was performed to evaluate and screen 186 F8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between Superhead#2 (Super Seri) and Roshan wheat varieties for salinity tolerance. All the individuals were evaluated under ...

  12. Improvement of Salinity Stress Tolerance in Rice: Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi My Linh Hoang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is an important staple crop that feeds more than one half of the world’s population and is the model system for monocotyledonous plants. However, rice is very sensitive to salinity and is the most salt sensitive cereal crop with a threshold of 3 dSm−1 for most cultivated varieties. Despite many attempts using different strategies to improve salinity tolerance in rice, the achievements so far are quite modest. This review aims to discuss challenges that hinder the improvement of salinity stress tolerance in rice as well as potential opportunities for enhancing salinity stress tolerance in this important crop.

  13. Genetic studies on saline and sodic tolerances in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Donghe; Tuyen, Do Duc

    2012-01-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories: saline and sodic (alkaline). Developing and using soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr) cultivars with high salt tolerance is an effective way of maintaining sustainable production in areas where soybean growth is threatened by salt stress. Early classical genetics studies revealed that saline tolerance was conditioned by a single dominant gene. Recently, a series of studies consistently revealed a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for saline tolerance located on linkage group N (chromosome 3) around the SSR markers Satt255 and Sat_091; other minor QTLs were also reported. In the case of sodic tolerance, most studies focused on iron deficiency caused by a high soil pH, and several QTLs associated with iron deficiency were identified. A wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) accession with high sodic tolerance was recently identified, and a significant QTL for sodic tolerance was detected on linkage group D2 (chromosome 17). These studies demonstrated that saline and sodic tolerances were controlled by different genes in soybean. DNA markers closely associated with these QTLs can be used for marker-assisted selection to pyramid tolerance genes in soybean for both saline and sodic stresses.

  14. Genetic studies on saline and sodic tolerances in soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Donghe; Tuyen, Do Duc

    2012-01-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories: saline and sodic (alkaline). Developing and using soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr) cultivars with high salt tolerance is an effective way of maintaining sustainable production in areas where soybean growth is threatened by salt stress. Early classical genetics studies revealed that saline tolerance was conditioned by a single dominant gene. Recently, a series of studies consistently revealed a major quantitative trait locus...

  15. Evaluation of bread wheat genotypes for salinity tolerance under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In two consecutive seasons (2007-08 and 2008-09), field experiments were conducted at Soil Salinity Research Institute, Pindi Bhattian and Biosaline Agricultural Research Station, Pakka Aana, Pakistan. During 2007-08, 103 wheat landrace genotypes were evaluated for salinity tolerance. During 2008-09, 47 selected ...

  16. Varietal differences of quinoa’s tolerance to saline conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adolf, V I; Shabala, S; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2012-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to assess varietal differences of quinoa’s tolerance to salinity and to investigate physiological mechanisms conferring these differences. Methods Production of biomass in fourteen varieties grown under saline conditions was analysed in a pot experiment. For two contrasting...

  17. Comparative salinity tolerances of four siphonariid limpets in relation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The salinity tolerances of four South African species of limpet in the genus Siphonaria were experimentally tested, in the context that one of them, S. compressa, is South Africa's most endangered marine mollusc and is restricted to two lagoonal localities that normally experience little variation in salinity. Its habitat is ...

  18. Identification of RAPD markers linked to salinity tolerance in wheat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    armghan_shehzad

    tolerance in wheat. Waqas Manzoor Bhutta* and Muhammad Hanif. Department of Botany, Government College University Faisalabad, 38040-Pakistan. Accepted 24 August, 2009 ... Key words: Marker, RAPD, root length, salinity, wheat. INTRODUCTION. Salinity is a ..... to leaf rust resistance in barley. Theor. Appl. Genet.

  19. Proteomics, metabolomics and ionomics perspectives of salinity tolerance in halophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASHA KUMARI YADAV

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Halophytes are plants which naturally survive in saline environment. They account for approximately 1% of the total flora of the world. They include both dicots and monocots and are distributed mainly in arid, semi-arid inlands and saline wet lands along the tropical and sub-tropical coasts. Salinity tolerance in halophytes depends on a set of ecological and physiological characteristics that allow them to grow and flourish in high saline conditions. The ability of halophytes to tolerate high salt is determined by the effective coordination between various physiological processes, metabolic pathways and protein or gene networks responsible for delivering salinity tolerance. The salinity responsive proteins belong to diverse functional classes such as photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, stress/defence, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction and membrane transport. The important metabolites which are involved in salt tolerance of halophytes are proline and proline analogue (4-hydroxy-N-methyl proline, glycine betaine, pinitol, myo-inositol, mannitol, sorbitol, O-methylmucoinositol and polyamines. In halophytes, the synthesis of specific proteins and osmotically active metabolites control ion and water flux and support scavenging of oxygen radicals under salt stress condition. The present review summarizes the salt tolerance mechanisms of halophytes by elucidating the recent studies that have focused on proteomic, metabolomic and ionomic aspects of various halophytes in response to salinity. By integrating the information from halophytes and its comparison with glycophytes could give an overview of salt tolerance mechanisms in halophytes, thus laying down the pavement for development of salt tolerant crop plants through genetic modification and effective breeding strategies.

  20. Bioengineering for salinity tolerance in plants: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pradeep K; Shukla, Pushp Sheel; Gupta, Kapil; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-05-01

    Genetic engineering of plants for abiotic stress tolerance is a challenging task because of its multifarious nature. Comprehensive studies for developing abiotic stress tolerance are in progress, involving genes from different pathways including osmolyte synthesis, ion homeostasis, antioxidative pathways, and regulatory genes. In the last decade, several attempts have been made to substantiate the role of "single-function" gene(s) as well as transcription factor(s) for abiotic stress tolerance. Since, the abiotic stress tolerance is multigenic in nature, therefore, the recent trend is shifting towards genetic transformation of multiple genes or transcription factors. A large number of crop plants are being engineered by abiotic stress tolerant genes and have shown the stress tolerance mostly at laboratory level. This review presents a mechanistic view of different pathways and emphasizes the function of different genes in conferring salt tolerance by genetic engineering approach. It also highlights the details of successes achieved in developing salt tolerance in plants thus far.

  1. Genetic variation in southern USA rice genotypes for salinity tolerance

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    Teresa B De Leon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The success of a rice breeding program in developing salt tolerant varieties depends on genetic variation and the salt stress response of adapted and donor rice germplasm. In this study, we used a combination of morphological and physiological traits in multivariate analyses to elucidate the phenotypic and genetic variation in salinity tolerance of thirty Southern USA rice genotypes, along with nineteen donor genotypes with varying degrees of tolerance. Significant genotypic variation and correlations were found among the salt injury score (SIS, ion leakage, chlorophyll reduction, shoot length reduction, shoot K+ concentration, and shoot Na+/K+ ratio. Using these parameters, the combined methods of cluster analysis and discriminant analysis validated the salinity response of known genotypes and classified most of the USA varieties into sensitive groups, except for three and seven varieties placed in the tolerant and moderately tolerant groups, respectively. Discriminant function and MANOVA delineated the differences in tolerance and suggested no differences between sensitive and highly sensitive groups. DNA profiling using simple sequence repeat markers showed narrow genetic diversity among USA genotypes. However, the overall genetic clustering was mostly due to subspecies and grain type differentiation and not by varietal grouping based on salinity tolerance. Among the donor genotypes, Nona Bokra, Pokkali, and its derived breeding lines remained the donors of choice for improving salinity tolerance during the seedling stage. However, due to undesirable agronomic attributes and photosensitivity of these donors, alternative genotypes such as TCCP266, Geumgangbyeo, and R609 are recommended as useful and novel sources of salinity tolerance for USA rice breeding programs.

  2. Salinity tolerance of germinating alternative oilseeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrating oilseed crops into rotations can improve soil health benefits, nutrient retention, and pollinator provisions. Field margins represent areas where incorporation of oilseeds is feasible. However in the northern Great Plains, field margins can oftentimes be areas of saline soil, which can i...

  3. New evidence of QTLs attributed to salinity tolerance in rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... All these results reinforced the idea that, new QTLs of this study play an important role in the growth of rice at seedling in Iranian local population under salinity condition. Key words: Composite interval mapping, ion exchange, molecular markers, salt tolerance, simple sequence repeat. INTRODUCTION.

  4. Comparing test systems to measure the salinity tolerance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There have recently been several studies into acute salinity tolerance of freshwater invertebrates using different methods, making comparisons between studies difficult. The alternatives focus on experimental flow regimes and ionic proportions. In this study non-rheophilic riverine taxa collected in South Africa and ...

  5. Identification of quantitative trait loci for salinity tolerance in rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many earlier studies reported big qSaltol for seedling stage salinity tolerance in rice is on short arm of chromosome 1 but none of the QTL in our study was on qSaltol or nearby position, therefore, Hasawi ... Dates. Manuscript received: 6 September 2016; Manuscript revised: 12 November 2016; Accepted: 1 December 2016 ...

  6. Identification of RAPD markers linked to salinity tolerance in wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity can be measured by a number of ways, including pedigree, phenotype and allelic diversity at loci controlling phenotypes of interest. A DNA marker for root length in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was identified. The individual plants from F2 population segregation for salinity tolerance and the parents (S-24 ...

  7. Temperature and salinity tolerance of adult hermit crabs, Diogenes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stimpson (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura). A.M. Avis. Departments of Plant Sciences and Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 Republic of South Africa. Received 4 November 1987; accepted 4 July 1988. Diogenes brevirostris was found to be tolerant to low salinities (0,5 - 4,0 °/oo) at a wide ...

  8. Identification of Proteins Involved in Salinity Tolerance in Salicornia bigelovii

    KAUST Repository

    Salazar Moya, Octavio Ruben

    2017-11-01

    With a global growing demand in food production, agricultural output must increase accordingly. An increased use of saline soils and brackish water would contribute to the required increase in world food production. Abiotic stresses, such as salinity and drought, are also major limiters of crop growth globally - most crops are relatively salt sensitive and are significantly affected when exposed to salt in the range of 50 to 200 mM NaCl. Genomic resources from plants that naturally thrive in highly saline environments have the potential to be valuable in the generation of salt tolerant crops; however, these resources have been largely unexplored. Salicornia bigelovii is a plant native to Mexico and the United States that grows in salt marshes and coastal regions. It can thrive in environments with salt concentrations higher than seawater. In contrast to most crops, S. bigelovii is able to accumulate very high concentrations (in the order of 1.5 M) of Na+ and Cl- in its photosynthetically active succulent shoots. Part of this tolerance is likely to include the storage of Na+ in the vacuoles of the shoots, making S. bigelovii a good model for understanding mechanisms of Na+ compartmentalization in the vacuoles and a good resource for gene discovery. In this research project, phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic approaches have been used for the identification of candidate genes involved in salinity tolerance in S. bigelovii. The genomes and transcriptomes of three Salicornia species have been sequenced. This information has been used to support the characterization of the salt-induced transcriptome of S. bigelovii shoots and the salt-induced proteome of various organellar membrane enriched fractions from S. bigelovii shoots, which led to the creation of organellar membrane proteomes. Yeast spot assays at different salt concentrations revealed several proteins increasing or decreasing yeast salt tolerance. This work aims to create the basis for

  9. Growth curve registration for evaluating salinity tolerance in barley

    KAUST Repository

    Meng, Rui

    2017-03-23

    Background: Smarthouses capable of non-destructive, high-throughput plant phenotyping collect large amounts of data that can be used to understand plant growth and productivity in extreme environments. The challenge is to apply the statistical tool that best analyzes the data to study plant traits, such as salinity tolerance, or plant-growth-related traits. Results: We derive family-wise salinity sensitivity (FSS) growth curves and use registration techniques to summarize growth patterns of HEB-25 barley families and the commercial variety, Navigator. We account for the spatial variation in smarthouse microclimates and in temporal variation across phenotyping runs using a functional ANOVA model to derive corrected FSS curves. From FSS, we derive corrected values for family-wise salinity tolerance, which are strongly negatively correlated with Na but not significantly with K, indicating that Na content is an important factor affecting salinity tolerance in these families, at least for plants of this age and grown in these conditions. Conclusions: Our family-wise methodology is suitable for analyzing the growth curves of a large number of plants from multiple families. The corrected curves accurately account for the spatial and temporal variations among plants that are inherent to high-throughput experiments.

  10. Antioxidant Defense Mechanisms of Salinity Tolerance in Rice Genotypes

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    Mohammad Golam Kibria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the role of antioxidant responses in salinity tolerance in rice genotypes under salt stress, experiments were conducted using four rice varieties, including salt-sensitive BRRI dhan 28 and three salt-tolerant varieties BRRI dhan 47, BINA dhan 8 and BINA dhan 10. Thirty-day-old rice seedlings were transplanted into pots. At the active tillering stage (35 d after transplanting, plants were exposed to different salinity levels (0, 20, 40 and 60 mmol/L NaCl. Salt stress caused a significant reduction in growth for all the rice genotypes. Growth reduction was higher in the salt-sensitive genotype than in the salt-tolerant ones, and BINA dhan 10 showed higher salt tolerance in all measured physiological parameters. The reduction in shoot and root biomass was found to be minimal in BINA dhan 10. Chlorophyll content significantly decreased under salt stress except for BINA dhan 10. Proline content significantly increased in salt-tolerant rice genotypes with increased salt concentration, and the highest proline content was obtained from BINA dhan 10 under salt stress. Catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities significantly decreased in salt-sensitive genotype whereas significantly increased in salt-tolerant ones with increasing salt concentration. However, salt stress significantly decreased guaiacol peroxidase activity in all the rice genotypes irrespective of salt tolerance. K+/Na+ ratio also significantly decreased in shoots and roots of all the rice genotypes. The salt-tolerant genotype BINA dhan 10 maintained higher levels of chlorophyll and proline contents as well as catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities under salt stress, thus, this might be the underlying mechanism for salt tolerance.

  11. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF SALINITY TOLERANCE IN PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Hakan TERZİ; CENKCİ, Süleyman; E. Suna ARIKAN TERZİ; Uruşak, Behiye

    2011-01-01

    Salt stress limits plant productivity in arid and semi arid regions. Salt stress causes decrease in plant growth by adversely affecting physiological processes, especially photosynthesis. Salinity tolerance is defined as the ability of plant to maintain normal rowth and development under salt conditions. Salt stress results in accumulation of low molecular weight compounds, termed compatible solutes, which do not interfere with the normal biochemical reactions. These compatible solutes such ...

  12. Evaluation of Different Rice Genotypes Tolerance to Saline Irrigation Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jafari Rad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the responses of seven rice genotypes (Khazar, SA13, Deylam, Sange Joe, Sepidrud, 831 and T5 to different levels of irrigation water salinity, and determining grain yield based on tolerance indices, a CRD based factorial pot experiment with five levels of irrigation water salinity (1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 dSm-1 and three replications was carried out at Rice Research Institute of Iran in 2011. Indices such as SSI, TOL, MP, GMP, HM, STI, YI and YSI were calculated and their correlations with grain yield were estimated for both stress and non-stress conditions. Results indicated significant differences among genotypes and the indices within both conditions. Results also showed that STI and MP indices could be considered as the best indices to screen salt tolerant genotypes. Among the genotypes used in the experiment, T5 produced the highest yield in both non-stress (19.71 g/plant and stress (10.69 g/plant conditions, while the lowest yield in normal (11.84 g/plant and stressful (4.29 g/plant conditions was recorded for Deylam and Khazar, respectively. The highest and the lowest percentage of yield reduction were found in Khazar (69.49% and Sange Joe (31.48% in stressful conditions, respectively. Overall, genotypes T5, 831, Sepidrud and Sange Joe can probably be considered as superior high yielding genotypes in both saline and non-saline conditions for further research.

  13. Optimizing silicon application to improve salinity tolerance in wheat

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    A. Ali

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Salinity often suppresses the wheat performance. As wheat is designated as silicon (Si accumulator, hence Si application may alleviate the salinity induced damages. With the objective to combat the salinity stress in wheat by Si application (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg L-1 using calcium silicate, an experiment was conducted on two contrasting wheat genotypes (salt sensitive; Auqab-2000 and salt tolerant; SARC-5 in salinized (10 dS m-1 and non-salinized (2 dS m-1 solutions. Plants were harvested 32 days after transplanting and evaluation was done on the basis of different morphological and analytical characters. Silicon supplementation into the solution culture improved wheat growth and K+/Na+ with reduced Na+ and enhanced K+ uptake. Concomitant improvement in shoot growth was observed; nonetheless the root growth remained unaffected by Si application. Better results were obtained with 150 and 200 mg L-1 of Si which were found almost equally effective. It was concluded that SARC-5 is better than Auqab-2000 against salt stress and Si inclusion into the solution medium is beneficial for wheat and can improve the crop growth both under optimal and salt stressful conditions.

  14. Early growth stages salinity stress tolerance in CM72 x Gairdner doubled haploid barley population

    OpenAIRE

    Angessa, Tefera Tolera; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Zhou, Gaofeng; Broughton, Sue; Zhang, Wenying; Li, Chengdao

    2017-01-01

    A doubled haploid (DH) population of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) generated from salinity tolerant genotype CM72 and salinity sensitive variety Gairdner was studied for salinity stress tolerance at germination, seedling emergence and first leaf full expansion growth stages. Germination study was conducted with deionized water, 150 mM and 300 mM NaCl treatments. Seedling stage salinity tolerance was conducted with three treatments: control, 150 mM NaCl added at seedling emergence and first leaf...

  15. Genotypic variation for salinity tolerance in Cenchrus ciliaris L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iftikhar Hussain

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Scarcity of irrigation water and increasing soil salinization has threatened the sustainability of forage production in arid and semi-arid region around the globe. Introduction of salt-tolerant perennial species is a promising alternative to overcome forage deficit to meet future livestock needs in salt-affected areas. This study presents the results of a salinity tolerance screening trial which was carried out in plastic pots buried in the open field for 160 buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L. accessions for three consecutive years (2003-2005. The plastic pots were filled with sand, organic, and peat moss mix and were irrigated with four different quality water (EC 0, 10, 15, and 20 dS m-1. The results indicate that the average annual dry weights (DW were in the range from 122.5 – 148.9 g pot-1 in control; 96.4 – 133.8 g pot-1 at 10 dS m-1; 65.6 – 80.4 g pot-1 at 15 dS m-1, and 55.4- 65.6 g pot-1 at 20 dS m-1. The highest DW (148.9 g pot-1 was found with accession 49 and the lowest with accession 23. Principle component analysis shows that PC-1 contributed 81.8 % of the total variability, while PC-2 depicted 11.7% of the total variation among C. ciliaris accessions for DW. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that a number of accessions collected from diverse regions could be grouped into a single cluster. Accessions 3, 133, 159, 30, 23, 142, 141, 95, 49, 129, 124, and 127 were stable, salt tolerant, and produced good dry biomass yield. These accessions demonstrate sufficient salinity tolerance potential for promotion in marginal land and arid regions to enhance farm productivity and reduce rural poverty.

  16. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF SALINITY TOLERANCE IN PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa YILDIZ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress limits plant productivity in arid and semi arid regions. Salt stress causes decrease in plant growth by adversely affecting physiological processes, especially photosynthesis. Salinity tolerance is defined as the ability of plant to maintain normal rowth and development under salt conditions. Salt stress results in accumulation of low molecular weight compounds, termed compatible solutes, which do not interfere with the normal biochemical reactions. These compatible solutes such as carbohydrates, polyols, amino acids and amides, quaternary ammonium compounds, polyamines andsoluble proteins may play a crucial role in osmotic adjustment, protection of macromolecules, maintenance of cellular pH and detoxification of free radicals. On the other hand, plants subjected to environmental stresses such as salinity produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and these ROS are efficiently eliminated by antioxidant enzyme systems. In plant breeding studies, the use of some physiological and biochemical markers for improving the salt tolerance in plants is crucial. In this review, the possibility of using some physiological and biochemical markers as selection criteria for salt tolerance is discussed.

  17. Understanding salinity responses and adopting ‘omics-based’ approaches to generate salinity tolerant cultivars of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Priyanka; Nutan, Kamlesh K.; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L.; Pareek, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity is one of the main constraints affecting production of rice worldwide, by reducing growth, pollen viability as well as yield of the plant. Therefore, detailed understanding of the response of rice towards soil salinity at the physiological and molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. Various approaches have been adopted by molecular biologists or breeders to understand the mechanism for salinity tolerance in plants and to develop salt tolerant rice cultivars. Genome wide analysis using ‘omics-based’ tools followed by identification and functional validation of individual genes is becoming one of the popular approaches to tackle this task. On the other hand, mutation breeding and insertional mutagenesis has also been exploited to obtain salinity tolerant crop plants. This review looks into various responses at cellular and whole plant level generated in rice plants toward salinity stress thus, evaluating the suitability of intervention of functional genomics to raise stress tolerant plants. We have tried to highlight the usefulness of the contemporary ‘omics-based’ approaches such as genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and phenomics towards dissecting out the salinity tolerance trait in rice. In addition, we have highlighted the importance of integration of various ‘omics’ approaches to develop an understanding of the machinery involved in salinity response in rice and to move forward to develop salt tolerant cultivars of rice. PMID:26442026

  18. Understanding Salinity Responses and Adopting ‘Omics-based’ Approaches to Generate Salinity Tolerant Cultivars of Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eDas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is one of the main constraints affecting production of rice worldwide, by reducing growth, pollen viability as well as yield of the plant. Therefore, detailed understanding of the response of rice towards soil salinity at the physiological and molecular level is a prerequisite for its effective management. Various approaches have been adopted by molecular biologists or breeders to understand the mechanism for salinity tolerance in plants and to develop salt tolerant rice cultivars. Genome wide analysis using ‘omics-based’ tools followed by identification and functional validation of individual genes is becoming one of the popular approaches to tackle this task. On the other hand, mutation breeding and insertional mutagenesis has also been exploited to obtain salinity tolerant crop plants. This review looks into various responses at cellular and whole plant level generated in rice plants towards salinity stress thus, evaluating the suitability of intervention of functional genomics to raise stress tolerant plants. We have tried to highlight the usefulness of the contemporary ‘omics-based’ approaches such as genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and phenomics towards dissecting out the salinity tolerance trait in rice. In addition, we have highlighted the importance of integration of various ‘omics’ approaches to develop an understanding of the machinery involved in salinity response in rice and to move forward to develop salt tolerant cultivars of rice.

  19. Differences in salinity tolerance and gene expression between two populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in response to salinity stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Foged; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Meier, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    in salinity tolerance and gene expression among Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from two populations distributed across a steep salinity gradient, we observed high mortality (45% North Sea cod and 80% Baltic Sea cod) in a reciprocal common garden setup. Quantitative RT-PCR assays for expression of hsp70 and Na....... The findings strongly suggest that Atlantic cod are adapted to local saline conditions, despite relatively low levels of neutral genetic divergence between populations...

  20. Mechanism of Salinity Tolerance in Plants: Physiological, Biochemical, and Molecular Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress limiting growth and productivity of plants in many areas of the world due to increasing use of poor quality of water for irrigation and soil salinization. Plant adaptation or tolerance to salinity stress involves complex physiological traits, metabolic pathways, and molecular or gene networks. A comprehensive understanding on how plants respond to salinity stress at different levels and an integrated approach of combining molecular tools with physiological and biochemical techniques are imperative for the development of salt-tolerant varieties of plants in salt-affected areas. Recent research has identified various adaptive responses to salinity stress at molecular, cellular, metabolic, and physiological levels, although mechanisms underlying salinity tolerance are far from being completely understood. This paper provides a comprehensive review of major research advances on biochemical, physiological, and molecular mechanisms regulating plant adaptation and tolerance to salinity stress. PMID:24804192

  1. Effect of salinity stress on growth and carbohydrate metabolism in three rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars differing in salinity tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanagul, Wattana; Thitisaksakul, Maysaya

    2008-10-01

    Rice seedlings cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 (salt-sensitive), Luang Anan (moderately salt-tolerant) and Pokkali (salt-tolerant) were exposed to 0, 50, 100 and 150 mM NaCI for 9 d. Salinity stress caused reduction in leaf relative water contents in all cultivars. Shoot length of cv. Pokkali was least affected by salinity stress whereas increased root length in response to salinity stress was apparent in cvs. Khao Dawk Mali 105 and Luang Anan. Increased salinity level also caused reduction in fresh and dry weights in cvs. Khao Dawk Mali 105 and Luang Anan, but had no effect in cv. Pokkali except at 150 mM. Accumulation of total soluble sugars and sucrose in mature leaves were observed in cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 exposed to high level of salinity whereas their concentrations in cvs. Luang Anan and Pokkali remained the same as control plants. Accumulation of sucrose in cv. Khao Dawk Mali 105 was suggested to be resulted from the alteration of photosynthate partitioning since the activities of sucrose phosphate synthase were not affected by salinity in this cultivar. On the contrary, salinity stress induced an accumulation of starch in cv. Pokkali. It is suggested that partitioning sugars into starch may involve in salinity tolerance by avoiding metabolic alterations.

  2. Comparatiave analysis of the grain proteome fraction in barley genotypes with contrasting salinity tolerance during germination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witzel, K.; Weidner, A.; Surabhi, G.K.; Varshney, R.K.; Kunze, G.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Börner, A.; Mock, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper, we based a search for candidates underlying different levels of salinity tolerance during germination in the Oregon Wolfe Barley mapping population (DOM × REC) by proteomic profiling of the mature grain of lines showing differing levels of salinity tolerance. By contrasting the

  3. Halotolerant rhizobacteria promote growth and enhance salinity tolerance in peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sharma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Use of Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR is a promising strategy to improve the crop production under optimal or sub-optimal conditions. In the present study, five diazotrophic salt tolerant bacteria were isolated from the roots of a halophyte, Arthrocnemum indicum. The isolates were partially characterized in vitro for plant growth promoting traits and evaluated for their potential to promote growth and enhanced salt tolerance in peanut. The 16S rRNA gene sequence homology indicated that these bacterial isolates belong to the genera, Klebisiella, Pseudomonas, Agrobacterium and Ochrobactrum. All isolates were nifH positive and able to produce indole -3-acetic acid (ranging from 11.5 to 19.1 µg ml-1. The isolates showed phosphate solubilisation activity (ranging from 1.4 to 55.6 µg phosphate /mg dry weight, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity (0.1 to 0.31 µmol α-kB/µg protein/h and were capable of reducing acetylene in acetylene reduction assay (ranging from 0.95 to 1.8 µmol C2H4 mg protein/h. These isolates successfully colonized the peanut roots and were capable of promoting the growth under non-stress condition. A significant increase in total nitrogen (N content (up to 76% was observed over the non-inoculated control. All isolates showed tolerance to NaCl ranging from 4-8% in nutrient broth medium. Under salt stress, inoculated peanut seedlings maintained ion homeostasis, accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS and showed enhanced growth compared to non-inoculated seedlings. Overall, the present study has characterized several potential bacterial strains that showed an enhanced growth promotion effect on peanut under control as well as saline conditions. The results show the possibility to reduce chemical fertilizer inputs and may promote the use of bio-inoculants.

  4. A Single Locus Is Responsible for Salinity Tolerance in a Chinese Landrace Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengdao; Johnson, Peter; Lu, Chao; Zhou, Meixue

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Salinity and waterlogging are two major abiotic stresses severely limiting barley production. The lack of a reliable screening method makes it very hard to improve the tolerance through breeding programs. Methods This work used 188 DH lines from a cross between a Chinese landrace variety, TX9425 (waterlogging and salinity tolerant), and a Japanese malting barley, Naso Nijo (waterlogging and salinity sensitive), to identify QTLs associated with the tolerance. Results Four QTLs were found for waterlogging tolerance. The salinity tolerance was evaluated with both a hydroponic system and in potting mixture. In the trial with potting mixture, only one major QTL was identified to associate with salinity tolerance. This QTL explained nearly 50% of the phenotypic variation, which makes it possible for further fine mapping and cloning of the gene. This QTL was also identified in the hydroponic experiment for different salt-related traits. The position of this QTL was located at a similar position to one of the major QTLs for waterlogging tolerance, indicating the possibility of similar mechanisms controlling both waterlogging and salinity tolerance. Conclusion The markers associated with the QTL provided a unique opportunity in breeding programs for selection of salinity and waterlogging tolerance. PMID:22916210

  5. Improving Tolerance of Faba Bean during Early Growth Stages to Salinity through Micronutrients Foliar Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. EL FOULY

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Salinity, either of soil or of irrigation water, causes disturbances in plant growth and nutrient balance. Previous work indicates that applying nutrients by foliar application increases tolerance to salinity. A pot experiment with three replicates was carried out in the green house of NRC, Cairo, Egypt, to study the effect of micronutrients foliar application on salt tolerance of faba bean. Two concentrations of a micronutrient compound (0.1% and 0.15% were sprayed in two different treatments prior to or after the salinity treatments. Levels of NaCl (0.00-1000-2000-5000 ppm were supplied to irrigation water. Results indicated that 2000 and 5000 ppm NaCl inhibited growth and nutrient uptake. Spraying micronutrients could restore the negative effect of salinity on dry weight and nutrients uptake, when sprayed either before or after the salinity treatments. It is suggested that micronutrient foliar sprays could be used to improve plant tolerance to salinity.

  6. Early growth stages salinity stress tolerance in CM72 x Gairdner doubled haploid barley population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angessa, Tefera Tolera; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Zhou, Gaofeng; Broughton, Sue; Zhang, Wenying; Li, Chengdao

    2017-01-01

    A doubled haploid (DH) population of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) generated from salinity tolerant genotype CM72 and salinity sensitive variety Gairdner was studied for salinity stress tolerance at germination, seedling emergence and first leaf full expansion growth stages. Germination study was conducted with deionized water, 150 mM and 300 mM NaCl treatments. Seedling stage salinity tolerance was conducted with three treatments: control, 150 mM NaCl added at seedling emergence and first leaf full expansion growth stages. Results from this study revealed transgressive phenotypic segregations for germination percentage and biomass at seedling stage. Twelve QTL were identified on chromosomes 2H-6H each explaining 10-25% of the phenotypic variations. A QTL located at 176.5 cM on chromosome 3H was linked with fresh weight per plant and dry weight per plant in salinity stress induced at first leaf full expansion growth stage, and dry weight per plant in salinity stress induced at seedling emergence. A stable QTL for germination at both 150 and 300 mM salinity stress was mapped on chromosome 2H but distantly located from a QTL linked with seedling stage salinity stress tolerance. QTL, associated markers and genotypes identified in this study play important roles in developing salinity stress tolerant barley varieties.

  7. Salinity tolerance of 'Valencia' orange trees on rootstocks with contrasting salt tolerance is not improved by moderate shade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, F; Syvertsen, J P; Martínez, V; Melgar, J C

    2006-01-01

    The effects of shading in combination with salinity treatments were studied in citrus trees on two rootstocks with contrasting salt tolerance to determine if shading could reduce the negative effects of salinity stress. Well-nourished 2-year-old 'Valencia' orange trees grafted on Cleopatra mandarin (Cleo, relatively salt tolerant) or Carrizo citrange (Carr, relatively salt sensitive), were grown either under a 50% shade cloth or left unshaded in full sunlight. Half the trees received no salinity treatment and half were salinized with 50 mM Cl- during two 9 week salinity periods in the spring and autumn interrupted by an 11 week rainy period. The shade treatment reduced midday leaf temperature and leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit regardless of salinity treatments. In non-salinized trees, shade increased midday CO2 assimilation rate (A(CO2)) and stomatal conductance, but had no effect on leaf transpiration (E(lf)). Shade also increased leaf chlorophyll and photosynthetic water use efficiency (A(CO2)/E(lf)) in leaves on both rootstocks and increased total plant dry weight in Cleo. The salinity treatment reduced leaf growth and leaf gas exchange parameters. Shade decreased Cl- concentrations in leaves of salinized Carr trees, but had no effect on leaf or root Cl- of trees on Cleo. There were no significant differences in leaf gas exchange parameters of shaded and unshaded salinized plants but the growth reduction from salinity stress was actually greater for shaded than for unshaded trees. Shaded trees on both rootstocks had higher leaf Na+ than unshaded trees after the first salinity period, and this shade-induced elevated leaf Na+ persisted after the second salinity period in trees on Carr. Thus, shading did not alleviate the negative effects of salinity on growth and Na+ accumulation.

  8. Aquatic insects in a multistress environment: cross-tolerance to salinity and desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallarés, Susana; Botella-Cruz, María; Arribas, Paula; Millán, Andrés; Velasco, Josefa

    2017-04-01

    Exposing organisms to a particular stressor may enhance tolerance to a subsequent stress, when protective mechanisms against the two stressors are shared. Such cross-tolerance is a common adaptive response in dynamic multivariate environments and often indicates potential co-evolution of stress traits. Many aquatic insects in inland saline waters from Mediterranean-climate regions are sequentially challenged with salinity and desiccation stress. Thus, cross-tolerance to these physiologically similar stressors could have been positively selected in insects of these regions. We used adults of the saline water beetles Enochrus jesusarribasi (Hydrophilidae) and Nebrioporus baeticus (Dytiscidae) to test cross-tolerance responses to desiccation and salinity. In independent laboratory experiments, we evaluated the effects of (i) salinity stress on the subsequent resistance to desiccation and (ii) desiccation stress (rapid and slow dehydration) on the subsequent tolerance to salinity. Survival, water loss and haemolymph osmolality were measured. Exposure to stressful salinity improved water control under subsequent desiccation stress in both species, with a clear cross-tolerance (enhanced performance) in N. baeticus In contrast, general negative effects on performance were found under the inverse stress sequence. The rapid and slow dehydration produced different water loss and haemolymph osmolality dynamics that were reflected in different survival patterns. Our finding of cross-tolerance to salinity and desiccation in ecologically similar species from distant lineages, together with parallel responses between salinity and thermal stress previously found in several aquatic taxa, highlights the central role of adaption to salinity and co-occurring stressors in arid inland waters, having important implications for the species' persistence under climate change. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Transcriptome analysis of salt tolerant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under saline conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hiz, Mahmut Can; Canher, Balkan; Niron, Harun; Turet, Muge

    2014-01-01

    .... Common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., a major protein source in developing countries, is highly affected by soil salinity and the information on genes that play a role in salt tolerance is scarce...

  10. Physiological and Growth Responses of Six Turfgrass Species Relative to Salinity Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamal Uddin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for salinity-tolerant turfgrasses is increasing due to augmented use of effluent or low-quality water (sea water for turf irrigation and the growing turfgrass industry in coastal areas. Experimental plants, grown in plastic pots filled with a mixture of river sand and KOSASR peat (9 : 1, were irrigated with sea water at different dilutions imparting salinity levels of 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, or 48 dS m-1. Salinity tolerance was evaluated on the basis of leaf firing, shoot and root growth reduction, proline content, and relative water content. Paspalum vaginatum was found to be most salt tolerant followed by Zoysia japonica and Zoysia matrella, while Digitaria didactyla, Cynodon dactylon “Tifdwarf,” and Cynodon dactylon “Satiri” were moderately tolerant. The results indicate the importance of turfgrass varietal selection for saline environments.

  11. The genetic basis of salinity tolerance traits in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glebe Brian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capacity to maintain internal ion homeostasis amidst changing conditions is particularly important for teleost fishes whose reproductive cycle is dependent upon movement from freshwater to seawater. Although the physiology of seawater osmoregulation in mitochondria-rich cells of fish gill epithelium is well understood, less is known about the underlying causes of inter- and intraspecific variation in salinity tolerance. We used a genome-scan approach in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus to map quantitative trait loci (QTL correlated with variation in four salinity tolerance performance traits and six body size traits. Comparative genomics approaches allowed us to infer whether allelic variation at candidate gene loci (e.g., ATP1α1b, NKCC1, CFTR, and cldn10e could have underlain observed variation. Results Combined parental analyses yielded genome-wide significant QTL on linkage groups 8, 14 and 20 for salinity tolerance performance traits, and on 1, 19, 20 and 28 for body size traits. Several QTL exhibited chromosome-wide significance. Among the salinity tolerance performance QTL, trait co-localizations occurred on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 18 and 20, while the greatest experimental variation was explained by QTL on chromosomes 20 (19.9%, 19 (14.2%, 4 (14.1% and 12 (13.1%. Several QTL localized to linkage groups exhibiting homeologous affinities, and multiple QTL mapped to regions homologous with the positions of candidate gene loci in other teleosts. There was no gene × environment interaction among body size QTL and ambient salinity. Conclusions Variation in salinity tolerance capacity can be mapped to a subset of Arctic charr genomic regions that significantly influence performance in a seawater environment. The detection of QTL on linkage group 12 was consistent with the hypothesis that variation in salinity tolerance may be affected by allelic variation at the ATP1α1b locus. IGF2 may also affect salinity tolerance

  12. Improving Tolerance of Faba Bean during Early Growth Stages to Salinity through Micronutrients Foliar Spray

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed M. EL FOULY; Zeinab M. MOBARAK; Zeinab A. SALAMA

    2010-01-01

    Salinity, either of soil or of irrigation water, causes disturbances in plant growth and nutrient balance. Previous work indicates that applying nutrients by foliar application increases tolerance to salinity. A pot experiment with three replicates was carried out in the green house of NRC, Cairo, Egypt, to study the effect of micronutrients foliar application on salt tolerance of faba bean. Two concentrations of a micronutrient compound (0.1% and 0.15%) were sprayed in two different treatmen...

  13. Salinity and temperature tolerance of an emergent alien species, the Amazon fish Astronotus ocellatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrel, Silvia M M; Schofield, Pam; Prodocimo, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    Astronotus ocellatus (oscar), is native to the Amazon basin and, although it has been introduced to many countries, little is known regarding its tolerances for salinity and temperature. In this report, we provide data on the tolerance of A. ocellatus to abrupt and gradual changes in salinity, its high and low temperature tolerance, and information on how salinity, temperature, and fish size interact to affect survival. Fish were able to survive abrupt transfer to salinities as high as 16 ppt with no mortality. When salinity change was gradual (2 ppt/day), fish in the warm-temperature experiment (28°C) survived longer than fish in the cool-temperature experiment (18°C). Larger fish survived longer than smaller ones at the higher salinities when the temperature was warm, but when the temperature was cool fish size had little effect on survival. In the temperature-tolerance experiments, fish survived from 9 to 41°C for short periods of time. Overall, the species showed a wide range of temperature and salinity tolerance. Thus, in spite of the tropical freshwater origin of this species, physiological stress is not likely to hinder its dispersal to brackish waters, especially when temperatures are warm.

  14. Salt tolerance of halophytes, research questions reviewed in the perspective of saline agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozema, J.; Schat, H.

    2013-01-01

    Halophytes of the lower coastal salt marsh show increased salt tolerance, and under high salinity they grow faster than upper marsh species. We could not show reduced growth rate of halophytes compared with glycophytes when grown under non-saline conditions. This indicates limited energy costs

  15. Role of mycorrhizal fungi and salicylic acid in salinity tolerance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinity is one of the common agricultural and biological problems. Most researchers showed that inoculation of plants with mycorrhizal fungi and using salicylic acid increase tolerance of plants due to salinity. In this study, the effect of mycorrhizal fungi, including Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices, and salicylic acid (0.2 ...

  16. Salinity tolerance of the South African endemic amphipod ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data are discussed in the context of the known ecology of this amphipod. Amphipods were exposed to salinities of 0–56 for 96 h. ... Synthetic sea salt can thus be used to manipulate the salinity of media for toxicity testing without it acting as a confounding variable. The tests performed also highlight the importance of ...

  17. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  18. Salinity and Temperature Tolerance Experiments on Selected Florida Bay Mollusks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James B.; Wingard, G. Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) is to restore and preserve the unique ecosystems of South Florida, including the estuaries. Understanding the effect of salinity and temperature changes, beyond typical oscillations, on the biota of South Florida's estuaries is a necessary component of achieving the goal of restoring the estuaries. The U.S. Geological Survey has been actively involved in researching the history of the South Florida Ecosystem, to provide targets, performance measures, and baseline data for restoration managers. These experiments addressed two aspects of ecosystem history research: 1) determining the utility of using molluscan shells as recorders of change in water chemistry parameters, primarily salinity, and 2) enhancing our in situ observations on modern assemblages by exceeding typically observed aquatic conditions. This set of experiments expanded our understanding of the effects of salinity, temperature and other water chemistry parameters on the reproduction, growth and overall survivability of key species of mollusks used in interpreting sediment core data. Observations on mollusks, plants and microbes made as part of these experiments have further refined our knowledge and understanding of the effects of ecosystem feedback and the role salinity and temperature play in ecosystem stability. The results have demonstrated the viability of several molluscan species as indicators of atypical salinity, and possibly temperature, modulations. For example Cerithium muscarum and Bulla striata demonstrated an ability to withstand a broad salinity and temperature range, with reproduction occurring in atypically high salinities and temperatures. These experiments also provided calibration data for the shell biogeochemistry of Chione cancellata and the possible use of this species as a water chemistry recorder. Observations made in the mesocosms, on a scale not normally observable in the field, have led to new

  19. Effects of Soil Salinity and Alkalinity on Grain Quality of Tolerant, Semi-Tolerant and Sensitive Rice Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. SUREKHA RAO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity and alkalinity adversely affects the productivity and grain quality of rice. The grain quality of 19 rice genotypes characterized as salt tolerant (T, semi-tolerant (ST and sensitive (S was assessed in lysimeters containing saline and highly alkaline soils. Head rice recovery was reduced by salinity stress whereas it was not affected by alkalinity stress. The ratio of length to width (grain dimensions was significantly reduced in the T genotype even at low electrical conductivity (EC, 4 mS/cm and alkalinity (pH 9.5, whereas in the ST genotype, it was significantly reduced at high salinity (EC 8 mS/cm. There was no significant effect of any levels of salinity or alkalinity on grain dimensions in the S genotype. Amylose content was significantly reduced in T and ST groups even at low EC (4 mS/cm and alkalinity (pH 9.5 and the effect in the S genotype was only at high salinity. Starch content showed significant reduction at high salinity and alkalinity (EC 8 mS/cm and pH 9.8 in the T and ST genotypes and no significant effect was observed in the S genotype. The effect of both levels of salinity (EC 4 and 8 mS/cm and high alkalinity (pH 9.8 on gel consistency was observed only in the S genotype. The tolerant genotypes IR36 under high salinity, and CSR10 and CSR11 under alkali stress showed less reduction in amylose content. The T genotype BR4-10, and ST genotypes CSR30, CSR29 and CSR13 showed better gel consistency under saline and alkali stress. Amylose content was affected even at low salinity stress and thus important to be considered in breeding rice for salt tolerance. Overall, the grain quality of T and ST genotypes was less affected by saline and alkali stress compared to S ones.

  20. An acanthocephalan parasite increases the salinity tolerance of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli (Crustacea: Gammaridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscart, Christophe; Webb, Dennis; Beisel, Jean Nicolas

    2007-09-01

    Studies of the influence of parasites on host fitness generally conclude that parasites have a strong negative effect on their hosts. In this study, we have investigated experimentally the role of Polymorphus minutus, an acanthocephalan parasite, on the salinity tolerance of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli, one of its intermediate hosts. Unexpectedly, P. minutus-infected gammarids were more tolerant to salinity stress than uninfected ones. The mean lethal salt concentrations for 50% mortality of hosts tested were 17.3 (infected) and 9.7 g/L (uninfected). The parasitic load (one or two parasites per host) did not affect the result. The size of hosts had no significant influence on the salinity tolerance of either infected or uninfected gammarids. The mobility of all types of gammarid decreased when the salinity exceeded 9.0 g/L, but there was no significant difference between infected and uninfected gammarids. We discuss the higher salinity tolerance of infected amphipods in relation to O2 consumption and osmoregulation. Finally, we demonstrate that the salinity tolerance is enhanced in the parasitized amphipod but without a significant change in behavior or an osmoregulatory adjustment.

  1. High salinity tolerance in eggs and fry of a brackish Esox lucius population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A.T.; Hansen, B.W.; Vismann, B.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge on the biology and physiology of pike, Esox lucius L., populations inhabiting saline environments is scarce. An experimental setup was used to examine egg development and fry behaviour and growth under varying salinity levels in a brackish-water pike population from the western Baltic Sea....... Eggs and fry developed at 8.5 psu, which is higher than hitherto reported for other populations. Fry exhibited stress behaviour and reduced growth when subjected to salinities above 13 psu. This indicates that early life stages of E. lucius tolerate ambient salinity conditions equivalent to the natural...

  2. Larval tolerance to salinity in three species of Australian anuran: an indication of saline specialisation in Litoria aurea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Kearney

    Full Text Available Recent anthropogenic influences on freshwater habitats are forcing anuran populations to rapidly adapt to high magnitude changes in environmental conditions or face local extinction. We examined the effects of ecologically relevant elevated salinity levels on larval growth, metamorphosis and survival of three species of Australian anuran; the spotted marsh frog (Limnodynastes tasmaniensis, the painted burrowing frog (Neobatrachus sudelli and the green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea, in order to better understand the responses of these animals to environmental change. Elevated salinity (16% seawater negatively impacted on the survival of L. tasmaniensis (35% survival and N sudelli (0% survival, while reduced salinity had a negative impact on L. aurea. (16% seawater: 85% survival; 0.4% seawater: 35% survival. L. aurea tadpoles survived in salinities much higher than previously reported for this species, indicating the potential for inter-populations differences in salinity tolerance. In L. tasmaniensis and L. aurea, development to metamorphosis was fastest in low and high salinity treatments suggesting it is advantageous for tadpoles to invest energy in development in both highly favourable and developmentally challenging environments. We propose that this response might either maximise potential lifetime fecundity when tadpoles experience favourable environments, or, facilitate a more rapid escape from pond environments where there is a reduced probability of survival.

  3. Salinity tolerance of Picochlorum atomus and the use of salinity for contamination control by the freshwater cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena limnetica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas von Alvensleben

    Full Text Available Microalgae are ideal candidates for waste-gas and -water remediation. However, salinity often varies between different sites. A cosmopolitan microalga with large salinity tolerance and consistent biochemical profiles would be ideal for standardised cultivation across various remediation sites. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of salinity on Picochlorum atomus growth, biomass productivity, nutrient uptake and biochemical profiles. To determine if target end-products could be manipulated, the effects of 4-day nutrient limitation were also determined. Culture salinity had no effect on growth, biomass productivity, phosphate, nitrate and total nitrogen uptake at 2, 8, 18, 28 and 36 ppt. 11 ppt, however, initiated a significantly higher total nitrogen uptake. While salinity had only minor effects on biochemical composition, nutrient depletion was a major driver for changes in biomass quality, leading to significant increases in total lipid, fatty acid and carbohydrate quantities. Fatty acid composition was also significantly affected by nutrient depletion, with an increased proportion of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Having established that P. atomus is a euryhaline microalga, the effects of culture salinity on the development of the freshwater cyanobacterial contaminant Pseudanabaena limnetica were determined. Salinity at 28 and 36 ppt significantly inhibited establishment of P. limnetica in P. atomus cultures. In conclusion, P. atomus can be deployed for bioremediation at sites with highly variable salinities without effects on end-product potential. Nutrient status critically affected biochemical profiles--an important consideration for end-product development by microalgal industries. 28 and 36 ppt slow the establishment of the freshwater cyanobacterium P. limnetica, allowing for harvest of low contaminant containing biomass.

  4. Linking salinity stress tolerance with tissue-specific Na+ sequestration in wheat roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghong eWu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Salinity stress tolerance is a physiologically complex trait that is conferred by the large array of interacting mechanisms. Among these, vacuolar Na+ sequestration has always been considered as one of the key components differentiating between sensitive and tolerant species and genotypes. However, vacuolar Na+ sequestration has been rarely considered in the context of the tissue-specific expression and regulation of appropriate transporters contributing to Na+ removal from the cytosol. In this work, six bread wheat varieties contrasting in their salinity tolerance (three tolerant and three sensitive were used to understand the essentiality of vacuolar Na+ sequestration between functionally different root tissues, and link it with the overall salinity stress tolerance in this species. Roots of 4-d old wheat seedlings were treated with 100 mM NaCl for 3 days, and then Na+ distribution between cytosol and vacuole was quantified by CoroNa Green fluorescent dye imaging. Our major observations were as follows: 1 salinity stress tolerance correlated positively with vacuolar Na+ sequestration ability in the mature root zone but not in the root apex; 2 Contrary to expectations, cytosolic Na+ levels in root meristem were significantly higher in salt tolerant than sensitive group, while vacuolar Na+ levels showed an opposite trend. These results are interpreted as meristem cells playing a role of the salt sensor; 3 No significant difference in the vacuolar Na+ sequestration ability was found between sensitive and tolerant group in either transition or elongation zones; 4 The overall Na+ accumulation was highest in the elongation zone, suggesting its role in osmotic adjustment and turgor maintenance required to drive root expansion growth. Overall, the reported results suggest high tissue-specificity of Na+ uptake, signalling, and sequestration in wheat root. The implications of these findings for plant breeding for salinity stress tolerance are discussed.

  5. Salinity tolerance of non-native suckermouth armoured catfish (Loricariidae: Pterygoplichthys sp.) from Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A. Biju; Schofield, Pam; Raj, Smrithy; Satheesh, Sima

    2018-01-01

    Loricariid catfishes of the genus Pterygoplichthys are native to South America and have been introduced in many localities around the world. They are freshwater fishes, but may also use low-salinity habitats such as estuaries for feeding or dispersal. Here we report results of a field survey and salinity-tolerance experiments for a population of Pterygoplichthys sp. collected in Kerala, India. In both chronic and acute salinity-tolerance trials, fish were able to withstand salinities up to 12 ppt with no mortality; however, fish transferred to salinities > 12 ppt did not survive. The experimental results provide evidence that nonnative Pterygoplichthys sp. are able to tolerate mesohaline conditions for extended periods, and can easily invade the brackish water ecosystems of the state. Further, Pterygoplichthys sp. from Kerala have greater salinity tolerance than other congeners. These data are vital to predicting the invasion of non-native fishes such as Pterygoplichthys spp. into coastal systems in Kerala and worldwide. This is particularly important as estuarine ecosystems are under threat of global climate change and sea-level rise. In light of the results of the present study and considering the reports of negative impacts of the species in invaded water bodies, management authorities may consider controlling populations and/or instituting awareness programmes to prevent the spread of this nuisance aquatic invasive species in Kerala.

  6. Tolerância da cultura do tomate à salinidade do solo em ambiente protegido Tolerance of tomato crop to salinity of soil in protected ambient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro R. F. Medeiros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o intuito de contribuir com os dados disponíveis na literatura sobre tolerância das culturas à salinidade do solo oriunda de sais fertilizantes, o presente trabalho tem, como objetivo, determinar a tolerância da cultura do tomate a salinidade do solo, a partir de dois manejos de fertirrigação e seis níveis iniciais de salinidade (1,0; 2,0; 3,0; 4,0; 5,0 e 6,0 dS m-1 a partir das variáveis produção e componentes de produção, em ambiente protegido com solo franco-argiloso. O experimento foi realizado no Departamento de Engenharia de Biossistemas da ESALQ/USP, Piracicaba,SP. O delineamento estatístico foi aleatorizado em blocos, com 4 repetições, concluindo que a produção e os componentes de produção da cultura do tomate foram afetados estatisticamente, tanto pelo tipo de manejo de fertirrigação quanto pelos níveis de salinidade do solo, com redução na tolerância da cultura do tomate, passando a ser classificada sensível à salinidade do solo.In order to contribute to data available in the literature on tolerance of crops to soil salinity derived from fertilizer salts, the present study aims to determine the tolerance of tomato crop to the soil salinity, based on two managements of fertirrigation and six initial levels of salinity (1.0; 2.0; 3.0; 4.0; 5.0 and 6.0 dS m-1 from the variables production and components of production, in a protected environment with sandy-clay soil. The experiment was conducted at the Department of Biosystems Engineering of ESALQ/USP, Piracicaba/SP. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, with 4 repetitions. Concluding that the production and the components of production of tomato crop were significantly affected both by the type of management of fertirrigation and by the levels of soil salinity, with a reduction in the tolerance of tomato crop, being classified as sensitive to soil salinity.

  7. Potassium Retention under Salt Stress Is Associated with Natural Variation in Salinity Tolerance among Arabidopsis Accessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Sun

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to various environmental stresses during their life cycle such as salt, drought and cold. Natural variation mediated plant growth adaptation has been employed as an effective approach in response to the diverse environmental cues such as salt stress. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. In the present study, a collection of 82 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions (ecotypes was screened with a view to identify variation for salinity tolerance. Seven accessions showed a higher level of tolerance than Col-0. The young seedlings of the tolerant accessions demonstrated a higher K(+ content and a lower Na(+/K(+ ratio when exposed to salinity stress, but its Na(+ content was the same as that of Col-0. The K(+ transporter genes AtHAK5, AtCHX17 and AtKUP1 were up-regulated significantly in almost all the tolerant accessions, even in the absence of salinity stress. There was little genetic variation or positive transcriptional variation between the selections and Col-0 with respect to Na+-related transporter genes, as AtSOS genes, AtNHX1 and AtHKT1;1. In addition, under salinity stress, these selections accumulated higher compatible solutes and lower reactive oxygen species than did Col-0. Taken together, our results showed that natural variation in salinity tolerance of Arabidopsis seems to have been achieved by the strong capacity of K(+ retention.

  8. Environmental tolerances of rare and common mangroves along light and salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangremond, Emily M; Feller, Ilka C; Sousa, Wayne P

    2015-12-01

    Although mangroves possess a variety of morphological and physiological adaptations for life in a stressful habitat, interspecific differences in survival and growth under different environmental conditions can shape their local and geographic distributions. Soil salinity and light are known to affect mangrove performance, often in an interactive fashion. It has also been hypothesized that mangroves are intrinsically shade intolerant due to the high physiological cost of coping with saline flooded soils. To evaluate the relationship between stress tolerance and species distributions, we compared responses of seedlings of three widespread mangrove species and one narrow endemic mangrove species in a factorial array of light levels and soil salinities in an outdoor laboratory experiment. The more narrowly distributed species was expected to exhibit a lower tolerance of potentially stressful conditions. Two of the widespread species, Avicennia germinans and Lumnitzera racemosa, survived and grew well at low-medium salinity, regardless of light level, but performed poorly at high salinity, particularly under high light. The third widespread species, Rhizophora mangle, responded less to variation in light and salinity. However, at high salinity, its relative growth rate was low at every light level and none of these plants flushed leaves. As predicted, the rare species, Pelliciera rhizophorae, was the most sensitive to environmental stressors, suffering especially high mortality and reduced growth and quantum yield under the combined conditions of high light and medium-high salinity. That it only thrives under shaded conditions represents an important exception to the prevailing belief that halophytes are intrinsically constrained to be shade intolerant.

  9. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Enhance Salinity Stress Tolerance in Okra through ROS-Scavenging Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Hasna Habib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is a major environmental stress that limits crop production worldwide. In this study, we characterized plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC deaminase and examined their effect on salinity stress tolerance in okra through the induction of ROS-scavenging enzyme activity. PGPR inoculated okra plants exhibited higher germination percentage, growth parameters, and chlorophyll content than control plants. Increased antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, APX, and CAT and upregulation of ROS pathway genes (CAT, APX, GR, and DHAR were observed in PGPR inoculated okra plants under salinity stress. With some exceptions, inoculation with Enterobacter sp. UPMR18 had a significant influence on all tested parameters under salt stress, as compared to other treatments. Thus, the ACC deaminase-containing PGPR isolate Enterobacter sp. UPMR18 could be an effective bioresource for enhancing salt tolerance and growth of okra plants under salinity stress.

  10. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Enhance Salinity Stress Tolerance in Okra through ROS-Scavenging Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Sheikh Hasna; Kausar, Hossain; Saud, Halimi Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major environmental stress that limits crop production worldwide. In this study, we characterized plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase and examined their effect on salinity stress tolerance in okra through the induction of ROS-scavenging enzyme activity. PGPR inoculated okra plants exhibited higher germination percentage, growth parameters, and chlorophyll content than control plants. Increased antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, APX, and CAT) and upregulation of ROS pathway genes (CAT, APX, GR, and DHAR) were observed in PGPR inoculated okra plants under salinity stress. With some exceptions, inoculation with Enterobacter sp. UPMR18 had a significant influence on all tested parameters under salt stress, as compared to other treatments. Thus, the ACC deaminase-containing PGPR isolate Enterobacter sp. UPMR18 could be an effective bioresource for enhancing salt tolerance and growth of okra plants under salinity stress.

  11. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Enhance Salinity Stress Tolerance in Okra through ROS-Scavenging Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Habib, Sheikh Hasna; Kausar, Hossain; Saud, Halimi Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major environmental stress that limits crop production worldwide. In this study, we characterized plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase and examined their effect on salinity stress tolerance in okra through the induction of ROS-scavenging enzyme activity. PGPR inoculated okra plants exhibited higher germination percentage, growth parameters, and chlorophyll content than control plants. Increased antioxidant enzym...

  12. Salinity tolerance of larvae of African catfish Clarias gariepinus ( ) X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fourteen and twenty one day larvae were exposed to abrupt stepwise change in salinity (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 ppt) for 96 hours to determine mortality, median lethal mortality, MLS and median lethal time, MLT. The fourteen day-old fry that were exposed to 0 – 6 ppt recorded 90%, 87.5% 77.5% and 10% survival at the end of ...

  13. Effect on Soil Properties of BcWRKY1 Transgenic Maize with Enhanced Salinity Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize (Zea mays L. is the most important cereal crop in the world. However, soil salinity has become a major problem affecting plant productivity due to arable field degradation. Thus, transgenic maize transformed with a salinity tolerance gene has been developed to further evaluate its salt tolerance and effects on agronomic traits. It is necessary to analyze the potential environmental risk of transgenic maize before further commercialization. Enzyme activities, physicochemical properties, and microbial populations were evaluated in saline and nonsaline rhizosphere soils from a transgenic maize line (WL-73 overexpressing BcWRKY1 and from wild-type (WT maize LH1037. Measurements were taken at four growth stages (V3, V9, R1, and R6 and repeated in three consecutive years (2012–2014. There was no change in the rhizosphere soils of either WL-73 or WT plants in the four soil enzyme activities, seven soil physicochemical properties, and the populations of three soil organisms. The results of this study suggested that salinity tolerant transgenic maize had no adverse impact on soil properties in soil rhizosphere during three consecutive years at two different locations and provided a theoretical basis for environmental impact monitoring of salinity tolerant transgenic maize.

  14. Deciphering the salinity adaptation mechanism in Penicilliopsis clavariiformis AP, a rare salt tolerant fungus from mangrove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Prem Lal; Rai, Anuradha; Singh, Ruchi; Chakdar, Hillol; Kumar, Sudheer; Srivastava, Alok Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliopsis clavariiformis AP, a rare salt tolerant fungus reported for the first time from India was identified through polyphasic taxonomy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the fungus has unique features such as biverticillate penicilli bearing masses of oval to ellipsoidal conidia. The fungus has been characterized for salt tolerance and to understand the relevance of central carbon metabolism in salt stress adaptation. It showed optimal growth at 24 °C and able to tolerate up to 10% (w/v) NaCl. To understand the mechanism of adaptation to high salinity, activities of the key enzymes regulating glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle were investigated under normal (0% NaCl) and saline stress environment (10% NaCl). The results revealed a re-routing of carbon metabolism away from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), served as a cellular stress-resistance mechanism in fungi under saline environment. The detection and significant expression of fungus genes (Hsp98, Hsp60, HTB, and RHO) under saline stress suggest that these halotolerance conferring genes from the fungus could have a role in fungus protection and adaptation under saline environment. Overall, the present findings indicate that the rearrangement of the metabolic fluxes distribution and stress related genes play an important role in cell survival and adaptation under saline environment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mechanisms of Soybean Roots' Tolerances to Salinity Revealed by Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparisons Between Two Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Erxu; Qu, Liqun; Hu, Jianwen; Huang, Yingying; Qiu, Lijuan; Lu, Hongfei; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Cong; Peng, Tingting; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Huizhong; Tsai, Sau-Na; Ngai, Saiming; Du, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms underlying plant salinity tolerance provides valuable knowledgebase for effective crop improvement through genetic engineering. Current proteomic technologies, which support reliable and high-throughput analyses, have been broadly used for exploring sophisticated molecular networks in plants. In the current study, we compared phosphoproteomic and proteomic changes in roots of different soybean seedlings of a salt-tolerant cultivar (Wenfeng07) and a salt-sensitive cultivar (Union85140) induced by salt stress. The root samples of Wenfeng07 and Union85140 at three-trifoliate stage were collected at 0 h, 0.5 h, 1 h, 4 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h after been treated with 150 mm NaCl. LC-MS/MS based phosphoproteomic analysis of these samples identified a total of 2692 phosphoproteins and 5509 phosphorylation sites. Of these, 2344 phosphoproteins containing 3744 phosphorylation sites were quantitatively analyzed. Our results showed that 1163 phosphorylation sites were differentially phosphorylated in the two compared cultivars. Among them, 10 MYB/MYB transcription factor like proteins were identified with fluctuating phosphorylation modifications at different time points, indicating that their crucial roles in regulating flavonol accumulation might be mediated by phosphorylated modifications. In addition, the protein expression profiles of these two cultivars were compared using LC MS/MS based shotgun proteomic analysis, and expression pattern of all the 89 differentially expressed proteins were independently confirmed by qRT-PCR. Interestingly, the enzymes involved in chalcone metabolic pathway exhibited positive correlations with salt tolerance. We confirmed the functional relevance of chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes using soybean composites and Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, and found that their salt tolerance were positively regulated by chalcone synthase, but was negatively regulated by

  16. Multivariate analysis of germination ability and tolerance to salinity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, germination ability and salt stress tolerance of Agropyron desertorum were evaluated using ten genotypes originally collected from different areas of Iran in greenhouse condition. Five different concentrations of NaCl solution were used in this experiment. Analysis of variance showed considerable variation in all the ...

  17. New evidence of QTLs attributed to salinity tolerance in rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An F2:3 population derived from the cross between Tarommahalli (indica) and Khazar (indica) was used to mapping salt tolerance in rice. The linkage map constructed by 74 simple sequence repeat (SSR) molecular markers covered a total of about 1231.50 cM rice genome. Plant stand, chlorophyll content, root and shoot ...

  18. Genome-wide association mapping of salinity tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Anshuman; Mithra, S V Amitha; Krishnamurthy, S L; Parida, Swarup K; Jain, Sourabh; Tiwari, Kapil K; Kumar, Pankaj; Rao, Atmakuri R; Sharma, S K; Khurana, Jitendra P; Singh, Nagendra K; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2015-04-01

    Salinity tolerance in rice is highly desirable to sustain production in areas rendered saline due to various reasons. It is a complex quantitative trait having different components, which can be dissected effectively by genome-wide association study (GWAS). Here, we implemented GWAS to identify loci controlling salinity tolerance in rice. A custom-designed array based on 6,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in as many stress-responsive genes, distributed at an average physical interval of rice chromosomes, was used to genotype 220 rice accessions using Infinium high-throughput assay. Genetic association was analysed with 12 different traits recorded on these accessions under field conditions at reproductive stage. We identified 20 SNPs (loci) significantly associated with Na(+)/K(+) ratio, and 44 SNPs with other traits observed under stress condition. The loci identified for various salinity indices through GWAS explained 5-18% of the phenotypic variance. The region harbouring Saltol, a major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosome 1 in rice, which is known to control salinity tolerance at seedling stage, was detected as a major association with Na(+)/K(+) ratio measured at reproductive stage in our study. In addition to Saltol, we also found GWAS peaks representing new QTLs on chromosomes 4, 6 and 7. The current association mapping panel contained mostly indica accessions that can serve as source of novel salt tolerance genes and alleles. The gene-based SNP array used in this study was found cost-effective and efficient in unveiling genomic regions/candidate genes regulating salinity stress tolerance in rice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  19. Genome-wide association mapping of salinity tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Anshuman; Mithra, S. V. Amitha; Krishnamurthy, S. L.; Parida, Swarup K.; Jain, Sourabh; Tiwari, Kapil K.; Kumar, Pankaj; Rao, Atmakuri R.; Sharma, S. K.; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Singh, Nagendra K.; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2015-01-01

    Salinity tolerance in rice is highly desirable to sustain production in areas rendered saline due to various reasons. It is a complex quantitative trait having different components, which can be dissected effectively by genome-wide association study (GWAS). Here, we implemented GWAS to identify loci controlling salinity tolerance in rice. A custom-designed array based on 6,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in as many stress-responsive genes, distributed at an average physical interval of rice chromosomes, was used to genotype 220 rice accessions using Infinium high-throughput assay. Genetic association was analysed with 12 different traits recorded on these accessions under field conditions at reproductive stage. We identified 20 SNPs (loci) significantly associated with Na+/K+ ratio, and 44 SNPs with other traits observed under stress condition. The loci identified for various salinity indices through GWAS explained 5–18% of the phenotypic variance. The region harbouring Saltol, a major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosome 1 in rice, which is known to control salinity tolerance at seedling stage, was detected as a major association with Na+/K+ ratio measured at reproductive stage in our study. In addition to Saltol, we also found GWAS peaks representing new QTLs on chromosomes 4, 6 and 7. The current association mapping panel contained mostly indica accessions that can serve as source of novel salt tolerance genes and alleles. The gene-based SNP array used in this study was found cost-effective and efficient in unveiling genomic regions/candidate genes regulating salinity stress tolerance in rice. PMID:25627243

  20. Selection of high temperature and salinity tolerant Trichoderma isolates with antagonistic activity against Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosapati, Sowmya; Ravulapalli, Prasad Durga; Tippirishetty, Navaneetha; Vishwanathaswamy, Dinesh Kumar; Chunduri, Sarada

    2014-01-01

    Trichoderma isolates were collected from varied agro-climatic zones of India and screened for high temperature and salinity tolerance. Among all the isolates tested, T. asperellum, TaDOR673 was highly tolerant to heat shock of 52°C with a mean spore count (log c.f.u/ml) of 4.33. The isolate after recovery from heat shock possessed higher germination rate and biomass production compared to its wild counterpart, upon prolonged exposure to 37°C. Under stress, TaDOR673 accumulated >15% of trehalose and >5% of mannose and raffinose compared to the wild type strain signifying their role in stress tolerance. T. asperellum, TaDOR693 and T. asperellum, TaDORS3 were identified as superior salt-tolerant isolates. Interestingly, TaDOR673 also possessed similar tolerance levels to increasing saline concentrations as indicated by its improved colony growth under stress conditions. T. asperellum, TaDOR673 and T. asperellum, TaDOR7316 effectively controlled the collar rot disease in groundnut by 79.7% when screened in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the study identified a potential thermotolerant and saline tolerant strain of Trichoderma, TaDOR673 that could be used as potential bioagent in stressed soils.

  1. Selection of Rice Genotypes for Salinity Tolerance Through Morpho-Biochemical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nasim ALI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study reported the morpho-biochemical evaluation of 15 selected rice genotypes for salt tolerance at the seedling stage. Growth parameters including shoot length, root length, plant biomass, plant turgid weight, plant dry weight along with relative water content were measured after exposure to saline solution (with electrical conductivity value of 12 dS/m. Genotypes, showing significant differential responses towards salinity in the fields, were assessed through 14 salinity-linked morpho-biochemical attributes, measured at 14 d after exposure of seedling in saline nutrient solution. Relative water content, chlorophyll a/b, peroxidase activity and plant biomass were identified as potential indicators of salt tolerance. Principal component analysis and successive Hierarchical clustering using Euclidean distance revealed that Talmugur, Gheus, Ghunsi, Langalmura, Sabitapalui, and Sholerpona were promising genotypes for further breeding programmes in rice. The maximum Euclidean distance was plotted between Thavallakanan and Talmugur (7.49, followed by Thavallakanan and Langalmura (6.82, indicating these combinations may be exploited as parental lines in hybridization programmes to develop salinity tolerant variety.

  2. Advances in functional genomics for investigating salinity stress tolerance mechanisms in cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan C Shelden

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as low water availability and high salinity are major causes of cereal crop yield losses and significantly impact on sustainability. Wheat and barley are two of the most important cereal crops (after maize and rice and are grown in increasingly hostile environments with soil salinity and drought both expected to increase this century, reducing the availability of arable land. Barley and wheat are classified as glycophytes (salt-sensitive, yet they are more salt-tolerant than other cereal crops such as rice and so are good models for studying salt-tolerance in cereals. The exploitation of genetic variation of phenotypic traits through plant breeding could significantly improve growth of cereals in salinity-affected regions, thus leading to improved crop yields. Genetic variation in phenotypic traits for abiotic stress tolerance have been identified in land races and wild germplasm but the molecular basis of these differences is often difficult to determine due to the complex genetic nature of these species. High-throughput functional genomics technologies, such as transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics and ionomics are powerful tools for investigating the molecular responses of plants to abiotic stress. The advancement of these technologies has allowed for the identification and quantification of transcript /metabolites in specific cell types and/or tissues. Using these new technologies on plants will provide a powerful tool to uncovering genetic traits in more complex species such as wheat and barley and provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of salinity stress tolerance.

  3. Physiological processes associated with salinity tolerance in an alfalfa half-sib family

    Science.gov (United States)

    We prevously reported an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) half-sib (HS) family, HS-B, with improved salt tolerance. In this study, we showed that HS-B produced 86 and 90% greater shoot and root dry biomass, respectively compared to P-B (parental) plants under salinity stress in the greenhouse. Under s...

  4. Multiple PLDs required for high salinity and water deficit tolerance in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bargmann, B.O.R.; Laxalt, A.M.; ter Riet, B.; van Schooten, B.; Merquiol, E.; Testerink, C.; Haring, M.A.; Bartels, D.; Munnik, T.

    2009-01-01

    High salinity and drought have received much attention because they severely affect crop production worldwide. Analysis and comprehension of the plant's response to excessive salt and dehydration will aid in the development of stress-tolerant crop varieties. Signal transduction lies at the basis of

  5. Ocean acidification narrows the acute thermal and salinity tolerance of the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Laura M; Scanes, Elliot; O'Connor, Wayne A; Coleman, Ross A; Byrne, Maria; Pörtner, Hans-O; Ross, Pauline M

    2017-09-15

    Coastal and estuarine environments are characterised by acute changes in temperature and salinity. Organisms living within these environments are adapted to withstand such changes, yet near-future ocean acidification (OA) may challenge their physiological capacity to respond. We tested the impact of CO 2 -induced OA on the acute thermal and salinity tolerance, energy metabolism and acid-base regulation capacity of the oyster Saccostrea glomerata. Adult S. glomerata were acclimated to three CO 2 levels (ambient 380μatm, moderate 856μatm, high 1500μatm) for 5weeks (24°C, salinity 34.6) before being exposed to a series of acute temperature (15-33°C) and salinity (34.2-20) treatments. Oysters acclimated to elevated CO 2 showed a significant metabolic depression and extracellular acidosis with acute exposure to elevated temperature and reduced salinity, especially at the highest CO 2 of 1500μatm. Our results suggest that the acute thermal and salinity tolerance of S. glomerata and thus its distribution will reduce as OA continues to worsen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tolerance of combined submergence and salinity in the halophytic stem-succulent Tecticornia pergranulata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, T D; Vos, H; Pedersen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    in waters of high salinity. A 'quiescence response', i.e. no shoot growth, would conserve carbohydrates, but tissue sugars still declined with time. A low K(+) : Na(+) ratio, typical for tissues of succulent halophytes, was tolerated even during prolonged submergence, as evidenced by maintenance......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Habitats occupied by many halophytes are not only saline, but are also prone to flooding. Few studies have evaluated submergence tolerance in halophytes. METHODS: Responses to submergence, at a range of salinity levels, were studied for the halophytic stem-succulent Tecticornia...... pergranulata subsp. pergranulata (syn. Halosarcia pergranulata subsp. pergranulata). Growth and total sugars in succulent stems were assessed as a function of time after submergence. Underwater net photosynthesis, dark respiration, total sugars, glycinebetaine, Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+), in succulent stems, were...

  7. Evaluating relative contribution of osmotolerance and tissue tolerance mechanisms toward salinity stress tolerance in three Brassica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Eyles, Alieta; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    Three different species of Brassica, with differential salt sensitivity were used to understand physiological mechanisms of salt tolerance operating in these species and to evaluate the relative contribution of different strategies to cope with salt load. Brassica napus was the most tolerant species in terms of the overall performance, with Brassica juncea and Brassica oleracea being much more sensitive to salt stress with no obvious difference between them. While prominent reduction in net CO2 assimilation was observed in both sensitive species, physiological mechanisms beyond this reduction differed strongly. Brassica juncea plants possessed high osmotolerance and were able to maintain high transpiration rate but showed a significant reduction in leaf chlorophyll content and efficiency of leaf photochemistry. On the contrary, B. oleracea plants possessed the highest (among the three species) tissue tolerance but showed a very significant stomatal limitation of photosynthesis. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that the high tissue tolerance in B. oleracea was related to the ability of leaf mesophyll cells to maintain highly negative membrane potential in the presence of high apoplastic Na(+) . In addition to high osmotolerance, the most tolerant B. napus showed also lesser accumulation of toxic Na(+) and Cl(-) in the leaf, possessed moderate tissue tolerance and had a superior K(+) retention ability. Taken together, the results from this study indicate that the three Brassica species employ very different mechanisms to cope with salinity and, despite its overall sensitivity to salinity, B. oleracea could be recommended as a valuable 'donor' of tissue tolerance genes to confer this trait for marker-assisted breeding programs. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Physiological Response to Salinity and Alkalinity of Rice Genotypes of Varying Salt Tolerance Grown in Field Lysimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Rao, P.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity and alkalinity seriously threaten rice production in south Asia. Improving screening methodologies to identify sources of tolerance for improved breeding for salt tolerant rice is of continuing importance. Rice genotypes of varying salt tolerance, such as tolerant (T, semi-tolerant (ST, and sensitive (S, were grown in field lysimeters in saline soil of ECe 4 and 8 mS cm-1 and alkali soil of pH 9.5 and 9.8 in North India and analyzed for chlorophyll (Chl, sugar, starch and proline in leaves. Chlorophyll a and b decreased due to salinity in all the tolerance groups. However, Chl a was not much affected but chl b increased with alkalinity. Under high stress both at ECe 8 and pH 9.8 Chl a and b were more in tolerant than in sensitive genotypes. The ratio of Chl a/b was similar in T, ST and S genotypes under salinity stress. Sugar accumulation was higher in T compared to S under normal conditions but under salinity or alkalinity stress the differences were not significant. Leaf starch was highest in T, intermediate in ST and lowest in S genotypes in normal as well as under salinity and alkalinity stress. There was decrease in starch with salinity and alkalinity stress only in T group but not in ST and S group. Proline increased significantly in all the tolerance groups even at low salinity of ECe 4 mS cm -1 or pH 9.5. The salt tolerant genotypes of rice maintained higher levels of Chl a and b, starch and proline under high salinity and alkalinity stress and are the robust criteria for tolerating high salinity and alkalinity.

  9. Salinity Stress Tolerance Of Camelina Investigated In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid H.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Camelina sativa to withstand salinity stress in vitro by adding NaCl (0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200mM in Murashige and Skoog basal medium was studied. Performance of the plants was measured in terms of various growth parameters and physiological and biochemical tests performed on fully grown plants. The germination capacity, cotyledon unfolding and first true leaf emergence was reduced by 30.6, 17.3, and 28.8%, respectively in 200mM salt treatment with respect to control. The plant height, relative water content, and plant water content were decreased by 85.4, 10.8, and 9.8%, respectively, in stressed plants with respect to control. A decrease in chlorophyll a and b and total chlorophyll contents (by 81.3%, as well as of protein content was registered. Electrical conductivity increased by 52.8% in stressed plants over control, as expected. Other stress indicators like guiacol peroxidase activity and malondialdehyde also increased with respect to control. At salt concentrations lower than 200mM, no clear cut retardation effects were seen. Thus, the present study opens up the scope of further assessment of survivability of camelina in salt contaminated soils.

  10. Genotypic difference in salinity tolerance in quinoa is determined by differential control of xylem Na(+) loading and stomatal density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabala, Sergey; Hariadi, Yuda; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2013-07-01

    Quinoa is regarded as a highly salt tolerant halophyte crop, of great potential for cultivation on saline areas around the world. Fourteen quinoa genotypes of different geographical origin, differing in salinity tolerance, were grown under greenhouse conditions. Salinity treatment started on 10 day old seedlings. Six weeks after the treatment commenced, leaf sap Na and K content and osmolality, stomatal density, chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, and xylem sap Na and K composition were measured. Responses to salinity differed greatly among the varieties. All cultivars had substantially increased K(+) concentrations in the leaf sap, but the most tolerant cultivars had lower xylem Na(+) content at the time of sampling. Most tolerant cultivars had lowest leaf sap osmolality. All varieties reduced stomata density when grown under saline conditions. All varieties clustered into two groups (includers and excluders) depending on their strategy of handling Na(+) under saline conditions. Under control (non-saline) conditions, a strong positive correlation was observed between salinity tolerance and plants ability to accumulate Na(+) in the shoot. Increased leaf sap K(+), controlled Na(+) loading to the xylem, and reduced stomata density are important physiological traits contributing to genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in quinoa, a halophyte species from Chenopodium family. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. The Mechanisms of Salinity Tolerance in the Xero-halophyte Blue Panicgrass (Panicum antidotale Retz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R. ESHGHIZADEH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the physiological traits associated with salt tolerance is important in optimal management of biosaline systems and optimum utilization of saline water resources in dry and saline areas. Therefore, some indices of photosynthetic activity, dry matter production and accumulation of sodium and potassium ions in Blue panicgrass (Panicum antidotale Retz were evaluated in five levels of salinity treatment (0, 70, 140, 210 and 280 mM NaCl solution under greenhouse conditions. The results showed that at 28 and 35 days after salt stress, plant leaf area reduced in the highest salinity treatment, 93 and 96% respectively, compared with control. Leaf stomatal conductance, CO2 fixation and quantum efficiency of photosystem II were decreased by increasing salinity. It caused also a reduction in chlorophyll content (Chl a, Chl b in leaves of Blue panicgrass. Content of carotenoids showed binary patterns to different salinity levels, slightly increased in 70-140 mM NaCl and decreased again in 210-280 mM, respectively. Increasing levels of salinity, increased sodium content in both roots and shoots but the shoots potassium content decreased. Decline in photosynthesis indices caused the reduction of root and shoot dry weight. This decrease resulted from lower leaf area (r=0.91**, lower stomatal conductance (r=0.78**, lower CO2 fixed in photosynthesis (r=0.63**, lower quantum efficiency of photosystem II (r=0.54** and lower Chl a (r=0.45**, respectively. Data analysis base on using stepwise regression introduced leaf area (?=0.560, chlorophyll a content (?=0.245 and shoot potassium content (?= 0.264 as main effective components of salinity tolerance in Blue panicgrass.

  12. Genomic arrangement of salinity tolerance QTLs in salmonids: a comparative analysis of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norman, Joseph D; Robinson, Mike; Glebe, Brian; Ferguson, Moira M; Danzmann, Roy G

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies show that variation in salinity tolerance in Arctic charr and rainbow trout has a genetic basis, even though both these species have low to moderate salinity tolerance capacities...

  13. Effect of salinity on the upper lethal temperature tolerance of early-juvenile red drum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Dusty; Bumguardner, Britt; Cason, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Previous work investigating the temperature tolerance of juvenile red drum ranging 18-50mm TL found evidence for positive size dependence (smaller fish less tolerant to higher temperatures) suggesting smaller size classes (<18mm TL) potentially may succumb to extreme summer water temperatures. Here, we explored the upper lethal temperature tolerance (ULT) in smaller-sized red drum which ranged from 10 to 20mm TL across multiple salinities to further understand the thermal limitations of this propagated game fish. In order to investigate the combined effect of temperature and salinity on ULT, temperature trials were conducted under three levels of salinity which commonly occur along the coast of Texas (25, 35, and 45ppt). The rate of temperature increase (+0.25°C/h) was designed to mimic a natural temperature increase of a summer day in Texas. We determined that the lethal temperature at 50% (LT50) did not differ between the three salinities examined statistically; median lethal temperature for individuals exposed to 25ppt ranged from 36.4 to 37.7°C, 35ppt ranged from 36.4 to 37.7°C, and 45ppt ranged from 36.1 to 37.4°C. Further, LT50 data obtained here for early-juvenile red drum did not differ from data of a similar experiment examining 25mm TL sized fish. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Supplementary Material for: Growth curve registration for evaluating salinity tolerance in barley

    KAUST Repository

    Meng, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Smarthouses capable of non-destructive, high-throughput plant phenotyping collect large amounts of data that can be used to understand plant growth and productivity in extreme environments. The challenge is to apply the statistical tool that best analyzes the data to study plant traits, such as salinity tolerance, or plant-growth-related traits. Results We derive family-wise salinity sensitivity (FSS) growth curves and use registration techniques to summarize growth patterns of HEB-25 barley families and the commercial variety, Navigator. We account for the spatial variation in smarthouse microclimates and in temporal variation across phenotyping runs using a functional ANOVA model to derive corrected FSS curves. From FSS, we derive corrected values for family-wise salinity tolerance, which are strongly negatively correlated with Na but not significantly with K, indicating that Na content is an important factor affecting salinity tolerance in these families, at least for plants of this age and grown in these conditions. Conclusions Our family-wise methodology is suitable for analyzing the growth curves of a large number of plants from multiple families. The corrected curves accurately account for the spatial and temporal variations among plants that are inherent to high-throughput experiments.

  15. Assessment of salinity tolerance in rice using seedling based morpho-physiological indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Adeel Zafar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salinity is among the most damaging abiotic stresses for rice production which limits its growing area. The present research was conducted to evaluate five rice varieties for salinity tolerance at seedling stage. Methods: Experiment was conducted in triplicate and in two sets. One set was grown as a control (non-stress and other as salt stressed. Salt stress of 15 dS/m was applied to one set of rice seedlings under controlled conditions. Data for different growth related morpho-physiological traits, i.e. germination percentage, root and shoot length, seedling fresh and dry weight, Na+ and K+ uptake were recorded after 15 days of seedling emergence under control as well as salinity condition. Results: Significant differences were observed among the genotypes under both the treatments and interaction of the evaluated traits suggested a significant variability among the rice genotypes under salt stress. NIAB-IRRI-9, Basmati-198 and KSK-133 were proved to be relatively salt tolerant varieties as they showed good performance for the recorded parameters. However, Basmati-385 was observed a salt sensitive variety due to highest reduction in seedling fresh and dry weight along with the maximum Na+ uptake. Conclusion: Based on obtained results, it was concluded that the evaluated morpho-physiological traits were useful to screen rice cultivars for salinity stress. In addition, NIAB-IRRI-9, Basmati-198 and KSK-133 can be used in breeding programs as tolerant check and Basmati-385 can be used as sensitive check.

  16. Enhancement of salinity tolerance in wheat through soil applied calcium carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ahmad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbide (CaC2 has been reported to increase growth and yield of crops under normal soil conditions. This study assessed its capacity to enhance salinity tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.; cv- 1076 under saline conditions. Three levels of salinity: 0, 7 and 12 dS m-1 were created using NaCl. Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium were applied as ammonium sulphate and KH2PO4 at 50 and 25 mg kg-1 soil, respectively. The encapsulated calcium carbide (ECC at 45 mg kg-1 soil produced 1291.8 µmols of acetylene (C2H2 and 257.5 µmols of its product ethylene (C2H4 over a period of 80 days. The results of the pot study indicated that ECC increased the weight of spike, weight of grains per spike, length of spike, total water concentration, root/shoot ratio and relative leaf water content up to 17, 23, 22, 35, 33 and 3%, respectively, over the control. Contrary to this, salinity (at 12 dS m -1 decreased all these parameters up to 68, 60, 26, 30, 28 and 8%, respectively, compared to the control. These results indicate that ECC enhances salinity tolerance in wheat by improving uptake of nutrients through enhanced root growth, increased hydraulic conductivity and hormonal action of ethylene released by ECC. Total water concentration was positively correlated (0.73 with grains spike-1 at P ≤ 0.05

  17. Banana NAC transcription factor MusaNAC042 is positively associated with drought and salinity tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Himanshu; Negi, Sanjana; Ganapathi, T R

    2017-03-01

    Banana is an important fruit crop and its yield is hampered by multiple abiotic stress conditions encountered during its growth. The NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factors are involved in plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present study, we studied the induction of banana NAC042 transcription factor in drought and high salinity conditions and its overexpression in transgenic banana to improve drought and salinity tolerance. MusaNAC042 expression was positively associated with stress conditions like salinity and drought and it encoded a nuclear localized protein. Transgenic lines of banana cultivar Rasthali overexpressing MusaNAC042 were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of banana embryogenic cells and T-DNA insertion was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Our results using leaf disc assay indicated that transgenic banana lines were able to tolerate drought and high salinity stress better than the control plants and retained higher level of total chlorophyll and lower level of MDA content (malondialdehyde). Transgenic lines analyzed for salinity (250 mM NaCl) and drought (Soil gravimetric water content 0.15) tolerance showed higher proline content, better Fv/Fm ratio, and lower levels of MDA content than control suggesting that MusaNAC042 may be involved in responses to higher salinity and drought stresses in banana. Expression of several abiotic stress-related genes like those coding for CBF/DREB, LEA, and WRKY factors was altered in transgenic lines indicating that MusaNAC042 is an efficient modulator of abiotic stress response in banana.

  18. The genome sequence of the wild tomato Solanum pimpinellifolium provides insights into salinity tolerance

    KAUST Repository

    Razali, Rozaimi

    2017-11-14

    Solanum pimpinellifolium, a wild relative of cultivated tomato, offers a wealth of breeding potential for several desirable traits such as tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Here, we report the genome and annotation of S. pimpinellifolium LA0480. The LA0480 genome size (811 Mb) and the number of annotated genes (25,970) are within the range observed for other sequenced tomato species. We developed and utilized the Dragon Eukaryotic Analyses Platform (DEAP) to functionally annotate the LA0480 protein-coding genes. Additionally, we used DEAP to compare protein function between S. pimpinellifolium and cultivated tomato. Our data suggest enrichment in genes involved in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Moreover, we present phenotypic data from one field experiment that demonstrate a greater salinity tolerance for fruit- and yield-related traits in S. pimpinellifolium compared with cultivated tomato. To understand the genomic basis for these differences in S. pimpinellifolium and S. lycopersicum, we analyzed 15 genes that have previously been shown to mediate salinity tolerance in plants. We show that S. pimpinellifolium has a higher copy number of the inositol-3-phosphate synthase and phosphatase genes, which are both key enzymes in the production of inositol and its derivatives. Moreover, our analysis indicates that changes occurring in the inositol phosphate pathway may contribute to the observed higher salinity tolerance in LA0480. Altogether, our work provides essential resources to understand and unlock the genetic and breeding potential of S. pimpinellifolium, and to discover the genomic basis underlying its environmental robustness.

  19. Ionic and photosynthetic homeostasis in quinoa challenged by drought and salinity – mechanisms of tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Jensen, Christian Richardt

    2015-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) grown under field conditions was exposed to five irrigation water salinities (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 dS m–1; 4 : 1 NaCl : CaCl2 molar ratio) from flowering, and divided between full irrigation and progressive drought (PD) during seed filling. Quinoa demonstrated...... homeostatic mechanisms which contributed to quinoa’s extraordinary tolerance. Salinity increased K+ and Na+ uptake by 60 and 100 kg ha–1, respectively, resulting in maintenance of cell turgor by osmotic adjustment, and a 50% increase of the leaf’s fresh weight (FW) : dry weight (DW) ratio and non...

  20. Identification of Putative Transmembrane Proteins Involved in Salinity Tolerance in Chenopodium quinoa by Integrating Physiological Data, RNAseq, and SNP Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmöckel, Sandra M; Lightfoot, Damien J; Razali, Rozaimi; Tester, Mark; Jarvis, David E

    2017-01-01

    Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is an emerging crop that produces nutritious grains with the potential to contribute to global food security. Quinoa can also grow on marginal lands, such as soils affected by high salinity. To identify candidate salt tolerance genes in the recently sequenced quinoa genome, we used a multifaceted approach integrating RNAseq analyses with comparative genomics and topology prediction. We identified 219 candidate genes by selecting those that were differentially expressed in response to salinity, were specific to or overrepresented in quinoa relative to other Amaranthaceae species, and had more than one predicted transmembrane domain. To determine whether these genes might underlie variation in salinity tolerance in quinoa and its close relatives, we compared the response to salinity stress in a panel of 21 Chenopodium accessions (14 C. quinoa, 5 C. berlandieri, and 2 C. hircinum). We found large variation in salinity tolerance, with one C. hircinum displaying the highest salinity tolerance. Using genome re-sequencing data from these accessions, we investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variation (CNV) in the 219 candidate genes in accessions of contrasting salinity tolerance, and identified 15 genes that could contribute to the differences in salinity tolerance of these Chenopodium accessions.

  1. Identification of Putative Transmembrane Proteins Involved in Salinity Tolerance in Chenopodium quinoa by Integrating Physiological Data, RNAseq, and SNP Analyses

    KAUST Repository

    Schmöckel, Sandra M.

    2017-06-21

    Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is an emerging crop that produces nutritious grains with the potential to contribute to global food security. Quinoa can also grow on marginal lands, such as soils affected by high salinity. To identify candidate salt tolerance genes in the recently sequenced quinoa genome, we used a multifaceted approach integrating RNAseq analyses with comparative genomics and topology prediction. We identified 219 candidate genes by selecting those that were differentially expressed in response to salinity, were specific to or overrepresented in quinoa relative to other Amaranthaceae species, and had more than one predicted transmembrane domain. To determine whether these genes might underlie variation in salinity tolerance in quinoa and its close relatives, we compared the response to salinity stress in a panel of 21 Chenopodium accessions (14 C. quinoa, 5 C. berlandieri, and 2 C. hircinum). We found large variation in salinity tolerance, with one C. hircinum displaying the highest salinity tolerance. Using genome re-sequencing data from these accessions, we investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variation (CNV) in the 219 candidate genes in accessions of contrasting salinity tolerance, and identified 15 genes that could contribute to the differences in salinity tolerance of these Chenopodium accessions.

  2. Identification of Putative Transmembrane Proteins Involved in Salinity Tolerance in Chenopodium quinoa by Integrating Physiological Data, RNAseq, and SNP Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Schmöckel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa is an emerging crop that produces nutritious grains with the potential to contribute to global food security. Quinoa can also grow on marginal lands, such as soils affected by high salinity. To identify candidate salt tolerance genes in the recently sequenced quinoa genome, we used a multifaceted approach integrating RNAseq analyses with comparative genomics and topology prediction. We identified 219 candidate genes by selecting those that were differentially expressed in response to salinity, were specific to or overrepresented in quinoa relative to other Amaranthaceae species, and had more than one predicted transmembrane domain. To determine whether these genes might underlie variation in salinity tolerance in quinoa and its close relatives, we compared the response to salinity stress in a panel of 21 Chenopodium accessions (14 C. quinoa, 5 C. berlandieri, and 2 C. hircinum. We found large variation in salinity tolerance, with one C. hircinum displaying the highest salinity tolerance. Using genome re-sequencing data from these accessions, we investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variation (CNV in the 219 candidate genes in accessions of contrasting salinity tolerance, and identified 15 genes that could contribute to the differences in salinity tolerance of these Chenopodium accessions.

  3. Comprehensive screening and selection of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) germplasm for salinity tolerance at the seedling stage and during plant ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ikram-ul; Khan, Asif Ali; Khan, Iqrar Ahmad; Azmat, Muhammad Abubakkar

    2012-07-01

    The okra germplasm was screened for salinity tolerance at the seedling stage and during plant ontogeny. Substantial variation existed in okra for salinity tolerance at the seedling stage. An 80 mmol/L NaCl concentration was suitable for discriminating tolerant and non-tolerant okra genotypes. The pooled ranking of the genotypes, based on individual rankings for each trait (root and shoot length, germination percentage, and relative Na(+) and K(+)) in individual NaCl concentrations, was effective for selecting tolerant genotypes. Genotypes selected at the seedling stage maintained their tolerance to NaCl during plant ontogeny, suggesting that screening of the germplasm entries and advanced breeding materials for salt tolerance at the seedling stage is effective. Among 39 okra genotypes, five were identified as the most tolerant genotypes and showed potential for use in breeding programs that focus on the development of salt-tolerant, high-yield okra cultivars.

  4. Comprehensive screening and selection of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) germplasm for salinity tolerance at the seedling stage and during plant ontogeny*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ikram-ul; Khan, Asif Ali; Khan, Iqrar Ahmad; Azmat, Muhammad Abubakkar

    2012-01-01

    The okra germplasm was screened for salinity tolerance at the seedling stage and during plant ontogeny. Substantial variation existed in okra for salinity tolerance at the seedling stage. An 80 mmol/L NaCl concentration was suitable for discriminating tolerant and non-tolerant okra genotypes. The pooled ranking of the genotypes, based on individual rankings for each trait (root and shoot length, germination percentage, and relative Na+ and K+) in individual NaCl concentrations, was effective for selecting tolerant genotypes. Genotypes selected at the seedling stage maintained their tolerance to NaCl during plant ontogeny, suggesting that screening of the germplasm entries and advanced breeding materials for salt tolerance at the seedling stage is effective. Among 39 okra genotypes, five were identified as the most tolerant genotypes and showed potential for use in breeding programs that focus on the development of salt-tolerant, high-yield okra cultivars. PMID:22761245

  5. Tolerances of plants to drought and salinity in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Farrel Allen; Miller, Reuben Fred; Sorenson, Stephen K.

    1988-01-01

    Differing capacities of plant species to tolerate drought and salinity are causative factors for presence of species and communities in various habitats. It is proposed that minimum xylem pressure potentials measured are indicative of drought tolerance and that minimum cell osmotic potentials are indicative of salt tolerance of plant species. Of 85 species measured, Nuttall saltbush (Atriplex nuttallii nuttallii) was found to be the most drought tolerant. Saltbrush (Atriplex confertifolia, A. nuttallii, A. canescens, and A. torreyi) had the lowest cell osmotic potentials measured. Although pickleweed (Allenrolfea occidentalis) grows in the saltiest soil measured, it did not have the lowest cell osmotic potential. This apparent inconsistency may be explained by the succulent characteristics of pickleweed. (USGS)

  6. Image-based phenotyping for non-destructive screening of different salinity tolerance traits in rice

    KAUST Repository

    Hairmansis, Aris

    2014-08-14

    Background Soil salinity is an abiotic stress wide spread in rice producing areas, limiting both plant growth and yield. The development of salt-tolerant rice requires efficient and high-throughput screening techniques to identify promising lines for salt affected areas. Advances made in image-based phenotyping techniques provide an opportunity to use non-destructive imaging to screen for salinity tolerance traits in a wide range of germplasm in a reliable, quantitative and efficient way. However, the application of image-based phenotyping in the development of salt-tolerant rice remains limited. Results A non-destructive image-based phenotyping protocol to assess salinity tolerance traits of two rice cultivars (IR64 and Fatmawati) has been established in this study. The response of rice to different levels of salt stress was quantified over time based on total shoot area and senescent shoot area, calculated from visible red-green-blue (RGB) and fluorescence images. The response of rice to salt stress (50, 75 and 100 mM NaCl) could be clearly distinguished from the control as indicated by the reduced increase of shoot area. The salt concentrations used had only a small effect on the growth of rice during the initial phase of stress, the shoot Na+ accumulation independent phase termed the ‘osmotic stress’ phase. However, after 20 d of treatment, the shoot area of salt stressed plants was reduced compared with non-stressed plants. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of Na+ in the shoot. Variation in the senescent area of the cultivars IR64 and Fatmawati in response to a high concentration of Na+ in the shoot indicates variation in tissue tolerance mechanisms between the cultivars. Conclusions Image analysis has the potential to be used for high-throughput screening procedures in the development of salt-tolerant rice. The ability of image analysis to discriminate between the different aspects of salt stress (shoot ion

  7. Screening of the Salt Tolerant Plants for High Salinity Wastewater Treatment by the Artificial Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHANG Ke-chun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tanggu, as the core area in Binhai New Area, is currently one of the fastest developing areas in Tianjin City. Because of the saline alkali soil and other natural conditions, wastewater reuse is restricted by high salinity. The removal of high concentration chloride by Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa, Artemisia anethifolia Weber, Iris wilsonii, Salicornia europaea, and Spartina anglica in light polluted water was compared by the simulation experiment of artificial wetland. The plants with stronger removal ability were selected and the ecosystem condition with maximum removal rate was determined. The results showed that the removal effect of chloride by salt-tolerant plants in artificial wetland was: Phragmites australis>Suaeda salsa>Artemisia anethifolia>Iris wilsonii>Salicornia europaea>Spartina anglica. The removal efficiency reached balance after four days. This study provided a scientific basis for the high salinity wastewater treatment by artificial wetland.

  8. Short-term salinity tolerance of northern pike, Esox lucius , fry, related to temperature and size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lene; Skov, Christian; Koed, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The short-term tolerances of northern pike, Esox lucius L., fry reared in a freshwater hatchery, to salinity were examined in the laboratory. Survival of two size groups of pike fry (mean length 21 +/- 2 mm SD and 37 +/- 4 mm SD) was examined over 72- to 96-h periods at 9-14 ppt salinity...... in combination with temperatures of 10, 14 and 18 degrees C. A parametric survival model found a significant correlation between survival of pike fry and temperature and salinity, respectively. L(C)50 values after 72 h were between 11.2 and 12.2 ppt, being lowest at 10 degrees C. Pike fry did not survive more...

  9. Salinity tolerance of laboratory reared juveniles of the fat snook centropomus parallelus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Yumi Tsuzuki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of salinity tolerance is essential for aquaculture production in different water sources, as well as for stocking enhancement programs. In the present experiment, salinity tolerance was investigated in laboratory reared juveniles of the fat snook Centropomus parallelus. Fish of 52 days (22.0 mm ± 0.4: mean total length ± SEM, 59 days (22.6 mm ± 0.5 and 73 days (25.8 mm ± 0.5 after hatching (DAH were directly transferred from 35 to 0, 5, 15 and 35 ppt. Survival was checked every 24 h during a 96-h period. The experiment was carried out with fed (for all salinities and unfed individuals (except for 5 ppt. Direct transfer resulted in less than 40% mortality in all treatments and ages tested. At the same salinity level, no difference in survival rates was found between fed and unfed juveniles, at the different ages and exposure time tested. Juveniles of 52 DAH presented lower tolerance to 0 ppt compared to other salinities. In older juveniles (59 and 73 DAH, mortality after 96 h was very low ( > 95% survival, regardless the salinity treatment or feeding condition. Therefore, the present study showed that juveniles of 52 DAH are less tolerant to abrupt transfer to freshwater, indicating that a salinity acclimation procedure prior to release in freshwater areas would be necessary, and that tolerance increased with increasing age.O conhecimento da tolerância à salinidade é essencial para produção em aquacultura em diferentes ambientes aquáticos, bem como para programas de repovoamento. No presente experimento, a tolerância à salinidade foi investigada em juvenis de robalo-peva Centropomus parallelus. Peixes de 52 dias (22,0 mm ± 0,4: média comprimento total ± EP, 59 dias (22,6 mm ± 0,5 e 73 dias (25,8 mm ± 0,5 após eclosão (DAE foram diretamente transferidos de 35 para 0, 5, 15 e 35 ppt. Sobrevivência foi monitorada a cada 24 h durante um período de 96 h. O experimento foi conduzido com animais alimentados (todas as

  10. A novel Azotobacter vinellandii (SRIAz3) functions in salinity stress tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Ansari, Mohammad Wahid; Pradhan, Madhusmita; Dangar, Tushar K; Mohanty, Santanu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    The plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPRs) as a biofertilizer provide agricultural benefits to advance various crops productivity. Recently, we discovered a novel Azotobacter vinellandii (SRIAz3) from rice rhizosphere, which is well competent to improve rice productivity. In this study, we investigated a role of A. vinellandii to confer salinity tolerance in rice (var. IR64). A. vinellandii inoculated rice plants showed higher proline and malondialdehyde content under 200 mM NaCl stress as compared with uninoculated one. The endogenous level of plant hormones viz., indole-3 acetic acid (IAA), gibberellins (GA3), zeatint (Zt) was higher in A. vinellandii inoculated plants under high salinity. The fresh biomass of root and shoot were relatively elevated in A. vinellandii inoculated rice. Further, the macronutrient profile was superior in A. vinellandii inoculated plants under salinity as compared with non-inoculated plants. The present findings further suggest that A. vinellandii, a potent biofertilzer, potentially confer salinity stress tolerance in rice via sustaining growth and improving compatible solutes and nutrients profile and thereby crop improvement.

  11. Evaluation of Indigenous Potato Challisha (Solanum tuberosum L. Cv. Challisha Somaclonals Tolerance to Salinity In Vitro

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    Md. Sanaullah Biswas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Potato is one of the most important food crops in the world. It is generally sensitive to salinity and likes to grow in neutral soil. On the other hand, salinity is increasing alarmingly in the ever changing climatic conditions. Thus, the selection of salt tolerant potato cultivars is necessary to keep pace the production of potato. To select salt tolerant cultivars, here we attempt to compare the salinity level between indigenous and modern cultivars. In vitro selection of local and modern potato cultivars were investigated with five levels of NaCl (0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mM. The indigenous potato Challisha and modern cultivars Diamant and Felsina were used as plant materials. Significant differences were noticed among the cultivars in response to different levels of NaCl. Plant growth and root development were gradually reduced with increased concentration of NaCl. All three cultivars were survived well with exhibiting different growth status up to 60 mM NaCl, but they performed poorly at 120 mM of NaCl. Cultivar Challisha performed better regarding shoot length, root length, the number of nodes per plantlet and the fresh weight per plant up to 90 mM of NaCl. Thus, we can conclude that local indigenous variety Challisha is salt tolerant comparing with the modern cultivated varieties.

  12. High salinity tolerance of the Red Sea coral Fungia granulosa under desalination concentrate discharge conditions: an in situ photophysiology experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Van Der Merwe, Riaan

    2014-11-10

    Seawater reverse osmosis desalination concentrate may have chronic and/or acute impacts on the marine ecosystems in the near-field area of the discharge. Environmental impact of the desalination plant discharge is supposedly site- and volumetric- specific, and also depends on the salinity tolerance of the organisms inhabiting the water column in and around a discharge environment. Scientific studies that aim to understand possible impacts of elevated salinity levels are important to assess detrimental effects to organisms, especially for species with no mechanism of osmoregulation, e.g., presumably corals. Previous studies on corals indicate sensitivity toward hypo- and hyper-saline environments with small changes in salinity already affecting coral physiology. In order to evaluate sensitivity of Red Sea corals to increased salinity levels, we conducted a long-term (29 days) in situ salinity tolerance transect study at an offshore seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) discharge on the coral Fungia granulosa. While we measured a pronounced increase in salinity and temperature at the direct outlet of the discharge structure, effects were indistinguishable from the surrounding environment at a distance of 5 m. Interestingly, corals were not affected by varying salinity levels as indicated by measurements of the photosynthetic efficiency. Similarly, cultured coral symbionts of the genus Symbiodinium displayed remarkable tolerance levels in regard to hypo- and hypersaline treatments. Our data suggest that increased salinity and temperature levels from discharge outlets wear off quickly in the surrounding environment. Furthermore, F. granulosa seem to tolerate levels of salinity that are distinctively higher than reported for other corals previously. It remains to be determined whether Red Sea corals in general display increased salinity tolerance, and whether this is related to prevailing levels of high(er) salinity in the Red Sea in comparison to other oceans.

  13. Pea p68, a DEAD-box helicase, provides salinity stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco by reducing oxidative stress and improving photosynthesis machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Banu, Mst Sufara Akhter; Huda, Kazi Md Kamrul; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Jain, Parul; Pham, Xuan Hoi; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-01-01

    The DEAD-box helicases are required mostly in all aspects of RNA and DNA metabolism and they play a significant role in various abiotic stresses, including salinity. The p68 is an important member of the DEAD-box proteins family and, in animal system, it is involved in RNA metabolism including pre-RNA processing and splicing. In plant system, it has not been well characterized. Here we report the cloning and characterization of p68 from pea (Pisum sativum) and its novel function in salinity stress tolerance in plant. The pea p68 protein self-interacts and is localized in the cytosol as well as the surrounding of cell nucleus. The transcript of pea p68 is upregulated in response to high salinity stress in pea. Overexpression of p68 driven by constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter in tobacco transgenic plants confers enhanced tolerances to salinity stress by improving the growth, photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery. Under stress treatment, pea p68 overexpressing tobacco accumulated higher K+ and lower Na+ level than the wild-type plants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation was remarkably regulated by the overexpression of pea p68 under salinity stress conditions, as shown from TBARS content, electrolyte leakage, hydrogen peroxide accumulation and 8-OHdG content and antioxidant enzyme activities. To the best of our knowledge this is the first direct report, which provides the novel function of pea p68 helicase in salinity stress tolerance. The results suggest that p68 can also be exploited for engineering abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants of economic importance.

  14. Pea p68, a DEAD-box helicase, provides salinity stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco by reducing oxidative stress and improving photosynthesis machinery.

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    Narendra Tuteja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DEAD-box helicases are required mostly in all aspects of RNA and DNA metabolism and they play a significant role in various abiotic stresses, including salinity. The p68 is an important member of the DEAD-box proteins family and, in animal system, it is involved in RNA metabolism including pre-RNA processing and splicing. In plant system, it has not been well characterized. Here we report the cloning and characterization of p68 from pea (Pisum sativum and its novel function in salinity stress tolerance in plant. RESULTS: The pea p68 protein self-interacts and is localized in the cytosol as well as the surrounding of cell nucleus. The transcript of pea p68 is upregulated in response to high salinity stress in pea. Overexpression of p68 driven by constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter in tobacco transgenic plants confers enhanced tolerances to salinity stress by improving the growth, photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery. Under stress treatment, pea p68 overexpressing tobacco accumulated higher K+ and lower Na+ level than the wild-type plants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation was remarkably regulated by the overexpression of pea p68 under salinity stress conditions, as shown from TBARS content, electrolyte leakage, hydrogen peroxide accumulation and 8-OHdG content and antioxidant enzyme activities. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge this is the first direct report, which provides the novel function of pea p68 helicase in salinity stress tolerance. The results suggest that p68 can also be exploited for engineering abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants of economic importance.

  15. Pea p68, a DEAD-Box Helicase, Provides Salinity Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco by Reducing Oxidative Stress and Improving Photosynthesis Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Banu, Mst. Sufara Akhter; Huda, Kazi Md. Kamrul; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Jain, Parul; Pham, Xuan Hoi; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-01-01

    Background The DEAD-box helicases are required mostly in all aspects of RNA and DNA metabolism and they play a significant role in various abiotic stresses, including salinity. The p68 is an important member of the DEAD-box proteins family and, in animal system, it is involved in RNA metabolism including pre-RNA processing and splicing. In plant system, it has not been well characterized. Here we report the cloning and characterization of p68 from pea (Pisum sativum) and its novel function in salinity stress tolerance in plant. Results The pea p68 protein self-interacts and is localized in the cytosol as well as the surrounding of cell nucleus. The transcript of pea p68 is upregulated in response to high salinity stress in pea. Overexpression of p68 driven by constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter in tobacco transgenic plants confers enhanced tolerances to salinity stress by improving the growth, photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery. Under stress treatment, pea p68 overexpressing tobacco accumulated higher K+ and lower Na+ level than the wild-type plants. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation was remarkably regulated by the overexpression of pea p68 under salinity stress conditions, as shown from TBARS content, electrolyte leakage, hydrogen peroxide accumulation and 8-OHdG content and antioxidant enzyme activities. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first direct report, which provides the novel function of pea p68 helicase in salinity stress tolerance. The results suggest that p68 can also be exploited for engineering abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants of economic importance. PMID:24879307

  16. Evaluation of Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. Somaclonals Tolerance to Salinity Via In Vitro and In Vivo

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    HAMID RAJABI MEMARI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tissue culture technique was used to obtain salt tolerant variants from embryogenic calluses of sugarcane (Saccharum sp. var. CP48-103 that cultured on a selective medium containing different levels of NaCl (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8% NaCl. A total of four plants regenerated from the tolerant calluses were selected but the best of them in vigor grown in in vitro and hydroponic systems under salinity stress to comparison with source variety. With increasing supply of NaCl in both systems, root growth was more adversely affected than was shoot growth. Chlorophyll contents showed a decreasing trend and dry matter yield of plants reduced but in a slow rate in tolerant somaclonal than source variety. The biochemical analysis showed that at high salt concentration, Cl- and Na+ content in shoot and root increased. With rising salt concentration from 0 to 0.8%, content of Cl- in shoot and root of tolerant variant changed lower than parent showed that this variant had genetic lowest ratio of shoot/root chloride and had minimum transport of Cl- to shoots. Also this variant had high content of Ca2+ in shoot and high K+/Na+ ratio at all salinity levels. Thus it probably has genetic potential to avoid harmful ions uptake.

  17. Simultaneous Expression of PDH45 with EPSPS Gene Improves Salinity and Herbicide Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bharti; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Biswas, Dipul K.; Sahoo, Ranjan K.; Kunchge, Nandkumar S.; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the problem of salinity- and weed-induced crop losses, a multi-stress tolerant trait is need of the hour but a combinatorial view of such traits is not yet explored. The overexpression of PDH45 (pea DNA helicase 45) and EPSPS (5-enoylpruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase) genes have been reported to impart salinity and herbicide tolerance. Further, the understanding of mechanism and pathways utilized by PDH45 and EPSPS for salinity and herbicide tolerance will help to improve the crops of economical importance. In the present study, we have performed a comparative analysis of salinity and herbicide tolerance to check the biochemical parameters and antioxidant status of tobacco transgenic plants. Collectively, the results showed that PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines display efficient tolerance to salinity stress, while PDH45+EPSPS transgenics showed tolerance to both the salinity and herbicide as compared to the control [wild type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants. The activities of the components of enzymatic antioxidant machinery were observed to be higher in the transgenic plants indicating the presence of an efficient antioxidant defense system which helps to cope with the stress-induced oxidative-damages. Photosynthetic parameters also showed significant increase in PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS overexpressing transgenic plants in comparison to WT, VC and EPSPS transgenic plants under salinity stress. Furthermore, PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS synergistically modulate the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid mediated signaling pathways for combating salinity stress. The findings of our study suggest that pyramiding of the PDH45 gene with EPSPS gene renders host plants tolerant to salinity and herbicide by enhancing the antioxidant machinery thus photosynthesis. PMID:28392794

  18. Transcriptome analysis of salt tolerant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. under saline conditions.

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    Mahmut Can Hiz

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the important abiotic stress factors that limit crop production. Common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., a major protein source in developing countries, is highly affected by soil salinity and the information on genes that play a role in salt tolerance is scarce. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs and related pathways by comprehensive analysis of transcriptomes of both root and leaf tissues of the tolerant genotype grown under saline and control conditions in hydroponic system. We have generated a total of 158 million high-quality reads which were assembled into 83,774 all-unigenes with a mean length of 813 bp and N50 of 1,449 bp. Among the all-unigenes, 58,171 were assigned with Nr annotations after homology analyses. It was revealed that 6,422 and 4,555 all-unigenes were differentially expressed upon salt stress in leaf and root tissues respectively. Validation of the RNA-seq quantifications (RPKM values was performed by qRT-PCR (Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR analyses. Enrichment analyses of DEGs based on GO and KEGG databases have shown that both leaf and root tissues regulate energy metabolism, transmembrane transport activity, and secondary metabolites to cope with salinity. A total of 2,678 putative common bean transcription factors were identified and classified under 59 transcription factor families; among them 441 were salt responsive. The data generated in this study will help in understanding the fundamentals of salt tolerance in common bean and will provide resources for functional genomic studies.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of salt tolerant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiz, Mahmut Can; Canher, Balkan; Niron, Harun; Turet, Muge

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is one of the important abiotic stress factors that limit crop production. Common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., a major protein source in developing countries, is highly affected by soil salinity and the information on genes that play a role in salt tolerance is scarce. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and related pathways by comprehensive analysis of transcriptomes of both root and leaf tissues of the tolerant genotype grown under saline and control conditions in hydroponic system. We have generated a total of 158 million high-quality reads which were assembled into 83,774 all-unigenes with a mean length of 813 bp and N50 of 1,449 bp. Among the all-unigenes, 58,171 were assigned with Nr annotations after homology analyses. It was revealed that 6,422 and 4,555 all-unigenes were differentially expressed upon salt stress in leaf and root tissues respectively. Validation of the RNA-seq quantifications (RPKM values) was performed by qRT-PCR (Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR) analyses. Enrichment analyses of DEGs based on GO and KEGG databases have shown that both leaf and root tissues regulate energy metabolism, transmembrane transport activity, and secondary metabolites to cope with salinity. A total of 2,678 putative common bean transcription factors were identified and classified under 59 transcription factor families; among them 441 were salt responsive. The data generated in this study will help in understanding the fundamentals of salt tolerance in common bean and will provide resources for functional genomic studies.

  20. A wheat salinity-induced WRKY transcription factor TaWRKY93 confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Liu, Xiuzhi

    2015-08-21

    Wheat is an important crop in the world. But most of the cultivars are salt sensitive, and often adversely affected by salt stress. WRKY transcription factors play a major role in plant responses to salt stress, but the effective salinity regulatory WRKYs identified in bread wheat are limited and the mechanism of salt stress tolerance is also not well explored. Here, we identified a salt (NaCl) induced class II WRKY transcription factor TaWRKY93. Its transcript level was strongly induced by salt (NaCl) and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expression of TaWRKY93 in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced salt (NaCl), drought, low temperature and osmotic (mannitol) stress tolerance, mainly demonstrated by transgenic plants forming longer primary roots or more lateral roots on MS plates supplemented with NaCl and mannitol individually, higher survival rate under drought and low temperature stress. Further, transgenic plants maintained a more proline content, higher relative water content and less electrolyte leakage than the wild type plants. The transcript abundance of a series of abiotic stress-related genes was up-regulated in the TaWRKY93 transgenic plants. In summary, TaWRKY93 is a new positive regulator of abiotic stress, it may increase salinity, drought and low temperature stress tolerance through enhancing osmotic adjustment, maintaining membrane stability and increasing transcription of stress related genes, and contribute to the superior agricultural traits of SR3 through promoting root development. It can be used as a candidate gene for wheat transgenic engineering breeding against abiotic stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Osmoregulation and salinity tolerance in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica: seawater exposure confers enhanced tolerance to freezing and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Michael A; Benoit, Joshua B; Lopez-Martinez, Giancarlo; Denlinger, David L; Lee, Richard E

    2009-09-01

    Summer storms along the Antarctic Peninsula can cause microhabitats of the terrestrial midge Belgica antarctica to become periodically inundated with seawater from tidal spray. As microhabitats dry, larvae may be exposed to increasing concentrations of seawater. Alternatively, as a result of melting snow or following rain, larvae may be immersed in freshwater for extended periods. The present study assessed the tolerance and physiological response of B. antarctica larvae to salinity exposure, and examined the effect of seawater acclimation on their subsequent tolerance of freezing, dehydration and heat shock. Midge larvae tolerated extended exposure to hyperosmotic seawater; nearly 50% of larvae survived a 10-day exposure to 1000 mOsm kg(-1) seawater and approximately 25% of larvae survived 6 days in 2000 mOsm kg(-1) seawater. Exposure to seawater drastically reduced larval body water content and increased hemolymph osmolality. By contrast, immersion in freshwater did not affect water content or hemolymph osmolality. Hyperosmotic seawater exposure, and the accompanying osmotic dehydration, resulted in a significant correlation between the rate of oxygen consumption and larval water content and induced the de novo synthesis and accumulation of several organic osmolytes. A 3-day exposure of larvae to hyperosmotic seawater increased freezing tolerance relative to freshwater-acclimated larvae. Even after rehydration, the freezing survival of larvae acclimated to seawater was greater than freshwater-acclimated larvae. Additionally, seawater exposure increased the subsequent tolerance of larvae to dehydration. Our results further illustrate the similarities between these related, yet distinct, forms of osmotic stress and add to the suite of physiological responses used by larvae to enhance survival in the harsh and unpredictable Antarctic environment.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide: a new endogenous player in an old mechanism of plant tolerance to high salinity

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    Cristiane J. da-Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT High salinity affects plants due to stimulation of osmotic stress. Cell signaling triggered by nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S activates a cascade of biochemical events that culminate in plant tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. For instance, the NO/H2S-stimulated biochemical events that occur in plants during response to high salinity include the control of reactive oxygen species, activation of antioxidant system, accumulation of osmoprotectants in cytosol, induction of K+ uptake and Na+ cell extrusion or its vacuolar compartmentation among others. This review is a compilation of what we have learned in the last 10 years about NO participation during cell signaling in response to high salinity as well as the role of H2S, a new player in the mechanism of plant tolerance to salt stress. The main sources of NO and H2S in plant cells is also discussed together with the evidence of interplay between both signaling molecules during response to stress.

  3. Ternary cycle treatment of high saline wastewater from pesticide production using a salt-tolerant microorganism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Du, Ya-guang; Qu, Yi; Du, Dong-yun

    2013-01-01

    The material of this study is provided by biological aerobic treatment of high saline wastewater from pesticide production. The microorganism used for biodegradation has been identified by gene-sequencing as a strain of Bacillus sp. SCUN. The best growth condition for the salt-tolerant microorganism has been studied by varying the pH, immobilized microorganism dosage and temperature conditions. The feasibility of pretreating wastewater in ethyl chloride production containing 4% NaCl has been discussed. It was found that under the pH range of 6.0-8.0, immobilized microorganism dosage of 1.5 g/L, temperature of 30 °C, and NaCl concentration of 0-3%, the microorganism achieves the best growth for biodegradation. After domestication, the strain can grow under 4% NaCl. This salt-tolerant microorganism is effective in the pretreated high saline wastewater. With a newly developed ternary cycle treatment, the chemical oxygen demand removal approaches 58.3%. The theoretical basis and a new method for biological treatments in biodegradation of high saline wastewater in ethyl chloride production are discussed.

  4. Exploring novel genetic sources of salinity tolerance in rice through molecular and physiological characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Akhlasur; Thomson, Michael J.; Shah-E-Alam, M.; de Ocampo, Marjorie; Egdane, James; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Agricultural productivity is increasingly being affected by the build-up of salinity in soils and water worldwide. The genetic base of salt-tolerant rice donors being used in breeding is relatively narrow and needs broadening to breed varieties with wider adaptation to salt-affected areas. This study evaluated a large set of rice accessions of diverse origins to identify and characterize novel sources of salt tolerance. Methods Diversity analysis was performed on 107 germplasm accessions using a genome-wide set of 376 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, along with characterization of allelic diversity at the major quantitative trait locus Saltol. Sixty-nine accessions were further evaluated for physiological traits likely associated with responses to salt stress during the seedling stage. Key Results Three major clusters corresponding to the indica, aus and aromatic subgroups were identified. The largest group was indica, with the salt-tolerant Pokkali accessions in one sub-cluster, while a set of Bangladeshi landraces, including Akundi, Ashfal, Capsule, Chikirampatnai and Kutipatnai, were in a different sub-cluster. A distinct aus group close to indica contained the salt-tolerant landrace Kalarata, while a separate aromatic group closer to japonica rice contained a number of traditional, but salt-sensitive Bangladeshi landraces. These accessions have different alleles at the Saltol locus. Seven landraces – Akundi, Ashfal, Capsule, Chikirampatnai, Jatai Balam, Kalarata and Kutipatnai – accumulated less Na and relatively more K, maintaining a lower Na/K ratio in leaves. They effectively limit sodium transport to the shoot. Conclusions New salt-tolerant landraces were identified that are genetically and physiologically distinct from known donors. These landraces can be used to develop better salt-tolerant varieties and could provide new sources of quantitative trait loci/alleles for salt tolerance for use in molecular breeding. The

  5. Engineering microbes for tolerance to next-generation biofuels

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    Dunlop Mary J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A major challenge when using microorganisms to produce bulk chemicals such as biofuels is that the production targets are often toxic to cells. Many biofuels are known to reduce cell viability through damage to the cell membrane and interference with essential physiological processes. Therefore, cells must trade off biofuel production and survival, reducing potential yields. Recently, there have been several efforts towards engineering strains for biofuel tolerance. Promising methods include engineering biofuel export systems, heat shock proteins, membrane modifications, more general stress responses, and approaches that integrate multiple tolerance strategies. In addition, in situ recovery methods and media supplements can help to ease the burden of end-product toxicity and may be used in combination with genetic approaches. Recent advances in systems and synthetic biology provide a framework for tolerance engineering. This review highlights recent targeted approaches towards improving microbial tolerance to next-generation biofuels with a particular emphasis on strategies that will improve production.

  6. Salinity tolerances of two Australian freshwater turtles, Chelodina expansa and Emydura macquarii (Testudinata: Chelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Deborah S; Scheltinga, David M; Clulow, Simon; Clulow, John; Franklin, Craig E; Georges, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater biota experience physiological challenges in regions affected by salinization, but often the effects on particular species are poorly understood. Freshwater turtles are of particular concern as they appear to have limited ability to cope with environmental conditions that are hyperosmotic to their body fluids. Here, we determined the physiological responses of two Australian freshwater chelid turtles, Emydura macquarii and Chelodina expansa, exposed to freshwater (0‰) and brackish water (15‰, representing a hyperosmotic environment). Brackish water is common in the Murray-Darling River Basin within the natural range of these species in Australia during periods of drought, yet it is unknown how well these species tolerate saline conditions. We hypothesized that these turtles would be unable to maintain homeostasis in the 15‰ water treatment and would suffer osmotic loss of water, increased ionic concentrations and a decrease in body mass. Results revealed that these turtles had elevated plasma concentrations of sodium, chloride, urea and uric acid in the plasma. Plasma ionic concentrations increased proportionally more in E. macquarii than in C. expansa. Individuals of both species reduced feeding in 15‰ water, indicating that behaviour may provide an additional means for freshwater turtles to limit ion/solute influx when in hyperosmotic environments. This osmoregulatory behaviour may allow for persistence of turtles in regions affected by salinization; however, growth rates and body condition may be affected in the long term. Although we demonstrate that these turtles have mechanisms to survive temporarily in saline waters, it is likely that sustained salinization of waterways will exceed their short- to medium-term capacity to survive increased salt levels, making salinization a potentially key threatening process for these freshwater reptiles.

  7. Salinity affects production and salt tolerance of dimorphic seeds of Suaeda salsa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengxia; Xu, Yan-Ge; Wang, Shuai; Shi, Weiwei; Liu, Ranran; Feng, Gu; Song, Jie

    2015-10-01

    The effect of salinity on brown seeds/black seeds ratio, seed weight, endogenous hormone concentrations, and germination of brown and black seeds in the euhalophyte Suaeda salsa was investigated. The brown seeds/black seeds ratio, seed weight of brown and black seeds and the content of protein increased at a concentration of 500 mM NaCl compared to low salt conditions (1 mM NaCl). The germination percentage and germination index of brown seeds from plants cultured in 500 mM NaCl were higher than those cultured in 1 mM NaCl, but it was not true for black seeds. The concentrations of IAA (indole-3-acetic acid), ZR (free zeatin riboside) and ABA (abscisic acid) in brown seeds were much greater than those in black seeds, but there were no differences in the level of GAs (gibberellic acid including GA1 and GA3) regardless of the degree of salinity. Salinity during plant culture increased the concentration of GAs, but salinity had no effect on the concentrations of the other three endogenous hormones in brown seeds. Salinity had no effect on the concentration of IAA but increased the concentrations of the other three endogenous hormones in black seeds. Accumulation of endogenous hormones at different concentrations of NaCl during plant growth may be related to seed development and to salt tolerance of brown and black S. salsa seeds. These characteristics may help the species to ensure seedling establishment and population succession in variable saline environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidermal bladder cells confer salinity stress tolerance in the halophyte quinoa and Atriplex species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani-Pouya, Ali; Roessner, Ute; Jayasinghe, Nirupama S; Lutz, Adrian; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Bazihizina, Nadia; Bohm, Jennifer; Alharbi, Sulaiman; Hedrich, Rainer; Shabala, Sergey

    2017-09-01

    Epidermal bladder cells (EBCs) have been postulated to assist halophytes in coping with saline environments. However, little direct supporting evidence is available. Here, Chenopodium quinoa plants were grown under saline conditions for 5 weeks. One day prior to salinity treatment, EBCs from all leaves and petioles were gently removed by using a soft cosmetic brush and physiological, ionic and metabolic changes in brushed and non-brushed leaves were compared. Gentle removal of EBC neither initiated wound metabolism nor affected the physiology and biochemistry of control-grown plants but did have a pronounced effect on salt-grown plants, resulting in a salt-sensitive phenotype. Of 91 detected metabolites, more than half were significantly affected by salinity. Removal of EBC dramatically modified these metabolic changes, with the biggest differences reported for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), proline, sucrose and inositol, affecting ion transport across cellular membranes (as shown in electrophysiological experiments). This work provides the first direct evidence for a role of EBC in salt tolerance in halophytes and attributes this to (1) a key role of EBC as a salt dump for external sequestration of sodium; (2) improved K(+) retention in leaf mesophyll and (3) EBC as a storage space for several metabolites known to modulate plant ionic relations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Tolerance to copper and to salinity in Daphnia longispina: implications within a climate change scenario.

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    João Leitão

    Full Text Available Considering IPPC climate change scenarios, it is pertinent to predict situations where coastal ecosystems already impacted with chemical contamination became exposed to an additional stressor under a future scenario of seawater intrusion. Accordingly, the present study aimed at evaluating if a negative association between tolerance to a metal and to saltwater exists among genotypes of a freshwater organism. For this, five clonal lineages of the cladoceran Daphnia longispina O.F. Müller, exhibiting a differential tolerance to lethal levels of copper, were selected. Each clonal lineage was exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of sodium chloride (assumed as a protective surrogate to evaluate the toxicity of increased salinity to freshwater organisms. Mortality, time to release the first brood and total number of neonates per female were monitored and the somatic growth rate and intrinsic rate of natural increase were computed for each clonal lineage. Data here obtained were compared with their lethal responses to copper and significant negative correlations were found. These results suggest that genetically eroded populations of D. longispina, due to copper or salinity, may be particularly susceptible to a later exposure to the other contaminant supporting the multiple stressors differential tolerance.

  10. A transcriptomic analysis reveals the nature of salinity tolerance of a wheat introgression line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Li, Shuo; Wang, Mengcheng; Xia, Guangmin

    2012-01-01

    The bread wheat cultivar Shanrong No.3 (SR3) is a salinity tolerant derivative of an asymmetric somatic hybrid between cultivar Jinan 177 (JN177) and tall wheatgrass (Thinopyrum ponticum). To reveal some of the mechanisms underlying its elevated abiotic stress tolerance, both SR3 and JN177 were exposed to iso-osmotic NaCl and PEG stress, and the resulting gene expression was analysed using a customized microarray. Some genes associated with stress response proved to be more highly expressed in SR3 than in JN177 in non-stressed conditions. Its unsaturated fatty acid and flavonoid synthesis ability was also enhanced, and its pentose phosphate metabolism was more active than in JN177. These alterations in part accounted for the observed shift in the homeostasis related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The specific down-regulation of certain ion transporters after a 0.5 h exposure to 340 mM NaCl demonstrated that Na(+) uptake occurred rapidly, so that the early phase of salinity stress imposes more than simply an osmotic stress. We discussed the possible effect of the introgression of new genetic materials in wheat genome on stress tolerance.

  11. Tolerance to copper and to salinity in Daphnia longispina: implications within a climate change scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, João; Ribeiro, Rui; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Lopes, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Considering IPPC climate change scenarios, it is pertinent to predict situations where coastal ecosystems already impacted with chemical contamination became exposed to an additional stressor under a future scenario of seawater intrusion. Accordingly, the present study aimed at evaluating if a negative association between tolerance to a metal and to saltwater exists among genotypes of a freshwater organism. For this, five clonal lineages of the cladoceran Daphnia longispina O.F. Müller, exhibiting a differential tolerance to lethal levels of copper, were selected. Each clonal lineage was exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of sodium chloride (assumed as a protective surrogate to evaluate the toxicity of increased salinity to freshwater organisms). Mortality, time to release the first brood and total number of neonates per female were monitored and the somatic growth rate and intrinsic rate of natural increase were computed for each clonal lineage. Data here obtained were compared with their lethal responses to copper and significant negative correlations were found. These results suggest that genetically eroded populations of D. longispina, due to copper or salinity, may be particularly susceptible to a later exposure to the other contaminant supporting the multiple stressors differential tolerance.

  12. Ectopic expression of JcWRKY transcription factor confers salinity tolerance via salicylic acid signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinita Agarwal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants, being sessile, have developed intricate signalling network to specifically respond to the diverse environmental stress. The crop performance and yield is limited due to exposure of multiple stresses simultaneously. The coordinated crosstalk between different signalling components, including phytohormones and transcription factor(s play a crucial role towards increased stress resistance in crops. Transcription factors play an important role in regulating the downstream processes during stress. The plant-specific WRKY TFs form one of the largest TF family and are involved in diverse plant processes, involving growth, development and stress signalling through auto and cross regulation with different genes and TFs. The salicylic acid -inducible JcWRKY TF confers salinity tolerance in transgenic tobacco, as was evident by increased chlorophyll content and seed germination potential. The transgenic plants showed increased soluble sugar, membrane stability, reduced electrolyte leakage and generation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2•− as compared to the wild type (WT. Furthermore, the low SA treatment along with salinity improved the tolerance potential of the transgenics by maintaining ROS homeostasis and high K+/Na+ ratio. The transcript expression of SA biosynthetic gene ICS1 and antioxidative enzymes (CAT and SOD showed upregulation during stress. Thus, the present study reflects that JcWRKY might be working in co-ordination with SA and salt stress signalling to orchestrate the different biochemical and molecular pathways to manoeuvre stress tolerance of the transgenic plants.

  13. Predicting species’ tolerance to salinity and alkalinity using distribution data and geochemical modelling: a case study using Australian grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslis-Lagoudakis, C. Haris; Hua, Xia; Bui, Elisabeth; Moray, Camile; Bromham, Lindell

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Salt tolerance has evolved many times independently in different plant groups. One possible explanation for this pattern is that it builds upon a general suite of stress-tolerance traits. If this is the case, then we might expect a correlation between salt tolerance and other tolerances to different environmental stresses. This association has been hypothesized for salt and alkalinity tolerance. However, a major limitation in investigating large-scale patterns of these tolerances is that lists of known tolerant species are incomplete. This study explores whether species’ salt and alkalinity tolerance can be predicted using geochemical modelling for Australian grasses. The correlation between taxa found in conditions of high predicted salinity and alkalinity is then assessed. Methods Extensive occurrence data for Australian grasses is used together with geochemical modelling to predict values of pH and electrical conductivity to which species are exposed in their natural distributions. Using parametric and phylogeny-corrected tests, the geochemical predictions are evaluated using a list of known halophytes as a control, and it is determined whether taxa that occur in conditions of high predicted salinity are also found in conditions of high predicted alkalinity. Key Results It is shown that genera containing known halophytes have higher predicted salinity conditions than those not containing known halophytes. Additionally, taxa occurring in high predicted salinity tend to also occur in high predicted alkalinity. Conclusions Geochemical modelling using species’ occurrence data is a potentially useful approach to predict species’ relative natural tolerance to challenging environmental conditions. The findings also demonstrate a correlation between salinity tolerance and alkalinity tolerance. Further investigations can consider the phylogenetic distribution of specific traits involved in these ecophysiological strategies, ideally by

  14. Can we improve the salinity tolerance of genotypes of Taxodium by using varietal and hybrid crosses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijing; Creech, David L.; Krauss, Ken W.; Yunlong, Yin; Kulhavy, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich. var. distichum [baldcypress (BC)], Taxodium distichum var. mexicanum Gordon [Montezuma cypress (MC)], and a Taxodium hybrid (\\'Nanjing Beauty\\': BC x MC cross, T302) were evaluated for salt tolerance in 2006 at Nacogdoches, TX. Plants were irrigated weekly with four levels of salinity [0, 1, 3.5, and 6 ppt (0, 17, 60, and 102 mol*m-3)] for 13 weeks and then 0, 2, 7, and 12 ppt (0, 34, 120, and 204 mol*m-3) for another 12 weeks. Salinity treatments did not have a significant effect on growth rate; however, there were significant differences in growth rate among the three genotypes. Genotype T302 produced the greatest wet weight, whereas MC had stronger apical dominance and exhibited the greatest increase in height over the course of study. As expected, sodium (Na) concentration in Taxodium leaves increased as sea salt concentrations increased but did not tilt Na/potassium (K) ratios to stressful disproportions. Of the three genotypes, BC exhibited the highest leaf content of Na, calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), and iron (Fe); MC had the lowest leaf content of Na, Ca, S, and Fe; and T302 was intermediate. The benefits of using a hybrid cross (T302) that maintains greater biomass than BC or MC across a range of salinities must be weighed against the potential additional pruning and training necessary for cutting-grown clones relative to BC and MC propagated from seed and flood tolerance relative to BC. Still, combining the best characteristics of different varieties of T. distichum should facilitate the production of favorable genotypes tolerant to a number of soil physical and chemical property fluctuations for arboricultural operations.

  15. Salt tolerant plants increase nitrogen removal from biofiltration systems affected by saline stormwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szota, Christopher; Farrell, Claire; Livesley, Stephen J; Fletcher, Tim D

    2015-10-15

    Biofiltration systems are used in urban areas to reduce the concentration and load of nutrient pollutants and heavy metals entering waterways through stormwater runoff. Biofilters can, however be exposed to salt water, through intrusion of seawater in coastal areas which could decrease their ability to intercept and retain pollutants. We measured the effect of adding saline stormwater on pollutant removal by six monocotyledonous species with different levels of salt-tolerance. Carex appressa, Carex bichenoviana, Ficinia nodosa, Gahnia filum, Juncus kraussii and Juncus usitatus were exposed to six concentrations of saline stormwater, equivalent to electrical conductivity readings of: 0.09, 2.3, 5.5, 10.4, 20.0 and 37.6 mS cm(-1). Salt-sensitive species: C. appressa, C. bichenoviana and J. usitatus did not survive ≥10.4 mS cm(-1), removing their ability to take up nitrogen (N). Salt-tolerant species, such as F. nodosa and J. kraussii, maintained N-removal even at the highest salt concentration. However, their levels of water stress and stomatal conductance suggest that N-removal would not be sustained at concentrations ≥10.4 mS cm(-1). Increasing salt concentration indirectly increased phosphorus (P) removal, by converting dissolved forms of P to particulate forms which were retained by filter media. Salt concentrations ≥10 mS cm(-1) also reduced removal efficiency of zinc, manganese and cadmium, but increased removal of iron and lead, regardless of plant species. Our results suggest that biofiltration systems exposed to saline stormwater ≤10 mS cm(-1) can only maintain N-removal when planted with salt-tolerant species, while P removal and immobilisation of heavy metals is less affected by species selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inter-population differences in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation of juvenile wild and hatchery-born Sacramento splittail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhille, Christine E.; Dabruzzi, Theresa F.; Cocherell, Dennis E.; Mahardja, Brian; Feyrer, Frederick V.; Foin, Theodore C.; Baerwald, Melinda R.; Fangue, Nann A.

    2016-01-01

    The Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus) is a minnow endemic to the highly modified San Francisco Estuary of California, USA and its associated rivers and tributaries. This species is composed of two genetically distinct populations, which, according to field observations and otolith strontium signatures, show largely allopatric distribution patterns as recently hatched juveniles. Juvenile Central Valley splittail are found primarily in the nearly fresh waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries, whereas San Pablo juveniles are found in the typically higher-salinity waters (i.e. up to 10‰) of the Napa and Petaluma Rivers. As the large salinity differences between young-of-year habitats may indicate population-specific differences in salinity tolerance, we hypothesized that juvenile San Pablo and Central Valley splittail populations differ in their response to salinity. In hatchery-born and wild-caught juvenile San Pablo splittail, we found upper salinity tolerances, where mortalities occurred within 336 h of exposure to 16‰ or higher, which was higher than the upper salinity tolerance of 14‰ for wild-caught juvenile Central Valley splittail. This, in conjunction with slower recovery of plasma osmolality, but not ion levels, muscle moisture or gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity, in Central Valley relative to San Pablo splittail during osmoregulatory disturbance provides some support for our hypothesis of inter-population variation in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation. The modestly improved salinity tolerance of San Pablo splittail is consistent with its use of higher-salinity habitats. Although confirmation of the putative adaptive difference through further studies is recommended, this may highlight the need for population-specific management considerations.

  17. Inter-population differences in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation of juvenile wild and hatchery-born Sacramento splittail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhille, Christine E; Dabruzzi, Theresa F; Cocherell, Dennis E; Mahardja, Brian; Feyrer, Frederick; Foin, Theodore C; Baerwald, Melinda R; Fangue, Nann A

    2016-01-01

    The Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus) is a minnow endemic to the highly modified San Francisco Estuary of California, USA and its associated rivers and tributaries. This species is composed of two genetically distinct populations, which, according to field observations and otolith strontium signatures, show largely allopatric distribution patterns as recently hatched juveniles. Juvenile Central Valley splittail are found primarily in the nearly fresh waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries, whereas San Pablo juveniles are found in the typically higher-salinity waters (i.e. up to 10‰) of the Napa and Petaluma Rivers. As the large salinity differences between young-of-year habitats may indicate population-specific differences in salinity tolerance, we hypothesized that juvenile San Pablo and Central Valley splittail populations differ in their response to salinity. In hatchery-born and wild-caught juvenile San Pablo splittail, we found upper salinity tolerances, where mortalities occurred within 336 h of exposure to 16‰ or higher, which was higher than the upper salinity tolerance of 14‰ for wild-caught juvenile Central Valley splittail. This, in conjunction with slower recovery of plasma osmolality, but not ion levels, muscle moisture or gill Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, in Central Valley relative to San Pablo splittail during osmoregulatory disturbance provides some support for our hypothesis of inter-population variation in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation. The modestly improved salinity tolerance of San Pablo splittail is consistent with its use of higher-salinity habitats. Although confirmation of the putative adaptive difference through further studies is recommended, this may highlight the need for population-specific management considerations.

  18. Is salinity tolerance related to osmolytes accumulation in Lygeum spartum L. seedlings?

    OpenAIRE

    Nedjimi, Bouzid

    2011-01-01

    Lygeum spartum L. (Poaceae) is a plant of commercial relevance used as raw material for manufacturing paper. This species is a newly found salt tolerant species, but its physiological responses to salinity are poorly understood. The effect of salt stress (50 and 100 mM NaCl) on growth, leaf water relations, soluble sugars and free amino acids in L. spartum has been investigated. Fresh and dry weights were reduced significantly above 50 mM NaCl. Transpiration, water potential (Ψω) and osmotic ...

  19. Phytohormones and their metabolic engineering for abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabir H. Wani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses including drought, salinity, heat, cold, flooding, and ultraviolet radiation causes crop losses worldwide. In recent times, preventing these crop losses and producing more food and feed to meet the demands of ever-increasing human populations have gained unprecedented importance. However, the proportion of agricultural lands facing multiple abiotic stresses is expected only to rise under a changing global climate fueled by anthropogenic activities. Identifying the mechanisms developed and deployed by plants to counteract abiotic stresses and maintain their growth and survival under harsh conditions thus holds great significance. Recent investigations have shown that phytohormones, including the classical auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, and gibberellins, and newer members including brassinosteroids, jasmonates, and strigolactones may prove to be important metabolic engineering targets for producing abiotic stress-tolerant crop plants. In this review, we summarize and critically assess the roles that phytohormones play in plant growth and development and abiotic stress tolerance, besides their engineering for conferring abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic crops. We also describe recent successes in identifying the roles of phytohormones under stressful conditions. We conclude by describing the recent progress and future prospects including limitations and challenges of phytohormone engineering for inducing abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

  20. Engineering Cold Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Gulzar S; Wani, Shabir H; Hussain, Wasim; Singh, N.B

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond with changes in their pattern of gene expression and protein products when exposed to low temperatures. Thus ability to adapt has an impact on the distribution and survival of the plant, and on crop yields. Many species of tropical or subtropical origin are injured or killed by non-freezing low temperatures, and exhibit various symptoms of chilling injury such as chlorosis, necrosis, or growth retardation. In contrast, chilling tolerant species are able to grow at such cold temperatures. Conventional breeding methods have met with limited success in improving the cold tolerance of important crop plants involving inter-specific or inter-generic hybridization. Recent studies involving full genome profiling/ sequencing, mutational and transgenic plant analyses, have provided a deep insight of the complex transcriptional mechanism that operates under cold stress. The alterations in expression of genes in response to cold temperatures are followed by increases in the levels of hundreds of metabolites, some of which are known to have protective effects against the damaging effects of cold stress. Various low temperature inducible genes have been isolated from plants. Most appear to be involved in tolerance to cold stress and the expression of some of them is regulated by C-repeat binding factor/ dehydration-responsive element binding (CBF/DREB1) transcription factors. Numerous physiological and molecular changes occur during cold acclimation which reveals that the cold resistance is more complex than perceived and involves more than one pathway. The findings summarized in this review have shown potential practical applications for breeding cold tolerance in crop and horticultural plants suitable to temperate geographical locations. PMID:21886453

  1. Engineering cold stress tolerance in crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Gulzar S; Wani, Shabir H; Hussain, Wasim; Singh, N B

    2011-03-01

    Plants respond with changes in their pattern of gene expression and protein products when exposed to low temperatures. Thus ability to adapt has an impact on the distribution and survival of the plant, and on crop yields. Many species of tropical or subtropical origin are injured or killed by non-freezing low temperatures, and exhibit various symptoms of chilling injury such as chlorosis, necrosis, or growth retardation. In contrast, chilling tolerant species are able to grow at such cold temperatures. Conventional breeding methods have met with limited success in improving the cold tolerance of important crop plants involving inter-specific or inter-generic hybridization. Recent studies involving full genome profiling/ sequencing, mutational and transgenic plant analyses, have provided a deep insight of the complex transcriptional mechanism that operates under cold stress. The alterations in expression of genes in response to cold temperatures are followed by increases in the levels of hundreds of metabolites, some of which are known to have protective effects against the damaging effects of cold stress. Various low temperature inducible genes have been isolated from plants. Most appear to be involved in tolerance to cold stress and the expression of some of them is regulated by C-repeat binding factor/ dehydration-responsive element binding (CBF/DREB1) transcription factors. Numerous physiological and molecular changes occur during cold acclimation which reveals that the cold resistance is more complex than perceived and involves more than one pathway. The findings summarized in this review have shown potential practical applications for breeding cold tolerance in crop and horticultural plants suitable to temperate geographical locations.

  2. A minimum cost tolerance allocation method for rocket engines and robust rocket engine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, Richard J.

    1993-11-01

    Rocket engine design follows three phases: systems design, parameter design, and tolerance design. Systems design and parameter design are most effectively conducted in a concurrent engineering (CE) environment that utilize methods such as Quality Function Deployment and Taguchi methods. However, tolerance allocation remains an art driven by experience, handbooks, and rules of thumb. It was desirable to develop and optimization approach to tolerancing. The case study engine was the STME gas generator cycle. The design of the major components had been completed and the functional relationship between the component tolerances and system performance had been computed using the Generic Power Balance model. The system performance nominals (thrust, MR, and Isp) and tolerances were already specified, as were an initial set of component tolerances. However, the question was whether there existed an optimal combination of tolerances that would result in the minimum cost without any degradation in system performance.

  3. A minimum cost tolerance allocation method for rocket engines and robust rocket engine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    Rocket engine design follows three phases: systems design, parameter design, and tolerance design. Systems design and parameter design are most effectively conducted in a concurrent engineering (CE) environment that utilize methods such as Quality Function Deployment and Taguchi methods. However, tolerance allocation remains an art driven by experience, handbooks, and rules of thumb. It was desirable to develop and optimization approach to tolerancing. The case study engine was the STME gas generator cycle. The design of the major components had been completed and the functional relationship between the component tolerances and system performance had been computed using the Generic Power Balance model. The system performance nominals (thrust, MR, and Isp) and tolerances were already specified, as were an initial set of component tolerances. However, the question was whether there existed an optimal combination of tolerances that would result in the minimum cost without any degradation in system performance.

  4. Integrating Classical with Emerging Concepts for Better Understanding of Salinity Stress Tolerance Mechanisms in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navdeep Kaur

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rice is an important cereal crop responsible for world's food security. The sensitivity of rice plants toward a range of abiotic stresses is a prime challenge for its overall growth and productivity. Among these, salinity is a major stress which results in a significant loss of global rice yield annually. For finding straightforward and strict future solutions in order to assure the food security to growing world population, understanding of the various mechanisms responsible for salt stress tolerance in rice is of paramount importance. In classical studies, identification of salt tolerant cultivars and the genetic markers linked to salt tolerance and breeding approaches have been given emphasis. It further affirmed on the identification of various pathways regulating the complex process of salt stress adaptation. However, only limited success has been achieved in these approaches as salt tolerance is a complex process and is governed by multiple factors. Hence, for better understanding of salt tolerance mechanisms, a comprehensive approach involving physiological, biochemical and molecular studies is much warranted. Modern experimental and genetic resources have provided a momentum in this direction and have provided molecular insights into different salt stress responsive pathways at the signaling and regulatory level. The integrative knowledge of classical and modern research of the understanding of salt stress adaptive pathways can help the researchers for designing effective strategies to fight against salt stress. Hence, the present review is focused on the understanding of the salt stress tolerance mechanisms in rice through the consolidative knowledge of classical and modern concepts. It further highlights the emerging new trends of salt stress adaptive pathways in rice.

  5. Oxygation enhances growth, gas exchange and salt tolerance of vegetable soybean and cotton in a saline vertisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Surya P; Midmore, David J

    2009-07-01

    Impacts of salinity become severe when the soil is deficient in oxygen. Oxygation (using aerated water for subsurface drip irrigation of crop) could minimize the impact of salinity on plants under oxygen-limiting soil environments. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of oxygation (12% air volume/volume of water) on vegetable soybean (moderately salt tolerant) and cotton (salt tolerant) in a salinized vertisol at 2, 8, 14, 20 dS/m EC(e). In vegetable soybean, oxygation increased above ground biomass yield and water use efficiency (WUE) by 13% and 22%, respectively, compared with the control. Higher yield with oxygation was accompanied by greater plant height and stem diameter and reduced specific leaf area and leaf Na+ and Cl- concentrations. In cotton, oxygation increased lint yield and WUE by 18% and 16%, respectively, compared with the control, and was accompanied by greater canopy light interception, plant height and stem diameter. Oxygation also led to a greater rate of photosynthesis, higher relative water content in the leaf, reduced crop water stress index and lower leaf water potential. It did not, however, affect leaf Na+ or Cl- concentration. Oxygation invariably increased, whereas salinity reduced the K+ : Na+ ratio in the leaves of both species. Oxygation improved yield and WUE performance of salt tolerant and moderately tolerant crops under saline soil environments, and this may have a significant impact for irrigated agriculture where saline soils pose constraints to crop production.

  6. Enhanced photosynthesis and redox energy production contribute to salinity tolerance in Dunaliella as revealed by homology-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liska, Adam J; Shevchenko, Andrej; Pick, Uri; Katz, Adriana

    2004-09-01

    Salinity is a major limiting factor for the proliferation of plants and inhibits central metabolic activities such as photosynthesis. The halotolerant green alga Dunaliella can adapt to hypersaline environments and is considered a model photosynthetic organism for salinity tolerance. To clarify the molecular basis for salinity tolerance, a proteomic approach has been applied for identification of salt-induced proteins in Dunaliella. Seventy-six salt-induced proteins were selected from two-dimensional gel separations of different subcellular fractions and analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). Application of nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry, combined with sequence-similarity database-searching algorithms, MS BLAST and MultiTag, enabled identification of 80% of the salt-induced proteins. Salinity stress up-regulated key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, starch mobilization, and redox energy production; regulatory factors in protein biosynthesis and degradation; and a homolog of a bacterial Na(+)-redox transporters. The results indicate that Dunaliella responds to high salinity by enhancement of photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation and by diversion of carbon and energy resources for synthesis of glycerol, the osmotic element in Dunaliella. The ability of Dunaliella to enhance photosynthetic activity at high salinity is remarkable because, in most plants and cyanobacteria, salt stress inhibits photosynthesis. The results demonstrated the power of MS BLAST searches for the identification of proteins in organisms whose genomes are not known and paved the way for dissecting molecular mechanisms of salinity tolerance in algae and higher plants.

  7. Ethanol Enhances High-Salinity Stress Tolerance by Detoxifying Reactive Oxygen Species in Arabidopsis thaliana and Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huong Mai Nguyen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available High-salinity stress considerably affects plant growth and crop yield. Thus, developing techniques to enhance high-salinity stress tolerance in plants is important. In this study, we revealed that ethanol enhances high-salinity stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the ethanol-induced tolerance, we performed microarray analyses using A. thaliana seedlings. Our data indicated that the expression levels of 1,323 and 1,293 genes were upregulated by ethanol in the presence and absence of NaCl, respectively. The expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS signaling-related genes associated with high-salinity tolerance was upregulated by ethanol under salt stress condition. Some of these genes encode ROS scavengers and transcription factors (e.g., AtZAT10 and AtZAT12. A RT-qPCR analysis confirmed that the expression levels of AtZAT10 and AtZAT12 as well as AtAPX1 and AtAPX2, which encode cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases (APX, were higher in ethanol-treated plants than in untreated control plants, when exposure to high-salinity stress. Additionally, A. thaliana cytosolic APX activity increased by ethanol in response to salinity stress. Moreover, histochemical analyses with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB and nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT revealed that ROS accumulation was inhibited by ethanol under salt stress condition in A. thaliana and rice, in which DAB staining data was further confirmed by Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 content. These results suggest that ethanol enhances high-salinity stress tolerance by detoxifying ROS. Our findings may have implications for improving salt-stress tolerance of agriculturally important field-grown crops.

  8. Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and Silicon Synergistically Enhance Salinity Tolerance of Mung Bean

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Sajid

    2016-06-17

    The present study explored the eco-friendly approach of utilizing plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation and foliar application of silicon (Si) to improve the physiology, growth, and yield of mung bean under saline conditions. We isolated 18 promising PGPR from natural saline soil in Saudi Arabia, and screened them for plant-growth-promoting activities. Two effective strains were selected from the screening trial, and were identified as Enterobacter cloacae and Bacillus drentensis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques, respectively. Subsequently, in a 2-year mung bean field trial, using a randomized complete block design with a split-split plot arrangement, we evaluated the two PGPR strains and two Si levels (1 and 2 kg ha−1), in comparison with control treatments, under three different saline irrigation conditions (3.12, 5.46, and 7.81 dS m−1). The results indicated that salt stress substantially reduced stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, relative water content (RWC), total chlorophyll content, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoid content, plant height, leaf area, dry biomass, seed yield, and salt tolerance index. The PGPR strains and Si levels independently improved all the aforementioned parameters. Furthermore, the combined application of the B. drentensis strain with 2 kg Si ha−1 resulted in the greatest enhancement of mung bean physiology, growth, and yield. Overall, the results of this study provide important information for the benefit of the agricultural industry.

  9. Using euhalophytes to understand salt tolerance and to develop saline agriculture: Suaeda salsa as a promising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Wang, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Background As important components in saline agriculture, halophytes can help to provide food for a growing world population. In addition to being potential crops in their own right, halophytes are also potential sources of salt-resistance genes that might help plant breeders and molecular biologists increase the salt tolerance of conventional crop plants. One especially promising halophyte is Suaeda salsa, a euhalophytic herb that occurs both on inland saline soils and in the intertidal zone. The species produces dimorphic seeds: black seeds are sensitive to salinity and remain dormant in light under high salt concentrations, while brown seeds can germinate under high salinity (e.g. 600 mm NaCl) regardless of light. Consequently, the species is useful for studying the mechanisms by which dimorphic seeds are adapted to saline environments. S. salsa has succulent leaves and is highly salt tolerant (e.g. its optimal NaCl concentration for growth is 200 mm). A series of S. salsa genes related to salt tolerance have been cloned and their functions tested: these include SsNHX1, SsHKT1, SsAPX, SsCAT1, SsP5CS and SsBADH. The species is economically important because its fresh branches have high value as a vegetable, and its seed oil is edible and rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Because it can remove salts and heavy metals from saline soils, S. salsa can also be used in the restoration of salinized or contaminated saline land. Scope Because of its economic and ecological value in saline agriculture, S. salsa is one of the most important halophytes in China. In this review, the value of S. salsa as a source of food, medicine and forage is discussed. Its uses in the restoration of salinized or contaminated land and as a source of salt-resistance genes are also considered. PMID:25288631

  10. ISSR markers based on GA and AG repeats reveal genetic relationship among rice varieties tolerant to drought, flood, or salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ch Surendhar; Babu, A Prasad; Swamy, B P Mallikarjuna; Kaladhar, K; Sarla, N

    2009-02-01

    Drought, flood, salinity, or a combination of these limits rice production. Several rice varieties are well known for their tolerance to specific abiotic stresses. We determined genetic relationship among 12 rice varieties including 9 tolerant to drought, flood, or salinity using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Based on all markers, the nine tolerant varieties formed one cluster distinct from the cluster of three control varieties. The salt-tolerant varieties were closest to two flood-tolerant varieties, and together they were distinct from the drought-tolerant varieties. (GA)(8)YG was the most informative primer, showing the highest polymorphic information content (PIC) and resolving power (Rp). The drought-, flood-, and salt-tolerant varieties grouped in three distinct clusters within the group of tolerant varieties, when (GA)(8)YG was used. Sabita was the only exception. The two aus varieties, Nagina22 and FR13A, were separated and grouped with the drought- and flood-tolerant varieties, respectively, but they were together in dendrograms based on other primers. The results show that ISSR markers associated with (GA)(8)YG delineated the three groups of stress-tolerant varieties from each other and can be used to identify genes/new alleles associated with the three abiotic stresses in rice germplasm.

  11. Systematic engineering of microorganisms to improve alcohol tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Kaizhi; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin [Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2010-10-15

    Microbial production of alcohol is a promising approach for obtaining important chemicals and fuels from renewable carbon resources. One of the key problems associated with the fermentative production of alcohol is alcohol toxicity and/or growth inhibition, resulting in a low alcohol titer in the fermentation broth. Cost-effective production of alcohol needs the scientific community to engineer microbes for increased alcohol tolerance. Here, based on the understanding of the mechanisms of alcohol toxicity and alcohol stress resistance, we review the recent progress in engineering microbial alcohol tolerance by rational approaches. In addition, random approaches including traditional mutagenesis and selection, evolution engineering, random knockout and overexpression libraries, genome shuffling, replicational/transcriptional/translational engineering were also included into this review. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Is salinity tolerance related to osmolytes accumulation in Lygeum spartum L. seedlings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouzid Nedjimi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lygeum spartum L. (Poaceae is a plant of commercial relevance used as raw material for manufacturing paper. This species is a newly found salt tolerant species, but its physiological responses to salinity are poorly understood. The effect of salt stress (50 and 100 mM NaCl on growth, leaf water relations, soluble sugars and free amino acids in L. spartum has been investigated. Fresh and dry weights were reduced significantly above 50 mM NaCl. Transpiration, water potential (Ψω and osmotic potential (Ψπ decreased with elevated NaCl. No change was observed in the turgor potential (Ψτ. Subsequently, the composition of free amino acids estimated by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC indicated a significant increase in free amino acid content. It appears that valine was the main amino acid accumulated significantly by the plants for both NaCl treatments. However, tyrosine levels decrease by salt treatment compared to control. Contents of Na+ and Cl− increased with an increase in salinity. The concentration of Na+ of salinized plants (100 mM NaCl was ∼70-fold greater than that measured in control plants, and this was associated with significant reductions in leaf K+ and Ca2+ concentrations. In addition, a significant accumulation of soluble sugars, probably associated with osmotic adjustment and protection of membrane stability, occurred in roots of salinized plants. Based upon these results, a possible physiological role of soluble sugars and free amino acids was suggested in L. spartum to maintain turgor.

  13. Klebsiella sp. confers enhanced tolerance to salinity and plant growth promotion in oat seedlings (Avena sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapre, Swapnil; Gontia-Mishra, Iti; Tiwari, Sharad

    2018-01-01

    Plant growth and yield is adversely affected by soil salinity. Salt tolerant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain IG 3 was isolated from rhizosphere of wheat plants. The isolate IG 3 was able to grow in presence of NaCl ranging from 0 to 20% in Luria Bertani medium. The present study was planned to evaluate the role of inoculation of PGPR strain IG 3 and its efficacy in augmenting salt tolerance in oat (Avena sativa) under NaCl stress (100mM). The physiological parameter such as shoot length, root length, shoot dry weight, root dry weight and relative water content (RWC) were remarkably higher in IG 3 inoculated plants in comparison to un-inoculated plants under NaCl stress. Similarly, the biochemical parameters such as proline content, electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and activities of antioxidant enzymes were analyzed and found to be notably lesser in IG 3 inoculated oat plants in contrast to un-inoculated plants under salt stress. Inoculation of IG 3 strain to oat seedlings under salt stress positively modulated the expression profile of rbcL and WRKY1 genes. Root colonization of root surface and interior was demonstrated using scanning electron microscopy and tetrazolium staining, respectively. Due these outcomes, it could be implicated that inoculation of PGPR strain IG 3 enhanced plant growth under salt stress condition. This study demonstrates that PGPR play an imperative function in stimulating salt tolerance in plants and can be used as biofertilizer to enhance growth of crops in saline areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Genotypic difference in salinity tolerance in quinoa is determined by differential control of xylem Na+ loading and stomatal density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabala, Sergey; Hariadi, Yuda; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    increased K+ concentrations in the leaf sap, but the most tolerant cultivars had lower xylem Na+ content at the time of sampling. Most tolerant cultivars had lowest leaf sap osmolality. All varieties reduced stomata density when grown under saline conditions. All varieties clustered into two groups...... to the xylem, and reduced stomata density are important physiological traits contributing to genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in quinoa, a halophyte species from Chenopodium family....... old seedlings. Six weeks after the treatment commenced, leaf sap Na and K content and osmolality, stomatal density, chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, and xylem sap Na and K composition were measured. Responses to salinity differed greatly among the varieties. All cultivars had substantially...

  15. Contrasting responses of salinity-stressed salt-tolerant and intolerant winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars to ozone pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y H; Li, X; Li, Y G; Miao, B H; Xu, H; Simmons, M; Yang, X H

    2012-03-01

    Contrasting winter wheat cultivars, salt-tolerant DK961 and intolerant JN17, which sown in no salinity (-S) and salinity (+S) boxes were exposed to charcoal filtered air (CF) and elevated O(3) (+O(3)) in open top chambers (OTCs) for 30 days. In -S DK961 and JN17 plants, +O(3) DK961 and JN17 plants had significantly lower light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (A(sat), 26% and 24%), stomatal conductance (g(s), 20% and 32%) and chlorophyll contents (10% and 21%), while O(3) considerably increased foliar electrolyte leakage (13% and 39%), malondialdehyde content (9% and 23%), POD activity and ABA content. However, responses of these parameters to O(3) were significant in DK961 but not in JN17 in +S treatment. Correlation coefficient of DK961 reached significance level of 0.01, but it was not significant in JN17 under interaction of O(3) and salinity. O(3)-induced reductions were larger in shoot than in root in both cultivars. Results indicate that the salt-tolerant cultivar sustained less damage from salinity than did the intolerant cultivar but was severely injured by O(3) under +S condition. Therefore, selecting for greater salt tolerance may not lead to the expected gains in yield in areas of moderate (100 mM) salinity when O(3) is present in high concentrations. In contrast, salinity-induced stomatal closure effectively reduced sensitivity to O(3) in the salt-intolerant cultivar. Hence we suggest salt-tolerant winter wheat cultivars might be well adapted to areas of high (>100 mM) salinity and O(3) stress, while intolerant cultivars might be adaptable to areas of mild/moderate salinity but high O(3) pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Selection of efficient salt-tolerant bacteria containing ACC deaminase for promotion of tomato growth under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannika Chookietwattana* and Kedsukon Maneewan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available For successful application of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB in salt-affected soil, bioinoculant with salt-tolerant property is required in order to provide better survival and perform well in the field. The present study aimed to select the most efficient salt-tolerant bacterium containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC deaminase from eighty four bacterial strains and to investigate the effects of the selected bacterium on the germination and growth of tomato (Licopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Seeda under saline conditions. The Bacillus licheniformis B2r was selected for its ability to utilize ACC as a sole nitrogen source under salinity stress. It also showed a high ACC deaminase activity at 0.6 M NaCl salinity. Tomato plants inoculated with the selected bacterium under various saline conditions (0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mM NaCl revealed a significant increase in the germination percentage, germination index, root length, and seedling dry weight especially at salinity levels ranging from 30-90 mM NaCl. The work described in this report is an important step in developing an efficient salt-tolerant bioinoculant to facilitate plant growth in saline soil.

  17. Compatible Solute Engineering in Plants for Abiotic Stress Tolerance - Role of Glycine Betaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Shabir Hussain; Singh, Naorem Brajendra; Haribhushan, Athokpam; Mir, Javed Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic stresses collectively are responsible for crop losses worldwide. Among these, drought and salinity are the most destructive. Different strategies have been proposed for management of these stresses. Being a complex trait, conventional breeding approaches have resulted in less success. Biotechnology has emerged as an additional and novel tool for deciphering the mechanism behind these stresses. The role of compatible solutes in abiotic stress tolerance has been studied extensively. Osmotic adjustment, at the physiological level, is an adaptive mechanism involved in drought or salinity tolerance, which permits the maintenance of turgor under conditions of water deficit, as it can counteract the effects of a rapid decline in leaf water potential. Increasing evidence from a series of in vivo and in vitro studies of the physiology, biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology of plants suggest strongly that Glycine Betaine (GB) performs an important function in plants subjected to environmental stresses. It plays an adaptive role in mediating osmotic adjustment and protecting the sub-cellular structures in stressed plants, protection of the transcriptional and translational machineries and intervention as a molecular chaperone in the refolding of enzymes. Many important crops like rice do not accumulate glycinebetaine under stress conditions. Both the exogenous application of GB and the genetically engineered biosynthesis of GB in such crops is a promising strategy to increase stress tolerance. In this review we will discuss the importance of GB for abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Further, strategies like exogenic application and transgenic development of plants accumulating GB will be also be discussed. Work done on exogenic application and genetically engineered biosynthesis of GB will be listed and its advantages and limitations will be described. PMID:24179438

  18. Compatible solute engineering in plants for abiotic stress tolerance - role of glycine betaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Shabir Hussain; Singh, Naorem Brajendra; Haribhushan, Athokpam; Mir, Javed Iqbal

    2013-05-01

    Abiotic stresses collectively are responsible for crop losses worldwide. Among these, drought and salinity are the most destructive. Different strategies have been proposed for management of these stresses. Being a complex trait, conventional breeding approaches have resulted in less success. Biotechnology has emerged as an additional and novel tool for deciphering the mechanism behind these stresses. The role of compatible solutes in abiotic stress tolerance has been studied extensively. Osmotic adjustment, at the physiological level, is an adaptive mechanism involved in drought or salinity tolerance, which permits the maintenance of turgor under conditions of water deficit, as it can counteract the effects of a rapid decline in leaf water potential. Increasing evidence from a series of in vivo and in vitro studies of the physiology, biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology of plants suggest strongly that Glycine Betaine (GB) performs an important function in plants subjected to environmental stresses. It plays an adaptive role in mediating osmotic adjustment and protecting the sub-cellular structures in stressed plants, protection of the transcriptional and translational machineries and intervention as a molecular chaperone in the refolding of enzymes. Many important crops like rice do not accumulate glycinebetaine under stress conditions. Both the exogenous application of GB and the genetically engineered biosynthesis of GB in such crops is a promising strategy to increase stress tolerance. In this review we will discuss the importance of GB for abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Further, strategies like exogenic application and transgenic development of plants accumulating GB will be also be discussed. Work done on exogenic application and genetically engineered biosynthesis of GB will be listed and its advantages and limitations will be described.

  19. Yield-related salinity tolerance traits identified in a nested association mapping (NAM) population of wild barley

    KAUST Repository

    Saade, Stephanie

    2016-09-02

    Producing sufficient food for nine billion people by 2050 will be constrained by soil salinity, especially in irrigated systems. To improve crop yield, greater understanding of the genetic control of traits contributing to salinity tolerance in the field is needed. Here, we exploit natural variation in exotic germplasm by taking a genome-wide association approach to a new nested association mapping population of barley called HEB-25. The large population (1,336 genotypes) allowed cross-validation of loci, which, along with two years of phenotypic data collected from plants irrigated with fresh and saline water, improved statistical power. We dissect the genetic architecture of flowering time under high salinity and we present genes putatively affecting this trait and salinity tolerance. In addition, we identify a locus on chromosome 2H where, under saline conditions, lines homozygous for the wild allele yielded 30% more than did lines homozygous for the Barke allele. Introgressing this wild allele into elite cultivars could markedly improve yield under saline conditions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Tolerating correlated failures in Massively Parallel Stream Processing Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, L.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fault-tolerance techniques for stream processing engines can be categorized into passive and active approaches. A typical passive approach periodically checkpoints a processing task's runtime states and can recover a failed task by restoring its runtime state using its latest checkpoint. On the o......Fault-tolerance techniques for stream processing engines can be categorized into passive and active approaches. A typical passive approach periodically checkpoints a processing task's runtime states and can recover a failed task by restoring its runtime state using its latest checkpoint....... On the other hand, an active approach usually employs backup nodes to run replicated tasks. Upon failure, the active replica can take over the processing of the failed task with minimal latency. However, both approaches have their own inadequacies in Massively Parallel Stream Processing Engines (MPSPE...

  1. Influence of salt tolerant Trichoderma spp. on growth of maize (Zea mays) under different salinity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishna; Manigundan, K; Amaresan, Natarajan

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, a total of 70 Trichoderma spp. were isolated from the rhizosphere soils of vegetable and spice crops that were grown in Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. Initial screening of Trichoderma spp. for salt tolerant properties showed 32 isolates were able to tolerate 10% NaCl. Furthermore, these isolates were screened for their potential plant growth-promoting characteristics such as IAA production, phosphate solubilization, and siderophore production. Among 32 isolates, nine isolates were able to produce IAA, siderophore, and solubilize phosphate. Jar trial was carried out on maize under axenic conditions at 1.67, 6.25, 11.25, 17.2, and 22.9 dS m -1 salt stress using the best nine isolates. Three isolates (TRC3, NRT2, and THB3) were effective in improving germination percentage, reducing reduction percentage of germination (RPG) and also in increasing the shoot and root length under axenic conditions. These three isolates were further tested under pot trial at 52 (sea water), 27, 15, 7, and 1.67 dS m -1 . TRC3 was found to be the most effective isolate compared to the other isolates and significantly increased the physiological parameters like shoot, root length, leaf area, total biomass, and stem and leaf fresh weight at all stress levels. Similarly, total chlorophyll content also increased by TRC3 over control. All three isolates, NRT2, TRC3, and THB3 showed lower accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) content whereas, proline and phenol content were higher than the uninoculated control plants under both normal and saline conditions. The results suggest that these isolates could be utilized for the alleviation of salinity stress in maize. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hydraulic lift and tolerance to salinity of semiarid species: consequences for species interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Cristina; Padilla, Francisco M; Pugnaire, Francisco I; Jackson, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    The different abilities of plant species to use ephemeral or permanent water sources strongly affect physiological performance and species coexistence in water-limited ecosystems. In addition to withstanding drought, plants in coastal habitats often have to withstand highly saline soils, an additional ecological stress. Here we tested whether observed competitive abilities and C-water relations of two interacting shrub species from an arid coastal system were more related to differences in root architecture or salinity tolerance. We explored water sources of interacting Juniperus phoenicea Guss. and Pistacia lentiscus L. plants by conducting physiology measurements, including water relations, CO2 exchange, photochemical efficiency, sap osmolality, and water and C isotopes. We also conducted parallel soil analyses that included electrical conductivity, humidity, and water isotopes. During drought, Pistacia shrubs relied primarily on permanent salty groundwater, while isolated Juniperus plants took up the scarce and relatively fresh water stored in upper soil layers. As drought progressed further, the physiological activity of Juniperus plants nearly stopped while Pistacia plants were only slightly affected. Juniperus plants growing with Pistacia had stem-water isotopes that matched Pistacia, unlike values for isolated Juniperus plants. This result suggests that Pistacia shrubs supplied water to nearby Juniperus plants through hydraulic lift. This lifted water, however, did not appear to benefit Juniperus plants, as their physiological performance with co-occurring Pistacia plants was poor, including lower water potentials and rates of photosynthesis than isolated plants. Juniperus was more salt sensitive than Pistacia, which withstood salinity levels similar to that of groundwater. Overall, the different abilities of the two species to use salty water appear to drive the outcome of their interaction, resulting in asymmetric competition where Juniperus is negatively

  3. Proteome Analysis for Understanding Abiotic Stress (Salinity and Drought Tolerance in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad A. El Rabey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to study the proteome of date palm under salinity and drought stress conditions to possibly identify proteins involved in stress tolerance. For this purpose, three-month-old seedlings of date palm cultivar “Sagie” were subjected to drought (27.5 g/L polyethylene glycol 6000 and salinity stress conditions (16 g/L NaCl for one month. DIGE analysis of protein extracts identified 47 differentially expressed proteins in leaves of salt- and drought-treated palm seedlings. Mass spectrometric analysis identified 12 proteins; three out of them were significantly changed under both salt and drought stress, while the other nine were significantly changed only in salt-stressed plants. The levels of ATP synthase alpha and beta subunits, an unknown protein and some of RubisCO fragments were significantly changed under both salt and drought stress conditions. Changes in abundance of superoxide dismutase, chlorophyll A-B binding protein, light-harvesting complex1 protein Lhca1, RubisCO activase, phosphoglycerate kinase, chloroplast light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein, phosphoribulokinase, transketolase, RubisCO, and some of RubisCO fragments were significant only for salt stress.

  4. SNP-based discovery of salinity-tolerant QTLs in a bi-parental population of rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimhani, D R; Gregorio, Glenn B; Kottearachchi, N S; Samarasinghe, W L G

    2016-12-01

    Breeding for salt tolerance is the most promising approach to enhance the productivity of saline prone areas. However, polygenic inheritance of salt tolerance in rice acts as a bottleneck in conventional breeding for salt tolerance. Hence, we set our goals to construct a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based molecular map employing high-throughput SNP marker technology and to investigate salinity tolerant QTLs with closest flanking markers using an elite rice background. Seedling stage salinity responses were assessed in a population of 281 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from the cross between At354 (salt tolerant) and Bg352 (salt susceptible), by 11 morpho-physiological indices under a hydroponic system. Selected extreme 94 RILs were genotyped using Illumina Infinium rice 6K SNP array and densely saturated molecular map spanning 1460.81 cM of the rice genome with an average interval of 1.29 cM between marker loci was constructed using 1135 polymorphic SNP markers. The results revealed 83 significant QTLs for 11 salt responsive traits explaining 12.5-46.7 % of phenotypic variation in respective traits. Of them, 72 QTLs responsible for 10 traits were co-localized together forming 14 QTL hotspots at 14 different genomic regions. The all QTL hotspots were flanked less than 1 Mb intervals and therefore the SNP loci associated with these QTL hotspots would be important in candidate gene discovery for salt tolerance.

  5. Hyaluronic acid improves "pleasantness" and tolerability of nebulized hypertonic saline in a cohort of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonpensiero, Paolo; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Sepe, Angela; Di Pasqua, Antonio; Ferri, Pasqualina; Siano, Maria; Terlizzi, Vito; Raia, Valeria

    2010-11-01

    Inhaled hypertonic saline improves lung function and decreases pulmonary exacerbations in people with cystic fibrosis. However, side effects such as cough, narrowing of airways and saltiness cause intolerance of the therapy in 8% of patients. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of an inhaled solution of hyaluronic acid and hypertonic saline with hypertonic solution alone on safety and tolerability. A total of 20 patients with cystic fibrosis aged 6 years and over received a single treatment regimen of 7% hypertonic saline solution or hypertonic solution with 0.1% hyaluronate for 2 days nonconsecutively after a washout period in an open crossover study. Cough, throat irritation, and salty taste were evaluated by a modified ordinal score for assessing tolerability; "pleasantness" was evaluated by a five-level, Likert-type scale. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second was registered before and after the end of the saline inhalations. All 20 patients (nine males, 11 females, mean age 13 years, range 8.9-17.7) completed the study. The inhaled solution of 0.1% hyaluronic acid and hypertonic saline significantly improved tolerability and pleasantness compared to hypertonic saline alone. No major adverse effects were observed. No difference was documented in pulmonary function tests between the two treatments. Hyaluronic acid combined with hypertonic saline solution may contribute to improved adherence to hypertonic saline therapy. Further clinical trials are needed to confirm our findings. Considering the extraordinary versatility of hyaluronic acid in biological reactions, perspective studies could define its applicability to halting progression of lung disease in cystic fibrosis.

  6. A stress inducible SUMO conjugating enzyme gene (SaSce9 from a grass halophyte Spartina alterniflora enhances salinity and drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Ratna

    2012-10-01

    stress tolerance in plants through genetic engineering of the sumoylation pathway. The study provides evidence that the overexpression of SaSce9 in plant can improve salinity and drought stress tolerance by protecting the plant through scavenging of ROS, accumulation of an osmolyte, proline, and expression of stress responsive genes. In addition, this study demonstrates the potential of the halophyte grass S. alterniflora as a reservoir of abiotic stress related genes for crop improvement.

  7. Microbial community biomass and structure in saline and non-saline soils associated with salt, boron tolerant poplar clones grown for the phytoremediation of selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Sadikshya R; Bañuelos, Gary; Buyer, Jeffrey S; Hanson, Bradley; Gerik, James

    2017-07-05

    Poplar trees (Populus spp.) are often used in bioremediation strategies because of their ability to phytoextract potential toxic ions, e.g., selenium (Se) from poor quality soils. Soil microorganisms may play a vital role in sustaining health of soil and/or tolerance of these trees grown in poor quality soils by contributing to nutrient cycling, soil structure, overall soil quality and plant survival. The effect of naturally-occurring salts, boron (B) and Se on soil microbial community composition associated with poplar trees is not known for bioremediation strategies. In this study, three Populus clones: 13-366, 345-1, and 347-14 were grown in spring 2006 under highly saline, B and Se clay-like soils in the west side of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of CA, as well as in non-saline sandy loam soils located in the east side of the SJV. After 7 years of growing in the respective soils of different quality, soil samples were collected from poplar clones grown in saline and non-saline soils to examine and compare soil quality effects on soil microbial community biomass and composition. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used to characterize microbial community composition in soils from trees grown at both locations. This study showed that microbial biomass as well as the amount and proportion of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community were lower in all three poplar clones grown in saline soil compared to non-saline soil. Amounts of Gram + bacterial and actinomycetes PLFAs were significantly lower in poplar clone 13-366 grown in saline soil compared to non-saline soil; however, they did not differ significantly in poplar clones 347-14 and 345-1. Additionally, amounts of saprophytic fungal, Gram - bacterial and eukaryotic PLFA remained similar at saline and non-saline sites under poplar clones 347-14, 345-1 and 13-366. Therefore, this study suggested that salinity and B do have an impact on microbial biomass and AMF, however, these poplar clones still

  8. The Salinity Responsive Mechanism of a Hydroxyproline-Tolerant Mutant of Peanut Based on Digital Gene Expression Profiling Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiongming Sui

    Full Text Available Soil salinity seriously limits plant growth and yield. Strategies have been developed for plants to cope with various environmental stresses during evolution. To screen for the broad-spectrum genes and the molecular mechanism about a hydroxyproline-tolerant mutant of peanut with enhanced salinity resistance under salinity stress, digital gene expression (DGE sequencing was performed in the leaves of salinity-resistant mutant (S2 and Huayu20 as control (S4 under salt stress. The results indicate that major transcription factor families linked to salinity stress responses (NAC, bHLH, WRKY, AP2/ERF are differentially expressed in the leaves of peanut under salinity stress. In addition, genes related to cell wall loosening and stiffening (xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases, peroxidases, lipid transfer protein, expansin, extension, late embryogenesis abundant protein family, fatty acid biosynthesis and metabolism (13-lipoxygenase omega-6 fatty acid desaturase, omega-3 fatty acid desaturase and some previously reported stress-related genes encoding proteins such as defensin, universal stress protein, metallothionein, peroxidase etc, and some other known or unknown function stress related genes, have been identified. The information from this study will be useful for further research on the mechanism of salinity resistance and will provide a useful genomic resource for the breeding of salinity resistance variety in peanut.

  9. Cell-Based Phenotyping Reveals QTL for Membrane Potential Maintenance Associated with Hypoxia and Salinity Stress Tolerance in Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad B. Gill

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Waterlogging and salinity are two major abiotic stresses that hamper crop production world-wide resulting in multibillion losses. Plant abiotic stress tolerance is conferred by many interrelated mechanisms. Amongst these, the cell’s ability to maintain membrane potential (MP is considered to be amongst the most crucial traits, a positive relationship between the ability of plants to maintain highly negative MP and its tolerance to both salinity and waterlogging stress. However, no attempts have been made to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL conferring this trait. In this study, the microelectrode MIFE technique was used to measure the plasma membrane potential of epidermal root cells of 150 double haploid (DH lines of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. from a cross between a Chinese landrace TX9425 and Japanese malting cultivar Naso Nijo under hypoxic conditions. A major QTL for the MP in the epidermal root cells in hypoxia-exposed plants was identified. This QTL was located on 2H, at a similar position to the QTL for waterlogging and salinity tolerance reported in previous studies. Further analysis confirmed that MP showed a significant contribution to both waterlogging and salinity tolerance. The fact that the QTL for MP was controlled by a single major QTL illustrates the power of the single-cell phenotyping approach and opens prospects for fine mapping this QTL and thus being more effective in marker assisted selection.

  10. Salinity tolerance of non-native Asian swamp eels (Teleostei: Synbranchidae) in Florida, USA: Comparison of three populations and implications for dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, P.J.; Nico, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Three populations of non-native Asian swamp eels are established in peninsular Florida (USA), and comprise two different genetic lineages. To assess potential for these fish to penetrate estuarine habitats or use coastal waters as dispersal routes, we determined their salinity tolerances. Swamp eels from the three Florida populations were tested by gradual (chronic) salinity increases; additionally, individuals from the Miami population were tested by abrupt (acute) salinity increases. Results showed significant tolerance by all populations to mesohaline waters: Mean survival time at 14 ppt was 63 days. The Homestead population, a genetically distinct lineage, exhibited greater tolerance to higher salinity than Tampa and Miami populations. Acute experiments indicated that swamp eels were capable of tolerating abrupt shifts from 0 to 16 ppt, with little mortality over 10 days. The broad salinity tolerance demonstrated by these experiments provides evidence that swamp eels are physiologically capable of infiltrating estuarine environments and using coastal waters to invade new freshwater systems. ?? 2009 US Government.

  11. Salinity tolerance of cultured Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis L.: Effects on growth and on survival as a function of temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overton, Julia Lynne; Bayley, M.; Paulsen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Eurasian perch is generally only considered to be a candidate for freshwater aquaculture even though wild populations are found in estuarine and brackish water habitats. Little knowledge exists on two issues a) the effect of temperature on the salinity tolerance of perch and b) the long......-term effects of brackish water on their overall growth performance. The present study addresses these two questions. Firstly, the effect of temperature (12, 15, 20 and 25°C) on perch survival of a salinity challenge at either 13 or 18‰ was determined. Survival was unaffected by 13‰ at the two lowest...... temperatures whereas higher temperature and higher salinities had a dramatic detrimental effect (at 25°C, 50% mortality was reach at 62h and 39h for 13‰ and 18‰, respectively). Secondly, we examined the effect of salinity on growth, which was assessed by measuring standard length and body weight at regular...

  12. Analysis of 13000 unique Citrus clusters associated with fruit quality, production and salinity tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dossat Carole

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvement of Citrus, the most economically important fruit crop in the world, is extremely slow and inherently costly because of the long-term nature of tree breeding and an unusual combination of reproductive characteristics. Aside from disease resistance, major commercial traits in Citrus are improved fruit quality, higher yield and tolerance to environmental stresses, especially salinity. Results A normalized full length and 9 standard cDNA libraries were generated, representing particular treatments and tissues from selected varieties (Citrus clementina and C. sinensis and rootstocks (C. reshni, and C. sinenis × Poncirus trifoliata differing in fruit quality, resistance to abscission, and tolerance to salinity. The goal of this work was to provide a large expressed sequence tag (EST collection enriched with transcripts related to these well appreciated agronomical traits. Towards this end, more than 54000 ESTs derived from these libraries were analyzed and annotated. Assembly of 52626 useful sequences generated 15664 putative transcription units distributed in 7120 contigs, and 8544 singletons. BLAST annotation produced significant hits for more than 80% of the hypothetical transcription units and suggested that 647 of these might be Citrus specific unigenes. The unigene set, composed of ~13000 putative different transcripts, including more than 5000 novel Citrus genes, was assigned with putative functions based on similarity, GO annotations and protein domains Conclusion Comparative genomics with Arabidopsis revealed the presence of putative conserved orthologs and single copy genes in Citrus and also the occurrence of both gene duplication events and increased number of genes for specific pathways. In addition, phylogenetic analysis performed on the ammonium transporter family and glycosyl transferase family 20 suggested the existence of Citrus paralogs. Analysis of the Citrus gene space showed that the most

  13. Dissipation of excess photosynthetic energy contributes to salinity tolerance: a comparative study of salt-tolerant Ricinus communis and salt-sensitive Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Neto, Milton C; Lobo, Ana K M; Martins, Marcio O; Fontenele, Adilton V; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio G

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between salt tolerance and photosynthetic mechanisms of excess energy dissipation were assessed using two species that exhibit contrasting responses to salinity, Ricinus communis (tolerant) and Jatropha curcas (sensitive). The salt tolerance of R. communis was indicated by unchanged electrolyte leakage (cellular integrity) and dry weight in leaves, whereas these parameters were greatly affected in J. curcas. The leaf Na+ content was similar in both species. Photosynthesis was intensely decreased in both species, but the reduction was more pronounced in J. curcas. In this species biochemical limitations in photosynthesis were more prominent, as indicated by increased C(i) values and decreased Rubisco activity. Salinity decreased both the V(cmax) (in vivo Rubisco activity) and J(max) (maximum electron transport rate) more significantly in J. curcas. The higher tolerance in R. communis was positively associated with higher photorespiratory activity, nitrate assimilation and higher cyclic electron flow. The high activity of these alternative electron sinks in R. communis was closely associated with a more efficient photoprotection mechanism. In conclusion, salt tolerance in R. communis, compared with J. curcas, is related to higher electron partitioning from the photosynthetic electron transport chain to alternative sinks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. The over-expression of Chrysanthemum crassum CcSOS1 improves the salinity tolerance of chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Juan; Song, Aiping; Guan, Zhiyong; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi; Lou, Wanghuai; Fang, Weimin; Liu, Zhaolei; Chen, Sumei

    2014-06-01

    Soil salinity represents a major constraint on plant growth. Here, we report that the over-expression of the Chrysanthemum crassum plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene CcSOS1, driven by the CaMV 35S promoter, improved the salinity tolerance of chrysanthemum 'Jinba'. In salinity-stressed transgenic plants, both the proportion of the leaf area suffering damage and the electrical conductivity of the leaf were lower in the transgenic lines than in salinity-stressed wild type plants. After a 6 day exposure to 200 mM NaCl, the leaf content of both chlorophyll (a+b) and proline was higher in the transgenic than in the wild type plants. The activity of both superoxide dismutase and peroxidase was higher in the transgenic than in the wild type plants throughout the period of NaCl stress. The transgenic plants had a stronger control over the ingress of Na(+) into the plant, particularly with respect to the youngest leaves, and so maintained a more favorable K(+)/Na(+) ratio. The result suggests that a possible strategy for improving the salinity tolerance of chrysanthemum could target the restriction of Na(+) accumulation. This study is the first to report the transgenic expression of a Na(+) efflux carrier in chrysanthemum.

  15. Genotypic differences in physiological characteristics in the tolerance to drought and salinity combined stress between Tibetan wild and cultivated barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Imrul Mosaddek; Dai, Huaxin; Zheng, Weite; Cao, Fangbin; Zhang, Guoping; Sun, Dongfa; Wu, Feibo

    2013-02-01

    Greenhouse pot experiments were conducted to investigate genotypic differences in response to individual and combined stresses of drought and salinity between Tibetan wild barley genotypes (XZ5, drought-tolerant; XZ16, salinity/aluminum tolerant) and cv. CM72 (salinity-tolerant). Either drought (D) or salinity (S) alone and in combination (D + S) stresses significantly decreased plant growth, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), water potential and osmotic potential, with the largest suppression under combined stress, and two wild genotypes showing more tolerance than CM72. Water use efficiency (WUE) increased significantly in XZ5 and XZ16 after D + S, but no significant change in CM72. XZ5 and XZ16 showed 30.9% and 12.1% higher K(+) level and 30.5% and 24.1% lower Na(+)/K(+) ratio in plants, compared with CM72, with increased metal nutrients as Ca, Fe and Mn under D + S. The peak accumulation in proline and glycine-beatine was recorded in combined stress with larger accumulation in two wild genotypes. Moreover, larger increases in the level of ASA and GSH, and the activities of Ca(2+)Mg(2+)-ATPase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), guaiacol peroxidase (POD) and glutathione reductase (GR) under D + S vs control were observed in XZ5 and XZ16 than CM72, with less accumulation of H(2)O(2) and malondialdehyde. These results suggest that high tolerance to D + S stress of XZ5 and XZ16 is closely related to lower Na(+)/K(+) ratio and enhanced Ca(2+)Mg(2+)-ATPase, proline, glycine-beatine and WUE, and improved capacity of antioxidative performance to scavenge reactive oxygen species and thus suppressed level of lipid peroxidation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of Salinity Tolerance in an Advanced Back Cross Rice Population Based on Some Inorganic Ions at Seedling Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammadi Chamnari1

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to investigate the effect of salinity stress on sodium, potassium and calcium concentrations, and Na+/K+ and Na+/Ca2+ ratios at seedling stage in an advanced back cross (BC2F6 rice population. The population was derived from crossing between Hashemi, an Iranian cultivar, and IR67418-110-32222 (IR-22 from IRRI. The ANOVA indicated that the effects of genotypes, salinity stress and interaction between stress and genotype were significant for all the traits, which is suggestive of high level of genetic variation, salinity effect on traits and different response of the genotypes to salinity levels. The salinity stress markedly decreased the K+ concentration in the shoot. However the shoot Na+ and Ca2+ concentration and Na+/K+ and Na+/Ca2+ ratios were significantly increased in saline environment. The population characteristics mean value were found to be between of parents values and it often shifted to recurrent parent (Hashemi value in both stress and non stress conditions. It shows that Hashemi variety gene’s leave more influences on the expression of the traits in the population. Transgressive segregation was observed for all the studied traits in the population lines. Genetic and phenotypic correlations among the studied traits showed the same trend. The highest correlation coefficients were related to Na+ concentration and Na+/K+ (rg= 0.89** in non stress condition. The high heritability levels of the traits provide selection possibility for salinity tolerance in the population based on these traits. According to the present findings, it is possible to candidate some lines (such as line number 139 as salt tolerant at the seedling stage.

  17. Constitutive expression of a salinity-induced wheat WRKY transcription factor enhances salinity and ionic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yuxiang, E-mail: yuxiangqin@126.com [Department of Biotechnology, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Tian, Yanchen [The Key Laboratory of Plant Cell Engineering and Germplasm Innovation, Ministry of Education, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Han, Lu; Yang, Xinchao [Department of Biotechnology, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •A class II WRKY transcription factor, TaWRKY79 was isolated and characterized. •TaWRKY79 was induced by NaCl or abscisic acid. •843 bp regulatory segment was sufficient to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. •TaWRKY79 enhanced salinity and ionic tolerance while reduced sensitivity to ABA. •TaWRKY79 increased salinity and ionic tolerance in an ABA-dependent pathway. -- Abstract: The isolation and characterization of TaWRKY79, a wheat class II WRKY transcription factor, is described. Its 1297 bp coding region includes a 987 bp long open reading frame. TaWRKY79 was induced by stressing seedlings with either NaCl or abscisic acid (ABA). When a fusion between an 843 bp segment upstream of the TaWRKY79 coding sequence and GUS was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana, GUS staining indicated that this upstream segment captured the sequence(s) required to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. When TaWRKY79 was constitutively expressed as a transgene in A. thaliana, the transgenic plants showed an improved capacity to extend their primary root in the presence of either 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM LiCl or 2 μM ABA. The inference was that TaWRKY79 enhanced the level of tolerance to both salinity and ionic stress, while reducing the level of sensitivity to ABA. The ABA-related genes ABA1, ABA2 ABI1 and ABI5 were all up-regulated in the TaWRKY79 transgenic plants, suggesting that the transcription factor operates in an ABA-dependent pathway.

  18. The role of salinity tolerance and competition in the distribution of an endangered desert salt marsh endemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFalco, Lesley; Scoles, Sara; Beamguard, Emily R.

    2017-01-01

    Rare plants are often associated with distinctive soil types, and understanding why endemic species occur in unique environments is fundamental for their management. At Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada, USA, we evaluated whether the limited distribution of endangered Amargosa niterwort (Nitrophila mohavensis) is explained by this species’ tolerance of saline soils on salt-encrusted mud flats compared with the broadly distributed desert saltgrass (Distichlis spicata var. stricta). We simultaneously explored whether niterwort distribution is restricted from expanding due to interspecific competition with saltgrass. Surface soils collected throughout niterwort’s range were unexpectedly less saline with lower extractable Na, seasonal electroconductivity, and Na absorption ratio, and higher soil moisture than in adjacent saltgrass or mixed shrub habitats. Comparison of niterwort and saltgrass growth along an experimental salinity gradient in a greenhouse demonstrated lower growth of niterwort at all but the highest NaCl concentrations. Although growth of niterwort ramets was similar when transplanted into both habitats at the refuge below Crystal Reservoir, niterwort reproductive effort was considerably higher in saltgrass compared to its own habitat, implying reallocation of resources to sexual reproduction to maximize fitness when the probability of ramet mortality increases with greater salinity stress. Saltgrass was not a demonstrated direct competitor of niterwort; however, this species is known to increase soil salinity by exuding salt ions and through litterfall. Niterwort conservation will benefit from protecting hydrological processes that reduce salinity stress and preventing saltgrass colonization into niterwort habitat.

  19. Efficient acquisition of iron confers greater tolerance to saline-alkaline stress in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Yang, An; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying tolerance to saline-alkaline stress in two rice genotypes, Dongdao-4 and Jigeng-88, we exposed them to medium supplemented with 10 mM Na2CO3 and 40 mM NaCl (pH 8.5). Dongdao-4 plants displayed higher biomass, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic rates, and a larger root system than Jigeng-88 under saline-alkaline conditions. Dongdao-4 had a higher shoot Na+/K+ ratio than Jigeng-88 under both control and saline-alkaline conditions. Dongdao-4 exhibited stronger rhizospheric acidification than Jigeng-88 under saline-alkaline conditions, resulting from greater up-regulation of H+-ATPases at the transcriptional level. Moreover, Fe concentrations in shoots and roots of Dongdao-4 were higher than those in Jigeng-88, and a higher rate of phytosiderophore exudation was detected in Dongdao-4 versus Jigeng-88 under saline-alkaline conditions. The Fe-deficiency-responsive genes OsIRO2, OsIRT1, OsNAS1, OsNAS2, OsYSL2, and OsYSL15 were more strongly up-regulated in Dongdao-4 than Jigeng-88 plants in saline-alkaline medium, implying greater tolerance of Dongdao-4 plants to Fe deficiency. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of Fe deficiency on the two genotypes, and found that Dongdao-4 was more tolerant to Fe deficiency. Exposure to Fe-deficient medium led to greater rhizospheric acidification and phytosiderophore exudation in Dongdao-4 than Jigeng-88 plants. Expression levels of OsIRO2, OsIRT1, OsNAS1, OsNAS2, OsYSL2, and OsYSL15 were higher in Dongdao-4 than Jigeng-88 plants under Fe-deficient conditions. These results demonstrate that a highly efficient Fe acquisition system together with a large root system may underpin the greater tolerance of Dongdao-4 plants to saline-alkaline stress. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Variation in the leaf δ(13)C is correlated with salinity tolerance under elevated CO(2) concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Amor, Francisco M

    2013-02-15

    Increasing atmospheric CO(2) concentration is expected to impact agricultural systems through a direct effect on leaf gas exchange and also due to effects on the global availability of good-quality water as a result of climate warming. Thus, the planning of land use for agriculture requires new tools to identify the capability of current cultivars to adapt to growth restrictions under new ambient conditions. We hypothesized that salinity stress may produce a specific pattern of carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) at elevated CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) that could be used in the breeding of salinity tolerance in a near-future climate scenario. Five commercial tomato cultivars were evaluated at elevated (800 μmol mol(-1)) or standard (400 μmol mol(-1)) [CO(2)], being irrigated with a nutrient solution containing 0, 60 or 120 mM NaCl. The biomass enhanced ratio, leaf net CO(2) assimilation and stomatal conductance, leaf NO(3)(-) and Cl(-) concentrations and leaf free amino acid profile were analyzed in relation to the pattern of δ(13)C, under different saline stress conditions. The results indicate that at high [CO(2)]: (i) salinity tolerance was enhanced, but the response was strongly cultivar dependent, (ii) leaf NO(3)(-) concentration was increased whilst Cl(-) and proline concentrations decreased, and (iii) leaf δ(13)C was highly correlated with plant dry matter accumulation and with leaf proline concentration, leaf gas exchange and ion concentrations. This study shows that δ(13)C is a useful tool for the determination of the salinity tolerance of tomato at high [CO(2)], as an integrative parameter of the stress period, and was validated by traditional physiological plant stress traits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. High-Throughput Non-destructive Phenotyping of Traits that Contribute to Salinity Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Mariam Awlia; Arianna Nigro; Jiri Fajkus; Sandra Schmockel; Sonia Negrao; Diana Santelia; Martin Trtilek; Mark Tester; Magdalena Maria Julkowska; Klara Panzarova

    2016-01-01

    Reproducible and efficient high-throughput phenotyping approaches, combined with advances in genome sequencing, are facilitating the discovery of genes affecting plant performance. Salinity tolerance is a desirable trait that can be achieved through breeding, where most have aimed at selecting for plants that perform effective ion exclusion from the shoots. To determine overall plant performance under salt stress, it is helpful to investigate several plant traits collectively in one experimen...

  2. External potassium (K(+)) application improves salinity tolerance by promoting Na(+)-exclusion, K(+)-accumulation and osmotic adjustment in contrasting peanut cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bhaduri, Debarati; Meena, Har Narayan; Kalariya, Kuldeepsingh

    2016-06-01

    Achieving salt-tolerance is highly desirable in today's agricultural context. Apart from developing salt-tolerant cultivars, possibility lies with management options, which can improve crop yield and have significant impact on crop physiology as well. Thus present study was aimed to evaluate the ameliorative role of potassium (K(+)) in salinity tolerance of peanut. A field experiment was conducted using two differentially salt-responsive cultivars and three levels of salinity treatment (control, 2.0 dS m(-1), 4.0 dS m(-1)) along with two levels (with and without) of potassium fertilizer (0 and 30 kg K2O ha(-1)). Salinity treatment incurred significant changes in overall physiology in two peanut cultivars, though the responses varied between the tolerant and the susceptible one. External K(+) application resulted in improved salinity tolerance in terms of plant water status, biomass produced under stress, osmotic adjustment and better ionic balance. Tolerant cv. GG 2 showed better salt tolerance by excluding Na(+) from uptake and lesser accumulation in leaf tissue and relied more on organic osmolyte for osmotic adjustment. On the contrary, susceptible cv. TG 37A allowed more Na(+) to accumulate in the leaf tissue and relied more on inorganic solute for osmotic adjustment under saline condition, hence showed more susceptibility to salinity stress. Application of K(+) resulted in nullifying the negative effect of salinity stress with slightly better response in the susceptible cultivar (TG 37A). The present study identified Na(+)-exclusion as a key strategy for salt-tolerance in tolerant cv. GG 2 and also showed the ameliorating role of K(+) in salt-tolerance with varying degree of response amongst tolerant and susceptible cultivars. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial use of choline to tolerate salinity shifts in sea-ice brines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firth, E.; Carpenter, S. D.; Sørensen, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    of starting salinities, when salinity was increased, 14C-solute (choline or derivatives) was preferentially retained as an intracellular osmolyte; when salinity was decreased, 14C-choline was preferentially respired to 14CO2. Additional experiments with cold-adapted bacteria in culture indicated......Bacteria within the brine network of sea ice experience temperature-driven fluctuations in salinity on both short and long temporal scales, yet their means of osmoprotection against such fluctuations is poorly understood. One mechanism used to withstand the ion fluxes caused by salinity shifts...... brines drained from sea ice in Kanajorsuit Bay (2013) and Kobbefjord (2014), Greenland, we measured the utilization of 14C-choline (precursor to glycine betaine, a common compatible solute) at -1°C upon salinity shifts to double and to half the starting salinity. In all cases and across a range...

  4. S-methylmethionine is involved in the salinity tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants at germination and early growth stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Saori; Mitsuya, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    Methionine (Met) is biosynthesized by the activated methyl cycle and S-methylmethionine (SMM) cycle in one-carbon (C1) metabolism in plants. It is converted to S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) which serves as a precursor for many metabolites including glycinebetaine, methylated polyols, polyamines and ethylene which accumulate in plants in response to salinity. We have investigated how the Met biosynthetic pathway is regulated under saline conditions at the transcriptional level in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Within Met biosynthesis-related genes, the expression of homocysteine methyltransferase (HMT) and methionine methyltransferase (MMT) genes in SMM cycle had altered toward increasing Met production by the presence of NaCl. We have determined the salinity tolerance of an Arabidopsis mmt mutant with an insertional mutation in the single copy of the AtMMT gene. Although the mmt mutant showed comparable germination and shoot growth with wild type under normal conditions, NaCl treatment caused severe repression of germination rate and shoot growth in the mmt mutant compared with in the wild type. These results indicate that the utilization of SMM is important for the salinity tolerance of Arabidopsis plants at the germination and early growth stages. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  5. Quantitative Trait Loci for Salinity Tolerance Identified under Drained and Waterlogged Conditions and Their Association with Flowering Time in Barley (Hordeum vulgare. L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanling; Shabala, Sergey; Li, Chengdao; Liu, Chunji; Zhang, Wenying; Zhou, Meixue

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting crop production via adverse effects of osmotic stress, specific ion toxicity, and stress-related nutritional disorders. Detrimental effects of salinity are also often exacerbated by low oxygen availability when plants are grown under waterlogged conditions. Developing salinity-tolerant varieties is critical to overcome these problems, and molecular marker assisted selection can make breeding programs more effective. In this study, a double haploid (DH) population consisting of 175 lines, derived from a cross between a Chinese barley variety Yangsimai 1 (YSM1) and an Australian malting barley variety Gairdner, was used to construct a high density molecular map which contained more than 8,000 Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Salinity tolerance of parental and DH lines was evaluated under drained (SalinityD) and waterlogged (SalinityW) conditions at two different sowing times. Three quantitative trait loci (QTL) located on chromosome 1H, single QTL located on chromosomes 1H, 2H, 4H, 5H and 7H, were identified to be responsible for salinity tolerance under different environments. Waterlogging stress, daylight length and temperature showed significant effects on barley salinity tolerance. The QTL for salinity tolerance mapped on chromosomes 4H and 7H, QSlwd.YG.4H, QSlwd.YG.7H and QSlww.YG.7H were only identified in winter trials, while the QTL on chromosome 2H QSlsd.YG.2H and QSlsw.YG.2H were only detected in summer trials. Genes associated with flowering time were found to pose significant effects on the salinity QTL mapped on chromosomes 2H and 5H in summer trials. Given the fact that the QTL for salinity tolerance QSlsd.YG.1H and QSlww.YG.1H-1 reported here have never been considered in the literature, this warrants further investigation and evaluation for suitability to be used in breeding programs.

  6. Comparison of saline tolerance among genetically similar species of Fusarium and Meloidogyne recovered from marine and terrestrial habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, W. H.; LaMondia, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    Successful plant pathogens co-evolve and adapt to the environmental constraints placed on host plants. We compared the salt tolerance of two salt marsh pathogens, Fusarium palustre and Meloidogyne spartinae, to genetically related terrestrial species, F. sporotrichioides and Meloidogyne hapla, to assess whether the salt marsh species had acquired selective traits for persisting in saline environments or if salt tolerance was comparable among Fusarium and Meloidogyne species. Comparisons of both species were made in vitro in vessels containing increasing concentration of NaCl. We observed that F. palustre was more tolerant to NaCl than F. sporotrichioides. The radial expansion of F. palustre on NaCl-amended agar plates was unaffected by increasing concentrations up to 0.3 M. F. sporotrichioides showed large reductions in growth at the same concentrations. Survival of M. hapla was greatest at 0 M, and reduced by half in a 0.3 M solution for 4 days. No juveniles survived exposure to 0.3 M NaCl for 12 days. M. spartinae survived at all NaCl concentrations tested, including 1.0 M for at least 12 days. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that marine organisms in the upper tidal zone must osmoregulate to withstand a wide range of salinity and provide evidence that these pathogens evolved in saline conditions and are not recent introductions from terrestrial niches.

  7. Niche Limits of Symbiotic Gut Microbiota Constrain the Salinity Tolerance of Brine Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougué, Odrade; Gallet, Romain; Chevin, Luis-Miguel; Lenormand, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Symbiosis generally causes an expansion of the niche of each partner along the axis for which a service is mutually provided. However, for other axes, the niche can be restricted to the intersection of each partner's niche and can thus be constrained rather than expanded by mutualism. We explore this phenomenon using Artemia as a model system. This crustacean is able to survive at very high salinities but not at low salinities, although its hemolymph's salinity is close to freshwater. We hypothesized that this low-salinity paradox results from poor performance of its associated microbiota at low salinity. We showed that, in sterile conditions, Artemia had low survival at all salinities when algae were the only source of carbon. In contrast, survival was high at all salinities when fed with yeast. We also demonstrated that bacteria isolated from Artemia's gut reached higher densities at high salinities than at low salinities, including when grown on algae. Taken together, our results show that Artemia can survive at low salinities, but their gut microbiota, which are required for algae digestion, have reduced fitness. Widespread facultative symbiosis may thus be an important determinant of niche limits along axes not specific to the mutualistic interaction.

  8. Engineering biofuel tolerance in non-native producing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hu; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of renewable biofuels through microbiological processes has drawn significant attention in recent years, mostly due to the increasing concerns on the petroleum fuel shortages and the environmental consequences of the over-utilization of petroleum-based fuels. In addition to native biofuel-producing microbes that have been employed for biofuel production for decades, recent advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology have made it possible to produce biofuels in several non-native biofuel-producing microorganisms. Compared to native producers, these non-native systems carry the advantages of fast growth, simple nutrient requirements, readiness for genetic modifications, and even the capability to assimilate CO2 and solar energy, making them competitive alternative systems to further decrease the biofuel production cost. However, the tolerance of these non-native microorganisms to toxic biofuels is naturally low, which has restricted the potentials of their application for high-efficiency biofuel production. To address the issues, researches have been recently conducted to explore the biofuel tolerance mechanisms and to construct robust high-tolerance strains for non-native biofuel-producing microorganisms. In this review, we critically summarize the recent progress in this area, focusing on three popular non-native biofuel-producing systems, i.e. Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of Genetic Control of Traits Related to Salinity Tolerance in Rice Seedling Using Line × Tester Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sabouri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available After wheat, rice is the second most important cereal grown in Iran that improvement of its economical characteristics always has important role in the rice breeding programs. In order to estimate the genetic parameters and identify salt-tolerant varieties and hybrids in seedling stage, seven female parents (Shah-pasand, Gharib, Tarom Mahalli, Ahlami Tarom, Hashemi and Dom Sepid and four male parents (Khazar, Sepidroud, Dorfak and IR28 were crossed in a Line × tester mating design and their progenies were evaluated for traits related to salinity tolerance in Physiology Laboratory of Gonbad Kavous University. These traits include genetic code, chlorophyll content, root and shoot length, dry weight of root and shoot, sodium and potassium percentage in roots and shoots, ratio of sodium to potassium in roots and shoots and the percentage of seedlings’ stand. The results showed both additive and non-additive effects are involved in seedlings’ traits under salinity condition but non-additive effects play more important role in the genetic control of the traits. In this study, it was found that varieties of Hashemi (-0.101, Gharib (-0.284, Tarom Mahalli (-0.326, Sepidroud (-0.562 and Dorfak (-0.164 which possess good general combining ability are suitable for transferring more desirable genetic code and the higher percentage of seedlings stand and could be used in breeding programs to reduce the genetic code and increase the seedlings’ stand under salinity stress. In addition, investigation of specific combining ability for morphological and physiological characteristics showed that among the 28 crosses, three hybrids of Sepidroud×Ahlami Tarom, Dorfak×Hashemi and Dorfak×Sepidroud could be suitable for the breeding programs of salinity tolerance in seedling stage.

  10. Investigation of Tolerance, Yield and Yield Components of Wheat Cultivars to Salinity of Irrigation Water at Sensitive Stages of Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Saadatian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research in order to study of tolerance ability of wheat cultivates yield and yield components to salinity of irrigation water at sensitive stages of growth, was carried out as a factorial based on a randomized complete block design with 3 replications at greenhouse of Agricultural Faculty of Bu-Ali Sina University, in 2009. Treatments were included wheat cultivars of Alvand, Tous, Sayson and Navid and salinity of irrigation water induced by sodium chloride at five levels of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 dS m-1. The results showed that percentage and rate of emergence, plant height, 1000-grain weight, number of seed per spike, number of spike per pot, biological and grain yield reduced by increasing salinity level. At all stress levels Navid cv. had highest emergence percentage. In non-stress and 4 dS m-1, Alvand cv. and at higher levels of stress, Tous cv. had high height in reproductive phase. At control and 4 dS m-1, Sayson cv. and at 8, 12 and 16 dS m-1, Tous cv. in majority of yield and yield components traits had significant superior than other cultivars. Tolerance index of Sayson cv. at 4 and 8 dS m-1 was more than other cultivars but at 12 and 16 dS m-1, maximum value of this index was belonged to Tous cv. At all salinity levels, Alvand cv. had least tolerance index to stress. Number of spike per pot had maximum direct effect on grain yield of wheat cultivars in stress condition. Also indirect effect of biological yield via number of spike per pot than other its indirect effects, had maximum share in wheat seed yield.

  11. Engineering the future. Development of transgenic plants with enhanced tolerance to adverse environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbriggen, Matias D; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Carrillo, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Environmental stresses - especially drought and salinity - and iron limitation are the primary causes of crop yield losses. Therefore, improvement of plant stress tolerance has paramount relevance for agriculture, and vigorous efforts are underway to design stress-tolerant crops. Three aspects of this ongoing research are reviewed here. First, attempts have been made to strengthen endogenous plant defences, which are characterised by intertwined, hierarchical gene networks involved in stress perception, signalling, regulation and expression of effector proteins, enzymes and metabolites. The multigenic nature of this response requires detailed knowledge of the many actors and interactions involved in order to identify proper intervention points, followed by significant engineering of the prospective genes to prevent undesired side-effects. A second important aspect refers to the effect of concurrent stresses as plants normally meet in the field (e.g., heat and drought). Recent findings indicate that plant responses to combined environmental hardships are somehow unique and cannot be predicted from the addition of the individual stresses, underscoring the importance of programming research within this conceptual framework. Finally, the photosynthetic microorganisms from which plants evolved (i.e., algae and cyanobacteria) deploy a totally different strategy to acquire stress tolerance, based on the substitution of stress-vulnerable targets by resistant isofunctional proteins that could take over the lost functions under adverse conditions. Reintroduction of these ancient traits in model and crop plants has resulted in increased tolerance to environmental hardships and iron starvation, opening a new field of opportunities to increase the endurance of crops growing under suboptimal conditions.

  12. High tolerance to salinity and herbivory stresses may explain the expansion of Ipomoea cairica to salt marshes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Invasive plants are often confronted with heterogeneous environments and various stress factors during their secondary phase of invasion into more stressful habitats. A high tolerance to stress factors may allow exotics to successfully invade stressful environments. Ipomoea cairica, a vigorous invader in South China, has recently been expanding into salt marshes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine why this liana species is able to invade a stressful saline environment, we utilized I. cairica and 3 non-invasive species for a greenhouse experiment. The plants were subjected to three levels of salinity (i.e., watered with 0, 4 and 8 g L(-1 NaCl solutions and simulated herbivory (0, 25 and 50% of the leaf area excised treatments. The relative growth rate (RGR of I. cairica was significantly higher than the RGR of non-invasive species under both stress treatments. The growth performance of I. cairica was not significantly affected by either stress factor, while that of the non-invasive species was significantly inhibited. The leaf condensed tannin content was generally lower in I. cairica than in the non-invasive I. triloba and Paederia foetida. Ipomoea cairica exhibited a relatively low resistance to herbivory, however, its tolerance to stress factors was significantly higher than either of the non-invasive species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study examining the expansion of I. cairica to salt marshes in its introduced range. Our results suggest that the high tolerance of I. cairica to key stress factors (e.g., salinity and herbivory contributes to its invasion into salt marshes. For I. cairica, a trade-off in resource reallocation may allow increased resources to be allocated to tolerance and growth. This may contribute to a secondary invasion into stressful habitats. Finally, we suggest that I. cairica could spread further and successfully occupy salt marshes, and countermeasures based on herbivory could be

  13. Salinity-induced accumulation of organic osmolytes in barley and wheat leaves correlates with increased oxidative stress tolerance: in planta evidence for cross-tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puniran-Hartley, Norhawa; Hartley, Joseph; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-10-01

    Salinity tolerance in plants is dependent on their abilities to adjust osmotically to reduced soil water potential and to keep intracellular ROS levels under control. Both these processes are believed to rely on de novo synthesis of organic osmolytes (traditionally defined as compatible solutes). However direct in planta evidence for anti-oxidant roles of compatible solutes are scarce. In this work, we induced changes in the level of endogenous organic osmolytes by exposing plants to various levels of NaCl (salinity stress; 50-300 mM range) and then studying sensitivity of leaves to oxidative (UV-B) stress. Increase in the external NaCl concentrations was accompanied by the progressive accumulation in leaf Na(+). This accumulation was much higher in old leaves compared with young ones. In old leaves, three major inorganic ions (Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+)) have made 67.7% and 70.4% of leaf osmotic potential (in wheat and barley, respectively) when exposed to 200 mM NaCl treatment, while in young leaves their contribution was only 43.9% and 46.8%, respectively. Here, organic osmolytes played a substantial role in leaf osmotic adjustment. Increased accumulation of organic osmolytes correlated strongly with activity of PSII in leaves exposed to oxidation inducing UV-B treatment in both species (R(2) = 0.50 for wheat and 0.71 for barley). We conclude that salinity-induced accumulation of organic osmolytes in barley and wheat leaves correlates with increased oxidative stress tolerance and provides the evidence for a mechanism of cross-tolerance between these two stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Salinity tolerance in Hyalophysa chattoni (Ciliophora, Apostomatida), a symbiont of the estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Kristy A; Landers, Stephen C; Pappanastos, Ed

    2008-05-01

    The apostome ciliate Hyalophysa chattoni, a symbiont of the estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio, was tested for its growth and reproductive ability in a wide range of salinities from 0.1 to 55 ppt. Shrimp, with their attached ciliates, were slowly acclimated to different salinities in order to assess protozoan cell size and division. The trophont and tomont stages of the ciliate life cycle were analyzed. In both stages, cell size increased with salinity from 0.1 to 20 ppt. Cell size leveled in the 20-35 ppt range, and decreased at higher salinities. The number of daughter cells produced per tomont cyst correlated with increased cell size, and also correlated with increased salinity. Additionally, increased salinity correlated with an increase in the percentage of cells able to divide and excyst as tomite stages. These results indicate that H. chattoni is able to grow and divide more effectively at salinities closer to seawater than in the estuarine environment from which they were collected. Though able to survive salinities from 0.1 to 55 ppt, the species is better adapted for an existence in the higher salt concentrations.

  15. Salinity effect on crop development and yield, analysis of salt tolerance according to several classification methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katerji, N.; Hoorn, van J.W.; Hamdy, A.; Mastrorilli, M.

    2003-01-01

    The publication is a synthesis of previous publications on the results of a long-term lysimeter experiment. From 1989 to 1998, the experimental variables were soil salinity and soil type, from 1999 onwards, soil salinity and crop variety. The plant was studied during the whole growing period by

  16. PiHOG1, a stress regulator MAP kinase from the root endophyte fungus Piriformospora indica, confers salinity stress tolerance in rice plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogawat, Abhimanyu; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Verma, Nidhi; Oelmüller, Ralf; Dua, Meenakshi; Nevo, Eviatar; Johri, Atul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In this study, yeast HOG1 homologue from the root endophyte Piriformospora indica (PiHOG1) was isolated and functionally characterized. Functional expression of PiHOG1 in S. cerevisiae ∆hog1 mutant restored osmotolerance under high osmotic stress. Knockdown (KD) transformants of PiHOG1 generated by RNA interference in P. indica showed that genes for the HOG pathway, osmoresponse and salinity tolerance were less stimulated in KD-PiHOG1 compared to the wild-type under salinity stress. Furthermore, KD lines are impaired in the colonization of rice roots under salinity stress of 200 mM NaCl, and the biomass of the host plants, their shoot and root lengths, root number, photosynthetic pigment and proline contents were reduced as compared to rice plants colonized by WT P. indica. Therefore, PiHOG1 is critical for root colonisation, salinity tolerance and the performance of the host plant under salinity stress. Moreover, downregulation of PiHOG1 resulted not only in reduced and delayed phosphorylation of the remaining PiHOG1 protein in colonized salinity-stressed rice roots, but also in the downregulation of the upstream MAP kinase genes PiPBS2 and PiSSK2 involved in salinity tolerance signalling in the fungus. Our data demonstrate that PiHOG1 is not only involved in the salinity response of P. indica, but also helping host plant to overcome salinity stress. PMID:27849025

  17. PiHOG1, a stress regulator MAP kinase from the root endophyte fungus Piriformospora indica, confers salinity stress tolerance in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogawat, Abhimanyu; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Verma, Nidhi; Oelmüller, Ralf; Dua, Meenakshi; Nevo, Eviatar; Johri, Atul Kumar

    2016-11-16

    In this study, yeast HOG1 homologue from the root endophyte Piriformospora indica (PiHOG1) was isolated and functionally characterized. Functional expression of PiHOG1 in S. cerevisiae ∆hog1 mutant restored osmotolerance under high osmotic stress. Knockdown (KD) transformants of PiHOG1 generated by RNA interference in P. indica showed that genes for the HOG pathway, osmoresponse and salinity tolerance were less stimulated in KD-PiHOG1 compared to the wild-type under salinity stress. Furthermore, KD lines are impaired in the colonization of rice roots under salinity stress of 200 mM NaCl, and the biomass of the host plants, their shoot and root lengths, root number, photosynthetic pigment and proline contents were reduced as compared to rice plants colonized by WT P. indica. Therefore, PiHOG1 is critical for root colonisation, salinity tolerance and the performance of the host plant under salinity stress. Moreover, downregulation of PiHOG1 resulted not only in reduced and delayed phosphorylation of the remaining PiHOG1 protein in colonized salinity-stressed rice roots, but also in the downregulation of the upstream MAP kinase genes PiPBS2 and PiSSK2 involved in salinity tolerance signalling in the fungus. Our data demonstrate that PiHOG1 is not only involved in the salinity response of P. indica, but also helping host plant to overcome salinity stress.

  18. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Mary J; Dossani, Zain Y; Szmidt, Heather L; Chu, Hou Cheng; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D; Hadi, Masood Z; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-01-01

    Many compounds being considered as candidates for advanced biofuels are toxic to microorganisms. This introduces an undesirable trade-off when engineering metabolic pathways for biofuel production because the engineered microbes must balance production against survival. Cellular export systems, such as efflux pumps, provide a direct mechanism for reducing biofuel toxicity. To identify novel biofuel pumps, we used bioinformatics to generate a list of all efflux pumps from sequenced bacterial genomes and prioritized a subset of targets for cloning. The resulting library of 43 pumps was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, where we tested it against seven representative biofuels. By using a competitive growth assay, we efficiently distinguished pumps that improved survival. For two of the fuels (n-butanol and isopentanol), none of the pumps improved tolerance. For all other fuels, we identified pumps that restored growth in the presence of biofuel. We then tested a beneficial pump directly in a production strain and demonstrated that it improved biofuel yields. Our findings introduce new tools for engineering production strains and utilize the increasingly large database of sequenced genomes. PMID:21556065

  19. A study of wild tomatoes endemic to the Galapagos Islands as a source for salinity tolerance traits

    KAUST Repository

    Pailles Galvez, Claudia Yveline

    2017-11-01

    Salinity is a major concern in agriculture since it adversely affects plant growth, development, and yield. Domestication of crops exerted strong selective pressure and reduced their genetic diversity. Meanwhile, wild species continued to adapt to their environment becoming valuable sources of genetic variation, with the potential for enhancing modern crops performance in today’s changing climate. Some wild species are found in highly saline environments; remarkable examples are the endemic wild tomatoes from the Galapagos Islands, forming the Solanum cheesmaniae and Solanum galapagense species (hereafter termed Galapagos tomatoes). These wild tomatoes adapted to thrive in the coastal regions of the Galapagos Islands. The present work includes a thorough characterization of a collection of 67 accessions of Galapagos tomatoes obtained from the Tomato Genetics Resource Center (TGRC). Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was performed to establish the population structure and genetic distance within the germplasm collection. Both species were genetically differentiated, and a substructure was found in S. cheesmaniae dividing the accessions in two groups based on their origin: eastern and western islands. Phenotypic studies were performed at the seedling stage, subjecting seedlings to 200 mM NaCl for 10 days. Various traits were recorded and analysed for their contribution to salinity tolerance, compared to control conditions. Large natural variation was found across the collection in terms of salt stress responses and different possible salt tolerant mechanisms were identified. Six accessions were selected for further work, based on their good performance under salinity. This experiment included scoring several plant growth and yield-related traits, as well as RNA sequencing (RNAseq) at the fruit-ripening stage, under three different NaCl concentrations. Accession LA0421 showed an increased yield of almost 50% in mild salinity (150 mM NaCl) compared to control conditions

  20. Bacterial use of choline to tolerate salinity shifts in sea-ice brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Firth

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacteria within the brine network of sea ice experience temperature-driven fluctuations in salinity on both short and long temporal scales, yet their means of osmoprotection against such fluctuations is poorly understood. One mechanism used to withstand the ion fluxes caused by salinity shifts, well-known in mesophilic bacteria, is the import and export of low molecular weight organic solutes that are compatible with intracellular functions. Working with the marine psychrophilic gammaproteobacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, and with natural microbial assemblages present in sackhole brines drained from sea ice in Kanajorsuit Bay (2013 and Kobbefjord (2014, Greenland, we measured the utilization of 14C-choline (precursor to glycine betaine, a common compatible solute at −1°C upon salinity shifts to double and to half the starting salinity. In all cases and across a range of starting salinities, when salinity was increased, 14C-solute (choline or derivatives was preferentially retained as an intracellular osmolyte; when salinity was decreased, 14C-choline was preferentially respired to 14CO2. Additional experiments with cold-adapted bacteria in culture indicated that an abrupt downshift in salinity prompted rapid (subsecond expulsion of retained 14C-solute, but that uptake of 14C-choline and solute retention resumed when salinity was returned to starting value. Overall, the results indicate that bacteria in sea-ice brines use compatible solutes for osmoprotection, transporting, storing and cycling these molecules as needed to withstand naturally occurring salinity shifts and persist through the seasons. Because choline and many commonly used compatible solutes contain nitrogen, we suggest that when brines freshen and bacteria respire such compatible solutes, the corresponding regeneration of ammonium may enhance specific biogeochemical processes in the ice, possibly algal productivity but particularly nitrification. Measurements

  1. The study of salinity and drought tolerance of Sinorhizobium meliloti isolated from province of Kerman in vivo condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahboobe abolhasani zeraatkar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the host plant inoculation by native strains with high efficiency has a positive effect on plant yield and biological nitrogen fixation process. The main aim of this investigation was to based on salinity and drought experiments, four isolates of Sinorhizobium meliloti (S27K and S36K tolerant isolates, S109K semi-sensitive isolate, S56K sensitive isolate were selected for plant inoculation which was under drought stress in greenhouse condition. This experiment was carried out by using a factorial model in completely randomized design. Results showed that inoculation of alfalfa plants with high salinity and drought tolerant of Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteria could increased biological nitrogen fixation process (symbiotic efficiency, percent crude protein and yield of alfalfa under salinity and drought conditions significantly. There were not any significant differences between S27K and S36K isolates and positive control (no nitrogen limitation. Symbiotic efficiency increased 3.4 times higher than alfalfa plants were inoculated by sensitive isolates S56K when alfalfa plants were inoculated by S27K and S36K isolates.

  2. Salinity Tolerance of H. stipulacea - Will H. stipulacea Survive the Impacts of Desalination Plants in the Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    One of the many potential effects of desalination plants on the nearby marine environments is the increase in salinity in the area of discharge. With almost half of the world's desalinated water being produced in the countries of the Middle East, there is a rising concern of the effects of the these plants on marine ecosystems. Seagrasses form some of the most valuable ecosystems on earth, with an estimated value of $2.8 106 sq km-1 yr-1. Salinity changes is one of the main factors impacting the distribution of seagrasses making it an important factor when studying effects of desalination in the marine environment. Halophila stipulacea, a native seagrass to the Red sea is often termed as a euryhaline (able to grow in wide ranges of salinity) species. One of the aims of this study was to find how tolerant H. stipulacea is to changes in salinities. Halophila stipulacea plants were collected from the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea (Eilat, Israel) and acclimated in mesocosms at similar conditions to the site of collection (40 PSU). Following acclimation, they were exposed to control (40], hypo (15, 20, 25) and hyper 55, 60 and 65 PSU) salinities for 3 weeks, followed by a 3-week recovery phase. Plants were followed over time for changes in growth parameters and photophysiology in parallel to changes in gene expression. Hyper and hypo-salinities caused a steady decrease in the growth of the plants, leaf area, photosynthetic ability (quantum efficiency of photosystem II- Fv/Fm) and in chlorophyll content. The plants seemed to recover from stress after returning to control salinity as indicated by the recovery in Fv/Fm, leaf count and chlorophyll content. Overall, plants coped less at 15 and 65 PSU. At 25, 55 and 60 PSU, plants could acclimate to the salinity with indications of stress. The results suggest that salinities as high as 60 PSU would not be a concern for the growth of H. stipulacea if that is the only effect of desalinitaiton plants.

  3. Avicennia germinans (black mangrove vessel architecture is linked to chilling and salinity tolerance in the Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric N Madrid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several decades, the distribution of the black mangrove Avicennia germinans in the Gulf of Mexico has expanded, in part because it can survive the occasional freeze events and high soil salinities characteristic of the area. Vessel architecture may influence mangrove chilling and salinity tolerance. We surveyed populations of A. germinans throughout the Gulf to determine if vessel architecture was linked to field environmental conditions. We measured vessel density, hydraulically weighted vessel diameter, potential conductance capacity, and maximum tensile fracture stress. At each sampling site we recorded mangrove canopy height and soil salinity, and determined average minimum winter temperature from archived weather records. At a subset of sites, we measured carbon fixation rates using a LI-COR 6400XT Portable Photosynthesis System. Populations of A. germinans from cooler areas (Texas and Louisiana had narrower vessels, likely reducing the risk of freeze-induced embolisms but also decreasing water conductance capacity. Vessels were also narrower in regions with high soil salinity, including Texas, USA and tidal flats in Veracruz, Mexico. Vessel density did not consistently vary with temperature or soil salinity. In abiotically stressful areas, A. germinans had a safe hydraulic architecture with narrower vessels that may increase local survival. This safe architecture appears to come at a substantial physiological cost in terms of reduction in conductance capacity and carbon fixation potential, likely contributing to lower canopy heights. The current distribution of A. germinans in the Gulf is influenced by the complex interplay between temperature, salinity, and vessel architecture. Given the plasticity of A. germinans vessel characters, it is likely that this mangrove species will be able to adapt to a wide range of potential future environmental conditions, and continue its expansion in the Gulf of Mexico in response to near

  4. OsSUV3 dual helicase functions in salinity stress tolerance by maintaining photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. IR64).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Garg, Bharti; Tuteja, Renu

    2013-10-01

    To overcome the salinity-induced loss of crop yield, a salinity-tolerant trait is required. The SUV3 helicase is involved in the regulation of RNA surveillance and turnover in mitochondria, but the helicase activity of plant SUV3 and its role in abiotic stress tolerance have not been reported so far. Here we report that the Oryza sativa (rice) SUV3 protein exhibits DNA and RNA helicase, and ATPase activities. Furthermore, we report that SUV3 is induced in rice seedlings in response to high levels of salt. Its expression, driven by a constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in IR64 transgenic rice plants, confers salinity tolerance. The T1 and T2 sense transgenic lines showed tolerance to high salinity and fully matured without any loss in yields. The T2 transgenic lines also showed tolerance to drought stress. These results suggest that the introduced trait is functional and stable in transgenic rice plants. The rice SUV3 sense transgenic lines showed lesser lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage and H2 O2 production, along with higher activities of antioxidant enzymes under salinity stress, as compared with wild type, vector control and antisense transgenic lines. These results suggest the existence of an efficient antioxidant defence system to cope with salinity-induced oxidative damage. Overall, this study reports that plant SUV3 exhibits DNA and RNA helicase and ATPase activities, and provides direct evidence of its function in imparting salinity stress tolerance without yield loss. The possible mechanism could be that OsSUV3 helicase functions in salinity stress tolerance by improving photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery in transgenic rice. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Experimentally derived salinity tolerance of hatchling Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) from the Everglades, Florida (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kristen M.; Schofield, Pamela J.; Gregoire, Denise R.

    2012-01-01

    In a laboratory setting, we tested the ability of 24 non-native, wild-caught hatchling Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) collected in the Florida Everglades to survive when given water containing salt to drink. After a one-month acclimation period in the laboratory, we grouped snakes into three treatments, giving them access to water that was fresh (salinity of 0, control), brackish (salinity of 10), or full-strength sea water (salinity of 35). Hatchlings survived about one month at the highest marine salinity and about five months at the brackish-water salinity; no control animals perished during the experiment. These results are indicative of a "worst-case scenario", as in the laboratory we denied access to alternate fresh-water sources that may be accessible in the wild (e.g., through rainfall). Therefore, our results may underestimate the potential of hatchling pythons to persist in saline habitats in the wild. Because of the effect of different salinity regimes on survival, predictions of ultimate geographic expansion by non-native Burmese pythons that consider salt water as barriers to dispersal for pythons may warrant re-evaluation, especially under global climate change and associated sea-level-rise scenarios.

  6. Transcriptome analysis reveals that distinct metabolic pathways operate in salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive upland cotton varieties subjected to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinyan; Shi, Gongyao; Guo, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Liwei; Xu, Wenying; Wang, Yumei; Su, Zhen; Hua, Jinping

    2015-09-01

    Salinity stress is one of the most devastating abiotic stresses in crop plants. As a moderately salt-tolerant crop, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is a major cash crop in saline areas and a suitable model for salt stress tolerance research. In this study, we compared the transcriptome changes between the salt-tolerant upland cotton cultivar Zhong 07 and salt-sensitive cultivar Zhong G5 in response to NaCl treatments. Transcriptional regulation, signal transduction and secondary metabolism in two varieties showed significant differences, all of which might be related to mechanisms underlying salt stress tolerance. The transcriptional profiles presented here provide a foundation for deciphering the mechanism underlying salt tolerance. Based on our findings, we proposed several candidate genes that might be used to improve salt tolerance in upland cotton. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physiological and biochemical perspectives of non-salt tolerant plants during bacterial interaction against soil salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Baek, Kwang Hyun

    2017-07-01

    Climatic changes on earth affect the soil quality of agricultural lands, especially by increasing salt deposition in soil, which results in soil salinity. Soil salinity is a major challenge to growth and reproduction among glycophytes (including all crop plants). Soil bacteria present in the rhizosphere and/or roots naturally protect plants from the adverse effects of soil salinity by reprogramming the stress-induced physiological changes in plants. Bacteria can enrich the soil with major nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) in a form easily available to plants and prevent the transport of excess sodium to roots (exopolysaccharides secreted by bacteria bind with sodium ions) for maintaining ionic balance and water potential in cells. Salinity also affects plant growth regulators and suppresses seed germination and root and shoot growth. Bacterial secretion of indole-3-acetic acid and gibberellins compensates for the salt-induced hormonal decrease in plants, and bacterial 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase synthesis decreases ethylene production to stimulate plant growth. Furthermore, bacteria modulate the redox state of salinity-affected plants by enhancing antioxidants and polyamines, which leads to increased photosynthetic efficiency. Bacteria-induced accumulation of compatible solutes in stressed plants regulates plant cellular activities and prevents salt stress damage. Plant-bacterial interaction reprograms the expression of salt stress-responsive genes and proteins in salinity-affected plants, resulting in a precise stress mitigation metabolism as a defense mechanism. Soil bacteria increase the fertility of soil and regulate the plant functions to prevent the salinity effects in glycophytes. This review explains the current understanding about the physiological changes induced in glycophytes during bacterial interaction to alleviate the adverse effects of soil salinity stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  8. Effects of salinity tolerances on survival and life history of 2 cladocerans

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKÇE, Didem; TURHAN, Duygu ÖZHAN

    2014-01-01

    Salinity alterations in freshwater ecosystems greatly affect the survival and life history of zooplankton and, therefore, have an effect on higher trophic levels. Salinity is an essential and critical factor in determining the presence, dominance, and succession of organisms. After being collected in the field, Scapholeberis mucronata and Simocephalus vetulus were brought to the laboratory in water. Under laboratory conditions (24 ± 1 °C; 16:8 h photoperiod), we evaluated the effect of differ...

  9. Na+ compartmentalization related to salinity stress tolerance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Peng; Shoupu He; Junling Sun; Zhaoe Pan; Wenfang Gong; Yanli Lu; Xiongming Du

    2016-01-01

    The capacity for ion compartmentalization among different tissues and cells is the key mechanism regulating salt tolerance in plants. In this study, we investigated the ion compartmentalization capacity of two upland cotton genotypes with different salt tolerances under salt shock at the tissue, cell and molecular levels. We found that the leaf glandular trichome could secrete more salt ions in the salt-tolerant genotype than in the sensitive genotype, demonstrating the excretion of ions from...

  10. Overexpression of a Plasma Membrane-Localized SbSRP-Like Protein Enhances Salinity and Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Mishra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An obligate halophyte, Salicornia brachiata grows in salt marshes and is considered to be a potential resource of salt- and drought-responsive genes. It is important to develop an understanding of the mechanisms behind enhanced salt tolerance. To increase this understanding, a novel SbSRP gene was cloned, characterized, over-expressed, and functionally validated in the model plant Nicotiana tabacum. The genome of the halophyte S. brachiata contains two homologs of an intronless SbSRP gene of 1,262 bp in length that encodes for a stress-related protein. An in vivo localization study confirmed that SbSRP is localized on the plasma membrane. Transgenic tobacco plants (T1 that constitutively over-express the SbSRP gene showed improved salinity and osmotic stress tolerance. In comparison to Wild Type (WT and Vector Control (VC plants, transgenic lines showed elevated relative water and chlorophyll content, lower malondialdehyde content, lower electrolyte leakage and higher accumulation of proline, free amino acids, sugars, polyphenols, and starch under abiotic stress treatments. Furthermore, a lower build-up of H2O2 content and superoxide-radicals was found in transgenic lines compared to WT and VC plants under stress conditions. Transcript expression of Nt-APX (ascorbate peroxidase, Nt-CAT (catalase, Nt-SOD (superoxide dismutase, Nt-DREB (dehydration responsive element binding factor, and Nt-AP2 (apetala2 genes was higher in transgenic lines under stress compared to WT and VC plants. The results suggested that overexpression of membrane-localized SbSRP mitigates salt and osmotic stress in the transgenic tobacco plant. It was hypothesized that SbSRP can be a transporter protein to transmit the environmental stimuli downward through the plasma membrane. However, a detailed study is required to ascertain its exact role in the abiotic stress tolerance mechanism. Overall, SbSRP is a potential candidate to be used for engineering salt and osmotic

  11. A receptor-like kinase gene (GbRLK) from Gossypium barbadense enhances salinity and drought-stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Gao, Yulong; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Tianzi; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2013-08-06

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is widely cultivated due to the important economic value of its fiber. However, extreme environmental degradation impedes cotton growth and production. Receptor-like kinase (RLK) proteins play important roles in signal transduction and participate in a diverse range of processes in response to plant hormones and environmental cues. Here, we introduced an RLK gene (GbRLK) from cotton into Arabidopsis and investigated its role in imparting abiotic stress tolerance. GbRLK transcription was induced by exogenously supplied abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, mock drought conditions and high salinity. We cloned the promoter sequence of this gene via self-formed adaptor PCR. Sequence analysis revealed that the promoter region contains many cis-acting stress-responsive elements such as ABRE, W-Box, MYB-core, W-Box core, TCA-element and others. We constructed a vector containing a 1,890-bp sequence in the 5' region upstream of the initiation codon of this promoter and transformed it into Arabidopsis thaliana. GUS histochemical staining analysis showed that GbRLK was expressed mainly in leaf veins, petioles and roots of transgenic Arabidopsis, but not in the cotyledons or root hairs. GbRLK promoter activity was induced by ABA, PEG, NaCl and Verticillium dahliae. Transgenic Arabidopsis with constitutive overexpression of GbRLK exhibited a reduced rate of water loss in leaves in vitro, along with improved salinity and drought tolerance and increased sensitivity to ABA compared with non-transgenic Col-0 Arabidopsis. Expression analysis of stress-responsive genes in GbRLK Arabidopsis revealed that there was increased expression of genes involved in the ABA-dependent signaling pathway (AtRD20, AtRD22 and AtRD26) and antioxidant genes (AtCAT1, AtCCS, AtCSD2 and AtCSD1) but not ion transporter genes (AtNHX1, AtSOS1). GbRLK is involved in the drought and high salinity stresses pathway by activating or participating in the ABA signaling

  12. The Multifarious PGPR Serratia marcescens CDP-13 Augments Induced Systemic Resistance and Enhanced Salinity Tolerance of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Jha, Prabhat Nath

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of a bacterial isolate CDP-13 isolated from 'Capparis decidua' plant, and its ability to protect plants from the deleterious effect of biotic and abiotic stressors. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as Serratia marcescens. Among the PGP traits, the isolate was found to be positive for ACC deaminase activity, phosphate solubilization, production of siderophore, indole acetic acid production, nitrogen fixation, and ammonia production. CDP-13 showed growth at an increased salt (NaCl) concentration of up to 6%, indicating its potential to survive and associate with plants growing in saline soil. The inoculation of S. marcescens enhanced the growth of wheat plant under salinity stress (150-200 mM). It significantly reduced inhibition of plant growth (15 to 85%) caused by salt stressors. Application of CDP-13 also modulated concentration (20 to 75%) of different osmoprotectants (proline, malondialdehyde, total soluble sugar, total protein content, and indole acetic acid) in plants suggesting its role in enabling plants to tolerate salt stressors. In addition, bacterial inoculation also reduced the disease severity caused by fungal infection, which illustrated its ability to confer induced systemic resistance (ISR) in host plants. Treatment of wheat plants with the test organism caused alteration in anti-oxidative enzymes activities (Superoxide dismutase, Catalase, and Peroxidase) under various salinity levels, and therefore minimizes the salinity-induced oxidative damages to the plants. Colonization efficiency of strain CDP-13 was confirmed by CFU count, epi-fluorescence microscopy, and ERIC-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting approach. Hence, the study indicates that bacterium CDP-13 enhances plant growth, and has potential for the amelioration of salinity stress in wheat plants. Likewise, the results also provide insights into biotechnological approaches to using PGPR

  13. The Multifarious PGPR Serratia marcescens CDP-13 Augments Induced Systemic Resistance and Enhanced Salinity Tolerance of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish Prakash Singh

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the plant growth promoting (PGP potential of a bacterial isolate CDP-13 isolated from 'Capparis decidua' plant, and its ability to protect plants from the deleterious effect of biotic and abiotic stressors. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as Serratia marcescens. Among the PGP traits, the isolate was found to be positive for ACC deaminase activity, phosphate solubilization, production of siderophore, indole acetic acid production, nitrogen fixation, and ammonia production. CDP-13 showed growth at an increased salt (NaCl concentration of up to 6%, indicating its potential to survive and associate with plants growing in saline soil. The inoculation of S. marcescens enhanced the growth of wheat plant under salinity stress (150-200 mM. It significantly reduced inhibition of plant growth (15 to 85% caused by salt stressors. Application of CDP-13 also modulated concentration (20 to 75% of different osmoprotectants (proline, malondialdehyde, total soluble sugar, total protein content, and indole acetic acid in plants suggesting its role in enabling plants to tolerate salt stressors. In addition, bacterial inoculation also reduced the disease severity caused by fungal infection, which illustrated its ability to confer induced systemic resistance (ISR in host plants. Treatment of wheat plants with the test organism caused alteration in anti-oxidative enzymes activities (Superoxide dismutase, Catalase, and Peroxidase under various salinity levels, and therefore minimizes the salinity-induced oxidative damages to the plants. Colonization efficiency of strain CDP-13 was confirmed by CFU count, epi-fluorescence microscopy, and ERIC-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting approach. Hence, the study indicates that bacterium CDP-13 enhances plant growth, and has potential for the amelioration of salinity stress in wheat plants. Likewise, the results also provide insights into biotechnological approaches to

  14. Tolerância de bactérias diazotróficas simbióticas à salinidade in vitro Tolerance of diazotrophic symbiotic bacteria to salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Simão Abrahão Nóbrega

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A busca de estirpes de bactérias diazotróficas simbióticas tolerantes à salinidade, em conjunto com a seleção de hospedeiros, tem por objetivo aumentar o desempenho da simbiose e manter a produtividade vegetal de forma sustentada em condições de estresse salino. Doze estirpes de bactérias diazotróficas de diferentes procedências foram estudadas quanto à tolerância a diferentes concentrações de NaCl em meios de cultura 79 e LB. As estirpes que apresentaram maior tolerância à salinidade (30 g L-1 em meio 79 foram: BR 6806 e BR 4007, ambas de crescimento rápido isoladas de solos do nordeste brasileiro, UFLA 03-51 e UFLA 03-65, de crescimento rápido e UFLA 03-84, de crescimento lento, sendo as três últimas oriundas da região Amazônica. Essas também estiveram entre as mais tolerantes em meio de cultura LB. A estirpe UFLA 03-84, selecionada em trabalhos prévios por sua alta eficiência para caupi (Vigna unguiculata, pode ser indicada para estudos de inoculação, visando a aumentar o rendimento dessa cultura em solos salinos. Os meios de cultura 79 e LB foram eficientes para avaliar a tolerância relativa de rizóbio a NaCl, mas o meio 79 é mais indicado, pois permite o crescimento de todas as estirpes. Pelos resultados, infere-se haver relação entre tolerância in vitro à salinidade e origem dos microssimbiontes, pois as estirpes BR 4007 e BR 6806, oriundas do Ceará, estiveram entre as mais tolerantes.Tolerance to salinity of diazotrophic bacteriaand their host species could increase plant growth and sustainability in salt stressed soils. Twelve diazotrophic bacteria strains were studied regarding their tolerance to different NaCl concentrations in 79 and LB media. More tolerant (30 g L-1 strains in 79 medium were: the fast growers BR 6806 and BR 4007, isolated from northeast Brazil, UFLA 03-51 and UFLA 03-65, and slow growing strain UFLA03-84, being these last three isolated from Amazon region. These strains were among

  15. Na+ compartmentalization related to salinity stress tolerance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhen; He, Shoupu; Sun, Junling; Pan, Zhaoe; Gong, Wenfang; Lu, Yanli; Du, Xiongming

    2016-10-04

    The capacity for ion compartmentalization among different tissues and cells is the key mechanism regulating salt tolerance in plants. In this study, we investigated the ion compartmentalization capacity of two upland cotton genotypes with different salt tolerances under salt shock at the tissue, cell and molecular levels. We found that the leaf glandular trichome could secrete more salt ions in the salt-tolerant genotype than in the sensitive genotype, demonstrating the excretion of ions from tissue may be a new mechanism to respond to short-term salt shock. Furthermore, an investigation of the ion distribution demonstrated that the ion content was significantly lower in critical tissues and cells of the salt-tolerant genotype, indicating the salt-tolerant genotype had a greater capacity for ion compartmentalization in the shoot. By comparing the membrane H+-ATPase activity and the expression of ion transportation-related genes, we found that the H+-ATPase activity and Na+/H+ antiporter are the key factors determining the capacity for ion compartmentalization in leaves, which might further determine the salt tolerance of cotton. The novel function of the glandular trichome and the comparison of Na+ compartmentalization between two cotton genotypes with contrasting salt tolerances provide a new understanding of the salt tolerance mechanism in cotton.

  16. Long-term salinity tolerance is accompanied by major restructuring of the coral bacterial microbiome

    KAUST Repository

    Röthig, Till

    2016-02-03

    Scleractinian corals are assumed to be stenohaline osmoconformers, although they are frequently subjected to variations in seawater salinity due to precipitation, freshwater runoff, and other processes. Observed responses to altered salinity levels include differences in photosynthetic performance, respiration, and increased bleaching and mortality of the coral host and its algal symbiont, but a study looking at bacterial community changes is lacking. Here we exposed the coral Fungia granulosa to strongly increased salinity levels in short- and long-term experiments to disentangle temporal and compartment effects of the coral holobiont (i.e. coral host, symbiotic algae, and associated bacteria). Our results show a significant reduction in calcification and photosynthesis, but a stable microbiome after short-term exposure to high salinity levels. By comparison, long-term exposure yielded unchanged photosynthesis levels and visually healthy coral colonies indicating long-term acclimation to high salinity levels that were accompanied by a major coral microbiome restructuring. Importantly, a bacterium in the family Rhodobacteraceae was succeeded by Pseudomonas veronii as the numerically most abundant taxon. Further, taxonomy-based functional profiling indicates a shift in the bacterial community towards increased osmolyte production, sulfur oxidation, and nitrogen fixation. Our study highlights that bacterial community composition in corals can change within days to weeks under altered environmental conditions, where shifts in the microbiome may enable adjustment of the coral to a more advantageous holobiont composition.

  17. Salinity tolerance loci revealed in rice using high-throughput non-invasive phenotyping

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Tamimi, Nadia Ali

    2016-11-17

    High-throughput phenotyping produces multiple measurements over time, which require new methods of analyses that are flexible in their quantification of plant growth and transpiration, yet are computationally economic. Here we develop such analyses and apply this to a rice population genotyped with a 700k SNP high-density array. Two rice diversity panels, indica and aus, containing a total of 553 genotypes, are phenotyped in waterlogged conditions. Using cubic smoothing splines to estimate plant growth and transpiration, we identify four time intervals that characterize the early responses of rice to salinity. Relative growth rate, transpiration rate and transpiration use efficiency (TUE) are analysed using a new association model that takes into account the interaction between treatment (control and salt) and genetic marker. This model allows the identification of previously undetected loci affecting TUE on chromosome 11, providing insights into the early responses of rice to salinity, in particular into the effects of salinity on plant growth and transpiration.

  18. Salinity tolerance loci revealed in rice using high-throughput non-invasive phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tamimi, Nadia; Brien, Chris; Oakey, Helena; Berger, Bettina; Saade, Stephanie; Ho, Yung Shwen; Schmöckel, Sandra M; Tester, Mark; Negrão, Sónia

    2016-11-17

    High-throughput phenotyping produces multiple measurements over time, which require new methods of analyses that are flexible in their quantification of plant growth and transpiration, yet are computationally economic. Here we develop such analyses and apply this to a rice population genotyped with a 700k SNP high-density array. Two rice diversity panels, indica and aus, containing a total of 553 genotypes, are phenotyped in waterlogged conditions. Using cubic smoothing splines to estimate plant growth and transpiration, we identify four time intervals that characterize the early responses of rice to salinity. Relative growth rate, transpiration rate and transpiration use efficiency (TUE) are analysed using a new association model that takes into account the interaction between treatment (control and salt) and genetic marker. This model allows the identification of previously undetected loci affecting TUE on chromosome 11, providing insights into the early responses of rice to salinity, in particular into the effects of salinity on plant growth and transpiration.

  19. Tolerance to salinities shocks of the invasive mussel Limnoperma fortunei under experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana G. Angonesi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The golden mussel, Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857, has been found in the estuarine regions of South America, including the Patos Lagoon (Brazil, a huge choked lagoon with an estuarine region that is highly unstable chemically. Limnoperna fortunei space-temporal variability in the lagoon's estuarine region demonstrated the need to evaluate this species' ability to survive under salinity shocks. A set of experiments was conducted under controlled laboratory conditions. Specimens were tested under salinities of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 ppt, and were exposed for periods of 24, 48, 72, 96 and 240 hours. The mussel can survive (90% up to a salinity shock of 2 ppt for periods of at least 10 days. Considering the influence of climatic and stochastic events and the chemical instability of the Patos Lagoon estuarine region, it's unlikely that populations could survive for longer periods (more than a year in this area.

  20. Overexpression of a chrysanthemum transcription factor gene DgNAC1 improves the salinity tolerance in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhong, Ming; Wu, Yin-Huan; Bai, Zhen-Yu; Liang, Qian-Yu; Liu, Qing-Lin; Pan, Yuan-Zhi; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Bei-Bei; Jia, Yin; Liu, Guang-Li

    2017-04-01

    DgNAC1, a transcription factor of chrysanthemum, was functionally verified to confer salt stress responses by regulating stress-responsive genes. NAC transcription factors play effective roles in resistance to different abiotic stresses, and overexpressions of NAC TFs in Arabidopsis have been proved to be conducive in improving salinity tolerance. However, functions of NAC genes in chrysanthemum continue to be poorly understood. Here, we performed physiology and molecular experiments to evaluate roles of DgNAC1 in chrysanthemum salt stress responses. In this study, DgNAC1-overexpressed chrysanthemum was obviously more resistant to salt over the WT (wild type). Specifically, the transgenic chrysanthemum showed a higher survival rate and lower EC (electrolyte conductivity) than WT under salt stress. The transgenic chrysanthemum also showed fewer accumulations of MDA (malondialdehyde) and reactive oxygen species (H 2 O 2 and O 2 - ), greater activities of SOD (superoxide dismutase), POD (peroxidase) and CAT (catalase), as well as more proline content than WT under salt stress. Furthermore, stress-responsive genes in transgenic chrysanthemum were greater up-regulated than in WT under salinity stress. Thus, all results revealed that DgNAC1 worked as a positive regulator in responses to salt stress and it may be an essential gene for molecular breeding of salt-tolerant plants.

  1. Effect of seed priming with NaCl on salinity tolerance of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L. at seedling stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Khan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to improve the hot pepper seed performance under salinity stress conditions. The effects of priming with an optimized dose (1 mM of sodium chloride (NaCl were assessed for improving seedling vigour and salt stress tolerance in seedlings of the hot pepper. Seeds primed with NaCl solution (1 mM were examined at different salinity levels [0, 3, 6 and 9 dS m-1] in relation to early growth stage. Priming with NaCl was effective in alleviating the adverse effects of salinity. Significant increase in germination percentage, germination index and germination speed, vigour index, plumule and radicle length, and dry weight of the seedlings as compared to control was recorded. On the other hand, mean germination time, time to reach 50% germination and fresh weight of seedlings were non-significant against control. In this experiment, it was concluded that seed priming with NaCl has been found to be better treatment as compared to non-primed seeds in case of hot pepper for improving the seedling vigour and seedling establishment under salt-stressed conditions.

  2. Improved salinity tolerance of rice through cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Plett

    Full Text Available Previously, cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1, a sodium transporter, improved sodium (Na(+ exclusion and salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis. In the current work, AtHKT1;1, was expressed specifically in the root cortical and epidermal cells of an Arabidopsis GAL4-GFP enhancer trap line. These transgenic plants were found to have significantly improved Na(+ exclusion under conditions of salinity stress. The feasibility of a similar biotechnological approach in crop plants was explored using a GAL4-GFP enhancer trap rice line to drive expression of AtHKT1;1 specifically in the root cortex. Compared with the background GAL4-GFP line, the rice plants expressing AtHKT1;1 had a higher fresh weight under salinity stress, which was related to a lower concentration of Na(+ in the shoots. The root-to-shoot transport of (22Na(+ was also decreased and was correlated with an upregulation of OsHKT1;5, the native transporter responsible for Na(+ retrieval from the transpiration stream. Interestingly, in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtHKT1;1 in the cortex and epidermis, the native AtHKT1;1 gene responsible for Na(+ retrieval from the transpiration stream, was also upregulated. Extra Na(+ retrieved from the xylem was stored in the outer root cells and was correlated with a significant increase in expression of the vacuolar pyrophosphatases (in Arabidopsis and rice the activity of which would be necessary to move the additional stored Na(+ into the vacuoles of these cells. This work presents an important step in the development of abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants via targeted changes in mineral transport.

  3. Improved salinity tolerance of rice through cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plett, Darren; Safwat, Gehan; Gilliham, Matthew; Skrumsager Møller, Inge; Roy, Stuart; Shirley, Neil; Jacobs, Andrew; Johnson, Alexander; Tester, Mark

    2010-09-03

    Previously, cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1, a sodium transporter, improved sodium (Na(+)) exclusion and salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis. In the current work, AtHKT1;1, was expressed specifically in the root cortical and epidermal cells of an Arabidopsis GAL4-GFP enhancer trap line. These transgenic plants were found to have significantly improved Na(+) exclusion under conditions of salinity stress. The feasibility of a similar biotechnological approach in crop plants was explored using a GAL4-GFP enhancer trap rice line to drive expression of AtHKT1;1 specifically in the root cortex. Compared with the background GAL4-GFP line, the rice plants expressing AtHKT1;1 had a higher fresh weight under salinity stress, which was related to a lower concentration of Na(+) in the shoots. The root-to-shoot transport of (22)Na(+) was also decreased and was correlated with an upregulation of OsHKT1;5, the native transporter responsible for Na(+) retrieval from the transpiration stream. Interestingly, in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtHKT1;1 in the cortex and epidermis, the native AtHKT1;1 gene responsible for Na(+) retrieval from the transpiration stream, was also upregulated. Extra Na(+) retrieved from the xylem was stored in the outer root cells and was correlated with a significant increase in expression of the vacuolar pyrophosphatases (in Arabidopsis and rice) the activity of which would be necessary to move the additional stored Na(+) into the vacuoles of these cells. This work presents an important step in the development of abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants via targeted changes in mineral transport.

  4. Saline agriculture in Mediterranean environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Maggio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinization is increasingly affecting world's agricultural land causing serious yield loss and soil degradation. Understanding how we could improve crop productivity in salinized environments is therefore critical to meet the challenging goal of feeding 9.3 billion people by 2050. Our comprehension of fundamental physiological mechanisms in plant salt stress adaptation has greatly advanced over the last decades. However, many of these mechanisms have been linked to salt tolerance in simplified experimental systems whereas they have been rarely functionally proven in real agricultural contexts. In-depth analyses of specific crop-salinity interactions could reveal important aspects of plant salt stress adaptation as well as novel physiological/agronomic targets to improve salinity tolerance. These include the developmental role of root vs. shoot systems respect to water-ion homeostasis, morphological vs. metabolic contributions to stress adaptation, developmental processes vs. seasonal soil salinity evolution, residual effects of saline irrigation in non-irrigated crops, critical parameters of salt tolerance in soil-less systems and controlled environments, response to multiple stresses. Finally, beneficial effects of salinization on qualitative parameters such as stress-induced accumulation of high nutritional value secondary metabolites should be considered, also. In this short review we attempted to highlight the multifaceted nature of salinity in Mediterranean agricultural systems by summarizing most experimental activity carried out at the Department of Agricultural Engineering and Agronomy of University of Naples Federico II in the last few years.

  5. Osmoregulatory physiology and rapid evolution of salinity tolerance in threespine stickleback recently introduced to fresh water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divino, Jeffrey N; Monette, Michelle Y.; McCormick, Stephen; Yancey, Paul H.; Flannery, Kyle G.; Bell, Michael A.; Rollins, Jennifer L.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Schultz, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-Pleistocene diversification of threespine stickleback in fresh water offers a valuable opportunity to study how changes in environmental salinity shape physiological evolution in fish. In Alaska, the presence of both ancestral oceanic populations and derived landlocked populations, including recent lake introductions, allows us to examine rates and direction of evolution of osmoregulation following halohabitat transition.

  6. Root-synthesised cytokinins induce salinity tolerance in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil salinity decreases crop yield via multiple mechanisms, including decreasing concentrations of the growth-promoting, senescence-delaying and insect resistance-enhancing plant hormones cytokinins. Two approaches evaluated whether root-localised ipt (a key enzyme for cytokinin biosynthesis) gene e...

  7. Suspended silt and salinity tolerances of the first zoeal stage of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fiddler crabs (Uca spp.) undergo the zoeal stage of development in open-ocean waters, where they experience stable salinity levels, low turbidity and reduced predation. The St Lucia estuarine system has undergone many geomorphological changes, both natural and anthropogenic, and the estuary mouth has been ...

  8. Soil salinity: Germination tolerance of alternative oilseed crops for soil health

    Science.gov (United States)

    World-wide, saline soils contribute to over US$27.3 billion in agricultural losses annually by reducing plant growth through osmotic imbalances and ion toxicity. Nearly 800,000 ha of salt affected land is located in the northern Great Plains. Limited information is available on the germination of al...

  9. Quantitative Trait Loci for Salinity Tolerance Identified under Drained and Waterlogged Conditions and Their Association with Flowering Time in Barley (Hordeum vulgare. L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Ma

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting crop production via adverse effects of osmotic stress, specific ion toxicity, and stress-related nutritional disorders. Detrimental effects of salinity are also often exacerbated by low oxygen availability when plants are grown under waterlogged conditions. Developing salinity-tolerant varieties is critical to overcome these problems, and molecular marker assisted selection can make breeding programs more effective.In this study, a double haploid (DH population consisting of 175 lines, derived from a cross between a Chinese barley variety Yangsimai 1 (YSM1 and an Australian malting barley variety Gairdner, was used to construct a high density molecular map which contained more than 8,000 Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT markers and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers. Salinity tolerance of parental and DH lines was evaluated under drained (SalinityD and waterlogged (SalinityW conditions at two different sowing times.Three quantitative trait loci (QTL located on chromosome 1H, single QTL located on chromosomes 1H, 2H, 4H, 5H and 7H, were identified to be responsible for salinity tolerance under different environments. Waterlogging stress, daylight length and temperature showed significant effects on barley salinity tolerance. The QTL for salinity tolerance mapped on chromosomes 4H and 7H, QSlwd.YG.4H, QSlwd.YG.7H and QSlww.YG.7H were only identified in winter trials, while the QTL on chromosome 2H QSlsd.YG.2H and QSlsw.YG.2H were only detected in summer trials. Genes associated with flowering time were found to pose significant effects on the salinity QTL mapped on chromosomes 2H and 5H in summer trials. Given the fact that the QTL for salinity tolerance QSlsd.YG.1H and QSlww.YG.1H-1 reported here have never been considered in the literature, this warrants further investigation and evaluation for suitability to be used in breeding programs.

  10. Physiological response to salinity stress and tolerance mechanics of Populus euphratica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun Yan; Si, Jian Hua; Feng, Qi; Deo, Ravinesh C; Yu, Teng Fei; Li, Pei Du

    2017-10-02

    The salinity stress inhibits the growth of Populus euphratica (P. euphratica), and the extent of inhibition tends to increase with a rise of salt concentration while the net photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and internal CO 2 concentration are seen to decline with increasing salt concentration. Compared with the control group, the percentage decline is found to be about 48.50, 15.72, 42.09, and 48.33%, respectively. Although all chlorophyll fluorescence of P. euphratica exhibits a typical O-J-I-P curve in differently concentrated salt solutions, salinity stress shows a significant influence on the value of J and I step (P salinity stress was seen to induce a decrease in variable fluorescence (Fv)/maximal fluorescence value by 2.32, 8.78, 12.80, 12.93, 16.46, and 19.63% treated by 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, and 300-mM salt solution compared with the control group, respectively. Salinity stress appeared also to induce a decrease in Fv/minimal fluorescence values by a magnitude of 5.22, 16.02, 18.06, 22.95, 26.34, and 32.19% in P. euphratica treated by 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, and 300-mM salt solution relative to the control group, respectively. An increase in the content of malondialdehyde amounted to 4.12, 25.59, 34.60, 68.11, 70.72, and 67.68% in P. euphratica treated by 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, and 300-mM salt solution compared to the control group, respectively. In terms of the content of proline, the salinity stress induced an increase by 4.94, 29.49, 53.20, 77.65, 82.46, and 90.68% in P. euphratica treated by 50-, 100-, 150-, 200-, 250-, and 300-mM salt solution, respectively.

  11. Changes in the salinity tolerance of sweet pepper plants as affected by nitrogen form and high CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, María C; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    The assimilation and availability of nitrogen in its different forms can significantly affect the response of primary productivity under the current atmospheric alteration and soil degradation. An elevated CO2 concentration (e[CO2]) triggers changes in the efficiency and efficacy of photosynthetic processes, water use and product yield, the plant response to stress being altered with respect to ambient CO2 conditions (a[CO2]). Additionally, NH4(+) has been related to improved plant responses to stress, considering both energy efficiency in N-assimilation and the overcoming of the inhibition of photorespiration at e[CO2]. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the response of sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) receiving an additional supply of NH4(+) (90/10 NO3(-)/NH4(+)) to salinity stress (60mM NaCl) under a[CO2] (400μmolmol(-1)) or e[CO2] (800μmolmol(-1)). Salt-stressed plants grown at e[CO2] showed DW accumulation similar to that of the non-stressed plants at a[CO2]. The supply of NH4(+) reduced growth at e[CO2] when salinity was imposed. Moreover, NH4(+) differentially affected the stomatal conductance and water use efficiency and the leaf Cl(-), K(+), and Na(+) concentrations, but the extent of the effects was influenced by the [CO2]. An antioxidant-related response was prompted by salinity, the total phenolics and proline concentrations being reduced by NH4(+) at e[CO2]. Our results show that the effect of NH4(+) on plant salinity tolerance should be globally re-evaluated as e[CO2] can significantly alter the response, when compared with previous studies at a[CO2]. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential activity of Plasma and Vacuolar Membrane Transporters contributes to Genotypic Differences in Salinity Tolerance in a Halophyte Species, Chenopodium quinoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Lana

    2013-01-01

    Halophytes species can be used as a highly convenient model system to reveal key ionic and molecular mechanisms that confer salinity tolerance in plants. Earlier, we reported that quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), a facultative C3 halophyte species, can efficiently control the activity of slow...... (SV) and fast (FV) tonoplast channels to match specific growth conditions by ensuring that most of accumulated Na+ is safely locked in the vacuole (Bonales-Alatorre et al. (2013) Plant Physiology). This work extends these finding by comparing the properties of tonoplast FV and SV channels in two...... quinoa genotypes contrasting in their salinity tolerance. The work is complemented by studies of the kinetics of net ion fluxes across the plasma membrane of quinoa leaf mesophyll tissue. Our results suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute towards genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in quinoa...

  13. Comparing salinity tolerance in embryonic and larval development of two species of water strider, Aquarius paludum and Gerris latiabdominis (Hemiptera: Gerridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Manabu; Harada, Tetsuo; Fujisaki, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    Water strider Aquarius paludum (Fabricius) is a cosmopolitan species colonizes mainly freshwater but occasionally brackish habitats throughout the Palearctic and Oriental regions. Water strider Gerris latiabdominis (Miyamoto) is a common species in Japan lives in temporary habitats as freshwater paddy fields. These two species often occur syntopically. We investigated differences in the developmental response to brackish water during embryonic and larval stages between the two species. Eggs were exposed to 0-1.8% NaCl solutions within 24 h of oviposition. Larvae of G. latiabdominis were exposed to salinities of 0, 0.5%, and 0.9% from the first instar until adult emergence. Limits of NaCl concentration for hatching were 1.3% and 1.0% for A. paludum and G. latiabdominis, respectively. The hatching rate of G. latiabdominis was lower than that of A. paludum at salinities ≥ 0.9%. The period of embryonic development of G. latiabdominis was more prolonged than that of A. paludum at a given salinity. Although the salinity tolerance of G. latiabdominis was lower than that of A. paludum, our results suggest G. latiabdominis has the physiological capacity to expand into brackish waters. High and low salinity tolerances of A. paludum and G. latiabdominis, respectively, reflect the relatively wide range of habitat salinities utilized by A. paludum and the relatively restricted habitats preferred by G. latiabdominis. The high salinity tolerance of A. paludum could be an important factor contributing to their cosmopolitan distribution because high tolerance to salinity means the possibility of them to be dispersed via ocean or sea to other continents and islands. © 2012 The Authors Insect Science © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Differential responses of cell wall bound phenolic compounds in sensitive and tolerant varieties of rice in response to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Poulami; De, Bratati

    2017-10-03

    In plants, cell wall bound phenolics change in response to stress. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of NaCl induced stress on wall bound phenolics in four rice varieties, of which two (Bhutnath, Nonabokra) were salt tolerant and two (MTU 7029, Sujala) were salt sensitive. After germination, seedlings were grown in hydroponic solution and subjected to salinity stress (25 mM, 50 mM, 100 mM and 150 mM NaCl) on day 12. Wall bound phenolic compounds were determined by GC-MS based metabolite analysis. Total seven wall bound phenols were identified from the leaf tissues and eight from the root tissues. Ferulic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid were found in all the four varieties. After NaCl treatment, these two wall bound phenols increased in the leaves of tolerant varieties only. Significant inverse correlation between leaf length and leaf fresh weight with wall bound ferulic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid in Nonabokra suggests the positive role of these wall bound phenolics in salt tolerance.

  15. Salinity-Induced Variation in Biochemical Markers Provides Insight into the Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Common (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Runner (P. coccineus) Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Morosan, Mihaela; López-Gresa, María del Pilar; Prohens, Jaime; Vicente, Oscar; Boscaiu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of biochemical markers is important for the understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to salinity of Phaseolus beans. We have evaluated several growth parameters in young plants of three Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars subjected to four salinity levels (0, 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl); one cultivar of P. coccineus, a closely related species reported as more salt tolerant than common bean, was included as external reference. Biochemical parameters evaluated in leaves of young plants included the concentrations of ions (Na+, K+, and Cl−), osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, and total soluble sugars), and individual soluble carbohydrates. Considerable differences were found among cultivars, salinity levels, and in their interaction for most traits. In general, the linear component of the salinity factor for the growth parameters and biochemical markers was the most important. Large differences in the salinity response were found, with P. vulgaris cultivars “The Prince” and “Maxidor” being, respectively, the most susceptible and tolerant ones. Our results support that salt stress tolerance in beans is mostly based on restriction of Na+ (and, to a lesser extent, also of Cl−) transport to shoots, and on the accumulation of myo-inositol for osmotic adjustment. These responses to stress during vegetative growth appear to be more efficient in the tolerant P. vulgaris cultivar “Maxidor”. Proline accumulation is a reliable marker of the level of salt stress affecting Phaseolus plants, but does not seem to be directly related to stress tolerance mechanisms. These results provide useful information on the responses to salinity of Phaseolus. PMID:27657045

  16. Salinity-Induced Variation in Biochemical Markers Provides Insight into the Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Common (Phaseolus vulgaris and Runner (P. coccineus Beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Al Hassan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of biochemical markers is important for the understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to salinity of Phaseolus beans. We have evaluated several growth parameters in young plants of three Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars subjected to four salinity levels (0, 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl; one cultivar of P. coccineus, a closely related species reported as more salt tolerant than common bean, was included as external reference. Biochemical parameters evaluated in leaves of young plants included the concentrations of ions (Na+, K+, and Cl−, osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, and total soluble sugars, and individual soluble carbohydrates. Considerable differences were found among cultivars, salinity levels, and in their interaction for most traits. In general, the linear component of the salinity factor for the growth parameters and biochemical markers was the most important. Large differences in the salinity response were found, with P. vulgaris cultivars “The Prince” and “Maxidor” being, respectively, the most susceptible and tolerant ones. Our results support that salt stress tolerance in beans is mostly based on restriction of Na+ (and, to a lesser extent, also of Cl− transport to shoots, and on the accumulation of myo-inositol for osmotic adjustment. These responses to stress during vegetative growth appear to be more efficient in the tolerant P. vulgaris cultivar “Maxidor”. Proline accumulation is a reliable marker of the level of salt stress affecting Phaseolus plants, but does not seem to be directly related to stress tolerance mechanisms. These results provide useful information on the responses to salinity of Phaseolus.

  17. Salinity tolerances of two Australian freshwater turtles, Chelodina expansa and Emydura macquarii (Testudinata: Chelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Deborah S; Scheltinga, David M.; Clulow, Simon; Clulow, John; Franklin, Craig E.; Georges, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater biota experience physiological challenges in regions affected by salinization, but often the effects on particular species are poorly understood. Freshwater turtles are of particular concern as they appear to have limited ability to cope with environmental conditions that are hyperosmotic to their body fluids. Here, we determined the physiological responses of two Australian freshwater chelid turtles, Emydura macquarii and Chelodina expansa, exposed to freshwater (0?) and brackish ...

  18. Differential activity of plasma and vacuolar membrane transporters contributes to genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in a Halophyte Species, Chenopodium quinoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Lana; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Zeng, Fanrong; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-04-29

    Halophytes species can be used as a highly convenient model system to reveal key ionic and molecular mechanisms that confer salinity tolerance in plants. Earlier, we reported that quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), a facultative C3 halophyte species, can efficiently control the activity of slow (SV) and fast (FV) tonoplast channels to match specific growth conditions by ensuring that most of accumulated Na+ is safely locked in the vacuole (Bonales-Alatorre et al. (2013) Plant Physiology). This work extends these finding by comparing the properties of tonoplast FV and SV channels in two quinoa genotypes contrasting in their salinity tolerance. The work is complemented by studies of the kinetics of net ion fluxes across the plasma membrane of quinoa leaf mesophyll tissue. Our results suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute towards genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in quinoa. These include: (i) a higher rate of Na+ exclusion from leaf mesophyll; (ii) maintenance of low cytosolic Na+ levels; (iii) better K+ retention in the leaf mesophyll; (iv) a high rate of H+ pumping, which increases the ability of mesophyll cells to restore their membrane potential; and (v) the ability to reduce the activity of SV and FV channels under saline conditions. These mechanisms appear to be highly orchestrated, thus enabling the remarkable overall salinity tolerance of quinoa species.

  19. Differential Activity of Plasma and Vacuolar Membrane Transporters Contributes to Genotypic Differences in Salinity Tolerance in a Halophyte Species, Chenopodium quinoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Bonales-Alatorre

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Halophytes species can be used as a highly convenient model system to reveal key ionic and molecular mechanisms that confer salinity tolerance in plants. Earlier, we reported that quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd., a facultative C3 halophyte species, can efficiently control the activity of slow (SV and fast (FV tonoplast channels to match specific growth conditions by ensuring that most of accumulated Na+ is safely locked in the vacuole (Bonales-Alatorre et al. (2013 Plant Physiology. This work extends these finding by comparing the properties of tonoplast FV and SV channels in two quinoa genotypes contrasting in their salinity tolerance. The work is complemented by studies of the kinetics of net ion fluxes across the plasma membrane of quinoa leaf mesophyll tissue. Our results suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute towards genotypic differences in salinity tolerance in quinoa. These include: (i a higher rate of Na+ exclusion from leaf mesophyll; (ii maintenance of low cytosolic Na+ levels; (iii better K+ retention in the leaf mesophyll; (iv a high rate of H+ pumping, which increases the ability of mesophyll cells to restore their membrane potential; and (v the ability to reduce the activity of SV and FV channels under saline conditions. These mechanisms appear to be highly orchestrated, thus enabling the remarkable overall salinity tolerance of quinoa species.

  20. The recently introduced bivalve Xenostrobus securis has higher thermal and salinity tolerance than the native Brachidontes variabilis and established Mytilopsis sallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astudillo, Juan C; Bonebrake, Timothy C; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2017-05-15

    The recently introduced bivalve Xenostrobus securis and the previously introduced Mytilopsis sallei (~30years) are dominant over the native Brachidontes variabilis in estuarine fouling communities in Hong Kong. This study tested whether these introduced species have higher thermal and salinity tolerance than the native species under local subtropical seawater conditions. Survival, attachment, clearance rate and byssal thread production of these three species were examined through 96-h acute temperature and salinity tests. The results indicated that X. securis responded normally over a wide range of temperature and salinity conditions. Though M. sallei exhibited a wide salinity tolerance, its sub-lethal responses decreased in cold-seawater conditions. Brachidontes variabilis had the narrowest tolerance to temperature and salinity. These findings may explain the dominance of the non-native bivalves over B. variabilis. The high tolerance of X. securis enables them to become highly invasive in subtropical regions across Southeast Asia, impacting natural communities and shellfish farming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Constitutive expression of a salinity-induced wheat WRKY transcription factor enhances salinity and ionic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Han, Lu; Yang, Xinchao

    2013-10-25

    The isolation and characterization of TaWRKY79, a wheat class II WRKY transcription factor, is described. Its 1297 bp coding region includes a 987 bp long open reading frame. TaWRKY79 was induced by stressing seedlings with either NaCl or abscisic acid (ABA). When a fusion between an 843 bp segment upstream of the TaWRKY79 coding sequence and GUS was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana, GUS staining indicated that this upstream segment captured the sequence(s) required to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. When TaWRKY79 was constitutively expressed as a transgene in A. thaliana, the transgenic plants showed an improved capacity to extend their primary root in the presence of either 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM LiCl or 2 μM ABA. The inference was that TaWRKY79 enhanced the level of tolerance to both salinity and ionic stress, while reducing the level of sensitivity to ABA. The ABA-related genes ABA1, ABA2 ABI1 and ABI5 were all up-regulated in the TaWRKY79 transgenic plants, suggesting that the transcription factor operates in an ABA-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Global climate change and its potential impact on disease transmission by salinity-tolerant mosquito vectors in coastal zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ranjan; Surendran, Sinnathamby Noble

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change can potentially increase the transmission of mosquito vector-borne diseases such as malaria, lymphatic filariasis, and dengue in many parts of the world. These predictions are based on the effects of changing temperature, rainfall, and humidity on mosquito breeding and survival, the more rapid development of ingested pathogens in mosquitoes and the more frequent blood feeds at moderately higher ambient temperatures. An expansion of saline and brackish water bodies (water with 30 ppt salt are termed fresh, brackish, and saline respectively) will also take place as a result of global warming causing a rise in sea levels in coastal zones. Its possible impact on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases has, however, not been adequately appreciated. The relevant impacts of global climate change on the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones are discussed with reference to the Ross-McDonald equation and modeling studies. Evidence is presented to show that an expansion of brackish water bodies in coastal zones can increase the densities of salinity-tolerant mosquitoes like Anopheles sundaicus and Culex sitiens, and lead to the adaptation of fresh water mosquito vectors like Anopheles culicifacies, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Aedes albopictus to salinity. Rising sea levels may therefore act synergistically with global climate change to increase the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones. Greater attention therefore needs to be devoted to monitoring disease incidence and preimaginal development of vector mosquitoes in artificial and natural coastal brackish/saline habitats. It is important that national and international health agencies are aware of the increased risk of mosquito-borne diseases in coastal zones and develop preventive and mitigating strategies. Application of appropriate counter measures can greatly reduce the potential for increased coastal transmission of mosquito-borne diseases

  3. Populus euphratica XTH overexpression enhances salinity tolerance by the development of leaf succulence in transgenic tobacco plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-01-01

    Populus euphratica is a salt-tolerant tree species that develops leaf succulence after a prolonged period of salinity stress. In the present study, a putative xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase gene (PeXTH) from P. euphratica was isolated and transferred to tobacco plants. PeXTH localized exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum and cell wall. Plants overexpressing PeXTH were more salt tolerant than wild-type tobacco with respect to root and leaf growth, and survival. The increased capacity for salt tolerance was due mainly to the anatomical and physiological alterations caused by PeXTH overexpression. Compared with the wild type, PeXTH-transgenic plants contained 36% higher water content per unit area and 39% higher ratio of fresh weight to dry weight, a hallmark of leaf succulence. However, the increased water storage in the leaves in PeXTH-transgenic plants was not accompanied by greater leaf thickness but was due to highly packed palisade parenchyma cells and fewer intercellular air spaces between mesophyll cells. In addition to the salt dilution effect in response to NaCl, these anatomical changes increased leaf water-retaining capacity, which lowered the increase of salt concentration in the succulent tissues and mesophyll cells. Moreover, the increased number of mesophyll cells reduced the intercellular air space, which improved carbon economy and resulted in a 47–78% greater net photosynthesis under control and salt treatments (100–150mM NaCl). Taken together, the results indicate that PeXTH overexpression enhanced salt tolerance by the development of succulent leaves in tobacco plants without swelling. PMID:24085577

  4. Populus euphratica XTH overexpression enhances salinity tolerance by the development of leaf succulence in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yansha; Wang, Wei; Sun, Jian; Ding, Mingquan; Zhao, Rui; Deng, Shurong; Wang, Feifei; Hu, Yue; Wang, Yang; Lu, Yanjun; Du, Liping; Hu, Zanmin; Diekmann, Heike; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-11-01

    Populus euphratica is a salt-tolerant tree species that develops leaf succulence after a prolonged period of salinity stress. In the present study, a putative xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase gene (PeXTH) from P. euphratica was isolated and transferred to tobacco plants. PeXTH localized exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum and cell wall. Plants overexpressing PeXTH were more salt tolerant than wild-type tobacco with respect to root and leaf growth, and survival. The increased capacity for salt tolerance was due mainly to the anatomical and physiological alterations caused by PeXTH overexpression. Compared with the wild type, PeXTH-transgenic plants contained 36% higher water content per unit area and 39% higher ratio of fresh weight to dry weight, a hallmark of leaf succulence. However, the increased water storage in the leaves in PeXTH-transgenic plants was not accompanied by greater leaf thickness but was due to highly packed palisade parenchyma cells and fewer intercellular air spaces between mesophyll cells. In addition to the salt dilution effect in response to NaCl, these anatomical changes increased leaf water-retaining capacity, which lowered the increase of salt concentration in the succulent tissues and mesophyll cells. Moreover, the increased number of mesophyll cells reduced the intercellular air space, which improved carbon economy and resulted in a 47-78% greater net photosynthesis under control and salt treatments (100-150 mM NaCl). Taken together, the results indicate that PeXTH overexpression enhanced salt tolerance by the development of succulent leaves in tobacco plants without swelling.

  5. Oxidative stress protection and stomatal patterning as components of salinity tolerance mechanism in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabala, Lana; Mackay, Alex; Tian, Yu; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Zhou, Daowei; Shabala, Sergey

    2012-09-01

    Two components of salinity stress are a reduction in water availability to plants and the formation of reactive oxygen species. In this work, we have used quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa), a dicotyledonous C3 halophyte species displaying optimal growth at approximately 150 mM NaCl, to study mechanisms by which halophytes cope with the afore-mentioned components of salt stress. The relative contribution of organic and inorganic osmolytes in leaves of different physiological ages (e.g. positions on the stem) was quantified and linked with the osmoprotective function of organic osmolytes. We show that the extent of the oxidative stress (UV-B irradiation) damage to photosynthetic machinery in young leaves is much less when compared with old leaves, and attribute this difference to the difference in the size of the organic osmolyte pool (1.5-fold difference under control conditions; sixfold difference in plants grown at 400 mM NaCl). Consistent with this, salt-grown plants showed higher Fv/Fm values compared with control plants after UV-B exposure. Exogenous application of physiologically relevant concentrations of glycine betaine substantially mitigated oxidative stress damage to PSII, in a dose-dependent manner. We also show that salt-grown plants showed a significant (approximately 30%) reduction in stomatal density observed in all leaves. It is concluded that accumulation of organic osmolytes plays a dual role providing, in addition to osmotic adjustment, protection of photosynthetic machinery against oxidative stress in developing leaves. It is also suggested that salinity-induced reduction in stomatal density represents a fundamental mechanism by which plants optimize water use efficiency under saline conditions. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  6. High-Throughput Non-destructive Phenotyping of Traits that Contribute to Salinity Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Awlia, Mariam

    2016-09-28

    Reproducible and efficient high-throughput phenotyping approaches, combined with advances in genome sequencing, are facilitating the discovery of genes affecting plant performance. Salinity tolerance is a desirable trait that can be achieved through breeding, where most have aimed at selecting for plants that perform effective ion exclusion from the shoots. To determine overall plant performance under salt stress, it is helpful to investigate several plant traits collectively in one experimental setup. Hence, we developed a quantitative phenotyping protocol using a high-throughput phenotyping system, with RGB and chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) imaging, which captures the growth, morphology, color and photosynthetic performance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants in response to salt stress. We optimized our salt treatment by controlling the soil-water content prior to introducing salt stress. We investigated these traits over time in two accessions in soil at 150, 100, or 50 mM NaCl to find that the plants subjected to 100 mM NaCl showed the most prominent responses in the absence of symptoms of severe stress. In these plants, salt stress induced significant changes in rosette area and morphology, but less prominent changes in rosette coloring and photosystem II efficiency. Clustering of ChlF traits with plant growth of nine accessions maintained at 100 mM NaCl revealed that in the early stage of salt stress, salinity tolerance correlated with non-photochemical quenching processes and during the later stage, plant performance correlated with quantum yield. This integrative approach allows the simultaneous analysis of several phenotypic traits. In combination with various genetic resources, the phenotyping protocol described here is expected to increase our understanding of plant performance and stress responses, ultimately identifying genes that improve plant performance in salt stress conditions.

  7. High-throughput non-destructive phenotyping of traits that contribute to salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Awlia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reproducible and efficient high-throughput phenotyping approaches, combined with advances in genome sequencing, are facilitating the discovery of genes affecting plant performance. Salinity tolerance is a desirable trait that can be achieved through breeding, where most have aimed at selecting for plants that perform effective ion exclusion from the shoots. To determine overall plant performance under salt stress, it is helpful to investigate several plant traits collectively in one experimental setup. Hence, we developed a quantitative phenotyping protocol using a high-throughput phenotyping system, with RGB and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, which captures the growth, morphology, color and photosynthetic performance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants in response to salt stress. We optimized our salt treatment by controlling the soil-water content prior to introducing salt stress. We investigated these traits over time in two accessions in soil at 150, 100 or 50 mM NaCl to find that the plants subjected to 100 mM NaCl showed the most prominent responses in the absence of symptoms of severe stress. In these plants, salt stress induced significant changes in rosette area and morphology, but less prominent changes in rosette coloring and photosystem II efficiency. Clustering of chlorophyll fluorescence traits with plant growth of nine accessions maintained at 100 mM NaCl revealed that in the early stage of salt stress, salinity tolerance correlated with non-photochemical quenching processes and during the later stage, plant performance correlated with quantum yield. This integrative approach allows the simultaneous analysis of several phenotypic traits. In combination with various genetic resources, the phenotyping protocol described here is expected to increase our understanding of plant performance and stress responses, ultimately identifying genes that improve plant performance in salt stress conditions.

  8. High-Throughput Non-destructive Phenotyping of Traits that Contribute to Salinity Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awlia, Mariam; Nigro, Arianna; Fajkus, Jiří; Schmoeckel, Sandra M; Negrão, Sónia; Santelia, Diana; Trtílek, Martin; Tester, Mark; Julkowska, Magdalena M; Panzarová, Klára

    2016-01-01

    Reproducible and efficient high-throughput phenotyping approaches, combined with advances in genome sequencing, are facilitating the discovery of genes affecting plant performance. Salinity tolerance is a desirable trait that can be achieved through breeding, where most have aimed at selecting for plants that perform effective ion exclusion from the shoots. To determine overall plant performance under salt stress, it is helpful to investigate several plant traits collectively in one experimental setup. Hence, we developed a quantitative phenotyping protocol using a high-throughput phenotyping system, with RGB and chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) imaging, which captures the growth, morphology, color and photosynthetic performance of Arabidopsis thaliana plants in response to salt stress. We optimized our salt treatment by controlling the soil-water content prior to introducing salt stress. We investigated these traits over time in two accessions in soil at 150, 100, or 50 mM NaCl to find that the plants subjected to 100 mM NaCl showed the most prominent responses in the absence of symptoms of severe stress. In these plants, salt stress induced significant changes in rosette area and morphology, but less prominent changes in rosette coloring and photosystem II efficiency. Clustering of ChlF traits with plant growth of nine accessions maintained at 100 mM NaCl revealed that in the early stage of salt stress, salinity tolerance correlated with non-photochemical quenching processes and during the later stage, plant performance correlated with quantum yield. This integrative approach allows the simultaneous analysis of several phenotypic traits. In combination with various genetic resources, the phenotyping protocol described here is expected to increase our understanding of plant performance and stress responses, ultimately identifying genes that improve plant performance in salt stress conditions.

  9. Notification: Evaluation of EPA's Management of Resistance Issues Related to Herbicide Tolerant Genetically Engineered Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY16-0023, March 25, 2016. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research to assess the EPA's management and oversight of resistance issues related to herbicide tolerant genetically engineered crops.

  10. Physiological and molecular mechanisms mediating xylem Na(+) loading in barley in the context of salinity stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Zhou, Meixue; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey

    2017-07-01

    Time-dependent kinetics of xylem Na(+) loading was investigated using a large number of barley genotypes contrasting in their salinity tolerance. Salt-sensitive varieties were less efficient in controlling xylem Na(+) loading and showed a gradual increase in the xylem Na(+) content over the time. To understand underlying ionic and molecular mechanisms, net fluxes of Ca(2+) , K(+) and Na(+) were measured from the xylem parenchyma tissue in response to H2 O2 and ABA; both of them associated with salinity stress signalling. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase-mediated apoplastic H2 O2 production acts upstream of the xylem Na(+) loading and is causally related to ROS-inducible Ca(2+) uptake systems in the root stelar tissue. It was also found that ABA regulates (directly or indirectly) the process of Na(+) retrieval from the xylem and the significant reduction of Na(+) and K(+) fluxes induced by bumetanide are indicative of a major role of chloride cation co-transporter (CCC) on xylem ion loading. Transcript levels of HvHKT1;5_like and HvSOS1_like genes in the root stele were observed to decrease after salt stress, while there was an increase in HvSKOR_like gene, indicating that these ion transporters are involved in primary Na(+) /K(+) movement into/out of xylem. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Variation in salinity tolerance among larval anurans: implications for community composition and the spread of an invasive, non-native species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mary E.; Walls, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians in freshwater coastal wetlands periodically experience acute exposure to salinity from hurricane-related overwash events, as well as chronic exposure associated with rising sea levels. In a comparative experimental approach, we examined whether seven species of anuran amphibians vary in their tolerance to changes in salinity. In a laboratory study, we exposed larval Hyla cinerea (Green Treefrog), H. squirella (Squirrel Treefrog), Lithobates catesbeianus (American Bullfrog), L. sphenocephalus (Southern Leopard Frog), Anaxyrus terrestris (Southern Toad), and Gastrophryne carolinensis (Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad) from an inland population in north central Florida, USA, and Osteopilus septentrionalis (Cuban Treefrog) tadpoles from an inland population in southwest Florida, to acute salinity for 72 h. For each species, we replicated trials in which tadpoles were exposed to salinities of 0.2 (control), 5, 10, 12, 14, and 16 ppt. For all species, tadpoles reared in the control and 5 ppt treatments had 96.7–100% survival. No individuals of G. carolinensis survived at salinities exceeding 5 ppt and no individuals of any species survived in the 14 or 16 ppt treatments. For all other native species, survival at 10 ppt ranged from 46.7 to 80%, but declined to 0% at 12 ppt (except for H. cinerea, of which only 3.3% survived at 12 ppt). In contrast, all individuals of the invasive, non-native O. septentrionalis survived exposure to a salinity of 10 ppt, and survival in this species remained relatively high at 12 ppt. Our results illustrate that the non-native O. septentrionalis has a higher salinity tolerance than the native species tested, which may contribute to its invasion potential. Moreover, species commonly associated with coastal freshwater wetlands differ in their salinity tolerances, suggesting that salt water intrusion due to storm surges and sea level rise may affect the species composition of these ecosystems.

  12. Study of the tolerance of ten accessions of carrot (Daucus carota L. to salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma Kahouli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work has focused on the assessment of the tolerance of ten accessions of carrot (L1, L2, L3, F4, E5, R7, R8, L10, G11 and S12 to salt stress, grown in the region of Sidi Bouzid. The tests were carried out under plastic greenhouse (during 5 months. The results obtained show that the salt stress reduced the parameters of growth and production. However, a difference in the response to salt stress was recorded between the accessions studied. A reduction in yield of up to 70 % with the concentration 3 g / l of NaCl, for different accessions studied is recorded. However, the accession L1 who has given the longer roots and dry matter yield and the largest root shows the most tolerant accessions unlike L10, G11 and S12 which are the most sensitive.

  13. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is tolerant to higher levels of salinity than previous guidelines indicated: Implications of field and greenhouse studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Daniel H.; Benes, Sharon; Galdi, Giuliano; Hutmacher, Bob; Grattan, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the most widely grown leguminous forage crop in North America and is valued for high productivity, quality, economic value, and for dairy productivity. Alfalfa has historically been classified as moderately sensitive to saline conditions, with yield declines predicted at >2 dS/m in the saturated soil paste extract. However, greenhouse, sand tank, and field studies over the past five years have confirmed that alfalfa can be grown with limited negative effects at much higher salinity levels. A broad collection of alfalfa varieties has exhibited a range of resistance at irrigation water salinities >5 dS/m ECw in greenhouse trials, with significant variation due to variety. USDA-ARS sand tank studies indicated similar or greater tolerances closer to 8 dS/m in the soil water, in addition to confirmation of significant varietal differences. A three-year field study on clay loam soil with applications of 5-7 dS/m ECw irrigation water indicated normal yields and excellent stand survivability. A second field study in the same soil type with levels from 8-10 dS/m ECw showed yield reductions of 10-15% but economic yields were still achieved at those levels. Field and greenhouse studies were conducted with mixed salt saline sodic waters typical of the San Joaquin Valley of California. Field evaluation of variety performance was subject to greater variation due to secondary salinity-soil interactions including water infiltration and crusting problems, not only salinity per-se. Thus, adequate irrigation water availability to the crop may be as important as salinity in impacting yields under field conditions. Once established, the deep-rooted characteristics of alfalfa enable utilization of deeper subsurface moisture, even at moderate to high salinity levels, as documented by USDA lysimeter studies. Significant advantages to salinity-tolerant varieties have been observed. It will be important to consider specific management factors which may enable

  14. Comparative study of salinity tolerance of an oceanic sea skater, Halobates micans and its closely related fresh water species, Metrocoris histrio

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekimoto, T.; Osumi, Y.; Shiraki, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Emi, K.; Nakajo, M.; Moku, M.; Košťál, Vladimír; Katagiri, C.; Harada, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 14 (2014), s. 1141-1148 ISSN 2150-4091 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : oceanic sea skater s * fresh water halobatinae species * salinity tolerance Subject RIV: ED - Physiology http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=49746

  15. Effect of Salinity and Low Osmotic Potential on the Germination and Seedling Growth of Rapeseed Cultivars with Different Stress Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pace

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In mediterranean environments, rapeseed is grown in fall-winter with late-summer sowing and this implies that germination and initial seedling growth may occur in soils with low water content and/or high salinity. Lab experiments were carried out to study the effect of the level and timing of salt and osmotic stress application on the germination and seedling growth of rapeseed (Brassica napus var. oleifera Del. cultivars with different stress tolerance. After a preliminary screening on eighteen cultivars, four hybrids with different stress tolerance during germination were chosen to study germination on Petri dishes at 14 increasing concentrations of PEG 6000 (ψs up to -1.5 MPa and 12 increasing concentrations of NaCl (up to 600 mM. Seedlings from seeds germinated at 0 and 250 mM of NaCl were then grown into boxes for the slant test containing NaCl solutions 0 mM and 100 mM, while seedlings from seeds germinated -0.8 and -0.03 MPa (PEG were grown in pots containing siliceous sand with a water content equivalent to field capacity or half of field capacity. In both experiments seedlings were grown for 11 days under controlled light/temperature conditions. Therefore, for both salt and osmotic stress experiments, the following four combinations for “germination-growth” conditions were obtained for each cultivar: optimum-optimum; optimum-stress; stress-optimum; stress-stress. The following determinations were performed: final percentage germination, time to 50% germination (T50, and base water potential of seeds; dry and fresh weights, and shoot and root lengths of seedlings at the end of the growth period (i.e. 11 days after plant transfer to the growth medium, and correspondent relative growth rates between the start and the end of the growth period. The different degree of stress tolerance observed among rapeseed cultivars for germination was in the order of 150 mMol for NaCl concentration and 0.2-0.3 MPa for osmotic potential. Nonetheless

  16. Cloning and characterization of ChiMYB in Chrysanthemum indicum with an emphasis on salinity stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M; Wang, H; Z Liu, Y; Gao, W J; Gao, Y H; Wang, F; Zhou, Y W

    2016-09-23

    v-myb avianmyeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) transcription factors are key regulators of stress responsive gene expression in plants. In this study, the MYB gene, ChiMYB (GenBank accession No. KT948997), was isolated from Chrysanthemum indicum, and was functionally characterized with an emphasis on salinity stress tolerance. The full ChiMYB cDNA sequence (948 bp) encoded a typical R2R3 MYB transcription factor that contained 315 amino acid residues and two MYB domains. The temporal expression pattern of ChiMYB was noted in C. indicum, and the highest level was detected in the roots, followed by leaves and stems. ChiMYB expression was induced by NaCl treatments, and transient expression of the fusion of ChiMYB and green fluorescent protein (GFP) indicated that the protein was targeted to the nuclei of onion epidermal cells. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ChiMYB displayed improved tolerance to drought and salt stress. When under salt stress conditions, transgenic Arabidopsis plants had higher survival rates than non-transgenic wild-type plants. Chlorophyll content, intercellular CO 2 concentration, photosynthetic rate, and stomatal conductance were higher in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants than in non-transgenic control plants. Further investigation revealed that ChiMYB was able to regulate the expression of RD29A, RAB18, COR15, ABI1, and ABA genes, which are involved in salt stress signaling pathways. Our findings demonstrated that ChiMYB is essential for plant responses to salt stress, and it may have great potential for the improvement of salt tolerance in crops.

  17. Salinity-tolerant larvae of mosquito vectors in the tropical coast of Jaffna, Sri Lanka and the effect of salinity on the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis to Aedes aegypti larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Pavilupillai J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue, chikungunya, malaria, filariasis and Japanese encephalitis are common mosquito-borne diseases endemic to Sri Lanka. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, the major vectors of dengue, were recently shown to undergo pre-imaginal development in brackish water bodies in the island. A limited survey of selected coastal localities of the Jaffna district in northern Sri Lanka was carried out to identify mosquito species undergoing pre-imaginal development in brackish and saline waters. The effect of salinity on the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis larvicide to Ae. aegypti larvae at salinity levels naturally tolerated by Ae. aegypti was examined. Methods Larvae collected at the selected sites along the Jaffna coast were identified and salinity of habitat water determined in the laboratory. The LC50 and LC90 of B. thuringiensis toxin, the active ingredient of a commercial formulation of the larvicide BACTIVEC®, were determined with Ae. aegypti larvae. Bioassays were also carried out at salinities varying from 0 to18 ppt to determine the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis to fresh and brackish water-derived larvae of Ae. aegypti. Results Larvae of four Anopheles, two Aedes, one Culex and one Lutzia species were collected from brackish and saline sites with salinity in the range 2 to 68 ppt. The LC50 and LC90 of B. thuringiensis toxin for the second instar larvae of Ae. aegypti in fresh water were 0.006 ppm and 0.013 ppm respectively, with corresponding values for brackish water populations of 0.008 and 0.012 ppm respectively. One hundred percent survival of second instar fresh water and brackish water-derived Ae. aegypti larvae was recorded at salinity up to 10 and 12 ppt and 100% mortality at 16 and 18 ppt, yielding an LC 50 for salinity of 13.9 ppt and 15.4 ppt at 24 h post-treatment respectively for the two populations. Statistical analysis showed significantly reduced toxicity of B. thuringiensis to fresh and

  18. Silicon-mediated Improvement in Plant Salinity Tolerance: The Role of Aquaporins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Rios

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is an abundant and differentially distributed element in soils that is believed to have important biological functions. However, the benefits of Si and its essentiality in plants are controversial due to differences among species in their ability to take up this element. Despite this, there is a consensus that the application of Si improves the water status of plants under abiotic stress conditions. Hence, plants treated with Si are able to maintain a high stomatal conductance and transpiration rate under salt stress, suggesting that a reduction in Na+ uptake occurs due to deposition of Si in the root. In addition, root hydraulic conductivity increases when Si is applied. As a result, a Si-mediated upregulation of aquaporin (PIP gene expression is observed in relation to increased root hydraulic conductivity and water uptake. Aquaporins of the subclass nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins are further involved in allowing Si entry into the cell. Therefore, on the basis of available published results and recent developments, we propose a model to explain how Si absorption alleviates stress in plants grown under saline conditions through the conjugated action of different aquaporins.

  19. Genetics of Na+ exclusion and salinity tolerance in Afghani durum wheat landraces

    KAUST Repository

    Shamaya, Nawar Jalal

    2017-11-21

    BackgroundSelecting for low concentration of Na+ in the shoot provides one approach for tackling salinity stress that adversely affects crop production. Novel alleles for Na+ exclusion can be identified and then introduced into elite crop cultivars.ResultsWe have identified loci associated with lower Na+ concentration in leaves of durum wheat landraces originating from Afghanistan. Seedlings of two F2 populations derived from crossings between Australian durum wheat (Jandaroi) and two Afghani landraces (AUS-14740 and AUS-14752) were grown hydroponically and evaluated for Na+ and K+ concentration in the third leaf. High heritability was found for both third leaf Na+ concentration and the K+/Na+ ratio in both populations. Further work focussed on line AUS-14740. Bulk segregant analysis using 9 K SNP markers identified two loci significantly associated with third leaf Na+ concentration. Marker regression analysis showed a strong association between all traits studied and a favourable allele originating from AUS-14740 located on the long arm of chromosome 4B.ConclusionsThe candidate gene in the relevant region of chromosome 4B is likely to be the high affinity K+ transporter B1 (HKT1;5-B1). A second locus associated with third leaf Na+ concentration was located on chromosome 3BL, with the favourable allele originating from Jandaroi; however, no candidate gene can be identified.

  20. Influence of Rhizobacterium Inoculation on NaCl Salinity Tolerance in Pusa Sukomal and RC101 Varieties of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhna Chaturvedi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is one of the most severe factors limiting growth and physiological response in cowpea plants. In the present study, the effect of rhizobacterium strains BR2 and BR3 on the growth of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. varieties—Pusa Sukomal and RC101—tolerance to 0, 25, 50, and 75 mM concentrations of NaCl salinity was evaluated. The rate of growth, in general, was high in plants irrigated with 25 mM NaCl saline water as compared to control, and thereafter, the growth reduced with increase in salinity concentrations. The results revealed that treating the seeds with rhizobacteria accompanied by NaCl salinity increased growth parameters of the cowpea plant as compared to the seeds irrigated with sodium chloride alone. Treatment with rhizobacteria mitigated the harmful effect of NaCl, and the growth was significantly better than the plants growing in saline water without rhizobacterium inoculation. The overall performance of Pusa Sukomal with BR3 strain was found to be better than the other combinations tested. Flowering in field plants started within 45 days of sowing, and the seeds in plants irrigated with saline water, in the presence of rhizobacterium, were found to be healthy as compared to control seeds. Seed protein profile was analyzed by SDS PAGE gel studies.

  1. Dehydrins from wheat x Thinopyrum ponticum amphiploid increase salinity and drought tolerance under their own inducible promoters without growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yu-Xiang; Qin, Fangyuan

    2016-02-01

    Dehydrins confer abiotic stress tolerance in seedlings, but few dehydrins have been studied by transgenic analysis under their own promoters in relation to abiotic stress tolerance. Also the inducible promoters for transgenic engineering are limited. In this study, we isolated from wheat three salt-induced YSK2 dehydrin genes and their promoters. The cDNA sequences were 711, 785, and 932 bp in length, encoding proteins containing 133, 166 and 231 amino acids, respectively, and were named TaDHN1, TaDHN2, and TaDHN3. TaDHN2 doesn't contain introns, while the other two genes each contain one. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed all three dehydrin genes are substantially induced by ABA and NaCl, but only TaDHN2 is induced in seedlings by PEG and by cold (4 °C). Regulatory sequences upstream of the first translation codon (775, 1615 and 889 bp) of the three dehydrin genes were also cloned. Cis-element prediction indicated the presence of ABRE and other abiotic-stress-related elements. Histochemical analysis using GUS expression demonstrated that all three promoters were induced by ABA, cold or NaCl. Ectopic over-expression of TaDHN1 or TaDHN3 in Arabidopsis under their own inducible promoters enhanced NaCl- and drought-stress tolerance without growth retardation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of leaf water relations in leaves of two olive (Olea europaea) cultivars differing in tolerance to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucci, R; Lombardini, L; Tattini, M

    1997-01-01

    One-year-old rooted cuttings of olive (Olea europaea L. cvs. Frantoio and Leccino) were grown either hydroponically or in soil in a greenhouse. Plants were exposed to NaCl treatments (0, 100, and 200 mM) for 35 days, followed by 30 to 34 days of relief from salt stress to determine whether previously demonstrated genotypic differences in tolerance to salinity were related to water relations parameters. Exposure to high salt concentrations resulted in reductions in predawn water potential (Psi(w)), osmotic potential at full turgor (Psi(piFT)), osmotic potential at turgor loss point (Psi(piTLP)), and relative water content (RWC) in both cultivars, regardless of the growth substrate. Leaf Psi(w) and RWC returned to values similar to those of controls by the end of the relief period. The effect of salinity on Psi(pi) appeared earlier in Leccino than in Frantoio. Values for Psi(piFT) were -2.50, -2.87, and -3.16 MPa for the 0, 100, and 200 mM salt-treated Frantoio plants, respectively, and -2.23, -2.87, and -3.37 MPa for the corresponding Leccino plants. Recovery of Psi(pi) was complete for plants in the 100 mM salt treatment, but not for plants in the 200 mM salt treatment, which maintained an increased pressure potential (Psi(pi)) compared to control plants. Net solute accumulation was higher in Leccino, the salt-sensitive cultivar, than in Frantoio. In controls of both cultivars, cations contributed 39.9 to 42.0% of the total Psi(piFT), mannitol and glucose contributed 27.1 to 30.8%, and other soluble carbohydrates contributed 3.1 to 3.6%. The osmotic contribution of Na(+) increased from 0.1-2.1% for non-treated plants to 8.6-15.5% and 15.6-20.0% for the 100 mM and 200 mM salt-treated plants, respectively. The mannitol contribution to Psi(piFT) reached a maximum of 9.1% at the end of the salinization period. We conclude that differences between the two cultivars in leaf water relations reflect differences in the exclusion capacities for Na(+) and Cl(-) ions.

  3. Reproductive stage physiological and transcriptional responses to salinity stress in reciprocal populations derived from tolerant (Horkuch) and susceptible (IR29) rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Samsad; Haque, Taslima; Elias, Sabrina M.; Rahman, Md. Sazzadur; Biswas, Sudip; Schwartz, Scott; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.; Walia, Harkamal; Juenger, Thomas E.; Seraj, Zeba I.

    2017-04-01

    Global increase in salinity levels has made it imperative to identify novel sources of genetic variation for tolerance traits, especially in rice. The rice landrace Horkuch, endemic to the saline coastal area of Bangladesh, was used in this study as the source of tolerance in reciprocal crosses with the sensitive but high-yielding IR29 variety for discovering transcriptional variation associated with salt tolerance in the resulting populations. The cytoplasmic effect of the Horkuch background in leaves under stress showed functional enrichment for signal transduction, DNA-dependent regulation and transport activities. In roots the enrichment was for cell wall organization and macromolecule biosynthesis. In contrast, the cytoplasmic effect of IR29 showed upregulation of apoptosis and downregulation of phosphorylation across tissues relative to Horkuch. Differential gene expression in leaves of the sensitive population showed downregulation of GO processes like photosynthesis, ATP biosynthesis and ion transport. Roots of the tolerant plants conversely showed upregulation of GO terms like G-protein coupled receptor pathway, membrane potential and cation transport. Furthermore, genes involved in regulating membrane potentials were constitutively expressed only in the roots of tolerant individuals. Overall our work has developed genetic resources and elucidated the likely mechanisms associated with the tolerance response of the Horkuch genotype.

  4. Variation in salinity tolerance and shoot sodium accumulation in Arabidopsis ecotypes linked to differences in the natural expression levels of transporters involved in sodium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, D; Shirley, N; Tester, M; Roy, S J

    2010-05-01

    Salinity tolerance can be attributed to three different mechanisms: Na+ exclusion from the shoot, Na+ tissue tolerance and osmotic tolerance. Although several key ion channels and transporters involved in these processes are known, the variation in expression profiles and the effects of these proteins on Na+ transport in different accessions of the same species are unknown. Here, expression profiles of the genes AtHKT1;1, AtSOS1, AtNHX1 and AtAVP1 are determined in four ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana. Not only are these genes differentially regulated between ecotypes, the expression levels of the genes can be linked to the concentration of Na+ in the plant. An inverse relationship was found between AtSOS1 expression in the root and total plant Na+ accumulation, supporting a role for AtSOS1 in Na+ efflux from the plant. Similarly, ecotypes with high expression levels of AtHKT1;1 in the root had lower shoot Na+ concentrations, due to the hypothesized role of AtHKT1;1 in retrieval of Na+ from the transpiration stream. The inverse relationship between shoot Na+ concentration and salinity tolerance typical of most cereal crop plants was not demonstrated, but a positive relationship was found between salt tolerance and levels of AtAVP1 expression, which may be related to tissue tolerance.

  5. A moso bamboo WRKY gene PeWRKY83 confers salinity tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Liu, Huanlong; Han, Guomin; Cai, Ronghao; Pan, Feng; Xiang, Yan

    2017-09-15

    The WRKY family are transcription factors, involved in plant development, and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Moso bamboo is an important bamboo that has high ecological, economic and cultural value and is widely distributed in the south of China. In this study, we performed a genome-wide identification of WRKY members in moso bamboo and identified 89 members. By comparative analysis in six grass genomes, we found the WRKY gene family may have experienced or be experiencing purifying selection. Based on relative expression levels among WRKY IIc members under three abiotic stresses, PeWRKY83 functioned as a transcription factor and was selected for detailed analysis. The transgenic Arabidopsis of PeWRKY83 showed superior physiological properties compared with the WT under salt stress. Overexpression plants were less sensitive to ABA at both germination and postgermination stages and accumulated more endogenous ABA under salt stress conditions. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of PeWRKY83 could regulate the expression of some ABA biosynthesis genes (AtAAO3, AtNCED2, AtNCED3), signaling genes (AtABI1, AtPP2CA) and responsive genes (AtRD29A, AtRD29B, AtABF1) under salt stress. Together, these results suggested that PeWRKY83 functions as a novel WRKY-related TF which plays a positive role in salt tolerance by regulating stress-induced ABA synthesis.

  6. Optimization studies on production of a salt-tolerant protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BC1 and its application on tannery saline wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Sivaprakasam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and safe disposal of tannery saline wastewater, a primary effluent stream that is generated by soaking salt-laden hides and skin is one of the major problems faced by the leather manufacturing industries. Conventional treatment methods like solar evaporation ponds and land composting are not eco-friendly as they deteriorate the ground water quality. Though, this waste stream is comprised of high concentration of dissolved proteins the presence of high salinity (1-6 % NaCl by wt makes it non-biodegradable. Enzymatic treatment is one of the positive alternatives for management of such kind of waste streams. A novel salt-tolerant alkaline protease obtained from P.aeruginosa (isolated from tannery saline wastewater was used for enzymatic degradation studies. The effect of various physical factors including pH, temperature, incubation time, protein source and salinity on the activity of identified protease were investigated. Kinetic parameters (Km , Vmax were calculated for the identified alkaline protease at varying substrate concentrations. Tannery saline wastewater treated with identified salt tolerant protease showed 75 % protein removal at 6 h duration and 2 % (v/v protease addition was found to be the optimum dosage value.

  7. Optimization studies on production of a salt-tolerant protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BC1 and its application on tannery saline wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprakasam, Senthilkumar; Dhandapani, Balaji; Mahadevan, Surianarayanan

    2011-10-01

    Treatment and safe disposal of tannery saline wastewater, a primary effluent stream that is generated by soaking salt-laden hides and skin is one of the major problems faced by the leather manufacturing industries. Conventional treatment methods like solar evaporation ponds and land composting are not eco-friendly as they deteriorate the ground water quality. Though, this waste stream is comprised of high concentration of dissolved proteins the presence of high salinity (1-6 % NaCl by wt) makes it non-biodegradable. Enzymatic treatment is one of the positive alternatives for management of such kind of waste streams. A novel salt-tolerant alkaline protease obtained from P.aeruginosa (isolated from tannery saline wastewater) was used for enzymatic degradation studies. The effect of various physical factors including pH, temperature, incubation time, protein source and salinity on the activity of identified protease were investigated. Kinetic parameters (Km , Vmax) were calculated for the identified alkaline protease at varying substrate concentrations. Tannery saline wastewater treated with identified salt tolerant protease showed 75 % protein removal at 6 h duration and 2 % (v/v) protease addition was found to be the optimum dosage value.

  8. Futile Na+ cycling at the root plasma membrane in rice (Oryza sativa L.): kinetics, energetics, and relationship to salinity tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagoli, Philippe; Britto, Dev T; Schulze, Lasse M; Kronzucker, Herbert J

    2008-01-01

    Globally, over one-third of irrigated land is affected by salinity, including much of the land under lowland rice cultivation in the tropics, seriously compromising yields of this most important of crop species. However, there remains an insufficient understanding of the cellular basis of salt tolerance in rice. Here, three methods of 24Na+ tracer analysis were used to investigate primary Na+ transport at the root plasma membrane in a salt-tolerant rice cultivar (Pokkali) and a salt-sensitive cultivar (IR29). Futile cycling of Na+ at the plasma membrane of intact roots occurred at both low and elevated levels of steady-state Na+ supply ([Na+]ext=1 mM and 25 mM) in both cultivars. At 25 mM [Na+]ext, a toxic condition for IR29, unidirectional influx and efflux of Na+ in this cultivar, but not in Pokkali, became very high [>100 micromol g (root FW)(-1) h(-1)], demonstrating an inability to restrict sodium fluxes. Current models of sodium transport energetics across the plasma membrane in root cells predict that, if the sodium efflux were mediated by Na+/H+ antiport, this toxic scenario would impose a substantial respiratory cost in IR29. This cost is calculated here, and compared with root respiration, which, however, comprised only approximately 50% of what would be required to sustain efflux by the antiporter. This suggests that either the conventional 'leak-pump' model of Na+ transport or the energetic model of proton-linked Na+ transport may require some revision. In addition, the lack of suppression of Na+ influx by both K+ and Ca2+, and by the application of the channel inhibitors Cs+, TEA+, and Ba2+, questions the participation of potassium channels and non-selective cation channels in the observed Na+ fluxes.

  9. Futile Na+ cycling at the root plasma membrane in rice (Oryza sativa L.): kinetics, energetics, and relationship to salinity tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagoli, Philippe; Britto, Dev T.; Schulze, Lasse M.; Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    2008-01-01

    Globally, over one-third of irrigated land is affected by salinity, including much of the land under lowland rice cultivation in the tropics, seriously compromising yields of this most important of crop species. However, there remains an insufficient understanding of the cellular basis of salt tolerance in rice. Here, three methods of 24Na+ tracer analysis were used to investigate primary Na+ transport at the root plasma membrane in a salt-tolerant rice cultivar (Pokkali) and a salt-sensitive cultivar (IR29). Futile cycling of Na+ at the plasma membrane of intact roots occurred at both low and elevated levels of steady-state Na+ supply ([Na+]ext=1 mM and 25 mM) in both cultivars. At 25 mM [Na+]ext, a toxic condition for IR29, unidirectional influx and efflux of Na+ in this cultivar, but not in Pokkali, became very high [>100 μmol g (root FW)−1 h−1], demonstrating an inability to restrict sodium fluxes. Current models of sodium transport energetics across the plasma membrane in root cells predict that, if the sodium efflux were mediated by Na+/H+ antiport, this toxic scenario would impose a substantial respiratory cost in IR29. This cost is calculated here, and compared with root respiration, which, however, comprised only ∼50% of what would be required to sustain efflux by the antiporter. This suggests that either the conventional ‘leak-pump’ model of Na+ transport or the energetic model of proton-linked Na+ transport may require some revision. In addition, the lack of suppression of Na+ influx by both K+ and Ca2+, and by the application of the channel inhibitors Cs+, TEA+, and Ba2+, questions the participation of potassium channels and non-selective cation channels in the observed Na+ fluxes. PMID:18854575

  10. Genetic engineering strategies for biotic and abiotic stress tolerance and quality enhancement in horticultural crops: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Nehanjali; Singh, Kunwar Harendra; Sharma, Deepika; Singh, Lal; Kumar, Pankaj; Nanjundan, J; Khan, Yasin Jeshima; Chauhan, Devendra Kumar; Thakur, Ajay Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Genetic engineering technique offers myriads of applications in improvement of horticultural crops for biotic and abiotic stress tolerance, and produce quality enhancement. During last two decades, a large number of transgenic horticultural crops has been developed and more are underway. A number of genes including natural and synthetic Cry genes, protease inhibitors, trypsin inhibitors and cystatin genes have been used to incorporate insect and nematode resistance. For providing protection against fungal and bacterial diseases, various genes like chitinase, glucanase, osmotin, defensin and pathogenesis-related genes are being transferred to many horticultural crops world over. RNAi technique has been found quite successful in inducing virus resistance in horticultural crops in addition to coat protein genes. Abiotic stresses such as drought, heat and salinity adversely affect production and productivity of horticultural crops and a number of genes encoding for biosynthesis of stress protecting compounds including mannitol, glycine betaine and heat shock proteins have been employed for abiotic stress tolerance besides various transcription factors like DREB1, MAPK, WRKY, etc. Antisense gene and RNAi technologies have revolutionized the pace of improvement of horticultural crops, particularly ornamentals for color modification, increasing shelf-life and reducing post-harvest losses. Precise genome editing tools, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, have been efficiently applied in tomato, petunia, citrus, grape, potato and apple for gene mutation, repression, activation and epigenome editing. This review provides comprehensive overview to draw the attention of researchers for better understanding of genetic engineering advancements in imparting biotic and abiotic stress tolerance as well as on improving various traits related to quality, texture, plant architecture modification, increasing shelf-life, etc. in different horticultural crops.

  11. Variation in the Abundance of OsHAK1 Transcript Underlies the Differential Salinity Tolerance of an indica and a japonica Rice Cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salinity imposes a major constraint over the productivity of rice. A set of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs, derived from a cross between the japonica type cultivar (cv. Nipponbare (salinity sensitive and the indica type cv. 9311 (moderately tolerant, was scored using a hydroponics system for their salinity tolerance at the seedling stage. Two of the CSSLs, which share a ∼1.2 Mbp stretch of chromosome 4 derived from cv. Nipponbare, were as sensitive to the stress as cv. Nipponbare itself. Fine mapping based on an F2 population bred from a backcross between one of these CSSLs and cv. 9311 narrowed this region to 95 Kbp, within which only one gene (OsHAK1 exhibited a differential (lower transcript abundance in cv. Nipponbare and the two CSSLs compared to in cv. 9311. The gene was up-regulated by exposure to salinity stress both in the root and the shoot, while a knockout mutant proved to be more salinity sensitive than its wild type with respect to its growth at both the vegetative and reproductive stages. Seedlings over-expressing OsHAK1 were more tolerant than wild type, displaying a superior photosynthetic rate, a higher leaf chlorophyll content, an enhanced accumulation of proline and a reduced level of lipid peroxidation. At the transcriptome level, the over-expression of OsHAK1 stimulated a number of stress-responsive genes as well as four genes known to be involved in Na+ homeostasis and the salinity response (OsHKT1;5, OsSOS1, OsLti6a and OsLti6b. When the stress was applied at booting through to maturity, the OsHAK1 over-expressors out-yielded wild type by 25%, and no negative pleiotropic effects were expressed in plants gown under non-saline conditions. The level of expression of OsHAK1 was correlated with Na+/K+ homeostasis, which implies that the gene should be explored a target for molecular approaches to the improvement of salinity tolerance in rice.

  12. Variation in the Abundance of OsHAK1 Transcript Underlies the Differential Salinity Tolerance of an indica and a japonica Rice Cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Liu, Chaolei; Gao, Zhenyu; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Anpeng; Zhu, Li; Hu, Jiang; Ren, Deyong; Yu, Ling; Xu, Guohua; Qian, Qian

    2018-01-01

    Salinity imposes a major constraint over the productivity of rice. A set of chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs), derived from a cross between the japonica type cultivar (cv.) Nipponbare (salinity sensitive) and the indica type cv. 9311 (moderately tolerant), was scored using a hydroponics system for their salinity tolerance at the seedling stage. Two of the CSSLs, which share a ∼1.2 Mbp stretch of chromosome 4 derived from cv. Nipponbare, were as sensitive to the stress as cv. Nipponbare itself. Fine mapping based on an F2 population bred from a backcross between one of these CSSLs and cv. 9311 narrowed this region to 95 Kbp, within which only one gene (OsHAK1) exhibited a differential (lower) transcript abundance in cv. Nipponbare and the two CSSLs compared to in cv. 9311. The gene was up-regulated by exposure to salinity stress both in the root and the shoot, while a knockout mutant proved to be more salinity sensitive than its wild type with respect to its growth at both the vegetative and reproductive stages. Seedlings over-expressing OsHAK1 were more tolerant than wild type, displaying a superior photosynthetic rate, a higher leaf chlorophyll content, an enhanced accumulation of proline and a reduced level of lipid peroxidation. At the transcriptome level, the over-expression of OsHAK1 stimulated a number of stress-responsive genes as well as four genes known to be involved in Na+ homeostasis and the salinity response (OsHKT1;5, OsSOS1, OsLti6a and OsLti6b). When the stress was applied at booting through to maturity, the OsHAK1 over-expressors out-yielded wild type by 25%, and no negative pleiotropic effects were expressed in plants gown under non-saline conditions. The level of expression of OsHAK1 was correlated with Na+/K+ homeostasis, which implies that the gene should be explored a target for molecular approaches to the improvement of salinity tolerance in rice. PMID:29354152

  13. Potentials toward genetic engineering of drought-tolerant soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2012-12-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crops in legume family. Soybean and soybean-based products are also considered as popular food for human and animal husbandry. With its high oil content, soybean has become a potential resource for the production of renewable fuel. However, soybean is considered one of the most drought-sensitive crops, with approximately 40% reduction of the yield in the worst years. Recent research progresses in elucidation of biochemical, morphological and physiological responses as well as molecular mechanisms of plant adaptation to drought stress in model plants have provided a solid foundation for translational genomics of soybean toward drought tolerance. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in development of drought-tolerant soybean cultivars by gene transfer.

  14. Salinity tolerance, Na+ exclusion and allele mining of HKT1;5 in Oryza sativa and O. glaberrima: many sources, many genes, one mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultivated rice species (Oryza sativa L. and O. glaberrima Steud.) are generally considered among the crop species most sensitive to salt stress. A handful of lines are known to be tolerant, and a small number of these have been used extensively as donors in breeding programs. However, these donors use many of the same genes and physiological mechanisms to confer tolerance. Little information is available on the diversity of mechanisms used by these species to cope with salt stress, and there is a strong need to identify varieties displaying additional physiological and/or genetic mechanisms to confer higher tolerance. Results Here we present data on 103 accessions from O. sativa and 12 accessions from O. glaberrima, many of which are identified as salt tolerant for the first time, showing moderate to high tolerance of high salinity. The correlation of salinity-induced senescence (as judged by the Standard Evaluation System for Rice, or SES, score) with whole-plant and leaf blade Na+ concentrations was high across nearly all accessions, and was almost identical in both O. sativa and O. glaberrima. The association of leaf Na+ concentrations with cultivar-groups was very weak, but association with the OsHKT1;5 allele was generally strong. Seven major and three minor alleles of OsHKT1;5 were identified, and their comparisons with the leaf Na+ concentration showed that the Aromatic allele conferred the highest exclusion and the Japonica allele the least. A number of exceptions to this association with the Oryza HKT1;5 allele were identified; these probably indicate the existence of additional highly effective exclusion mechanisms. In addition, two landraces were identified, one from Thailand and the other from Senegal, that show high tissue tolerance. Conclusions Significant variation in salinity tolerance exists within both cultivated Oryza species, and this is the first report of significant tolerance in O. glaberrima. The majority of accessions display a

  15. Effect of salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria on wheat plants and soil health in a saline environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, S K; Singh, D P

    2015-01-01

    Salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (ST-PGPR) significantly influence the growth and yield of wheat crops in saline soil. Wheat growth improved in pots with inoculation of all nine ST-PGPR (ECe = 4.3 dS·m(-1) ; greenhouse experiment), while maximum growth and dry biomass was observed in isolate SU18 Arthrobacter sp.; simultaneously, all ST-PGPR improved soil health in treated pot soil over controls. In the field experiment, maximum wheat root dry weight and shoot biomass was observed after inoculation with SU44 B. aquimaris, and SU8 B. aquimaris, respectively, after 60 and 90 days. Isolate SU8 B. aquimaris, induced significantly higher proline and total soluble sugar accumulation in wheat, while isolate SU44 B. aquimaris, resulted in higher accumulation of reducing sugars after 60 days. Percentage nitrogen (N), potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) in leaves of wheat increased significantly after inoculation with ST-PGPR, as compared to un-inoculated plants. Isolate SU47 B. subtilis showed maximum reduction of sodium (Na) content in wheat leaves of about 23% at both 60 and 90 days after sowing, and produced the best yield of around 17.8% more than the control. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. Salinization and Saline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    -arid zones. The increasing demand for water has created tremendous pressures on water resources that have resulted in lowering water level and increasing salinization. For example, in the Middle East salinity is the main factor that limits water utilization, and future prospects for water use in Israel, Palestinian Authority, and Jordan are overshadowed by the increasing salinization (Vengosh and Rosenthal, 1994; Salameh, 1996). The salinity problem has numerous grave economic, social, and political consequences, particularly in cross-boundary basins that are shared by different communities (e.g., Salinas Valley California; Vengosh et al., 2002a), friendly states (e.g., salinization of the Colorado River along Mexico-US border; Stanton et al., 2001), and hostile states (e.g., the Jordan River, Vengosh et al., 2001; Aral Basin, Weinthal, 2002; Euphrates River, Beaumont, 1996; and the Nile River, Ohlsson, 1995).Salinization of water resources also affects agricultural management. The type of irrigation water and its quality determine the salinity and fertility of the soil and eventually the quality of the underlying water resource. The use of treated wastewater or other marginal water (e.g., brackish water) depends on the salinity and the chemical composition of the water. Treated wastewater with high contents of chloride, sodium, and boron is suitable only for salt-tolerant crops and requires special treatment of the soil. Finally, high boron in irrigation water and consequently in soil water is also an important limiting factor for crops, as boron is an essential micronutrient for plants but becomes toxic at high levels (typically >0.75 mg L-1 in irrigation water).This chapter investigates the different mechanisms and geochemistry of salinization in different parts of the world. The role of the unsaturated zone in shaping the chemical composition of dryland salinization is discussed. Special emphasis is on the anthropogenic effects and to man-made fluids and reused water

  17. Increased Salinity Tolerance of Cowpea Plants by Dual Inoculation of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus clarum and a Nitrogen-fixer Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, G H; Aboul-Nasr, M B; Al-Humiany, A

    2005-03-01

    Pot greenhouse experiments were carried out to attempt to increase the salinity tolerance of one of the most popular legume of the world; cowpea; by using dual inoculation of an Am fungus Glomus clarum and a nitrogen-fixer Azospirillum brasilense. The effect of these beneficial microbes, as single- or dual inoculation-treatments, was assessed in sterilized loamy sand soil at five NaCl levels (0.0~7.2 ds/m) in irrigating water. The results of this study revealed that percentage of mycorrhizal infection, plant height, dry weight, nodule number, protein content, nitrogenase and phosphatase activities, as well as nutrient elements N, P, K, Ca, Mg were significantly decreased by increasing salinity level in non-mycorrhized plants in absence of NFB. Plants inoculated with NFB showed higher nodule numbers, protein content, nitrogen concentration and nitrogenase activities than those of non-inoculated at all salinity levels. Mycorrhized plants exhibited better improvement in all measurements than that of non-mycorrhized ones at all salinity levels, especially, in the presence of NFB. The concentration of Na(+) was significantly accumulated in cowpea plants by rising salinity except in shoots of mycorrhizal plants which had K(+)/Na(+) ratios higher than other treatments. This study indicated that dual inoculation with Am fungi and N-fixer Azospirillum can support both needs for N and P, excess of NaCl and will be useful in terms of soil recovery in saline area.

  18. Engineering and Economic Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Lawrence A. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (US); Gupta, Neeraj [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (US); Sass, Bruce M. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (US); Bubenik, Thomas A. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (US); Byrer, Charles [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV (US); Bergman, Perry [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (US)

    2001-05-31

    Concern over the potential effects of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) on global climate has triggered research about ways to mitigate the release of these gases to the atmosphere. A project to study the engineering feasibility and costs of sequestering CO2 in deep, saline reservoirs was completed as part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program supporting research on novel technologies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Study activities included a review of the status of existing technologies that could be used for CO2 sequestration, development of a preliminary engineering concept for accomplishing the required operations, and estimation of costs for sequestration systems. The primary components of the CO2 sequestration system considered are: · Capture of the CO2 from the flue gas · Preparation of the CO2 for transportation (compression and drying) · Transportation of the CO2 through a pipeline · Injection of the CO2 into a suitable aquifer. Costs are estimated for sequestration of CO2 from two types of power plants: pulverized coal with flue gas desulphurization (PC/FGD) and integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC). The sensitivity of cost to a variety of transportation and injection scenarios was also studied. The results show that the engineering aspects of the major components of CO2 capture and geologic storage are well understood through experience in related industries such as CO2 production, pipeline transport, and subsurface injection of liquids and gases for gas storage, waste disposal, and enhanced oil recovery. Capital costs for capture and compression and the operational cost for compression are the largest cost components.

  19. Arroz e trigo: tolerância à salinidade em solução nutritiva Tolerance of rice and wheat cultivars to salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guilherme de Freitas

    1988-01-01

    , com base nas variações das porcentagens diárias médias do comprimento das raízes seminais ao cloreto de sódio, os cultivares de arroz foram classificados em tolerantes: IAC-165, Pratão Precoce, Dourado Precoce, IAC-1 64 e IAC-1 20; moderadamente tolerantes: IAC-1246, Pérola, IAC-25, Batatais e IAC-47; moderadamente sensíveis: IAC-899, IAC-435, IAC-4440 e IR-841, e sensível: IAC-1278. Para o trigo foram considerados como os mais tolerantes os cultivares IAS-55 e Siete Cerros.The water stress and the salinity in the soil are the most important causes of low grain yield of rice and wheat in Brazil, when cultivated on upland conditions. Selection for new cultivars showing tolerance to salt effects seems to be one of the methods to solve this problem. The osmotic agent usually used to this purpose is sodium chloride. One experiment was conducted in laboratory conditions using nutrient solutions. The rice genotypes utilized were: upland cultivars IAC-25, IAC-47, IAC-164, IAC-165, IAC-1246, Batatais, Dourado Precoce, Pérola and Pratão Precoce; and irrigated cultivars IAC-120, IAC-435, IAC-899, IAC-1278, IAC-4440 and IR-841. The wheat genotypes utilizated were: upland cultivars IAC-5, IAS-55, Siete Cerros and Paraguay-281. Nutrient solutions aeration and light for the seedlings were provided continuously. Six levels of sodium chloride (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.8 molal or osmotic potentials of 0.00, -0.47, -0.93, -1.39, -1.85 and -3.75 MPa were applied int the nutrient solutions. The plastic pots containing the treatment solutions were placed in waterbath with temperature of 30 ± 1°C, for rice, and 25 ± 1°C, for wheat. The rice and wheat seedlings were cultivated during 48 hours in distilled water and after this period -they were changed to pots, containing nutrient solutions with different sodium chloride concentrations and pH = 6.0. The rice plants were cultivated during twelve days and the wheat plants, ten days. The longest seminal root lengths, the

  20. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...... the current models of restraint and benevolence, other ways of understanding the politics of democratic pluralism might be developed, which will enable us to conceive of tolerance's future in terms different than those currently on offer. Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics develops...

  1. Engineering sugar utilization and microbial tolerance toward lignocellulose conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizbeth M. Nieves

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Production of fuels and chemicals through a fermentation-based manufacturing process that uses renewable feedstock such as lignocellulosic biomass is a desirable alternative to petrochemicals. Although it is still in its infancy, synthetic biology offers great potential to overcome the challenges associated with lignocellulose conversion. In this review, we will summarize the identification and optimization of synthetic biological parts used to enhance the utilization of lignocellulose-derived sugars and to increase the biocatalyst tolerance for lignocellulose-derived fermentation inhibitors. We will also discuss the ongoing efforts and future applications of synthetic integrated biological systems used to improve lignocellulose conversion.

  2. Structure of RNA-interacting Cyclophilin A-like protein from Piriformospora indica that provides salinity-stress tolerance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Bhatt, Harshesh; Pal, Ravi Kant; Tuteja, Renu; Garg, Bharti; Johri, Atul Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-10-01

    Soil salinity problems are widespread around the globe with increased risk of spreading over the years. The fungus Piriformospora indica, identified in Indian Thar desert, colonizes the roots of monocotyledon plants and provides resistance towards biotic as well as abiotic stress conditions. We have identified a cyclophilin A-like protein from P. indica (PiCypA), which shows higher expression levels during salinity stress. The transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing PiCypA develop osmotic tolerance and exhibit normal growth under osmotic stress conditions. The crystal structure and NMR spectroscopy of PiCypA show a canonical cyclophilin like fold exhibiting a novel RNA binding activity. The RNA binding activity of the protein and identification of the key residues involved in the RNA recognition is unique for this class of protein. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a direct evidence of countering osmotic stress tolerance in plant by genetic modification using a P. indica gene.

  3. Effects of engineered Sinorhizobium meliloti on cytokinin synthesis and tolerance of alfalfa to extreme drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji; Li, Xiao-Lin; Luo, Li

    2012-11-01

    Cytokinin is required for the initiation of leguminous nitrogen fixation nodules elicited by rhizobia and the delay of the leaf senescence induced by drought stress. A few free-living rhizobia have been found to produce cytokinin. However, the effects of engineered rhizobia capable of synthesizing cytokinin on host tolerance to abiotic stresses have not yet been described. In this study, two engineered Sinorhizobium strains overproducing cytokinin were constructed. The tolerance of inoculated alfalfa plants to severe drought stress was assessed. The engineered strains, which expressed the Agrobacterium ipt gene under the control of different promoters, synthesized more zeatins than the control strain under free-living conditions, but their own growth was not affected. After a 4-week inoculation period, the effects of engineered strains on alfalfa growth and nitrogen fixation were similar to those of the control strain under nondrought conditions. After being subjected to severe drought stress, most of the alfalfa plants inoculated with engineered strains survived, and the nitrogenase activity in their root nodules showed no apparent change. A small elevation in zeatin concentration was observed in the leaves of these plants. The expression of antioxidant enzymes increased, and the level of reactive oxygen species decreased correspondingly. Although the ipt gene was transcribed in the bacteroids of engineered strains, the level of cytokinin in alfalfa nodules was identical to that of the control. These findings suggest that engineered Sinorhizobium strains synthesizing more cytokinin could improve the tolerance of alfalfa to severe drought stress without affecting alfalfa nodulation or nitrogen fixation.

  4. Contrasting physiological responses to high salinity between two varieties of corn 'Lluteño' (salt tolerant and 'Jubilee' (salt sensitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libertad Carrasco-Ríos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available 'Lluteño' is the only one corn capable to prosper in the Valley of Lluta under saline conditions (EC = 9.1 dS m-1. This cultivar has been little studied and there is no current information about its growth and about the possible mechanisms involved in its tolerance to salts. The aim of this research was to compare the growth of young plants of corn (Zea mays L. 'Lluteño' to that of the bred 'Jubilee', both grown under different salt concentrations, to characterize the absorption and distribution of Na+ and other nutrients in the plant and to evaluate the effect of the saline conditions in the osmotic adjustment in both cultivars. The plants of 21 d old were subjected for 15 d to two saline treatments: 50 and 100 mM NaCl. The accumulation of DM was reduced from 5.12 to 1.80 g plant-1 in 'Jubilee' and 5.53 to 4.12 g plant-1 in 'Lluteño' (P d" 0.05. 'Lluteño' showed to be more tolerant to salt stress that 'Jubilee' by greatest accumulation of biomass under saline conditions, it was associated with a lower accumulation of Na+, steadiness of K+ and Ca²+ content and accumulation of osmolytes in leaves. The latter affecting positively the maintenance of relative water content and the osmotic adjustment of this cultivar in the leaves.

  5. Salt tolerance and osmotic adjustment of Spartina alterniflora (Poaceae) and the invasive M haplotype of Phragmites australis (Poaceae) along a salinity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Edward A.; Glenn, Edward P.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Brown, J. Jed; Nelson, Stephen G.

    2006-01-01

    An invasive variety of Phragmites australis (Poaceae, common reed), the M haplotype, has been implicated in the spread of this species into North American salt marshes that are normally dominated by the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora (Poaceae, smooth cordgrass). In some European marshes, on the other hand, Spartina spp. derived from S. alterniflora have spread into brackish P. australis marshes. In both cases, the non-native grass is thought to degrade the habitat value of the marsh for wildlife, and it is important to understand the physiological processes that lead to these species replacements. We compared the growth, salt tolerance, and osmotic adjustment of M haplotype P. australis and S. alterniflora along a salinity gradient in greenhouse experiments. Spartina alterniflora produced new biomass up to 0.6 M NaCl, whereas P. australis did not grow well above 0.2 M NaCl. The greater salt tolerance of S. alterniflora compared with P. australis was due to its ability to use Na+ for osmotic adjustment in the shoots. On the other hand, at low salinities P. australis produced more shoots per gram of rhizome tissue than did S. alterniflora. This study illustrates how ecophysiological differences can shift the competitive advantage from one species to another along a stress gradient. Phragmites australis is spreading into North American coastal marshes that are experiencing reduced salinities, while Spartina spp. are spreading into northern European brackish marshes that are experiencing increased salinities as land use patterns change on the two continents.

  6. The ecological coherence of temperature and salinity tolerance interaction and pigmentation in a non-marine vibrio isolated from Salar de Atacama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karem Gallardo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of microorganisms from the Vibrio genus in saline lakes from northern Chile had been evidenced using Numerical Taxonomy decades before and, more recently, by phylogenetic analyses of environmental samples and isolates. Most of the knowledge about this genus came from marine isolates and showed temperature and salinity to be integral agents in shaping the niche of the Vibrio populations. The stress tolerance phenotypes of Vibrio sp. Teb5a1 isolated from Salar de Atacama was investigated. It was able to grow without NaCl and tolerated up to 100 g/L of the salt. Furthermore, it grew between 17° and 49°C (optimum 30°C in the absence of NaCl, and the range was expanded into cold temperature (4-49°C in the presence of the salt. Other additional adaptive strategies were observed in response to the osmotic stress: pigment production, identified as the known antibacterial prodigiosin, swimming and swarming motility and synthesis of a polar flagellum. It is possible to infer that environmental congruence might explain the cellular phenotypes observed in Vibrio sp. considering that coupling between temperature and salinity tolerance, the production of antibacterial agents at higher temperatures, flagellation and motility increase the chance of Vibrio sp. to survive in salty environments with high daily temperature swings and UV radiation.

  7. The Ecological Coherence of Temperature and Salinity Tolerance Interaction and Pigmentation in a Non-marine Vibrio Isolated from Salar de Atacama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Karem; Candia, Jonathan E; Remonsellez, Francisco; Escudero, Lorena V; Demergasso, Cecilia S

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of microorganisms from the Vibrio genus in saline lakes from northern Chile had been evidenced using Numerical Taxonomy decades before and, more recently, by phylogenetic analyses of environmental samples and isolates. Most of the knowledge about this genus came from marine isolates and showed temperature and salinity to be integral agents in shaping the niche of the Vibrio populations. The stress tolerance phenotypes of Vibrio sp. Teb5a1 isolated from Salar de Atacama was investigated. It was able to grow without NaCl and tolerated up to 100 g/L of the salt. Furthermore, it grew between 17° and 49°C (optimum 30°C) in the absence of NaCl, and the range was expanded into cold temperature (4-49°C) in the presence of the salt. Other additional adaptive strategies were observed in response to the osmotic stress: pigment production, identified as the known antibacterial prodigiosin, swimming and swarming motility and synthesis of a polar flagellum. It is possible to infer that environmental congruence might explain the cellular phenotypes observed in Vibrio sp. considering that coupling between temperature and salinity tolerance, the production of antibacterial agents at higher temperatures, flagellation and motility increase the chance of Vibrio sp. to survive in salty environments with high daily temperature swings and UV radiation.

  8. Tolerance to salinity of chicory plants grown in hydroponics Tolerância do almeirão à salinidade em cultivo hidropônico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerônimo Luiz Andriolo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Chicory plants, cv. 'Amarelo' and 'Pão de Açúcar', were grown hydroponically under four NaCl concentrations in the nutrient solution to determine its tolerance to salinity. Sowing was made in rows placed 0.05m apart, on a 0.15m deep sand growing bed placed over fibber cement tiles. After emergence, plants were thinned to a plant density of 1,600plants m-2. A standard nutrient solution was used, with the main composition of, in mmol L-1, 13.5 NO3-; 2.5 NH4+; 1.5 H2PO4-; 1.5 SO4--; 7.5 Ca++; 10.0 K+ and 1.5 Mg++. The control (T1 was the standard nutrient solution, without addition of NaCl. Four salinity levels were compared, by adding 0.697 (T2, 1.627 (T3, 2.556 (T4 and 3.485 (T5g L-1 of NaCl. The nutrient solution was delivered to plants four times a day, in a closed system. A completely split plot randomised experimental design was used, with four replications. Plants were harvested at 31 days after sowing, by cutting the shoot at 0.02m height. Fresh and dry mass of both cultivars decreased linearly by effect of salinity. For similar values of electrical conductivity, the decrease in fresh mass was stronger in plants of the Amarelo cultivar. Adding NaCl to the nutrient solution is a technique that may be used to reduce the water content of chicory plants grown hydroponically.Quatro concentrações de NaCl na solução nutritiva foram empregadas para determinar a tolerância das cultivares de almeirão "Amarelo" e "Pão de Açúcar" à salinidade da solução nutritiva. A semeadura foi feita em fileiras distanciadas de 0,05m, em uma camada de areia de 0,15m de profundidade, distribuída sobre telhas de fibrocimento. Após a emergência foi efetuado o desbaste, mantendo-se uma densidade de 1.600plantas m-2. Foi empregada uma solução nutritiva com a composição de, em mmol L-1, 13,5 NO3-; 2,5 NH4+; 1,5 H2PO4-; 1,5 SO4--; 7,5 Ca++; 10,0 K+ e 1,5 Mg++. A testemunha (T1 foi a solução nutritiva descrita anteriormente, sem adição de Na

  9. A DESD-box helicase functions in salinity stress tolerance by improving photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. PB1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Tajrishi, Marjan; Madan, Meenu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-05-01

    The exact mechanism of helicase-mediated salinity tolerance is not yet understood. We have isolated a DESD-box containing cDNA from Pisum sativum (Pea) and named it as PDH45. It is a unique member of DEAD-box helicase family; containing DESD instead of DEAD/H. PDH45 overexpression driven by constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter in rice transgenic [Oryza sativa L. cv. Pusa Basmati 1 (PB1)] plants confers salinity tolerance by improving the photosynthesis and antioxidant machinery. The Na(+) ion concentration and oxidative stress parameters in leaves of the NaCl (0, 100 or 200 mM) treated PDH45 overexpressing T1 transgenic lines were lower as compared to wild type (WT) rice plants under similar conditions. The 200 mM NaCl significantly reduced the leaf area, plant dry mass, net photosynthetic rate (PN), stomatal conductance (gs), intercellular CO2 (Ci), chlorophyll (Chl) content in WT plants as compared to the transgenics. The T1 transgenics exhibited higher glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (AsA) contents under salinity stress. The activities of antioxidant enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) were significantly higher in transgenics; suggesting the existence of an efficient antioxidant defence system to cope with salinity induced-oxidative damage. Yeast two-hybrid assay indicated that the PDH45 protein interacts with Cu/Zn SOD, adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate-kinase, cysteine proteinase and eIF(4G), thus confirming the involvement of ROS scavenging machinery in the transgenic plants to provide salt tolerance. Furthermore, the T2 transgenics were also able to grow, flower, and set viable seeds under continuous salinity stress of 200 mM NaCl. This study provides insights into the mechanism of PDH45 mediated salinity stress tolerance by controlling the generation of stress induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and also by protecting the photosynthetic machinery through a

  10. Projecting potential adoption of genetically engineered freeze-tolerant Eucalyptus in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Wear; Ernest Dixon IV; Robert C. Abt; Navinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Development of commercial Eucalyptus plantations has been limited in the United States because of the species’ sensitivity to freezing temperatures. Recently developed genetically engineered clones of a Eucalyptus hybrid, which confer freeze tolerance, could expand the range of commercial plantations. This study explores how...

  11. Salinity tolerance of non-native suckermouth armoured catfish (Loricariidae: Pterygoplichthys) in south-eastern Mexico: implications for invasion and dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Krista A.; Nico, Leo G.; Mendoza-Carranza, Manuel; Arevalo-Frias, Wendi; Ropicki, Andrew J.; Heilpern, Sebastian A.; Rodiles-Hernandez, Rocio

    2011-01-01

    1. Salinity tolerance is one of several important physiological attributes that determine invasion success and the pattern of dispersal of introduced aquatic organisms. Introduced freshwater fishes able to tolerate elevated salinities have the potential to invade and exploit brackish-water (mixohaline) environments and use estuaries and coastal waters as 'bridges' for dispersing from one coastal river system to another. 2. Several members of the neotropical suckermouth armoured catfish genus Pterygoplichthys (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) have established non-native populations in inland waters of North and Central America, Asia and islands in the Caribbean, and Pacific and Indian oceans. Loricariids are generally considered to be strictly freshwater; but a few naturally occur in mesohaline habitats. 3.Catch and habitat data from 2004–2005 and 2009–2011 fish surveys in the Grijalva–Usumacinta River delta region (south-eastern Mexico) confirmed that introduced Pterygoplichthys populations established in upstream freshwater sites (where these catfish are abundant) have recently dispersed into downstream oligohaline and mesohaline estuarine habitats. During 2009–2011 surveys, these non-native catfish — tentatively identified as P. pardalis or its hybrids — were found in sites with salinities ranging from 1 to 8 ppt (mean 5.2 ppt). 4.Acute-salinity experiments were conducted with Pterygoplichthys (110–302 mm standard length, N=140) captured in the Grijalva–Usumacinta Basin to determine upper salinity tolerance levels. Tests demonstrated that individuals maintained in salinities of 0.2 ppt were able to survive abrupt (acute) exposure to salinities up to 10 ppt with little mortality over 10 days (240 h experimental endpoint). A few individuals survived abrupt exposure to 11 and 12 ppt for 20 or more hours, although none survived more than a few hours at 16 ppt or greater. 5.These field and experimental results provide quantitative evidence that non

  12. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated by the d...... these alternatives by returning to the notion of tolerance as the endurance of pain, linking this notion to exemplars and theories relevant to the politics of multiculturalism, religious freedom, and free speech....

  13. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated by the d...... these alternatives by returning to the notion of tolerance as the endurance of pain, linking this notion to exemplars and theories relevant to the politics of multiculturalism, religious freedom, and free speech.......Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...

  14. Passive and Partially Active Fault Tolerance for Massively Parallel Stream Processing Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Li; Zhou, Yongluan

    2017-01-01

    Fault-tolerance techniques for stream processing engines can be categorized into passive and active approaches. A typical passive approach periodically checkpoints a processing task's runtime states and can recover a failed task by restoring its runtime state using its latest checkpoint. On the o......Fault-tolerance techniques for stream processing engines can be categorized into passive and active approaches. A typical passive approach periodically checkpoints a processing task's runtime states and can recover a failed task by restoring its runtime state using its latest checkpoint....... On the other hand, an active approach usually employs backup nodes to run replicated tasks. Upon failure, the active replica can take over the processing of the failed task with minimal latency. However, both approaches have their own inadequacies in Massively Parallel Stream Processing Engines (MPSPE...

  15. Leaf gas films contribute to rice (Oryza sativa) submergence tolerance during saline floods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Max; Konnerup, Dennis; Pedersen, Ole

    2018-01-01

    Floods and salinization of agricultural land adversely impact global rice production. We investigated whether gas films on leaves of submerged rice delay salt entry during saline submergence. Two-week-old plants with leaf gas films (+GF) or with gas films experimentally removed (-GF) were submerg...

  16. Interpopulation differences in expression of candidate genes for salinity tolerance in winter migrating anadromous brown trout ( Salmo trutta L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Foged; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Koed, Anders

    2008-01-01

    saline conditions and quantified expression of the hsp70 and Na/K-ATPases alpha 1b genes following acclimation to freshwater and full-strength seawater at 2 degrees C and 10 degrees C. An interaction effect of low temperature and high salinity on expression of both hsp70 and Na/K-ATPase alpha 1b......Background: Winter migration of immature brown trout (Salmo trutta) into freshwater rivers has been hypothesized to result from physiologically stressful combinations of high salinity and low temperature in the sea. Results: We sampled brown trout from two Danish populations entering different...... was found in trout from the river entering high saline conditions, while a temperature independent up-regulation of both genes in full-strength seawater was found for trout entering marine conditions with lower salinities. Conclusion: Overall our results support the hypothesis that physiologically stressful...

  17. Improvements of tolerance to stress conditions by genetic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2014-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, industrial yeast isolate, has been of great interest in recent years for fuel ethanol production. The ethanol yield and productivity depend on many inhibitory factors during the fermentation process such as temperature, ethanol, compounds released as the result of pretreatment procedures, and osmotic stress. An ideal strain should be able to grow under different stress conditions occurred at different fermentation steps. Development of tolerant yeast strains can be achieved by reprogramming pathways supporting the ethanol metabolism by regulating the energy balance and detoxicification processes. Complex gene interactions should be solved for an in-depth comprehension of the yeast stress tolerance mechanism. Genetic engineering as a powerful biotechnological tool is required to design new strategies for increasing the ethanol fermentation performance. Upregulation of stress tolerance genes by recombinant DNA technology can be a useful approach to overcome inhibitory situations. This review presents the application of several genetic engineering strategies to increase ethanol yield under different stress conditions including inhibitor tolerance, ethanol tolerance, thermotolerance, and osmotolerance.

  18. Linking stomatal traits and expression of slow anion channel genes HvSLAH1 2 HvSLAC1 with grain yield for increasing salinity tolerance in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eLiu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is an environmental and agricultural problem in many parts of the world. One of the keys to breeding barley for adaptation to salinity lies in a better understanding of the genetic control of stomatal regulation. We have employed a range of physiological and molecular techniques (stomata assay, gas exchange, phylogenetic analysis, QTL analysis, and gene expression to investigate stomatal behaviour and genotypic variation in barley cultivars and a genetic population in four experimental trials. A set of relatively efficient and reliable methods were developed for the characterisation of stomatal behaviour of large numbers of varieties and genetic lines. Furthermore, we have found a large genetic variation of gas exchange and stomatal traits in barley in response to salinity stress. Salt-tolerant CM72 showed significantly larger stomatal aperture in 200 mM NaCl treatment than that of salt-sensitive Gairdner. Stomatal traits such as aperture width/length were found to significantly correlate with grain yield in salt treatment. Phenotypic characterisation and QTL analysis of a segregating double haploid population of the CM72/Gairdner resulted in the identification of significant stomatal traits-related QTLs for salt tolerance. Moreover, expression analysis of the slow anion channel genes HvSLAH1 and HvSLAC1 demonstrated that their up-regulation is linked to high barley grain yield in the field.

  19. Comparison of individual and combined effects of salinity and deficit irrigation on physiological, nutritional and ornamental aspects of tolerance in Callistemon laevis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Sara; Sánchez-Blanco, M Jesús

    2015-08-01

    The effect of water deficit, salinity and both applied simultaneously on several physiological and morphological parameters in the ornamental plant Callistemon laevis was studied to identify the tolerance mechanisms developed by this species to these sources of stress and to evaluate their adaptability to such conditions. C. laevis plants were grown in pots outdoors and subjected to four irrigation treatments lasting ten months: control (0.8 dS m(-1), 100% water holding capacity), water deficit (0.8 dS m(-1), 50% of the amount of water supplied in control), saline (4.0 dS m(-1), same amount of water supplied as control) and saline water deficit (4.0 dS m(-1), 50% of the water supplied in the control). Water and saline stress, when applied individually, led to a reduction of 12% and 39% of total biomass, respectively, while overall plant quality (leaf color and flowering) was unaffected. However, saline water deficit affected leaf color and flowering and induced an excessive decrease of growth (68%) due to leaf tissue dehydration and a high leaf Cl and Na concentration. Biomass partitioning depended not only on the amount of water applied, but also on the electrical conductivity of the water. Water stress induced active osmotic adjustment and decreased leaf tissue elasticity. Although both Na and Cl concentrations in the plant tissues increased with salinity, Cl entry through the roots was more restricted. In plants submitted to salinity individually, Na tended to remain in the roots and stems, and little reached the leaves. However, plants simultaneously submitted to water and saline stress were not able to retain this ion in the woody parts. The decrease in stomatal conductance and photosynthesis was more marked in the plants submitted to both stresses, the effect of which decreased photosynthesis, and this together with membrane damage delayed plant recovery. The results show that the combination of deficit irrigation and salinity in C. laevis is not recommended

  20. The effects of the combination of salinity and excess boron on the water relations of tolerant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cv. Poncho Negro, in relation to aquaporin functionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, C.; Montoya, A.; Pacheco, P.; Martinez-Ballesta, M. C.; Carvajal, M.; Bastias, E.

    2011-07-01

    As elevated levels of boron (B) are accompanied by conditions of excessive salinity with drastic consequences for crops, it is crucial to find a crop that is tolerant to these conditions. In this work, the interaction between salinity and excess B with respect to aquaporin-mediated changes by blockade of mercury and water relations were studied as well as the osmotic adjustment of the plants. The treatments, for tomato Poncho Negro cultivated hydroponically in a controlled environment chamber, were control (75 and 150 mM) NaCl and/or 5 mg L{sup -}1 or 20 mg L{sup -}1 B. Hydraulic conductance (L0) of detached exuding root systems exhibits large variations in response to abiotic stimuli. No additive (synergic) effects of B and salinity were observed. Under salinity, the plants increased their turgor, compensating for the decrease in the leaf water potential through the reduction in the leaf osmotic potential by the accumulation of soluble sugars and proline. The involvement of Hg{sup 2}+-insensitive aquaporins or the osmotic gradient as the main force for water flow through the apoplastic pathway must be contemplated. Finally, all the data reveal the tomato cv. Poncho Negro to be a germplasm of agronomic interest and a good alternative for cultivation areas with high content of salts and the excess B of the soil and irrigation water. (Author) 67 refs.

  1. Monitoring the Short-Term Response to Salt Exposure of Two Genetically Distinct Phragmites australis Clones with Different Salinity Tolerance Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achenbach, Luciana; Brix, Hans

    2014-01-01

    in the 15-minute experiment. The Greeny-type also recovered after the 70-minute exposure, but not the Land-type. We conclude that the response to osmotic stress is genotype-dependent and that the salt-tolerant clone possesses very efficient signaling pathways to detect changes in the soil water potential......Aims: Two genetically distinct clones of Phragmites australis were used to investigate the immediate response induced by osmotic stress. The study aimed at elucidating if the response time, the inhibition rate and the recovery from salinity stress vary between these two genotypes. The experimental...... salt concentrations (20 and 40 parts per thousand salinity). Important findings: The osmotic stress induced stomata closure and reduction of Pmax and E for both clones. The clone-specific responses as measured through physiological parameters were negatively correlated with exposure time and salt...

  2. Larval salinity tolerance of the South American salt-marsh crab, Neohelice (Chasmagnathus) granulata: physiological constraints to estuarine retention, export and reimmigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anger, Klaus; Spivak, Eduardo; Luppi, Tomás; Bas, Claudia; Ismael, Deborah

    2008-06-01

    The semiterrestrial crab Neohelice (= Chasmagnathus) granulata (Dana 1851) is a predominant species in brackish salt marshes, mangroves and estuaries. Its larvae are exported towards coastal marine waters. In order to estimate the limits of salinity tolerance constraining larval retention in estuarine habitats, we exposed in laboratory experiments freshly hatched zoeae to six different salinities (5 32‰). At 5‰, the larvae survived for a maximum of 2 weeks, reaching only exceptionally the second zoeal stage, while 38% survived to the megalopa stage at 10‰. Shortest development and negligible mortality occurred at all higher salt concentrations. These observations show that the larvae of N. granulata can tolerate a retention in the mesohaline reaches of estuaries, with a lower limit of ca. 10 15‰. Maximum survival at 25‰ suggests that polyhaline conditions rather than an export to oceanic waters are optimal for successful larval development of this species. In another experiment, we tested the capability of the last zoeal stage (IV) for reimmigration from coastal marine into brackish waters. Stepwise reductions of salinity during this stage allowed for moulting to the megalopa at 4 10‰. Although survival was at these conditions reduced and development delayed, these results suggest that already the zoea-IV stage is able to initiate the reimmigration into estuaries. After further salinity reduction, megalopae survived in this experiment for up to >3 weeks in freshwater, without moulting to juvenile crabs. In a similar experiment starting from the megalopa stage, successful metamorphosis occurred at 4 10‰, and juvenile growth continued in freshwater. Although these juvenile crabs showed significantly enhanced mortality and smaller carapace width compared to a seawater control, our results show that the late larval and early juvenile stages of N. granulata are well adapted for successful recruitment in brackish and even limnetic habitats.

  3. Novel perspectives for the engineering of abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Julieta V; Lodeyro, Anabella F; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2014-04-01

    Adverse environmental conditions pose serious limitations to agricultural production. Classical biotechnological approaches towards increasing abiotic stress tolerance focus on boosting plant endogenous defence mechanisms. However, overexpression of regulatory elements or effectors is usually accompanied by growth handicap and yield penalties due to crosstalk between developmental and stress-response networks. Herein we offer an overview on novel strategies with the potential to overcome these limitations based on the engineering of regulatory systems involved in the fine-tuning of the plant response to environmental hardships, including post-translational modifications, small RNAs, epigenetic control of gene expression and hormonal networks. The development and application of plant synthetic biology tools and approaches will add new functionalities and perspectives to genetic engineering programs for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Capabilities Engineering:Promoting Change-Reduction and Constructing Change-Tolerant Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ravichandar, Ramya

    2008-01-01

    We propose a Capabilities-based approach for constructing complex emergent systems such that they are change-tolerant, and the development effort promotes change-reduction. The inherent complexity of software systems increases their susceptibility to change when subjected to the vagaries of user needs, technology advances, market demands and other change inducing factors. Despite the inevitability of change, traditional Requirements Engineering strives to develop systems based on a fixed solu...

  5. Effects of salinity stress on Bufo balearicus and Bufo bufo tadpoles: Tolerance, morphological gill alterations and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Bonacci, Antonella; Coscarelli, Francesca; Tripepi, Manuela; Brunelli, Elvira

    2013-05-15

    Freshwater habitats are globally threatened by human-induced secondary salinization. Amphibians are generally poorly adapted to survive in saline environments. We experimentally investigated the effects of chronic exposure to various salinities (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30% and 35% seawater, SW) on survival, larval growth and metamorphosis of tadpoles from two amphibian populations belonging to two species: the green toad Bufo balearicus and the common toad Bufo bufo. In addition, gill morphology of tadpoles of both species after acute exposure to hypertonic conditions (20%, 25%, and 30% SW) was examined by light and electron microscopy. Tadpoles experienced 100% mortality above 20% SW in B. balearicus while above 15% SW in B. bufo. We detected also sublethal effects of salinity stress on growth and metamorphosis. B. bufo cannot withstand chronic exposure to salinity above 5% SW, tadpoles grew slower and were significantly smaller than those in control at metamorphosis. B. balearicus tolerated salinity up to 20% SW without apparent effects during larval development, but starting from 15% SW tadpoles metamorphosed later and at a smaller size compared with control. We also revealed a negative relation between increasing salt concentration and gill integrity. The main modifications were increased mucous secretion, detachment of external layer, alteration of epithelial surface, degeneration phenomena, appearance of residual bodies, and macrophage immigration. These morphological alterations of gill epithelium can interfere with respiratory function and both osmotic and acid-base regulation. Significant variations in branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity were also observed between two species; moreover an increase in enzyme activity was evident in response to SW exposure. Epithelial responses to increasing salt concentration were different in the populations belonging to two species: the intensity of histological and ultrastructural pathology in B. bufo was greater and we

  6. Effects of salinity stress on Bufo balearicus and Bufo bufo tadpoles: Tolerance, morphological gill alterations and Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Bonacci, Antonella; Coscarelli, Francesca [Department of Ecology, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, 87036 Rende (Cosenza) (Italy); Tripepi, Manuela [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biology, 201 Leidy Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Brunelli, Elvira, E-mail: brunelli@unical.it [Department of Ecology, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, 87036 Rende (Cosenza) (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    Freshwater habitats are globally threatened by human-induced secondary salinization. Amphibians are generally poorly adapted to survive in saline environments. We experimentally investigated the effects of chronic exposure to various salinities (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30% and 35% seawater, SW) on survival, larval growth and metamorphosis of tadpoles from two amphibian populations belonging to two species: the green toad Bufo balearicus and the common toad Bufo bufo. In addition, gill morphology of tadpoles of both species after acute exposure to hypertonic conditions (20%, 25%, and 30% SW) was examined by light and electron microscopy. Tadpoles experienced 100% mortality above 20% SW in B. balearicus while above 15% SW in B. bufo. We detected also sublethal effects of salinity stress on growth and metamorphosis. B. bufo cannot withstand chronic exposure to salinity above 5% SW, tadpoles grew slower and were significantly smaller than those in control at metamorphosis. B. balearicus tolerated salinity up to 20% SW without apparent effects during larval development, but starting from 15% SW tadpoles metamorphosed later and at a smaller size compared with control. We also revealed a negative relation between increasing salt concentration and gill integrity. The main modifications were increased mucous secretion, detachment of external layer, alteration of epithelial surface, degeneration phenomena, appearance of residual bodies, and macrophage immigration. These morphological alterations of gill epithelium can interfere with respiratory function and both osmotic and acid-base regulation. Significant variations in branchial Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity were also observed between two species; moreover an increase in enzyme activity was evident in response to SW exposure. Epithelial responses to increasing salt concentration were different in the populations belonging to two species: the intensity of histological and ultrastructural pathology in B. bufo was

  7. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae for improvement in ethanol tolerance by accumulation of trehalose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divate, Nileema R; Chen, Gen-Hung; Wang, Pei-Ming; Ou, Bor-Rung; Chung, Yun-Chin

    2016-11-01

    A genetic recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starter with high ethanol tolerance capacities was constructed. In this study, the gene of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (encoded by tps1), which catalyzes the first step in trehalose synthesis, was cloned and overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. Moreover, the gene of neutral trehalase (encoded by nth1, trehalose degrading enzyme) was deleted by using a disruption cassette, which contained long flanking homology regions of nth1 gene (the upstream 0.26 kb and downstream 0.4 kb). The engineered strain increased its tolerance against ethanol and glucose stress. The growth of the wild strain was inhibited when the medium contained 6 % or more ethanol, whereas growth of the engineered strain was affected when the medium contained 10 % or more ethanol. There was no significant difference in the ethanol yield between the wild strain and the engineered strain when the fermentation broth contained 10 % glucose (p > 0.05). The engineered strain showed greater ethanol yield than the wild type strain when the medium contained more than 15 % glucose (p < 0.05). Higher intracellular trehalose accumulation by overexpression of tps1 and deletion of nth1 might provide the ability for yeast to protect against environmental stress.

  8. Engineered Escherichia coli silver-binding periplasmic protein that promotes silver tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Hnilova, Marketa; Grosh, Carolynn; Fong, Hanson; Baneyx, Francois; Schwartz, Dan; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan; Traxler, Beth

    2012-04-01

    Silver toxicity is a problem that microorganisms face in medical and environmental settings. Through exposure to silver compounds, some bacteria have adapted to growth in high concentrations of silver ions. Such adapted microbes may be dangerous as pathogens but, alternatively, could be potentially useful in nanomaterial-manufacturing applications. While naturally adapted isolates typically utilize efflux pumps to achieve metal resistance, we have engineered a silver-tolerant Escherichia coli strain by the use of a simple silver-binding peptide motif. A silver-binding peptide, AgBP2, was identified from a combinatorial display library and fused to the C terminus of the E. coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) to yield a silver-binding protein exhibiting nanomolar affinity for the metal. Growth experiments performed in the presence of silver nitrate showed that cells secreting MBP-AgBP2 into the periplasm exhibited silver tolerance in a batch culture, while those expressing a cytoplasmic version of the fusion protein or MBP alone did not. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of silver-tolerant cells revealed the presence of electron-dense silver nanoparticles. This is the first report of a specifically engineered metal-binding peptide exhibiting a strong in vivo phenotype, pointing toward a novel ability to manipulate bacterial interactions with heavy metals by the use of short and simple peptide motifs. Engineered metal-ion-tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli strain could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo.

  9. Constitutive Expression of Rice MicroRNA528 Alters Plant Development and Enhances Tolerance to Salinity Stress and Nitrogen Starvation in Creeping Bentgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuangrong; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Yuan, Ning; Hu, Qian; Luo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNA528 (miR528) is a conserved monocot-specific small RNA that has the potential of mediating multiple stress responses. So far, however, experimental functional studies of miR528 are lacking. Here, we report that overexpression of a rice (Oryza sativa) miR528 (Osa-miR528) in transgenic creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) alters plant development and improves plant salt stress and nitrogen (N) deficiency tolerance. Morphologically, miR528-overexpressing transgenic plants display shortened internodes, increased tiller number, and upright growth. Improved salt stress resistance is associated with increased water retention, cell membrane integrity, chlorophyll content, capacity for maintaining potassium homeostasis, CATALASE activity, and reduced ASCORBIC ACID OXIDASE (AAO) activity; while enhanced tolerance to N deficiency is associated with increased biomass, total N accumulation and chlorophyll synthesis, nitrite reductase activity, and reduced AAO activity. In addition, AsAAO and COPPER ION BINDING PROTEIN1 are identified as two putative targets of miR528 in creeping bentgrass. Both of them respond to salinity and N starvation and are significantly down-regulated in miR528-overexpressing transgenics. Our data establish a key role that miR528 plays in modulating plant growth and development and in the plant response to salinity and N deficiency and indicate the potential of manipulating miR528 in improving plant abiotic stress resistance. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Constitutive Expression of Rice MicroRNA528 Alters Plant Development and Enhances Tolerance to Salinity Stress and Nitrogen Starvation in Creeping Bentgrass1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuangrong; Li, Zhigang; Li, Dayong; Yuan, Ning; Hu, Qian; Luo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA528 (miR528) is a conserved monocot-specific small RNA that has the potential of mediating multiple stress responses. So far, however, experimental functional studies of miR528 are lacking. Here, we report that overexpression of a rice (Oryza sativa) miR528 (Osa-miR528) in transgenic creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) alters plant development and improves plant salt stress and nitrogen (N) deficiency tolerance. Morphologically, miR528-overexpressing transgenic plants display shortened internodes, increased tiller number, and upright growth. Improved salt stress resistance is associated with increased water retention, cell membrane integrity, chlorophyll content, capacity for maintaining potassium homeostasis, CATALASE activity, and reduced ASCORBIC ACID OXIDASE (AAO) activity; while enhanced tolerance to N deficiency is associated with increased biomass, total N accumulation and chlorophyll synthesis, nitrite reductase activity, and reduced AAO activity. In addition, AsAAO and COPPER ION BINDING PROTEIN1 are identified as two putative targets of miR528 in creeping bentgrass. Both of them respond to salinity and N starvation and are significantly down-regulated in miR528-overexpressing transgenics. Our data establish a key role that miR528 plays in modulating plant growth and development and in the plant response to salinity and N deficiency and indicate the potential of manipulating miR528 in improving plant abiotic stress resistance. PMID:26224802

  11. Hongos ectomicorrícicos y la tolerancia a la salinidad en plantas Ectomycorrhizal fungi and tolerance to salinity in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SELENE AGUILAR-AGUILAR

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de salinización de los suelos constituye un problema generalizado a nivel global. En este sentido, los hongos ectomicorrícicos tienen una importante participación en la recuperación de suelos forestales ya que involucran una serie de mecanismos celulares que pueden contribuir a la tolerancia a la salinidad en plantas que habitan los bosques templados o boreales. La participación de los hongos ectomicorrícicos en la tolerancia a la salinidad involucra la regulación homeostática de los iones, la mejora de captación de agua y la inducción de genes específicos en las raíces colonizadas. Los hongos ectomicorrícicos pueden estimular la presencia de osmolitos como la prolina, azúcares y polioles que contribuyen en la protección de las células vegetales. Además, estos organismos inducen la síntesis de enzimas antioxidantes y glutatión que participan en la disminución de especies reactivas de oxígeno. Esta revisión ofrece una descripción de la participación de los hongos ectomicorrícicos en la tolerancia a la salinidad en plantas.The process of salinization of the soil is a widespread problem at the global level. In this sense, ectomycorrhizal fungi have an important role in the recovery of forest soil, as it involves a number of cellular mechanisms that may contribute to the salinity tolerance in plants that inhabit temperate and boreal forests. The participation of ectomycorrhizal fungi on the salinity tolerance involves the ion-homeostasis regulation, improving uptake water and inducing specific gene in roots colonized. Likewise ectomycorrhizal fungi can stimulate the presence of osmolytes as proline, sugars and polyols that contribute to the protection of plant cells. Additionally, these organisms stimulate the synthesis of glutathione and antioxidant enzymes involved in the decrease of reactive oxygen species. This review provides an overview of participation of ectomycorrhizal fungi in the salinity tolerance in

  12. Evaluation of the yield of abiotic-stress-tolerant AtDREB1A transgenic potato under saline conditions in advance of field trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Takayoshi; Endo, Tsukasa; Kasuga, Mie; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Watanabe, Kazuo N; Kikuchi, Akira

    2016-12-01

    Cultivated potato is a drought-, salinity-, and frost-sensitive species. The transgenic approach is one of the methods used to mitigate abiotic stress. The utility of transgenic potatoes that have abiotic stress tolerance should be judged from their yield under stress conditions. In order to establish transgenic potato lines with the AtDREB1A gene that could be used in practical applications, we screened candidate lines in a growth room with growth profiles under non-stress conditions rather than the expression level of transgene. After identifying better transgenic lines (D163 and D164), yield of those lines under stress conditions was evaluated in the special netted-house. Although the yield was lower than the yield under non-stress conditions, two selected transgenic lines were able to maintain their yield under high saline conditions (EC > 10 mS/cm). In this study, fertilizer was not added beyond what was already contained in the soil mix in order to evaluate the yield of the transgenic lines under saline conditions in as simple a manner as possible. In future studies, it will be necessary to evaluate their yield in a farming context in an isolated field after assessing the environmental biosafety of these transgenic potato lines.

  13. H2O2seed priming improves tolerance to salinity; drought and their combined effect more than mannitol in Cakile maritima when compared to Eutrema salsugineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Sghayar, Souhir; Abdelly, Chedly

    2017-03-01

    The effect of H 2 O 2 and mannitol seed priming was investigated on plant growth, oxidative stress biomarkers and activities of antioxidant enzymes in leaves of Cakile maritima and Eutrema salsugineum, when exposed to drought and salt stress, either separately applied or combined. Under unprimed conditions, drought severely restricted growth (40% as compared to the control) and redox balance of C. maritima seedlings, whereas E. salsugineum showed these drastic effects under individual salinity (33% as compared to the control). Combined salinity and drought maintained and even stimulated the antioxidant defense of both plants from unprimed seeds. Both priming agents (mannitol and H 2 O 2 ) significantly ameliorated growth and antioxidant defense of both species grown under salinity, drought and their combined effect. However, H 2 O 2 priming appeared to be more beneficial in C. maritima seedlings. Indeed, oxidative injuries were significantly reduced, together with significantly higher concentrations of ascorbic acid (36%), glutathione (2-fold) and proline production (2-fold), leading to a greater redox balance that was closely associated with enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities, specifically under salt stress. Overall, our results indicate that it is very likely that H 2 O 2 priming, due to its signal role, improves C. maritima tolerance to both osmotic stresses and enables the plant to memorize and to decode early signals that are rapidly activated when plants are later exposed to stress. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. Simultaneous treatment with tebuconazole and abscisic acid induces drought and salinity stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana by maintaining key plastid protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Ruth; Chudobova, Ivana; Hänsel, Ulrike; Herwartz, Denise; Koskull-Döring, Pascal von; Schillberg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were treated simultaneously with the fungicide tebuconazole and the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). We carried out comparative proteomic and transcriptomic analysis against untreated controls under different stress regimes. The chemicals were applied 24 h before the onset of drought stress (removal of the nutrient medium) or salinity stress (hydroponic culture using 150 mM NaCl), and samples were taken during the stress treatments and after a 24 h recovery period. The combined chemical treatment protected plants against both forms of stress. Difference in-gel electrophoresis revealed 18 and 34 unique protein markers representing induced tolerance to drought and salinity stress, respectively. Most of the markers represented plastid functions (such as CO(2) fixation and photosystem II activity), and their abundance was reduced under stress conditions but maintained at near normal levels in the treated plants. The corresponding transcripts were reduced in abundance primarily under drought stress but not salinity stress, indicating that the signal transduction pathways activated by tebuconazole/ABA treatment depend on the nature of the stress stimulus.

  15. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Alleviates Salinity Stress in Cassava

    OpenAIRE

    Patanun, Onsaya; Ueda, Minoru; Itouga, Misao; Kato, Yukari; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Utsumi, Chikako; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Minoru; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Seki, Motoaki

    2017-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) demand has been rising because of its various applications. High salinity stress is a major environmental factor that interferes with normal plant growth and limits crop productivity. As well as genetic engineering to enhance stress tolerance, the use of small molecules is considered as an alternative methodology to modify plants with desired traits. The effectiveness of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for increasing tolerance to salinity stress has re...

  16. Overexpression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase from mangrove Kandelia candel in tobacco enhances salinity tolerance by the reduction of reactive oxygen species in chloroplast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshu eJing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Na+ uptake and transport in Kandelia candel and antioxidative defense were investigated under rising NaCl stress from 100 mM to 300 mM. Salinized K. candel roots had a net Na+ efflux with a declined flux rate during an extended NaCl exposure. Na+ buildup in leaves enhanced H2O2 levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and increased transcription of CSD gene encoding a Cu/Zn SOD. Sequence and subcellular localization analyses have revealed that KcCSD is a typical Cu/Zn SOD in chloroplast. The transgenic tobacco experimental system was used as a functional genetics model to test the effect of KcCSD on salinity tolerance. KcCSD-transgenic lines were more Na+ tolerant than wild-type (WT tobacco in terms of lipid peroxidation, root growth, and survival rate. In the latter, 100 mM NaCl led to a remarkable reduction in chlorophyll content and a/b ratio, decreased maximal chlorophyll a fluorescence, and photochemical efficiency of photosystem II. NaCl stress in WT resulted from H2O2 burst in chloroplast. Na+ injury to chloroplast was less pronounced in KcCSD-transgenic plants due to upregulated antioxidant defense. KcCSD-transgenic tobacco enhanced SOD activity by an increment in SOD isoenzymes under 100 mM NaCl stress from 24 h to 7 d. Catalase activity rose in KcCSD overexpressing tobacco plants. KcCSD-transgenic plants better scavenged NaCl-elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS compared to WT ones. In conclusion, K. candel effectively excluded Na+ in roots during a short exposure; and increased CSD expression to reduce ROS in chloroplast in a long-term and high saline environment.

  17. Growth, tolerance efficiency and phytoremediation potential of Ricinus communis (L.) and Brassica juncea (L.) in salinity and drought affected cadmium contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauddh, Kuldeep; Singh, Rana P

    2012-11-01

    We have previously reported that Ricinus communis (castor) is more tolerant to soil cadmium (Cd) and more efficient for Cd phytoremediation than Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) (Bauddh and Singh, 2012). In the present study, R. communis was found more tolerant to salinity and drought in presence of Cd and removed more Cd in a given time than Indian mustard. R. communis produced 23 and twelve folds higher biomass in terms of fresh weight and dry weight, respectively than that in B. juncea during three months when grown in Cd contaminated soil in presence of 100mM NaCl salinity and ten day water withdrawal based drought at 90 day after sowing (DAS). Castor plants showed stronger self-protection ability in form of proline bioaccumulation (r(2)=0.949) than Indian mustard (r(2)=0.932), whereas a lower r(2) for malondialdehyde (MDA) and total soluble protein in R. communis (r(2)=0.914 and r(2)=0.915, respectively) than that of B. juncea (r(2)=0.947 and r(2)=0.927, respectively) indicated a greater damage to cell membrane in Indian mustard during the multiple stress conditions. Though, the amount of Cd accumulated in the roots and shoots of Indian mustard was higher as per unit biomass than that in castor, total removal of the metal from soil was much higher in castor on per plant basis in the same period in presence of the stresses. R. communis accumulated about seventeen and 1.5 fold higher Cd in their roots and shoots, respectively than that of B. juncea in 90 DAS under the multiple stresses. Salinity alone enhanced Cd uptake, whereas drought stress reduced its uptake in both the plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic, physiological and modelling approaches towards tolerance to salinity and low nitrogen supply in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manneh, B.

    2004-01-01

    Keywords:   Rice, O ryza sativa , yield potential, yield gap, salinity, nitrogen supply, agro-ecosystems, Recombinant Inbred Line, genotype × environment interaction, yield components, adaptability, molecular markers, QTL, biomass, leaf area, leaf N, dry matter

  19. Avaliação de diploides de bananeira (Musa spp. quanto à tolerância a salinidade Evaluation of banana diploids plants (Musa spp. to salinity tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lane de Oliveira Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A salinidade é um fator comum de estresse abiótico que afeta a produção agrícola onde ela existe. Uma das estratégias para promover a reincorporação de áreas salinizadas e o aumento da produtividade consiste no desenvolvimento e na seleção de genótipos tolerantes, o que permitirá a identificação de parentais a serem utilizados em cruzamentos. Esta pesquisa teve como objetivo identificar genótipos diploides de bananeira tolerantes à salinidade a serem utilizados em futuros trabalhos de melhoramento genético, visando à obtenção de cultivares adaptados a solos salinos. Foram avaliados nove genótipos diploides (AA de bananeira. Para a avaliação dos parâmetros de crescimento, foram feitas medições de área foliar, altura e contagem do número de folhas. As plantas foram tratadas durante 21 dias com 0 e 100 mM de NaCl, num delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado, com três repetições. Aos 21 dias, foi feita a determinação do peso da matéria fresca, utilizando-se balança analítica. A obtenção do peso da matéria seca das partes limbo foliar, pseudocaule e raízes+rizoma de cada planta foi feita após secagem em estufa a 60ºC até peso constante. o genótipo Tjau Lagada, que sofreu menor redução da área foliar, possivelmente apresentará uma produção relativamente superior aos genótipos avaliados neste estudo. o genótipo 0116-01, por ter apresentado maior tolerância à salinidade, poderá ser utilizado em futuros cruzamentos, disponibilizando genes a serem incorporados em cultivares produtivas utilizadas em programas de melhoramento que visem à obtenção de cultivares adaptadas às regiões de solos salinos no Nordeste brasileiro.The salinity is a common factor of abiotic stress that seriously affects the agricultural production where it is found. one of the strategies to promote reincorporation of salinity areas and the productivity increasing consists in development and selection of tolerant

  20. Salinity tolerance of halophyte Atriplex nummularia L. grown under increasing NaCl levels Tolerância à salinidade da halófita Atriplex nummularia L. cultivada em níveis crescentes de NaCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro A.M. de Araújo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study reports effects of salt stress on growth, K+ nutrition and organic composition of Atriplex nummularia. The upper limit of the NaCl gradient imposed on the plants was close to seawater salinity (600 mM. An external NaCl of 150 mM improved the growth of this species, which corroborates its halophytic nature. Evidence show that Atriplex nummularia was responsive to NaCl, but the mechanisms of this response are still not known. In such stress condition, Na+ and Cl- accumulation in leaves was far greater than that in roots; therefore salinity tolerance of Atriplex nummularia is not due to ion exclusion mechanism. In spite of a reduction of K+ content of tissues under salinity conditions, no corresponding physiological relevance of this in terms of growth was found. The high affinity of root cells for Na+ during uptake and, probably, its subsequent sequestration into cell vacuoles and structures of protection seems to contribute to osmotic adjustment as an increase in relative water content (RWC of leaves was observed. NaCl caused a decrease in total soluble proteins and chlorophylls; the relevance of this is discussed in terms of mechanisms of salinity tolerance. The ability of Atriplex nummularia plants to keep Na+ and Cl- away from enzymes and cytosolic structures, together with an effective osmotic adjustment, is suggested as having a role in its tolerance to high salinity.O presente estudo relata os efeitos do estresse salino no crescimento, na nutrição de K+ e na composição orgânica de Atriplex nummularia. A maior concentração de NaCl imposta às plantas foi similar a da salinidade da água do mar (600 mM. Uma concentração externa de 150 mM de NaCl estimulou o crescimento da espécie o que, em parte, explica seu caráter halofítico. As evidências mostram que a Atriplex nummularia foi receptiva ao NaCl, porém os mecanismos envolvidos são ainda esperados. Em tais condições de estresse a acumulação de Na+ e Cl

  1. The constitutive expression of Chrysanthemum dichrum ICE1 in Chrysanthemum grandiflorum improves the level of low temperature, salinity and drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi; Guan, Zhiyong; Fang, Weimin

    2012-09-01

    The quality and productivity of chrysanthemum are severely compromised by various abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the isolation of CdICE1 from Chrysanthemum dichrum using RACE PCR, which shared identical nucleotide of ICE1 ORF from Chrysanthemum grandiflorum variety 'Jinba'. CdICE1 contains a conserved bHLH domain, a nuclear localization domain, a S-rich motif and a ACT domain. The constitutive expression of CdICE1 in C. grandiflorum improved the tolerance of C. grandiflorum to low temperature/freezing, drought and salinity. When the transgene was inserted in the antisense direction, the expression of the endogenous ICE1 gene was down-regulated, and the level of the plant's sensitivity to abiotic stress increased. The level of expression of CgDREBa and CgDREBb, activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase and the proline content were enhanced in the sense transgenic lines, and lowered in the antisense ones under stresses. In conclusion, CdICE1 represents a promising candidate for a biotechnological approach to improve the level of crop abiotic stress tolerance. Overexpression of CdICE1 in C. grandiflorum confers the stress tolerance via its regulation of CgDREB involved in the oxidative and osmotic homeostasis pathways.

  2. Effects of Fuel Composition on EGR Dilution Tolerance in Spark Ignited Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Fuel-specific differences in exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) dilution tolerance are studied in a modern, direct-injection single-cylinder research engine. A total of 6 model fuel blends are examined at a constant research octane number (RON) of 95 using n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and ethanol. Laminar flame speeds for these mixtures, which were calculated two different methods (an energy fraction mixing rule and a detailed kinetic simulation), spanned a range of about 6 cm/s. A constant fueling nominal load of 350 kPa IMEPg at 2000 rpm was operated with varying CA50 from 8-20 CAD aTDCf, and with EGR increasing until a COV of IMEP of 5% is reached. The results illustrate that flame speed affects EGR dilution tolerance; fuels with increased flame speeds increase EGR tolerance. Specifically, flame speed correlates most closely to the initial flame kernel growth, measured as the time of ignition to 5% mass fraction burned. The effect of the latent heat of vaporization on the flame speed is taken into account for the ethanol-containing fuels. At a 30 vol% blend level, the increased enthalpy of vaporization of ethanol compared to conventional hydrocarbons can decrease the temperature at the time of ignition by a maximum of 15 C, which can account for up to a 3.5 cm/s decrease in flame speed. The ethanol-containing fuels, however, still exhibit a flame speed advantage, and a dilution tolerance advantage over the slower flame-speed fuels. The fuel-specific differences in dilution tolerance are significant at the condition examined, allowing for a 50% relative increase in EGR (4% absolute difference in EGR) at a constant COV of IMEP of 3%.

  3. The Potential of Transcription Factor-Based Genetic Engineering in Improving Crop Tolerance to Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Prateek

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Drought is one of the major constraints in crop production and has an effect on a global scale. In order to improve crop production, it is necessary to understand how plants respond to stress. A good understanding of regulatory mechanisms involved in plant responses during drought will enable researchers to explore and manipulate key regulatory points in order to enhance stress tolerance in crops. Transcription factors (TFs) have played an important role in crop improvement from the dawn of agriculture. TFs are therefore good candidates for genetic engineering to improve crop tolerance to drought because of their role as master regulators of clusters of genes. Many families of TFs, such as CCAAT, homeodomain, bHLH, NAC, AP2/ERF, bZIP, and WRKY have members that may have the potential to be tools for improving crop tolerance to drought. In this review, the roles of TFs as tools to improve drought tolerance in crops are discussed. The review also focuses on current strategies in the use of TFs, with emphasis on several major TF families in improving drought tolerance of major crops. Finally, many promising transgenic lines that may have improved drought responses have been poorly characterized and consequently their usefulness in the field is uncertain. New advances in high-throughput phenotyping, both greenhouse and field based, should facilitate improved phenomics of transgenic lines. Systems biology approaches should then define the underlying changes that result in higher yields under water stress conditions. These new technologies should help show whether manipulating TFs can have effects on yield under field conditions. PMID:25118806

  4. The potential of transcription factor-based genetic engineering in improving crop tolerance to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabara, Roel C; Tripathi, Prateek; Rushton, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Drought is one of the major constraints in crop production and has an effect on a global scale. In order to improve crop production, it is necessary to understand how plants respond to stress. A good understanding of regulatory mechanisms involved in plant responses during drought will enable researchers to explore and manipulate key regulatory points in order to enhance stress tolerance in crops. Transcription factors (TFs) have played an important role in crop improvement from the dawn of agriculture. TFs are therefore good candidates for genetic engineering to improve crop tolerance to drought because of their role as master regulators of clusters of genes. Many families of TFs, such as CCAAT, homeodomain, bHLH, NAC, AP2/ERF, bZIP, and WRKY have members that may have the potential to be tools for improving crop tolerance to drought. In this review, the roles of TFs as tools to improve drought tolerance in crops are discussed. The review also focuses on current strategies in the use of TFs, with emphasis on several major TF families in improving drought tolerance of major crops. Finally, many promising transgenic lines that may have improved drought responses have been poorly characterized and consequently their usefulness in the field is uncertain. New advances in high-throughput phenotyping, both greenhouse and field based, should facilitate improved phenomics of transgenic lines. Systems biology approaches should then define the underlying changes that result in higher yields under water stress conditions. These new technologies should help show whether manipulating TFs can have effects on yield under field conditions.

  5. Rapid regulation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity is essential to salinity tolerance in two halophyte species, Atriplex lentiformis and Chenopodium quinoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jayakumar; Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Lai, Diwen; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao; Shabala, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The activity of H+-ATPase is essential for energizing the plasma membrane. It provides the driving force for potassium retention and uptake through voltage-gated channels and for Na+ exclusion via Na+/H+ exchangers. Both of these traits are central to plant salinity tolerance; however, whether the increased activity of H+-ATPase is a constitutive trait in halophyte species and whether this activity is upregulated at either the transcriptional or post-translation level remain disputed. Methods The kinetics of salt-induced net H+, Na+ and K+ fluxes, membrane potential and AHA1/2/3 expression changes in the roots of two halophyte species, Atriplex lentiformis (saltbush) and Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa), were compared with data obtained from Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Key Results Intrinsic (steady-state) membrane potential values were more negative in A. lentiformis and C. quinoa compared with arabidopsis (−144 ± 3·3, −138 ± 5·4 and −128 ± 3·3 mV, respectively). Treatment with 100 mm NaCl depolarized the root plasma membrane, an effect that was much stronger in arabidopsis. The extent of plasma membrane depolarization positively correlated with NaCl-induced stimulation of vanadate-sensitive H+ efflux, Na+ efflux and K+ retention in roots (quinoa > saltbush > arabidopsis). NaCl-induced stimulation of H+ efflux was most pronounced in the root elongation zone. In contrast, H+-ATPase AHA transcript levels were much higher in arabidopsis compared with quinoa plants, and 100 mm NaCl treatment led to a further 3-fold increase in AHA1 and AHA2 transcripts in arabidopsis but not in quinoa. Conclusions Enhanced salinity tolerance in the halophyte species studied here is not related to the constitutively higher AHA transcript levels in the root epidermis, but to the plant’s ability to rapidly upregulate plasma membrane H+-ATPase upon salinity treatment. This is necessary for assisting plants to maintain highly negative

  6. Rapid regulation of the plasma membrane H⁺-ATPase activity is essential to salinity tolerance in two halophyte species, Atriplex lentiformis and Chenopodium quinoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jayakumar; Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Lai, Diwen; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao; Shabala, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    The activity of H(+)-ATPase is essential for energizing the plasma membrane. It provides the driving force for potassium retention and uptake through voltage-gated channels and for Na(+) exclusion via Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. Both of these traits are central to plant salinity tolerance; however, whether the increased activity of H(+)-ATPase is a constitutive trait in halophyte species and whether this activity is upregulated at either the transcriptional or post-translation level remain disputed. The kinetics of salt-induced net H(+), Na(+) and K(+) fluxes, membrane potential and AHA1/2/3 expression changes in the roots of two halophyte species, Atriplex lentiformis (saltbush) and Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa), were compared with data obtained from Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Intrinsic (steady-state) membrane potential values were more negative in A. lentiformis and C. quinoa compared with arabidopsis (-144 ± 3·3, -138 ± 5·4 and -128 ± 3·3 mV, respectively). Treatment with 100 mm NaCl depolarized the root plasma membrane, an effect that was much stronger in arabidopsis. The extent of plasma membrane depolarization positively correlated with NaCl-induced stimulation of vanadate-sensitive H(+) efflux, Na(+) efflux and K(+) retention in roots (quinoa > saltbush > arabidopsis). NaCl-induced stimulation of H(+) efflux was most pronounced in the root elongation zone. In contrast, H(+)-ATPase AHA transcript levels were much higher in arabidopsis compared with quinoa plants, and 100 mm NaCl treatment led to a further 3-fold increase in AHA1 and AHA2 transcripts in arabidopsis but not in quinoa. Enhanced salinity tolerance in the halophyte species studied here is not related to the constitutively higher AHA transcript levels in the root epidermis, but to the plant's ability to rapidly upregulate plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase upon salinity treatment. This is necessary for assisting plants to maintain highly negative membrane potential values and to

  7. CDPK1 from ginger promotes salinity and drought stress tolerance without yield penalty by improving growth and photosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, transient changes in calcium concentrations of cytosol have been observed during stress conditions like high salt, drought, extreme temperature and mechanical disturbances. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in relaying these calcium signatures into downstream effects. In this study, a stress-responsive CDPK gene, ZoCDPK1 was isolated from a stress cDNA generated from ginger using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) - PCR technique and characterized its role in stress tolerance. An important aspect seen during the analysis of the deduced protein is a rare coupling between the presence of a nuclear localization sequence in the junction domain and consensus sequence in the EF-hand loops of calmodulin-like domain. ZoCDPK1 is abundantly expressed in rhizome and is rapidly induced by high-salt stress, drought, and jasmonic acid treatment but not by low temperature stress or abscissic acid treatment. The sub-cellular localization of ZoCDPK1-GFP fusion protein was studied in transgenic tobacco epidermal cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Over-expression of ginger CDPK1 gene in tobacco conferred tolerance to salinity and drought stress as reflected by the high percentage of seed germination, higher relative water content, expression of stress responsive genes, higher leaf chlorophyll content, increased photosynthetic efficiency and other photosynthetic parameters. In addition, transgenic tobacco subjected to salinity/drought stress exhibited 50% more growth during stress conditions as compared to wild type plant during normal conditions. T3 transgenic plants are able to grow to maturity, flowers early and set viable seeds under continuous salinity or drought stress without yield penalty. The ZoCDPK1 up-regulated the expression levels of stress-related genes RD21A and ERD1 in tobacco plants. These results suggest that ZoCDPK1 functions in the positive regulation of the signaling pathways that are involved in the

  8. CDPK1 from Ginger Promotes Salinity and Drought Stress Tolerance without Yield Penalty by Improving Growth and Photosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Tuteja, Narendra; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, transient changes in calcium concentrations of cytosol have been observed during stress conditions like high salt, drought, extreme temperature and mechanical disturbances. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in relaying these calcium signatures into downstream effects. In this study, a stress-responsive CDPK gene, ZoCDPK1 was isolated from a stress cDNA generated from ginger using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) – PCR technique and characterized its role in stress tolerance. An important aspect seen during the analysis of the deduced protein is a rare coupling between the presence of a nuclear localization sequence in the junction domain and consensus sequence in the EF-hand loops of calmodulin-like domain. ZoCDPK1 is abundantly expressed in rhizome and is rapidly induced by high-salt stress, drought, and jasmonic acid treatment but not by low temperature stress or abscissic acid treatment. The sub-cellular localization of ZoCDPK1-GFP fusion protein was studied in transgenic tobacco epidermal cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Over-expression of ginger CDPK1 gene in tobacco conferred tolerance to salinity and drought stress as reflected by the high percentage of seed germination, higher relative water content, expression of stress responsive genes, higher leaf chlorophyll content, increased photosynthetic efficiency and other photosynthetic parameters. In addition, transgenic tobacco subjected to salinity/drought stress exhibited 50% more growth during stress conditions as compared to wild type plant during normal conditions. T3 transgenic plants are able to grow to maturity, flowers early and set viable seeds under continuous salinity or drought stress without yield penalty. The ZoCDPK1 up-regulated the expression levels of stress-related genes RD21A and ERD1 in tobacco plants. These results suggest that ZoCDPK1 functions in the positive regulation of the signaling pathways that are involved in the

  9. High tolerance to temperature and salinity change should enable scleractinian coral Platygyra acuta from marginal environments to persist under future climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apple Pui Yi Chui

    Full Text Available With projected changes in the marine environment under global climate change, the effects of single stressors on corals have been relatively well studied. However, more focus should be placed on the interactive effects of multiple stressors if their impacts upon corals are to be assessed more realistically. Elevation of sea surface temperature is projected under global climate change, and future increases in precipitation extremes related to the monsoon are also expected. Thus, the lowering of salinity could become a more common phenomenon and its impact on corals could be significant as extreme precipitation usually occurs during the coral spawning season. Here, we investigated the interactive effects of temperature [24, 27 (ambient, 30, 32°C] and salinity [33 psu (ambient, 30, 26, 22, 18, 14 psu] on larval settlement, post-settlement survival and early growth of the dominant coral Platygyra acuta from Hong Kong, a marginal environment for coral growth. The results indicate that elevated temperatures (+3°C and +5°C above ambient did not have any significant effects on larval settlement success and post-settlement survival for up to 56 days of prolonged exposure. Such thermal tolerance was markedly higher than that reported in the literature for other coral species. Moreover, there was a positive effect of these elevated temperatures in reducing the negative effects of lowered salinity (26 psu on settlement success. The enhanced settlement success brought about by elevated temperatures, together with the high post-settlement survival recorded up to 44 and 8 days of exposure under +3°C and +5°C ambient respectively, resulted in the overall positive effects of elevated temperatures on recruitment success. These results suggest that projected elevation in temperature over the next century should not pose any major problem for the recruitment success of P. acuta. The combined effects of higher temperatures and lowered salinity (26 psu could

  10. High tolerance to temperature and salinity change should enable scleractinian coral Platygyra acuta from marginal environments to persist under future climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Apple Pui Yi; Ang, Put

    2017-01-01

    With projected changes in the marine environment under global climate change, the effects of single stressors on corals have been relatively well studied. However, more focus should be placed on the interactive effects of multiple stressors if their impacts upon corals are to be assessed more realistically. Elevation of sea surface temperature is projected under global climate change, and future increases in precipitation extremes related to the monsoon are also expected. Thus, the lowering of salinity could become a more common phenomenon and its impact on corals could be significant as extreme precipitation usually occurs during the coral spawning season. Here, we investigated the interactive effects of temperature [24, 27 (ambient), 30, 32°C] and salinity [33 psu (ambient), 30, 26, 22, 18, 14 psu] on larval settlement, post-settlement survival and early growth of the dominant coral Platygyra acuta from Hong Kong, a marginal environment for coral growth. The results indicate that elevated temperatures (+3°C and +5°C above ambient) did not have any significant effects on larval settlement success and post-settlement survival for up to 56 days of prolonged exposure. Such thermal tolerance was markedly higher than that reported in the literature for other coral species. Moreover, there was a positive effect of these elevated temperatures in reducing the negative effects of lowered salinity (26 psu) on settlement success. The enhanced settlement success brought about by elevated temperatures, together with the high post-settlement survival recorded up to 44 and 8 days of exposure under +3°C and +5°C ambient respectively, resulted in the overall positive effects of elevated temperatures on recruitment success. These results suggest that projected elevation in temperature over the next century should not pose any major problem for the recruitment success of P. acuta. The combined effects of higher temperatures and lowered salinity (26 psu) could even be beneficial

  11. Variation in salinity tolerance of four lowland genotypes of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) as assessed by growth, physiological traits, and sodium transporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Carrasco, Karina; Antognoni, Fabiana; Coulibaly, Amadou Konotie; Lizardi, Susana; Covarrubias, Adriana; Martínez, Enrique A; Molina-Montenegro, Marco A; Biondi, Stefania; Zurita-Silva, Andrés

    2011-11-01

    Chenopodium quinoa (Willd.) is an Andean plant showing a remarkable tolerance to abiotic stresses. In Chile, quinoa populations display a high degree of genetic distancing, and variable tolerance to salinity. To investigate which tolerance mechanisms might account for these differences, four genotypes from coastal central and southern regions were compared for their growth, physiological, and molecular responses to NaCl at seedling stage. Seeds were sown on agar plates supplemented with 0, 150 or 300mM NaCl. Germination was significantly reduced by NaCl only in accession BO78. Shoot length was reduced by 150mM NaCl in three out of four genotypes, and by over 60% at 300mM (except BO78 which remained more similar to controls). Root length was hardly affected or even enhanced at 150mM in all four genotypes, but inhibited, especially in BO78, by 300mM NaCl. Thus, the root/shoot ratio was differentially affected by salt, with the highest values in PRJ, and the lowest in BO78. Biomass was also less affected in PRJ than in the other accessions, the genotype with the highest increment in proline concentration upon salt treatment. Free putrescine declined dramatically in all genotypes under 300mM NaCl; however (spermidine+spermine)/putrescine ratios were higher in PRJ than BO78. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses of two sodium transporter genes, CqSOS1 and CqNHX, revealed that their expression was differentially induced at the shoot and root level, and between genotypes, by 300mM NaCl. Expression data are discussed in relation to the degree of salt tolerance in the different accessions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Tolerância de juvenis do pampo Trachinotus marginatus (Teleostei, Carangidae ao choque agudo de salinidade em laboratório Acute salinity tolerance of juvenile pompano Trachinotus marginatus (Teleostei, Carangidae under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís André Sampaio

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available O pampo Trachinotus marginatus é uma espécie com potencial para piscicultura, mas a sua utilização pode ser limitada pelas variações de salinidade comuns em estuários ou em ambientes super-salinos. Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de determinar a tolerância à salinidade de juvenis de T. marginatus em laboratório. Foram testadas 12 salinidades em duplicata (0, 6, 8, 10, 15, 25, 45, 55, 58, 61, 65 e 75‰ e um tratamento controle (35‰. Dez peixes (comprimento total: 20,7±2,3mm e peso úmido: 427±113mg foram colocados em tanques plásticos de 3L. A temperatura da água foi mantida em 24ºC com um banho termostatisado, aeração constante e, a cada 24 horas, os meios experimentais foram completamente renovados. Após 96 horas de exposição, as salinidades letais médias inferior e superior, com os respectivos intervalos de confiança (IC 95%, foram estimadas em 6,99‰ (IC 95% = 6,86-7,13‰ e 58,50‰ (IC 95% = 56,81-60,24‰, respectivamente. Estes resultados permitem caracterizar esta espécie como eurialina. O estudo da influência da salinidade sobre T. marginatus deve ser aprofundado, buscando avaliar principalmente os efeitos sobre o crescimento, de modo que seja possível determinar o potencial do seu cultivo em ambientes com diferentes salinidades.The pompano Trachinotus marginatus shows good potential for aquaculture, but the success of its culture might be limited by the salinity fluctuations common in estuaries or in hyper-saline environments. The objective of this work was to establish the salinity tolerance of juvenile T. marginatus under laboratory conditions. Twelve salinities (0, 6, 8, 10, 15, 25, 45, 55, 58, 61, 65, and 75‰ plus a control (35‰ were tested in duplicate. Groups of ten fish (total length: 20.7±2,3mm and wet weight: 427±113mg were placed in plastic tanks with 3L of water. A water bath was set to control the temperature at 24ºC, water was continuously aerated, and completely exchanged

  13. A MAPK gene from Dead Sea fungus confers stress tolerance to lithium salt and freezing–thawing: Prospects for saline agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan; Weining, Song; Nevo, Eviatar

    2005-01-01

    The Dead Sea is one of the most saline lakes on earth (≈340 g/liter salinity) and is ≈10 times saltier than the oceans. Eurotium herbariorum, a common fungal species, was isolated from its water. EhHOG gene, encoding a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) that plays an essential role in the osmoregulatory pathway in yeast and many other eukaryotes, was isolated from E. herbariorum. The deduced amino acid sequences of EhHOG indicated high similarity with homologous genes from Aspergillus nidulans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe and contained a TGY motif for phosphorylation by MAPK kinase. When EhHOG was expressed in S. cerevisiae hog1Δ mutant, the growth and aberrant morphology of hog1Δ mutant was restored under high osmotic stress condition. Moreover, intracellular glycerol content in the transformant increased to a much higher level than that in the mutant during salt-stress situations. hog1Δ mutant complemented by EhHOG outperformed the wild type or had higher genetic fitness under high Li+ and freezing–thawing conditions. The present study revealed the putative presence of a high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway in E. herbariorum and the significance of EhHOG in osmotic regulation, heat stress, freeze stress, and oxidative stress. The Dead Sea is becoming increasingly more saline while the fungi living in it evolutionarily adapt to its high-saline environment, particularly with the extraordinarily high Li+ concentration. The Dead Sea is potentially an excellent model for studies of evolution under extreme environments and is an important gene pool for future agricultural genetic engineering prospects. PMID:16365289

  14. Salicylic acid improves the salinity tolerance of Medicago sativa in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti by preventing nitrogen fixation inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, F; López-Gómez, M; Tejera, N A; Lluch, C

    2013-07-01

    In this work we have investigated the contribution of pretreatment with 0.1 and 0.5mM salicylic acid (SA) to the protection against salt stress in root nodules of Medicago sativa in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti. SA alleviated the inhibition induced by salinity in the plant growth and photosynthetic capacity of M. sativa-S. meliloti symbiosis. In addition, SA prevented the inhibition of the nitrogen fixation capacity under salt stress since nodule biomass was not affected by salinity in SA pretreated plants. Antioxidant enzymes peroxidase (POX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehidroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and glutathione reductase (GR), key in the main pathway that scavenges H2O2 in plants, were induced by SA pretreatments which suggest that SA may participate in the redox balance in root nodules under salt stress. Catalase activity (CAT) was inhibited around 40% by SA which could be behind the increase of H2O2 detected in nodules of plants pretreated with SA. The accumulation of polyamines (PAs) synthesized in response to salinity was prevented by SA which together with the induction of 1-aminocyclopropane-l-carboxylic acid (ACC) content suggest the prevalence of the ethylene signaling pathway induced by SA in detriment of the synthesis of PAs. In conclusion, SA alleviated the negative effect of salt stress in the M. sativa-S. meliloti symbiosis through the increased level of nodule biomass and the induction of the nodular antioxidant metabolism under salt stress. The H2O2 accumulation and the PAs inhibition induced by SA in nodules of M. sativa suggest that SA activates a hypersensitive response dependent on ethylene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Physiology, Genomics, and Pathway Engineering of an Ethanol-Tolerant Strain of Clostridium phytofermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Zuroff, Trevor R; Ramya, Mohandass; Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-08-15

    Novel processing strategies for hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass in a single reactor offer large potential cost savings for production of biocommodities and biofuels. One critical challenge is retaining high enzyme production in the presence of elevated product titers. Toward this goal, the cellulolytic, ethanol-producing bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans was adapted to increased ethanol concentrations. The resulting ethanol-tolerant (ET) strain has nearly doubled ethanol tolerance relative to the wild-type level but also reduced ethanol yield and growth at low ethanol concentrations. The genome of the ET strain has coding changes in proteins involved in membrane biosynthesis, the Rnf complex, cation homeostasis, gene regulation, and ethanol production. In particular, purification of the mutant bifunctional acetaldehyde coenzyme A (CoA)/alcohol dehydrogenase showed that a G609D variant abolished its activities, including ethanol formation. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase in the ET strain increased cellulose consumption and restored ethanol production, demonstrating how metabolic engineering can be used to overcome disadvantageous mutations incurred during adaptation to ethanol. We discuss how genetic changes in the ET strain reveal novel potential strategies for improving microbial solvent tolerance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Glutathione Peroxidase of Pennisetum glaucum (PgGPx Is a Functional Cd2+ Dependent Peroxiredoxin that Enhances Tolerance against Salinity and Drought Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmina Islam

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS arise in the plant system due to inevitable influence of various environmental stimuli. Glutathione peroxidases are one of the important ROS scavengers inside the cell. A glutathione peroxidase (PgGPx gene was previously found from Pennisetum glauccum abiotic stressed cDNA library. Enzyme kinetics data revealed that PgGPx possessed preference towards thioredoxin rather than glutathione as electron donor and thus belongs to the functional peroxiredoxin group. Moreover, its activity was found to be dependent on divalent cations, especially Cd2+ and homology model showed the presence of Cd2+ binding site in the protein. Site directed mutagenesis study of PgGPx protein revealed the vital role of two conserved Cysteine residues for its enzymatic activity and structural folding. Expression analysis suggested that PgGPx transcript is highly up-regulated in response to salinity and drought stresses. When expressed ectopically, PgGPx showed enhanced tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses in prokaryotic E. coli and model plant, rice. Transgenic rice plants showed lesser accumulation of MDA and H2O2; and higher accumulation of proline as compared to wild type (WT plants in response to both salinity and drought stresses that clearly indicates suppression of lipid peroxidation and ROS generation in transgenic lines. Moreover, transgenic plants maintained better photosynthesis efficiency and higher level of antioxidant enzyme activity as compared to WT plants under stress conditions. These results clearly indicate the imperative role of PgGPx in cellular redox homeostasis under stress conditions, leading to the maintenance of membrane integrity and increased tolerance towards oxidative stress.

  17. Co-expression of Arabidopsis NHX1 and bar Improves the Tolerance to Salinity, Oxidative Stress, and Herbicide in Transgenic Mungbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mungbean is an important pulse crop extensively cultivated in Southeast Asia for supply of easily digestible protein. Salinity severely limits the growth and productivity of mungbean, and weeding poses nutritional and disease constraints to mungbean cultivation. To pyramid both salt tolerance and protection against herbicide in mungbean, the AtNHX1 encoding tonoplast Na+/H+ antiporter from Arabidopsis, and bar gene associated with herbicide resistance were co-expressed through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Stress inducible expression of AtNHX1 significantly improved tolerance under salt stress to ionic, osmotic, and oxidative stresses in transgenic mungbean plants compared to the wild type (WT plants, whereas constitutive expression of bar provided resistance to herbicide. Compared to WT, transgenic mungbean plants grew better with higher plant height, foliage, dry mass and seed yield under high salt stress (200 mM NaCl in the greenhouse. The improved performance of transgenic plants under salt stress was associated with enhanced sequestration of Na+ in roots by vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter and limited transport of toxic Na+ to shoots, possibly by restricting Na+ influx into shoots. Transgenic plants showed better intracellular ion homeostasis, osmoregulation, reduced cell membrane damage, improved photosynthetic capacity, and transpiration rate as compared to WT when subjected to salt stress. Reduction in hydrogen peroxide and oxygen radical production indicated enhanced protection of transgenic plants to both salt- and methyl vialogen (MV-induced oxidative stress. This study laid a firm foundation for improving mungbean yield in saline lands in Southeast Asia.

  18. The Design and Semi-Physical Simulation Test of Fault-Tolerant Controller for Aero Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Tianhong

    2017-11-01

    A new fault-tolerant control method for aero engine is proposed, which can accurately diagnose the sensor fault by Kalman filter banks and reconstruct the signal by real-time on-board adaptive model combing with a simplified real-time model and an improved Kalman filter. In order to verify the feasibility of the method proposed, a semi-physical simulation experiment has been carried out. Besides the real I/O interfaces, controller hardware and the virtual plant model, semi-physical simulation system also contains real fuel system. Compared with the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation, semi-physical simulation system has a higher degree of confidence. In order to meet the needs of semi-physical simulation, a rapid prototyping controller with fault-tolerant control ability based on NI CompactRIO platform is designed and verified on the semi-physical simulation test platform. The result shows that the controller can realize the aero engine control safely and reliably with little influence on controller performance in the event of fault on sensor.

  19. Reduced Tonoplast Fast-Activating and Slow-Activating Channel Activity Is Essential for Conferring Salinity Tolerance in a Facultative Halophyte, Quinoa1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Shabala, Sergey; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Pottosin, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Halophyte species implement a “salt-including” strategy, sequestering significant amounts of Na+ to cell vacuoles. This requires a reduction of passive Na+ leak from the vacuole. In this work, we used quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) to investigate the ability of halophytes to regulate Na+-permeable slow-activating (SV) and fast-activating (FV) tonoplast channels, linking it with Na+ accumulation in mesophyll cells and salt bladders as well as leaf photosynthetic efficiency under salt stress. Our data indicate that young leaves rely on Na+ exclusion to salt bladders, whereas old ones, possessing far fewer salt bladders, depend almost exclusively on Na+ sequestration to mesophyll vacuoles. Moreover, although old leaves accumulate more Na+, this does not compromise their leaf photochemistry. FV and SV channels are slightly more permeable for K+ than for Na+, and vacuoles in young leaves express less FV current and with a density unchanged in plants subjected to high (400 mm NaCl) salinity. In old leaves, with an intrinsically lower density of the FV current, FV channel density decreases about 2-fold in plants grown under high salinity. In contrast, intrinsic activity of SV channels in vacuoles from young leaves is unchanged under salt stress. In vacuoles of old leaves, however, it is 2- and 7-fold lower in older compared with young leaves in control- and salt-grown plants, respectively. We conclude that the negative control of SV and FV tonoplast channel activity in old leaves reduces Na+ leak, thus enabling efficient sequestration of Na+ to their vacuoles. This enables optimal photosynthetic performance, conferring salinity tolerance in quinoa species. PMID:23624857

  20. The Medicago truncatula R2R3-MYB transcription factor gene MtMYBS1 enhances salinity tolerance when constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Song, Yuguang; Zhao, Zhong; Qiu, Nian Wei; Liu, Xijiang; Guo, Weihua

    2017-08-19

    MYB-type proteins are known to participate in many stress responses, although their role in legumes is still less clear. Here, the isolation and characterization of MtMYBS1, an R2R3 MYB gene isolated from the model legume Medicago truncatula, is described. MtMYBS1 transcription was inducible by NaCl, polyethylene glycol or abscisic acid (ABA). When tested in yeast, its product was shown to have transactivational activity. The constitutive expression of MtMYBS1 in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings mitigated the restriction on root growth imposed by either salinity or osmotic stress and raised their sensitivity to ABA. It also resulted in the plants being able to overcome several growth constraints and promoted activity in both the ABA-dependent and -independent stress-responsive pathways. In particular, it enhanced the transcription of P5CS, a gene which encodes a component of proline synthesis. MtMYBS1 may prove to be a useful gene for manipulating the salinity tolerance of legumes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of salinity tolerance of transgenic rice lines harboring HsCBL8 of wild barley (Hordeum spontanum line from Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rice is more sensitive to salinity, particularly at its early vegetative and later productive stages. Wild plants growing in harsh environments such as wild barley from Qinghai-Tibet Plateau adapt to the adverse environment with allelic variations at the loci responsible for stressful environment, which could be used for rice genetic improvement. In this study, we overexpressed HsCBL8 encoding a calcium-sensor calcineurin B-like (CBL protein in rice. The gene was isolated from XZ166, a wild-barley (Hordeum spontanum line originated from Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. We found that XZ166 responded to high NaCl concentration (200 mM with more HsCBL8 transcripts than CM72, a cultivated barley line known for salinity tolerance. XZ166 is significantly different from CM72 with nucleotide sequences at HsCBL8. The overexpression of HsCBL8 in rice resulted in significant improvement of water protection in vivo and plasma membrane, more proline accumulation, and a reduction of overall Na+ uptake but little change in K+ concentration in the plant tissues. Notably, HsCBL8 did not act on some genes downstream of the rice CBL family genes, suggesting an interesting interaction between HsCBL8 and unknown factors to be further investigated.

  2. Physcomitrella Patens Dehydrins (PpDHNA and PpDHNC Confer Salinity and Drought Tolerance to Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilong Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dehydrins (DHNs as a member of late-embryogenesis-abundant (LEA proteins are involved in plant abiotic stress tolerance. Two dehydrins PpDHNA and PpDHNC were previously characterized from the moss Physcomitrella patens, which has been suggested to be an ideal model plant to study stress tolerance due to its adaptability to extreme environment. In this study, functions of these two genes were analyzed by heterologous expressions in Arabidopsis. Phenotype analysis revealed that overexpressing PpDHN dehydrin lines had stronger stress resistance than wild type and empty-vector control lines. These stress tolerance mainly due to the up-regulation of stress-related genes expression and mitigation to oxidative damage. The transgenic plants showed strong scavenging ability of reactive oxygen species(ROS, which was attributed to the enhancing of the content of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT. Further analysis showed that the contents of chlorophyll and proline tended to be the appropriate level (close to non-stress environment and the malondialdehyde (MDA were repressed in these transgenic plants after exposure to stress. All these results suggest the PpDHNA and PpDHNC played a crucial role in response to drought and salt stress.

  3. Salinity in rose production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Reis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rose is one of the most important ornamental plants in the world. However, the cultivation systems used for roses often impose salt stress. Saline conditions occur naturally in some regions or by human activity in others with use of low quality water or excessive fertilizer application. In general, roses are considered sensitive to salinity. However, tolerance levels can be different among roses species and cultivars. Therefore, studies are needed that take into account characteristics of each species and how the exposure to salinity occurs. Management of water and nutrients can be important tools for mitigating the effects of high salt concentrations. Also, advances in biotechnology can be used for a better understanding of the physiological responses to salinity and to develop more salt tolerant rose cultivars. Thus, this paper aims to review the progress made and future prospects of salinity tolerance in commercial rose production.

  4. A high-quality genome assembly of quinoa provides insights into the molecular basis of salt bladder-based salinity tolerance and the exceptional nutritional value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Changsong; Chen, Aojun; Xiao, Lihong; Muller, Heike M; Ache, Peter; Haberer, Georg; Zhang, Meiling; Jia, Wei; Deng, Ping; Huang, Ru; Lang, Daniel; Li, Feng; Zhan, Dongliang; Wu, Xiangyun; Zhang, Hui; Bohm, Jennifer; Liu, Renyi; Shabala, Sergey; Hedrich, Rainer; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Zhang, Heng

    2017-01-01

    Chenopodium quinoa is a halophytic pseudocereal crop that is being cultivated in an ever-growing number of countries. Because quinoa is highly resistant to multiple abiotic stresses and its seed has a better nutritional value than any other major cereals, it is regarded as a future crop to ensure global food security. We generated a high-quality genome draft using an inbred line of the quinoa cultivar Real. The quinoa genome experienced one recent genome duplication about 4.3 million years ago, likely reflecting the genome fusion of two Chenopodium parents, in addition to the γ paleohexaploidization reported for most eudicots. The genome is highly repetitive (64.5% repeat content) and contains 54 438 protein-coding genes and 192 microRNA genes, with more than 99.3% having orthologous genes from glycophylic species. Stress tolerance in quinoa is associated with the expansion of genes involved in ion and nutrient transport, ABA homeostasis and signaling, and enhanced basal-level ABA responses. Epidermal salt bladder cells exhibit similar characteristics as trichomes, with a significantly higher expression of genes related to energy import and ABA biosynthesis compared with the leaf lamina. The quinoa genome sequence provides insights into its exceptional nutritional value and the evolution of halophytes, enabling the identification of genes involved in salinity tolerance, and providing the basis for molecular breeding in quinoa. PMID:28994416

  5. A high-quality genome assembly of quinoa provides insights into the molecular basis of salt bladder-based salinity tolerance and the exceptional nutritional value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Changsong; Chen, Aojun; Xiao, Lihong; Muller, Heike M; Ache, Peter; Haberer, Georg; Zhang, Meiling; Jia, Wei; Deng, Ping; Huang, Ru; Lang, Daniel; Li, Feng; Zhan, Dongliang; Wu, Xiangyun; Zhang, Hui; Bohm, Jennifer; Liu, Renyi; Shabala, Sergey; Hedrich, Rainer; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Zhang, Heng

    2017-11-01

    Chenopodium quinoa is a halophytic pseudocereal crop that is being cultivated in an ever-growing number of countries. Because quinoa is highly resistant to multiple abiotic stresses and its seed has a better nutritional value than any other major cereals, it is regarded as a future crop to ensure global food security. We generated a high-quality genome draft using an inbred line of the quinoa cultivar Real. The quinoa genome experienced one recent genome duplication about 4.3 million years ago, likely reflecting the genome fusion of two Chenopodium parents, in addition to the γ paleohexaploidization reported for most eudicots. The genome is highly repetitive (64.5% repeat content) and contains 54 438 protein-coding genes and 192 microRNA genes, with more than 99.3% having orthologous genes from glycophylic species. Stress tolerance in quinoa is associated with the expansion of genes involved in ion and nutrient transport, ABA homeostasis and signaling, and enhanced basal-level ABA responses. Epidermal salt bladder cells exhibit similar characteristics as trichomes, with a significantly higher expression of genes related to energy import and ABA biosynthesis compared with the leaf lamina. The quinoa genome sequence provides insights into its exceptional nutritional value and the evolution of halophytes, enabling the identification of genes involved in salinity tolerance, and providing the basis for molecular breeding in quinoa.

  6. Over-Expression of a Rice Tau Class Glutathione S-Transferase Gene Improves Tolerance to Salinity and Oxidative Stresses in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raghvendra; Sahoo, Annapurna; Devendran, Ragunathan; Jain, Mukesh

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional proteins encoded by large gene family in plants, which play important role in cellular detoxification of several endobiotic and xenobiotic compounds. Previously, we suggested the diverse roles of rice GST gene family members in plant development and various stress responses based on their differential expression. In this study, we report the functional characterization of a rice tau class GST gene, OsGSTU4. OsGSTU4 fusion protein was found to be localized in nucleus and cytoplasm. The over-expression of OsGSTU4 in E. coli resulted in better growth and higher GST activity under various stress conditions. Further, we raised over-expression transgenic Arabidopsis plants to reveal its in planta function. These transgenic lines showed reduced sensitivity towards plant hormones, auxin and abscisic acid. Various analyses revealed improved tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants towards salinity and oxidative stresses, which may be attributed to the lower accumulation of reactive oxygen species and enhanced GST activity. In addition, microarray analysis revealed up-regulation of several genes involved in stress responses and cellular detoxification processes in the transgenic plants as compared to wild-type. These results suggest that OsGSTU4 can be used as a good candidate for the generation of stress-tolerant crop plants. PMID:24663444

  7. Disentangling the photochemical salinity tolerance in Aster tripolium L.: connecting biophysical traits with changes in fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, B; Cabrita, M T; Gameiro, C; Matos, A R; Godinho, R; Marques, J C; Caçador, I

    2017-03-01

    A profound analysis of A. tripolium photochemical traits under salinity exposure is lacking in the literature, with very few references focusing on its fatty acid profile role in photophysiology. To address this, the deep photochemical processes were evaluated by Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) Fluorometry coupled with a discrimination of its leaf fatty acid profile. Plants exposed to 125-250 mm NaCl showed higher photochemical light harvesting efficiencies and lower energy dissipation rates. under higher NaCl exposure, there is evident damage of the oxygen evolving complexes (OECs). On the other hand, Reaction Centre (RC) closure net rate and density increased, improving the energy fluxes entering the PS II, in spite of the high amounts of energy dissipated and the loss of PS II antennae connectivity. Energy dissipation was mainly achieved through the auroxanthin pathway. Total fatty acid content displayed a similar trend, being also higher under 125-250 mm NaCl with high levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. The increase in oleic acid and palmitic acid allows the maintenance of the good functioning of the PS II. Also relevant was the high concentration of chloroplastic C16:1t in the individuals subjected to 125-250 mm NaCl, related with a higher electron transport activity and with the organization of the Light Harvesting Complexes (LHC) and thus reducing the activation of energy dissipation mechanisms. All these new insights shed some light not only on the photophysiology of this potential cash-crop, but also highlight its important saline agriculture applications of this species as forage and potential source of essential fatty acids. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  8. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  9. Ectopic expression of PgRab7 in rice plants (Oryza sativa L.) results in differential tolerance at the vegetative and seed setting stage during salinity and drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Manas Kumar; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar; Reddy, Malireddy K; Deswal, Renu; Sopory, Sudhir K

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we have overexpressed a vesicle trafficking protein, Rab7, from a stress-tolerant plant, Pennisetum glaucum, in a high-yielding but stress-sensitive rice variety Pusa Basmati-1 (PB-1). The transgenic rice plants were tested for tolerance against salinity and drought stress. The transgenic plants showed considerable tolerance at the vegetative stage against both salinity (200 mM NaCl) and drought stress (up to 12 days after withdrawing water). The protection against salt and drought stress may be by regulating Na + ion homeostasis, as the transgenic plants showed altered expression of multiple transporter genes, including OsNHX1, OsNHX2, OsSOS1, OsVHA, and OsGLRs. In addition, decreased generation and maintenance of lesser reactive oxygen species (ROS), with maintenance of chloroplast grana and photosynthetic machinery was observed. When evaluated for reproductive growth, 89-96 % of seed setting was maintained in transgenic plants during drought stress; however, under salt stress, a 33-53 % decrease in seed setting was observed. These results indicate that PgRab7 overexpression in rice confers differential tolerance at the seed setting stage during salinity and drought stress and could be a favored target for raising drought-tolerant crops.

  10. Narrowing down the targets: towards successful genetic engineering of drought-tolerant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujun; Vanderbeld, Barbara; Wan, Jiangxin; Huang, Yafan

    2010-05-01

    Drought is the most important environmental stress affecting agriculture worldwide. Exploiting yield potential and maintaining yield stability of crops in water-limited environments are urgent tasks that must be undertaken in order to guarantee food supply for the increasing world population. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to identifying key regulators in plant drought response through genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies using, in most cases, the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only a small portion of these regulators have been explored as potential candidate genes for their application in the improvement of drought tolerance in crops. Based on biological functions, these genes can be classified into the following three categories: (1) stress-responsive transcriptional regulation (e.g. DREB1, AREB, NF-YB); (2) post-transcriptional RNA or protein modifications such as phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (e.g. SnRK2, ABI1) and farnesylation (e.g. ERA1); and (3) osomoprotectant metabolism or molecular chaperones (e.g. CspB). While continuing down the path to discovery of new target genes, serious efforts are also focused on fine-tuning the expression of the known candidate genes for stress tolerance in specific temporal and spatial patterns to avoid negative effects in plant growth and development. These efforts are starting to bear fruit by showing yield improvements in several crops under a variety of water-deprivation conditions. As most such evaluations have been performed under controlled growth environments, a gap still remains between early success in the laboratory and the application of these techniques to the elite cultivars of staple crops in the field. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways and master regulators for drought tolerance. The knowledge acquired will facilitate the genetic engineering of single or multiple targets and quantitative trait loci in key crops to create

  11. Biocontrol potential of salinity tolerant mutants of Trichoderma harzianum against Fusarium oxysporum Potencial de biocontrole de mutantes sal-tolerantes de Trichoderma harzianum contra Fusarium oxysporum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Abdel-Latif A. Mohamed

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposing a wild-type culture of Trichoderma harzianum to gamma irradiation induced two stable salt-tolerant mutants (Th50M6 and Th50M11. Under saline conditions, both mutants greatly surpassed their wild type strain in growth rate, sporulation and biological proficiency against Fusarium oxysporum, the causal agent of tomato wilt disease. Tolerant T. harzianum mutants detained a capability to grow and convinced sporulation in growth media containing up to 69 mM NaCl. In comparison with their parent strain, characterization of both mutants confirmed that they have reinforced contents of proline and hydroxyproline, relatively higher sodium content compared to potassium, calcium or magnesium contents, higher level of total phenols. Electrophoretic analysis of total soluble proteins in the salt tolerance mutant Th50M6 showed different bands accumulated in response to 69 mM NaCl. Data also showed that mutants produce certain active metabolites, such as chitinases, cellulases, beta-galactosidases, as well as, some antibiotics i.e., trichodermin, gliotoxin and gliovirin. Trichoderma mutants significantly reduced wilt disease incidence and improved yield and mineral contents of tomato plants under both saline and non-saline soil conditions, as well as, under infested and natural conditions. T. harzianum mutants were also more efficient in dropping the F. oxysporum growth in rhizosphere compared to the wild type strain. Population density of both mutants in rhizosphere far exceeded that of T. harzianum wild type strain.A exposição de uma cepa selvagem de Trichoderma harzianum à irradiação gama induziu dois mutantes tolerantes a sal (Th50M6 e Th50M11. Em condições salinas, os dois mutantes foram muito superiores à cepa selvagem em relação à velocidade de multiplicação, esporulação e eficiência contra Fusarium oxysporum, o agente causador da doença wilt do tomate. Os mutantes tolerantes foram capazes de multiplicação e esporulação em

  12. Effects of salinity on the survival of the Brackwater mussel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Additionally, animals were exposed to a gradual change in salinity, using treatments that exceeded the minimum and maximum salinities mussels were previously able to tolerate. In all four experiments, animals were able to tolerate salinity levels up to 20. However, a wider salinity tolerance, up to 50, was shown by animals ...

  13. Arthrobacter pokkalii sp nov, a Novel Plant Associated Actinobacterium with Plant Beneficial Properties, Isolated from Saline Tolerant Pokkali Rice, Kerala, India.

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    Ramya Krishnan

    Full Text Available A novel yellow colony-forming bacterium, strain P3B162T was isolated from the pokkali rice rhizosphere from Kerala, India, as part of a project study aimed at isolating plant growth beneficial rhizobacteria from saline tolerant pokkali rice and functionally evaluate their abilities to promote plant growth under saline conditions. The novel strain P3B162T possesses plant growth beneficial traits such as positive growth on 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, production of indole acetic acid (IAA and siderophore. In addition, it also showed important phenotypic characters such as ability to form biofilm and utilization of various components of plant root exudates (sugars, amino acids and organic acids, clearly indicating its lifestyle as a plant rhizosphere associated bacterium. Taxonomically, the novel strain P3B162T was affiliated to the genus Arthrobacter based on the collective results of phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses. Moreover, molecular analysis using 16S rRNA gene showed Arthrobacter globiformis NBRC 12137T, Arthrobacter pascens DSM 20545T and Arthrobacter liuii DSXY973T as the closely related phylogenetic neighbours, showing more than 98% 16S rRNA similarity values, whereas the recA gene analysis displayed Arthrobacter liuii JCM 19864T as the nearest neighbour with 94.7% sequence similarity and only 91.7% to Arthrobacter globiformis LMG 3813T and 88.7% to Arthrobacter pascens LMG 16255T. However, the DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain P3B162T, Arthrobacter globiformis LMG 3813T, Arthrobacter pascens LMG 16255T and Arthrobacter liuii JCM 19864T was below 50%. In addition, the novel strain P3B162T can be distinguished from its closely related type strains by several phenotypic characters such as colony pigment, tolerance to NaCl, motility, reduction of nitrate, hydrolysis of DNA, acid from sucrose, cell wall sugars and cell wall peptidoglycan structure. In conclusion, the combined results of this study

  14. Synergistic Action of a Microbial-based Biostimulant and a Plant Derived-Protein Hydrolysate Enhances Lettuce Tolerance to Alkalinity and Salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouphael, Youssef; Cardarelli, Mariateresa; Bonini, Paolo; Colla, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    In the coming years, farmers will have to deal with growing crops under suboptimal conditions dictated by global climate changes. The application of plant biostimulants such as beneficial microorganisms and plant-derived protein hydrolysates (PHs) may represent an interesting approach for increasing crop tolerance to alkalinity and salinity. The current research aimed at elucidating the agronomical, physiological, and biochemical effects as well as the changes in mineral composition of greenhouse lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) either untreated or treated with a microbial-based biostimulant (Tablet) containing Rhizophagus intraradices and Trichoderma atroviride alone or in combination with a PH. Plants were sprayed with PH at weekly intervals with a solution containing 2.5 ml L(-1) of PH. Lettuce plants were grown in sand culture and supplied with three nutrient solutions: standard, saline (25 mM NaCl) or alkaline (10 mM NaHCO3 + 0.5 g l(-1) CaCO3; pH 8.1). Salt stress triggered a decrease in fresh yield, biomass production, SPAD index, chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf mineral composition and increased leaf proline concentration, without altering antioxidant enzyme activities. The decrease in marketable yield and biomass production under alkali stress was not significant. Irrespective of nutrient solution, the application of Tablet and especially Tablet + PH increased fresh marketable yield, shoot and root dry weight. This was associated with an improvement in SPAD index, Fv/Fm ratio, CAT and GPX activities and a better nutritional status (higher P, K, and Fe and lower Na with NaCl and higher P and Fe with NaHCO3) via an increase of total root length and surface. The combination of microbial biostimulant with foliar application of PH synergistically increased the marketable fresh yield by 15.5 and 46.7% compared to the Tablet-treated and untreated plants, respectively. The improved crop performance of Tablet + PH application was attributed to a better root system

  15. Confidence, tolerance, and allowance in biological engineering: the nuts and bolts of living things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcar, Manuel; Danchin, Antoine; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    The emphasis of systems and synthetic biology on quantitative understanding of biological objects and their eventual re-design has raised the question of whether description and construction standards that are commonplace in electric and mechanical engineering are applicable to live systems. The tuning of genetic devices to deliver a given activity is generally context-dependent, thereby undermining the re-usability of parts, and predictability of function, necessary for manufacturing new biological objects. Tolerance (acceptable limits within the unavoidable divergence of a nominal value) and allowance (deviation introduced on purpose for the sake of flexibility and hence modularity, i.e. fitting together with a variety of other components) are key aspects of standardization that need to be brought to biological design. These should endow functional building blocks with a pre-specified level of confidence for bespoke biosystems engineering. However, in the absence of more fundamental knowledge, fine-tuning necessarily relies on evolutionary/combinatorial gravitation toward a fixed objective. Also watch the Video Abstract. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The effect of exogenous spermidine concentration on polyamine metabolism and salt tolerance in zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud subjected to short-term salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucheng Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress, and particularly short-term salinity stress, is one of the most serious abiotic factors limiting plant survival and growth in China. It has been established that exogenous spermidine (Spd stimulats tolerance to salt stress in plants. In the present study, two cultivars that are typically grown in China were used. The two zoysiagrass cultivars, exhibiting a sensitive ( cv. Z081 or tolerant ( cv. Z057 salt stress adaptation ability, were subjected to 200 mM salt stress and treated with different exogenous Spd concentrations for 8 days. Polyamine (Put, Spd and Spm contents and polyamine metabolic enzyme (ADC, ODC, SAMDC, PAO and DAO, malondialdehyde (MDA, H2O2 and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase were measured. The results showed that salt stress induced increases in Spd and Spm contents and the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC and diamine oxidase (DAO in both cultivars. Exogenous Spd application did not compromise polyamine contents through the regulation of polyamine-degrading enzymes, and an increase in PA synthesis enzymes was observed during the experiment. The application resulted in a tendency for the Spd and Spm contents and the activities of ODC, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC, DAO, and antioxidant enzymes to first increase and then decrease in both cultivars with an increase in the exogenous Spd concentration. H2O2 and MDA significantly decreased in both cultivars treated with Spd. With an increase in the exogenous Spd concentration, the Spd + Spm level scores showed positive correlations with polyamine synthesis enzymes (ADC, SAMDC, DAO, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, POD, CAT, while showing negative correlations with H2O2 and MDA in both cultivars.

  17. Trichoderma-Plant Root Colonization: Escaping Early Plant Defense Responses and Activation of the Antioxidant Machinery for Saline Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Yariv; Landau, Udi; Cuadros-Inostroza, Álvaro; Takayuki, Tohge; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Chet, Ilan; Viterbo, Ada; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are versatile opportunistic plant symbionts which can colonize the apoplast of plant roots. Microarrays analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots inoculated with Trichoderma asperelloides T203, coupled with qPCR analysis of 137 stress responsive genes and transcription factors, revealed wide gene transcript reprogramming, proceeded by a transient repression of the plant immune responses supposedly to allow root colonization. Enhancement in the expression of WRKY18 and WRKY40, which stimulate JA-signaling via suppression of JAZ repressors and negatively regulate the expression of the defense genes FMO1, PAD3 and CYP71A13, was detected in Arabidopsis roots upon Trichoderma colonization. Reduced root colonization was observed in the wrky18/wrky40 double mutant line, while partial phenotypic complementation was achieved by over-expressing WRKY40 in the wrky18 wrky40 background. On the other hand increased colonization rate was found in roots of the FMO1 knockout mutant. Trichoderma spp. stimulate plant growth and resistance to a wide range of adverse environmental conditions. Arabidopsis and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants treated with Trichoderma prior to salt stress imposition show significantly improved seed germination. In addition, Trichoderma treatment affects the expression of several genes related to osmo-protection and general oxidative stress in roots of both plants. The MDAR gene coding for monodehydroascorbate reductase is significantly up-regulated and, accordingly, the pool of reduced ascorbic acid was found to be increased in Trichoderma treated plants. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC)-deaminase silenced Trichoderma mutants were less effective in providing tolerance to salt stress, suggesting that Trichoderma, similarly to ACC deaminase producing bacteria, can ameliorate plant growth under conditions of abiotic stress, by lowering ameliorating increases in ethylene levels as well as promoting an elevated antioxidative capacity

  18. Development of stress tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by metabolic engineering: New aspects from cell flocculation and zinc supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Mingming; Xue, Chuang; Bai, Fengwu; Zhao, Xinqing

    2017-02-01

    Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely studied for the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. However, economic production is currently challenged by the repression of cell growth and compromised fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae strains in the presence of various environmental stresses, including toxic level of final products, inhibitory compounds released from the pretreatment of cellulosic feedstocks, high temperature, and so on. Therefore, it is important to improve stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae to these stressful conditions to achieve efficient and economic production. In this review, the latest advances on development of stress tolerant S. cerevisiae strains are summarized, with the emphasis on the impact of cell flocculation and zinc addition. It was found that cell flocculation affected ethanol tolerance and acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae, and addition of zinc to a suitable level improved stress tolerance of yeast cells to ethanol, high temperature and acetic acid. Further studies on the underlying mechanisms by which cell flocculation and zinc status affect stress tolerance will not only enrich our knowledge on stress response and tolerance mechanisms of S. cerevisiae, but also provide novel metabolic engineering strategies to develop robust yeast strains for biofuels production. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Salt Tolerance in Rice: Focus on Mechanisms and Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inja Naga Bheema Lingeswara Reddy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Salt tolerance is an important constrain for rice, which is generally categorized as a typical glycophyte. Soil salinity is one of the major constraints affecting rice production worldwide, especially in the coastal areas. Susceptibility or tolerance of rice plants to high salinity is a coordinated action of multiple stress responsive genes, which also interacts with other components of stress signal transduction pathways. Salt tolerant varieties can be produced by marker-assisted selection or genetic engineering by introducing salt-tolerance genes. In this review, we have updated on mechanisms and genes which can help in transferring of the salt tolerance into high-yielding rice varieties. We have focused on the need for integrating phenotyping, genomics, metabolic profiling and phenomics into transgenic and breeding approaches to develop high-yielding as well as salt tolerant rice varieties.

  20. Characterization of salt-tolerant β-glucosidase with increased thermostability under high salinity conditions from Bacillus sp. SJ-10 isolated from jeotgal, a traditional Korean fermented seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Yu-Ri; Kim, Joong Kyun; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Ha, Jeong-Chul; Kong, In-Soo

    2015-07-01

    The β-glucosidase gene, bglC, was cloned from Bacillus sp. SJ-10 isolated from the squid jeotgal. Recombinant BglC protein overexpression was induced in Escherichia coli. The optimal pH and temperature of the enzyme, using p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPβGlc) as a substrate, were pH 6 and 40 °C, respectively. Enzymatic activity increased by 3.3- and 3.5-fold in the presence of 15% NaCl and KCl, respectively. Furthermore, enzyme thermostability improved in the presence of NaCl or KCl. At 45 °C in the presence of salts, the enzyme was stable for 2 h and maintained 80% activity. In the absence of salts, BglC completely lost activity after 110 min at 45 °C. Comparison of the kinetic parameters at various salt concentrations revealed that BglC had approximately 1.5- and 1.2-fold higher affinity and hydrolyzed pNPβGlc 1.9- and 2.1-fold faster in the presence of 15% NaCl and KCl, respectively. Additionally, the Gibb's free energy for denaturation was higher in the presence of 15% salt than in the absence of salt at 45 and 50 °C. Since enzymatic activity and thermostability were enhanced under high salinity conditions, BglC is an ideal salt-tolerant enzyme for further research and industrial applications.

  1. Pseudomonas induces salinity tolerance in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and resistance to Fusarium root rot through the modulation of indole-3-acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Jabborova, Dilfuza; Hashem, Abeer

    2015-11-01

    Abiotic stresses cause changes in the balance of phytohormones in plants and result in inhibited root growth and an increase in the susceptibility of plants to root rot disease. The aim of this work was to ascertain whether microbial indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) plays a role in the regulation of root growth and microbially mediated control of root rot of cotton caused by Fusarium solani. Seed germination and seedling growth were improved by both NaCl and Mg2SO4 (100 mM) solutions when treated with root-associated bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida R4 and Pseudomonas chlororaphis R5, which are able to produce IAA. These bacterial strains were also able to reduce the infection rate of cotton root rot (from 70 to 39%) caused by F. solani under gnotobiotic conditions. The application of a low concentration of IAA (0.01 and 0.001 μg/ml) stimulated plant growth and reduced disease incidence caused by F. solani (from 70 to 41-56%, respectively). Shoot and root growth and dry matter increased significantly and disease incidence was reduced by bacterial inoculants in natural saline soil. These results suggest that bacterial IAA plays a major role in salt stress tolerance and may be involved in induced resistance against root rot disease of cotton.

  2. HVP10 (V-PPase, A CANDIDATE GENE FOR HvNax3 CONTROLLING SODIUM EXCLUSION AND SALINITY TOLERANCE IN BARLEY: MAPPING, SEQUENCE ANALYSIS AND GENE EXPRESSION

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    Shavrukov Yuri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is a major abiotic stress limiting the production of agricultural plants in Australia and in other countries across the world. Wild relatives of cultivated barley have wider diversity in tolerance to salinity. We previously reported the identification of a major QTL for sodium exclusion (HvNax3 on chromosome 7HS, in a barley mapping population originating from a cross between the Australian feed barley Barque-73 and a Hordeum spontaneum accession, CPI-71284. Initial analysis of an AB-QTL population and F2 recombinants reduced the interval containing HvNax3 from 15.0 cM to 1.3 cM. For fine mapping of this region, four F3 progenies (60-100 individuals in each with different recombination events were genotyped with various CAPS markers and phenotyped for sodium exclusion. The interval was further reduced to 0.4 cM, limiting the number of candidate genes based on rice-barley synteny to five, with the most promising candidate encoding a vacuolar pyrophosphatase proton pump, V-PPase (HVP10 gene. The protein encoded by this gene has been shown to be responsible for establishing an electrochemical gradient across the tonoplast that allows other transporters such as Na+/H+ antiporters to transport sodium into the vacuole, thereby reducing toxic effects of excess Na+ in the cytosol. BLAST analysis of sequences of the complete HVP10 gene from both parents indicated the presence of eight exons and seven introns, with an open reading frame of 4,356 bp. The eight exons were well-conserved with only seven SNPs in the coding regions identified between the two parents but none of the SNPs altered the amino-acid sequence. The differences in Na+ accumulation between the two parents is, therefore, not related to the coding sequence of the HVP10 gene. However, Q-PCR experiments showed that expression of the gene in shoots and in roots of CPI-71284 was two-fold and 24%, respectively, higher than in Barque-73 on the third day following exposure to salt stress

  3. Hyaluronic acid improves the tolerability of hypertonic saline in the chronic treatment of cystic fibrosis patients: a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Mirco; Casciaro, Rosaria; Lucca, Francesca; Troiani, Patrizia; Salonini, Elena; Favilli, Federica; Quattrucci, Serena; Sher, Daniel; Assael, Baroukh Maurice

    2014-04-01

    TRIAL DESIGN AND METHODS: Between December 2009 and July 2011, four cystic fibrosis (CF) centers in Italy participated in a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial to test whether 7% hypertonic saline (HS) administered together with 0.1% hyaluronic acid (HA) was better tolerated by patients who previously did not tolerate HS well on its own. Participants were CF patients at least 8 years old, in clinically stable conditions, with forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) at least 50% predicted. Forty patients were recruited and randomized to receive either HS or HS plus HA (5 mL to be inhaled over 15 min, twice daily for 28 days). Primary endpoints were cough, throat irritation, salty taste, and overall acceptability, as assessed by each patient on a semiquantitative scale on a diary card. Secondary endpoint was FEV1 change at the end of treatment. Patients were randomized into randomly permuted blocks. The first and last doses were administered in hospital. In between, patients were treated at home. Patients, all caregivers, and the statistician who conducted the analysis (different from the one who generated the random list) were blinded to group assignment. Severity of cough, throat irritation, and saltiness were more severe in patients treated with HS alone, both after the first inhalation and over the entire treatment period. Overall pleasantness was rated higher by patients treated with the combination product. All differences were highly significant. There were no changes in FEV1 between the first and last administrations. Five patients did not complete the study. Four patients (two from each group) withdrew because of cough or throat irritation. One more patient from the HS group withdrew because of a respiratory exacerbation at week 3. HS is currently a cornerstone in the treatment of CF patients. The addition of HA to HS reduces the prevalence and severity of cough, throat irritation, and saltiness and may improve compliance in patients

  4. Salt exclusion and mycorrhizal symbiosis increase tolerance to NaCl and CaCl2 salinity in ‘Siam Queen’ basil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of salinity on growth and nutrient uptake in basil (Ocimum basilicum L.). Plants were fertilized with a complete nutrient solution and exposed to no, low, or moderate levels of salinity from NaCl or CaCl2. Plants in the control and moderate salinity tre...

  5. Seleção de genótipos de arroz tolerantes à salinidade durante a fase vegetativa Selection of genotypes of salinity tolerance rice during the vegetative phase

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    Palmira Cabral Sales de Melo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o grau de tolerância e sensibilidade à salinidade de genótipos de arroz durante a fase vegetativa da planta. O experimento foi conduzido sob condições de telado, nas dependências da Empresa Pernambucana de Pesquisa Agropecuária-IPA (Recife-PE, em 1996. Foram avaliados doze genótipos de arroz, sendo dez tolerantes e dois sensíveis à salinidade no estádio de desenvolvimento vegetativo. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos ao acaso com arranjo fatorial (doze genótipos x quatro níveis de NaCl, em três repetições. Os resultados constataram existência de variabilidade entre os genótipos de arroz na população estudada para tolerância e sensibilidade à salinidade. As linhagens PR492, PR504, CNA8250, CNA8262 e CNA8267 são tolerantes e a CNA8270, CNA8258, CNA8269, PR475 e PR477 são sensíveis à salinidade dos solos durante a fase vegetativa.The objective of this work was to evaluate the degree of tolerance and sensibility to the salinity of genoty,pes of rice (Oryza sativa L. during the vegetative phase of the plant. The experiment was lead under greenhouse conditions at IPA (Empresa Pernambucana de Pesquisa Agropecuária, in 1996. Twelve genotypes of rice had been evaluated, being ten tolerant and two sensible ones to salinity in the vegetative development stadium. The randomized blocks design were performed into three repetitions of factorials arrangements (twelve genotypes x four levels of NaCl. Results had evidenced variability existence among the genotypes of rice, in the specific population, for tolerance and sensitivity to the salinity. Samples PR492, PR504, CNA8250, CNA8262 and CNA8267 can be considered tolerant to salinity, while the genotypes CNA8270, CNA8258, CNA8269, PR475 and PR477 are sensible to salinity of soil during the vegetative phase.

  6. Fumarate Production by Torulopsis glabrata: Engineering Heterologous Fumarase Expression and Improving Acid Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Song, Wei; Gao, Cong; Qin, Wen; Luo, Qiuling; Liu, Jia; Liu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Fumarate is a well-known biomass building block compound. However, the poor catalytic efficiency of fumarase is one of the major factors preventing its widespread production. To address this issue, we selected residues 159HPND162 of fumarase from Rhizopus oryzae as targets for site-directed mutagenesis based on molecular docking analysis. Twelve mutants were generated and characterized in detail. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values of the P160A, P160T, P160H, N161E, and D162W mutants were decreased, whereas Km values of H159Y, H159V, H159S, N161R, N161F, D162K, and D162M mutants were increased. In addition, all mutants displayed decreased catalytic efficiency except for the P160A mutant, whose kcat/Km was increased by 33.2%. Moreover, by overexpressing the P160A mutant, the engineered strain T.G-PMS-P160A was able to produce 5.2 g/L fumarate. To further enhance fumarate production, the acid tolerance of T.G-PMS-P160A was improved by deleting ade12, a component of the purine nucleotide cycle, and the resulting strain T.G(△ade12)-PMS-P160A produced 9.2 g/L fumarate. The strategy generated in this study opens up new avenues for pathway optimization and efficient production of natural products.

  7. Fumarate Production by Torulopsis glabrata: Engineering Heterologous Fumarase Expression and Improving Acid Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulai Chen

    Full Text Available Fumarate is a well-known biomass building block compound. However, the poor catalytic efficiency of fumarase is one of the major factors preventing its widespread production. To address this issue, we selected residues 159HPND162 of fumarase from Rhizopus oryzae as targets for site-directed mutagenesis based on molecular docking analysis. Twelve mutants were generated and characterized in detail. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values of the P160A, P160T, P160H, N161E, and D162W mutants were decreased, whereas Km values of H159Y, H159V, H159S, N161R, N161F, D162K, and D162M mutants were increased. In addition, all mutants displayed decreased catalytic efficiency except for the P160A mutant, whose kcat/Km was increased by 33.2%. Moreover, by overexpressing the P160A mutant, the engineered strain T.G-PMS-P160A was able to produce 5.2 g/L fumarate. To further enhance fumarate production, the acid tolerance of T.G-PMS-P160A was improved by deleting ade12, a component of the purine nucleotide cycle, and the resulting strain T.G(△ade12-PMS-P160A produced 9.2 g/L fumarate. The strategy generated in this study opens up new avenues for pathway optimization and efficient production of natural products.

  8. Halophytes: Potential Resources for Salt Stress Tolerance Genes and Promoters

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    Avinash Mishra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Halophytes have demonstrated their capability to thrive under extremely saline conditions and thus considered as one of the best germplasm for saline agriculture. Salinity is a worldwide problem, and the salt-affected areas are increasing day-by-day because of scanty rainfall, poor irrigation system, salt ingression, water contamination, and other environmental factors. The salinity stress tolerance mechanism is a very complex phenomenon, and some pathways are coordinately linked for imparting salinity tolerance. Though a number of salt responsive genes have been reported from the halophytes, there is always a quest for promising stress-responsive genes that can modulate plant physiology according to the salt stress. Halophytes such as Aeluropus, Mesembryanthemum, Suaeda, Atriplex, Thellungiella, Cakile, and Salicornia serve as a potential candidate for the salt-responsive genes and promoters. Several known genes like antiporters (NHX, SOS, HKT, VTPase, ion channels (Cl−, Ca2+, aquaporins, antioxidant encoding genes (APX, CAT, GST, BADH, SOD and some novel genes such as USP, SDR1, SRP etc. were isolated from halophytes and explored for developing stress tolerance in the crop plants (glycophytes. It is evidenced that stress triggers salt sensors that lead to the activation of stress tolerance mechanisms which involve multiple signaling proteins, up- or down-regulation of several genes, and finally the distinctive or collective effects of stress-responsive genes. In this review, halophytes are discussed as an excellent platform for salt responsive genes which can be utilized for developing salinity tolerance in crop plants through genetic engineering.

  9. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Alleviates Salinity Stress in Cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanun, Onsaya; Ueda, Minoru; Itouga, Misao; Kato, Yukari; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Matsui, Akihiro; Tanaka, Maho; Utsumi, Chikako; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Minoru; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) demand has been rising because of its various applications. High salinity stress is a major environmental factor that interferes with normal plant growth and limits crop productivity. As well as genetic engineering to enhance stress tolerance, the use of small molecules is considered as an alternative methodology to modify plants with desired traits. The effectiveness of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for increasing tolerance to salinity stress has recently been reported. Here we use the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), to enhance tolerance to high salinity in cassava. Immunoblotting analysis reveals that SAHA treatment induces strong hyper-acetylation of histones H3 and H4 in roots, suggesting that SAHA functions as the HDAC inhibitor in cassava. Consistent with increased tolerance to salt stress under SAHA treatment, reduced Na+ content and increased K+/Na+ ratio were detected in SAHA-treated plants. Transcriptome analysis to discover mechanisms underlying salinity stress tolerance mediated through SAHA treatment reveals that SAHA enhances the expression of 421 genes in roots under normal condition, and 745 genes at 2 h and 268 genes at 24 h under both SAHA and NaCl treatment. The mRNA expression of genes, involved in phytohormone [abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene, and gibberellin] biosynthesis pathways, is up-regulated after high salinity treatment in SAHA-pretreated roots. Among them, an allene oxide cyclase (MeAOC4) involved in a crucial step of JA biosynthesis is strongly up-regulated by SAHA treatment under salinity stress conditions, implying that JA pathway might contribute to increasing salinity tolerance by SAHA treatment. Our results suggest that epigenetic manipulation might enhance tolerance to high salinity stress in cassava.

  10. The association between tolerance for ambiguity and fear of negative evaluation: A study of engineering technology capstone courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubikovsky, Sergey I.

    For many students in engineering and engineering technology programs in the US, senior capstone design courses require students to form a team, define a problem, and find a feasible technical solution to address this problem. Students must integrate the knowledge and skills acquired during their studies at the college or university level. These truly integrative design activities do not have a single "correct" solution. Instead, there is an array of solutions, many of which could be used to achieve the final result. This ambiguity can cause students to experience anxiety during the projects. This study examined the main topics: • To what extent is a social anxiety (measured as fear of negative evaluation) related to tolerance for ambiguity in senior engineering capstone courses? • How does exposure to ambiguity prior to and during capstone courses affect tolerance for ambiguity? The study looked at the standard educational practices to see if they have unintended consequences, such a social anxiety in dealing with ambiguity. Those consequences are highly undesirable because they reduce students' learning. It was hypothesized that the lecture-based approaches that are more common in the first three years of study would not prepare students for self-directed capstone courses because the students would rarely have experienced problem-based learning before. The study used a quantitative approach and examined students' perceptions of their tolerance for ambiguity, and social anxiety before and after their senior capstone design experience. A survey instrument was adapted to measure exposure to ambiguity, which was studied as a potential moderator of the relationship between social anxiety and tolerance for ambiguity. The study indicated that social anxiety, as measured by fear of negative evaluation, does not play a major role in capstone courses. The second finding is that a single course, even if it was administered as a problem-based senior class, failed to

  11. In vivo evolutionary engineering for ethanol-tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid cells triggers diploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanlı-Yıldız, Burcu; Benbadis, Laurent; Alkım, Ceren; Sezgin, Tuğba; Akşit, Arman; Gökçe, Abdülmecit; Öztürk, Yavuz; Baykal, Ahmet Tarık; Çakar, Zeynep Petek; François, Jean M

    2017-09-01

    Microbial ethanol production is an important alternative energy resource to replace fossil fuels, but at high level, this product is highly toxic, which hampers its efficient production. Towards increasing ethanol-tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the so far best industrial ethanol-producer, we evaluated an in vivo evolutionary engineering strategy based on batch selection under both constant (5%, v v-1) and gradually increasing (5-11.4%, v v-1) ethanol concentrations. Selection under increasing ethanol levels yielded evolved clones that could tolerate up to 12% (v v-1) ethanol and had cross-resistance to other stresses. Quite surprisingly, diploidization of the yeast population took place already at 7% (v v-1) ethanol level during evolutionary engineering, and this event was abolished by the loss of MKT1, a gene previously identified as being implicated in ethanol tolerance (Swinnen et al., Genome Res., 22, 975-984, 2012). Transcriptomic analysis confirmed diploidization of the evolved clones with strong down-regulation in mating process, and in several haploid-specific genes. We selected two clones exhibiting the highest viability on 12% ethanol, and found productivity and titer of ethanol significantly higher than those of the reference strain under aerated fed-batch cultivation conditions. This higher fermentation performance could be related with a higher abundance of glycolytic and ribosomal proteins and with a relatively lower respiratory capacity of the evolved strain, as revealed by a comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analysis between the evolved and the reference strains. Altogether, these results emphasize the efficiency of the in vivo evolutionary engineering strategy for improving ethanol tolerance, and the link between ethanol tolerance and diploidization. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Kozlowski, Tomasz [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Uddin, Rizwan [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Trinkle, Dallas [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Downar, Thoms [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); ang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabharwall, piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-25

    The DOE NEUP sponsored IRP on accident tolerant fuel (ATF) entitled Engineered Zircaloy Cladding Modifications for Improved Accident Tolerance of LWR Nuclear Fuel involved three academic institutions, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and ATI Materials (ATI). Detailed descriptions of the work at the University of Illinois (UIUC, prime), the University of Florida (UF), the University of Michigan (UMich), and INL are included in this document as separate sections. This summary provides a synopsis of the work performed across the IRP team. Two ATF solution pathways were initially proposed, coatings on monolithic Zr-based LWR cladding material and selfhealing modifications of Zr-based alloys. The coating pathway was extensively investigated, both experimentally and in computations. Experimental activities related to ATF coatings were centered at UIUC, UF, and UMich and involved coating development and testing, and ion irradiation. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic aspects of ATF coatings were the focus of computational work at UIUC and UMich, while materials science aspects were the focus of computational work at UF and INL. ATI provided monolithic Zircaloy 2 and 4 material and a binary Zr-Y alloy material. The selfhealing pathway was investigated with advanced computations only. Beryllium was identified as a valid self-healing additive early in this work. However, all attempts to fabricate a Zr-Be alloy failed. Several avenues of fabrication were explored. ATI ultimately declined our fabrication request over health concerns associated with Be (we note that Be was not part of the original work scope and the ATI SOW). Likewise, Ames Laboratory declined our fabrication request, citing known litigation dating to the 1980s and 1990s involving the U.S. Federal government and U.S. National Laboratory employees involving the use of Be. Materion (formerly, Brush Wellman) also declined our fabrication request, citing the difficulty in working with a highly reactive Zr and Be

  13. GmSALT3, which Confers Improved Soybean Salt Tolerance in the Field, Increases Leaf Cl– Exclusion prior to Na+ Exclusion but does not Improve Early Vigour under Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity reduces soybean growth and yield. The recently identified GmSALT3 (Glycine max salt Tolerance-associated gene on chromosome 3 has the potential to improve soybean yields in salinized conditions. To evaluate the impact of GmSALT3 on soybean performance under saline or non-saline conditions, three sets of near isogenic lines (NILs, with genetic similarity 95.6-99.3% between each pair of NIL-T and NIL-S, were generated from a cross between two varieties, 85-140 (salt-sensitive, S and Tiefeng 8 (salt-tolerant, T by using marker-assisted selection. Each NIL; 782-T, 820-T and 860-T, contained a common ~1000 kb fragment on chromosome 3 where GmSALT3 was located. We show that GmSALT3 does not contribute to an improvement in seedling emergence rate or early vigour under salt stress. However, when 12-day-old seedlings were exposed to NaCl stress, the NIL-T lines accumulated significantly less leaf Na+ compared with their corresponding NIL-S, while no significant difference of K+ concentration was observed between NIL-T and NIL-S; the magnitude of Na+ accumulation within each NIL-T set was influenced by the different genetic backgrounds. In addition, NIL-T lines accumulated less Cl– in the leaf and more in the root prior to any difference in Na+; in the field they accumulated less pod wall Cl– than the corresponding NIL-S lines. Under non-saline field conditions, no significant differences were observed for yield related traits within each pair of NIL-T and NIL-S lines, indicating there was no yield penalty for having the GmSALT3 gene. In contrast, under saline field conditions the NIL-T lines had significantly greater plant seed weight and 100-seed weight than the corresponding NIL-S lines, meaning GmSALT3 conferred a yield advantage to soybean plants in salinized fields. Our results indicated that GmSALT3 mediated regulation of both Na+ and Cl– accumulation in soybean, and contributes to improved soybean yield through maintaining a

  14. Simultaneous expression of abiotic stress responsive transcription factors, AtDREB2A, AtHB7 and AtABF3 improves salinity and drought tolerance in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittal Pruthvi

    Full Text Available Drought, salinity and extreme temperatures are the most common abiotic stresses, adversely affecting plant growth and productivity. Exposure of plants to stress activates stress signalling pathways that induce biochemical and physiological changes essential for stress acclimation. Stress tolerance is governed by multiple traits, and importance of a few traits in imparting tolerance has been demonstrated. Under drought, traits linked to water mining and water conservation, water use efficiency and cellular tolerance (CT to desiccation are considered to be relevant. In this study, an attempt has been made to improve CT in drought hardy crop, peanut (Arachis hypogaea L., cv. TMV2 by co-expressing stress-responsive transcription factors (TFs, AtDREB2A, AtHB7 and AtABF3, associated with downstream gene expression. Transgenic plants simultaneously expressing these TFs showed increased tolerance to drought, salinity and oxidative stresses compared to wild type, with an increase in total plant biomass. The transgenic plants exhibited improved membrane and chlorophyll stability due to enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging and osmotic adjustment by proline synthesis under stress. The improvement in stress tolerance in transgenic lines were associated with induced expression of various CT related genes like AhGlutaredoxin, AhAldehyde reductase, AhSerine threonine kinase like protein, AhRbx1, AhProline amino peptidase, AhHSP70, AhDIP and AhLea4. Taken together the results indicate that co-expression of stress responsive TFs can activate multiple CT pathways, and this strategy can be employed to improve abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

  15. Improvement of yeast tolerance to acetic acid through Haa1 transcription factor engineering: towards the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Steve; Henriques, Sílvia F; Shrestha, Ranjan; Ho, Ping-Wei; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Nevoigt, Elke

    2017-01-09

    Besides being a major regulator of the response to acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Haa1 is an important determinant of the tolerance to this acid. The engineering of Haa1 either by overexpression or mutagenesis has therefore been considered to be a promising avenue towards the construction of more robust strains with improved acetic acid tolerance. By applying the concept of global transcription machinery engineering to the regulon-specific transcription factor Haa1, a mutant allele containing two point mutations could be selected that resulted in a significantly higher acetic acid tolerance as compared to the wild-type allele. The level of improvement obtained was comparable to the level obtained by overexpression of HAA1, which was achieved by introduction of a second copy of the native HAA1 gene. Dissection of the contribution of the two point mutations to the phenotype showed that the major improvement was caused by an amino acid exchange at position 135 (serine to phenylalanine). In order to further study the mechanisms underlying the tolerance phenotype, Haa1 translocation and transcriptional activation of Haa1 target genes was compared between Haa1 mutant, overproduction and wild-type strains. While the rapid Haa1 translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to acetic acid was not affected in the Haa1 S135F mutant strain, the levels of transcriptional activation of four selected Haa1-target genes by acetic acid were significantly higher in cells of the mutant strain as compared to cells of the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the time-course of transcriptional activation in response to acetic acid was comparable for the mutant and wild-type strain whereas the maximum mRNA levels obtained correlate with each strain's tolerance level. Our data confirms that engineering of the regulon-specific transcription factor Haa1 allows the improvement of acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae. It was also shown that the

  16. Improved ethanol tolerance and ethanol production from glycerol in a streptomycin-resistant Klebsiella variicola mutant obtained by ribosome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshihiro; Seta, Kohei; Nishikawa, Chiaki; Hara, Eri; Shigeno, Toshiya; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    To improve the ethanol tolerance of the Klebsiella variicola strain TB-83, we obtained the streptomycin-resistant, ethanol-tolerant mutant strain TB-83D by a ribosome engineering approach. Strain TB-83D was able to grow in the presence of 7% (v/v) ethanol and it showed higher ethanol production than strain TB-83. Examination of various culture conditions revealed that yeast extract was essential for ethanol production and bacterial growth. In addition, ethanol production was elevated to 32g/L by the addition of yeast extract; however, ethanol production was inhibited by formate accumulation. With regard to cost reduction, the use of corn steep liquor (CSL) markedly decreased the formate concentration, and 34g/L ethanol was produced by combining yeast extract with CSL. Our study is the first to improve ethanol tolerance and productivity by a ribosome engineering approach, and we found that strain TB-83D is effective for ethanol production from glycerol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. PnLRR-RLK27, a novel leucine-rich repeats receptor-like protein kinase from the Antarctic moss Pohlia nutans, positively regulates salinity and oxidation-stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeats receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs play important roles in plant growth and development as well as stress responses. Here, 56 LRR-RLK genes were identified in the Antarctic moss Pohlia nutans transcriptome, which were further classified into 11 subgroups based on their extracellular domain. Of them, PnLRR-RLK27 belongs to the LRR II subgroup and its expression was significantly induced by abiotic stresses. Subcellular localization analysis showed that PnLRR-RLK27 was a plasma membrane protein. The overexpression of PnLRR-RLK27 in Physcomitrella significantly enhanced the salinity and ABA tolerance in their gametophyte growth. Similarly, PnLRR-RLK27 heterologous expression in Arabidopsis increased the salinity and ABA tolerance in their seed germination and early root growth as well as the tolerance to oxidative stress. PnLRR-RLK27 overproduction in these transgenic plants increased the expression of salt stress/ABA-related genes. Furthermore, PnLRR-RLK27 increased the activities of reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers and reduced the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and ROS. Taken together, these results suggested that PnLRR-RLK27 as a signaling regulator confer abiotic stress response associated with the regulation of the stress- and ABA-mediated signaling network.

  18. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine leads to increased tolerance of photosynthesis to salt stress in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghong; Liang, Zheng; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) with the ability to synthesis glycinebetaine (GB) in chloroplasts was established by introducing the BADH gene for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). The genetic engineering resulted in enhanced tolerance of growth of young seedlings to salt stress. This increased tolerance was not due to improved water status, since there were no significant differences in accumulation of sodium and chloride, leaf water potential, and relative water content between wild type and transgenic plants under salt stress. Salt stress resulted in a decrease in CO2 assimilation and such a decrease was much greater in wild type plants than in transgenic plants. Though salt stress showed no damage to PSII, there were a decrease in the maximal PSII electron transport rate in vivo and an increase in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and these changes were greater in wild type plants than in transgenic plants. In addition, salt stress inhibited the activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and phosphoribulokinase and such a decrease was also greater in wild type plants than in transgenic plants, suggesting that GB protects these enzymes against salt stress. However, there were no significant changes in the activities of phosphoglycerate kinase, triose phosphate isomerase, ribulose-5-phosphate isomerase, transketolase, and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase in both wild type and transgenic plants. The results in this study suggest that enhanced tolerance of CO2 assimilation to salt stress may be one of physiological bases for increased tolerance of growth of transgenic plants to salt stress.

  19. Engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Includes papers in the following fields: Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical...

  20. Regulation of cation transporter genes by the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in rice plants subjected to salinity suggests improved salt tolerance due to reduced Na(+) root-to-shoot distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Rosa; Aroca, Ricardo; Azcon, Rosario; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Rice is a salt-sensitive crop whose productivity is strongly reduced by salinity around the world. Plants growing in saline soils are subjected to the toxicity of specific ions such as sodium, which damage cell organelles and disrupt metabolism. Plants have evolved biochemical and molecular mechanisms to cope with the negative effects of salinity. These include the regulation of genes with a role in the uptake, transport or compartmentation of Na(+) and/or K(+). Studies have shown that the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alleviates salt stress in several host plant species. However, despite the abundant literature showing mitigation of ionic imbalance by the AM symbiosis, the molecular mechanisms involved are barely explored. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of the AM symbiosis on the expression of several well-known rice transporters involved in Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis and measure Na(+) and K(+) contents and their ratios in different plant tissues. Results showed that OsNHX3, OsSOS1, OsHKT2;1 and OsHKT1;5 genes were considerably upregulated in AM plants under saline conditions as compared to non-AM plants. Results suggest that the AM symbiosis favours Na(+) extrusion from the cytoplasm, its sequestration into the vacuole, the unloading of Na(+) from the xylem and its recirculation from photosynthetic organs to roots. As a result, there is a decrease of Na(+) root-to-shoot distribution and an increase of Na(+) accumulation in rice roots which seems to enhance the plant tolerance to salinity and allows AM rice plants to maintain their growing processes under salt conditions.

  1. A Soft Sensor-Based Fault-Tolerant Control on the Air Fuel Ratio of Spark-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Zhai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air/fuel ratio (AFR regulation for spark-ignition (SI engines has been an essential and challenging control problem for engineers in the automotive industry. The feed-forward and feedback scheme has been investigated in both academic research and industrial application. The aging effect can often cause an AFR sensor fault in the feedback loop, and the AFR control performance will degrade consequently. In this research, a new control scheme on AFR with fault-tolerance is proposed by using an artificial neural network model based on fault detection and compensation, which can provide the satisfactory AFR regulation performance at the stoichiometric value for the combustion process, given a certain level of misreading of the AFR sensor.

  2. Phytosiderophore release by wheat genotypes differing in zinc deficiency tolerance grown with Zn-free nutrient solution as affected by salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshbakhsh, Bahareh; Khoshgoftarmanesh, Amir Hossein; Shariatmadari, Hossein; Cakmak, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information concerning the effect of salinity on phytosiderophores exudation from wheat roots. The aim of this hydroponic experiment was to investigate the effect of salinity on phytosiderophore release by roots of three bread wheat genotypes differing in Zn efficiency (Triticum aestivum L. cvs. Rushan, Kavir, and Cross) under Zn deficiency conditions. Wheat seedlings were transferred to Zn-free nutrient solutions and exposed to three salinity levels (0, 60, and 120 mM NaCl). The results indicated that Cross and Rushan genotypes exuded more phytosiderophore than did the Kavir genotype. Our findings suggest that the adaptive capacity of Zn-efficient 'Cross' and 'Rushan' wheat genotypes to Zn deficiency is due partly to the higher amounts of phytosiderophore release. Only 15 days of Zn deficiency stress was sufficient to distinguish between Zn-efficient (Rushan and Cross) and Zn-inefficient (Kavir) genotypes, with the former genotypes exuding more phytosiderophore than the latter. Higher phytosiderophore exudation under Zn deficiency conditions was accompanied by greater Fe transport from root to shoot. The maximum amount of phytosiderophore was exuded at the third week in 'Cross' and at the fourth week in 'Kavir' and 'Rushan'. For all three wheat genotypes, salinity stress resulted in higher amounts of phytosiderophore exuded by the roots. In general, for 'Kavir', the largest amount of phytosiderophore was exuded from the roots at the highest salinity level (120mM NaCl), while for 'Cross' and 'Rushan', no significant difference was found in phytosiderophore exudation between the 60 and 120 mM NaCl treatments. More investigation is needed to fully understand the physiology of elevated phytosiderophore release by Zn-deficient wheat plants under salinity conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic diversity analysis of salinity related germplasm in cotton

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Zhang; Wuwei Ye; Junjuan Wang; Baoxiang Fan; Delong Wang

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the genetic variation of salinity related cotton germplasm, 47 upland cotton accessions including 23 salinity tolerant materials and 24 salinity sensitive materials were explored using 88 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. We detected a total of 338 alleles at 88 SSR loci with an average of 3.841 alleles per locus, 333 of these alleles were detected in salinity tolerant germplasm and 312 alleles in salinity sensitive germplasm. Mean polymorphism information content (PIC),...

  4. GsAPK, an ABA-activated and calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase from G. soja, mediates the regulation of plant tolerance to salinity and ABA stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Ji, Wei; Gao, Peng; Li, Yong; Cai, Hua; Bai, Xi; Chen, Qin; Zhu, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Plant Snf1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1) related protein kinase (SnRK), a subfamily of serine/threonine kinases, has been implicated as a crucial upstream regulator of ABA and osmotic signaling as in many other signaling cascades. In this paper, we have isolated a novel plant specific ABA activated calcium independent protein kinase (GsAPK) from a highly salt tolerant plant, Glycine soja (50109), which is a member of the SnRK2 family. Subcellular localization studies using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsAPK is localized in the plasma membrane. We found that autophosphorylation and Myelin Basis Protein phosphorylation activity of GsAPK is only activated by ABA and the kinase activity also was observed when calcium was replaced by EGTA, suggesting its independence of calcium in enzyme activity. We also found that cold, salinity, drought, and ABA stress alter GsAPK gene transcripts and heterogonous overexpression of GsAPK in Arabidopsis alters plant tolerance to high salinity and ABA stress. In summary, we demonstrated that GsAPK is a Glycine soja ABA activated calcium independent SnRK-type kinase presumably involved in ABA mediated stress signal transduction.

  5. GsAPK, an ABA-activated and calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase from G. soja, mediates the regulation of plant tolerance to salinity and ABA stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yang

    Full Text Available Plant Snf1 (sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase (SnRK, a subfamily of serine/threonine kinases, has been implicated as a crucial upstream regulator of ABA and osmotic signaling as in many other signaling cascades. In this paper, we have isolated a novel plant specific ABA activated calcium independent protein kinase (GsAPK from a highly salt tolerant plant, Glycine soja (50109, which is a member of the SnRK2 family. Subcellular localization studies using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsAPK is localized in the plasma membrane. We found that autophosphorylation and Myelin Basis Protein phosphorylation activity of GsAPK is only activated by ABA and the kinase activity also was observed when calcium was replaced by EGTA, suggesting its independence of calcium in enzyme activity. We also found that cold, salinity, drought, and ABA stress alter GsAPK gene transcripts and heterogonous overexpression of GsAPK in Arabidopsis alters plant tolerance to high salinity and ABA stress. In summary, we demonstrated that GsAPK is a Glycine soja ABA activated calcium independent SnRK-type kinase presumably involved in ABA mediated stress signal transduction.

  6. Engineering improved bio-jet fuel tolerance in Escherichia coli using a transgenic library from the hydrocarbon-degrader Marinobacter aquaeolei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Timothy A; Dunlop, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Recent metabolic engineering efforts have generated microorganisms that can produce biofuels, including bio-jet fuels, however these fuels are often toxic to cells, limiting production yields. There are natural examples of microorganisms that have evolved mechanisms for tolerating hydrocarbon-rich environments, such as those that thrive near natural oil seeps and in oil-polluted waters. Using genomic DNA from the hydrocarbon-degrading microbe Marinobacter aquaeolei, we constructed a transgenic library that we expressed in Escherichia coli. We exposed cells to inhibitory levels of pinene, a monoterpene that can serve as a jet fuel precursor with chemical properties similar to existing tactical fuels. Using a sequential strategy with a fosmid library followed by a plasmid library, we were able to isolate a region of DNA from the M. aquaeolei genome that conferred pinene tolerance when expressed in E. coli. We determined that a single gene, yceI, was responsible for the tolerance improvements. Overexpression of this gene placed no additional burden on the host. We also tested tolerance to other monoterpenes and showed that yceI selectively improves tolerance. The genomes of hydrocarbon-tolerant microbes represent a rich resource for tolerance engineering. Using a transgenic library, we were able to identify a single gene that improves E. coli's tolerance to the bio-jet fuel precursor pinene.

  7. Indicators: Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinity is the dissolved salt content of a body of water. Excess salinity, due to evaporation, water withdrawal, wastewater discharge, and other sources, is a chemical sterssor that can be toxic for aquatic environments.

  8. Screening and Integration Analysis of OsDREB1A BC4F2 and BC5F1 Generations of Transgenic Ciherang Rice (Oryza sativa L. for High-Salinity Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dika Migi Priyono

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of a number of abiotic stresses that threaten rice production in Indonesia. To support food security programs, BB-Biogen has developed rice lines derived from OsDREB1A transformed Ciherang up to BC4F2 and BC5F1 generations. To verify the salinity tolerance and the stability of transgene integration, the BC4F2 and BC5F1 generations of Ciherang-OsDREB1A transgenic were screened to select high-salinity tolerant lines. Second, molecular analysis using the primers hptII-F/hptII-R and 35S-496-F/OsDREB1A-R was conducted to identify the existence and the stability of the transgene integration in the BC4F2 and BC5F1 generations. Screening 543 BC4F2 and BC5F1 Ciherang-OsDREB1A transgenic lines in a nutrient solution with a final electrical conductivity (EC of approximately 18 mS/cm for 26 days yielded 134 putative transgenic plants. Integration analysis using the hptII-F/hptII-R primers showed that 73 of the 134 putative transgenic plants had positive PCR products, indicating the presence of the transgene in those plants. All the 73 plants also produced PCR products when tested with the specific primer 35S-496- F/OsDREB1A-R, indicating that transgene integration was maintained during the development of BC4F2 and BC5F1.

  9. System-Level Development of Fault-Tolerant Distributed Aero-Engine Control Architecture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's vision for an "intelligent engine" will be realized with the development of a truly distributed control system and reliable smart transducer node components;...

  10. Modeling a Sustainable Salt Tolerant Grass-Livestock Production System under Saline Conditions in the Western San Joaquin Valley of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Kaffka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Salinity and trace mineral accumulation threaten the sustainability of crop production in many semi-arid parts of the world, including California’s western San Joaquin Valley (WSJV. We used data from a multi-year field-scale trial in Kings County and related container trials to simulate a forage-grazing system under saline conditions. The model uses rainfall and irrigation water amounts, irrigation water quality, soil, plant, and atmospheric variables to predict Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers. growth, quality, and use by cattle. Simulations based on field measurements and a related container study indicate that although soil chemical composition is affected by irrigation water quality, irrigation timing and frequency can be used to mitigate salt and trace mineral accumulation. Bermuda grass yields of up to 12 Mg dry matter (DM·ha−1 were observed at the field site and predicted by the model. Forage yield and quality supports un-supplemented cattle stocking rates of 1.0 to 1.2 animal units (AU·ha−1. However, a balance must be achieved between stocking rate, desired average daily gain, accumulation of salts in the soil profile, and potential pollution of ground water from drainage and leaching. Using available weather data, crop-specific parameter values and field scale measurements of soil salinity and nitrogen levels, the model can be used by farmers growing forages on saline soils elsewhere, to sustain forage and livestock production under similarly marginal conditions.

  11. The Effects of Manufacturing Tolerances on the Vibration of Aero-engine Rotor-damper Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J. E. H.; Holmes, R.

    1991-01-01

    A range of rotor assemblies incorporating one and two squeeze film dampers with various static misalignments is investigated. Waterfall diagrams are constructed which demonstrate the effects of such misalignment and damper support flexibility on the nature and severity of subsynchronous resonance and jump phenomena. Vibration signatures of similar rotor-bearing assemblies are shown to contrast strongly due to different accumulations of tolerances during manufacture, fitting, and operation.

  12. Engineering carpel-specific cold stress tolerance: a case study in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artlip, Timothy S; Wisniewski, Michael E; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Bassett, Carole L

    2016-08-01

    Climate change predictions forecast an increase in early spring frosts that could result in severe damage to perennial crops. For example, the Easter freeze of April 2007 left several states in the United States reporting a complete loss of that year's peach crop. The most susceptible organ to early frost damage in fruit trees is the carpel, particularly during bloom opening. In this study, we explored the use of a carpel-specific promoter (ZPT2-10) from petunia (Petunia hybrida var. Mitchell) to drive expression of the peach dehydrin PpDhn1. In peach, this gene is exceptionally responsive to low temperature but has not been observed to be expressed in carpels. This study examined carpel-specific properties of a petunia promoter driving the expression of the GUS gene (uidA) in transgenic Arabidopsis flowers and developed a carpel-specific ion leakage test to assess freezing tolerance. A homozygous Arabidopsis line (line 1-20) carrying the petunia ZPT2-10 promoter::PpDhn1 construct was obtained and freezing tolerance in the transgenic line was compared with an untransformed control. Overexpression of PpDhn1 in line 1-20 provided as much as a 1.9°C increase in carpel freezing tolerance as measured by electrolyte leakage. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  13. Inoculation of Soil with Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria Producing 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase or Expression of the Corresponding acdS Gene in Transgenic Plants Increases Salinity Tolerance in Camelina sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarian, Zohreh; Yu, Min; Gruber, Margaret; Glick, Bernard R; Zhou, Rong; Hegedus, Dwayne D

    2016-01-01

    Camelina sativa (camelina) is an oilseed crop touted for use on marginal lands; however, it is no more tolerant of soil salinity than traditional crops, such as canola. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) that produce 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACC deaminase) facilitate plant growth in the presence of abiotic stresses by reducing stress ethylene. Rhizospheric and endophytic PGPB and the corresponding acdS- mutants of the latter were examined for their ability to enhance tolerance to salt in camelina. Stimulation of growth and tolerance to salt was correlated with ACC deaminase production. Inoculation of soil with wild-type PGPB led to increased shoot length in the absence of salt, and increased seed production by approximately 30-50% under moderately saline conditions. The effect of ACC deaminase was further examined in transgenic camelina expressing a bacterial gene encoding ACC deaminase (acdS) under the regulation of the CaMV 35S promoter or the root-specific rolD promoter. Lines expressing acdS, in particular those using the rolD promoter, showed less decline in root length and weight, increased seed production, better seed quality and higher levels of seed oil production under salt stress. This study clearly demonstrates the potential benefit of using either PGPB that produce ACC deaminase or transgenic plants expressing the acdS gene under the control of a root-specific promoter to facilitate plant growth, seed production and seed quality on land that is not normally suitable for the majority of crops due to high salt content.

  14. Inoculation of soil with plant growth promoting bacteria producing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase or expression the corresponding acdS gene in transgenic plants increases salinity tolerance in Camelina sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Heydarian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Camelina sativa (camelina is an oilseed crop touted for use on marginal lands; however, it is no more tolerant of soil salinity than traditional crops, such as canola. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB that produce 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACC deaminase facilitate plant growth in the presence of abiotic stresses by reducing stress ethylene. Rhizospheric and endophytic PGPB and the corresponding acdS- mutants of the latter were examined for their ability to enhance tolerance to salt in camelina. Stimulation of growth and tolerance to salt was correlated with ACC deaminase production. Inoculation of soil with wild-type PGPB led to increased shoot length in the absence of salt, and increased seed production by approximately 30-50 percent under moderately saline conditions. The effect of ACC deaminase was further examined in transgenic camelina expressing a bacterial gene encoding ACC deaminase (acdS under the regulation of the CaMV 35S promoter or the root-specific rolD promoter. Lines expressing acdS, in particular those using the rolD promoter, showed less decline in root length and weight, increased seed production, better seed quality and higher levels of seed oil production under salt stress. This study clearly demonstrates the potential benefit of using either PGPB that produce ACC deaminase or transgenic plants expressing the acdS gene under the control of a root-specific promoter to facilitate plant growth, seed production and seed quality on land that is not normally suitable for the majority of crops due to high salt content.

  15. Comparative genome analysis of a thermotolerant Escherichia coli obtained by Genome Replication Engineering Assisted Continuous Evolution (GREACE) and its parent strain provides new understanding of microbial heat tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Guodong; Bao, Guanhui; Lin, Zhao; Li, Yang; Chen, Zugen; Li, Yin; Cai, Zhen

    2015-12-25

    Heat tolerance of microbes is of great importance for efficient biorefinery and bioconversion. However, engineering and understanding of microbial heat tolerance are difficult and insufficient because it is a complex physiological trait which probably correlates with all gene functions, genetic regulations, and cellular metabolisms and activities. In this work, a novel strain engineering approach named Genome Replication Engineering Assisted Continuous Evolution (GREACE) was employed to improve the heat tolerance of Escherichia coli. When the E. coli strain carrying a mutator was cultivated under gradually increasing temperature, genome-wide mutations were continuously generated during genome replication and the mutated strains with improved thermotolerance were autonomously selected. A thermotolerant strain HR50 capable of growing at 50°C on LB agar plate was obtained within two months, demonstrating the efficiency of GREACE in improving such a complex physiological trait. To understand the improved heat tolerance, genomes of HR50 and its wildtype strain DH5α were sequenced. Evenly distributed 361 mutations covering all mutation types were found in HR50. Closed material transportations, loose genome conformation, and possibly altered cell wall structure and transcription pattern were the main differences of HR50 compared with DH5α, which were speculated to be responsible for the improved heat tolerance. This work not only expanding our understanding of microbial heat tolerance, but also emphasizing that the in vivo continuous genome mutagenesis method, GREACE, is efficient in improving microbial complex physiological trait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Salinity ranges of some southern African fish species occurring in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recorded salinity ranges of 96 fish species occurring in southern African estuaries are documented. Factors influen- cing the tolerance of fishes to low and high salinity regimes are discussed, with most species tolerant of low rather than high salinity conditions. This is important since most systems are subject to periodic ...

  17. Re-Tooling the Agency's Engineering Predictive Practices for Durability and Damage Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Agency has placed less emphasis on testing and has increasingly relied on computational methods to assess durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) behavior when evaluating design margins for fracture-critical components. With increased emphasis on computational D&DT methods as the standard practice, it is paramount that capabilities of these methods are understood, the methods are used within their technical limits, and validation by well-designed tests confirms understanding. The D&DT performance of a component is highly dependent on parameters in the neighborhood of the damage. This report discusses D&DT method vulnerabilities.

  18. Salinity tolerance of Dodonaea viscosa L. inoculated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria: assessed based on seed germination and seedling growth characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefi Sonia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate the potential of different strains of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR to reduce the effects of salinity stress on the medicinal hopbush plant. The bacterium factor was applied at five levels (non-inoculated, inoculated by Pseudomonas putida, Azospirillum lipoferum + Pseudomonas putida, Azotobacter chroococcum + Pseudomonas putida, and Azospirillum lipoferum + Azotobacter chroococcum + Pseudomonas putida, and the salinity stress at six levels: 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 50 dS m-1. The results revealed that Pseudomonas putida showed maximal germination percentage and rate at 20 dS m-1 (18.33% and 0.35 seed per day, respectively. The strongest effect among the treatments was obtained with the treatment combining the given 3 bacteria at 15 dS m-1 salinity stress. This treatment increased the root fresh and dry weights by 31% and 87.5%, respectively (compared to the control. Our results indicate that these bacteria applied on hopbush affected positively both its germination and root growth. The plant compatibility with the three bacteria was found good, and the treatments combining Pseudomonas putida with the other one or two bacteria discussed in this study can be applied in nurseries in order to restore and extend the area of hopbush forests and akin dry stands.

  19. Isolation and characterization of endophytic plant growth-promoting bacteria from date palm tree (Phoenix dactylifera L.) and their potential role in salinity tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Mahmoud W; Antony, Irin; Glick, Bernard R

    2015-06-01

    Endophytic bacteria were isolated from date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) seedling roots, characterized and tested for their ability to help plants grow under saline conditions. Molecular characterization showed that the majority of these strains belonged to the genera Bacillus and Enterobacter and had different degrees of resistance to various antibiotics. Some of these strains were able to produce the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase and the plant growth regulatory hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Some strains were also able to chelate ferric iron (Fe(3+)) and solubilize potassium (K(+)), phosphorus (PO 4 (3-) ) and zinc (Zn(2+)), and produce ammonia. The results also showed that ACC deaminase activity and IAA production was slightly increased in some strains in response to an increase in NaCl concentration in the growth media. Consistent with these results, selected strains such as PD-R6 (Paenibacillus xylanexedens) and PD-P6 (Enterobacter cloacae) were able to enhance canola root elongation when grown under normal and saline conditions as demonstrated by a gnotobiotic root elongation assay. These results suggest that the isolated and characterized endophytic bacteria can alter ethylene and IAA levels and also facilitate nutrient uptake in roots and therefore have the potential role to promote the growth and development of date palm trees growing under salinity stress.

  20. 76 FR 5780 - Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... movement, or release into the environment) of organisms and products altered or produced through genetic... connection with its determination. The regulations in 7 CFR part 340, ``Introduction of Organisms and... engineered (GE) organisms and products are considered ``regulated articles.'' The regulations in Sec. 340.6(a...

  1. Engineering tolerance using biomaterials to target and control antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostanoski, Lisa H; Gosselin, Emily A; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when cells of the adaptive immune system incorrectly recognize and attack "self" tissues. Importantly, the proliferation and differentiation of these cells is triggered and controlled by interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells. Thus, modulating the signals transduced by APCs (e.g., cytokines, costimulatory surface proteins) has emerged as a promising strategy to promote tolerance for diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and lupus. However, many approaches have been hindered by non-specific activity of immunosuppressive or immunoregulatory cues, following systemic administration of soluble factors via traditional injections routes (e.g., subcutaneous, intravenous). Biomaterials offer a unique opportunity to control the delivery of tolerogenic signals in vivo via properties such as controlled particle size, tunable release kinetics, and co-delivery of multiple classes of cargo. In this review, we highlight recent reports that exploit these properties of biomaterials to target APCs and promote tolerance via three strategies, i) passive or active targeting of particulate carriers to APCs, ii) biomaterial-mediated control over antigen localization and processing, and iii) targeted delivery of encapsulated or adsorbed immunomodulatory signals. These reports represent exciting advances toward the goal of more effective therapies for autoimmune diseases, without the broad suppressive effects associated with current clinically-approved therapies.

  2. Harnessing biomaterials to engineer the lymph node microenvironment for immunity or tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorko, James I; Hess, Krystina L; Jewell, Christopher M

    2015-03-01

    Nanoparticles, microparticles, and other biomaterials are advantageous in vaccination because these materials provide opportunities to modulate specific characteristics of immune responses. This idea of "tuning" immune responses has recently been used to combat infectious diseases and cancer, and to induce tolerance during organ transplants or autoimmune disease. Lymph nodes and other secondary lymphoid organs such as the spleen play crucial roles in determining if and how these responses develop following vaccination or immunotherapy. Thus, by manipulating the local microenvironments within these immunological command centers, the nature of systemic immune response can be controlled. This review provides recent examples that harness the interactions between biomaterials and lymph nodes or other secondary lymphoid organs to generate immunity or promote tolerance. These strategies draw on mechanical properties, surface chemistry, stability, and targeting to alter the interactions of cells, signals, and vaccine components in lymph nodes. While there are still many unanswered questions surrounding how best to design biomaterial-based vaccines to promote specific structures or functions in lymph nodes, features such as controlled release and targeting will help pave the way for the next generation of vaccines and immunotherapies that generate immune responses tuned for specific applications.

  3. The study of nutritional management of mother plant and seed priming by biofertilizers on improve salinity tolerance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sayonz at germination period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R Fallahi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the important factors that reduce the growth and yield of crops in Iran; however, determining appropriate methods for reducing its negative effects is important. In order to study the effects of nutritional condition of mother plant and bacterial biofertilizers seed priming on germination indices of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., in salinity condition, an experiment was conducted during 2009 at Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. This experiment was conducted as factorial layout based on randomized complete block design with three replications. Studied factors consisted of: four levels of nitrogen fertilizer applied on mother plant in field (0, 55, 110 and165 Nitrogen kg.ha-1, seed priming by three types of biofertilizers (Nitrajin, Biophosphouros and distillated water and four levels of salinity stress (0, -0.4, -0.8 and -1.2 MPa. Results indicated that the seed priming with biofertilizers had a positive effect on germination indices of wheat. The maximum radicle number per seedling (2.39, radical length (5.34 cm and plumule length (3.56 cm were observed in seed primed by Nitrajin biofertilizer and the minimum of those characteristics were shown in control. In addition, the lowest and highest mean germination time were obtained in seed priming by Biophosphouros (2.89 day and control (3.42 day, respectively. The highest germination indices were obtained at 55 and 110 kg.ha-1 Nitrogen. The maximum germination rate (2.59.day-1, number of radicle per seedling (2.34, radical length (5.75 cm and mean weight of radical (0.0022 g were obtained in seeds that were treated by 55 kg.ha-1 nitrogen on mother plant. So, all factors related to germination and growth seedling were decreased by increasing salinity stress. Over all, results indicated that use of 55-110 kg.ha-1 nitrogen with bacterial biofertilizers seed priming can improve germination indices under salinity stress conditions.

  4. Enhancing E. coli tolerance towards oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Basak

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage to microbial hosts often occurs under stressful conditions during bioprocessing. Classical strain engineering approaches are usually both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here, we aim to improve E. coli performance under oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP, which can directly or indirectly regulate redox-sensing regulators SoxR and OxyR, and other ~400 genes in E. coli. Error-prone PCR technique was employed to introduce modifications to CRP, and three mutants (OM1~OM3 were identified with improved tolerance via H(2O(2 enrichment selection. The best mutant OM3 could grow in 12 mM H(2O(2 with the growth rate of 0.6 h(-1, whereas the growth of wild type was completely inhibited at this H(2O(2 concentration. OM3 also elicited enhanced thermotolerance at 48°C as well as resistance against cumene hydroperoxide. The investigation about intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, which determines cell viability, indicated that the accumulation of ROS in OM3 was always lower than in WT with or without H(2O(2 treatment. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis has shown not only CRP-regulated genes have demonstrated great transcriptional level changes (up to 8.9-fold, but also RpoS- and OxyR-regulated genes (up to 7.7-fold. qRT-PCR data and enzyme activity assay suggested that catalase (katE could be a major antioxidant enzyme in OM3 instead of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase or superoxide dismutase. To our knowledge, this is the first work on improving E. coli oxidative stress resistance by reframing its transcription machinery through its native global regulator. The positive outcome of this approach may suggest that engineering CRP can be successfully implemented as an efficient strain engineering alternative for E. coli.

  5. Pleiotropic phenotypes of the salt-tolerant and cytosine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. centromeric DNA; DNA hypomethylation; drought tolerance; epigenetic regulation; gene expression changes; microRNA; plant development; ribosomal DNA; salinity tolerance; terpenoid indole alkaloids.

  6. The tolerance to salinity and nutrient supply in four European Bolboschoenus species (B. maritimus, B. laticarpus, B. planiculmis and B. yagara) affects their vulnerability or expansiveness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hroudová, Zdenka; Zákravský, Petr; Flegrová, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 112, Jan. 2014 (2014), s. 66-75 ISSN 0304-3770 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6005905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : halophytes * stress tolerance * wetlands Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2014

  7. Assessment of variation in antioxidative defense system in salt-treated pea (Pisum sativum) cultivars and its putative use as salinity tolerance markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Zahra; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2009-11-01

    The present work describes whether the changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the levels of some non-enzymatic antioxidants could be used as markers of salt tolerance in nine genetically diverse pea (Pisum sativum) cultivars. All cultivars were exposed to four levels of NaCl i.e., 0, 40, 80 and 120mM in sand culture. Plant fresh biomass, total phenolics, total soluble proteins, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) in leaves while different forms of tocopherols (alpha-, gamma- and Delta-tocopherol) in fresh seed of salt-stressed and non-stressed plants were analyzed. On the basis of percent inhibition in shoot biomass at the highest salt level (120mM) cultivars 2001-35, 2001-55 and Climax were ranked as tolerant (percent inhibition less than 60%), 2001-20, 9800-5 and 9800-10 moderately tolerant (percent inhibition 60-70%), and 2001-40, 9200 and Tere 2 salt sensitive (percent inhibition more than 70%). Salt stress markedly enhanced the activities of SOD and POD, levels of total phenolics and gamma- and Delta-tocopherols, and decreased the total soluble proteins and CAT activity, while the internal levels of H(2)O(2) remained unaffected in all pea cultivars. Although salt-induced oxidative stress occurred in all pea cultivars, the response of salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive cultivars with respect to the generation of enzymatic and non-enzymatic metabolites measured in the present study was not consistent. Of different antioxidant enzymes and metabolites analyzed, only CAT activity was found to be a reliable marker of salt tolerance in the set of pea cultivars examined.

  8. Enhancing the stress tolerance and virulence of an entomopathogen by metabolic engineering of dihydroxynaphthalene melanin biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min N; Chung, Pei C; Tzean, Shean S

    2011-07-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have been used for biocontrol of insect pests for many decades. However, the efficacy of such fungi in field trials is often inconsistent, mainly due to environmental stresses, such as UV radiation, temperature extremes, and desiccation. To circumvent these hurdles, metabolic engineering of dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin biosynthetic genes (polyketide synthase, scytalone dehydratase, and 1,3,8-trihydroxynaphthalene reductase genes) cloned from Alternaria alternata were transformed into the amelanotic entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Melanin expression in the transformant of M. anisopliae was verified by spectrophotometric methods, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), and confocal microscopy. The transformant, especially under stresses, showed notably enhanced antistress capacity and virulence, in terms of germination and survival rate, infectivity, and reduced median time to death (LT50) in killing diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) larvae compared with the wild type. The possible mechanisms in enhancing the stress tolerance and virulence, and the significance and potential for engineering melanin biosynthesis genes in other biocontrol agents and crops to improve antistress fitness are discussed.

  9. Enhancing the Stress Tolerance and Virulence of an Entomopathogen by Metabolic Engineering of Dihydroxynaphthalene Melanin Biosynthesis Genes ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min N.; Chung, Pei C.; Tzean, Shean S.

    2011-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have been used for biocontrol of insect pests for many decades. However, the efficacy of such fungi in field trials is often inconsistent, mainly due to environmental stresses, such as UV radiation, temperature extremes, and desiccation. To circumvent these hurdles, metabolic engineering of dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin biosynthetic genes (polyketide synthase, scytalone dehydratase, and 1,3,8-trihydroxynaphthalene reductase genes) cloned from Alternaria alternata were transformed into the amelanotic entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Melanin expression in the transformant of M. anisopliae was verified by spectrophotometric methods, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), and confocal microscopy. The transformant, especially under stresses, showed notably enhanced antistress capacity and virulence, in terms of germination and survival rate, infectivity, and reduced median time to death (LT50) in killing diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) larvae compared with the wild type. The possible mechanisms in enhancing the stress tolerance and virulence, and the significance and potential for engineering melanin biosynthesis genes in other biocontrol agents and crops to improve antistress fitness are discussed. PMID:21571888

  10. Phloem sap proteome studied by iTRAQ provides integrated insight into salinity response mechanisms in cucumber plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huaifu; Xu, Yanli; Du, Changxia; Wu, Xue

    2015-07-01

    Cucumber is an economically important crop as well as a model system for plant vascular biology. Salinity is one of the major environmental factors limiting plant growth. Here, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics approach for comparative analysis of protein abundances in cucumber phloem sap in response to salt. A total of 745 distinct proteins were identified and 111 proteins were differentially expressed upon salinity in sensitive and tolerant cultivars, of which 69 and 65 proteins changed significantly in sensitive and tolerant cultivars, respectively. A bioinformatics analysis indicated that cucumber phloem employed a combination of induced metabolism, protein turnover, common stress response, energy and transport, signal transduction and regulation of transcription, and development proteins as protection mechanisms against salinity. The proteins that were mapped to the carbon fixation pathway decreased in abundance in sensitive cultivars and had no change in tolerant cultivars under salt stress, suggesting that this pathway may promote salt tolerance by stabilizing carbon fixation and maintaining the essential energy and carbohydrates in tolerant cultivars. This study leads to a better understanding of the salinity mechanism in cucumber phloem and provides a list of potential gene targets for the further engineering of salt tolerance in plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 Cysteine-2/Histidine-2 Repressor-Like Transcription Factor Regulates Development and Tolerance to Salinity in Tomato and Arabidopsis1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hichri, Imène; Muhovski, Yordan; Žižková, Eva; Dobrev, Petre I.; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Solano, Roberto; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Motyka, Vaclav; Lutts, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    The zinc finger superfamily includes transcription factors that regulate multiple aspects of plant development and were recently shown to regulate abiotic stress tolerance. Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 [SIZF2]) is a cysteine-2/histidine-2-type zinc finger transcription factor bearing an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression domain and binding to the ACGTCAGTG sequence containing two AGT core motifs. SlZF2 is ubiquitously expressed during plant development, and is rapidly induced by sodium chloride, drought, and potassium chloride treatments. Its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato impaired development and influenced leaf and flower shape, while causing a general stress visible by anthocyanin and malonyldialdehyde accumulation. SlZF2 enhanced salt sensitivity in Arabidopsis, whereas SlZF2 delayed senescence and improved tomato salt tolerance, particularly by maintaining photosynthesis and increasing polyamine biosynthesis, in salt-treated hydroponic cultures (125 mm sodium chloride, 20 d). SlZF2 may be involved in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis/signaling, because SlZF2 is rapidly induced by ABA treatment and 35S::SlZF2 tomatoes accumulate more ABA than wild-type plants. Transcriptome analysis of 35S::SlZF2 revealed that SlZF2 both increased and reduced expression of a comparable number of genes involved in various physiological processes such as photosynthesis, polyamine biosynthesis, and hormone (notably ABA) biosynthesis/signaling. Involvement of these different metabolic pathways in salt stress tolerance is discussed. PMID:24567191

  12. Engineering yeast hexokinase 2 for improved tolerance toward xylose-induced inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basti Bergdahl

    Full Text Available Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a bi-functional enzyme being both a catalyst and an important regulator in the glucose repression signal. In the presence of xylose Hxk2p is irreversibly inactivated through an autophosphorylation mechanism, affecting all functions. Consequently, the regulation of genes involved in sugar transport and fermentative metabolism is impaired. The aim of the study was to obtain new Hxk2p-variants, immune to the autophosphorylation, which potentially can restore the repressive capability closer to its nominal level. In this study we constructed the first condensed, rationally designed combinatorial library targeting the active-site in Hxk2p. We combined protein engineering and genetic engineering for efficient screening and identified a variant with Phe159 changed to tyrosine. This variant had 64% higher catalytic activity in the presence of xylose compared to the wild-type and is expected to be a key component for increasing the productivity of recombinant xylose-fermenting strains for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks.

  13. Engineering water-tolerant core/shell upconversion nanoparticles for optical temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahtani, Masfer H; Gomes, Carmen L; Hemmer, Philip R

    2017-07-01

    Luminescence thermometry is a promising approach using upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with a nanoscale regime in biological tissues. UCNPs are superior to conventional fluorescent markers, benefiting from their autofluorescence suppression and deep imaging in tissues. However, they are still limited by poor water solubility and weak upconversion luminescence intensity, especially at a small particle size. Recently, YVO4:Er(+3),Yb(+3) nanoparticles have shown high efficiency upconversion (UC) luminescence in water at single-particle level and high contrast imaging in biological models. Typically, a 980-nm laser triggers the UC process in the UCNPs, which overlaps with maximum absorption of water molecules that are dominant in biological samples, resulting in biological tissues overheating and possible damaging. Interestingly, neodymium (Nd(+3)) possesses a large absorption cross section at the water low absorption band (808 nm), which can overcome overheating issues. In this Letter, we introduce Nd(+3) as a new near-infrared absorber and UC sensitizer into YVO4:Er(+3),Yb(+3) nanoparticles in a core/shell structure to ensure successive energy transfer between the new UC sensitizer (Nd(+3)) to the upconverting activator (Er(+3)). Finally, we synthesized water-tolerant YVO4:Er(+3),Yb(+3)@Nd(+3) core/shell nanoparticles (average size 20 nm) with strong UC luminescence at a biocompatible excitation wavelength for optical temperature sensing where overheating in water is minimized.

  14. Laboratory experiment to study the effect of salinity variations on benthic foraminiferal species - Pararotalia nipponica (Asano)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Kurtarkar, S.R.

    Culture experiment has been carried out to observe the response of Pararotalia nipponica (Asano) to different salinities and its salinity tolerance limits. The specimens of P. nipponica kept in 33‰ saline water achieved optimum growth, while rest...

  15. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress

    OpenAIRE

    Negr?o, S.; Schm?ckel, S. M.; Tester, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant?s physiology, making it difficult to study in toto. Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant?s response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. Scope and conclusions We discuss how to quantify the impact of sa...

  16. Engineering Synechocystis PCC6803 for hydrogen production: influence on the tolerance to oxidative and sugar stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Ortega-Ramos

    Full Text Available In the prospect of engineering cyanobacteria for the biological photoproduction of hydrogen, we have studied the hydrogen production machine in the model unicellular strain Synechocystis PCC6803 through gene deletion, and overexpression (constitutive or controlled by the growth temperature. We demonstrate that the hydrogenase-encoding hoxEFUYH operon is dispensable to standard photoautotrophic growth in absence of stress, and it operates in cell defense against oxidative (H₂O₂ and sugar (glucose and glycerol stresses. Furthermore, we showed that the simultaneous over-production of the proteins HoxEFUYH and HypABCDE (assembly of hydrogenase, combined to an increase in nickel availability, led to an approximately 20-fold increase in the level of active hydrogenase. These novel results and mutants have major implications for those interested in hydrogenase, hydrogen production and redox metabolism, and their connections with environmental conditions.

  17. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae fatty acid composition for increased tolerance to octanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besada-Lombana, Pamela B; Fernandez-Moya, Ruben; Fenster, Jacob; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2017-07-01

    Biorenewable chemicals such as short and medium chain fatty acids enable functional or direct substitution of petroleum-derived building blocks, allowing reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gases while meeting market needs of high-demand products like aliphatic alcohols and alpha olefins. However, producing these fatty acids in microorganisms can be challenging due to toxicity issues. Octanoic acid (C8) can disrupt the integrity of the cell membrane in yeast, and exogenous supplementation of oleic acid has been shown to help alleviate this. We recently engineered the Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase by replacing serine residue 1157 with alanine to prevent deactivation by phosphorylation. Expression of Acc1 S1157A in S. cerevisiae resulted in an increase in total fatty acid production, with the largest increase for oleic acid. In this study, we evaluated the effect of this modified lipid profile on C8 toxicity to the yeast. Expression of Acc1 S1157A in S. cerevisiae BY4741 increased the percentage of oleic acid 3.1- and 1.6-fold in the absence and presence of octanoic acid challenge, respectively. Following exposure to 0.9 mM of C8 for 24 h, the engineered yeast had a 10-fold higher cell density relative to the baseline strain. Moreover, overexpressing Acc1 S1157A allowed survival at C8 concentrations that were lethal for the baseline strain. This marked reduction of toxicity was shown to be due to higher membrane integrity as an 11-fold decrease in leakage of intracellular magnesium was observed. Due to the increase in oleic acid, this approach has the potential to reduce toxicity of other valuable bioproducts such as shorter chain aliphatic acids and alcohols and other membrane stressors. In an initial screen, increased resistance to n-butanol, 2-propanol, and hexanoic acid was demonstrated with cell densities 3.2-, 1.8-, and 29-fold higher than the baseline strain, respectively. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1531-1538. © 2017 Wiley

  18. Avaliação da tolerância de larvas do pacamã Lophiosilurus alexandri Steindachner, 1877 (Pisces: Siluriformes a diferentes salinidades = Evaluation of the tolerance of “pacamã” Lophiosilurus alexandri Steindachner, 1877 (Pisces: Siluriformes larvae to different salinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Kennedy Luz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a tolerância de larvas de pacamãLophiosilurus alexandri ao teste agudo de salinidade da água em diferentes idades. Os testes foram realizados em larvas recém-eclodidas, com oito e 12 dias pós-eclosão. As larvas foramaclimatadas às condições experimentais por 24h, sendo estocadas em 18 tanques plásticos de 1 L na densidade de 15 larvas L-1. Após esse período, as larvas foram transferidas para as salinidades: água doce, 2, 4, 6, 8 e 10 g de sal L-1 e observadas durante 96h. Larvas recémeclodidas apresentaram mortalidade total em 6, 8 e 10 g de sal L-1 e 100% de sobrevivência para água doce, 2 e 4 g de sal L-1; porém, com redução dos valores de peso e comprimento mediante as duas salinidades. Larvas com oito dias pós-eclosão apresentaram CL(I50-96h de 8,9 g de sal L-1. Para o peso, verificou-se redução gradativa a partir da salinidade de 2 g de sal L-1, mas sem diferenças para o comprimento das larvas entre os tratamentos. Para as larvas com 12 dias pós-eclosão, não se registraram diferenças no comprimento e peso e a sobrevivência foi menor a 8 e 10 g de sal L-1. Larvas com oito e 12 dias pós-eclosão tiveram alterações no comportamento natatório em salinidades superiores a 6 g de sal L-1. Larvas de pacamã apresentaram maior tolerância às diferentes salinidades da água com o desenvolvimento ontogenético.The aim of this study was to analyze the salinity tolerance of “pacamã” Lophiosilurus alexandri larvae at different ages. The test was conducted in post-hatching-larvae and larvae with 8 and 12 daysold post-hatching. Larvae were acclimatized to experimental conditions for 24h, kept in 18 plastic tanks with 1 L at a density of 15 larvae L-1. After this period, larvae were subjected tothe salinities: freshwater, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 g salt L-1, and observed over a period of 96h. Posthatching larvae exhibited complete mortality in 6, 8 and 10 g salt L-1. Survival was 100

  19. Salinity Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  20. Silicon occurrence, uptake, transport and mechanisms of heavy metals, minerals and salinity enhanced tolerance in plants with future prospects: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Muhammad; Rizwan, Muhammad Shahid; Mushtaq, Muhammad Adnan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Shahzad, Sher Muhammad; Yousaf, Balal; Saeed, Dawood Anser; Rizwan, Muhammad; Nawaz, Muhammad Azher; Mehmood, Sajid; Tu, Shuxin

    2016-12-01

    Recently, heavy metals pollution due to industrialization and urbanization, use of untreated wastewater and unreasonable use of pesticides and fertilizers is increasing rapidly, resulting in major threat to the environment and contaminate soils. Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in the earth crust after oxygen. Although it's higher accumulation in plants, yet Si has not been listed as essential nutrient however, considered as beneficial element for growth of plants particularly in stressed environment. Research to date has demonstrated that silicon helps the plants to alleviate the various biotic and abiotic stresses. This review article presents a comprehensive update about Si and heavy metals, minerals and salinity stresses, and contained the progress about Si so far done worldwide in the light of previous studies to evaluate the ecological importance of Si. Moreover, this review will also be helpful to understand the Si uptake ability and its benefits on plants grown under stressed environment. Further research needs for Si-mediated mitigation of heavy metals and mineral nutrients stresses are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrão, S.; Schmöckel, S. M.; Tester, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant’s physiology, making it difficult to study in toto. Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant’s response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. Scope and conclusions We discuss how to quantify the impact of salinity on different traits, such as relative growth rate, water relations, transpiration, transpiration use efficiency, ionic relations, photosynthesis, senescence, yield and yield components. We also suggest some guidelines to assist with the selection of appropriate experimental systems, imposition of salinity stress, and obtaining and analysing relevant physiological data using appropriate indices. We illustrate how these indices can be used to identify relationships amongst the proposed traits to identify which traits are the most important contributors to salinity tolerance. Salinity tolerance is complex and involves many genes, but progress has been made in studying the mechanisms underlying a plant’s response to salinity. Nevertheless, several previous studies on salinity tolerance could have benefited from improved experimental design. We hope that this paper will provide pertinent information to researchers on performing proficient assays and interpreting results from salinity tolerance experiments. PMID:27707746

  2. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress

    KAUST Repository

    Negrão, Sónia

    2016-10-06

    Background Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant’s physiology, making it difficult to study in toto. Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant’s response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. Scope and conclusions We discuss how to quantify the impact of salinity on different traits, such as relative growth rate, water relations, transpiration, transpiration use efficiency, ionic relations, photosynthesis, senescence, yield and yield components. We also suggest some guidelines to assist with the selection of appropriate experimental systems, imposition of salinity stress, and obtaining and analysing relevant physiological data using appropriate indices. We illustrate how these indices can be used to identify relationships amongst the proposed traits to identify which traits are the most important contributors to salinity tolerance. Salinity tolerance is complex and involves many genes, but progress has been made in studying the mechanisms underlying a plant’s response to salinity. Nevertheless, several previous studies on salinity tolerance could have benefited from improved experimental design. We hope that this paper will provide pertinent information to researchers on performing proficient assays and interpreting results from salinity tolerance experiments.

  3. Evaluating physiological responses of plants to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrão, S; Schmöckel, S M; Tester, M

    2017-01-01

    Because soil salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting crop yield, much research has been conducted to develop plants with improved salinity tolerance. Salinity stress impacts many aspects of a plant's physiology, making it difficult to study in toto Instead, it is more tractable to dissect the plant's response into traits that are hypothesized to be involved in the overall tolerance of the plant to salinity. We discuss how to quantify the impact of salinity on different traits, such as relative growth rate, water relations, transpiration, transpiration use efficiency, ionic relations, photosynthesis, senescence, yield and yield components. We also suggest some guidelines to assist with the selection of appropriate experimental systems, imposition of salinity stress, and obtaining and analysing relevant physiological data using appropriate indices. We illustrate how these indices can be used to identify relationships amongst the proposed traits to identify which traits are the most important contributors to salinity tolerance. Salinity tolerance is complex and involves many genes, but progress has been made in studying the mechanisms underlying a plant's response to salinity. Nevertheless, several previous studies on salinity tolerance could have benefited from improved experimental design. We hope that this paper will provide pertinent information to researchers on performing proficient assays and interpreting results from salinity tolerance experiments. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  4. Plant salt tolerance: adaptations in halophytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flowers, Timothy J; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    ..., and to develop salt-tolerant crops. In this Preface to a Special Issue on halophytes and saline adaptations, the evolution of salt tolerance in halophytes, their life-history traits and progress in understanding...

  5. Expression of Animal Anti-Apoptotic Gene Ced-9 Enhances Tolerance during Glycine max L.–Bradyrhizobium japonicum Interaction under Saline Stress but Reduces Nodule Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Germán; Muñoz, Nacira; Melchiorre, Mariana; Sánchez, Federico; Lascano, Ramiro

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the expression of animal cell death suppressors in economically important plants conferred enhanced stress tolerance are not fully understood. In the present work, the effect of expression of animal antiapoptotic gene Ced-9 in soybean hairy roots was evaluated under root hairs and hairy roots death-inducing stress conditions given by i) Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation in presence of 50 mM NaCl, and ii) severe salt stress (150 mM NaCl), for 30 min and 3 h, respectively. We have determined that root hairs death induced by inoculation in presence of 50 mM NaCl showed characteristics of ordered process, with increased ROS generation, MDA and ATP levels, whereas the cell death induced by 150 mM NaCl treatment showed non-ordered or necrotic-like characteristics. The expression of Ced-9 inhibited or at least delayed root hairs death under these treatments. Hairy roots expressing Ced-9 had better homeostasis maintenance, preventing potassium release; increasing the ATP levels and controlling the oxidative damage avoiding the increase of reactive oxygen species production. Even when our results demonstrate a positive effect of animal cell death suppressors in plant cell ionic and redox homeostasis under cell death-inducing conditions, its expression, contrary to expectations, drastically inhibited nodule formation even under control conditions. PMID:25050789

  6. Constitutive over-expression of rice chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene OCPI2 results in enhanced growth, salinity and osmotic stress tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Lalit Dev; Mittal, Dheeraj; Chandra Mishra, Ratnesh; Grover, Anil

    2015-07-01

    Protease inhibitors are involved primarily in defense against pathogens. In recent years, these proteins have also been widely implicated in response of plants to diverse abiotic stresses. Rice chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene OCPI2 is highly induced under salt and osmotic stresses. The construct containing the complete coding sequence of OCPI2 cloned downstream to CaMV35S promoter was transformed in Arabidopsis and single copy, homozygous transgenic lines were produced. The transgenic plants exhibited significantly enhanced tolerance to NaCl, PEG and mannitol stress as compared to wild type plants. Importantly, the vegetative and reproductive growth of transgenic plants under unstressed, control conditions was also enhanced: transgenic plants were more vigorous than wild type, resulting into higher yield in terms of silique number. The RWC values and membrane stability index of transgenic in comparison to wild type plants was higher. Higher proline content was observed in the AtOCPI2 lines, which was associated with higher transcript expression of pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase and lowered levels of proline dehydrogenase genes. The chymotrypsin protease activities were lower in the transgenic as against wild type plants, under both unstressed, control as well as stressed conditions. It thus appears that rice chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene OCPI2 is a useful candidate gene for genetic improvement of plants against salt and osmotic stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactive effects of silicon and arbuscular mycorrhiza in modulating ascorbate-glutathione cycle and antioxidant scavenging capacity in differentially salt-tolerant Cicer arietinum L. genotypes subjected to long-term salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neera; Bhandari, Purnima

    2016-09-01

    Salinity is the major environmental constraint that affects legume productivity by inducing oxidative stress. Individually, both silicon (Si) nutrition and mycorrhization have been reported to alleviate salt stress. However, the mechanisms adopted by both in mediating stress responses are poorly understood. Thus, pot trials were undertaken to evaluate comparative as well as interactive effects of Si and/or arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) in alleviating NaCl toxicity in modulating oxidative stress and antioxidant defence mechanisms in two Cicer arietinum L. (chickpea) genotypes-HC 3 (salt-tolerant) and CSG 9505 (salt-sensitive). Plants subjected to different NaCl concentrations (0-100 mM) recorded a substantial increase in the rate of superoxide radical (O2 (·-)), H2O2, lipoxygenase (LOX) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which induced leakage of ions and disturbed Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratio in roots and leaves. Individually, Si and AM reduced oxidative burst by strengthening antioxidant enzymatic activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX)). Si was relatively more efficient in reducing accumulation of stress metabolites, while mycorrhization significantly up-regulated antioxidant machinery and modulated ascorbate-glutathione (ASA-GSH) cycle. Combined applications of Si and AM complemented each other in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) build-up by further enhancing the antioxidant defence responses. Magnitude of ROS-mediated oxidative burden was lower in HC 3 which correlated strongly with more effective AM symbiosis, better capacity to accumulate Si and stronger defence response when compared with CSG 9505. Study indicated that Si and/or AM fungal amendments upgraded salt tolerance through a dynamic shift from oxidative destruction towards favourable antioxidant defence system in stressed chickpea plants.

  8. De novo transcriptome assembly of a Chinese locoweed (Oxytropis ochrocephala species provides insights into genes associated with drought, salinity and cold tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eHe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locoweeds (toxic Oxytropis and Astraglus species, containing the toxic agent swainsonine, pose serious threats to animal husbandry on grasslands in both China and the US. Some locoweeds have evolved adaptations in order to resist various stress conditions such as drought, salt and cold. As a result they replace other plants in their communities and become an ecological problem. Currently very limited genetic information of locoweeds is available and this hinders our understanding in the molecular basis of their environmental plasticity, and the interaction between locoweeds and their symbiotic swainsonine producing endophytes. Next-generation sequencing provides a means of obtaining transcriptomic sequences in a timely manner, which is particularly useful for non-model plants. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of Oxytropis ochrocephala plants followed by a de nove assembly. Our primary aim was to provide an enriched pool of genetic sequences of an Oxytropis sp. for further locoweed research. Results: Transcriptomes of four different O. ochrocephala samples, from control (CK plants, and those that had experienced either drought (20% PEG, salt (150 mM NaCl or cold (4 °C stress were sequenced using an Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform. From 232,209,506 clean reads 23,220,950,600 (~23 G nucleotides, 182,430 transcripts and 88,942 unigenes were retrieved, with an N50 value of 1,237. Differential expression analysis revealed putative genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs and late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins, enzymes in secondary metabolite and plant hormone biosyntheses, and transcription factors which are involved in stress tolerance in O. ochrocephala. In order to validate our sequencing results, we further analyzed the expression profiles of nine genes by quantitative real-time PCR. Finally, we discuss the possible mechanism of O. ochrocephala’s adaptations to stress environment. Conclusion: Our

  9. Silicon mediated biochemical changes in wheat under salinized and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report on the effects of silicon (150 mg L-1) on the morphological, physiological and biochemical traits in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars (salt sensitive; Auqab-2000 and salt tolerant; SARC-5) differing in salt tolerance under saline (10 dS m-1) and non-saline (2 dS m-1) hydroponic culture. Silicon supplementation ...

  10. Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the salinity-tolerance of Oreochromis niloticus and the influence of salinity changes on the acute toxicities of copper sulphate (CuSO4) and lead nitrate (Pb[NO3]2) against the fish species. On the basis of daily mortality assessment, O. niloticus was found to be unable to survive in media with salinity ...

  11. Nutrient composition, forage parameters, and antioxidant capacity of alfalfa (Medicago sativa, L.) in response to saline irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although alfalfa is moderately tolerant of salinity, the effects of salinity on nutrient composition and forage parameters are poorly understood. In addition, there are no data on the effect of salinity on the antioxidant capacity of alfalfa. We evaluated four non-dormant, salinity-tolerant commerci...

  12. Inverse metabolic engineering based on transient acclimation of yeast improves acid-containing xylose fermentation and tolerance to formic and acetic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Improving the production of ethanol from xylose is an important goal in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae must produce ethanol in the presence of weak acids (formate and acetate) generated during pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, weak acid-containing xylose fermentation was significantly improved using cells that were acclimated to the weak acids during pre-cultivation. Transcriptome analyses showed that levels of transcripts for transcriptional/translational machinery-related genes (RTC3 and ANB1) were enhanced by formate and acetate acclimation. Recombinant yeast strains overexpressing RTC3 and ANB1 demonstrated improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of the weak acids, along with improved tolerance to the acids. Novel metabolic engineering strategy based on the combination of short-term acclimation and system-wide analysis was developed, which can develop stress-tolerant strains in a short period of time, although conventional evolutionary engineering approach has required long periods of time to isolate inhibitor-adapted strains.

  13. High efficiency transformation of banana [Musa acuminata L. cv. Matti (AA)] for enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stress through overexpression of a peanut salinity-induced pathogenesis-related class 10 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Anjana; Jain, Shalu; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Jain, Mukesh; Bhat, Vishnu; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2015-01-01

    Bananas and plantains (Musa spp. L.) are important subsistence crops and premium export commodity in several countries, and susceptible to a wide range of environmental and biotic stress conditions. Here, we report efficient, rapid, and reproducible Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and regeneration of an Indian niche cultivar of banana [M. acuminata cv. Matti (AA)]. Apical meristem-derived highly proliferative multiple shoot clump (MSC) explants were transformed with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harboring a binary vector pCAMBIA-1301 carrying hptII and uidA. Sequential agro-infiltration (10 min, 400 mmHg), infection (additional 35 min, Agrobacterium density A 600 = 0.8) and co-cultivation (18 h) regimen in 100 µM acetosyringone containing liquid medium were critical factors yielding high transformation efficiency (~81 %) corroborated by transient GUS expression assay. Stable transgenic events were recovered following two cycles of meristem initiation and selection on hygromycin containing medium. Histochemical GUS assay in several tissues of transgenic plants and molecular analyses confirmed stable integration and expression of transgene. The protocol described here allowed recovery of well-established putative transgenic plantlets in as little as 5 months. The transgenic banana plants could be readily acclimatized under greenhouse conditions, and were phenotypically similar to the wild-type untransformed control plants (WT). Transgenic plants overexpressing Salinity-Induced Pathogenesis-Related class 10 protein gene from Arachis hypogaea (AhSIPR10) in banana cv. Matti (AA) showed better photosynthetic efficiency and less membrane damage (P < 0.05) in the presence of NaCl and mannitol in comparison to WT plants suggesting the role of AhSIPR10 in better tolerance of salt stress and drought conditions.

  14. Genetic engineering of maize (Zea mays) for high-level tolerance to treatment with the herbicide dicamba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mingxia; Sato, Shirley J; Behrens, Mark; Jiang, Wen Z; Clemente, Thomas E; Weeks, Donald P

    2011-06-08

    Herbicide-tolerant crops have been widely and rapidly adopted by farmers in several countries due to enhanced weed control, lower labor and production costs, increased environmental benefits, and gains in profitability. Soon to be introduced transgenic soybean and cotton varieties tolerant to treatments with the herbicide dicamba offer prospects for excellent broadleaf weed control in these broadleaf crops. Because monocots such as maize (Zea mays) can be treated with dicamba only during a limited window of crop development and because crop injury is sometimes observed when conditions are unfavorable, transgenic maize plants have been produced and tested for higher levels of tolerance to treatment with dicamba. Maize plants expressing the gene encoding dicamba monooxygenase (DMO) linked with an upstream chloroplast transit peptide (CTP) display greatly enhanced tolerance to dicamba applied either pre-emergence or postemergence. Comparisons of DMO coupled to CTPs derived from the Rubisco small subunit from either Arabidopsis thaliana or Z. mays showed that both allowed production of transgenic maize plants tolerant to treatment with levels of dicamba (i.e., 27 kg/ha) greatly exceeding the highest recommended rate of 0.56 kg/ha.

  15. An Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene fromSynechocystissp. Confers Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, So Young; Ku, Seong Sub; Sim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Sang-Kyu; Park, Ji Hyun; Lyu, Jae Il; So, Eun Jin; Choi, So Yeon; Kim, Jonghyun; Ahn, Myung Suk; Kim, Suk Weon; Park, Hyunwoo; Jeong, Won Joong; Lim, Yong Pyo; Min, Sung Ran; Liu, Jang Ryol

    2017-01-01

    Synechocystis salt-responsive gene 1 ( sysr1 ) was engineered for expression in higher plants, and gene construction was stably incorporated into tobacco plants. We investigated the role of Sysr1 [a member of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) superfamily] by examining the salt tolerance of sysr1 -overexpressing ( sysr1 -OX) tobacco plants using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and bioassays. The sysr1 -OX plants exhibited considerably increased ADH activity and tolerance to salt stress conditions. Additionally, the expression levels of several stress-responsive genes were upregulated. Moreover, airborne signals from salt-stressed sysr1 -OX plants triggered salinity tolerance in neighboring wild-type (WT) plants. Therefore, Sysr1 enhanced the interconversion of aldehydes to alcohols, and this occurrence might affect the quality of green leaf volatiles (GLVs) in sysr1 -OX plants. Actually, the Z -3-hexenol level was approximately twofold higher in sysr1 -OX plants than in WT plants within 1-2 h of wounding. Furthermore, analyses of WT plants treated with vaporized GLVs indicated that Z -3-hexenol was a stronger inducer of stress-related gene expression and salt tolerance than E -2-hexenal. The results of the study suggested that increased C 6 alcohol ( Z -3-hexenol) induced the expression of resistance genes, thereby enhancing salt tolerance of transgenic plants. Our results revealed a role for ADH in salinity stress responses, and the results provided a genetic engineering strategy that could improve the salt tolerance of crops.

  16. Low salinity tolerance 0/ eggs and larvae.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    American. Optical Co.). Migratory movement of C. kraussi was monitored in the East Kleinemonde estuary. This estuary was closed off from the sea by a sand bar during the course of the experiment. Four asbestos cement boxes 30 x 20 x 30 cm ...

  17. Engineering a thermo-stable superoxide dismutase functional at sub-zero to >50°C, which also tolerates autoclaving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Dutt, Som; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Kumar, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is a critical enzyme associated with controlling oxygen toxicity arising out of oxidative stress in any living system. A hyper-thermostable SOD isolated from a polyextremophile higher plant Potentilla atrosanguinea Lodd. var. argyrophylla (Wall. ex Lehm.) was engineered by mutation of a single amino acid that enhanced the thermostability of the enzyme to twofold. The engineered enzyme was functional from sub-zero temperature to >50°C, tolerated autoclaving (heating at 121°C, at a pressure of 1.1 kg per square cm for 20 min) and was resistant to proteolysis. The present work is the first example to enhance the thermostability of a hyper-thermostable protein and has potential to application to other proteins for enhancing thermostability.

  18. Down-regulation of CBP80 gene expression as a strategy to engineer a drought-tolerant potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczynski, Marcin; Marczewski, Waldemar; Hennig, Jacek; Dolata, Jakub; Bielewicz, Dawid; Piontek, Paulina; Wyrzykowska, Anna; Krusiewicz, Dominika; Strzelczyk-Zyta, Danuta; Konopka-Postupolska, Dorota; Krzeslowska, Magdalena; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2013-05-01

    Developing new strategies for crop plants to respond to drought is crucial for their innovative breeding. The down-regulation of nuclear cap-binding proteins in Arabidopsis renders plants drought tolerant. The CBP80 gene in the potato cultivar Desiree was silenced using artificial microRNAs. Transgenic plants displayed a higher tolerance to drought, ABA-hypersensitive stomatal closing, an increase in leaf stomata and trichome density, and compact cuticle structures with a lower number of microchannels. These findings were correlated with a higher tolerance to water stress. The level of miR159 was decreased, and the levels of its target mRNAs MYB33 and MYB101 increased in the transgenic plants subjected to drought. Similar trends were observed in an Arabidopsis cbp80 mutant. The evolutionary conservation of CBP80, a gene that plays a role in the response to drought, suggests that it is a candidate for genetic manipulations that aim to obtain improved water-deficit tolerance of crop plants. © 2012 The Authors Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Avaliação da tolerância de larvas do pacamã Lophiosilurus alexandri Steindachner, 1877 (Pisces:Siluriformes a diferentes salinidades - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i4.791 Evaluation of the tolerance of “pacamã” Lophiosilurus alexandri Steindachner, 1877 (Pisces:Siluriformes larvae to different salinities - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i4.791

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Kennedy Luz

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a tolerância de larvas de pacamã Lophiosilurus alexandri ao teste agudo de salinidade da água em diferentes idades. Os testes foram realizados em larvas recém-eclodidas, com oito e 12 dias pós-eclosão. As larvas foram aclimatadas às condições experimentais por 24h, sendo estocadas em 18 tanques plásticos de 1 L na densidade de 15 larvas L-1. Após esse período, as larvas foram transferidas para as salinidades: água doce, 2, 4, 6, 8 e 10 g de sal L-1 e observadas durante 96h. Larvas recém- eclodidas apresentaram mortalidade total em 6, 8 e 10 g de sal L-1 e 100% de sobrevivência para água doce, 2 e 4 g de sal L-1; porém, com redução dos valores de peso e comprimento mediante as duas salinidades. Larvas com oito dias pós-eclosão apresentaram CL(I50-96hde 8,9 g de sal L-1. Para o peso, verificou-se redução gradativa a partir da salinidade de 2 g de sal L-1, mas sem diferenças para o comprimento das larvas entre os tratamentos. Para as larvas com 12 dias pós-eclosão, não se registraram diferenças no comprimento e peso e a sobrevivência foi menor a 8 e 10 g de sal L-1. Larvas com oito e 12 dias pós-eclosão tiveram alterações no comportamento natatório em salinidades superiores a 6 g de sal L-1. Larvas de pacamã apresentaram maior tolerância às diferentes salinidades da água com o desenvolvimento ontogenético.The aim of this study was to analyze the salinity tolerance of “pacamã” Lophiosilurus alexandri larvae at different ages. The test was conducted in post-hatching-larvae and larvae with 8 and 12 days old post-hatching. Larvae were acclimatized to experimental conditions for 24h, kept in 18 plastic tanks with 1 L at a density of 15 larvae L-1. After this period, larvae were subjected to the salinities: freshwater, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 g salt L-1, and observed over a period of 96h. Post-hatching larvae exhibited complete mortality in 6, 8 and 10 g salt L-1. Survival was

  20. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreiras, Lucas S; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B; Bice, Benjamin D; Bonfert, Brandi L; Pinhancos, Rebeca C; Balloon, Allison J; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T; Simmons, Blake A; Hodge, David B; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Dale, Bruce E; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  1. Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreiras, Lucas S.; Breuer, Rebecca J.; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J.; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Bonfert, Brandi L.; Pinhancos, Rebeca C.; Balloon, Allison J.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M.; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L.; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Hodge, David B.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P.; Sato, Trey K.

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

  2. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas S Parreiras

    Full Text Available The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH.

  3. Practically Saline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Schroeder MD

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2, and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak.

  4. Genetic Diversity of Salt Tolerance in Miscanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Lin; van der Schoot, Hanneke; Dehghan, Shiva; Alvim Kamei, Claire L.; Schwarz, Kai-Uwe; Meyer, Heike; Visser, Richard G. F.; van der Linden, C. Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Miscanthus is a woody rhizomatous C4 grass that can be used as a CO2 neutral biofuel resource. It has potential to grow in marginal areas such as saline soils, avoiding competition for arable lands with food crops. This study explored genetic diversity for salt tolerance in Miscanthus and discovered mechanisms and traits that can be used to improve the yield under salt stress. Seventy genotypes of Miscanthus (including 57 M. sinensis, 5 M. sacchariflorus, and 8 hybrids) were evaluated for salt tolerance under saline (150 mM NaCl) and normal growing conditions using a hydroponic system. Analyses of shoot growth traits and ion concentrations revealed the existence of large variation for salt tolerance in the genotypes. We identified genotypes with potential for high biomass production both under control and saline conditions that may be utilized for growth under marginal, saline conditions. Several relatively salt tolerant genotypes had clearly lower Na+ concentrations and showed relatively high K+/Na+ ratios in the shoots under salt stress, indicating that a Na+ exclusion mechanism was utilized to prevent Na+ accumulation in the leaves. Other genotypes showed limited reduction in leaf expansion and growth rate under saline conditions, which may be indicative of osmotic stress tolerance. The genotypes demonstrating potentially different salt tolerance mechanisms can serve as starting material for breeding programs aimed at improving salinity tolerance of Miscanthus. PMID:28261243

  5. Influence of salinity and water content on soil microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Nan Yan; Petra Marschner; Wenhong Cao; Changqing Zuo; Wei Qin

    2015-01-01

    Salinization is one of the most serious land degradation problems facing world. Salinity results in poor plant growth and low soil microbial activity due to osmotic stress and toxic ions. Soil microorganisms play a pivotal role in soils through mineralization of organic matter into plant available nutrients. Therefore it is important to maintain high microbial activity in soils. Salinity tolerant soil microbes counteract osmotic stress by synthesizing osmolytes which allows them to maintain t...

  6. Genetic adaptability of durum wheat to salinity level at germination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-23

    May 23, 2011 ... only additive and dominance effects were implicated in the genetic control of this trait. ... *Corresponding author. E-mail: fethib